Science.gov

Sample records for rat rubrospinal tract

  1. Lewis, Fischer 344, and Sprague-Dawley Rats Display Differences in Lipid Peroxidation, Motor Recovery, and Rubrospinal Tract Preservation after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mestre, Humberto; Ramirez, Manuel; Garcia, Elisa; Martiñón, Susana; Cruz, Yolanda; Campos, Maria G.; Ibarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The rat is the most common animal model for the preclinical validation of neuroprotective therapies in spinal cord injury (SCI). Lipid peroxidation (LP) is a hallmark of the damage triggered after SCI. Free radicals react with fatty acids causing cellular and membrane disruption. LP accounts for a considerable amount of neuronal cell death after SCI. To better understand the implications of inbred and outbred rat strain selection on preclinical SCI research, we evaluated LP after laminectomy sham surgery and a severe contusion of the T9 spinal cord in female Sprague-Dawley (SPD), Lewis (LEW), and Fischer 344 (F344) rats. Further analysis included locomotor recovery using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale and retrograde rubrospinal tract tracing. LEW had the highest levels of LP products 72 h after sham surgery and SCI, significantly different from both F344 and SPD. SPD rats had the fastest functional recovery and highest BBB scores; these were not significantly different to F344. However, LEW rats achieved the lowest BBB scores throughout the 2-month follow-up, yielding significant differences when compared to SPD and F344. To see if the improvement in locomotion was secondary to an increase in axon survival, we evaluated rubrospinal neurons (RSNs) via retrograde labeling of the rubrospinal tract and quantified cells at the red nuclei. The highest numbers of RSNs were observed in SPD rats then F344; the lowest counts were seen in LEW rats. The BBB scores significantly correlated with the amount of positively stained RSN in the red nuclei. It is critical to identify interstrain variations as a potential confound in preclinical research. Multi-strain validation of neuroprotective therapies may increase chances of successful translation. PMID:26029162

  2. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated global anterograde delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor to the spinal cord: comparison of rubrospinal and corticospinal tracts in the rat.

    PubMed

    Foust, Kevin D; Flotte, Terence R; Reier, Paul J; Mandel, Ronald J

    2008-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive loss of spinal lower motoneurons. Gene delivery is a promising strategy to deliver therapeutic molecules to these vulnerable cells. However, definition of an optimal route of delivery capable of accessing neurons over a considerable extent of the neuraxis represents a significant logistical problem. Intramuscular vector injections are not ideal as this approach would involve hundreds of injections to completely treat an ALS patient and also would be dependent on retrograde transport of the viral platform of choice. Alternatively, upper motoneurons could deliver trophic factors over considerable distances by anterograde transport after a relatively localized intracerebral injection. To test this approach, the present study was designed to compare the corticospinal (CST) and rubrospinal (RST) tracts for their ability to transport recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (rAAV5)-derived green fluorescent protein (GFP) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to the spinal cord. Unilateral injections of rAAV5-GFP into the red nucleus (RN) or motor cortex of normal rats produced GFP-positive fibers in the appropriate descending tracts extending to the lumbar spinal cord. For both tracts, GFP-positive axonal projections into the spinal gray matter were consistently observed. GDNF immunohistochemistry demonstrated that confirmed RN injections resulted in GDNF-positive fibers projecting into spinal gray matter as seen in the GFP group. In contrast, confirmed cortical rAAV5-GDNF injections resulted in less evident staining in spinal cord. Spinal cord GDNF levels were elevated at distances up to 72 mm from the injection sites, and confirmed that RST-related GDNF transport to spinal cord surpassed CST-associated delivery.

  3. Red nucleus and rubrospinal tract disorganization in the absence of Pou4f1

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Jesus E.; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A.; Madrigal, M. Pilar; Martinez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is a neuronal population that plays an important role in forelimb motor control and locomotion. Histologically it is subdivided into two subpopulations, the parvocellular RN (pRN) located in the diencephalon and the magnocellular RN (mRN) in the mesencephalon. The RN integrates signals from motor cortex and cerebellum and projects to spinal cord interneurons and motor neurons through the rubrospinal tract (RST). Pou4f1 is a transcription factor highly expressed in this nucleus that has been related to its specification. Here we profoundly analyzed consequences of Pou4f1 loss-of-function in development, maturation and axonal projection of the RN. Surprisingly, RN neurons are specified and maintained in the mutant, no cell death was detected. Nevertheless, the nucleus appeared disorganized with a strong delay in radial migration and with a wider neuronal distribution; the neurons did not form a compacted population as they do in controls, Robo1 and Slit2 were miss-expressed. Cplx1 and Npas1, expressed in the RN, are transcription factors involved in neurotransmitter release, neuronal maturation and motor function processes among others. In our mutant mice, both transcription factors are lost, suggesting an abnormal maturation of the RN. The resulting altered nucleus occupied a wider territory. Finally, we examined RST development and found that the RN neurons were able to project to the spinal cord but their axons appeared defasciculated. These data suggest that Pou4f1 is necessary for the maturation of RN neurons but not for their specification and maintenance. PMID:25698939

  4. Preferential and Bidirectional Labeling of the Rubrospinal Tract with Adenovirus-GFP for Monitoring Normal and Injured Axons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Smith, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The rodent rubrospinal tract (RST) has been studied extensively to investigate regeneration and remodeling of central nervous system (CNS) axons. Currently no retrograde tracers can specifically label rubrospinal axons and neurons (RSNs). The RST can be anterogradely labeled by injecting tracers into the red nucleus (RN), but accurately locating the RN is a technical challenge. Here we developed a recombinant adenovirus carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene (Adv-GFP) which can preferentially, intensely, and bi-directionally label the RST. When Adv-GFP was injected into the second lumbar spinal cord, the GFP was specifically transported throughout the entire RST, with peak labeling seen at 2 weeks post-injection. When Adv-GFP was injected directly into the RN, GFP was anterogradely transported throughout the RST. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), injection of Adv-GFP resulted in visualization of GFP in transected, spared, or sprouted RST axons bi-directionally. Thus Adv-GFP could be used as a novel tool for monitoring and evaluating strategies designed to maximize RST axonal regeneration and remodeling following SCI. PMID:21299337

  5. Treatment of chronically injured spinal cord with neurotrophic factors stimulates betaII-tubulin and GAP-43 expression in rubrospinal tract neurons.

    PubMed

    Storer, Paul D; Dolbeare, Dirk; Houle, John D

    2003-11-15

    Exogenous neurotrophic factors provided at a spinal cord injury site promote regeneration of chronically injured rubrospinal tract (RST) neurons into a peripheral nerve graft. The present study tested whether the response to neurotrophins is associated with changes in the expression of two regeneration-associated genes, betaII-tubulin and growth-associated protein (GAP)-43. Adult female rats were subjected to a right full hemisection lesion via aspiration of the C3 spinal cord. A second aspiration lesion was made 4 weeks later and gel foam saturated in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was applied to the lesion site for 60 min. Using in situ hybridization, RST neurons were examined for changes in mRNA levels of betaII-tubulin and GAP-43 at 1, 3, and 7 days after treatment. Based on analysis of gene expression in single cells, there was no effect of BDNF treatment on either betaII-tubulin or GAP-43 mRNA expression at any time point. betaII-Tubulin mRNA levels were enhanced significantly at 1 and 3 days in animals treated with GDNF relative to levels in animals treated with PBS. Treatment with GDNF did not affect GAP-43 mRNA levels at 1 and 3 days, but at 7 days there was a significant increase in mRNA expression. Interestingly, 7 days after GDNF treatment, the mean cell size of chronically injured RST neurons was increased significantly. Although GDNF and BDNF both promote axonal regeneration by chronically injured neurons, only GDNF treatment is associated with upregulation of betaII-tubulin or GAP-43 mRNA. It is not clear from the present study how exogenous BDNF stimulates regrowth of injured axons.

  6. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  7. The role of the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus in the switching of descending influences to motor activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fanardzhyan, V V; Papoyan, E V; Pogosyan, V I; Gevorkyan, O V

    2002-01-01

    Studies on rats showed that the facilitating influence of preliminary transection of the rubrospinal tract on recovery of motor activity and operant reflexes disrupted by lesioning of the red nucleus was more apparent when lesioning was chemical than when lesioning was electrolytic. This is due to the survival of cerebellothalamic fibers to the ventrolateral nucleus of the thalamus after chemical lesioning of the red nucleus with quinolinic acid. It was also shown that preliminary lesioning of the ventrolateral thalamic nucleus strongly hindered the switching of motor activity under the control of the corticospinal tract in rats subjected to section of the rubrospinal tract and lesioning of the red nucleus.

  8. The red nucleus and the rubrospinal projection in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-04-01

    We studied the organization and spinal projection of the mouse red nucleus with a range of techniques (Nissl stain, immunofluorescence, retrograde tracer injections into the spinal cord, anterograde tracer injections into the red nucleus, and in situ hybridization) and counted the number of neurons in the red nucleus (3,200.9 ± 230.8). We found that the rubrospinal neurons were mainly located in the parvicellular region of the red nucleus, more lateral in the rostral part and more medial in the caudal part. Labeled neurons were least common in the rostral and caudal most parts of the red nucleus. Neurons projecting to the cervical cord were predominantly dorsomedially placed and neurons projecting to the lumbar cord were predominantly ventrolaterally placed. Immunofluorescence staining with SMI-32 antibody showed that ~60% of SMI-32-positive neurons were cervical cord-projecting neurons and 24% were lumbar cord-projecting neurons. SMI-32-positive neurons were mainly located in the caudomedial part of the red nucleus. A study of vGluT2 expression showed that the number and location of glutamatergic neurons matched with those of the rubrospinal neurons. In the anterograde tracing experiments, rubrospinal fibers travelled in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus, between the lateral spinal nucleus and the calretinin-positive fibers of the lateral funiculus. Rubrospinal fibers terminated in contralateral laminae 5, 6, and the dorsal part of lamina 7 at all spinal cord levels. A few fibers could be seen next to the neurons in the dorsolateral part of lamina 9 at levels of C8-T1 (hand motor neurons) and L5-L6 (foot motor neurons), which is consistent with a view that rubrospinal fibers may play a role in distal limb movement in rodents.

  9. Autophagy Inhibition Favors Survival of Rubrospinal Neurons After Spinal Cord Hemisection.

    PubMed

    Bisicchia, Elisa; Latini, Laura; Cavallucci, Virve; Sasso, Valeria; Nicolin, Vanessa; Molinari, Marco; D'Amelio, Marcello; Viscomi, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-11

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are devastating conditions of the central nervous system (CNS) for which there are no restorative therapies. Neuronal death at the primary lesion site and in remote regions that are functionally connected to it is one of the major contributors to neurological deficits following SCI.Disruption of autophagic flux induces neuronal death in many CNS injuries, but its mechanism and relationship with remote cell death after SCI are unknown. We examined the function and effects of the modulation of autophagy on the fate of axotomized rubrospinal neurons in a rat model of spinal cord dorsal hemisection (SCH) at the cervical level. Following SCH, we observed an accumulation of LC3-positive autophagosomes (APs) in the axotomized neurons 1 and 5 days after injury. Furthermore, this accumulation was not attributed to greater initiation of autophagy but was caused by a decrease in AP clearance, as demonstrated by the build-up of p62, a widely used marker of the induction of autophagy. In axotomized rubrospinal neurons, the disruption of autophagic flux correlated strongly with remote neuronal death and worse functional recovery. Inhibition of AP biogenesis by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly attenuated remote degeneration and improved spontaneous functional recovery, consistent with the detrimental effects of autophagy in remote damage after SCH. Collectively, our results demonstrate that autophagic flux is blocked in axotomized neurons on SCI and that the inhibition of AP formation improves their survival. Thus, autophagy is a promising target for the development of therapeutic interventions in the treatment of SCIs.

  10. [Absorption of 249Bk from the gastrointestinal tract of rats].

    PubMed

    Zalikin, G A; Nisimov, P G

    1988-01-01

    In experiments with albino mongrel female rats a study was made of the absorption of 249Bk from the gastrointestinal tract after a single per os administration. The bulk of 249Bk (96 per cent) administered either intravenously or per os was mainly deposited in the skeleton and liver. The value of 249Bk absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by days 4 and 8 following administration was 0.05 per cent.

  11. Effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin A on the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Beery, J T; Taylor, S L; Schlunz, L R; Freed, R C; Bergdoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) was administered orally (15 micrograms) to two groups of rats. A marked immune reaction was evoked in the stomach and proximal small intestine of the first group. The second group of rats was used to study the absorptive fate and sites of action of orally administered SEA, utilizing immunoperoxidase staining. After oral dosing of the second group of rats. SEA-related immunoperoxidase staining was confined to: (i) neutrophils and macrophages, principally in the duodenum, and (ii) glomerular neutrophils and cells of the proximal convoluted tubules. Peroxidase staining of the kidney was noted within 15 min of exposure, indicating that SEA or some major postabsorption antigenic product can promptly pass through an intact gastrointestinal mucous membrane and become renally localized. Intestinal and renal detoxification and removal was indicated by an absence of detectable antigen in rats 180 min postexposure. Neuronal binding of SEA in the gastrointestinal tract was not demonstrable. Images PMID:6370862

  12. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Autoradiography using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat.

  13. Renal inflammatory response to urinary tract infection in rat neonates.

    PubMed

    Zarepour, M; Moradpoor, H; Emamghorashi, F; Owji, S M; Roodaki, M; Khamoushi, M

    2015-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections. Maternal UTI is a risk factor for neonatal UTI. The aim of the present study was to determine the severity of renal inflammation in neonate rats born from mothers with induced UTI. Twelve pregnant rats (Sprague-Dawley) were included in study. The rats were divided into two groups (six rats in each group). In the first group, pyelonephritis was induced in the third trimester of pregnancy and the second group was used as a control group. After delivery, the neonates were divided into three groups based on days after birth (the 1 st, 3 rd and 7 th days after birth). In each group, two neonates of each mother were killed and a midline abdominal incision was made and both kidneys were aseptically removed. On the 7 th day, rat mothers were killed and their kidneys were removed. The preparations were evaluated with a bright field microscope for inflammatory response. Renal pathology showed inflammation in all UTI-induced mothers, but only two cases of neonates (2.1%) showed inflammation in the renal parenchyma. There was no relation between the positive renal culture and the pathological changes. We conclude that neonates with UTI born to UTI-induced mothers showed a lesser inflammatory response.

  14. Antibacterial activity of norfloxacin in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, P C; Jensen, K M; Madsen, P O

    1983-01-01

    The capacities of norfloxacin (MK-0366) and neomycin to reduce the numbers of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats were evaluated. Results of a 3-day treatment with norfloxacin were compared with those of a 3-day treatment with neomycin. Both drugs significantly decreased gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Norfloxacin effected a significantly greater reduction in numbers of gram-negative bacteria than did neomycin. Norfloxacin also significantly increased the number of anaerobic bacteria. Although neomycin reduced gram-positive bacteria more effectively than did norfloxacin, this difference between the two drugs was not significant. Norfloxacin merits further study for potential as a bowel sterilant. PMID:6228191

  15. Neurogenic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sann, H; Dux, M; Schemann, M; Jancsó, G

    1996-11-29

    In contrast to the skin and some visceral organs the capability of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of evoking an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract is equivocal. We have therefore investigated the neurogenic plasma extravasation induced by local application of capsaicin to the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of the rat. Permeable vessels were visualised histologically with the vascular labelling technique using colloidal silver. In the smooth muscle layer of the small intestine, capsaicin elicited a 3-fold increase in the density of labelled blood vessels (diameter, 7-35 microns). Significant capsaicin-evoked plasma extravasation was also observed in the submucosa of the jejunum and ileum, and in the basal layer of the jejunal mucosa. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was not noted in the stomach and the colon. The data suggest the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents in inflammatory processes in the rat small intestine.

  16. Transport of nattokinase across the rat intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Hong, K; Ito, Y; Misawa, S; Takeuchi, N; Kariya, K; Nishimuro, S

    1995-09-01

    Intraduodenal administration of nattokinase (NK) at a dose of 80 mg/kg, resulted in the degradation of fibrinogen in plasma suggesting transport of NK across the intestinal tract in normal rats. The action of NK on the cleavage of fibrinogen in the plasma from blood samples drawn at intervals after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis with an anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody. The 270 kDa fragment carrying antigenic sites for the binding of the anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody appeared within 0.5 h and was then degraded gradually to a 105 kDa fragment via a 200 kDa fragment. This suggests that fibrinogen was degraded to a 105 kDa fragment via several intermediates (270 and 200 kDa). In parallel with the degradation process, plasma recalcification times were remarkably prolonged NK was also detected in the plasma from blood samples drawn 3 and 5 h after administration of the enzyme by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis with an anti-NK antibody. The results indicate that NK is absorbed from the rat intestinal tract and that NK cleaves fibrinogen in plasma after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme.

  17. Microbial Biogeography and Core Microbiota of the Rat Digestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongyao; Chen, Haiqin; Mao, Bingyong; Yang, Qin; Zhao, Jianxin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    As a long-standing biomedical model, rats have been frequently used in studies exploring the correlations between gastrointestinal (GI) bacterial biota and diseases. In the present study, luminal and mucosal samples taken along the longitudinal axis of the rat digestive tract were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based analysis to determine the baseline microbial composition. Results showed that the community diversity increased from the upper to lower GI segments and that the stratification of microbial communities as well as shift of microbial metabolites were driven by biogeographic location. A greater proportion of lactate-producing bacteria (such as Lactobacillus, Turicibacter and Streptococcus) were found in the stomach and small intestine, while anaerobic Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, fermenting carbohydrates and plant aromatic compounds, constituted the bulk of the large-intestinal core microbiota where topologically distinct co-occurrence networks were constructed for the adjacent luminal and mucosal compartments. When comparing the GI microbiota from different hosts, we found that the rat microbial biogeography might represent a new reference, distinct from other murine animals. Our study provides the first comprehensive characterization of the rat GI microbiota landscape for the research community, laying the foundation for better understanding and predicting the disease-related alterations in microbial communities. PMID:28374781

  18. Microbial Biogeography and Core Microbiota of the Rat Digestive Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongyao; Chen, Haiqin; Mao, Bingyong; Yang, Qin; Zhao, Jianxin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-01

    As a long-standing biomedical model, rats have been frequently used in studies exploring the correlations between gastrointestinal (GI) bacterial biota and diseases. In the present study, luminal and mucosal samples taken along the longitudinal axis of the rat digestive tract were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based analysis to determine the baseline microbial composition. Results showed that the community diversity increased from the upper to lower GI segments and that the stratification of microbial communities as well as shift of microbial metabolites were driven by biogeographic location. A greater proportion of lactate-producing bacteria (such as Lactobacillus, Turicibacter and Streptococcus) were found in the stomach and small intestine, while anaerobic Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, fermenting carbohydrates and plant aromatic compounds, constituted the bulk of the large-intestinal core microbiota where topologically distinct co-occurrence networks were constructed for the adjacent luminal and mucosal compartments. When comparing the GI microbiota from different hosts, we found that the rat microbial biogeography might represent a new reference, distinct from other murine animals. Our study provides the first comprehensive characterization of the rat GI microbiota landscape for the research community, laying the foundation for better understanding and predicting the disease-related alterations in microbial communities.

  19. Characterization of pruriceptive trigeminothalamic tract neurons in rats

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Hannah R.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent models of facial itch and pain provide a valuable tool for distinguishing between behaviors related to each sensation. In rats, pruritogens applied to the face elicit scratching using the hindlimb while algogens elicit wiping using the forelimb. We wished to determine the role of trigeminothalamic tract (VTT) neurons in carrying information regarding facial itch and pain to the forebrain. We have characterized responses to facially applied pruritogens (serotonin, BAM8–22, chloroquine, histamine, capsaicin, and cowhage) and noxious stimuli in 104 VTT neurons recorded from anesthetized rats. Each VTT neuron had a mechanically sensitive cutaneous receptive field on the ipsilateral face. All pruriceptive VTT neurons also responded to noxious mechanical and/or thermal stimulation. Over half of VTT neurons responsive to noxious stimuli also responded to at least one pruritogen. Each tested pruritogen, with the exception of cowhage, produced an increase in discharge rate in a subset of VTT neurons. The response to each pruritogen was characterized, including maximum discharge rate, response duration, and spike timing dynamics. Pruriceptive VTT neurons were recorded from throughout superficial and deep layers of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and were shown to project via antidromic mapping to the ventroposterior medial nucleus or posterior thalamic nuclei. These results indicate that pruriceptive VTT neurons are a subset of polymodal nociceptive VTT neurons and characterize a system conducive to future experiments regarding the similarities and differences between facial itch and pain. PMID:24478156

  20. Characterization of pruriceptive trigeminothalamic tract neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, Hannah R; Giesler, Glenn J

    2014-04-01

    Rodent models of facial itch and pain provide a valuable tool for distinguishing between behaviors related to each sensation. In rats, pruritogens applied to the face elicit scratching using the hindlimb while algogens elicit wiping using the forelimb. We wished to determine the role of trigeminothalamic tract (VTT) neurons in carrying information regarding facial itch and pain to the forebrain. We have characterized responses to facially applied pruritogens (serotonin, BAM8-22, chloroquine, histamine, capsaicin, and cowhage) and noxious stimuli in 104 VTT neurons recorded from anesthetized rats. Each VTT neuron had a mechanically sensitive cutaneous receptive field on the ipsilateral face. All pruriceptive VTT neurons also responded to noxious mechanical and/or thermal stimulation. Over half of VTT neurons responsive to noxious stimuli also responded to at least one pruritogen. Each tested pruritogen, with the exception of cowhage, produced an increase in discharge rate in a subset of VTT neurons. The response to each pruritogen was characterized, including maximum discharge rate, response duration, and spike timing dynamics. Pruriceptive VTT neurons were recorded from throughout superficial and deep layers of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and were shown to project via antidromic mapping to the ventroposterior medial nucleus or posterior thalamic nuclei. These results indicate that pruriceptive VTT neurons are a subset of polymodal nociceptive VTT neurons and characterize a system conducive to future experiments regarding the similarities and differences between facial itch and pain.

  1. GM crops and the rat digestive tract: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Zdziarski, I M; Edwards, J W; Carman, J A; Haynes, J I

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between genetically modified (GM) crops and health, based on histopathological investigations of the digestive tract in rats. We reviewed published long-term feeding studies of crops containing one or more of three specific traits: herbicide tolerance via the EPSPS gene and insect resistance via cry1Ab or cry3Bb1 genes. These genes are commonly found in commercialised GM crops. Our search found 21 studies for nine (19%) out of the 47 crops approved for human and/or animal consumption. We could find no studies on the other 38 (81%) approved crops. Fourteen out of the 21 studies (67%) were general health assessments of the GM crop on rat health. Most of these studies (76%) were performed after the crop had been approved for human and/or animal consumption, with half of these being published at least nine years after approval. Our review also discovered an inconsistency in methodology and a lack of defined criteria for outcomes that would be considered toxicologically or pathologically significant. In addition, there was a lack of transparency in the methods and results, which made comparisons between the studies difficult. The evidence reviewed here demonstrates an incomplete picture regarding the toxicity (and safety) of GM products consumed by humans and animals. Therefore, each GM product should be assessed on merit, with appropriate studies performed to indicate the level of safety associated with them. Detailed guidelines should be developed which will allow for the generation of comparable and reproducible studies. This will establish a foundation for evidence-based guidelines, to better determine if GM food is safe for human and animal consumption. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Convergence pattern of cortical and interposital influences on rubrospinal neurons of the cat.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, R; Palmeri, A; Raffaele, R; Ricca, G; Sapienza, S

    1988-01-01

    In adult semi-chronically implanted sedated cats discharges of single rubrospinal (RS) neurons were tested for selective activation of movement-evoking foci within pericruciate cortex (CX; area 4) and anterior division of cerebellar interpositus nucleus (IN). It was found that a very high incidence of neuronal responses was obtained only when stimulating IN and CX foci which controlled the same joint with respect to that moved from activation of the rubral foci including the recorded neurons. In these cases very frequent convergence phenomena were observed by activating IN and/or CX foci. Analysis of response patterns showed that RS neurons included in a focus controlling a given muscle were excited by IN foci for the same muscle (agonist foci) and inhibited from IN foci for the antagonist muscle (antagonist foci). In contrast, the same RS neurons were inhibited by agonist CX foci and excited by antagonist CX foci. Such an organization suggests that the motor cortex plays a competitive role in modulating the action of the interposito-rubrospinal system.

  3. Fermentation of dietary fibre components in the rat intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Nyman, M; Asp, N G

    1982-05-01

    1. The fermentative breakdown of dietary fibre from various sources in the intestinal tract was studied using rat balance experiments and gas-liquid chromatograhic analysis of dietary fibre monomers in feed and faces. 2. On a basal diet with 690 g maize starch/kg but no added fibre, small but detectable amounts of polymeric glucose, rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, galactose, mannose and uronic acids, i.e. sugars occurring in dietary fibre, were excreted in faeces. 3. Dietary fibre in wheat bran was rather resistant to fermentation; 63% was recovered in the faeces. Guar gum, on the other hand, was almost completely fermented, whereas 19 and 25% of the uronic acids in low and high methoxylated pectin respectively, were excreted in faeces. The various constituents of sugar-beet dietary fibre (approximately equal amounts of arabinose-based hemicellulose, pectin and non-starch glucan (cellulose)) showed quite variable availability for micro-organisms in that 6-12% of the arabinose, 17-25% of the uronic acids, and 52-58% of the cellulose were recovered in the faeces. 4. Faecal nitrogen excretion increased on addition of any one of the dietary fibre preparations studied, resulting in decreased true and apparent protein digestibility values. 5. The faecal dry weight increment was most pronounced when feeding bran and could then almost be accounted for by the remaining fibre and by protein. The less-prominent bulking effect of guar gum and pectins, that were much more extensively fermented, could be only partly explained by dietary fibre and protein.

  4. Role of parotid amylase in starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tracts of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, M; Inomata, K

    1989-09-01

    In order for the role of parotid amylase in starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tracts of diabetic rats to be clarified, this study investigated the effect of parotid-duct ligation on both amylase secretion from the parotid glands and pancreas into the gastro-intestinal tract and on starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal contents during feedings. In both diabetic rats and control rats, parotid-duct ligation reduced amylase activity in both the parotid glands during fasting and in the gastric contents after feeding. The amylase activity in the intestinal contents after feeding was reduced by parotid-duct ligation in the diabetic rats. Starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tract after feeding was reduced by parotid-duct ligation in the diabetic rats. The results suggest that most of the amylase activity in the gastric contents and a large part of the amylase activity in the intestinal contents are derived from the parotid glands, and that parotid amylase plays an important role in starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tracts of diabetic rats.

  5. Dietary pectin up-regulates monocaboxylate transporter 1 in the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kirat, Doaa; Kondo, Koji; Shimada, Ritsu; Kato, Seiyu

    2009-04-01

    This work was undertaken to study the effect of pectin feeding on the expression level, cellular localization and functional activity of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in the gastrointestinal tract of rats. The results indicated that MCT1 protein level was significantly increased along the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract of pectin-fed rats in comparison with control animals. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an increase in MCT1 in the stratified squamous epithelia of the forestomach as well as in the basolateral membranes of the cells lining the gastric pit of the glandular stomach of pectin-fed rats when compared with control animals. The parietal cells, which showed barely any or no detectable MCT1 in the control group, exhibited a strong intensity of MCT1 on the basolateral membranes in pectin-fed rats. In the small intestine of pectin-fed rats, strong immunopositivity for MCT1 was detected in the brush border and basolateral membranes of the absorptive enterocytes lining the entire villi, while in control rats, weak reactivity was detected on the brush border membrane in a few absorptive enterocytes in the villus tip. In the large intestine of control animals, MCT1 was detected on the basolateral membranes of the epithelia lining the caecum and colon. This staining intensity was markedly increased in pectin-fed rats, along with the appearance of strong reactivity for MCT1 on the apical membranes of the surface and crypt epithelia of caecum and colon. Our results also showed that MCT1 co-localizes with its chaperone, basigin (CD147), in the rat gastrointestinal tract, and that the pectin feeding increased the expression of CD147. In vivo functional studies revealed an enhanced acetate absorption in the colon of pectin-fed in comparison with control animals. We conclude that MCT1 is up-regulated along the gastrointestinal tract of pectin-fed rats, which might represent an adaptive response to the increased availability of its substrates.

  6. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R) stimulation delays rubrospinal mitochondrial-dependent degeneration and improves functional recovery after spinal cord hemisection by ERK1/2 inactivation.

    PubMed

    Latini, L; Bisicchia, E; Sasso, V; Chiurchiù, V; Cavallucci, V; Molinari, M; Maccarrone, M; Viscomi, M T

    2014-09-04

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition of CNS that often results in severe functional impairments for which there are no restorative therapies. As in other CNS injuries, in addition to the effects that are related to the primary site of damage, these impairments are caused by degeneration of distal regions that are connected functionally to the primary lesion site. Modulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) counteracts this neurodegeneration, and pharmacological modulation of type-2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) is a promising therapeutic target for several CNS pathologies, including SCI. This study examined the effects of CB2R modulation on the fate of axotomized rubrospinal neurons (RSNs) and functional recovery in a model of spinal cord dorsal hemisection (SCH) at the cervical level in rats. SCH induced CB2R expression, severe atrophy, and cell death in contralateral RSNs. Furthermore, SCH affected molecular changes in the apoptotic cascade in RSNs - increased cytochrome c release, apoptosome formation, and caspase-3 activity. CB2R stimulation by its selective agonist JWH-015 significantly increased the bcl-2/bax ratio, reduced cytochrome c release, delayed atrophy and degeneration, and improved spontaneous functional recovery through ERK1/2 inactivation. These findings implicate the ECS, particularly CB2R, as part of the endogenous neuroprotective response that is triggered after SCI. Thus, CB2R modulation might represent a promising therapeutic target that lacks psychotropic effects and can be used to exploit ECS-based approaches to counteract neuronal degeneration.

  7. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  8. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  9. Ghrelin-immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Janiuk, Izabela; Kaleczyc, Jerzy; Kasacka, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin, an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted by the endocrine cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, has recently been shown to affect the function of the cardiovascular system. This study aimed to assess the number and morphology of ghrelin-immunopositive (GhrIP) cells in the gastrointestinal tract of rats at different developmental phases of experimentally evoked renovascular hypertension. The study involved 40 rats divided into two groups: control (C; n = 20) and rats with experimentally induced hypertension (EH; n = 20). The Goldblatt model of two-kidneys, one clip (2K1C) was used to induce hypertension. Renovascular hypertension was maintained for either 3 (EH1 group; n = 10) or 42 (EH2 group; n = 10) days. Paraffin sections from the cardia, corpus and pylorus of the stomach, as well as from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were processed for peroxidase immunohistochemistry. The number of GhrIP cells was significantly higher in the cardia and corpus of the stomach as well as the duodenum and jejunum of hypertensive rats compared to that found in the control animals. The increased number of GhrIP cells in the rat gastrointestinal tract after partial unilateral ligation of the renal artery suggests that renovascular hypertension may affect ghrelin secretion, which can contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications.

  10. Selection of target mutation in rat gastrointestinal tract E. coli by minute dosage of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dachuan; Chen, Kaichao; Li, Ruichao; Liu, Lizhang; Guo, Jiubiao; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that bacterial resistance is selected within a mutation selection window of antibiotics. More recent studies showed that even extremely low concentration of antibiotic could select resistant bacteria in vitro. Yet little is known about the exact antibiotic concentration range that can effectively select for resistant organisms in animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study, the effect of different dosages of enrofloxacin on resistance and mutation development in rat GI tract E. coli was investigated by determining the number of resistant E. coli recoverable from rat fecal samples. Our data showed that high dose antibiotic treatment could effectively eliminate E. coli with single gyrA mutation in the early course of treatment, yet the eradication effects diminished upon prolonged treatment. Therapeutic and sub-therapeutic dose (1/10 and 1/100 of therapeutic doses) of enrofloxacin could effectively select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment and during the cessation periods. Surprisingly, very low dose of enrofloxacin (1/1000 therapeutic dose) could also select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment, only with slightly lower efficiency. No enrofloxacin-resistant E. coli could be selected at all test levels of enrofloxacin during long term treatment and the strength of antibiotic treatment does not alter the overall level of E. coli in rat GI tract. This study demonstrated that long term antibiotic treatment seems to be the major trigger for the development of target mutations in GI tract E. coli, which provided insight into the rational use of antibiotics in animal husbandry.

  11. Effect of prenatal exposure to ethanol on the pyramidal tract in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol induces a relative increase in the numbers of pyramidal tract axons relative to the number of corticospinal projection neurons in somatosensory/motor cortices in the adult rat. The present study examines the effects of ethanol on the numbers of axons in the developing caudal pyramidal tract, i.e., corticospinal axons. Electron microscopic analyses of the pyramidal tracts of the offspring of pregnant rat dams fed a control diet ad libitum, pair-fed a liquid control diet, or fed an ethanol-containing diet ad libitum were performed. The pups were 5-, 15-, 30- and 90-days-old. The numbers of axons in control rats fell precipitously after postnatal day (P) 15 and the frequency of myelinated axons rose dramatically between P15 and P90. Ethanol exposure had no significant effect on the numbers of pyramidal tract axons at any age. Moreover, no ethanol-induced differences in the numbers of axons in different stages of myelination, i.e., axons that were "free" of glial associations, glia-engulfed, invested by 1-2 layers of myelin, or myelinated by 3+ layers of myelin, were detected on P15. Thus, it appears that (a) pyramidal tract axons are lost or pruned during the first two postnatal weeks and (b) postnatal development of pyramidal tract axons (e.g., pruning and myelination) is not affected by ethanol. The implications are that the ethanol-induced increase in the number of axons relative to the number of somata of corticospinal neurons detected in pups and adults results from the effects of ethanol on early stages (initiation) of axogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Distribution Dynamics of Recombinant Lactobacillus in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Sujin; Zhu, Libin; Zhuang, Qiang; Wang, Lucia; Xu, Pin-Xian; Itoh, Keiji; Holzman, Ian R.; Lin, Jing

    2013-01-01

    One approach to deliver therapeutic agents, especially proteins, to the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is to use commensal bacteria as a carrier. Genus Lactobacillus is an attractive candidate for use in this approach. However, a system for expressing exogenous proteins at a high level has been lacking in Lactobacillus. Moreover, it will be necessary to introduce the recombinant Lactobacillus into the GI tract, ideally by oral administration. Whether orally administered Lactobacillus can reach and reside in the GI tract has not been explored in neonates. In this study, we have examined these issues in neonatal rats. To achieve a high level of protein expression in Lactobacillus, we tested the impact of three promoters and two backbones on protein expression levels using mRFP1, a red fluorescent protein, as a reporter. We found that a combination of an L-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhL) promoter of Lactobacillus sakei with a backbone from pLEM415 yielded the highest level of reporter expression. When this construct was used to transform Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus acidophilus, high levels of mRFP1 were detected in all these species and colonies of transformed Lactobacillus appeared pink under visible light. To test whether orally administered Lactobacillus can be retained in the GI tract of neonates, we fed the recombinant Lactobacillus casei to neonatal rats. We found that about 3% of the bacteria were retained in the GI tract of the rats at 24 h after oral feeding with more recombinant Lactobacillus in the stomach and small intestine than in the cecum and colon. No mortality was observed throughout this study with Lactobacillus. In contrast, all neonatal rats died within 24 hours after fed with transformed E. coli. Taken together, our results indicate that Lactobacillus has the potential to be used as a vehicle for the delivery of therapeutic agents to neonates. PMID:23544119

  13. Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, K.N.; Beal, J.A.; Knight, D.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient.

  14. A comparison of peripheral and rubrospinal synaptic input to slow and fast twitch motor units of triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Jankowska, E; ten Bruggencate, G

    1970-05-01

    1. Post-synaptic potentials (PSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of a variety of input systems have been compared in triceps surae motoneurones innervating slow and fast muscle units, the speed of contraction of which was also determined.2. Stimulation of high threshold afferents in both flexor and extensor muscle nerves, and of joint afferents, evoked polysynaptic PSPs which were predominantly hyperpolarizing in both fast and slow twitch motor units.3. Volleys in cutaneous afferents in the sural and saphenous nerves evoked polysynaptic PSPs composed of mixtures of inhibitory and excitatory components. The inhibitory components were predominant in slow twitch motor units, while in fast twitch units there was a trend towards excitatory predominance.4. Repetitive stimulation of the red nucleus caused predominantly inhibitory PSPs in slow twitch units and mixed or predominantly excitatory PSPs in fast twitch units. There was a correlation in the excitatory/inhibitory balance between PSPs of cutaneous and rubrospinal origin in those motoneurones in which both types of PSPs were studied.5. The amplitudes of group Ia disynaptic inhibitory PSPs were found to be correlated with motor unit twitch type: IPSPs in slow twitch units were larger than those in fast twitch units. Rubrospinal conditioning volleys were found to facilitate group Ia IPSPs in both fast and slow twitch motor units.6. The results suggest that there may be several basic patterns of synaptic input organization to motoneurones within a given motor unit pool. In addition to quantitative variation in synaptic distribution, there is evidence that qualitative differences in excitatory to inhibitory balance also exist in the pathways conveying input from cutaneous afferents and rubrospinal systems to triceps surae motoneurones. These qualitative differences are correlated with the motor unit twitch type.

  15. Evaluation of changes in magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging of the bilateral optic tract in monocular blind rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zhong, Yufeng; Tang, Weijun; Tang, Zuohua; Sun, Xinghuai; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Fan, Jiawen; Wu, Lingjie; Wang, Jie; Xiao, Zebin; Jin, Lixin

    2017-06-01

    Some studies have used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate white matter development of the visual pathway in humans and animals after visual deprivation. However, the alterations in the bilateral optic tract after the transection of unilateral optic nerve have not been well explored. In this study, we attempted to investigate the structural integrity of and pathological changes to the bilateral optic tract after transection of the unilateral optic nerve in rats using DTI. Eight healthy male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 2 groups, with 4 in each group. Group A served as a control group. Transection of the unilateral (right) optic nerve was performed in the four rats in group B at seven days after birth to establish the early monocular blind model. Four months after the operation, MnCl2 was injected into the left eyes of all rats, and MRI examinations were performed 24h after injection. We detect the fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) values of the bilateral optic tract in all rats. In a comparison of the ipsilateral optic tract of group B with group A, a significant decrease in FA (P<0.001) and an increase in RD (P<0.01) of the left optic tract were found in group B, while no significant difference was found in the right optic tract. In group B, the FA and RD values of the left optic tract were significantly lower (P<0.01) and significantly higher (P<0.05), respectively, than those of the right optic tract. Consequently, transection of the right optic nerve can lead to structural integrity damage of and pathological changes to the left optic tract in rats. Some DTI-derived parameters (such as FA and RD) may serve as biomarkers of optic tract degeneration. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-range projections of Adelta primary afferents in the Lissauer tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Lidierth, Malcolm

    2007-09-25

    Electrical microstimulation has been used to activate fine myelinated primary afferents running within the Lissauer tract. Stimulation of the tract at the L2/L3 border produced antidromic volleys which were recorded on the dorsal roots of more caudal spinal segments. Antidromic volleys were present in all cases for roots as far caudal as the S2 segment (L3, n=12; L4, n=6; L5, n=6; L6, n=9; S1, n=3; S2, n=6; observations in a total of 15 rats). These fibres were collaterals of primary afferents with conduction velocities in the dorsal root of up to 17.3+/-2.3 ms(-1) (mean+/-S.D., n=6; range 14-20 ms(-1)). Conduction velocities within the Lissauer tract were slower; the fastest contributing fibres had conduction velocities of 9.2+/-2.2 ms(-1) (range 6-12 ms(-1)). Lesions of the Lissauer tract caudal to the stimulation site abolished the volleys on roots lying caudal to the lesion. Most previous works have suggested that primary afferents project in the Lissauer tract for only one or two spinal segments. The present study shows that some fibres project rostrally for up to seven spinal segments (L2-S2).

  17. Diet-induced obesity suppresses ghrelin in rat gastrointestinal tract and serum.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Suleyman; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2011-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine ghrelin expression in serum and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tissues, and to measure tissue ghrelin levels and obesity-related alterations in some serum biochemical variables in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). The study included 12 male rats, 60 days old. The rats were randomly allocated to two groups (n = 6). Rats in the DIO group were fed a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity, while those in the control group were fed on standard rat pellets. After a 12 week diet program including an adaptation period all rats were decapitated, tissues were individually fixed, ghrelin expression was examined by immunohistochemistry , and tissue and serum ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum biochemical variables were measured using an autoanalyzer. When the baseline and week 12 body mass index and GIT ghrelin expression were compared between DIO and control rats, BMI had increased and ghrelin expression decreased due to obesity. The RIA results were consistent with these findings. Serum glucose, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels were elevated and HDL cholesterol significantly decreased in the DIO group. A comparison of GIT tissues between the control and obese groups demonstrated that ghrelin was decreased in all tissues of the latter. This decrease was brought about a decline in the circulating ghrelin pool. This suggests that rather than being associated with a change in a single tissue, obesity is a pathological condition in which ghrelin expression is changed in all tissues.

  18. Keratinocyte growth factor induces proliferation of hepatocytes and epithelial cells throughout the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Housley, R M; Morris, C F; Boyle, W; Ring, B; Biltz, R; Tarpley, J E; Aukerman, S L; Devine, P L; Whitehead, R H; Pierce, G F

    1994-11-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, was identified as a specific keratinocyte mitogen after isolation from a lung fibroblast line. Recently, recombinant (r)KGF was found to influence proliferation and differentiation patterns of multiple epithelial cell lineages within skin, lung, and the reproductive tract. In the present study, we designed experiments to identify additional target tissues, and focused on the rat gastrointestinal (GI) system, since a putative receptor, K-sam, was originally identified in a gastric carcinoma. Expression of KGF receptor and KGF mRNA was detected within the entire GI tract, suggesting the gut both synthesized and responded to KGF. Therefore, rKGF was administered to adult rats and was found to induce markedly increased proliferation of epithelial cells from the foregut to the colon, and of hepatocytes, one day after systemic treatment. Daily treatment resulted in the marked selective induction of mucin-producing cell lineages throughout the GI tract in a dose-dependent fashion. Other cell lineages were either unaffected (e.g., Paneth cells), or relatively decreased (e.g., parietal cells, enterocytes) in rKGF-treated rats. The direct effect of rKGF was confirmed by demonstrating markedly increased carcinoembryonic antigen production in a human colon carcinoma cell line, LIM1899. Serum levels of albumin were specifically and significantly elevated after daily treatment. These results demonstrate rKGF can induce epithelial cell activation throughout the GI tract and liver. Further, endogenous KGF may be a normal paracrine mediator of growth within the gut.

  19. Accumulation of organotins in seafood leads to reproductive tract abnormalities in female rats.

    PubMed

    Podratz, Priscila L; Merlo, Eduardo; Sena, Gabriela C; Morozesk, Mariana; Bonomo, Marina M; Matsumoto, Silvia T; da Costa, Mércia B; Zamprogno, Gabriela C; Brandão, Poliane A A; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Miguel, Emilio de C; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Silva, Ian V; Graceli, Jones B

    2015-11-01

    Organotins (OTs) are environmental contaminants used as biocides in antifouling paints that have been shown to be endocrine disrupters. However, studies evaluating the effects of OTs accumulated in seafood (LNI) on reproductive health are particularly sparse. This study demonstrates that LNI leads to impairment in the reproductive tract of female rats, as the estrous cycle development, as well as for ovary and uterus morphology. Rats were treated with LNI, and their reproductive morphophysiology was assessed. Morphophysiological abnormalities, such as irregular estrous cycles, abnormal ovarian follicular development and ovarian collagen deposition, were observed in LNI rats. An increase in luminal epithelia and ERα expression was observed in the LNI uteri. Together, these data provide in vivo evidence that LNI are toxic for reproductive morphophysiology, which may be associated with risks to reproductive function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF DIBUTYL PHTHALATE AND DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE ON MALE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT DEVELOPMENT: ALTERED FETAL STEROID HORMONES AND GENES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the plasticizers diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) during sexual differentiation causes male reproductive tract malformations in rats and rabbits. In the fetal male rat, these two phthalate esters decrease testosterone (T) production and i...

  1. CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF DIBUTYL PHTHALATE AND DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE ON MALE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT DEVELOPMENT: ALTERED FETAL STEROID HORMONES AND GENES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the plasticizers diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) during sexual differentiation causes male reproductive tract malformations in rats and rabbits. In the fetal male rat, these two phthalate esters decrease testosterone (T) production and i...

  2. The Failure of Absorption of DC Silicone Fluid 703 from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, J.; Pover, W. F. R.

    1960-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of silicone fluid 703, a methyl phenyl polysiloxane, has been studied in the rat. This silicone was chosen for the present investigation because of its lipid-like character and its solubility in olive oil. The experimental findings demonstrate that very little, if any, silicone is absorbed when fed in olive oil. No silicone was found in the lymph lipids of cannulated rats fed the silicone, and balance experiments by recovery of the organosilicon compound and triglyceride after feeding to rats for three hours showed that 85% of silicone fluid 703 was recovered from the gastrointestinal tract, whereas 70% of the fed triglyceride was absorbed. The unabsorbed silicone was concentrated chiefly in the intestinal lumen. Balance experiments by recovery of the organosilicon compound after long-term feeding gave recoveries of 96% of the silicone. This amount was recovered entirely from the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract and the faeces. No silicon fluid 703 was found in the liver, kidneys, or fat depots. The urine contained no soluble silica. PMID:14430986

  3. Excretory Function of Intestinal Tract Enhanced in Kidney Impaired Rats Caused by Adenine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yu; Gao, Tao; Li, Yue; Gao, Zhiyi; Duan, Jinlian; Yin, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to prove the compensative effect of intestine for renal function. Rat kidney was impaired by intragastrically administrating adenine (400 mg per day for 5 days). Intestinal tract was harvested and equally divided into 20 segments except cecum. Kidneys were harvested and histologically examined with hematoxylin-eosin staining kits. Uric acid, urea (BUN), and creatinine in serum were determined with assay kits, and BUN and creatinine in every intestinal segment were also determined. The results showed that adenine was able to increase uric acid level in serum from 20.98 ± 6.98 μg/mL to 40.77 ± 7.52 μg/mL and cause renal function damage with BUN (from 3.87 ± 0.62 mM to 12.33 ± 3.27 mM) and creatinine (from 51.48 ± 6.98 μM to 118.25 ± 28.63 μM) increasing in serum and with abnormally micromorphological changes in kidney. The amount of BUN and creatinine distributed in intestinal tract was positively correlated with those in blood. In impaired renal function rats, the amount of BUN (from 4.26 ± 0.21 μMole to 10.72 ± 0.55 μMole) and creatinine (from 681.4 ± 23.3 nMole to 928.7 ± 21.3 nMole) distributed in intestinal tract significantly increased. All the results proved that intestinal tract had excretory function compensative for renal function. PMID:27975080

  4. In vivo DTI tractography of the rat brain: an atlas of the main tracts in Paxinos space with histological comparison.

    PubMed

    Figini, Matteo; Zucca, Ileana; Aquino, Domenico; Pennacchio, Paolo; Nava, Simone; Di Marzio, Alessandro; Preti, Maria Giulia; Baselli, Guseppe; Spreafico, Roberto; Frassoni, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a magnetic resonance modality that permits to characterize the orientation and integrity of white matter (WM). DTI-based tractography techniques, allowing the virtual reconstruction of WM tract pathways, have found wide application in preclinical neurological research. Recently, anatomically detailed rat brain atlases including DTI data were constructed from ex vivo DTI images, but tractographic atlases of normal rats in vivo are still lacking. We propose here a probabilistic tractographic atlas of the main WM tracts in the healthy rat brain based on in vivo DTI acquisition. Our study was carried out on 10 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats using a 7T preclinical scanner. The MRI protocol permitted a reliable reconstruction of the main rat brain bundles: corpus callosum, cingulum, external capsule, internal capsule, anterior commissure, optic tract. The reconstructed fibers were compared with histological data, proving the viability of in vivo DTI tractography in the rat brain with the proposed acquisition and processing protocol. All the data were registered to a rat brain template in the coordinate system of the commonly used atlas by Paxinos and Watson; then the individual tracts were binarized and averaged, obtaining a probabilistic atlas in Paxinos-Watson space of the main rat brain WM bundles. With respect to the recent high-resolution MRI atlases, the resulting tractographic atlas, available online, provides complementary information about the average anatomical position of the considered WM tracts and their variability between normal animals. Furthermore, reference values for the main DTI-derived parameters, mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy, were provided. Both these results can be used as references in preclinical studies on pathological rat models involving potential alterations of WM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sexual dimorphism in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Guillamón, A; Valencia, A; Segovia, S

    1990-11-01

    This work investigates the existence of sex differences in the volume and number of neurons and glial cells in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT). Males showed larger volume and number of cells than female rats. Early postnatal (day 1 after birth) orchidectomy in males, and androgenization in females, reversed these differences. No sex differences were found in BAOT glial cells. The sexual dimorphism found in the neuron/glial cell ratio reflects sex differences in neuron number. The existence of sexual dimorphism in the BAOT supports our earlier hypothesis which states that the vomeronasal system (VNS) is sexually dimorphic.

  6. Effect of time of exposure to rat coronavirus and Mycoplasma pulmonis on respiratory tract lesions in the Wistar rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schunk, M K; Percy, D H; Rosendal, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of time of exposure on the progression of pulmonary lesions in rats inoculated with Mycoplasma pulmonis and the rat coronavirus, sialodacryoadenitis virus (SDAV) were studied, using six groups of 18 SPF Wistar rats (n = 108). Rats were inoculated intranasally as follows: Group 1, sterile medium only; Group 2, sterile medium followed one week later by 150 TCID50 SDAV; Group 3, sterile medium followed by 10(5.7) colony forming units of M. pulmonis; Group 4, SDAV followed one week later by M. pulmonis; Group 5, M. pulmonis followed one week later by SDAV; Group 6, M. pulmonis followed two weeks later by SDAV. Six rats from each group were euthanized at one, two and three weeks after the final inoculation. In a separate experiment, six additional animals were inoculated in each of groups 3, 5 and 6 (n = 18) and were sampled at five weeks after they had received M. pulmonis. Bronchoalveolar lavage and quantitative lung mycoplasma cultures were conducted on two-thirds of the rats. Histopathological examination and scoring of lesion severity were performed on all animals. Based on the prevalence and extent of histopathological lesions, bronchoalveolar lavage cell numbers, neutrophil differential cell counts and the isolation of M. pulmonis, the most severe disease occurred in the groups that received both agents. There was no significant difference in lesion severity between the groups receiving both agents other than in those examined during the acute stages of SDAV infection. Based on these results, it is evident that SDAV enhances lower respiratory tract disease in Wistar rats whether exposure occurs at one week prior to or at various intervals following M. pulmonis infections. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:7704844

  7. Endogenous leptin contributes to baroreflex suppression within the solitary tract nucleus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Diz, Debra I

    2014-12-01

    The decline in cardiovagal baroreflex function that occurs with aging is accompanied by an increase in circulating leptin levels. Our previous studies showed that exogenous leptin impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate in younger rats, but the contribution of this hormone to baroreflex dysfunction during aging is unknown. Thus we assessed the effect of bilateral leptin microinjection (500 fmol/60 nl) within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) on the baroreflex sensitivity in older (66 ± 2 wk of age) urethane/chloralose anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with elevated circulating leptin levels. In contrast to the 63% reduction observed in younger rats, leptin did not alter the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia evoked by phenylephrine in older rats (0.76 ± 0.19 baseline vs. 0.71 ± 0.15 ms/mmHg after leptin; P = 0.806). We hypothesized that this loss of sensitivity reflected endogenous suppression of the baroreflex by elevated leptin, rather than cardiovascular resistance to the peptide. Indeed, NTS administration of a leptin receptor antagonist (75 pmol/120 nl) improved the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in older rats (0.73 ± 0.13 baseline vs. 1.19 ± 0.26 at 10 min vs. 1.87 ± 0.32 at 60 min vs. 1.22 ± 0.54 ms/mmHg at 120 min; P = 0.002), with no effect in younger rats. There was no effect of the leptin antagonist on the baroreflex sensitivity for tachycardia, responses to cardiac vagal chemosensitive fiber activation, or resting hemodynamics in older rats. These findings suggest that the actions of endogenous leptin within the NTS, either produced locally or derived from the circulation, contribute to baroreflex suppression during aging. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Endogenous leptin contributes to baroreflex suppression within the solitary tract nucleus of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    The decline in cardiovagal baroreflex function that occurs with aging is accompanied by an increase in circulating leptin levels. Our previous studies showed that exogenous leptin impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate in younger rats, but the contribution of this hormone to baroreflex dysfunction during aging is unknown. Thus we assessed the effect of bilateral leptin microinjection (500 fmol/60 nl) within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) on the baroreflex sensitivity in older (66 ± 2 wk of age) urethane/chloralose anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with elevated circulating leptin levels. In contrast to the 63% reduction observed in younger rats, leptin did not alter the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia evoked by phenylephrine in older rats (0.76 ± 0.19 baseline vs. 0.71 ± 0.15 ms/mmHg after leptin; P = 0.806). We hypothesized that this loss of sensitivity reflected endogenous suppression of the baroreflex by elevated leptin, rather than cardiovascular resistance to the peptide. Indeed, NTS administration of a leptin receptor antagonist (75 pmol/120 nl) improved the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in older rats (0.73 ± 0.13 baseline vs. 1.19 ± 0.26 at 10 min vs. 1.87 ± 0.32 at 60 min vs. 1.22 ± 0.54 ms/mmHg at 120 min; P = 0.002), with no effect in younger rats. There was no effect of the leptin antagonist on the baroreflex sensitivity for tachycardia, responses to cardiac vagal chemosensitive fiber activation, or resting hemodynamics in older rats. These findings suggest that the actions of endogenous leptin within the NTS, either produced locally or derived from the circulation, contribute to baroreflex suppression during aging. PMID:25260611

  9. Feed-Forward Control of Preshaping in the Rat Is Mediated by the Corticospinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Jason B.; Kim, Sangsoo; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Martin, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Rats are used to model human corticospinal tract (CST) injury and repair. We asked whether rats possess the ability to orient their paw to the reaching target and whether the CST mediates this skill, as it does in primates. To test this ability, called preshaping, we trained rats to reach for pieces of pasta oriented either vertically or horizontally. We measured paw angle relative to the target and asked whether rats used target information attained before contact to preshape the paw, indicating feed-forward control. We also determined if preshaping improved with practice. We then selectively lesioned the CST in the medullary pyramid contralateral to the reaching forepaw to test whether preshaping relies on the CST. Rats significantly oriented their paw to the pasta orientation before contact, demonstrating feed-forward control. Both preshaping and reaching efficiency improved with practice, while selective CST lesion abrogated both. The loss of preshaping was greatest for pasta oriented vertically, suggesting loss of supination, as seen with human CST injury. The degree of preshaping loss strongly correlated with the amount of skill acquired at baseline, suggesting that the CST mediates the learned component of preshaping. Finally, the amount of preshaping lost after injury strongly correlated with reduced retrieval success, showing an important functional consequence for preshaping. Thus, we demonstrate, for the first time, preshaping in the rat, and dependence of this skill on the CST. Understanding the basis for this skill and measuring its recovery after injury will be important for studying higher-level motor control in rats. PMID:21044175

  10. Intervention effect and mechanism of curcumin in chronic urinary tract infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wen-Yong; Qi, Jin-Chun; Du, Lei

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the invention effect of curcumin on chronic urinary tract infection in rats and explore its possible mechanism of action. The experimental animals were randomly divided into three groups, normal, model and curcumin group. Chronic urinary tract infection models were built for model group and curcumin group by injecting coliform fluid into the cavity of bladder. From the first day of modeling, rats in the curcumin group were injected with 150 mg/kg curcumin, while rats in normal group and model group were given no other treatment. The treatment lasted for 14 d. The white blood cell counts in blood and urine, bacterial colony count in urine and renal tubular functional indexes of rats in all groups at day 1, 7, and 14 after treatment were detected. Urine β2-microglobulin (β2-MG), urinary N-acetyl-β-D glucosaminidase (NAG) levels were used to detected the inflammatory cytokines in serum after treatment including the contents of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and real-time PCR was employed to determine the expression of mRNA of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) and TLR-4 in renal tissues and bladder tissues of all groups after treatment. The white blood cell counts at day 1 and 7 after treatment in rats of model group and curcumin group were significantly higher than those of normal group at the same time points, while the white blood cell counts of the curcumin group were significantly lower than those of model group (P < 0.05). The urine white blood cell counts in rats of model group at day 1, 7 and 14 were all significantly higher than those of normal group at the same time points; those in the curcumin group were significantly lower than those of the model group at day 1, 7 and 14 at the same time points (P < 0.05). The bacterial colony counts of urine in rats of model group and curcumin group at day 1, 7 and 14 were all significantly higher than those of normal group at the same time points, while the counts of

  11. [Length and weight of gastrointestinal tracts of pikas, suncus, millardias, mice and rats].

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, M; Matsuzaki, T; Saito, M

    1983-01-01

    The length and weight of gastrointestinal tracts including contents of ten week old male pikas (Ochotona rufescens rufescens) and suncus (Suncus murinus) were measured and they were investigated and compared with those of millardias, ICR-mice and Wistar-rats. The length from the duodenum to the anus of pikas was much longer and the weight from the stomach to the anus was about 16g per 100g of body weight. The weight of cecum was about 7g per body weight and they were heavier than those of other species. The length from the duodenum to the anus of the suncus was short but the weight of the small intestine plus colon and rectum per body weight did not differ from that of other species. The suncus has no cecum but the weight from the stomach to the anus was almost the same as that of rats.

  12. Functional abnormalities of the motor tract in the rat after portocaval anastomosis and after carbon tetrachloride induction of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Oria, Marc; Raguer, Nuria; Chatauret, Nicolas; Bartolí, Ramón; Odena, Gemma; Planas, Ramón; Córdoba, Juan

    2006-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neurologic syndrome secondary to liver failure that causes cognitive and motor abnormalities. Impairment in the function of the first neuron of the motor tract (corticospinal tract) has been demonstrated in patients with cirrhosis and minimal hepatic encephalopathy. Investigate the function of the first neuron of the motor tract in experimental models of minimal hepatic encephalopathy. Rats with portocaval anastomosis (n = 8) and rats with carbon tetrachloride induced cirrhosis (n = 11) underwent neurophysiological recording under light anesthesia with propofol. Motor evoked potentials were elicited applying a transcranial electric pulse and were recorded in the tibialis anterior muscle. The effect of the dose of anesthesia was assessed in a group of normal rats (n = 10). Rats with portocaval anastomosis exhibited a decrease in motor evoked potentials amplitude following surgery (67 +/- 11 to 41 +/- 16%, P < 0.001). Cirrhotic rats exhibited an increase in motor evoked potentials latency after the appearance of ascites (4.65 +/- 0.43 to 5.15 +/- 0.67 ms., P = 0.04). Increasing doses of propofol produced a decrease in the amplitude and an increase in the latency of motor evoked potentials. It is possible to reproduce functional abnormalities of the central motor tract in rats with portocaval anastomosis and carbon tetrachloride induced cirrhosis. The development of motor abnormalities in experimental models of minimal hepatic encephalopathy offers the possibility to investigate the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and test therapeutic strategies.

  13. [Study of the influence of Staphylococcus aureus on gastrointestinal tract microbiocenosis in rats].

    PubMed

    Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Bogdanova, E A; Vorob'ev, A A

    2006-01-01

    The authors studied the modifying effect of Staphylococcus aureus on the microbial composition of gastrointestinal tract microbiocenosis. The subjects were female rats in the condition of eubiosis or dysbiosis. The species and quantitative composition of the fecal microflora and the parietal mucin in different parts of the intestine were studied after an intragastral administration of St. aureus suspension. A single introduction of St. aureus into the gastrointestinal tract of rats led to the appearance of this microbe in the feces and parietal mucin in all the parts of the intestine regardless the initial condition of the intestinal microbiocenosis. The indigenous microflora, both in eubiotic and dysbiotic conditions, practically did not respond to an intragastral administration of staphylococcus, except a little decrease in the proportion of bifidobacteria. Meanwhile, there was a significant increase in the incidence of candid detection. The indigenous parietal microflora changed more substantially, which demonstrates a higher sensitivity of the parietal microbiocenosis to a short-time exposure to an exogenous microbial factor.

  14. Proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the rat and mouse respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Renne, Roger; Brix, Amy; Harkema, Jack; Herbert, Ron; Kittel, Birgit; Lewis, David; March, Thomas; Nagano, Kasuke; Pino, Michael; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Rosenbruch, Martin; Tellier, Pierre; Wohrmann, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    The INHAND Project (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP) and North America (STP) to develop an internationally-accepted nomenclature for proliferative and non-proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature for classifying microscopic lesions observed in the respiratory tract of laboratory rats and mice, with color photomicrographs illustrating examples of some lesions. The standardized nomenclature presented in this document is also available electronically on the internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous developmental and aging lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test materials. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature for respiratory tract lesions in laboratory animals will decrease confusion among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists.

  15. Encoding of forelimb forces by corticospinal tract activity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yi; Foulds, Richard A.; Adamovich, Sergei V.; Sahin, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    In search of a solution to the long standing problems encountered in traditional brain computer interfaces (BCI), the lateral descending tracts of the spinal cord present an alternative site for taping into the volitional motor signals. Due to the convergence of the cortical outputs into a final common pathway in the descending tracts of the spinal cord, neural interfaces with the spinal cord can potentially acquire signals richer with volitional information in a smaller anatomical region. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of extracting motor control signals from the corticospinal tract (CST) of the rat spinal cord. Flexible substrate, multi-electrode arrays (MEA) were implanted in the CST of rats trained for a lever pressing task. This novel use of flexible substrate MEAs allowed recording of CST activity in behaving animals for up to three weeks with the current implantation technique. Time-frequency and principal component analyses (PCA) were applied to the neural signals to reconstruct isometric forelimb forces. Computed regression coefficients were then used to predict isometric forces in additional trials. The correlation between measured and predicted forces in the vertical direction averaged across six animals was 0.67 and R2 value was 0.44. Force regression in the horizontal directions was less successful, possibly due to the small amplitude of forces. Neural signals above and near the high gamma band made the largest contributions to prediction of forces. The results of this study support the feasibility of a spinal cord computer interface (SCCI) for generation of command signals in paralyzed individuals. PMID:24847198

  16. Ghrelin induces fasted motor activity of the gastrointestinal tract in conscious fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Kazunori; Inui, Akio; Asakawa, Akihiro; Kihara, Naoki; Fujimura, Masaki; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2003-01-01

    Ghrelin is a newly discovered orexigenic peptide originating from the stomach. However, its action in regulating the fed and fasted motor activity of the digestive tract is not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intravenous (i.v.) injection of ghrelin on the physiological fed and fasted motor activities in the stomach and duodenum of freely moving conscious rats. i.c.v. and i.v. injection of ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in the duodenum in normal fed rats, while i.v. injection of ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in both the stomach and duodenum in vagotomized rats. The effects of i.c.v. and i.v. injected ghrelin were blocked by growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) antagonist given by the same route and also blocked by immunoneutralization of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the brain. The effects of i.v. injected ghrelin were not altered by i.c.v. injection of GHS-R antagonist in vagotomized rats. Injection of GHS-R antagonist blocked the fasted motor activity in both the stomach and duodenum in vagotomized rats but did not affect the fasted motor activity in normal rats. Low intragastric pH inhibited the effect of ghrelin. The present results indicate that ghrelin is involved in regulation of fasted motor activity in the stomach and duodenum. Peripheral ghrelin may induce the fasted motor activity by activating the NPY neurons in the brain, probably through ghrelin receptors on vagal afferent neurons. Once the brain mechanism is eliminated by truncal vagotomy, ghrelin might be primarily involved in the regulation of fasted motor activity through ghrelin receptors on the stomach and duodenum. The action of ghrelin to induce fasted motor activity is strongly affected by intragastric pH; low pH inhibits the action. PMID:12837928

  17. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves.

  18. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005–0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  19. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.; Gies, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m{sup {minus}3} uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans.

  20. Network Actions of Pentobarbital in the Rat Mesopontine Tegmentum on Sensory Inflow Through the Spinothalamic Tract

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Dhananjay R.; McErlane, Shelly A.; Taepavarapruk, Niwat; Soja, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    The recent discovery of a barbiturate-sensitive “general anesthesia switch” mechanism localized in the rat brain stem mesopontine tegmental anesthesia area (MPTA) has challenged the current view of the nonspecific actions of general anesthetic agents in the CNS. In this study we provide electrophysiological evidence that the antinociception, which accompanies the behavioral state resembling general anesthesia following pentobarbital (PB) microinjections into the MPTA of awake rats, could be accompanied by the attenuation of sensory transmission through the spinothalamic tract (STT). Following bilateral microinjections of PB into the MPTA spontaneous firing rate (SFR), antidromic firing index (FI), and sciatic (Sc) as well as sural (Su) nerve-evoked responses (ER) of identified lumbar STT neurons in the isoflurane-anesthetized rat were quantified using extracellular recording techniques. Microinjections of PB into the MPTA significantly suppressed the SFR (47%), magnitudes of Sc- (26%) and Su-ER (36%), and FI (41%) of STT neurons. Microinjections of PB-free vehicle control did not alter any of the above-cited electrophysiological parameters. The results from this study suggest that antinociception, which occurs during the anesthesia-like state following PB microinjections into the MPTA, may be due, in part, to (in)direct inhibition of STT neurons via switching mechanism(s) located in the MPTA. This study provides a provenance for investigating electrophysiologically the actions on STT neurons of other current agents used clinically to maintain the state of general anesthesia. PMID:19458144

  1. Sensory feedback from the urethra evokes state-dependent lower urinary tract reflexes in rat.

    PubMed

    Danziger, Zachary C; Grill, Warren M

    2017-08-15

    The lower urinary tract is regulated by reflexes responsible for maintaining continence and producing efficient voiding. It is unclear how sensory information from the bladder and urethra engages differential, state-dependent reflexes to either maintain continence or promote voiding. Using a new in vivo experimental approach, we quantified how sensory information from the bladder and urethra are integrated to switch reflex responses to urethral sensory feedback from maintaining continence to producing voiding. The results demonstrate how sensory information regulates state-dependent reflexes in the lower urinary tract and contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of urinary retention and incontinence where sensory feedback may engage these reflexes inappropriately. Lower urinary tract reflexes are mediated by peripheral afferents from the bladder (primarily in the pelvic nerve) and the urethra (in the pudendal and pelvic nerves) to maintain continence or initiate micturition. If fluid enters the urethra at low bladder volumes, reflexes relax the bladder and evoke external urethral sphincter (EUS) contraction (guarding reflex) to maintain continence. Conversely, urethral flow at high bladder volumes, excites the bladder (micturition reflex) and relaxes the EUS (augmenting reflex). We conducted measurements in a urethane-anaesthetized in vivo rat preparation to characterize systematically the reflexes evoked by fluid flow through the urethra. We used a novel preparation to manipulate sensory feedback from the bladder and urethra independently by controlling bladder volume and urethral flow. We found a distinct bladder volume threshold (74% of bladder capacity) above which flow-evoked bladder contractions were 252% larger and evoked phasic EUS activation 2.6 times as often as responses below threshold, clearly demonstrating a discrete transition between continence (guarding) and micturition (augmenting) reflexes. Below this threshold urethral flow evoked

  2. Electrophysiological Characteristics of the Rubrospinal Neurons in the Nucleus Ruber of the Cat (K Electrofisiologicheskoi Kharakteristike Rubro-Spinalnykh Neironov Krasnogo Yadra Koshki),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The presence of a reflex inhibition in the rubrospinal neurons has been determined by using subthreshold and strict threshold antidromic stimulation...In all tests, the minimum attenuation of the threshold stimulus for the axon of this neuron led to complete disappearance of the antidromic action...cord, according to which reflex inhibition decreases with a decrease in the duration of the subsequent hyperpolarization of an antidromically aroused

  3. Terahertz spectroscopic imaging and properties of gastrointestinal tract in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Young Bin; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jeong, Kiyoung; Choi, Yuna; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Lee, Sang Kil; Oh, Seung Jae; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated basic properties of normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues, including glandular stomach (GS), fore stomach (FS), large intestine (LI), small intestine (SI), and esophagus (ESO), from a rat model using terahertz (THz) reflection imaging and spectroscopy. The THz images collected from stratified squamous epithelia (SSE) of FS and ESO show a lower peak-to-peak value compared to those from columnar epithelia (CE) of GS, LI, or SI because the SSE contains less water than CE. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of FS were less than those of GS or LI, both having values similar to those of water. Additionally, we report internal reflection THz signals from ESO, although we were unable to determine the exact interface for this internal reflection.

  4. Comparative study of PrPc expression in rat, monkey, and cow gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Z; Bodegas, M E; Sesma, M P; Guembe, L

    2005-04-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) appears to be the main site of entry for the pathological isoform of prions (PrP(sc)). To understand how the PrP(sc) internalization process occurs, it is important to characterize the cell types that express normal prion protein (PrP(c)) along the GIT. To do so, we studied the distribution of PrP(c) in the rat, monkey, and cow GIT. Using Western blot analysis, we found that PrP(c) is expressed in all digestive regions of the three species. Immunoreactivity for PrP(c) was found throughout the GIT in epithelial cells sharing the neuroendocrine (NE) phenotype. Immunostained cells appeared scattered throughout the epithelium of fundic and pyloric glands as well as in intestinal villi and crypts.

  5. Lesioned corticospinal tract axons regenerate in myelin-free rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Savio, T.; Schwab, M.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS) of higher vertebrates lesioned axons seemed unable to regenerate and reach their former target regions due to influences of the CNS microenvironment. Evidence from in vitro and biochemical experiments has demonstrated the presence of inhibitory substrate components in CNS tissue, in particular in white matter. These CNS components, which strongly inhibit neurite growth, were identified as minor membrane proteins of defined molecular mass (35 and 250 kDa) in oligodendrocyte membranes and CNS myelin. Oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation can be prevented by x-irradiation of newborn rats. Here we show that in myelin-free spinal cords cortico-spinal tract fibers transected at 2 weeks of age show reelongation of many millimeters within 2-3 weeks after the lesion. In normally myelinated controls, regenerative sprouts grew less than 1.7 mm caudal to the lesion.

  6. Female's DHT controls sex differences in the rat bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Segovia, S; Calés, J M; Pérez Laso, C; Rodriquez Zafra, M; Guillamón, A; Valencia, A

    1992-04-01

    In the present study the regulatory action of the non-aromatic androgen dihydrotestoterone (DHT) on the volume of the sexually dimorphic bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) was investigated. Postnatal treatment with DHT (180 micrograms day-1) between days 6 and 20 (D6-D20) induced, in gonadally intact male rats, a drastic reduction in the overall volume to levels typical in control females. Conversely, the postnatal administration of the anti-androgen cyproterone acetate (CA) to the females from D6-D20 produced an increment in the BAOT volume not dissimilar to that found in control males. These findings reveal that sexual organization in this vomeronasal structure is dependent on the presence of DHT in females during postnatal development.

  7. Delayed intervention with transplants and neurotrophic factors supports recovery of forelimb function after cervical spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lynskey, James V; Sandhu, Faheem A; Sandhu, Faheen A; Dai, Hai-Ning; Dai, Hail-Ning; McAtee, Marietta; Slotkin, Jonathan R; Slotkin, Jon R; MacArthur, Linda; Bregman, Barbara S

    2006-05-01

    The adult central nervous system is capable of considerable anatomical reorganization and functional recovery after injury. Functional outcomes, however, vary greatly, depending upon size and location of injury, type and timing of intervention, and type of recovery and plasticity evaluated. The present study was undertaken to assess the recovery of skilled and unskilled forelimb function in adult rats after a C5/C6 spinal cord over-hemisection and delayed intervention with fetal spinal cord transplants and neurotrophins. Recovery of forelimb function was evaluated during both target reaching (a skilled behavior) and vertical exploration (an unskilled behavior). Anatomical tracing and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the growth of descending raphespinal, corticospinal, and rubrospinal fibers at the injury site, tracts that normally confer forelimb function. Delayed intervention with transplants and either brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) restored skilled left forelimb reaching to pre-injury levels. Animals showed recovery of normal reaching movements rather than compensation with abnormal movements. Transplants and NT-3 also improved right forelimb use during an unskilled vertical exploration, but not skilled right reaching. Intervention with fetal transplant tissue supported the growth of descending serotonergic, corticospinal, and rubrospinal fibers into the transplant at the lesion site. The addition of neurotrophins, however, did not significantly increase axonal growth at the lesion site. These studies suggest that the recovery of skilled and unskilled forelimb use is possible after a large cervical spinal cord injury following delayed intervention with fetal spinal cord and neurotrophins. Plasticity of both spared and axotomized descending pathways likely contributes to the functional recovery observed.

  8. Cellular prion protein is expressed in a subset of neuroendocrine cells of the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Zuberoa; Pffeifer, Kristine; Bodegas, María E; Sesma, María P; Guembe, Laura

    2004-10-01

    Prion diseases are believed to develop from the conformational change of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) to a pathogenic isoform (PrPsc). PrPc is present in both the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues, although protein concentration is significantly lower in non-neuronal tissues. PrPc expression is essential for internalization and replication of the infectious agent. Several works have pointed to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as the principal site of entry of PrPsc, but how passage through the GI mucosa occurs is not yet known. Here we studied PrPc expression using Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry in rat GI tract. PrPc mRNA and protein were detected in corpus, antrum, duodenum, and colon. Immunoreactivity was found in scattered cells of the GI epithelium. With double immunofluorescence, these cells have been identified as neuroendocrine cells. PrPc immunostaining was found in subsets of histamine, somatostatin (Som), ghrelin, gastrin (G), and serotonin (5HT) cells in stomach. In small and large bowel, PrPc cells co-localized with subpopulations of 5HT-, Som-, G-, and peptide YY-immunolabeled cells. Our results provide evidence for a possible and important role of endocrine cells in the internalization of PrPsc from gut lumen. Copyright The Histochemical Society, Inc.

  9. Effects of coprophagy on serum urea and the weight of the gastrointestinal tract of fed or fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Levine, S; Saltzman, A

    1999-07-01

    Coprophagy can be minimized by fitting rat cages with metal grids which allow faecal pellets to pass through to the floor of the cage. When bedding was omitted overnight, the extent of coprophagy could be estimated from the weight of the droppings on the cage floor or the weight of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract removed from rats housed with or without grids. The effect of coprophagy was also demonstrated by the elevation of serum urea nitrogen in rats that consumed faeces. Therefore, precautions against coprophagy, or their absence, should be specified in all experimental protocols and reports.

  10. Effects of dehulled adlay on the culture count of some microbiota and their metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract of rats.

    PubMed

    Chiang, W; Cheng, C y; Chiang, M t; Chung, K T

    2000-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effect of a dietary supplement of dehulled adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) on the culture counts of some important groups of intestinal bacteria and their metabolism in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were divided into four groups, and each group was fed a diet containing different levels of dehulled adlay for 30 days as follows: 0% (control), 5%, 20%, and 40%. All animals fed with adlay had normal healthy intestinal walls and no pathogenic signs whatsoever. There were no significant differences in body weight gain or the cecal pH between different groups of rats. Both the 20% and 40% groups had lower culture counts of enterics in their feces than the 5% and control groups, whereas the culture counts of fecal lactic acid bacteria were higher in feces of rats fed with adlay than in the control group. Cecal total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) content and fecal SCFA were significantly higher in the 20% and 40% groups than in the control and 5% groups. All the adlay-fed rats had a higher fecal butyric acid concentration than the control rats. It is concluded that adlay has a significant influence on the growth of intestinal bacteria, which may ultimately affect the physiology and other functions of GI tracts of rats.

  11. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Jason B; Martin, John H

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal system-with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST) - is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout, and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that 10 days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay.

  12. Different effects of running wheel exercise and skilled reaching training on corticofugal tract plasticity in hypertensive rats with cortical infarctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, ChanJuan; Zou, Yan; Li, Kui; Li, Chao; Jiang, YingPing; Sun, Ju; Sun, Ruifang; Wen, HongMei

    2017-09-04

    The approaches that facilitate white matter plasticity may prompt functional recovery after a stroke. The effects of different exercise methods on motor recovery in stroke rats have been investigated. However, it is not clear whether their effects on axonal plasticity different. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the forced running wheel exercise (RWE) and skilled reaching training (SRT) on axonal plasticity and motor recovery. Cortical infarctions were generated in stroke-prone renovascular hypertensive rats. The rats were randomly divided into the following three groups: the control (Con) group, the RWE group, and the SRT group. A sham group was also included. The mNSS and forelimb grip strength tests were performed on days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 after ischemia. The anterograde tract tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was injected into the rats to trace the axonal plasticity of the contralesional corticofugal tracts. Compared with the Con group, the mNSS scores in the SRT and RWE groups decreased on day 28 (P<0.05) and on days 35 and 42 (P<0.01). The grip strength in the SRT group increased relative to that in the RWE group at 42day post-ischemia (P<0.01). Both the RWE and SRT groups exhibited enhanced plasticity of the contralesional corticofugal tract axons at the level of the red nucleus (P<0.01) and the cervical enlargement (P<0.01). More contralateral corticorubral tract remodeling was observed at the red nucleus level in the SRT group than in the RWE group (P<0.001). Taken together, these results suggest that SRT may enhance axon plasticity in the corticorubral tract more effectively than the forced RWE and is associated with better motor recovery after cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Effect of orchiectomy and testosterone replacement on lower urinary tract function in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Li; de Groat, William C

    2016-11-01

    Lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms (LUTS), including frequency, urgency, incomplete voiding, and slow stream, are common in both men and women with advancing age. The most common cause for LUTS in aging men is benign prostatic hyperplasia. Some studies have also revealed an inverse association of serum testosterone levels with LUTS; however, the underlying mechanisms by which gonadal hormones affect the LUT have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined the effect of orchiectomy and testosterone replacement on LUT function in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Six weeks after bilateral orchiectomy or sham operations and 3 wk after injection of long-acting testosterone undecanoate (100 mg/kg im), transvesical cystometry and external urethral sphincter electromyogram (EUS EMG) recordings were performed under urethane anesthesia. The micturition reflex was elicited in both sham and orchiectomized animals. In orchiectomized rats, volume threshold for inducing micturition decreased by 47.6%; however, contraction amplitude, duration, and voiding efficiency were similar in sham and orchiectomized rats. The active period during EUS EMG bursting was lengthened during micturition in orchiectomized animals. Testosterone treatment, which normalized plasma testosterone levels, reversed these changes but also increased the duration of EUS EMG bursting. Orchiectomy also reduced mean voiding flow rate estimated from the duration of EUS EMG bursting, an effect that was not reversed by testosterone. The results indicate that orchiectomy affects both the active and passive properties of the bladder and urethra, and that many, but not all, of the changes can be reversed by testosterone. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity identifies neuronal integrity in damaged rat central nervous system after application of bacterial melanin

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Tigran R.; Ter-Markosyan, Anna S.; Hovsepyan, Anna S.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to confirm the neuroregenerative effects of bacterial melanin (BM) on central nervous system injury using a special staining method based on the detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to undergo either unilateral destruction of sensorimotor cortex (group I; n = 12) or unilateral rubrospinal tract transection at the cervical level (C3–4) (group II; n = 12). In each group, six rats were randomly selected after surgery to undergo intramuscular injection of BM solution (BM subgroup) and the remaining six rats were intramuscularly injected with saline (saline subgroup). Neurological testing confirmed that BM accelerated the recovery of motor function in rats from both BM and saline subgroups. Two months after surgery, Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity detection in combination with Chilingarian’s calcium adenoside triphosphate method revealed that BM stimulated the sprouting of fibers and dilated the capillaries in the brain and spinal cord. These results suggest that BM can promote the recovery of motor function of rats with central nervous system injury; and detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity is a fast and easy method used to study the regeneration-promoting effects of BM on the injured central nervous system. PMID:27630700

  15. Prenatal testosterone exposure permanently masculinizes anogenital distance, nipple development, and reproductive tract morphology in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Andrew K; Lambright, Christy S; Ostby, Joseph S; Parks-Saldutti, Louise; Vandenbergh, John G; Gray, Leon E

    2007-04-01

    In mammals, abnormal increases in fetal androgens disrupt normal development of the female phenotype. Due to the recent concern regarding environmental androgen-active chemicals, there is a need to identify sources of fetal androgen variation and sensitive developmental markers for androgenic activity in female rats. Anogenital distances (AGD), nipple retention, reproductive tract, and external genitalia are morphological parameters organized by prenatal androgens and are predictive of altered masculinized/defeminized phenotype in adult female mice and rats. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the natural prenatal androgen environment of rats including the magnitude of the intrauterine position (IUP) effect, (2) characterize the permanent effects of prenatal androgen exposure on female rats, and (3) determine the ability of AGD and areolas to predict these permanent androgenic alterations in female rats. Untreated male fetal rats had higher tissue testosterone (T) concentrations than females in the amniotic fluid, reproductive tract, gonad, and fetal body. The intrauterine position (IUP) of male and female fetuses did not affect T concentrations or AGD in male or female rats at gestational day (GD) 22. Female offspring exposed to 0, 1.5, and 2.5 mg/kg/day testosterone propionate (TP) on GDs 14-18 displayed increased AGD at postnatal day (PND) 2 and decreased nipples at PND 13 and as adults. TP-induced changes in neonatal AGD and infant areola number were reliable indicators of permanently altered adult phenotype in female rats. Further, females in the two high-dose groups displayed increased incidences of external genital malformations and the presence of prostatic tissue, not normally found in female rats.

  16. Delayed evacuatory function due to specific smooth muscle reactivity in the gastrointestinal tracts of tacrine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Krustev, A; Sirakov, V; Turiiski, V; Getova, D; Velkova, K; Prissadova, N

    2008-01-01

    Most of the side effects induced by tacrine are associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of the study was to analyze the nature of radiographically registered, tacrine-induced changes in evacuatory function, as well as to find a possible correlation with the immediate in vitro action of the drug on smooth muscles from the GI tracts of rats. The tacrine dose we used reliably delayed GI passage: contrast matter was not fully evacuated, predominantly from the stomach and cecum. The delay resulted from changes in tone and peristaltic activity, specific for the various regions of the tract. These changes were associated with a superposing of the responses due to the anticholinesterase and noncholinergic action of tacrine.

  17. Expression of PPAR, RXR isoforms and fatty acid transporting proteins in the rat and human gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Herrera-Ruiz, D; Mathis, A S; Cook, T J; Bhardwaj, R K; Knipp, G T

    2005-02-01

    Dietary fatty acid (FA) absorption across the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is of critical importance for sustenance, however, excessive FA absorption has also been linked to metabolic syndrome and associated disorders. The expression of isoforms that regulate the dietary FA absorption are not as well characterized in the GI tract as they are elsewhere. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARalpha, beta, and gamma) and 9-cis-retinoic acid receptors (RXRalpha, beta, and gamma) are nuclear hormone transcription factors that control FA homeostasis, in part through the regulation of expression of membrane-bound FA transporting proteins. The present study was designed to elucidate the expression of PPAR and RXR isoforms and FA transporting proteins (FABPpm and FAT/CD36) in the rat and human GI tracts using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical staining. The results revealed rat GI expression of all the PPAR and RXR isoforms, FABPpm and FAT/CD36. PPARalpha, PPARbeta, PPARgamma, RXRalpha, FABPpm, and FAT/CD36 isoforms exhibited ubiquitous expression in human GI tract, whereas RXRbeta was not detected. RXRgamma was observed in a majority of the human GI samples. These results provide a physiological foundation for rational drug design and drug delivery for the mitigation of metabolic syndrome and associated disorders to normalize intestinal FA absorption. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Aerosol deposition in the respiratory tract of the rat. Experimental results and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Halík, J; Lenger, V; Kliment, V; Voboril, P

    1980-01-01

    The deposition fraction in the respiratory tract of rats were determined experimentally using aerosol 85Srl2 in saline. The dimensions of the particles [MMD 1.63 /+- /+- 0.47 micron, Sg = 1.29] were measured by two independent methods. Rats weighing 200 g were exposed for a period of 60 min [t] in the inhalation apparatus PIANO 3 with a generator according to Lauterbach. From the volume activity [A] of 3 - 11 Bq/litre air a depot of 35-129 kBq was formed in the animals. Spirometric values measured with a modified Jäger ergospirometer were: V = 178.8 /+- 42.9 ml, VT = = 1.18 /+- 0.24 ml. f = 163.1 /+- 28.1 cycles/min. The total amount inhaled [Q] was calculated [Q = V.A.t], the deposited amount [D] was measured by a whole body counter. THe mean deposition fraction was 0.570 /+- 0.052 and was not related either to exposure time or to aerosol activity. In view of the broad validity of the conclusions for aerosols of round-shaped particles, the mean deposition fraction was determined with the help of a mathematical model according to Landahl. The theoretical values amounted to 0.609 [from 0.522 to 0.686]. The good agreement between the mean deposition fractions estimated by two independent methods indicates that on the basis of the probability theory and dimensional analysis, the mathematical model can also be used in humans for simulation deposition as one of the basis foundations for a quantitative evaluation of inhalation risk from any kind of aerosol.

  19. Proteus vulgaris urinary tract infections in rats; treatment with nitrofuran derivatives.

    PubMed

    HOSSACK, D J

    1962-10-01

    Ascending urinary tract infections with stone formation have been produced experimentally in rats, using a modification of the method of Vermuelen & Goetz (1954a, b). A zinc disc infected with a culture of Proteus vulgaris was inserted into the bladder by suprapubic cystotomy under ether anaesthesia. The pH of the urine rises from 6.9 to 8 or 9 and calculi develop in the bladder within a few days of infection. The bladder and ureters become swollen, distended and inflamed, and renal abscesses develop. Death from renal failure generally occurs within 10 days of infection. Oral treatment with nitrofurantoin was commenced three days after infection and continued for one month. This arrested the initial rise in urine alkalinity and stone formation, and few, if any, macroscopic lesions were found at post-mortem examination. Of nine nitrofuran derivatives examined for activity against this infection several showed slight activity, but only one, N-(5-Nitrofurfurylidene)-gamma-butyric acid, was as active as nitrofurantoin when given at four times the dose, but it was also one-third as toxic. It is concluded that this technique is suitable for the examination of potential urinary antiseptics.

  20. Promotion of the Toxic Action of Cyclophosphamide by Digestive Tract Luminal Ammonia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ivnitsky, Jury Ju.; Schäfer, Timur V.; Rejniuk, Vladimir L.

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the influence of the digestive tract luminal ammonia pool on acute toxic effects of cyclophosphamide, the dynamics of blood ammonia, glutamine and urea level, symptoms of toxic action and the survival time have been studied in rats, intraperitoneally treated with cyclophosphamide, at the background of the gavage with non-lethal dose of ammonium acetate (12 mmol/kg, i.e., 0.35 LD50). Ammonium acetate enhanced the hyperammonaemic action of cyclophosphamide while promoting its lethal action: the mean survival time decreased 1.5, 2.1, 2.8, or 6.1 times at the background of cyclophosphamide i/p doses 200, 600, 1000, or 1400 mg/kg, respectively. Animals exposed to the combination of toxicants, manifested symptoms which were characteristic of the effect of lethal doses of ammonia salts. These data provide the evidence of the detrimental role of gastrointestinal luminal ammonia in the acute high-dose cyclophosphamide toxicity. PMID:23724282

  1. Application of computational fluid dynamics to regional dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kimbell, J.S.; Gross, E.A.; Joyner, D.R.; Godo, M.N.; Morgan, K.T. )

    1993-08-01

    For certain inhaled air pollutants, such as reactive, water soluble gases, the distribution of nasal lesions observed in F344 rats may be closely related to regional gas uptake patterns in the nose. These uptake patterns can be influenced by the currents of air flowing through the upper respiratory tract during the breathing cycle. Since data on respiratory tract lesions in F344 rats are extrapolated to humans to make predictions of risk to human health, a better understanding of the factors affecting these responses is needed. To assess potential effects of nasal airflow on lesion location and severity, a methodology was developed for creation of computer simulations of steady-state airflow and gas transport using a three-dimensional finite element grid reconstructed from serial step-sections of the nasal passages of a male F344 rat. Simulations on a supercomputer used the computational fluid dynamics package FIDAP (FDI, Evanston, IL). Distinct streams of bulk flow evident in the simulations matched inspiratory streams reported for the F344 rat. Moreover, simulated regional flow velocities matched measured velocities in concurrent laboratory experiments with a hollow nasal mold. Computer-predicted flows were used in simulations of gas transport to nasal passage walls, with formaldehyde as a test case. Results from the uptake simulations were compared with the reported distribution of formaldehyde-induced nasal lesions observed in the F344 rat, and indicated that airflow-driven uptake patterns probably play an important role in determining the location of certain nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde. This work demonstrated the feasibility of applying computational fluid dynamics to airflow-driven dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract.

  2. Identification in rats of a programming window for reproductive tract masculinization, disruption of which leads to hypospadias and cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michelle; Saunders, Philippa T K; Fisken, Mark; Scott, Hayley M; Hutchison, Gary R; Smith, Lee B; Sharpe, Richard M

    2008-04-01

    Becoming a phenotypic male is ultimately determined by androgen-induced masculinization. Disorders of fetal masculinization, resulting in hypospadias or cryptorchidism, are common, but their cause remains unclear. Together with the adult-onset disorders low sperm count and testicular cancer, they can constitute a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Although masculinization is well studied, no unifying concept explains normal male reproductive development and its abnormalities, including TDS. We exposed rat fetuses to either anti-androgens or androgens and showed that masculinization of all reproductive tract tissues was programmed by androgen action during a common fetal programming window. This preceded morphological differentiation, when androgen action was, surprisingly, unnecessary. Only within the programming window did blocking androgen action induce hypospadias and cryptorchidism and altered penile length in male rats, all of which correlated with anogenital distance (AGD). Androgen-driven masculinization of females was also confined to the same programming window. This work has identified in rats a common programming window in which androgen action is essential for normal reproductive tract masculinization and has highlighted that measuring AGD in neonatal humans could provide a noninvasive method to predict neonatal and adult reproductive disorders. Based on the timings in rats, we believe the programming window in humans is likely to be 8-14 weeks of gestation.

  3. Maternal behavior induced in male rats by bilateral lesions of the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, M A; Collado, P; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A; del Cerro, M C

    1992-10-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of bilateral electrolytic lesions of the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) in male Wistar rats that did not have care-pups experience, using a test of induced maternal behavior. Consistent with our previous findings in virgin female rats (10), there was a significantly shorter sensitization (3 days) and retrieval (2 days) latencies in the BAOT-lesioned group than in the sham-lesioned and intact-control male groups (12 days for both). Based on these findings, we propose that BAOT, a sexually dimorphic nucleus of the vomeronasal system, exerts an inhibitory modulation in the expression of parental behavior in male and female virgin rats. It may do so by maintaining an olfactory-based tonic inhibition of maternal behavior, thereby resulting in the adults' tonic avoidance of the pups until this inhibition is abolished by lesion, or reduced or overridden by appropriate hormonal and/or sensory influences.

  4. Rat brain digital stereotaxic white matter atlas with fine tract delineation in Paxinos space and its automated applications in DTI data analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shengxiang; Wu, Shang; Huang, Qi; Duan, Shaofeng; Liu, Hua; Li, Yuxiao; Zhao, Shujun; Nie, Binbin; Shan, Baoci

    2017-11-01

    To automatically analyze diffusion tensor images of the rat brain via both voxel-based and ROI-based approaches, we constructed a new white matter atlas of the rat brain with fine tracts delineation in the Paxinos and Watson space. Unlike in previous studies, we constructed a digital atlas image from the latest edition of the Paxinos and Watson. This atlas contains 111 carefully delineated white matter fibers. A white matter network of rat brain based on anatomy was constructed by locating the intersection of all these tracts and recording the nuclei on the pathway of each white matter tract. Moreover, a compatible rat brain template from DTI images was created and standardized into the atlas space. To evaluate the automated application of the atlas in DTI data analysis, a group of rats with right-side middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and those without were enrolled in this study. The voxel-based analysis result shows that the brain region showing significant declines in signal in the MCAO rats was consistent with the occlusion position. We constructed a stereotaxic white matter atlas of the rat brain with fine tract delineation and a compatible template for the data analysis of DTI images of the rat brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Close relationship between the frequency of 22-kHz calls and vocal tract length in male rats.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2012-05-15

    It is known that the size of the components of the sound production apparatus in mammals may affect the acoustic structure of vocalizations. Therefore, some acoustic variables such as voice frequency may change with age in association with body size and body weight increases. However, whether this relationship also applies to ultrasonic vocalizations emitted by laboratory rats has not been investigated. Thus, in the present study, we first recorded changes in three acoustic variables (mean frequency, duration, and bandwidth) of air puff-induced 22-kHz calls in male rats during their growth period and assessed the relationship between these changes and body weight gain (Experiment 1). Then we directly recorded several body size measures including components of the sound production apparatus in 6- and 12-week-old male rats and examined the correlation between these values and the acoustic variables of 22-kHz calls (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, the mean frequency of 22-kHz calls in male rats during the growth period showed negative correlations with body weight gain, while the duration of 22-kHz calls showed positive correlations. In Experiment 2, only a close negative correlation between the mean frequency of 22-kHz calls and vocal tract length in male rats was found. These results suggest that the age-related decrease in the mean frequency of 22-kHz calls may be ascribed to anatomical elongation of the vocal tract length in association with the growth of male rats. These acoustic differences could inform the receivers about the age of the signaler. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinically Relevant Levels of 4-Aminopyridine Strengthen Physiological Responses in Intact Motor Circuits in Rats, Especially After Pyramidal Tract Injury.

    PubMed

    Sindhurakar, Anil; Mishra, Asht M; Gupta, Disha; Iaci, Jennifer F; Parry, Tom J; Carmel, Jason B

    2017-04-01

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) is a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug to improve motor function in people with multiple sclerosis. Preliminary results suggest the drug may act on intact neural circuits and not just on demyelinated ones. To determine if 4-AP at clinically relevant levels alters the excitability of intact motor circuits. In anesthetized rats, electrodes were placed over motor cortex and the dorsal cervical spinal cord for electrical stimulation, and electromyogram electrodes were inserted into biceps muscle to measure responses. The motor responses to brain and spinal cord stimulation were measured before and for 5 hours after 4-AP administration both in uninjured rats and rats with a cut lesion of the pyramidal tract. Blood was collected at the same time as electrophysiology to determine drug plasma concentration with a goal of 20 to 100 ng/mL. We first determined that a bolus infusion of 0.32 mg/kg 4-AP was optimal: it produced on average 61.5 ± 1.8 ng/mL over the 5 hours after infusion. This dose of 4-AP increased responses to spinal cord stimulation by 1.3-fold in uninjured rats and 3-fold in rats with pyramidal tract lesion. Responses to cortical stimulation also increased by 2-fold in uninjured rats and up to 4-fold in the injured. Clinically relevant levels of 4-AP strongly augment physiological responses in intact circuits, an effect that was more robust after partial injury, demonstrating its broad potential in treating central nervous system injuries.

  7. Aquaporin-6 is expressed along the rat gastrointestinal tract and upregulated by feeding in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Laforenza, Umberto; Gastaldi, Giulia; Polimeni, Mariarosa; Tritto, Simona; Tosco, Marisa; Ventura, Ulderico; Scaffino, Manuela F; Yasui, Masato

    2009-01-01

    Background Several aquaporins (a family of integral membrane proteins) have been recently identified in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and their involvement in the movement of fluid and small solutes has been suggested. In this direction we investigated, in some regions of the rat gastrointestinal tract, the presence and localization of aquaporin-6, given its peculiar function as an ion selective channel. Results RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments showed that aquaporin-6 was expressed in all the investigated portions of the rat gastrointestinal tract. The RT-PCR experiments showed that aquaporin-6 transcript was highly expressed in small intestine and rectum, and less in stomach, caecum and colon. In addition, jejunal mRNA expression was specifically stimulated by feeding. Immunoblotting analysis showed a major band with a molecular weight of about 55 kDa corresponding to the aquaporin-6 protein dimer; this band was stronger in the stomach and large intestine than in the small intestine. Immunoblotting analysis of brush border membrane vesicle preparations showed an intense signal for aquaporin-6 protein. The results of in situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that aquaporin-6 transcript is present in the isthmus, neck and basal regions of the stomach lining, and throughout the crypt-villus axis in both small and large intestine. In the latter regions, immunohistochemistry revealed strong aquaporin-6 labelling in the apical membrane of the surface epithelial cells, while weak or no labelling was observed in the crypt cells. In the stomach, an intense staining was observed in mucous neck cells and lower signal in principal cells and some parietal cells. Conclusion The results indicate that aquaporin-6 is distributed throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Aquaporin-6 localization at the apical pole of the superficial epithelial cells and its upregulation by feeding suggest that it may be involved in movements of water and anions through the epithelium

  8. Complete and Partial Lesions of the Pyramidal Tract in the Rat Affect Qualitative Measures of Skilled Movements: Impairment in Fixations as a Model for Clumsy Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Whishaw, Ian Q.; Piecharka, Dionne M.; Drever, Felicia R.

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about prenatal and perinatal brain injury resulting in subsequent clumsy behavior in children. One candidate motor system is the pyramidal tract. The tract traverses the entire central nervous system and, through direct and indirect connections to the brainstem and spinal cord sensory and motor nuclei, is involved in the learning and execution of skilled movements. Here, rats, either naive or pretrained on a number of motor tasks, were assessed for acute and chronic impairments following complete or incomplete pyramidal tract lesions. Postsurgery rats with complete lesions were impaired on the qualitative measures of limb aiming, supination, and posture. Impaired movements require fixations, complementary movements in different body segments. The impairment in fixations was manifest acutely and underwent no improvement with subsequent training/testing. The finding that complete and partial pyramidal tract lesions produce chronic impairment in fixations provides insight for understanding clumsy behavior in humans and its potential remediation via specific training in making fixations. PMID:14640310

  9. Respiratory tract changes in guinea pigs, rats, and mice following a single six-hour exposure to methyl isocyanate vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, E.H.; Dodd, D.E.

    1987-06-01

    Groups of male and female Fischer 344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Hartley guinea pigs were exposed once for 6 hr to mean concentrations of 10.5, 5.4, 2.4, 1.0, or 0 (control) ppm of methyl isocyanate (MIC) vapor. Rats and mice were also exposed to 20.4 ppm of MIC. The majority of deaths occurred during postexposure days 1 through 3. The 6-hr LC/sub 50/ values were 6.1 ppm for rats, 12.2 ppm for mice, and 5.4 ppm for guinea pigs. Notable clinical observations during and immediately following MIC exposure were lacrimation, perinasal/perioral wetness, respiratory difficulty (e.g., mouth breathing), decreased activity, ataxia, and hypothermia. Body weight losses were common in all species following MIC exposures of 2.4 ppm or greater. Microscopic lesions included acute necrosis of the epithelial lining throughout the respiratory tract in animals that died shortly after exposure, coupled with congestion, edema, and inflammation. A microscopic lesion that appeared unique to guinea pigs was bronchiolitis obliterans. Additional microscopic lesions observed in some animals that died or were sacrificed at the end of the study (postexposure day 14) consisted of squamous metaplasia of respiratory epithelium in the nasal cavity, which extended into the larynx, trachea, and in some cases, the bronchi. In addition, epithelial regeneration throughout the tract and submucosal fibroplasia in the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles were observed, the latter lesion being primarily confined to rodents. Only in guinea pigs were there lesions in the 1.0 ppm group attributed to MIC exposure. In conclusion, guinea pigs were more sensitive to the MIC vapor than were rats, which were in turn more sensitive than mice.

  10. Histoplanimetrical study on the spatial relationship of distribution of indigenous bacteria with mucosal lymphatic follicles in alimentary tract of rat.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenkichi; Qi, Wang-Mei; Yokoo, Yuh; Miyata, Hidenori; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Kawano, Junichi; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2009-05-01

    The spatial relationship between the distribution of indigenous bacteria (IB) and the situation of mucosal lymphatic follicles (LF) is histoplanimetrically studied in the rat alimentary tract. From the oral cavity to the nonglandular part of the stomach, IB adhered to the corneal layer of the most luminal mucosa. In the glandular part of the stomach, IB adhered only to the most luminal mucosa but not in the gastric pits. In the small intestine, IB consistently adhered around the apices of both intestinal villi and the domes, and their amounts decreased toward their basal portions. No IB entered the intestinal crypts. In the large intestine, IB consistently adhered to the most luminal mucosa. Numerous IB were suspended in the intestinal crypts of both the cecum and the proximal colon, whereas there were no IB in the crypts of the distal colon and the rectum. When IB spread over the basal portions of the intestinal villi, IB with the same morphology were detected on the neighboring LF, whereas no bacteria were detected on the neighboring LF, when IB were located in the apical to middle portions of the intestinal villi. This close relationship between the distribution of IB and mucosal LF was also observed in the large intestine. These results suggest that the most luminal mucosae are a fundamental settlement site of IB throughout the alimentary tract and that the hyperproliferation of IB's colonies might be detected by neighboring LF in the rat intestine.

  11. Examination of the stability of hydrophobic (CdSe)ZnS quantum dots in the digestive tract of rats.

    PubMed

    Karabanovas, Vitalijus; Zakarevicius, Eugenijus; Sukackaite, Angele; Streckyte, Giedre; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2008-06-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots show promise as alternatives to organic dyes for biological labelling because of their bright and stable photoluminescence. The typical quantum dots is CdSe because colloidal synthesis for nanocrystals of this semiconductor is well established. CdSe is usually passivated with zinc sulfide. While the cytotoxicity of bulk CdSe is well documented, questions about (CdSe)ZnS potential toxicity and behaviour in vivo remain unanswered. The distribution and stability of (CdSe)ZnS quantum dots in Wistar line rats' digestive tract were investigated. Hydrophobic quantum dots were mixed with fat or sonificated in water and administered orally. The distribution and stability of quantum dots moving through the digestive system of rats was followed by fluorescence spectroscopy. In both ways prepared quantum dots were degraded in the digestive tract of animals. Quantum dots mixed with fat were more stable and degraded more slowly than quantum dots sonificated in water. The data obtained suggest possible toxicity of (CdSe)ZnS quantum dots due to the liberation of Cd(2+).

  12. COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF AIRFLOWS AND VAPOR DOSIMETY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACTS OF RAT, MONKEY, AND HUMAN

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb W.; Pipavath, Sudhaker; Cox, Timothy C.; Wallis, Chris; Larson, Richard; Fanucchi, M.; Postlewait, Ed; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-07-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. Historically, these models were limited to discrete regions of the respiratory system. CFD/PBPK models have now been developed for the rat, monkey, and human that encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A PBPK model previously developed to describe acrolein uptake in nasal tissues was adapted to the extended airway models as an example application. Model parameters for each anatomic region were obtained from the literature, measured directly, or estimated from published data. Airflow and site-specific acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steadystate inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasalonly simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was dependent upon airflow rates and acrolein concentrations with nasal extraction efficiencies predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, then the human. For human oral-breathing simulations, acrolein uptake rates in oropharyngeal and laryngeal tissues were comparable to nasal tissues following nasal breathing under the same exposure conditions. For both breathing modes, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheo-bronchial tissues of humans than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing dosimetry across a significantly more extensive range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  13. Sensorimotor Processing in the Newborn Rat Red Nucleus during Active Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio-Bermudez, Carlos; Sokoloff, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Sensory feedback from sleep-related myoclonic twitches is thought to drive activity-dependent development in spinal cord and brain. However, little is known about the neural pathways involved in the generation of twitches early in development. The red nucleus (RN), source of the rubrospinal tract, has been implicated in the production of phasic motor activity during active sleep in adults. Here we hypothesized that the RN is also a major source of motor output for twitching in early infancy, a period when twitching is an especially abundant motor behavior. We recorded extracellular neural activity in the RN during sleep and wakefulness in 1-week-old unanesthetized rats. Neurons in the RN fired phasically before twitching and wake movements of the contralateral forelimb. A subpopulation of neurons in the RN exhibited a significant peak of activity after forelimb movement onset, suggesting reafferent sensory processing. Consistent with this observation, manual stimulation of the forelimb evoked RN responses. Unilateral inactivation of the RN using a mixture comprising GABAA, GABAB, and glycine receptor agonists caused an immediate and temporary increase in motor activity followed by a marked and prolonged decrease in twitching and wake movements. Altogether, these data support a causal role for the RN in infant motor behavior. Furthermore, they indicate that twitching, which is characterized by discrete motor output and reafferent input, provides an opportunity for sensorimotor integration and activity-dependent development of topography within the newborn RN. PMID:26019345

  14. Sensorimotor processing in the newborn rat red nucleus during active sleep.

    PubMed

    Del Rio-Bermudez, Carlos; Sokoloff, Greta; Blumberg, Mark S

    2015-05-27

    Sensory feedback from sleep-related myoclonic twitches is thought to drive activity-dependent development in spinal cord and brain. However, little is known about the neural pathways involved in the generation of twitches early in development. The red nucleus (RN), source of the rubrospinal tract, has been implicated in the production of phasic motor activity during active sleep in adults. Here we hypothesized that the RN is also a major source of motor output for twitching in early infancy, a period when twitching is an especially abundant motor behavior. We recorded extracellular neural activity in the RN during sleep and wakefulness in 1-week-old unanesthetized rats. Neurons in the RN fired phasically before twitching and wake movements of the contralateral forelimb. A subpopulation of neurons in the RN exhibited a significant peak of activity after forelimb movement onset, suggesting reafferent sensory processing. Consistent with this observation, manual stimulation of the forelimb evoked RN responses. Unilateral inactivation of the RN using a mixture comprising GABAA, GABAB, and glycine receptor agonists caused an immediate and temporary increase in motor activity followed by a marked and prolonged decrease in twitching and wake movements. Altogether, these data support a causal role for the RN in infant motor behavior. Furthermore, they indicate that twitching, which is characterized by discrete motor output and reafferent input, provides an opportunity for sensorimotor integration and activity-dependent development of topography within the newborn RN.

  15. Systematic analysis of axonal damage and inflammatory response in different white matter tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Leal, W; Corkill, D J; Picanço-Diniz, C W

    2005-12-20

    The mechanisms of white matter (WM) damage during secondary degeneration are a fundamental issue in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Our main goal was to describe the pattern of an acute inflammatory response and secondary damage to axons in different WM tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord. Adult rats were deeply anesthetized and injected with 20 nmol of NMDA into the spinal cord ventral horn on T7. Animals were perfused after survival times of 1 day, 3 days and 7 days. Ten micrometer sections were submitted to immunocytochemical analysis for activated macrophages/microglia, neutrophils and damaged axons. There were inflammatory response and progressive tissue destruction of ventral WM (VWM) with formation of microcysts in both VWM and lateral WM (LWM). In the VWM, the number of beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) end-bulbs increased from 1 day with a peak at 3 days, decreasing by 7 days following the injection. APP end-bulbs were present in the dorsal WM (DWM) at 3 days survival time but were not in the LWM. Electron microscopic analysis revealed different degrees of myelin disruption and axonal pathology in the vacuolated WM up to 14 mm along the rostrocaudal axis. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant loss of medium and large axons (P < 0.05), but not of small axons (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that bystander axonal damage and myelin vacuolation are important secondary component of the pathology of WM tracts following rat SCI. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these pathological events.

  16. Pro-resolution, protective and anti-nociceptive effects of a cannabis extract in the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wallace, J L; Flannigan, K L; McKnight, W; Wang, L; Ferraz, J G P; Tuitt, D

    2013-04-01

    Cannabis is widely used for treating a number of gastrointestinal ailments, but its use is associated with several adverse effects, particularly when the route of administration is via smoking. In the present study, we tested the effects (in rats) of a simple extract of medicinal cannabis (called "MFF") for its ability to promote resolution of colitis, to prevent gastric damage induced by naproxen, and to reduce gastric distention-induced visceral pain. Intracolonic, but not oral administration of MFF dose-dependently reduced the severity of hapten-induced colitis, an effect not reduced by pretreatment with antagonists of CB1 or CB2 receptors. Significant improvement of symptoms (diarrhea, weight loss) and healing of ulcerated tissue was evident with MFF treatment at doses that did not produce detectable urinary levels of 9-Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). MFF increased colonic hydrogen sulfide synthesis in healthy rats, but not in rats with colitis, and had no effect on colonic prostaglandin E2 synthesis. Orally, but not systemically administered MFF dose-dependently reduced the severity of naproxen-induced gastric damage, and a CB1 antagonist reversed this effect. MFF prevented gastric distention-induced visceral pain via a CB2-dependent mechanism. These results demonstrate that a simple extract of medicinal cannabis can significantly enhance resolution of inflammation and injury, as well as prevent injury, in the gastrointestinal tract. Interestingly, different cannabinoid receptors were involved in some of the effects. MFF may serve as the basis for a simple preparation of cannabis that would produce beneficial effects in the GI tract with reduced systemic toxicity.

  17. Simvastatin reduces fetal testosterone production and permanently alters reproductive tract development in the male rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling by fetal Leydig cells is critical in the proper development of the male reproductive tract. As cholesterol is a precursor for hormone biosynthesis,inhibition of the cholesterol pathway during sex differentiation may reduce testosterone {T). We hypothesized tha...

  18. Simvastatin reduces fetal testosterone production and permanently alters reproductive tract development in the male rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling by fetal Leydig cells is critical in the proper development of the male reproductive tract. As cholesterol is a precursor for hormone biosynthesis,inhibition of the cholesterol pathway during sex differentiation may reduce testosterone {T). We hypothesized tha...

  19. Comparative Computational Modeling of Airflows and Vapor Dosimetry in the Respiratory Tracts of Rat, Monkey, and Human

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. We improved the imaging and model development methods to the point where CFD models for the rat, monkey, and human now encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A total of 1272, 2172, and 135 pulmonary airways representing 17±7, 19±9, or 9±2 airway generations were included in the rat, monkey and human models, respectively. A CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic model previously developed for acrolein was adapted for these anatomically correct extended airway models. Model parameters were obtained from the literature or measured directly. Airflow and acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steady-state inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasal-only simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was sensitive to airway geometry, airflow rates, acrolein concentrations, air:tissue partition coefficients, tissue thickness, and the maximum rate of metabolism. Nasal extraction efficiencies were predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, and then the human. For both nasal and oral breathing modes in humans, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheobronchial tissues than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing material transport and site-specific tissue uptake across a significantly greater range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models. PMID:22584687

  20. Comparative computational modeling of airflows and vapor dosimetry in the respiratory tracts of rat, monkey, and human.

    PubMed

    Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P; Carson, James P; Minard, Kevin R; Jacob, Richard E; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Cox, Timothy; Wallis, Christopher D; Larson, Richard F; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Postlethwait, Edward M; Einstein, Daniel R

    2012-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. We improved the imaging and model development methods to the point where CFD models for the rat, monkey, and human now encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A total of 1272, 2172, and 135 pulmonary airways representing 17±7, 19±9, or 9±2 airway generations were included in the rat, monkey and human models, respectively. A CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic model previously developed for acrolein was adapted for these anatomically correct extended airway models. Model parameters were obtained from the literature or measured directly. Airflow and acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steady-state inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasal-only simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was sensitive to airway geometry, airflow rates, acrolein concentrations, air:tissue partition coefficients, tissue thickness, and the maximum rate of metabolism. Nasal extraction efficiencies were predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, and then the human. For both nasal and oral breathing modes in humans, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheobronchial tissues than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing material transport and site-specific tissue uptake across a significantly greater range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  1. An investigation of horizontal transfer of feed introduced DNA to the aerobic microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer through natural transformation of members of the microbiota of the lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of mammals has not yet been described. Insufficient DNA sequence similarity for homologous recombination to occur has been identified as the major barrier to interspecies transfer of chromosomal DNA in bacteria. In this study we determined if regions of high DNA similarity between the genomes of the indigenous bacteria in the GIT of rats and feed introduced DNA could lead to homologous recombination and acquisition of antibiotic resistance genes. Results Plasmid DNA with two resistance genes (nptI and aadA) and regions of high DNA similarity to 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA genes present in a broad range of bacterial species present in the GIT, were constructed and added to standard rat feed. Six rats, with a normal microbiota, were fed DNA containing pellets daily over four days before sampling of the microbiota from the different GI compartments (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon). In addition, two rats were included as negative controls. Antibiotic resistant colonies growing on selective media were screened for recombination with feed introduced DNA by PCR targeting unique sites in the putatively recombined regions. No transformants were identified among 441 tested isolates. Conclusions The analyses showed that extensive ingestion of DNA (100 μg plasmid) per day did not lead to increased proportions of kanamycin resistant bacteria, nor did it produce detectable transformants among the aerobic microbiota examined for 6 rats (detection limit < 1 transformant per 1,1 × 108 cultured bacteria). The key methodological challenges to HGT detection in animal feedings trials are identified and discussed. This study is consistent with other studies suggesting natural transformation is not detectable in the GIT of mammals. PMID:22463741

  2. Comparative Immunohistochemical Analysis of Ochratoxin A Tumourigenesis in Rats and Urinary Tract Carcinoma in Humans; Mechanistic Significance of p-S6 Ribosomal Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gazinska, Patrycja; Herman, Diana; Gillett, Cheryl; Pinder, Sarah; Mantle, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is considered to be a possible human urinary tract carcinogen, based largely on a rat model, but no molecular genetic changes in the rat carcinomas have yet been defined. The phosphorylated-S6 ribosomal protein is a marker indicating activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin, which is a serine/threonine kinase with a key role in protein biosynthesis, cell proliferation, transcription, cellular metabolism and apoptosis, while being functionally deregulated in cancer. To assess p-S6 expression we performed immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumours and normal tissues. Marked intensity of p-S6 expression was observed in highly proliferative regions of rat renal carcinomas and a rare angiosarcoma, all of which were attributed to prolonged exposure to dietary OTA. Only very small OTA-generated renal adenomas were negative for p-S6. Examples of rat subcutaneous fibrosarcoma and testicular seminoma, as well as of normal renal tissue, showed no or very weak positive staining. In contrast to the animal model, human renal cell carcinoma, upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma from cases of Balkan endemic nephropathy, and a human angiosarcoma were negative for p-S6. The combined findings are reminiscent of constitutive changes in the rat tuberous sclerosis gene complex in the Eker strain correlated with renal neoplasms, Therefore rat renal carcinogenesis caused by OTA does not obviously mimic human urinary tract tumourigenesis. PMID:23105973

  3. RESPIRATORY RESPONSE AND INTERNAL TISSUE DOSE OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF F344 RATS: SEX AND SPECIES COMPARISONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. Females of various toxicological studies show more severe effects than males, notably a decrease in survivability observed in rats of a 2-year bioassay (CIIT, 1993; Wolf et al., 1995, Fundam. Appl. Toxic...

  4. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.

    Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.

    Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  5. NEONATAL LOW- AND HIGH-DOSE EXPOSURE TO ESTRADIOL BENZOATE IN THE MALE RAT: II. EFFECTS ON THE MALE PUBERTY AND THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    NEONATAL LOW- AND HIGH-DOSE EXPOSURE TO ESTRADIOL BENZOATE IN THE MALE RAT: II. EFFECTS ON MALE PUBERTY AND THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT. Oliver Putz, Christian B. Schwartz, Gerald A. LeBlanc, Ralph L. Cooper, Gail S. Prins

    ABSTRACT
    Environmental contaminants with estrogen...

  6. EFFECT OF RAPID SHALLOW BREATHING ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF 18-O-LABELED OZONE REACTION PRODUCT IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effect of breathing pattern on ozone reaction product content within the respiratory tract. Thirty-four anesthetized, maleWistar rats were exposed to oxygen-18 (18O)-labeled ozone at 1.0 ppm for 2 h using a dual-chamber, negative-pressure ventilation system. Fre...

  7. Defining the Borders of Dose Addition: Mixture Effects of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and Dibutyl phthalate on Male Rat Reproductive Tract Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    In utero exposure to either dibutyl phthalate (DBP) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) disrupts male rat reproductive tract differentiation. However, they act via different modes of toxicity and induce distinct postnatal phenotypes. DBP exposure decreases anogenital di...

  8. EFFECT OF RAPID SHALLOW BREATHING ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF 18-O-LABELED OZONE REACTION PRODUCT IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effect of breathing pattern on ozone reaction product content within the respiratory tract. Thirty-four anesthetized, maleWistar rats were exposed to oxygen-18 (18O)-labeled ozone at 1.0 ppm for 2 h using a dual-chamber, negative-pressure ventilation system. Fre...

  9. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.

    Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.

    Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  10. Defining the Borders of Dose Addition: Mixture Effects of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and Dibutyl phthalate on Male Rat Reproductive Tract Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    In utero exposure to either dibutyl phthalate (DBP) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) disrupts male rat reproductive tract differentiation. However, they act via different modes of toxicity and induce distinct postnatal phenotypes. DBP exposure decreases anogenital di...

  11. RESPIRATORY RESPONSE AND INTERNAL TISSUE DOSE OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF F344 RATS: SEX AND SPECIES COMPARISONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. Females of various toxicological studies show more severe effects than males, notably a decrease in survivability observed in rats of a 2-year bioassay (CIIT, 1993; Wolf et al., 1995, Fundam. Appl. Toxic...

  12. TURNOVER OF S35-SULFATE IN THE MUCOSA OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF RATS AS SEEN IN AUTORADIOGRAMS

    PubMed Central

    Dziewiatkowski, Dominic D.

    1956-01-01

    Segments of the gastrointestinal tract removed from rats after intervals of time following injection of S35-sulfate were fixed in aqueous formalin and then washed in water. Contact and coated autoradiograms were prepared. The suggestion made by others that more of the labelled sulfate is fixed by the mucosa than by the underlying coats of the gastrointestinal tract is confirmed. In addition it was found that the isotope is fixed to a greater extent in the lower intestine than in the middle or upper portions of it. Coated autoradiograms revealed that 6 hours after administration of S35-sulfate more of the label was present in the goblet cells lying deep in the crypts of the mucosa than in those adjacent to the intestinal lumen. By the 24th hour the concentration of the isotope was strikingly higher and more uniform from cell to cell. The mucus in the intestinal lumen was also highly radioactive. At the end of 48 hours very little of the sulfur-35 remained in the intestinal wall or could be made out in the mucus of the lumen: the autoradiographic reaction was faint and diffuse as contrasted with the punctiform and intense reaction given by the specimens removed at the end of shorter intervals of time. PMID:13295309

  13. Forebrain Projections of Arcuate Neurokinin B Neurons Demonstrated by Anterograde Tract-Tracing and Monosodium Glutamate Lesions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Sally J.; Burke, Michelle C.; Anderson, Miranda J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin receptor signaling are essential components of the reproductive axis. A population of neurons resides within the arcuate nucleus of the rat that expresses NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and estrogen receptor α. Here we investigate the projections of these neurons using NKB-immunocytochemistry as a marker. First, the loss of NKB-immunoreactive (ir) somata and fibers was characterized after ablation of the arcuate nucleus by neonatal injections of monosodium glutamate. Second, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the arcuate nucleus and anterogradely labeled NKB-ir fibers were identified using dual-labeled immunofluorescence. Four major projection pathways are described: 1) Local projections within the arcuate nucleus bilaterally, 2) Projections to the median eminence including the lateral palisade zone, 3) Projections to a periventricular pathway extending rostrally to multiple hypothalamic nuclei, the septal region and BNST and dorsally to the dorsomedial nucleus and 4) Projections to a ventral hypothalamic tract to the lateral hypothalamus and medial forebrain bundle. The diverse projections provide evidence that NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons could integrate the reproductive axis with multiple homeostatic, behavioral and neuroendocrine processes. Interestingly, anterograde tract-tracing revealed NKB-ir axons originating from arcuate neurons terminating on other NKB-ir somata within the arcuate nucleus. Combined with previous studies, these experiments reveal a bilateral interconnected network of sex-steroid responsive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat that express NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and ERα and project to GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This circuitry provides a mechanism for bilateral synchronization of arcuate NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons to modulate the pulsatile secretion of GnRH. PMID:20038444

  14. Fermentation of dietary fibre in the intestinal tract: comparison between man and rat.

    PubMed

    Nyman, M; Asp, N G; Cummings, J; Wiggins, H

    1986-05-01

    1. The breakdown and faecal bulking capacity of dietary fibre preparations from wheat bran, apple, cabbage, carrot, and guar gum were compared in man and rat. 2. The degradation of the fibre showed good correlation between man and rat (r 0.99, regression coefficient 0.86). Wheat bran was the least well-digested, 66 and 59% of the neutral sugars being excreted in faeces of man and rat respectively. The breakdown of the fibre in apple, cabbage, carrot and guar gum was more complete and 4-29% of the neutral sugars were recovered in faeces. 3. The main dietary fibre constituents in each preparation were degraded to a similar extent in man and rat. The main dietary fibre constituents of apple, carrot, cabbage and guar gum were almost completely degraded. Of the xylose in wheat bran 45% (man) and 48% (rat) were recovered in faeces. However, the percentage excretion of glucose and arabinose from bran was higher in man. 4. A faecal glucan other than cellulose was identified in human faeces after guar gum, and has been provisionally identified as starch. No such glucan occurred in rat faeces. 5. A good correlation between the faecal bulking capacity in man and rat was seen (r 0.97, regression coefficient 0.56). Wheat bran had the best bulking capacity, while that of apple, cabbage, carrot and guar gum was less pronounced. Faecal bulking was inversely related to the amount of fibre which was water-soluble in each preparation. 6. It is concluded that this rat experimental model is useful for the prediction of fermentative breakdown and bulking capacity of dietary fibre in man. However, more comparative studies are needed to evaluate animal experiments regarding other physiological effects of dietary fibre.

  15. Effects of endorphins on different parts of the gastrointestinal tract of rat and guinea-pig in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nijkamp, F.P.; Van Ree, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    1 The spasmogenic and spasmolytic effects of β-lipotropin (LPH) fragments and one analogue were investigated on different parts of the gastro-intestinal tract of guinea-pig and rat in vitro. 2 Changes in muscle tone were observed in colon and rectum and to a lesser extent in jejunum and ileum of both species. Rat colon and rectum contracted to the peptides. Guinea-pig colon and rectum relaxed after an initial short-lasting contraction. 3 On the rat rectum (D-ala2)met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, γ-endorphin, α-endorphin and β-LPH 80-91 caused dose-dependent contractions, their ED50 values being 0.96 × 10-12 mol, 1.05 × 10-11 mol, 1.22 × 10-11 mol, 1.08 × 10-10 mol, 2.65 × 10-10 mol and 6.5 × 10-9 mol, respectively. 4 Naloxone dose-dependently shifted the dose-response curve of met-enkephalin to the right. Atropine, hexamethonium, burimamide, mepyramine, propranolol and indomethacin did not influence the response to met-enkephalin. 5 In the presence of tetrodotoxin, the ED50 for met-enkephalin and the maximal contractor response induced by met-enkephalin, appeared to be increased. 6 The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, reduced the contractor response in a non-competitive manner. The α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine, in contrast, caused an increase of the maximal response to met-enkephalin of up to 200%. Noradrenergic and tryptaminergic systems, therefore, might be involved in the changes in muscle tone induced by met-enkephalin. 7 These results demonstrate that rectum and colon of guinea-pig and rat are very sensitive to opioid-like peptides. PMID:6247000

  16. Surgical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Its Vasculature in the Laboratory Rat.

    PubMed

    Vdoviaková, Katarína; Petrovová, Eva; Maloveská, Marcela; Krešáková, Lenka; Teleky, Jana; Elias, Mario Zefanias Joao; Petrášová, Darina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate the morphology of the stomach, liver, intestine, and their vasculature to support the planning of surgical therapeutic methods in abdominal cavity. On adult Wistar rats corrosion casts were prepared from the arterial system and Duracryl Dental and PUR SP were used as a casting medium and was performed macroscopic anatomical dissection of the stomach, liver, and intestine was performed. The rat stomach was a large, semilunar shaped sac with composite lining. On the stomach was very marked fundus, which formed a blind sac (saccus cecus). The rat liver was divided into six lobes, but without gall bladder. Intestine of the rat was simple, but cecum had a shape as a stomach. The following variations were observed in the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. On the corrosion cast specimens we noticed the presence of the anastomosis between middle colic artery (a. colica media) and left colic artery (a. colica sinistra). We investigated the second anastomosis between middle colic artery and left colic artery. The results of this study reveal that the functional anatomical relationship between the rat stomach, liver and intestine is important for the development of surgical research in human and veterinary medicine.

  17. Surgical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Its Vasculature in the Laboratory Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vdoviaková, Katarína; Petrovová, Eva; Maloveská, Marcela; Krešáková, Lenka; Teleky, Jana; Elias, Mario Zefanias Joao; Petrášová, Darina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate the morphology of the stomach, liver, intestine, and their vasculature to support the planning of surgical therapeutic methods in abdominal cavity. On adult Wistar rats corrosion casts were prepared from the arterial system and Duracryl Dental and PUR SP were used as a casting medium and was performed macroscopic anatomical dissection of the stomach, liver, and intestine was performed. The rat stomach was a large, semilunar shaped sac with composite lining. On the stomach was very marked fundus, which formed a blind sac (saccus cecus). The rat liver was divided into six lobes, but without gall bladder. Intestine of the rat was simple, but cecum had a shape as a stomach. The following variations were observed in the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. On the corrosion cast specimens we noticed the presence of the anastomosis between middle colic artery (a. colica media) and left colic artery (a. colica sinistra). We investigated the second anastomosis between middle colic artery and left colic artery. The results of this study reveal that the functional anatomical relationship between the rat stomach, liver and intestine is important for the development of surgical research in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:26819602

  18. The Excitatory Synaptic Transmission of the Nucleus of Solitary Tract Was Potentiated by Chronic Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ban; Zhang, Zi-Nan; Lei, Jie; Li, Yun-Qing; Du, Jian-Qing; Chen, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Angina pectoris is a common clinical symptom that often results from myocardial infarction. One typical characteristic of angina pectoris is that the pain does not match the severity of the myocardial ischemia. One possible explanation is that the intensity of cardiac nociceptive information could be dynamically regulated by certain brain areas. As an important nucleus for processing cardiac nociception, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) has been studied to some extent. However, until now, the morphological and functional involvement of the NTS in chronic myocardial infarction (CMI) has remained unknown. In the present study, by exploring left anterior descending coronary artery ligation surgery, we found that the number of synaptophysin-immunoreactive puncta and Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the rat NTS two weeks after ligation surgery increased significantly. Excitatory pre- and postsynaptic transmission was potentiated. A bath application of a Ca2+ channel inhibitor GABApentin and Ca2+ permeable AMPA receptor antagonist NASPM could reverse the potentiated pre- and postsynaptic transmission, respectively. Meanwhile, rats with CMI showed significantly increased visceral pain behaviors. Microinjection of GABApentin or NASPM into the NTS decreased the CMI-induced visceral pain behaviors. In sum, our results suggest that the NTS is an important area for the process of cardiac afference in chronic myocardial infarction condition. PMID:25756354

  19. Semi-automated 3D segmentation of major tracts in the rat brain: comparing DTI with standard histological methods.

    PubMed

    Gyengesi, Erika; Calabrese, Evan; Sherrier, Matthew C; Johnson, G Allan; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Researchers working with rodent models of neurological disease often require an accurate map of the anatomical organization of the white matter of the rodent brain. With the increasing popularity of small animal MRI techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), there is considerable interest in rapid segmentation methods of neurological structures for quantitative comparisons. DTI-derived tractography allows simple and rapid segmentation of major white matter tracts, but the anatomic accuracy of these computer-generated fibers is open to question and has not been rigorously evaluated in the rat brain. In this study, we examine the anatomic accuracy of tractography-based segmentation in the adult rat brain. We analysed 12 major white matter pathways using semi-automated tractography-based segmentation alongside manual segmentation of Gallyas silver-stained histology sections. We applied four fiber-tracking algorithms to the DTI data-two integration methods and two deflection methods. In many cases, tractography-based segmentation closely matched histology-based segmentation; however different tractography algorithms produced dramatically different results. Results suggest that certain white matter pathways are more amenable to tractography-based segmentation than others. We believe that these data will help researchers decide whether it is appropriate to use tractography-based segmentation of white matter structures for quantitative DTI-based analysis of neurologic disease models.

  20. Loss of interstitial cells of Cajal after pulsating electromagnetic field (PEMF) in gastrointestinal tract of the rats.

    PubMed

    Kaszuba-Zwoińska, J; Gil, K; Ziomber, A; Zaraska, W; Pawlicki, R; Królczyk, G; Matyja, A; Thor, P J

    2005-09-01

    Exposure to the magnetic field has remarkably increased lately due to fast urbanization and widely available magnetic field in diagnosis and treatment. However, biological effects of the magnetic field are not well recognized. The myoelectric activity recorded from the gastrointestinal and urinary systems is generated by specialized electrically active cells called interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). Thus it seems rational that ICC have significant vulnerability to physical factors like an electromagnetic field. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pulsating electromagnetic field (PEMF) (frequency 10 kHz, 30ms, 300 muT burst, with frequency 1Hz) on ICCs density in the rat gastrointestinal tract. Rats were divided into two groups (n=32). The first group was exposed to PEMF continuously for 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks (n = 16), and the second group (n=16) served as a control. Tissue samples of the rat stomach, duodenum and proximal colon were fixed and paraffin embedded. The tangential sections of 5 microm thickness were stained immunohistochemically with anti-c-Kit (sc-168) antibody and visualized finally by DAB as chromogen (brown end product). C-Kit positive branched ICC-like cells were detected under the light microscope, distinguished from the c-kit-negative non-branched smooth muscle cells and from the c-kit positive but non-branched mast cells and quantitatively analyzed by MultiScan computer program. Apoptosis detection was performed with rabbit anti-Bax polyclonal antibody (Calbiochem, Germany) and LSAB 2 visualization system. The surface of c-Kit immunopositive cells decreased after exposure to PEMF in each part of the gastrointestinal tract. Reduced density of ICCs was related to exposure time. The most sensitive to PEMF were ICCs in the fundus of the stomach and in the duodenum, less sensitive were ICCs in the colon and pacemaker areas of the stomach. No marked changes in ICC density in the pyloric part of the stomach were observed. We

  1. Determination of fermentable carbohydrate from the upper gastrointestinal tract by using colectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Monsma, D J; Vollendorf, N W; Marlett, J A

    1992-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to characterize the carbohydrate that would be supplied to the colon for fermentation under physiological conditions. Colectomized rats were fed fiber-free diets or diets containing 5% (wt/wt) gum arabic. Four (fucose, galactose, glucosamine, and galactosamine) of 11 analyzed sugars accounted for 77% of the total sugar in ileal excreta from colectomized rats fed fiber-free diets. The three sugars in gum arabic, rhamnose, arabinose, and galactose, accounted for 84% of the total sugars in gum arabic ileal excreta. Comparisons of the sugar compositions of the ileal excreta, the water-soluble fractions of the excreta, and three gel filtration fractions of the water-soluble material with those of the water-soluble fraction of rat mucosa, the acetone-soluble fraction of pancreas, and pancreatin suggested that the major source of endogenous carbohydrate is mucin. Gum arabic increased the daily excretion of the four mucin-derived sugars (fucose, galactose, glucosamine, and galactosamine) by the colectomized rats from 473 mumol per day to 634 mumol per day. We conclude that mucin is the major endogenous carbohydrate excreted from the upper gut and that gum arabic increases the amount of this endogenous carbohydrate. PMID:1332609

  2. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NTS noradrenergic A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n= 5; HPA study, n= 5], or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n= 6; HPA study, n= 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 days of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress. PMID:25765732

  3. Binding and the effect of the red kidney bean lectin, phytohaemagglutinin, in the gastrointestinal tract of suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Linderoth, Ann; Prykhod'ko, Olena; Ahrén, Bo; Fåk, Frida; Pierzynowski, Stefan G; Weström, Björn R

    2006-01-01

    Enteral exposure of suckling rats to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) has been shown to induce growth and precocious functional maturation of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the present study was to explore the mechanism of this action. Suckling rats, 14 d old, were fed a single dose of PHA (0.05 mg/g body weight) or saline. The binding of PHA to the gut epithelium and its effect on the morphology and functional properties of the gut and pancreas were studied up to 3 d after treatment. Initially, at 1-24 h, the PHA bound along the gut mucosal lining, resulting in disturbed gut morphology with villi shortening and rapid decreases in disaccharidase activities and macromolecular absorption capacity. During a later phase, between 1 and 3 d, the PHA binding had declined, and an uptake by enterocytes was observed. An increase in crypt cell proliferation and gut growth became evident during this period, together with a functional maturation, as indicated by increases in disaccharidase (maltase and sucrase) activities and the low macromolecular absorption capacity. Pancreas growth also increased, as did its content of digestive enzymes. We conclude that enteral exposure to PHA in suckling rats temporarily causes mucosal disarrangement and functional impediment of the gut, which may be explained by binding to and disruption of the gut mucosa and a two-fold increase in the plasma corticosterone concentration. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the role of diet in gastrointestinal maturation and may constitute a basis for the treatment of mammals having an immature gut.

  4. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats.

    PubMed

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Herman, James P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NTS NA A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n = 5; HPA study, n = 5] or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n = 6; HPA study, n = 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 d of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress.

  5. The comparative anatomy of the abdominal gastrointestinal tract of six species of African mole-rats (Rodentia, Bathyergidae).

    PubMed

    Kotzé, Sanet H; Van Der Merwe, Elizabeth L; Bennett, Nigel C; O'Riain, M Justin

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of six species of African mole-rats (Bathyergidae) were compared. The aim was to provide a comprehensive anatomical comparison between the different species. The relative shape, length, and surface areas were taken into account to determine whether the GITs are phylogenetically constrained or exhibit anatomical adaptations in response to diets. In all six species the stomach was simple and glandular. With the exception of Heterocephalus glaber, the caecum was coiled in a flat spiral, the ascending colon was arranged in a loop of varying lengths, and a mucosal colonic papillary-lined groove was present in the ascending colon in all species. By contrast, the caecum in H. glaber was uncoiled, the ascending colon was not looped, and the groove was not papillated. A caeco-appendix was observed only in Bathyergus suillus and Georychus capensis. Hierarchical multivariate cluster analysis on the presence/absence of nine anatomical structures associated with the GIT of mole-rats revealed that H. glaber was anatomically the least similar of the six species (77.6% similarity) with respect to the nine GIT variables included. All Cryptomys species were the same (100% similarity), and two species B. suillus and G. capensis grouped together and were more similar to the Cryptomys genus (95% similarity) than they were to H. glaber. These findings support previous phylogenetic classifications. The voluminous caeco-colon in B. suillus may be explained by its ingestion of grasses in addition to below-ground storage organs of plants. We conclude that phylogeny and diet affect the GIT anatomy of the African mole rats studied here.

  6. CD36 mRNA in the gastrointestinal tract is differentially regulated by dietary fat intake in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Primeaux, Stefany D; Braymer, H Douglas; Bray, George A

    2013-02-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GI) is important for detection and transport of consumed nutrients and has been implicated in susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in various rat strains. The current studies investigated the regulation of CD36, a receptor which facilitates uptake of long-chain fatty acids, in the GI tract of obesity-prone Osborne-Mendel and obesity-resistant S5B rats fed a high-fat diet. Osborne-Mendel and S5B rats consumed a high-fat diet (HFD, 55 % kcal from fat) or a low-fat diet (10 % kcal from fat) for either 3 or 14 days. CD36 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were measured from circumvallate papillae of the tongue and from duodenal enterocytes. In Osborne-Mendel rats, consumption of HFD for 3 and 14 days led to an increase in CD36 mRNA on circumvallate papillae and in duodenal enterocytes. CD36 mRNA levels were positively correlated with body weight gain and kilocalories consumed at 3 days. In S5B rats, consumption of HFD for 3 days did not alter CD36 mRNA levels on circumvallate papillae or in the duodenum. Duodenal CD36 levels were elevated in S5B rats following 14 days of HFD consumption. CD36 mRNA levels in the duodenum were positively correlated with body weight gain and kilocalories consumed at 14 days. These data support the differential sensing of nutrients by two regions of the GI tract of obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats consuming HFD and suggest a role for CD36 in the strain-specific susceptibility to obesity.

  7. Responses in the respiratory tract of rats following exposure to sulphuric acid aerosols for 5 or 28 days.

    PubMed

    Kilgour, Joanne D; Foster, John; Soames, Anthony; Farrar, David G; Hext, Paul M

    2002-01-01

    Sulphuric acid mists have been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as being carcinogenic to humans based on epidemiological findings of respiratory tract tumours. To determine if early changes in the respiratory tract following exposure to sulphuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) aerosols are consistent with the possible development of tumours after extended periods of exposure, groups of female rats were exposed to respirable aerosols of H(2)SO(4) at target concentrations of 0, 0.2, 1.0 or 5.0 mg m(-3) for 6 h per day for either 5 days or for 5 days a week over a 28-day period. Additional groups exposed to 0 or 5.0 mg m(-3) over the 28-day period were retained after exposure for 4 or 8 weeks to assess recovery. Histopathological examinations and quantitative cell proliferation measurements were conducted on the nasal passages, larynx and lung. Achieved concentrations were 0.3, 1.38 and 5.52 mg m(-3) H(2)SO(4). Histological and cell proliferative changes were confined to the larynx and no effects were seen in the nasal passages or lungs. At the two highest concentrations, squamous metaplasia accompanied by significant cell proliferation was apparent after 5 and 28 days of exposure and there was a reduction in the severity of the pathological changes following the recovery periods. No effects were seen at 0.3 mg m(-3) after 5 days of exposure and only minimal metaplastic change was seen after 28 days in a few animals and was not accompanied by cell proliferation. The toxicological relevance of these findings is discussed.

  8. Changes of the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the diabetic rat's alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Erzsébet; Batbayar, Bayarchimeg; Vér, Agota; Zelles, Tivadar

    2006-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, where neuropeptides and immunocells might play important roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this article we have quantified the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat's alimentary tract (tongue, duodenum, colon) using immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical methods. The immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were found in all layers of the alimentary tract and their distribution pattern was similar in both control and diabetic groups. Mast cell-nerve fiber contacts were rarely found in the controls. However, after 4 weeks duration of diabetes the number of IR nerve fibers and the immunocompetent cells increased significantly (P < 0.05), and the number of mast cell-nerve fiber contacts was even more significantly increased (P < 0.001). The distance between nerve fibers and immunocells was about 1 mum or even less. Some of the mast cells were degranulated in the vicinity of nerve fibers. No immunocompetent cells were IR for any antisera in the control. However, after the streptozotocin treatment, a large number of the immunocompetent cells showed immunoreactivity for SP and NPY. Counting all immunocompetent cells in whole sections showed that 12.3% of them were IR for SP and 25.4% were IR for NPY. Increased number of SP-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in diabetes mellitus might be the reason for painful neuropathy and might amplify the inflammatory reaction in an axon reflex manner; the released histamine and leukotrienes, cytokines, and chemokines might cause inflammations and lesions of the mucosa.

  9. Chasing central nervous system plasticity: the brainstem's contribution to locomotor recovery in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zörner, Björn; Bachmann, Lukas C; Filli, Linard; Kapitza, Sandra; Gullo, Miriam; Bolliger, Marc; Starkey, Michelle L; Röthlisberger, Martina; Gonzenbach, Roman R; Schwab, Martin E

    2014-06-01

    Anatomical plasticity such as fibre growth and the formation of new connections in the cortex and spinal cord is one known mechanism mediating functional recovery after damage to the central nervous system. Little is known about anatomical plasticity in the brainstem, which contains key locomotor regions. We compared changes of the spinal projection pattern of the major descending systems following a cervical unilateral spinal cord hemisection in adult rats. As in humans (Brown-Séquard syndrome), this type of injury resulted in a permanent loss of fine motor control of the ipsilesional fore- and hindlimb, but for basic locomotor functions substantial recovery was observed. Antero- and retrograde tracings revealed spontaneous changes in spinal projections originating from the reticular formation, in particular from the contralesional gigantocellular reticular nucleus: more reticulospinal fibres from the intact hemicord crossed the spinal midline at cervical and lumbar levels. The intact-side rubrospinal tract showed a statistically not significant tendency towards an increased number of midline crossings after injury. In contrast, the corticospinal and the vestibulospinal tract, as well as serotonergic projections, showed little or no side-switching in this lesion paradigm. Spinal adaptations were accompanied by modifications at higher levels of control including side-switching of the input to the gigantocellular reticular nuclei from the mesencephalic locomotor region. Electrolytic microlesioning of one or both gigantocellular reticular nuclei in behaviourally recovered rats led to the reappearance of the impairments observed acutely after the initial injury showing that anatomical plasticity in defined brainstem motor networks contributes significantly to functional recovery after injury of the central nervous system. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  10. Radiologic evaluation of the liver and gastrointestinal tract in rats infected with Taenia taeniaeformis.

    PubMed

    Perry, R L; Williams, J F; Carrig, C B; Kaneene, J B; Schillhorn van Veen, T W

    1994-08-01

    In rats infected with the cestode Taenia taeniaeformis, hepatomegaly results from development of parasitic cysts in the liver. Diffuse nodular mucosal hyperplasia in the glandular region (corpus and antrum) of the stomach, and gross thickening of the intestinal mucosa also result. Between postinfection days (PID) 21 and 84, radiologic observations were made after oral administration of a barium sulfate suspension in T taeniaeformis-infected rats and in age/sex-matched controls. There was radiographic evidence of hepatic enlargement at PID 21. Enlargement of the gastric folds was first observed along the greater curvature of the stomach at PID 35. Fimbriation of small intestinal mucosal surfaces resulted from thickening of the intestinal villi and was observed in the duodenum at PID 21. Intestinal motility was assessed, and contractions were counted, using image intensification fluoroscopy, then were recorded on videotape. There were no significant differences between control and infected rats for gastric emptying time, intestinal transit time, and number of intestinal contractions per minute. Barium contrast radiography clearly indicated large gastric folds, thickening of the small intestinal villi, and hepatic enlargement, and was useful for assessing gastrointestinal motility.

  11. Effect of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on volume and albumin content of respiratory tract fluid but not on epithelial secretory cell number in "smoking" rats.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N; Brattsand, R; Dahlbäck, M

    1990-03-01

    This study was designed to look at the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on epithelial secretory cells and the respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content from the lower airways of "bronchitic" rats. Rats were exposed either to tobacco smoke (TS), TS and NAC, or NAC alone. TS caused a significant increase in epithelial secretory cell number which was not reduced by concomitant NAC administration; NAC alone had no effect on cell numbers. TS increased respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content by a small but non-significant amount, whereas TS and NAC increased the volume and albumin content by a greater and significant amount; NAC alone was also shown to significantly increase both fluid volume and albumin content.

  12. Biological fractionation of lead isotopes in Sprague-Dawley rats lead poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Duojian; Xie, Qing; Wang, Jingyu

    2012-01-01

    It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate) via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces) were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance) and the low-lead animal feed (diet) administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). There are significant differences (p<0.05) in lead isotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of (204)Pb/(206)Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for (204)Pb/(206)Pb ratio under high-dose exposure.

  13. Biological Fractionation of Lead Isotopes in Sprague-Dawley Rats Lead Poisoned via the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Liu, Duojian; Xie, Qing; Wang, Jingyu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It was considered that lead isotope ratios did not change during physical, chemical, or biological processes. Thus, lead isotope ratios have been used as fingerprints to identify possible lead sources. However, recent evidence has shown that the lead isotope ratios among different biological samples in human are not always identical from its lead origins in vitro. An animal experiment was conducted to explore the biological fractionation of lead isotopes in biological systems. Methods 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into groups that received acute lead exposure (0, 0.02, 0.2, or 2 mg/kg body weight of lead acetate) via the respiratory route every day for 5 days. Biological samples (i.e., blood, urine, and feces) were collected for comparison with the lead acetate (test substance) and the low-lead animal feed (diet) administered to the rats. The lead isotope ratios were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results There are significant differences (p<0.05) in lead isotope ratios between blood, urine, and feces. Moreover, a nonlinear relationship between the blood lead concentration and the blood lead isotope ratios was observed. There is also a threshold effect to the fractionation function. Only the blood isotope ratio of 204Pb/206Pb matches the test substance well. As for feces, when 204Pb/206Pb ratio is considered, there is no significant difference between feces-test substance pairs in medium and high dose group. Conclusions The biological fractionation of lead isotopes in SD rats was observed. Moreover, there might be a threshold for the biological fractionation of lead isotopes which is depending on whole blood lead level. It is considered to be more reliable that we compared the isotope ratios of potential lead hazards with both blood and feces lead fingerprints especially for 204Pb/206Pb ratio under high-dose exposure. PMID:23300678

  14. Carbohydrate Metabolism Is Essential for the Colonization of Streptococcus thermophilus in the Digestive Tract of Gnotobiotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Muriel; Wrzosek, Laura; Ben-Yahia, Leila; Noordine, Marie-Louise; Gitton, Christophe; Chevret, Didier; Langella, Philippe; Mayeur, Camille; Cherbuy, Claire; Rul, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is the archetype of lactose-adapted bacterium and so far, its sugar metabolism has been mainly investigated in vitro. The objective of this work was to study the impact of lactose and lactose permease on S. thermophilus physiology in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of gnotobiotic rats. We used rats mono-associated with LMD-9 strain and receiving 4.5% lactose. This model allowed the analysis of colonization curves of LMD-9, its metabolic profile, its production of lactate and its interaction with the colon epithelium. Lactose induced a rapid and high level of S. thermophilus in the GIT, where its activity led to 49 mM of intra-luminal L-lactate that was related to the induction of mono-carboxylic transporter mRNAs (SLC16A1 and SLC5A8) and p27Kip1 cell cycle arrest protein in epithelial cells. In the presence of a continuous lactose supply, S. thermophilus recruited proteins involved in glycolysis and induced the metabolism of alternative sugars as sucrose, galactose, and glycogen. Moreover, inactivation of the lactose transporter, LacS, delayed S. thermophilus colonization. Our results show i/that lactose constitutes a limiting factor for colonization of S. thermophilus, ii/that activation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism constitutes the metabolic signature of S. thermophilus in the GIT, iii/that the production of lactate settles the dialogue with colon epithelium. We propose a metabolic model of management of carbohydrate resources by S. thermophilus in the GIT. Our results are in accord with the rationale that nutritional allegation via consumption of yogurt alleviates the symptoms of lactose intolerance. PMID:22216112

  15. Carbohydrate metabolism is essential for the colonization of Streptococcus thermophilus in the digestive tract of gnotobiotic rats.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Muriel; Wrzosek, Laura; Ben-Yahia, Leila; Noordine, Marie-Louise; Gitton, Christophe; Chevret, Didier; Langella, Philippe; Mayeur, Camille; Cherbuy, Claire; Rul, Françoise

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is the archetype of lactose-adapted bacterium and so far, its sugar metabolism has been mainly investigated in vitro. The objective of this work was to study the impact of lactose and lactose permease on S. thermophilus physiology in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of gnotobiotic rats. We used rats mono-associated with LMD-9 strain and receiving 4.5% lactose. This model allowed the analysis of colonization curves of LMD-9, its metabolic profile, its production of lactate and its interaction with the colon epithelium. Lactose induced a rapid and high level of S. thermophilus in the GIT, where its activity led to 49 mM of intra-luminal L-lactate that was related to the induction of mono-carboxylic transporter mRNAs (SLC16A1 and SLC5A8) and p27(Kip1) cell cycle arrest protein in epithelial cells. In the presence of a continuous lactose supply, S. thermophilus recruited proteins involved in glycolysis and induced the metabolism of alternative sugars as sucrose, galactose, and glycogen. Moreover, inactivation of the lactose transporter, LacS, delayed S. thermophilus colonization. Our results show i/that lactose constitutes a limiting factor for colonization of S. thermophilus, ii/that activation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism constitutes the metabolic signature of S. thermophilus in the GIT, iii/that the production of lactate settles the dialogue with colon epithelium. We propose a metabolic model of management of carbohydrate resources by S. thermophilus in the GIT. Our results are in accord with the rationale that nutritional allegation via consumption of yogurt alleviates the symptoms of lactose intolerance. © 2011 Thomas et al.

  16. Immunohistochemical study about the Flt-1/VEGFR1 expression in the gastrointestinal tract of mouse, rat, dog, swine and monkey.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, A; Germann, P-G; Junker-Walker, U; Tomovic, A; Seewald, W; Polkinghorne, A; Pospischil, A

    2005-11-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt-1) performs a subordinate effector role in mesenchymal angiogenesis and potentially serves an equally important functional role as a self-contained receptor in epithelial cells. In both endothelial cells and epithelial cells, Flt-1/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) downstream signalling is involved in regulating cellular processes such as cytoskeletal changes and cellular survival protection. Cellular renewal of the gastrointestinal mucosa is based on these processes and might involve Flt-1/VEGFR1 pathway activities; the molecular mechanisms regulating these cellular dynamics remain unclear. This study was performed to investigate the presence and distribution of Flt-1/VEGFR1 in epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Gastrointestinal tissues were taken from eight anatomical sites from mouse, rat, dog, swine and monkey. Present results revealed a cytosolic Flt-1/VEGFR1 staining pattern in mucosal epithelial cells for all investigated species. Non-epithelial structures also displayed a distinct Flt-1/VEGFR1 positivity and included vascular smooth muscle walls, enteric smooth muscle layers, the enteric nervous system and capillary endothelial cells. Diverse intensities of the Flt-1/VEGFR1 binding reaction within each species were observed in the intestinal mucosa with a strong immunoreaction in enterocytes and with a low protein expression in the ileum in most species. Crypt cells in the large intestine were mostly negative for Flt-1/VEGFR1. A peculiar and mainly intranuclear antibody binding reaction was found in Brunner's gland epithelial cells of mouse and rat whereas Brunner's glands of dog, swine and monkey remained completely negative. These results indicate a potential involvement of Flt-1/VEGFR1 in normal restitution of gastrointestinal structures in the species studied. Additionally, intranuclear Flt-1/VEGFR1 antibody binding in Brunner's glands of rodents may suggest

  17. Glutamatergic phenotype of glucagon-like peptide 1 neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, H.; Stornetta, R. L.; Agassandian, K.

    2017-01-01

    The expression of a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) suffices to assign a glutamatergic phenotype to neurons and other secretory cells. For example, intestinal L cells express VGLUT2 and secrete glutamate along with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). We hypothesized that GLP1-positive neurons within the caudal (visceral) nucleus of the solitary tract (cNST) also are glutamatergic. To test this, the axonal projections of GLP1 and other neurons within the cNST were labeled in rats via iontophoretic delivery of anterograde tracer. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy was used to visualize tracer-, GLP1-, and VGLUT2-positive fibers within brainstem, hypothalamic, and limbic forebrain nuclei that receive input from the cNST. Electron microscopy was used to confirm GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling within the same axon varicosities, and fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to examine VGLUT2 mRNA expression by GLP1-positive neurons. Most anterograde tracer-labeled fibers displayed VGLUT2-positive varicosities, providing new evidence that ascending axonal projections from the cNST are primarily glutamatergic. Virtually all GLP1-positive varicosities also were VGLUT2-positive. Electron microscopy confirmed the colocalization of GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling in axon terminals that formed asymmetric (excitatory-type) synapses with unlabeled dendrites in the hypothalamus. Finally, in situ hybridization confirmed that GLP1-positive cNST neurons express VGLUT2 mRNA. Thus, hindbrain GLP1 neurons in rats are equipped to store glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and likely co-release both glutamate and GLP1 from axon varicosities and terminals in the hypothalamus and other brain regions. PMID:25012114

  18. Glutamatergic phenotype of glucagon-like peptide 1 neurons in the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Stornetta, R L; Agassandian, K; Rinaman, Linda

    2015-09-01

    The expression of a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) suffices to assign a glutamatergic phenotype to neurons and other secretory cells. For example, intestinal L cells express VGLUT2 and secrete glutamate along with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1). We hypothesized that GLP1-positive neurons within the caudal (visceral) nucleus of the solitary tract (cNST) also are glutamatergic. To test this, the axonal projections of GLP1 and other neurons within the cNST were labeled in rats via iontophoretic delivery of anterograde tracer. Dual immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy was used to visualize tracer-, GLP1-, and VGLUT2-positive fibers within brainstem, hypothalamic, and limbic forebrain nuclei that receive input from the cNST. Electron microscopy was used to confirm GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling within the same axon varicosities, and fluorescent in situ hybridization was used to examine VGLUT2 mRNA expression by GLP1-positive neurons. Most anterograde tracer-labeled fibers displayed VGLUT2-positive varicosities, providing new evidence that ascending axonal projections from the cNST are primarily glutamatergic. Virtually all GLP1-positive varicosities also were VGLUT2-positive. Electron microscopy confirmed the colocalization of GLP1 and VGLUT2 immunolabeling in axon terminals that formed asymmetric (excitatory-type) synapses with unlabeled dendrites in the hypothalamus. Finally, in situ hybridization confirmed that GLP1-positive cNST neurons express VGLUT2 mRNA. Thus, hindbrain GLP1 neurons in rats are equipped to store glutamate in synaptic vesicles, and likely co-release both glutamate and GLP1 from axon varicosities and terminals in the hypothalamus and other brain regions.

  19. Effects of fasting and/or oxidizing and reducing agents on absorption of neptunium from the gastrointestinal tract of mice and adult or neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Ruemmler, P S; Ryan, J L

    1984-12-01

    Neptunium-237(V) nitrate was administered by gavage to groups of fed or fasted adult and 5-day-old rats. Some groups also received the oxidants quinhydrone or ferric iron, and others received the reducing agent ferrous iron. Adult mice received ferric or ferrous iron and 235Np. When the adult rats were killed at 7 days after gavage, measurements showed that, compared with rats that were fed, a 24-hr fast caused a fivefold increase in 237Np absorption and retention. Both quinhydrone and ferric iron caused an even greater increase in absorption in both fed and fasted rats. Ferrous iron, on the other hand, decreased absorption in fasted rats to values lower than those obtained in fed rats. Similar results were obtained in mice treated with 235Np and either ferric or ferrous iron. The highest absorption obtained after gavage of ferric iron to fasted rats and mice was about two orders of magnitude higher than the value obtained in animals that were fed before gavage. The effects of ferric and ferrous iron on neptunium absorption by neonatal rats were similar to their effects on adult animals but of lesser magnitude. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Np(V), when given in small mass quantities to fed animals, is reduced in the gastrointestinal tract to Np(IV), which is less well absorbed than Np(V).

  20. Bromochloromethane, a Methane Analogue, Affects the Microbiota and Metabolic Profiles of the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Mu, Chun-Long; Luo, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bromochloromethane (BCM), an inhibitor of methanogenesis, has been used in animal production. However, little is known about its impact on the intestinal microbiota and metabolic patterns. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of BCM on the colonic bacterial community and metabolism by establishing a Wistar rat model. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups (control and treated with BCM) and raised for 6 weeks. Bacterial fermentation products in the cecum were determined, and colonic methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were quantified. The colonic microbiota was analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, and metabolites were profiled by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results showed that BCM did not affect body weight and feed intake, but it did significantly change the intestinal metabolic profiles. Cecal protein fermentation was enhanced by BCM, as methylamine, putrescine, phenylethylamine, tyramine, and skatole were significantly increased. Colonic fatty acid and carbohydrate concentrations were significantly decreased, indicating the perturbation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by BCM. BCM treatment decreased the abundance of methanogen populations, while SRB were increased in the colon. BCM did not affect the total colonic bacterial counts but significantly altered the bacterial community composition by decreasing the abundance of actinobacteria, acidobacteria, and proteobacteria. The results demonstrated that BCM treatment significantly altered the microbiotic and metabolite profiles in the intestines, which may provide further information on the use of BCM in animal production. PMID:26567308

  1. Is Remodelling of Corticospinal Tract Terminations Originating in the Intact Hemisphere Associated with Recovery following Transient Ischaemic Stroke in the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Emma J.; Dewar, Deborah; Maxwell, David J

    2016-01-01

    Following large strokes that encompass the cerebral cortex, it has been suggested that the corticospinal tract originating from the non-ischaemic hemisphere reorganises its pattern of terminal arborisation within the spinal cord to compensate for loss of function. However many strokes in humans predominantly affect subcortical structures with minimal involvement of the cerebral cortex. The aim of the present study was to determine whether remodelling of corticospinal terminals arising from the non-ischaemic hemisphere was associated with spontaneous recovery in rats with subcortical infarcts. Rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery and 28 days later, when animals exhibited functional recovery, cholera toxin b subunit was injected into the contralesional, intact forelimb motor cortex in order to anterogradely label terminals within cervical spinal cord segments. Infarcts were limited to subcortical structures and resulted in partial loss of corticospinal tract axons from the ischaemic hemisphere. Quantitative analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the numbers of terminals on the contralesional side of the spinal grey matter between ischaemic and sham rats. The results indicate that significant remodelling of the corticospinal tract from the non-ischaemic hemisphere is not associated with functional recovery in animals with subcortical infarcts. PMID:27014870

  2. Luminal hydrolysis of recombinant human epidermal growth factor in the rat gastrointestinal tract: segmental and developmental differences

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, J.R.; George-Nascimento, C.; Koldovsky, O.

    1988-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), present in high concentrations in the milk of various species, is biologically active following oral administration to young animals. To characterize the luminal metabolism of dietary EGF in the developing gastrointestinal tract, the authors incubated human recombinant /sup 125/I-EGF in vitro at 37/sup 0/ with luminal fluid from the stomach and various segments of the small intestine of 12 day old suckling and 31 day old weanling rats and analyzed the resulting reaction products. The rate of EGF hydrolysis as determined by generation of acid soluble material was greater in weanling small intestine than in suckling, with maximal hydrolytic capacity observed in the mid-jejunum and ilium. Minimal hydrolysis was observed with stomach fluid from both age groups, and EGF retained its ability to elute as a single species on Sephadex G-25 columns and to bind to monospecific affinity columns and placental membrane receptors. Incubation with suckling small intestinal fluid produced little change in the chromatographic profile on Sephadex G-25, but a reduction in antibody and receptor binding was observed. In contrast, incubation with weanling small intestinal fluid yielded both a more pronounced loss of EGF-like material on G-25 columns and a greater reduction in receptor and antibody binding.

  3. Central connectivity of the chorda tympani afferent terminals in the rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Kyung; Lee, Dae Seop; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-03-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives gustatory input via chorda tympani (CT) afferents from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and transmits it to higher brain regions. To help understand how the gustatory information is processed at the 1st relay nucleus of the brain stem, we investigated the central connectivity of the CT afferent terminals in the central subdivision of the rat rNST through retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, immunogold staining for GABA, glycine, and glutamate, and quantitative ultrastructural analysis. Most CT afferents were small myelinated fibers (<5 µm(2) in cross-sectional area) and made simple synaptic arrangements with 1-2 postsynaptic dendrites. It suggests that the gustatory signal is relayed to a specific group of neurons with a small degree of synaptic divergence. The volume of the identified synaptic boutons was positively correlated with their mitochondrial volume and active zone area, and also with the number of their postsynaptic dendrites. One-fourth of the boutons received synapses from GABA-immunopositive presynaptic profiles, 27 % of which were also glycine-immunopositive. These results suggest that the gustatory information mediated by CT afferents to the rNST is processed in a simple and specific manner. They also suggest that the minority of CT afferents are presynaptically modulated by GABA- and/or glycine-mediated mechanism.

  4. The neural code for taste in the nucleus of the solitary tract of the rat: effects of adaptation.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, P M; Lemon, C H

    2000-01-10

    Adaptation of the tongue to NaCl, HCl, quinine or sucrose was used as a tool to study the stability and organization of response profiles in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Taste responses in the NTS were recorded in anesthetized rats before and after adaptation of the tongue to NaCl, HCl, sucrose or quinine. Results showed that the magnitude of response to test stimuli following adaptation was a function of the context, i.e., adaptation condition, in which the stimuli were presented. Over half of all taste responses were either attenuated or enhanced following the adaptation procedure: NaCl adaptation produced the most widespread, non-stimulus-selective cross-adaptation and sucrose adaptation produced the least frequent cross-adaptation and the most frequent enhancement of taste responses. Adaptation to quinine cross-adapted to sucrose and adaptation to HCl cross-adapted to quinine in over half of the units tested. The adaptation procedure sometimes unmasked taste responses where none were present beforehand and sometimes altered taste responses to test stimuli even though the adapting stimulus did not itself produce a response. These effects demonstrated a form of context-dependency of taste responsiveness in the NTS and further suggest a broad potentiality in the sensitivity of NTS units across taste stimuli. Across unit patterns of response remained distinct from each other under all adaptation conditions. Discriminability of these patterns may provide a neurophysiological basis for residual psychophysical abilities following adaptation.

  5. Effect of Calabash Chalk on the Histomorphology of the Gastro-Oesophageal Tract of Growing Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moses, B Ekong; Emma, E John; Christopher, C Mbadugha; Enobong I, Bassey; Theresa, B Ekanem

    2012-01-01

    Background: Calabash chalk is a naturally occurring mineral consumed by members of some Nigerian communities for pleasure and by pregnant women as a remedy for morning sickness. The consumption of this geophagic material motivated our interest on the effect of the chalk on the histomorphology of the gastro-oesophageal tract. Methods: Twenty-eight young Wistar rats, 4 weeks old, were divided into 4 groups of equal size. Group 1 animals served as controls and received 1 mL of distilled water. Groups 2, 3, and 4 received orally 1 mL of a Calabash chalk suspension containing 40 mg/mL for 14, 21, and 28 days, respectively. Upon completion of the treatments, the animals in groups 2, 3, and 4 were sacrificed on days 15, 22, and 29, respectively, and the control group animals were sacrificed on day 29. All animals were euthanised using chloroform anaesthesia. The oesophagus and the stomach of each animal were dissected out and routinely processed for histological studies. Results: There was oedema with haemorrhages in the mucosa of the stomach, and acanthosis, hyperkeratosis, and koilocytic changes were observed in the mucosa of the oesophagus of the groups treated with 40 mg/mL of Calabash chalk suspension. Conclusion: Calabash chalk caused histological changes to the stomach and the oesophagus that may lead to other pathophysiological conditions. PMID:22977372

  6. Odor-Taste Convergence in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract of the Awake Freely Licking Rat

    PubMed Central

    Escanilla, Olga D.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Flavor is produced by the integration of taste, olfaction, texture, and temperature, currently thought to occur in the cortex. However, previous work has shown that brainstem taste-related nuclei also respond to multisensory inputs. Here, we test the hypothesis that taste and olfaction interact in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS; the first neural relay in the central gustatory pathway) in awake, freely licking rats. Electrophysiological recordings of taste and taste + odor responses were conducted in an experimental chamber following surgical electrode implantation and recovery. Tastants (0.1 m NaCl, 0.1 m sucrose, 0.01 m citric acid, and 0.0001 m quinine) were delivered for five consecutive licks interspersed with five licks of artificial saliva rinse delivered on a VR5 schedule. Odorants were n-amyl acetate (banana), acetic acid (vinegar), octanoic acid (rancid), and phenylethyl alcohol (floral). For each cell, metric space analyses were used to quantify the information conveyed by spike count, by the rate envelope, and by individual spike timing. Results revealed diverse effects of odorants on taste-response magnitude and latency across cells. Importantly, NTS cells were more competent at discriminating taste + odor stimuli versus tastants presented alone for all taste qualities using both rate and temporal coding. The strong interaction of odorants and tastants at the NTS underscores its role as the initial node in the neural circuit that controls food identification and ingestion. PMID:25904782

  7. Enhanced heat shock protein 25 immunoreactivity in cranial nerve motoneurons and their related fiber tracts in rats prenatally-exposed to X-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Horiuchi-Hirose, Miwa; Murase, Kenya

    2014-05-01

    Alterations in histoarchitecture of the brainstem were examined immunohistochemically in 4-week-old rats with a single whole body X-irradiation at a dose of 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 Gy on embryonic day (ED) 15 using anti-heat shock protein 25 (HSP25). HSP25 immunostaining was seen in the neuronal perikarya of cranial nerve motoneurons, that is, the motor and mesencephalic nuclei of the trigeminal nerve, facial nucleus, abducens nucleus and accessory facial nucleus in the pons, and the ambiguous nucleus, dorsal nucleus of vagus nerve and hypoglossus nucleus in the medulla oblongata of intact controls. In 0.5 to 1.5 Gy-irradiated rats, HSP25 immunostaining in those neurons was more intense than in controls, while the most intense immunostaining was marked in 1.5 Gy-irradiated rats. HSP25 immunostaining was also apparent in the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve tracts in 0.5 to 1.5 Gy-irradiated rats, but was faint in controls. Interestingly, HSP25 immunostaining was aberrantly enhanced in dendritic arbors in the magnocellular region of medial vestibular nucleus of 0.5-1.5 Gy-irradiated rats. Those arbors were identified as excitatory secondary vestibulo-ocular neurons by double immunofluorescence for HSP25 and SMI-32. The results suggest an increase of HSP25 expression in cranial nerve motoneurons and their related fiber tracts from prenatal exposure to ionizing irradiation. This may be an adaptive response to chronic hypoxia due to malformed brain arteries caused by prenatal ionizing irradiation.

  8. Characterization of Neural Activity Recorded from the Descending Tracts of the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Abhishek; Sahin, Mesut

    2010-01-01

    A multi-electrode array (MEA) was implanted in the dorsolateral funiculus of the cervical spinal cord to record descending information during behavior in freely moving rats. Neural signals were characterized in terms of frequency and information content. Frequency analysis revealed components both at the range of local field potentials and multi-unit activity. Coherence between channels decreased steadily with inter-contact distance and frequency suggesting greater spatial selectivity for multi-unit activity compared to local field potentials. Principal component analysis (PCA) extracted multiple channels of neural activity with patterns that correlated to the behavior, indicating multiple dimensionality of the signals. Two different behaviors involving the forelimbs, face cleaning and food reaching, generated neural signals through distinctly different combination of neural channels, which suggested that these two behaviors could readily be differentiated from recordings. This preliminary data demonstrated that descending spinal cord signals recorded with MEAs can be used to extract multiple channels of command control information and potentially be utilized as a means of communication in high level spinal cord injury subjects. PMID:20589238

  9. Inhibition by tianeptine of neuronally mediated contractions in the rat isolated gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Victoria N; Bassil, Anna K; Lee, Kevin; Sanger, Gareth J

    2008-05-01

    The antidepressant tianeptine is associated with a small but significant incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, including nausea and constipation. Since the site of action of tianeptine is not clear, we looked for an ability of this drug to directly interfere with GI motility. The effects of tianeptine were studied in rat isolated stomach and colon preparations, in which neuronally mediated (predominantly cholinergic) contractions were evoked by electrical field stimulation. Tianeptine concentration dependently inhibited these contractions in both stomach (0.3-10microM; n=2-5) and colon (1-10microM; n=3-6). This activity was likely to be prejunctional, since contractions evoked by carbachol were unaffected by tianeptine 1microM. Further, the inhibitory activity of tianeptine was unaffected by inhibitors of 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline re-uptake, adenosine metabolism, nitric oxide synthesis and tryptophan dehydroxylase. Thus, our experiments demonstrate a pathway by which tianeptine affects GI functions and this could explain the side effects observed. It is not known if the mechanism of this activity is also related in any way to the therapeutic action of tianeptine within the CNS.

  10. Individual sympathetic postganglionic neurons coinnervate myenteric ganglia and smooth muscle layers in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Walter, Gary C; Phillips, Robert J; McAdams, Jennifer L; Powley, Terry L

    2016-09-01

    A full description of the terminal architecture of sympathetic axons innervating the gastrointestinal (GI) tract has not been available. To label sympathetic fibers projecting to the gut muscle wall, dextran biotin was injected into the celiac and superior mesenteric ganglia (CSMG) of rats. Nine days postinjection, animals were euthanized and stomachs and small intestines were processed as whole mounts (submucosa and mucosa removed) to examine CSMG efferent terminals. Myenteric neurons were counterstained with Cuprolinic Blue; catecholaminergic axons were stained immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase. Essentially all dextran-labeled axons (135 of 136 sampled) were tyrosine hydroxylase-positive. Complete postganglionic arbors (n = 154) in the muscle wall were digitized and analyzed morphometrically. Individual sympathetic axons formed complex arbors of varicose neurites within myenteric ganglia/primary plexus and, concomitantly, long rectilinear arrays of neurites within circular muscle/secondary plexus or longitudinal muscle/tertiary plexus. Very few CSMG neurons projected exclusively (i.e., ∼100% of an arbor's varicose branches) to myenteric plexus (∼2%) or smooth muscle (∼14%). With less stringent inclusion criteria (i.e., ≥85% of an axon's varicose branches), larger minorities of neurons projected predominantly to either myenteric plexus (∼13%) or smooth muscle (∼27%). The majority (i.e., ∼60%) of all individual CSMG postganglionics formed mixed, heterotypic arbors that coinnervated extensively (>15% of their varicose branches per target) both myenteric ganglia and smooth muscle. The fact that ∼87% of all sympathetics projected either extensively or even predominantly to smooth muscle, while simultaneously contacting myenteric plexus, is consistent with the view that these neurons control GI muscle directly, if not exclusively. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2577-2603, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Degradation of polyphenols (catechin and tannic acid) in the rat intestinal tract. Effect on colonic fermentation and faecal output.

    PubMed

    Bravo, L; Abia, R; Eastwood, M A; Saura-Calixto, F

    1994-06-01

    Low- and intermediate-molecular-weight polyphenols are usually extracted by using different solvents (e.g. water, methanol, aqueous acetone). The aim of the present work was to study the possible effects of some extractable polyphenols (EPP) on fat and protein digestibilities and on the colonic microflora. Degradability of these compounds through the intestinal tract was also studied. Catechin and tannic acid (TA) were chosen as representatives of the most common basic structures of EPP (flavonoids and gallic acid respectively). Three groups of eight male Wistar rats were given either a control diet free of EPP, or diets containing 20 g/kg dry matter of catechin and TA. Body-weight and food intake were monitored during a 3-week experimental period. Faeces and urine were collected daily during the third experimental week. EPP and fat were determined in faeces, and N in both urine and faeces. Only 3.1 and 4.6% of the ingested catechin and TA respectively were excreted in faeces, indicating that absorption and/or degradation of these EPP had occurred. HPLC analysis of the polyphenolic content of faeces showed qualitative differences between groups. A significant increase of total faecal weight as well as water, fat and N excretion was produced by TA. Catechin only caused an increase in fat excretion. In vitro fermentation assays were also performed to study the effect of EPP on the colonic microflora. Both catechin and TA affected the yield of end-products of fermentation, and were also degraded during the fermentation process.

  12. Bombesin receptor subtype-3 is expressed by the enteric nervous system and by interstitial cells of Cajal in the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Christophe; Juhem, Aurélie; Peinnequin, André; Bonaz, Bruno

    2005-04-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3), a G-protein-coupled orphan receptor, shares 47% and 55% homology with other known mammalian bombesin receptors. Despite the molecular characterization of BRS-3, its function remains unclear as a consequence of its low affinity for bombesin and the absence of an identified natural ligand. Although the other mammalian bombesin receptors are widely distributed in the gut and central nervous system, expression of BRS-3 in the gastrointestinal tract has not been previously described. We report the expression of BRS-3 mRNA and protein in the tunica muscularis of the rat gastrointestinal tract. The mRNA expression pattern was studied by reverse transcription followed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. To identify the cellular sites of expression of BRS-3, we performed immunocytochemistry by using a N-terminus-specific affinity-purified antiserum. BRS-3 was found to be widely expressed in the rat gastrointestinal tract at both the mRNA and protein levels. BRS-3-like immunoreactivity (BRS-3-LI) was localized in neurons of the myenteric and submucosal ganglia, being primarily concentrated near the neuronal plasma membrane, and in fibers distributed in the longitudinal and circular muscle layers. In addition, BRS-3-LI was observed in the cell bodies and processes of c-kit+ interstitial cells of Cajal. These data have functional applications for the effects mediated by the activation of BRS-3 on gut motility through distinct neuronal and non-neuronal pathways.

  13. Dorsal horn cells connected to the lissauer tract and their relation to the dorsal root potential in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lidierth, M; Wall, P D

    1998-08-01

    We have examined the role of dorsal horn cells that respond to Lissauer tract stimulation in regulating primary afferent depolarization (PAD). PAD was monitored by recording the dorsal root potential (DRP) in the roots of the lumbar cord. Recordings were made of the discharges of Lissauer tract-responsive cells, and their discharges were correlated with the DRPs occurring spontaneously and those evoked by stimulation. Electrical microstimulation of the Lissauer tract (<10 microA; 200 micros) was used to activate the tract selectively and evoke a characteristic long-latency DRP. Cells that were excited by Lissauer tract stimulation were found in the superficial laminae of the dorsal horn. They exhibited low rates of ongoing discharge and responded to Lissauer tract stimulation typically with a burst of impulses with a latency to onset of 5.6 +/- 2.7 ms (mean +/- SD) and to termination of 13.6 +/- 4.1 ms (n = 105). Lissauer tract-responsive cells in L5 were shown to receive convergent inputs from cutaneous and muscle afferents as they responded to stimulation of the sural nerve (100%, n = 19) and the nerve to gastrocnemius (95%, n = 19). The latency of the response to sural nerve stimulation was 3.7 +/- 1.5 ms and to gastrocnemius nerve stimulation, 8.3 +/- 3.6 ms. Stimulation through a microelectrode at a depth of 1.5 mm in the sensorimotor cortex (100 microA, 200 micros) evoked a response in 17 of 31 Lissauer tract-responsive cells (55%) with a latency to onset of 21.9 +/- 2.8 ms (n = 17). Stimulation of the sural nerve, nerve to gastrocnemius or sensorimotor cortex was shown to depress the response of Lissauer tract-responsive cells to a subsequent Lissauer tract stimulus. The ongoing discharges of Lissauer tract-responsive cells were correlated to the spontaneous DRP using spike-triggered averaging. Of 123 cells analyzed in this way, 117 (95%) were shown to be correlated to the DRP. In addition, the peaks of spontaneous negative DRPs in spinally transected

  14. Immunoexpression of constitutive and inducible cyclo-oxygenase isoforms in the rat foetal and maternal digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Burdan, F; Szumiło, J; Gajjar, B; Dudka, J; Korobowicz, A; Patel, S; Nat, A; Nat, A S; Dworzański, W; Kwaśniewski, W

    2008-02-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX), which catalyses the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide and prostanoids, is widely expressed in mammalian organs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the immunoexpression of the constitutive and inducible cyclo-oxygenase isoforms (COX-1 and COX-2 respectively) in the oesophagus, stomach and the small and large bowels of untreated rat dams and foetuses on gestational day 21. The localisation of the COX isoforms was similar in the maternal and foetal organs, although the intensity of the reaction for COX-2 was stronger in the foetuses. Cytoplasmic COX-1 immunostaining was found in myocytes of the muscularis propria, muscularis mucosae and the blood vessels. It was also positive in the endothelial cells, scattered stromal cells of the lamina propria and the ganglion cells of the nerve plexus in the bowels. Apart from the keratinised layer, a strong reaction was revealed in the stratified squamous epithelium of the oesophagus and forestomach. Negative or weakly positive staining was found in the mucus-secreting cells covering the surface, gastric pits and pyloric glands, as well as in the parietal cells and the chief cells. Weakly positive COX-1 immunostaining was observed in epithelial cells of the small intestine crypts, but in some cases enterocytes and goblet cells covering villi were also positive. In the colonic mucosa weak COX-1 staining was typical of the absorptive, and goblet cells. The COX-2 immunostaining was nuclear and/or cytoplasmic. An inconsistent positive reaction was seen in the muscle of the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propria and the blood vessels. Positive staining was also found in scattered stromal cells of the lamina propria and adventitia and the ganglion cells. Weak nuclear staining was found in the stratified squamous epithelium of the oesophagus and forestomach. Unlike the strong foetal reactivity in the epithelial cells of the glandular stomach, a negative or weakly positive reaction was

  15. Regional differences in serotonin content in the nucleus of the solitary tract of male rats after hypovolemia produced by polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Curtis, J Thomas; Anderson, Michael B; Curtis, Kathleen S

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in centrally mediated compensatory responses to volume loss in rats. Accordingly, we hypothesized that slowly developing, non-hypotensive hypovolemia increases serotonin in the hindbrain nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We produced volume loss in adult male rats by administering hyperoncotic polyethylene glycol (PEG) and then assessed 5-HT levels in the NTS using measurements of tissue 5-HT content or 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The results show selective increases of 5-HT in the caudal NTS after PEG treatment, but no change in the primary 5-HT metabolite, 5-HIAA. Moreover, the intensity of 5-HT immunolabeled fibers in the caudal NTS was increased after PEG treatment. These findings suggest that, after PEG-induced hypovolemia, 5-HT accumulates in neural elements in the caudal NTS. We propose that this accumulation is attributable to an initial release of 5-HT that then acts at presynaptic autoreceptors to inhibit subsequent 5-HT release.

  16. Aromatase inhibition exacerbates pain and reactive gliosis in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of female rats caused by spinothalamic tract injury.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanpoor, Samar; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Haeri-Rohani, Ali; Khodagholi, Fariba; Jorjani, Masoumeh

    2014-11-01

    Central pain syndrome is characterized by severe and excruciating pain resulting from a lesion in the central nervous system. Previous studies have shown that estradiol decreases pain and that inhibitors of the enzyme aromatase, which synthesizes estradiol from aromatizable androgens, increases pain sensitivity. In this study we have assessed whether aromatase expression in the dorsal horns of the spinal cord is altered in a rat model of central pain syndrome, induced by the unilateral electrolytic lesion of the spinothalamic tract. Protein and mRNA levels of aromatase, as well as the protein and mRNA levels of estrogen receptors α and β, were increased in the dorsal horn of female rats after spinothalamic tract injury, suggesting that the injury increased estradiol synthesis and signaling in the dorsal horn. To determine whether the increased aromatase expression in this pain model may participate in the control of pain, mechanical allodynia thresholds were determined in both hind paws after the intrathecal administration of letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor. Aromatase inhibition enhanced mechanical allodynia in both hind paws. Because estradiol is known to regulate gliosis we assessed whether the spinothalamic tract injury and aromatase inhibition regulated gliosis in the dorsal horn. The proportion of microglia with a reactive phenotype and the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive astrocytes were increased by the injury in the dorsal horn. Aromatase inhibition enhanced the effect of the injury on gliosis. Furthermore, a significant a positive correlation of mechanical allodynia and gliosis in the dorsal horn was detected. These findings suggest that aromatase is up-regulated in the dorsal horn in a model of central pain syndrome and that aromatase activity in the spinal cord reduces mechanical allodynia by controlling reactive gliosis in the dorsal horn.

  17. Alterations of action potentials and the localization of Nav1.6 sodium channels in spared axons after hemisection injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Hunanyan, Arsen S; Alessi, Valentina; Patel, Samik; Pearse, Damien D; Matthews, Gary; Arvanian, Victor L

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we reported a pronounced reduction in transmission through surviving axons contralateral to chronic hemisection (HX) of adult rat spinal cord. To examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for this diminished transmission, we recorded intracellularly from lumbar lateral white matter axons in deeply anesthetized adult rats in vivo and measured the propagation of action potentials (APs) through rubrospinal/reticulospinal tract (RST/RtST) axons contralateral to chronic HX at T10. We found decreased excitability in these axons, manifested by an increased rheobase to trigger APs and longer latency for AP propagation passing the injury level, without significant differences in axonal resting membrane potential and input resistance. These electrophysiological changes were associated with altered spatial localization of Nav1.6 sodium channels along axons: a subset of axons contralateral to the injury exhibited a diffuse localization (>10 μm spread) of Nav1.6 channels, a pattern characteristic of demyelinated axons (Craner MJ, Newcombe J, Black JA, Hartle C, Cuzner ML, Waxman SG. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101: 8168-8173, 2004b). This result was substantiated by ultrastructural changes seen with electron microscopy, in which an increased number of large-caliber, demyelinated RST axons were found contralateral to the chronic HX. Therefore, an increased rheobase, pathological changes in the distribution of Nav1.6 sodium channels, and the demyelination of contralateral RST axons are likely responsible for their decreased conduction chronically after HX and thus may provide novel targets for strategies to improve function following incomplete spinal cord injury.

  18. Implications of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) with codissolved brain-derived neurotrophic factor injectable scaffold on motor function recovery rate following cervical dorsolateral funiculotomy in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Grous, Lauren Conova; Vernengo, Jennifer; Jin, Ying; Himes, B. Timothy; Shumsky, Jed S.; Fischer, Itzhak; Lowman, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Object In a follow-up study to their prior work, the authors evaluated a novel delivery system for a previously established treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), based on a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), lightly cross-linked with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) injectable scaffold. The primary aim of this work was to assess the recovery of both spontaneous and skilled forelimb function following a cervical dorsolateral funiculotomy in the rat. This injury ablates the rubrospinal tract (RST) but spares the dorsal and ventral corticospinal tract and can severely impair reaching and grasping abilities. Methods Animals received an implant of either PNIPAAm-g-PEG or PNIPAAm-g-PEG + brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The single-pellet reach-to-grasp task and the staircase-reaching task were used to assess skilled motor function associated with reaching and grasping abilities, and the cylinder task was used to assess spontaneous motor function, both before and after injury. Results Because BDNF can stimulate regenerating RST axons, the authors showed that animals receiving an implant of PNIPAAm-g-PEG with codissolved BDNF had an increased recovery rate of fine motor function when compared with a control group (PNIPAAm-g-PEG only) on both a staircase-reaching task at 4 and 8 weeks post-SCI and on a single-pellet reach-to-grasp task at 5 weeks post-SCI. In addition, spontaneous motor function, as measured in the cylinder test, recovered to preinjury values in animals receiving PNIPAAm-g-PEG + BDNF. Fluorescence immunochemistry indicated the presence of both regenerating axons and BDA-labeled fibers growing up to or within the host-graft interface in animals receiving PNIPAAm-g-PEG + BDNF. Conclusions Based on their results, the authors suggest that BDNF delivered by the scaffold promoted the growth of RST axons into the lesion, which may have contributed in part to the increased recovery rate. PMID:23581453

  19. UPTAKE AND INTERNAL DOSIMETRY OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to large-volume commercial uses as an intermediate and for water disinfection, chlorine (Cl2) is an important hazardous air pollutant (HAP). Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. We conducted studies to characterize determinants...

  20. UPTAKE AND INTERNAL DOSIMETRY OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to large-volume commercial uses as an intermediate and for water disinfection, chlorine (Cl2) is an important hazardous air pollutant (HAP). Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. We conducted studies to characterize determinants...

  1. Isolation of adhesive strains and evaluation of the colonization and immune response by Lactobacillus plantarum L2 in the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Li, Jieshou; Li, Qiurong; Zhang, Haiyun; Li, Ning

    2009-06-01

    Five Lactobacillus strains were tested for their ability to adhere to Caco-2 and IEC-6 cell lines as in vitro models and to induce of the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Among the tested strains, Lactobacillus plantarum L2 was the most adhesive strain, approximately 595+/-125 or 704+/-273 of the added bacteria adhered to Caco-2 or IEC-6 cell cultures, respectively. Furthermore, L. plantarum L2 was also found to induce a considerable level of IL-10 from PBMCs, but low levels of all three pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma and IL-12. From these results, one promising strain, L. plantarum L2, was selected for in vivo studies. For 28 days F344 rats were fed a daily dose of 2 x 10(9)L. plantarum L2; for the next 14 days the rats were not fed any Lactobacillus. Intestinal mucosal samples and feces were taken at days 0, 28 and 42 to determine the colonizing ability of the lactobacilli. Recovered Lactobacillus isolates were initially identified by API 50CHL and strain-specific PCR. Intestinal specimen was analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization with a strain-specific molecular probe, and immune cell populations were determined by immunostaining for evidence of immune responses at the colonized sites. After intake of L. plantarum L2 for 28 days, a significant increase in live L. plantarum was found in the rats' feces, small intestine and colon. The bacterial levels remained high even after the L. plantarum L2 administration had been stopped for two weeks. Strain-specific PCR and FISH provided clear and direct evidence of colonization of the rat gastrointestinal tract by L. plantarum L2. Additionally, a significant increase in CD19-positive cells in the ileum was observed after intake of L. plantarum L2. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with L. plantarum L2 induced significant colonization of the gastrointestinal tract of rats, and this was associated with significant

  2. A critical examination of the mode of action of quinacrine in the reproductive tract in a 2-year rat cancer bioassay and its implications for human clinical use.

    PubMed

    Haseman, Joseph K; Growe, Roger G; Zeiger, Errol; McConnell, Ernest E; Luster, Michael I; Lippes, Jack

    2015-04-01

    A rat carcinogenicity bioassay (CaBio) of quinacrine was reanalyzed to investigate its mode of tumor induction. Quinacrine's effects in the rat uterus when administered as a slurry in methylcellulose were contrasted with the human clinical experience which uses a solid form of the drug, to determine the relevance of the tumors produced in the rat to safe clinical use of quinacrine for permanent contraception (QS). A review was performed of the study report, dose feasibility studies, and clinical evaluations of women who had undergone the QS procedure. The top three doses of quinacrine in the CaBio exceeded the maximum tolerated dose, and produced chronic damage, including inflammation, resulting in reproductive tract tumors. Chronic inflammation was significantly correlated with the tumors; there was no evidence of treatment-related tumors in animals without chronic inflammation or other reproductive system toxicity. Because such permanent uterine damage and chronic toxicity have not been observed in humans under therapeutic conditions, we conclude that this mode of action for tumor production will not occur at clinically relevant doses in women who choose quinacrine for permanent contraception.

  3. Inflammation and Edema in the Lung and Kidney of Hemorrhagic Shock Rats Are Alleviated by Biliary Tract External Drainage via the Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhao, Bing; Chen, Ying; Ma, Li; Chen, Er-Zhen; Mao, En-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    The lung and kidney are two organs that are easily affected by hemorrhagic shock (HS). We investigated roles of biliary tract external drainage (BTED) in inflammation and edema of the lung and kidney in HS and its relationship with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Rat models of HS were induced by drawing blood from the femoral artery until a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 40 ± 5 mmHg was achieved. A MAP of 40 ± 5 mmHg was maintained for 60 min. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to the following groups: sham group; HS group; HS + zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, group; HS + BTED group; HS + BTED + ZnPP group; and HS + BTED + bile infusion (BI) group. HO-1 levels, aquaporin-1 levels, and ratios of dry/wet in the lung and kidney increased markedly after BTED, but tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase levels in the lung and kidney decreased significantly after BTED under HS conditions. Under the condition that HO-1 was inhibited by ZnPP, all these effects induced by BTED disappeared in the lung and kidney. These results demonstrated that inflammation and edema of the lung and kidney of HS rats are alleviated by BTED via the HO-1 pathway.

  4. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC) Ultrastructure and Connexin 43 Protein Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Functional Dyspepsia (FD) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoshan; Xie, Shen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuer; Liu, Mailan; Liu, Mi; Chang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal motility disorder is the main clinical manifestation in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. Electroacupuncture is effective in improving gastrointestinal motility disorder in FD; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and the pacemaker potential is transmitted to nearby cells through gap junctions between ICC or ICC and the smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture on ICC ultrastructure and expression of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in FD rats. Material/Methods The animals were randomized into 3 groups: control, model, and electroacupuncture. Electroacupuncture was applied at Zusanli (ST36) in the electroacupuncture group daily for 10 days, while no electroacupuncture was applied to model group animals. Results Ultrastructure of ICC recovered normally in gastric antrum and small intestine specimens was improved, with Cx43 expression levels in these tissues significantly increased in the electroacupuncture group compared with the model group. Conclusions These findings indicated that electroacupuncture is effective in alleviating ICC damage and reduces Cx43 levels in FD rats, and suggest that ICC and Cx43 are involved in electroacupuncture treatment in rats with FD to improve gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:27297942

  5. Dose Addition Models Based on Biologically Relevant Reductions in Fetal Testosterone Accurately Predict Postnatal Reproductive Tract Alterations by a Phthalate Mixture in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Howdeshell, Kembra L.; Rider, Cynthia V.; Wilson, Vickie S.; Furr, Johnathan R.; Lambright, Christy R.; Gray, L. Earl

    2015-01-01

    Challenges in cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic phthalate mixtures include a lack of data on all the individual phthalates and difficulty determining the biological relevance of reduction in fetal testosterone (T) on postnatal development. The objectives of the current study were 2-fold: (1) to test whether a mixture model of dose addition based on the fetal T production data of individual phthalates would predict the effects of a 5 phthalate mixture on androgen-sensitive postnatal male reproductive tract development, and (2) to determine the biological relevance of the reductions in fetal T to induce abnormal postnatal reproductive tract development using data from the mixture study. We administered a dose range of the mixture (60, 40, 20, 10, and 5% of the top dose used in the previous fetal T production study consisting of 300 mg/kg per chemical of benzyl butyl (BBP), di(n)butyl (DBP), diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP), di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP), and 100 mg dipentyl (DPP) phthalate/kg; the individual phthalates were present in equipotent doses based on their ability to reduce fetal T production) via gavage to Sprague Dawley rat dams on GD8-postnatal day 3. We compared observed mixture responses to predictions of dose addition based on the previously published potencies of the individual phthalates to reduce fetal T production relative to a reference chemical and published postnatal data for the reference chemical (called DAref). In addition, we predicted DA (called DAall) and response addition (RA) based on logistic regression analysis of all 5 individual phthalates when complete data were available. DA ref and DA all accurately predicted the observed mixture effect for 11 of 14 endpoints. Furthermore, reproductive tract malformations were seen in 17–100% of F1 males when fetal T production was reduced by about 25–72%, respectively. PMID:26350170

  6. Activation of neurons in the hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus via hypothalamic projections of the nucleus of the solitary tract following refeeding of fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Renner, Eva; Szabó-Meltzer, Kinga I; Puskás, Nela; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Dobolyi, Arpád; Palkovits, Miklós

    2010-01-01

    We report that satiation evokes neuronal activity in the ventral subdivision of the hypothalamic dorsomedial nucleus (DMH) as indicated by increased c-fos expression in response to refeeding in fasted rats. The absence of significant Fos activation following food presentation without consumption suggests that satiation but not craving for food elicits the activation of ventral DMH neurons. The distribution pattern of the prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP)-immunoreactive (ir) network showed remarkable correlations with the distribution of activated neurons within the DMH. The PrRP-ir fibers and terminals were immunolabeled with tyrosine hydroxylase, suggesting their origin in lower brainstem instead of local, hypothalamic PrRP cells. PrRP-ir fibers arising from neurons of the nucleus of the solitary tract could be followed to the hypothalamus. Unilateral transections of these fibers at pontine and caudal hypothalamic levels resulted in a disappearance of the dense PrRP-ir network in the ventral DMH while PrRP immunoreactivity was increased in transected fibers caudal to the knife cuts as well as in perikarya of the nucleus of the solitary tract ipsilateral to the transections. In accord with these changes, the number of Fos-expressing neurons following refeeding declined in the ipsilateral but remained high in the contralateral DMH. However, the Fos response in the ventral DMH was not attenuated following chemical lesion (neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment) of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, another possible source of DMH inputs. These findings suggest that PrRP projections from the nucleus of the solitary tract contribute to the activation of ventral DMH neurons during refeeding, possibly by transferring information on cholecystokinin-mediated satiation.

  7. Neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in the baroreceptor reflex arc: connections between the nucleus of the solitary tract and the ventrolateral medulla oblongata in the rat.

    PubMed

    Palkovits, M; Mezey, E; Fodor, M; Ganten, D; Bahner, U; Geiger, H; Heidland, A

    1995-01-01

    The primary baroreceptor area (nucleus of the solitary tract-NTS) is anatomically interconnected with the rostral ("vasomotor area") and the caudal ("vasodepressor area") ventrolateral medulla by a well-defined arc of neuronal pathways. The chemical character and the direction of these pathways have been investigated with immunohistochemical and neurochemical techniques in intact and brainstem-operated rats. The transection of the neuronal arc resulted in an accumulation of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in a small group of cells in the NTS adjacent to the area postrema, ipsilateral to the knife cut. Decreased angiotensinogen mRNA and atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations were measured in the ventrolateral medulla after the cut, and an accumulation of angiotensin II-immunoreactivity was found in neuronal perikarya in the ipsilateral NTS. Intracranial vagotomy caused marked depletions in glutamate levels in the subcommissural portion of the NTS and in the caudal ventrolateral medulla but nowhere else in the brainstem investigated including the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

  8. Content and in vitro release of endogenous amino acids in the area of the nucleus of the solitary tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Meeley, M P; Underwood, M D; Talman, W T; Reis, D J

    1989-12-01

    We sought to identify amino acid neurotransmitter candidates within the nucleus of the solitary tract in rats. Twenty endogenous amino acids were quantified by reverse-phase HPLC with fluorescence detection (30-fmol limit). Micropunches (1 mm) of the intermediate area of the solitary nucleus were prepared, and the amino acid content determined. Of all the components measured, the putative transmitters Glu, Gly, gamma-aminobutyric acid, taurine, Asp, and Ala appeared in greatest concentrations. Bilateral micropunches superfused in vitro with buffered medium containing 56 mM potassium released Glu, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and Gly in a significant manner (p less than 0.05) compared with basal levels. With Glu, 78% was calcium-dependent and, therefore, presumably from nerve endings; 99% of gamma-aminobutyric acid and 42% of Gly were dependent on calcium. After removal of the nodose ganglion, a bilateral decrease in the calcium-dependent release of Glu and gamma-aminobutyric acid, but not Gly, was observed; decreases were significant ipsilateral to the site of ablation. We conclude that (a) Glu is a transmitter of primary afferents in the nucleus of the solitary tract; (b) glutamatergic afferents may interact with gamma-aminobutyric acid system(s) in this region; (c) Gly also may participate in the mediation and/or modulation of cardiovascular or other visceral reflexes; and (d) amino acid neurotransmission may play an integral role in the neurogenic control of arterial pressure.

  9. Manifestation of the Se, Cd and Mo levels in different components of the peripheral blood of Sprague-Dawley rats poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Fang; Sun, Xuan; Cao, Bing; Wen, Hua; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Duo-Jian; Yan, Lai-Lai; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Lu, Qing-Bin; Wang, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of exogenous element exposure via the respiratory tract on the Se, Cd and Mo concentrations in different components of the peripheral blood in rats as well as to determine the correlations of the three trace elements concentrations among the components. The Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and several experimental groups treated with different doses. The rats were exposed to a mixed trace element solution through 10 days of intratracheal instillation. The whole blood of all rats was collected and separated into three parts with Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The Se, Cd and Mo levels in whole blood, plasma, red blood cells (RBCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The concentrations of the three trace elements increased together with the increase of the given doses (P<0.05), except Cd and Mo in the PBMCs. The three trace elements lacked linearity with the exposure doses in the PBMCs (r, 0.249-0.508), while the opposite was the case for the other components of the peripheral blood (r, 0.806-0.934). The correlation coefficients were higher (0.842-0.962) among the whole blood, plasma and RBCs than between PBMCs and other components, such as Se (0.376-0.529), Cd (0.495-0.604) and, especially, Mo (0.160-0.257). In conclusion, PBMCs might provide information about endogenous factors, and whole blood could more accurately reflect the effects of exogenous factors compared to other blood components.

  10. Cortical PKC inhibition promotes axonal regeneration of the corticospinal tract and forelimb functional recovery after cervical dorsal spinal hemisection in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofei; Hu, Jianguo; She, Yun; Smith, George M; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Our previous study shows that conventional protein kinases C (cPKCs) are key signaling mediators that are activated by extracellular inhibitory molecules. Inhibition of cPKC by intrathecal infusion of a cPKC inhibitor, GÖ6976, into the site of dorsal hemisection (DH) induces regeneration of lesioned dorsal column sensory, but not corticospinal tract (CST), axons. Here, we investigated whether a direct cortical delivery of GÖ6976 into the soma of corticospinal neurons promotes regeneration of CST and the recovery of forelimb function in rats with cervical spinal cord injuries. We report that cortical delivery of GÖ6976 reduced injury-induced activation of conventional PKCα and PKCβ1 in CST neurons, promoted regeneration of CST axons through and beyond a cervical DH at C4, formed new synapses on target neurons caudal to the injury, and enhanced forelimb functional recovery in adult rats. When combined with lenti-Chondroitinase ABC treatment, cortical administration of GÖ6976 promoted even greater CST axonal regeneration and recovery of forelimb function. Thus, this study has demonstrated a novel strategy that can promote anatomical regeneration of damaged CST axons and partial recovery of forelimb function. Importantly, such an effect is critically dependent on the efficient blockage of injury-induced PKC activation in the soma of layer V CST neurons.

  11. ATRAZINE-INDUCED REPRODUCTIVE TRACT ALTERATIONS AFTER TRANSPLACENTAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE IN LONG-EVANS RAT PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have shown that early postnatal exposure to the common herbicide atrazine (ATR) will delay preputial separation (PPS) in Wistar rats and increase incidence of prostate inflammation in adults. To evaluate ATR exposure parameters required for pubertal delays (PPS), we used...

  12. The effect of x rays, DTPA, and aspirin on the absorption of plutonium from the gastrointestinal tract of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.F.; Gorham, L.S.; Miller, B.M.

    1983-04-01

    To measure the effect of radiation on plutonium transport, rats that were exposed to 250-kVp X rays were given /sup 238/Pu 3 days afterwards by either gavage or injection into a ligated segment of the duodenum. In a second group of experiments, rats were either injected intraduodenally with /sup 238/Pu-DTPA or administered the chelate intravenously and the /sup 238/Pu by gavage. In a third experiment, rats that had been gavaged with 200 or 400 mg/kg/day of aspirin for 2 days were injected intragastrically with /sup 238/Pu nitrate. Results of the first experiment showed a dose-dependent increase in /sup 238/Pu absorption between 800 and 1500 rad of lower-body X irradiation. Intravenous or intraduodenal injections of DTPA caused a marked increase in /sup 238/Pu absorption but resulted in decreased plutonium deposition in the skeleton and liver. Retention of /sup 238/Pu in the skeleton of rats given aspirin was double that of controls, but the effect on plutonium absorption was less marked than that of DTPA.

  13. Immunoreactivity for Thymosin Beta 4 and Thymosin Beta 10 in the Adult Rat Oro-Gastro-Intestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, S; Ekstrom, J.; Cabras, T.; Gerosa, C.; Fanni, D.; Di Felice, E.; Locci, A.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2013-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10) are two members of the β-thymosin family, involved in multiple cellular activities in different organs in multiple animal species. Here we report the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in rat tissues, in the gut and in annexed glands. The two peptide were differently expressed: Tβ4 was absent in salivary glands whereas Tβ10 was expressed in parotid and in submandibular glands. Tβ4 was mildly expressed in the tongue and in the esophagus, where Tβ10 was absent. A similar expression was found in the stomach, ileum and colon mucosa. In pancreas Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the Langerhans islet cells; Tβ4 was also detected in the exocrine cells. Both peptide were not expressed in liver cells. When the rat expression pattern in rat organs was compared to reactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 in humans, marked differences were found. Our data clearly indicate a species-specific expression of Tβ4 and Tβ10, characterized by the actual unpredictability of the expression of these peptides in different cells and tissues. The common high expression of Tβ4 in mast cells, both in humans and in rats, represents one of the few similarities between these two species. PMID:23807296

  14. ATRAZINE-INDUCED REPRODUCTIVE TRACT ALTERATIONS AFTER TRANSPLACENTAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE IN MALE LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR wou...

  15. Effects of environmental enrichment on blood vessels in the optic tract of malnourished rats: A morphological and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Everton Horiquini; Soares, Roberto Oliveira; Braga, Natália Nassif; Almeida, Sebastião de Sousa; Lachat, João-José

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects of environmental enrichment in nourished (on a diet containing 16% protein) and malnourished (on a diet containing 6% protein) rats during the critical period of brain development, specifically focusing on the optic nerve. By means of morphologic and morphometric assessment of the optic nerve, we analyzed the changes caused by diet and stimulation (environmental enrichment) on postnatal day 35, a time point ideal for such morphological analysis since developmental processes are considered complete at this age. Malnourished animals presented low body and brain weights and high body-to-brain weight ratio compared to well-nourished rats. Furthermore, malnourished animals showed morphological changes in the optic nerve such as edema and vacuolization characterized by increased interstitial space. The malnourished-stimulated group presented lesions characteristic of early protein malnutrition but were milder than lesions exhibited by malnourished-non-stimulated group. The morphometric analysis revealed no difference in glial cell density between groups, but there was significantly higher blood vessel density in the stimulated rats, independent of their nutritional condition. Our data indicate that protein malnutrition imposed during the critical period of brain development alters the cytoarchitecture of the optic nerve. In addition, we affirm that a 1-hour exposure to an enriched environment everyday was sufficient for tissue preservation in rats maintained on a low-protein diet. This protective effect might be related to angiogenesis, as confirmed by the increased vascular density observed in morphometric analyses.

  16. ATRAZINE-INDUCED REPRODUCTIVE TRACT ALTERATIONS AFTER TRANSPLACENTAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE IN MALE LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR wou...

  17. Elevated mu-opioid receptor expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract accompanies attenuated withdrawal signs after chronic low dose naltrexone in opiate-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, E J; Rudoy, C; Mannelli, P; Oropeza, V; Qian, Y

    2006-02-15

    We previously described a decrease in withdrawal behaviors in opiate-dependent rats that were chronically treated with very low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. Attenuated expression of withdrawal behaviors correlated with decreased c-Fos expression and intracellular signal transduction elements [protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB)] in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. In this study, to determine whether similar cellular changes occurred in forebrain nuclei associated with drug reward, expressions of PKA and pCREB were analyzed in the ventral tegmental area, frontal cortex, striatum, and amygdala of opiate-treated rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. No significant difference in PKA or pCREB was detected in these regions following drug treatment. To examine further the cellular mechanisms in noradrenergic nuclei that could underlie attenuated withdrawal behaviors following low dose naltrexone administration, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and locus coeruleus (LC) were examined for opioid receptor (OR) protein expression. Results showed a significant increase in muOR expression in the NTS of morphine-dependent rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water, and increases in muOR expression were also found to be dose dependent. Protein expression of muOR in the LC and deltaOR in either brain region remained unchanged. In conclusion, our previously reported decreases in c-Fos and PKA expression in the NTS following pretreatment with low doses of naltrexone may be partially explained by a greater inhibition of NTS neurons resulting from increased muOR expression in this region.

  18. Hydrolysis of urea in the gastrointestinal tract of "monoxenic" rats: effect of immunization with strains of ureolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, M C; Ducluzeau, R; Raibaud, P

    1976-01-01

    Axenic rats, in whose feces urea is ordinarily excreted, were inoculated with ureolytic strains of Lactobacillus or Actinobacillus originally derived from the microflora of "holoxenic" rats. In these "monoxenic" animals, harboring one or another of the bacterial strains, fecal urea was hydrolyzed, with a more rapid onset of ureolysis in the case of Actinobacillus as compared with Lactobacillus. In vitro, a parallel difference between the two strains with regard to the onset of ureolysis was observed, hydrolysis beginning at the onset of growth in the case of Actinobacillus and only at the end of the exponential growth phase in the case of Lactobacillus. Extracellular urease activity was demonstrated in cultures of Lactobacillus, whereas none was found extracellularly with Actinobacillus. The pH optimum for the Lactobacillus urease in vitro was found to be 3.0, whereas the corresponding value for Actinobacillus was 6.0. In the two types of monoxenic rats, urea was consistently present in the small intestine and virtually absent from cecum and colon. Hydrolysis of urea in stomach was almost complete in rats bearing Lactobacillus but much less so in animals monoxenic with Actinobacillus, despite essentially equal numbers of organisms in that location. When rats carrying a monoflora of ureolytic Lactobacillus were immunized with either whole cells or soluble extract of the same organism, urea appeared in cecum and feces, indicating suppression of ureolytic activity. Immunization with an extract of nonureolytic Lactobacillus failed to produce such a result. Similar immunization techniques applied to animals monoassociated with ureolytic Actinobacillus did not alter ureolysis, and no appreciable quantity of urea appeared in feces. These studies demonstrate that it is indeed possible to inhibit the ureolytic activity of some bacteria in vivo by immunological means, but that the urease system of other organisms may not be as amenable to such manipulation. PMID:1248879

  19. Temporal and spatial expression of Muc2 and Muc5ac mucins during rat respiratory and digestive tracts development.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, V A; Segal-Eiras, A; Barbeito, C G; Croce, M V

    2016-02-01

    Secreted mucins constitute a crucial part of the gel that protects respiratory and digestive epithelia, being MUC2/Muc2 the predominant gel-forming mucin of the intestine while MUC5AC/Muc5ac is one of the gel-forming mucins most expressed at the airways. In this study, we have analyzed Muc2 and Muc5ac during rat development by using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and RT-PCR. We demonstrated that rat Muc2 was expressed in fetal intestinal goblet cells of surface epithelium of villi and developing Lieberkühn crypts. In neonates and adults, Muc2 was expressed at luminal goblet cells of small and large intestine and at gastric mucous and glandular cells. Muc5ac protein was observed in embryonic gastric and lung samples; expression increased during development and postnatal and adult life. After birth, a low reaction was detected at the tracheal surface epithelium and glands, which increased in adults.

  20. Cervical vagus nerve stimulation augments spontaneous discharge in second- and higher-order sensory neurons in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Campbell, Regenia P; Andresen, Michael C; Scofield, Stephanie; Singh, Krishna; Libbus, Imad; KenKnight, Bruce H; Snyder, Logan; Cantrell, Nathan

    2017-08-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) currently treats patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, depression, and heart failure. The mild intensities used in chronic VNS suggest that primary visceral afferents and central nervous system activation are involved. Here, we measured the activity of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in anesthetized rats using clinically styled VNS. Our chief findings indicate that VNS at threshold bradycardic intensity activated NTS neuron discharge in one-third of NTS neurons. This VNS directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents projecting to second-order NTS neurons. Most VNS-induced activity in NTS, however, was unsynchronized to vagal stimuli. Thus, VNS activated unsynchronized activity in NTS neurons that were second order to vagal afferent C-fibers as well as higher-order NTS neurons only polysynaptically activated by the vagus. Overall, cardiovascular-sensitive and -insensitive NTS neurons were similarly activated by VNS: 3/4 neurons with monosynaptic vagal A-fiber afferents, 6/42 neurons with monosynaptic vagal C-fiber afferents, and 16/21 polysynaptic NTS neurons. Provocatively, vagal A-fibers indirectly activated C-fiber neurons during VNS. Elevated spontaneous spiking was quantitatively much higher than synchronized activity and extended well into the periods of nonstimulation. Surprisingly, many polysynaptic NTS neurons responded to half the bradycardic intensity used in clinical studies, indicating that a subset of myelinated vagal afferents is sufficient to evoke VNS indirect activation. Our study uncovered a myelinated vagal afferent drive that indirectly activates NTS neurons and thus central pathways beyond NTS and support reconsideration of brain contributions of vagal afferents underpinning of therapeutic impacts.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Acute vagus nerve stimulation elevated activity in neurons located in the medial nucleus of the solitary tract. Such stimuli directly activated only myelinated vagal afferents but

  1. Atrazine-induced reproductive tract alterations after transplacental and/or lactational exposure in male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, Jennifer L.; Enoch, Rolondo R.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Fenton, Suzanne E. . E-mail: fenton.suzanne@epa.gov

    2007-02-01

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR would also result in altered puberty and reproductive tissue effects in the male rat. Timed-pregnant Long-Evans (LE) rats were dosed by gavage on gestational days (GD) 15-19 with 100 mg ATR/kg body weight (BW) or 1% methylcellulose (controls, C). On postnatal day (PND)1, half litters were cross-fostered, creating 4 treatment groups; C-C, ATR-C, C-ATR, and ATR-ATR (transplacental-milk as source, respectively). On PND4, male offspring in the ATR-ATR group weighed significantly less than the C-C males. ATR-ATR male pups had significantly delayed preputial separation (PPS). BWs at PPS for C-ATR and ATR-ATR males were reduced by 6% and 9%, respectively, from that of C-C. On PND120, lateral prostate weights of males in the ATR-ATR group were significantly increased over C-C. Histological examination of lateral and ventral prostates identified an increased distribution of inflammation in the lateral prostates of C-ATR males. By PND220, lateral prostate weights were significantly increased for ATR-C and ATR-ATR, but there were no significant changes in inflammation in either the lateral or ventral prostate. These results suggest that in LE rats, gestational ATR exposure delays PPS when male offspring suckle an ATR dam, but leads to increased lateral prostate weight via transplacental exposure alone. Inflammation present at PND120 does not increase in severity with time.

  2. [Distribution of nervous system-specific enolase (NSE) and S-100 protein in the gastrointestinal tract of congenital aganglionosis rat].

    PubMed

    Horisawa, M; Isiguro, Y; Ito, T; Kato, K

    1985-02-01

    Immunobiochemical and immunohistochemical studies were performed to find out changes in neural and glial components of the intestine in congenital aganglionosis rats. Nervous system-specific enolase (NSE) was used as a marker of the neural component. S-100 protein was used as a marker of the glial component. NSE and S-100 protein were quantitated by highly sensitive immunoassay. And distribution of NSE and S-100 protein of the intestine was studied by immunohistochemical methods in fetal rats of various gestational age. The results of our studies were followed; Significant decrease in NSE and S-100 protein was found in the aganglionic segment. Although there was no decrease in NSE, significant decrease in S-100 protein was found in the ganglionic segment just proximal to the aganglionic narrow segment. In the studies using rat embryos, NSE positive cells and S-100 protein positive cells were identified in the more caudal intestine with increasing gestational age. In addition, NSE positive cells appeared in the intestine few days earlier than S-100 protein positive cells did. In conclusion, our studies disclosed that there was abnormality of the glial component as well as the neural component in the intestine of Hirschsprung's disease.

  3. Chlorophyll derived from Chlorella inhibits dioxin absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and accelerates dioxin excretion in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Morita, K; Ogata, M; Hasegawa, T

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the effects of chlorophyll derived from Chlorella on gastrointestinal absorption of seven types of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and 10 types of polychlorinated dibenzofuran (PCDF) in Wistar rats. Twenty-eight rats were randomly distributed into seven groups (n = 4). After overnight food deprivation, rats were given 4 g of the basal diet or 4 g of the chlorophyll diet containing 0.01-0.5% chlorophyll one time on day 1; each diet also contained 0.2 mL PCDD and PCDF standard solutions. The amounts of fecal excretion of PCDD and PCDF congeners from days 1 to 5 in the group fed 0.01% chlorophyll were 64.8% for 1,2,3,7,8-pentaCDD, 78.6% for 1,2,3,4,7,8-hexaCDD, 73.5% for 1,2,3,6,7,8-hexaCDD, 58.5% for 1,2,3,7,8,9-hexaCDD, 33.3% for 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptaCDD, 85.7% for 1,2,3,7,8-pentaCDF, 77.3% for 2,3,4,7,8-pentaCDF, 88.6% for 1,2,3,4,7,8-hexaCDF, 78.0% for 1,2,3,6,7,8-hexaCDF, 62.5% for 1,2,3,7,8,9-hexaCDF, 84.1% for 2,3,4,6,7,8-hexaCDF, 41.7% for 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptaCDF, and 40.0% for 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-heptaCDF greater (p < 0.01) than those of the control group, respectively. The fecal excretion of PCDD and PCDF congeners was remarkably increased along with the increasing dietary chlorophyll. The amounts of PCDD and PCDF congeners in rats on day 5 administered dioxin mixtures were lower in the 0.01% chlorophyll group than in the control group, ranging from 3.5 to 50.0% for PCDD congeners and from 3.7 to 41.7% lower for PCDF congeners, except for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran. The amount of PCDD and PCDF congeners in rats was remarkably decreased along with the increasing dietary chlorophyll. These findings suggest that chlorophyll is effective for preventing dioxin absorption via foods. PMID:11333191

  4. Long-Term Potentiation of Excitatory Synaptic Strength in Spinothalamic Tract Neurons of the Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Sung Won

    2013-01-01

    Spinal dorsal horn nociceptive neurons have been shown to undergo long-term synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Here, we focused on the spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons that are the main nociceptive neurons projecting from the spinal cord to the thalamus. Optical technique using fluorescent dye has made it possible to identify the STT neurons in the spinal cord. Evoked fast mono-synaptic, excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were measured in the STT neurons. Time-based tetanic stimulation (TBS) was employed to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) in the STT neurons. Coincident stimulation of both pre- and postsynaptic neurons using TBS showed immediate and persistent increase in AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs. LTP can also be induced by postsynaptic spiking together with pharmacological stimulation using chemical NMDA. TBS-induced LTP observed in STT neurons was blocked by internal BAPTA, or Ni2+, a T-type VOCC blocker. However, LTP was intact in the presence of L-type VOCC blocker. These results suggest that long-term plastic change of STT neurons requires NMDA receptor activation and postsynaptic calcium but is differentially sensitive to T-type VOCCs. PMID:24381506

  5. Long-term potentiation of excitatory synaptic strength in spinothalamic tract neurons of the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hur, Sung Won; Park, Joo Min

    2013-12-01

    Spinal dorsal horn nociceptive neurons have been shown to undergo long-term synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Here, we focused on the spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons that are the main nociceptive neurons projecting from the spinal cord to the thalamus. Optical technique using fluorescent dye has made it possible to identify the STT neurons in the spinal cord. Evoked fast mono-synaptic, excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were measured in the STT neurons. Time-based tetanic stimulation (TBS) was employed to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) in the STT neurons. Coincident stimulation of both pre- and postsynaptic neurons using TBS showed immediate and persistent increase in AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs. LTP can also be induced by postsynaptic spiking together with pharmacological stimulation using chemical NMDA. TBS-induced LTP observed in STT neurons was blocked by internal BAPTA, or Ni(2+), a T-type VOCC blocker. However, LTP was intact in the presence of L-type VOCC blocker. These results suggest that long-term plastic change of STT neurons requires NMDA receptor activation and postsynaptic calcium but is differentially sensitive to T-type VOCCs.

  6. Cortical Overexpression of Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 Induces Functional Plasticity in Spinal Cord Following Unilateral Pyramidal Tract Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Ping K.; Wong, Liang-Fong; Sears, Thomas A.; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Following trauma of the adult brain or spinal cord the injured axons of central neurons fail to regenerate or if intact display only limited anatomical plasticity through sprouting. Adult cortical neurons forming the corticospinal tract (CST) normally have low levels of the neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS1) protein. In primary cultured adult cortical neurons, the lentivector-induced overexpression of NCS1 induces neurite sprouting associated with increased phospho-Akt levels. When the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway was pharmacologically inhibited the NCS1-induced neurite sprouting was abolished. The overexpression of NCS1 in uninjured corticospinal neurons exhibited axonal sprouting across the midline into the CST-denervated side of the spinal cord following unilateral pyramidotomy. Improved forelimb function was demonstrated behaviourally and electrophysiologically. In injured corticospinal neurons, overexpression of NCS1 induced axonal sprouting and regeneration and also neuroprotection. These findings demonstrate that increasing the levels of intracellular NCS1 in injured and uninjured central neurons enhances their intrinsic anatomical plasticity within the injured adult central nervous system. PMID:20585375

  7. Taste coding in the parabrachial nucleus of the pons in awake, freely licking rats and comparison with the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Michael S; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2014-04-01

    In the rodent, the parabrachial nucleus of the pons (PbN) receives information about taste directly from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Here we examined how information about taste quality (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter) is conveyed in the PbN of awake, freely licking rats, with a focus on how this information is transformed from the incoming NTS signals. Awake rats with electrodes in the PbN had free access to a lick spout that delivered taste stimuli (5 consecutive licks; 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM citric acid, 0.01 mM quinine HCl, or 100 mM sucrose and water) or water (as a rinse) on a variable-ratio schedule. To assess temporal coding, a family of metrics that quantifies the similarity of two spike trains in terms of spike count and spike timing was used. PbN neurons (n = 49) were generally broadly tuned across taste qualities with variable response latencies. Some PbN neurons were quiescent during lick bouts, and others, some taste responsive, showed time-locked firing to the lick pattern. Compared with NTS neurons, spike timing played a larger role in signaling taste in the first 2 s of the response, contributing significantly in 78% (38/49) of PbN cells compared with 45% of NTS cells. Also, information from temporal coding increased at a faster rate as the response unfolded over time in PbN compared with NTS. Collectively, these data suggest that taste-related information from NTS converges in the PbN to enable a subset of PbN cells to carry a larger information load.

  8. Taste coding in the parabrachial nucleus of the pons in awake, freely licking rats and comparison with the nucleus of the solitary tract

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Michael S.; Victor, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    In the rodent, the parabrachial nucleus of the pons (PbN) receives information about taste directly from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Here we examined how information about taste quality (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter) is conveyed in the PbN of awake, freely licking rats, with a focus on how this information is transformed from the incoming NTS signals. Awake rats with electrodes in the PbN had free access to a lick spout that delivered taste stimuli (5 consecutive licks; 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM citric acid, 0.01 mM quinine HCl, or 100 mM sucrose and water) or water (as a rinse) on a variable-ratio schedule. To assess temporal coding, a family of metrics that quantifies the similarity of two spike trains in terms of spike count and spike timing was used. PbN neurons (n = 49) were generally broadly tuned across taste qualities with variable response latencies. Some PbN neurons were quiescent during lick bouts, and others, some taste responsive, showed time-locked firing to the lick pattern. Compared with NTS neurons, spike timing played a larger role in signaling taste in the first 2 s of the response, contributing significantly in 78% (38/49) of PbN cells compared with 45% of NTS cells. Also, information from temporal coding increased at a faster rate as the response unfolded over time in PbN compared with NTS. Collectively, these data suggest that taste-related information from NTS converges in the PbN to enable a subset of PbN cells to carry a larger information load. PMID:24381029

  9. Total N-nitroso compounds and their precursors in hot dogs and in the gastrointestinal tract and feces of rats and mice: possible etiologic agents for colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Sidney S; Haorah, James; Zhou, Lin; Clapper, Marge L; Harrison, Kathryn L; Povey, Andrew C

    2002-11-01

    We review evidence that red and processed meat are causes of colon cancer and that processed meat is a risk factor for childhood cancer and type 2 diabetes. Associations could be due to N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) derived from nitrosation of NOC precursors (NOCPs). We review our survey of total NOC and NOCP content of foods. Only rapidly nitrosated amines, including a glycosyl amino acid, were efficiently determined as NOCPs. NOCPs in hot dogs and rat feces were partly purified by adsorption-desorption and HPLC. After nitrosation, purified hot dog fractions were directly mutagenic in Ames test. The main NOCPs in these materials may be N-glycosyl amino acids and peptides. NOC levels in rat gastrointestinal tract rose steadily from stomach to feces. NOCP levels showed similar trend but with sharp increases from stomach to duodenum. One day after Min and C57BL/6J mice were fed 4% dextran sulfate sodium to induce acute colitis, fecal NOC levels increased 1.9-fold compared with untreated mice (P < 0.05). For 7 d Swiss mice received semipurified diet, 180 g beef-pork hot dogs mixed with 820 g diet or 180 g sautéed beef mixed with 820 g diet. Fecal NOC outputs on day 7 were 3.7-5.0 (hot dog) and 2.0-2.9 (beef) times those for control groups (P < 0.002 for combined groups), perhaps reflecting higher dietary NOC intakes. Feeding a similar hot dog mixture to mice did not affect normal 7-methyldeoxyguanosine level in colonic mucosal DNA. Overall, results support the hypothesis that colonic NOCs are a cause of colon cancer.

  10. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  11. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Pancreas and Salivary Glands of the Rat and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Thomas; Brander-Weber, Patricia; Dangler, Charles; Deschl, Ulrich; Elwell, Michael R.; Greaves, Peter; Hailey, Richard; Leach, Michael W.; Pandiri, Arun R.; Rogers, Arlin; Shackelford, Cynthia C.; Spencer, Andrew; Tanaka, Takuji; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) project is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP), and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for nonproliferative and proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for classifying lesions in the digestive system including the salivary glands and the exocrine pancreas of laboratory rats and mice. Most lesions are illustrated by color photomicrographs. The standardized nomenclature, the diagnostic criteria, and the photomicrographs are also available electronically on the Internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous and age related lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test items. Relevant infectious and parasitic lesions are included as well. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for the digestive system will decrease misunderstandings among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. PMID:26973378

  12. [Diamine oxidase as blood biomarker in rats and humans to GI tract toxicity of fluorouracil anti-cancer drugs].

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsuhiro; Matsubara, Taketo; Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Sasaya, Shouji; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Sanada, Yutaka; Moriyama, Kenji; Kouchi, Yasuhide

    2011-05-01

    Diarrhea is a side effect of a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) anti-cancer drug-induced intestinal mucosal disorder, which sometimes becomes more severe. Blood diamine oxidase (DAO; EC1. 4. 3. 6) activity is reported to be significantly correlated with activity in the small intestinal mucosal tissue, and to be a reliable indicator of small intestinal mucosal integrity and maturity. Here, we investigated whether blood DAO activity can be a biomarker for the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal disorder caused by 5-FU anti-cancer drugs, both in rats and humans. From results of the rat study, the degree of jejunal mucosal disorder caused by the 5-FU anti-cancer drug was well correlated with a decrease in blood DAO activity. Clinically, 12 out of 28 patients (43%) administered 5-FU anti-cancer drug suffered from diarrhea. The plasma DAO activity within one week of the onset of diarrhea significantly decreased compared with that before the administration. Furthermore, before drug administration, plasma DAO activity in patients suffering from diarrhea was higher than those in patients without diarrhea. Although DAO activity differs by the individual, it is a useful biomarker for estimating the degree of intestinal mucosal disorder, and possibly for estimating manifestations of diarrhea induced by 5-FU anti-cancer drug administration.

  13. Applications of Micro-CT scanning in medicine and dentistry: Microstructural analyses of a Wistar Rat mandible and a urinary tract stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latief, F. D. E.; Sari, D. S.; Fitri, L. A.

    2017-08-01

    High-resolution tomographic imaging by means of x-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) has been widely utilized for morphological evaluations in dentistry and medicine. The use of μCT follows a standard procedure: image acquisition, reconstruction, processing, evaluation using image analysis, and reporting of results. This paper discusses methods of μCT using a specific scanning device, the Bruker SkyScan 1173 High Energy Micro-CT. We present a description of the general workflow, information on terminology for the measured parameters and corresponding units, and further analyses that can potentially be conducted with this technology. Brief qualitative and quantitative analyses, including basic image processing (VOI selection and thresholding) and measurement of several morphometrical variables (total VOI volume, object volume, percentage of total volume, total VOI surface, object surface, object surface/volume ratio, object surface density, structure thickness, structure separation, total porosity) were conducted on two samples, the mandible of a wistar rat and a urinary tract stone, to illustrate the abilities of this device and its accompanying software package. The results of these analyses for both samples are reported, along with a discussion of the types of analyses that are possible using digital images obtained with a μCT scanning device, paying particular attention to non-diagnostic ex vivo research applications.

  14. Electrical stimulation of the medullary pyramid promotes proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the corticospinal tract of the adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qun; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Martin, John H.; McDonald, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous tri-potential neural stem cells (eNSCs) exist in the adult spinal cord and differentiate primarily into oligodendrocytes (OLs) and astrocytes. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that during development proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) depend on activity in neighboring axons. However, this activity-dependent development of OPCs has not been examined in the adult CNS. In the present study, we stimulated unilateral corticospinal (CS) axons of the adult rat and investigated proliferation and differentiation of OPCs in dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST). eNSCs were labeled with the mitotic indicator 5-Bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Phenotypes of proliferating cells were identified by double-immunolabeling of BrdU with a panel of antibodies to cell markers: NG2, Nkx2.2, APC, GFAP, and Glut-1. Electrical stimulation of CS axons increased BrdU labeled eNSCs and promoted the proliferation and differentiation of OPCs, but not astrocytes and endothelial cells. Our findings demonstrate the importance of neural activity in regulating OPC proliferation/differentiation in the mature CNS. Selective pathway electrical stimulation could be used to promote remyelination and recovery of function in CNS injury and disease. PMID:20493923

  15. Characteristics of rostral solitary tract nucleus neurons with identified afferent connections that project to the parabrachial nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Suwabe, Takeshi; Bradley, Robert M

    2009-07-01

    Afferent information derived from oral chemoreceptors is transmitted to second-order neurons in the rostral solitary tract nucleus (rNST) and then relayed to other CNS locations responsible for complex sensory and motor behaviors. Here we investigate the characteristics of rNST neurons sending information rostrally to the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Afferent connections to these rNST-PBN projection neurons were identified by anterograde labeling of the chorda tympani (CT), glossopharyngeal (IX), and lingual (LV) nerves. We used voltage- and current-clamp recordings in brain slices to characterize the expression of both the transient A-type potassium current, IKA and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ih, important determinants of neuronal repetitive discharge characteristics. The majority of rNST-PBN neurons express IKA, and these IKA-expressing neurons predominate in CT and IX terminal fields but were expressed in approximately half of the neurons in the LV field. rNST-PBN neurons expressing Ih were evenly distributed among CT, IX and LV terminal fields. However, expression patterns of IKA and Ih differed among CT, IX, and LV fields. IKA-expressing neurons frequently coexpress Ih in CT and IX terminal fields, whereas neurons in LV terminal field often express only Ih. After GABAA receptor block all rNST-PBN neurons responded to afferent stimulation with all-or-none excitatory synaptic responses. rNST-PBN neurons had either multipolar or elongate morphologies and were distributed throughout the rNST, but multipolar neurons were more often encountered in CT and IX terminal fields. No correlation was found between the biophysical and morphological characteristics of the rNST-PBN projection neurons in each terminal field.

  16. Caudal Nuclei Of The Rat Nucleus Of The Solitary Tract Differentially Innervate Respiratory Compartments Within The Ventrolateral Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Alheid, George F.; Jiao, Weijie; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial array of respiratory, cardiovascular, visceral and somatic afferents are relayed via the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to the brainstem (and forebrain). Despite some degree of overlap within the NTS, specificity is maintained in central respiratory reflexes driven by 2nd order afferent relay neurons in the NTS. While the topographical arrangement of respiratory-related afferents targeting the NTS has been extensively investigated, their higher order brainstem targets beyond the NTS has only rarely been defined with any precision. Nonetheless, the various brainstem circuits serving blood gas homeostasis and airway protective reflexes must clearly receive a differential innervation from the NTS in order to evoke stimulus appropriate behavioral responses. Accordingly, we have examined the question of which specific NTS nuclei project to particular compartments within the ventral respiratory column (VRC) of the ventrolateral medulla. Our analyses of NTS labeling after retrograde tracer injections in the VRC and the nearby neuronal groups controlling autonomic function indicate a significant distinction between projections to the Bötzinger complex and preBötzinger complex compared to the remainder of the VRC. Specifically, the caudomedial NTS, including caudal portions of the medial solitary nucleus and the commissural division of NTS project relatively densely to the region of the retrotrapezoid nucleus and rostral ventrolateral medullary nucleus as well as to the rostral ventral respiratory group while avoiding the intervening Bötzinger and preBötzinger complexes. Area postrema appears to demonstrate a pattern of projections similar to that of caudal medial and commissural NTS nuclei. Other, less pronounced differential projections of lateral NTS nuclei to the various VRC compartments are additionally noted. PMID:21704133

  17. Multiple neuroanatomical tract-tracing using fluorescent Alexa Fluor conjugates of cholera toxin subunit B in rats.

    PubMed

    Conte, William L; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Reep, Roger L

    2009-01-01

    Cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) is a highly sensitive retrograde neuroanatomical tracer. With the new availability of fluorescent Alexa Fluor (AF) conjugates of CTB, multiple neuroanatomical connections can be reliably studied and compared in the same animal. Here we provide a protocol that describes the use of AF-CTB for studying connections in the central nervous system of rats. The viscous properties of CTB allow small and discreet injection sites yet still show robust retrograde labeling. Furthermore, the AF conjugates are extremely bright and photostable, compared with other conventional fluorescent tracers. This protocol can also be adapted for use with other neuroanatomical tracers. Including a 7-d survival period, this protocol takes approximately 11 to 12 d to complete in its entirety.

  18. [Effect of veralipride on the estral cycle, genital tract, mammary gland and pituitary gland in female rats (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tuchmann-Duplessis, H

    1980-10-15

    A study of the potential biological effects of veralipride was conducted in female rats. A definite stimulating action on the mammary gland was noted, but doses of 5 to 20 mg/kg/day are required to produce secretion, which is varying from one animal to another. Follicular maturation is preserved, though there is an increase in the number of corpora lutea with more marked development in some of them. Progesterone impregnation of the uterus occurs in a variable way and then only at doses of 5 + 0 20 mg/kg/day. Vaginal mucification, from a reduction in estrogen in relation to progesterone impregnation, is noted after 1 mg/kg/day (though 25 p. cent of the animals still demonstrate vaginal keratinization after 20 mg/kg/day). Finally, degranulation of the carminophile cells of the anterior pituitary gland, occurs after 5 mg/kg/day.

  19. Aldehyde dehydrogenases of the rat colon: comparison with other tissues of the alimentary tract and the liver.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, T; Salaspuro, M

    1996-05-01

    Intracolonic bacteria have previously been shown to produce substantial amounts of acetaldehyde during ethanol oxidation, and it has been suggested that this acetaldehyde might be associated with alcohol-related colonic disorders, as well as other alcohol-induced organ injuries. The capacity of colonic mucosa to remove this bacterial acetaldehyde by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is, however, poorly known. We therefore measured ALDH activities and determined ALDH isoenzyme profiles from different subcellular fractions of rat colonic mucosa. For comparison, hepatic, gastric, and small intestinal samples were studied similarly. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities were also measured from all of these tissues. Rat colonic mucosa was found to possess detectable amounts of ALDH activity with both micromolar and millimolar acetaldehyde concentrations and in all subcellular fractions. The ALDH activities of colonic mucosa were, however, generally low when compared with the liver and stomach, and they also tended to be lower than in small intestine. Mitochondrial low K(m) ALDH2 and cytosolic ALDH with low K(m) for acetaldehyde were expressed in the colonic mucosa, whereas some cytosolic high K(m) isoenzymes found in the small intestine and stomach were not detectable in colonic samples. Cytosolic ADH activity corresponded well to ALDH activity in different tissues: in colonic mucosa, it was approximately 6 times lower than in the liver and about one-half of gastric ADH activity. ALDH activity of the colonic mucosa should, thus, be sufficient for the removal of acetaldehyde produced by colonic mucosal ADH during ethanol oxidation. It may, however, be insufficient for the removal of the acetaldehyde produced by intracolonic bacteria. This may lead to the accumulation of acetaldehyde in the colon and colonic mucosa after ingestion of ethanol that might, at least after chronic heavy alcohol consumption, contribute to the development of alcohol-related colonic morbidity

  20. Protective role of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in the male reproductive tract of the F-344 rat

    SciTech Connect

    Teaf, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purposes of this study were fourfold: to quantify GSH concentration and GSH-S-transferase activity in testis and epididymis of the F-344 rat; to screen selected compounds for capacity to depress GSH in male reproductive tissue; to determine the effect of pretreatment with agents which depress testicular/epididymal GSH on the dominant lethal (DL) mutagenic effect of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), which undergoes GSH-dependent metabolism; and to investigate the correlation between binding of radiolabelled EMS (/sup 3/H-EMS) and the temporal pattern of EMS-induced germ cell mutations. Cadmium (Cd), at a dosage which did not cause testicular necrosis was not effective in depressing GSH. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) depressed testicular and epididymal GSH to a minimum of 40% of concurrent controls in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. 1,2-dibromethane (EDB) depressed epididymal and testicular GSH in a dose-dependent fashion at 2 hours post-injection. Cd and EDB inhibited GSH-S transferase activity in edpididymis but no testis. Pretreatment of male F-344 rats with BSO or EDB potentiated the rate of EMS-induced DL mutations. The rate of /sup 3/H-EMS binding to isolated sperm heads was well correlated with the temporal pattern of DL mutations induced by EMS. BSO and EDB significantly increased /sup 3/H-EMS binding to sperm heads at time points during which potentiation of germ cell mutagenicity was observed. Data from these studies demonstrate that GSH depression is functionally correlated with enhancement of germ cell toxicity, establishing the importance of this biochemical protective mechanism GSH in male reproductive tissue.

  1. Enteric-formulated lactoferrin was more effectively transported into blood circulation from gastrointestinal tract in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takashi; Jyonotsuka, Takahiro; Kamemori, Nao; Kawano, Genji; Shimizu, Hirohiko; Ando, Kunio; Harada, Etsumori

    2006-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intestinally infused bovine lactoferrin (bLF) is transported into the blood circulation via the lymphatic pathway, not via the portal circulation. Therefore, in the present study, we further investigated whether intragastrically infused enteric-formulated bLF (EF-bLF) was more efficiently absorbed than bLF from the intestine in adult rats. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: 30 and 300 mg kg(-1) non-enteric-formulated bLF (non-EF-bLF) groups and a 30 mg kg(-1) EF-bLF group. Thoracic lymph was collected from a thoracic lymph duct under general anaesthesia. Bovine lactoferrin was infused into the stomach or duodenal lumen via a needle for a period of over 1 min in a volume of 1 ml kg(-1). The bLF transported into the lymph was assayed quantitatively by double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Following the intragastric administration of bLF, the three groups showed almost the same lymph flow, but the bLF concentration in the lymph fluid in the EF-bLF group increased significantly and peaked 3 h after administration. With intraduodenal administration, the bLF concentration in the lymph fluid of the higher non-EF-bLF group was significantly higher than those of the other groups. The amount of absorbed bLF in the EF-bLF group was, however, about 10 times higher than that in the lower non-EF-bLF group, when it was administered intragastrically. These data show that enteric-formulated bLF is less susceptible to gastric pepsin and is more efficiently absorbed from the intestine than is non-enteric-formulated bLF.

  2. Nucleus of the solitary tract (pro)renin receptor-mediated antihypertensive effect involves nuclear factor-κB-cytokine signaling in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Zubcevic, Jasenka; Jun, Joo Y; Lamont, Gwyneth; Murça, Tatiane M; Shi, Peng; Yuan, Wei; Lin, Fan; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Li, Qiuhong; Sumners, Colin; Raizada, Mohan K; Shan, Zhiying

    2013-03-01

    The importance of the (pro)renin receptor (PRR) in the function of the central nervous system is increasingly evident because PRR seems to play a role in neuronal control of cardiovascular function. PRR expression is elevated in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that altered activity of PRR in the NTS is linked to hypertension. Eight weeks of chronic knockdown of the NTS PRR, using recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2)-PRR-small hairpain RNA (shRNA)-mediated gene transduction, caused a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the SHR (shRNA, 173±5; Control, 151±6 mm Hg) but not in Wistar Kyoto rats (shRNA, 108±7; Control, 106±6 mm Hg). The MAP elevation in the SHR was associated with decreased inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, C-C motif ligand 5, and their transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB. Consistent with the pressor effects of the PRR knockdown, acute bilateral NTS injection of human renin (2 pmol/side) decreased MAP and heart rate (HR) in SHR (ΔMAP, -38±4 mm Hg; Δheart rate, -40±10 bpm), with negligible responses in Wistar Kyoto rats (ΔMAP, -4±3 mm Hg; Δheart rate, -12±7 bpm). These effects in SHR were attenuated (80%) by prorenin handle region peptide but were not affected by angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptor blockers. Finally, PRR activation in SHR neuronal cultures by prorenin activated nuclear factor-κB and increased mRNA levels of interleukin-1β (250-fold), tumor necrosis factor-α (32-fold), interleukin-6 (35-fold), C-C motif ligand 5 (12-fold), and interleukin-10 (7-fold) in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent but angiotensin II type 1 receptor-independent manner. Therefore, NTS PRR mediates antihypertensive effects via an angiotensin II-independent mechanism in SHR, which involves stimulation of the nuclear factor-κB-cytokine signaling pathway.

  3. N-nitroso compounds in the gastrointestinal tract of rats and in the feces of mice with induced colitis or fed hot dogs or beef.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Sidney S; Haorah, James; Zhou, Lin; Hartman, Melissa; Morris, Chantey R; Clapper, Marge L

    2003-03-01

    Because colonic N-nitroso compounds (NOC) may be a cause of colon cancer, we determined total NOC levels by Walters' method in the gastrointestinal tract and feces of rodents: (i) feces of C57BL mice fed chow and semi-purified diets contained 3.2 +/- 0.4 and 0.46 +/- 0.06 NOC/g, respectively (P < 0.01, mean +/- SD). (ii) NOC levels for gastrointestinal contents of three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats fed chow diet were 0.9 +/- 0.05 (diet), 0.2 +/- 0 (stomach), 0.3-0.4 (small intestine), 0.7-1.6 (cecum and colon) and 2.6 +/- 0.6 (feces) nmol/g. NOC precursor (NOCP) levels (measured as NOC after mild nitrosation) for two rat groups fed chow diet showed a 16-fold increase from stomach to proximal small intestine (mean, 6.2 micromol/g), and a 1.7-fold increase from distal colon to feces (mean, 11.6 micromol/g). (iii) Eight Min and five C57BL/6J mice received 4% dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water on days 1-4 to induce acute colitis. This increased fecal NOC levels 1.9-fold on day 5 in both strains (P < or = 0.04), probably due to NO synthase-derived nitrosating agents in the colon. (iv) Following studies on humans fed beef [Hughes et al. (2001) Carcinogenesis, 22, 199], Swiss mice received semi-purified diets mixed with 18% of beef plus pork hot dogs or sautéed beef for 7 days. On day 7, individual 24-h fecal NOC outputs were determined. In three hot dog and two beef groups with 5 mice/group, mean fecal NOC output/day was 3.7-5.0 (hot dog) and 2.0-2.9 (beef) times that for control groups fed semi-purified diet alone (P < 0.002 for each of combined groups). These groups showed little change in fecal NOCP output. (v) Initial purification of rat fecal NOCP by adsorption-desorption and HPLC is described. Results should help evaluate the view that colonic NOC causes colon cancer associated with colitis and ingestion of red and nitrite-preserved meat.

  4. Intramuscular Neurotrophin-3 normalizes low threshold spinal reflexes, reduces spasms and improves mobility after bilateral corticospinal tract injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kathe, Claudia; Hutson, Thomas Haynes; McMahon, Stephen Brendan; Moon, Lawrence David Falcon

    2016-01-01

    Brain and spinal injury reduce mobility and often impair sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord leading to spasticity. Here, we establish that complete transection of corticospinal pathways in the pyramids impairs locomotion and leads to increased spasms and excessive mono- and polysynaptic low threshold spinal reflexes in rats. Treatment of affected forelimb muscles with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) encoding human Neurotrophin-3 at a clinically-feasible time-point after injury reduced spasticity. Neurotrophin-3 normalized the short latency Hoffmann reflex to a treated hand muscle as well as low threshold polysynaptic spinal reflexes involving afferents from other treated muscles. Neurotrophin-3 also enhanced locomotor recovery. Furthermore, the balance of inhibitory and excitatory boutons in the spinal cord and the level of an ion co-transporter in motor neuron membranes required for normal reflexes were normalized. Our findings pave the way for Neurotrophin-3 as a therapy that treats the underlying causes of spasticity and not only its symptoms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18146.001 PMID:27759565

  5. Inhibition of rat respiratory-tract cytochrome P-450 isozymes following inhalation of m-Xylene: possible role of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Anu; Foy, J W-D; Schatz, Robert

    2003-06-27

    Xylene is used as a solvent in paints, cleaning agents, and gasoline. Exposure occurs primarily by inhalation. The volatility and lipophilicity of the xylenes make the lung and nasal mucosa the primary target organs. m-Xylene (m-XYL) has been shown to alter cytochrome P-450 (CYP) activity in an organ- and isozyme-specific manner. The purpose of this work was to determine if the metabolism of m-XYL to the inhibitory metabolite m-tolualdehyde (m-ALD) is the cause of inhibition of CYP isozymes following in vivo inhalation exposure to m-XYL (100, 300 ppm), 3-methylbenzyl alcohol (3-MBA) (50, 100 ppm), or m-ALD (50, 100 ppm). A single 6-h inhalation exposure of rats to m-XYL inhibited pulmonary CYPs 2B1, 2E1, and 4B1 in a dose-dependent manner. Inhalation of 3-MBA inhibited pulmonary CYPs 2B1 and 4B1 in a dose-dependent manner. m-ALD inhibited pulmonary CYPs 2B1 and 2E1 in a dose-dependent manner, while 4B1 activity was increased dose dependently. Nasal mucosa CYP 2B1 and 2E1 activity was inhibited following exposure to m-XYL dose dependently, 3-MBA inhibited nasal mucosa CYPs 2E1 and 4B1 dose dependently. CYPs 2B1, 2E1, and 4B1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion following inhalation of m-ALD. Following high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, m-ALD was detected after in vivo exposure to m-XYL, m-ALD, and 3-MBA in a dose-dependent manner, with highest m-ALD levels in the nasal mucosa and lung. Alteration of cytochrome P-450 activity by m-XYL could result in increased or decreased toxicity, changing the metabolic profiles of xenobiotics in coexposure scenarios in an organ-specific manner.

  6. Chronic knockdown of the nucleus of the solitary tract AT1 receptors increases blood inflammatory-endothelial progenitor cell ratio and exacerbates hypertension in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhiying; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Shi, Peng; Jun, Joo Y; Dong, Ying; Murça, Tatiane M; Lamont, Gwyneth J; Cuadra, Adolfo; Yuan, Wei; Qi, Yanfei; Li, Qiuhong; Paton, Julian F R; Katovich, Michael J; Sumners, Colin; Raizada, Mohan K

    2013-06-01

    AT1 receptor subtype a (AT1Ra) expression is increased in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) compared with Wistar Kyoto controls. However, the chronic role of AT1Ra in the NTS for cardiovascular control is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that the NTS AT1Ra is involved in the neural regulation of the peripheral inflammatory status and linked with hypertension. Transduction of brain neuronal cultures with recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2)-AT1R-small hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in a 72% decrease in AT1Ra mRNA and attenuated angiotensin II-induced increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and neuronal firing. Specific NTS microinjection of AAV2-AT1R-shRNA vector in the SHR resulted in a ≈30 mm Hg increase in the mean arterial pressure compared with control vector-injected animals (Sc-shRNA: 154±4 mm Hg; AT1R-shRNA: 183±10 mm Hg) and induced a resetting of the baroreflex control of heart rate to higher mean arterial pressure. In addition, AAV2-AT1R-shRNA-treated SHRs exhibited a 74% decrease in circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CD90+, CD4- / CD5- / CD8-) and a 300% increase in the circulating inflammatory cells, including CD4+ + CD8+, CD45+ / 3+ T lymphocytes, and macrophages (CD68+). As a result, the endothelial progenitor cell/inflammatory cells ratio was decreased by 8- to 15-fold in the AT1R-shRNA-treated SHR. However, identical injection of AAV2-AT1R-shRNA into the NTS of Wistar Kyoto rats had no effect on mean arterial pressure and inflammatory cells. These observations suggest that increased expression of the AT1Ra in SHR NTS may present a counterhypertensive mechanism involving inflammatory/angiogenic cells.

  7. Role of protein kinase A in phosphorylation of NMDA receptor 1 subunits in dorsal horn and spinothalamic tract neurons after intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, X; Lin, Q; Willis, W D

    2002-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism for regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor function. The NMDA receptor 1 subunit (NR1) is phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) on serine 890 and 897. We have recently reported that there is enhanced phosphorylation of NR1 on serine 897 in dorsal horn and spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons after intradermal injection of capsaicin (CAP) in rats [Zou et al. (2000) J. Neurosci. 20, 6989-6997]. Whether or not this phosphorylation, which develops during central sensitization following CAP injection, is mediated by PKA remains to be determined. In this study, western blots and immunofluorescence staining were employed to observe if pretreatment with a PKA inhibitor, N-[2-((p-bromocinnamyl)amino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, HCl (H89), blocks the enhanced phosphorylation of NR1 on serine 897 following injection of CAP into the glabrous skin of one hind paw of anesthetized rats. Western blots showed that pretreatment with H89 caused a decrease in CAP-induced phosphorylation of NR1 protein in spinal cord segments L(4)-S(1). In experiments using immunofluorescence staining, the numbers of phospho-NR1-like immunoreactive (p-NR1-LI) neurons seen after CAP injection were significantly decreased in the dorsal horn of the L(4)-L(5) segments on the side ipsilateral to the injection after PKA was inhibited. When STT cells were labeled by microinjection of the retrograde tracer, fluorogold, we found that the proportion of p-NR1-LI STT cells on the side ipsilateral to the injection in the superficial laminae of spinal cord segments L(4)-L(5) was markedly reduced when H89 was administered intrathecally before CAP injection. However, the proportion of p-NR1-LI STT cells in deep laminae was unchanged unless the PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine chloride, was co-administered with H89. Combined with our previous findings, the present results indicate that NR1 in spinal dorsal horn neurons, including the superficial dorsal horn STT

  8. Three-Dimensional Histology Volume Reconstruction of Axonal Tract Tracing Data: Exploring Topographical Organization in Subcortical Projections from Rat Barrel Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zakiewicz, Izabela M; Majka, Piotr; Wójcik, Daniel K; Bjaalie, Jan G; Leergaard, Trygve B

    2015-01-01

    Topographical organization is a hallmark of the mammalian brain, and the spatial organization of axonal connections in different brain regions provides a structural framework accommodating specific patterns of neural activity. The presence, amount, and spatial distribution of axonal connections are typically studied in tract tracing experiments in which axons or neurons are labeled and examined in histological sections. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction techniques are used to achieve more complete visualization and improved understanding of complex topographical relationships. 3-D reconstruction approaches based on manually or semi-automatically recorded spatial points representing axonal labeling have been successfully applied for investigation of smaller brain regions, but are not practically feasible for whole-brain analysis of multiple regions. We here reconstruct serial histological images from four whole brains (originally acquired for conventional microscopic analysis) into volumetric images that are spatially registered to a 3-D atlas template. The aims were firstly to evaluate the quality of the 3-D reconstructions and the usefulness of the approach, and secondly to investigate axonal projection patterns and topographical organization in rat corticostriatal and corticothalamic pathways. We demonstrate that even with the limitations of the original routine histological material, the 3-D reconstructed volumetric images allow efficient visualization of tracer injection sites and axonal labeling, facilitating detection of spatial distributions and across-case comparisons. Our results further show that clusters of S1 corticostriatal and corticothalamic projections are distributed within narrow, elongated or spherical subspaces extending across the entire striatum / thalamus. We conclude that histology volume reconstructions facilitate mapping of spatial distribution patterns and topographical organization. The reconstructed image volumes are shared via the

  9. Characterization of obestatin- and ghrelin-producing cells in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas of rats: an immunohistochemical and electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Furnes, Marianne W; Stenström, Björn; Kulseng, Bård; Chen, Duan

    2008-03-01

    Both ghrelin and obestatin are derived from preproghrelin by post-translational processing. We have morphologically characterized the cells that produce obestatin and ghrelin in new-born and adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were freely fed, fasted, or subjected to gastric bypass surgery or reserpine treatment. Tissue samples collected from the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas were examined by double-immunofluorescence staining, immunoelectron microscopy, and conventional electron microscopy. Obestatin was present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, colon, and pancreas. In the stomach, differences were noted in the development of obestatin- and preproghrelin-immunreactive (IR) cells on the one hand and ghrelin-IR cells on the other, particularly 2 weeks after birth. Preproghrelin- and obestatin-IR cells were more numerous than ghrelin-IR cells in the stomach, suggesting the lack of ghrelin in some A-like cells. Most obestatin-producing cells in the stomach were distributed in the basal part of the oxyntic mucosa; these cells co-localized with chromogranin A (pancreastatin) and vesicle monoamine transporters type 1 and 2, but not with serotonin or histidine decarboxylase. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the obestatin- and ghrelin-producing cells to be A-like cells, characterized by numerous highly electron-dense granules containing ghrelin and obestatin. Some granules exhibited an even electron density with thin electron-lucent halos, suggestive of monoamines. Feeding status, gastric bypass surgery, and reserpine treatment had no obvious effect on the A-like cells. In the pancreas, obestatin was present in the peripheral part of the islets, with a distribution distinct from that of glucagon-producing A cells, insulin-producing beta cells, and cells producing pancreatic polypeptide Y. Thus, obestatin and ghrelin co-localize with an anticipated monoamine in A-like cells in the stomach, and obestatin is found in pancreatic islets.

  10. Three-Dimensional Histology Volume Reconstruction of Axonal Tract Tracing Data: Exploring Topographical Organization in Subcortical Projections from Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zakiewicz, Izabela M.; Majka, Piotr; Wójcik, Daniel K.; Bjaalie, Jan G.; Leergaard, Trygve B.

    2015-01-01

    Topographical organization is a hallmark of the mammalian brain, and the spatial organization of axonal connections in different brain regions provides a structural framework accommodating specific patterns of neural activity. The presence, amount, and spatial distribution of axonal connections are typically studied in tract tracing experiments in which axons or neurons are labeled and examined in histological sections. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction techniques are used to achieve more complete visualization and improved understanding of complex topographical relationships. 3-D reconstruction approaches based on manually or semi-automatically recorded spatial points representing axonal labeling have been successfully applied for investigation of smaller brain regions, but are not practically feasible for whole-brain analysis of multiple regions. We here reconstruct serial histological images from four whole brains (originally acquired for conventional microscopic analysis) into volumetric images that are spatially registered to a 3-D atlas template. The aims were firstly to evaluate the quality of the 3-D reconstructions and the usefulness of the approach, and secondly to investigate axonal projection patterns and topographical organization in rat corticostriatal and corticothalamic pathways. We demonstrate that even with the limitations of the original routine histological material, the 3-D reconstructed volumetric images allow efficient visualization of tracer injection sites and axonal labeling, facilitating detection of spatial distributions and across-case comparisons. Our results further show that clusters of S1 corticostriatal and corticothalamic projections are distributed within narrow, elongated or spherical subspaces extending across the entire striatum / thalamus. We conclude that histology volume reconstructions facilitate mapping of spatial distribution patterns and topographical organization. The reconstructed image volumes are shared via the

  11. A HYBRID CFD-PBPK MODEL OF INHALED CHLORINE GAS UPTAKE AND TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine (Cl2), an important commercial gas, is highly reactive in water, causing irritant effects in the respiratory tract on inhalation. Nasal extraction of Cl2 is high and resultant lesions in the respiratory tract show a proximal to distal distribution ...

  12. A HYBRID CFD-PBPK MODEL OF INHALED CHLORINE GAS UPTAKE AND TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine (Cl2), an important commercial gas, is highly reactive in water, causing irritant effects in the respiratory tract on inhalation. Nasal extraction of Cl2 is high and resultant lesions in the respiratory tract show a proximal to distal distribution ...

  13. The In Vivo Effect of Ytterbium-Doped Fiber Laser on Rat Buccal Mucosa as a Simulation of Its Effect on the Urinary Tract: A Preclinical Histopathological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to perform a histological analysis of the effect of a ytterbium-doped fiber (YDF) laser on oral buccal mucosa tissue in vivo to simulate its effect on the mucosa of the lower urinary tract. Methods A total of 90 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with urethrane (1.2 g/kg intraperitoneally). A prespecified inner buccal mucosal site was irradiated with a YDF master-oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system for 60 seconds, with output power settings of 0.5, 1, and 2 W, respectively, in 3 treatment groups. Specimens of irradiated tissue were harvested at 2 hours, 24 hours, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after irradiation. The tissue specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histological analysis. Results In the group treated with 0.5 W, basal cell elongation and vacuolization were observed at 2 hours and 24 hours after treatment, respectively. No evident injury was observed after 2 or 4 weeks. The group treated with 1 W presented partial basal layer separation, and even complete epidermal ablation, within 2 hours. At 24 hours after laser treatment, new capillaries on an edematous background of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, as well as profuse infiltration of the neutrophils to the basal layer, were observed. Collagen deposition and reepithelization were observed in specimens taken 2 weeks and 4 weeks after treatment. The group treated with 2 W presented bigger and deeper injuries at 2 hours after irradiation. Meanwhile, subepidermal bullae with full-thickness epidermal necrosis and underlying inflammatory infiltrate were observed 24 hours after treatment. The presence of fibrous connective tissue and collagen deposition were observed 2 weeks and 4 weeks after the treatment. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the effect of a YDF laser on living tissue. Our study demonstrated that the typical histological findings of the tissue reaction to the YDF MOPA apparatus were very similar to those

  14. Spinothalamic and spinohypothalamic tract neurons in the cervical enlargement of rats. II. Responses to innocuous and noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Dado, R J; Katter, J T; Giesler, G J

    1994-03-01

    1. The goal of this study was to gather data that would increase our understanding of nociceptive processing by spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons that receive inputs from the hand and arm. Fifty neurons in the cervical enlargement of urethan-anesthetized rats were antidromically activated from the contralateral posterior thalamus. A stimulating electrode was moved systematically within an anterior-posterior plane in the thalamus until a point was located where the smallest amount of current antidromically activated the neuron. The antidromic thresholds at each of these lowest threshold points was < or = 30 microA; the mean antidromic threshold was 15.4 +/- 1.0 (SE) microA. Lowest threshold points were found primarily in the posterior thalamic group (Po), zona incerta, and in or near the supraoptic decussation. 2. The recording sites of 47 neurons were marked and recovered. Recording sites were located in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH, n = 15), deep dorsal horn (DDH, n = 31), and ventral horn (n = 1). Recording sites were located across the mediolateral extent of the SDH. Within the DDH, recording sites were concentrated laterally in nucleus proprius and dorsally in the lateral reticulated area. The locations of the recording points confirm previous anatomic descriptions of STT neurons in the cervical enlargement. 3. Cutaneous excitatory receptive fields were restricted to the ipsilateral forepaw or forelimb in 67% (10/15) of the neurons recorded in the SDH and 42% (13/31) of the neurons recorded in the DDH. Neurons having larger, more complex receptive fields were also commonly encountered. Thirty-three percent (5/15) of the neurons recorded in the SDH and 58% (18/31) recorded in the DDH had receptive fields that were often discontinuous and included areas of the ipsilateral shoulder, thorax, and head, including the face. 4. Innocuous and noxious mechanical stimuli were applied to the receptive field of each neuron. Fifty percent (25/50) responded to innocuous

  15. Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells enhances nerve regeneration of the corticospinal tract and improves recovery of neurological functions in a collagenase-induced rat model of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongsheng; Yin, Yibo; Lin, Tie; Guan, Dong; Ma, Bowen; Li, Changyu; Wang, Yuehua; Zhang, Xiangtong

    2013-07-01

    The reorganization of brain structures after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) insult is crucial to functional outcome. Although the pattern of neuronal rewiring is well-documented after ischemic stroke, the study of brain plasticity after ICH has been focusing on the enhancement of dendritic complexity. Here we hypothesized that functional restoration after ICH involves brain reorganization which may be favorably modulated by stem cell transplantation. In this study, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were transplanted into the perilesional sites of collagenase-induced ICH in adult rats one day after ICH injury. Forelimb functional recovery was monitored with modified limb placing and vibrissae-elicited forelimb placement tests. Anterograde and retrograde tracing were used to assess the reorganization of bilateral forelimb areas of the sensorimotor cortex. We found that in rats transplanted with BMSCs after ICH injury, axonal sprouting occurred in the contralateral caudal forelimb area of the cortex, and was significantly higher than in ICH rat models that received only the vehicle (P < 0.01). The number of positive neurons in the ipsilateral rostral forelimb area of the cortex of the BMSC group was 1.5-to 4.5-fold greater than in the vehicle group (P < 0.05). No difference was found between the BMSC and vehicle groups in hemispheric atrophy or labeled neurons in the ipsilateral caudal forelimb area (P = 0.193). Scores for improved functional behavior in the BMSC group were in accord with the results from histology. Neuronal plasticity of the denervated corticospinal tract at bilateral forelimb areas of the cortex in the collagenase-induced ICH rat models was significantly enhanced by BMSC transplantation. BMSC transplantation may facilitate functional recovery after ICH injury.

  16. Effects of whole body CO60 irradiation on the male genital tract of gerbil (Meriones hurrianae), hedgehod (hemiechinus auratus Collaris), and house rat (Rattus rattus Rufescens).

    PubMed

    Dixit, V P

    1977-06-01

    1. The effects of 400 and 575 rads of whole body irradiation in gerbil (Meriones hurrianae), hedgehog (Hemiechinus auratus Collaris) and house rat have been studied with a view to compare the effects of irradiation on the desert mammalian species with those of domestic ones. 2. Typical signs and symptoms of radiation sickness, transient body loss and radiation mortality in gerbils and house-rats were apparent, whereas the hedgehogs were not affected at this dose level. 3. Extensive necrosis, exfoliation of seminiferous element, intertubular edema and shrinkage of the seminiferous tubule and Leydig cell nuclei in gerbils and house-rats were conspicuous in histological preparations. Mild regressive tubular lesions were also observed in hedgehogs treated with 575R. 4. Whole body irradiation depleted the RNA, protein and sialic acid contents of the testes. High cholesterol contens in the testes of irradiated gerbil, hedgehog and house rats identified this as the site of degenerating cells and fragments. 5. Reduced androgen production was confirmed in non active Leydig cells and decreased fructose contents in the seminal vesicles of gerbil and house rats. At 575 R dose level, hedgehog was comparatively radio-resistant. But at 875 R extensive damage to the reproductive organs could be noticed.

  17. Effects of estradiol on the development of sexual dimorphism in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Valencia, A; Del Abril, A; Rodríguez-Zafra, M; Pérez-Laso, C; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A

    1993-10-15

    Orchidectomized males injected with a single dose of estradiol benzoate (EB) on the day of birth (D1) showed a volume and neuron number in the nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) similar to that of control males. However, orchidectomized males and those orchidectomized and given a single dose of DHT on D1 showed a decrease in BAOT volume and neuron number with respect to control males. These results support the notion that estradiol induces the morphological masculinization of this structure. The inability of DHT in counteracting the effect of orchidectomy is addressed taking into account the inhibitory action of androgens.

  18. Enhanced Behavioral Recovery from Sensorimotor Cortex Lesions After Pyramidotomy in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fanardjian, V. V.; Gevorkyan, O. V.; Mallina, R. K.; Melik-Moussian, A. B.; Meliksetyan, I. B.

    2000-01-01

    Unilateral transection of the bulbar pyramid, performed before the ablation of the ipsilateral sensorimotor cortex, has been shown to facilitate the recovery of operantly conditioned reflexes and compensatory processes in rats. Such enhanced behaviorai recovery was absent when only the sensorimotor cortex was ablated. This phenomenon is explained by the switching of motor activity under the control of the cortico-rubrospinal system. Switching of the descending influences is accomplished through the following loop: cortico-rubrai projectionred nucleus-inferior olive-cerebellum-thalamuscerebral cortex. This suggests that a preliminary lesion of the peripheral part of the system, represented by a descending spinal projection, facilitates the recovery processes to develop during the subsequent destruction of its central part. PMID:11486486

  19. Diamine oxidase as a marker of intestinal mucosal injury and the effect of soluble dietary fiber on gastrointestinal tract toxicity after intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukudome, Ian; Kobayashi, Michiya; Dabanaka, Ken; Maeda, Hiromichi; Okamoto, Ken; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Baba, Ryoko; Kumagai, Nana; Oba, Koji; Fujita, Mamoru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    The level of plasma diamine oxidase (DAO) activity is associated with the maturation and integrity of small intestinal mucosa. This study in rats investigated whether a decreased level of plasma DAO could reflect the severity of mucosal injury due to intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. The beneficial effect of soluble dietary fiber (SDF) on preventing diarrhea after 5-FU treatment was also examined. To induce diarrhea, 5-FU (50 mg/kg/day for four days) was administered via the tail vein with or without SDF supplementation. After 5-FU treatment, the majority of rats developed moderate to severe diarrhea, and levels of plasma DAO activity significantly decreased compared to those of control group (P < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy revealed disarrangement of the small intestinal villi. Contrarily, the rats supplemented with SDF had diarrhea less frequently (50.0 vs. 91.7 %, P = 0.025) on day five, and DAO activity levels were significantly higher than in those rats administered 5-FU alone (8.25 ± 5.34 vs. 5.50 ± 4.32, P = 0.023). In conclusion, plasma DAO activity decreases in response to severe intestinal mucosal injury after 5-FU treatment, and SDF supplementation might be a practical and useful treatment for reducing the intestinal toxicity of 5-FU.

  20. 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) DISRUPTS EARLY MORPHOGENETIC EVENTS THAT FORM THE LOWER REPRODUCTIVE TRACT IN FEMALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rats, in utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) during critical periods of organogenesis causes a permanent thread of tissue across the vaginal opening, which consists of a core of mesenchyme surrounded by keratinized epithelia. The objective of t...

  1. Pubertal administration of DEHP delays puberty, suppresses testosterone production and inhibits reproductive tract development in male Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    While is clear that exposure to high dosage levels of some phthalates delays the onset of puberty in the male rat it has been hypothesized that low levels of DEHP accelerate puberty by enhancing testicular androgen synthesis. The current study was designed to determine if the do...

  2. 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) DISRUPTS EARLY MORPHOGENETIC EVENTS THAT FORM THE LOWER REPRODUCTIVE TRACT IN FEMALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rats, in utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) during critical periods of organogenesis causes a permanent thread of tissue across the vaginal opening, which consists of a core of mesenchyme surrounded by keratinized epithelia. The objective of t...

  3. Pubertal administration of DEHP delays puberty, suppresses testosterone production and inhibits reproductive tract development in male Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    While is clear that exposure to high dosage levels of some phthalates delays the onset of puberty in the male rat it has been hypothesized that low levels of DEHP accelerate puberty by enhancing testicular androgen synthesis. The current study was designed to determine if the do...

  4. Acupuncture at “Zusanli” (St.36) and “Sanyinjiao” (SP.6) Points on the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Study of the Bioavailability of 99mTc-Sodium Pertechnetate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Senna-Fernandes, Vasco; França, Daisy L. M.; de Souza, Deise; Santos, Kelly C. M.; Sousa, Rafael S.; Manoel, Cristiano V.; Santos-Filho, Sebastião D.; Cortez, Célia M.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Guimarães, Marco Antonio M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the differences of acupuncture effect between the Zusanli (St.36) and Sanyinjiao (SP.6) points on the gastrointestinal-tract (GIT) segment performed by the bioavailability of 99mTc-sodium-pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) in rats. Male Wistar rats (n = 21) were allocated into three groups of seven each. Group 1 was treated by acupuncture bilaterally at St.36; Group 2 at SP.6; and Group 3 was untreated (control). After 10 min of needle insertion in anesthetized rats, 0.3 mL of Na99mTcO4 (7.4 MBq) was injected via ocular-plexus. After 20 min, the exitus of animals was induced by cervical-dislocation and GIT organs isolated. However, immediately before the exitus procedure, blood was collected by cardiac-puncture for blood radio-labeling (BRL). The radioactivity uptake of the blood constituents was calculated together with the GIT organs by a well gamma counter. The percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) of Na99mTcO4 was calculated for each GIT organs, while BRL was calculated in %ID. According to the one-way ANOVA, the stomach, jejunum, ileum from the treated groups (Group 1 and Group 2) had significant differences compared to the controls (Group 3). However, between the treated groups (Group 1 and Group 2), there were significant differences (P < .05) in the stomach, jejunum, ileum, cecum, transverse and rectum. In BRL analysis, Group 2 showed significant increase and decrease of the insoluble and soluble fractions of the blood cells, respectively (P < .0001). The authors suggest that St.36 may have a tendency of up-regulation effect on GIT, whereas SP.6, down-regulation effect. However, further rigorous experimental studies to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture in either acupuncture points need to be carried out. PMID:19213853

  5. Changes associated with long-term oral administration of the penem antibiotic FCE 22891 to rats and monkeys with particular emphasis on the urinary tract and the urine.

    PubMed

    Brughera, M; Iatropoulos, M J; Scampini, G; Moneta, D; Mazué, G; Newman, A J

    1995-01-01

    FCE 22891, a synthetic beta-lactam antibiotic of the penem class, was administered by gavage to Sprague-Dawley rats and cynomolgus monkeys for 26 wk (with and without a 6-wk recovery). Rats received the test material at doses of 0, 200, 500, and 1,250 mg/kg/day, and monkeys were given doses of 0, 100, 200, 400, and 600 mg/kg/day. At the end of the 26-wk treatment period, approximately two-thirds of the animals (both species) were sacrificed, and the remaining animals were held without treatment for a further 6 wk. A treatment-related mortality occurred in female monkeys receiving 600 mg/kg. There was a reduction in body weight gain in the high-dose groups of both species. Male rats were more affected than the females and, conversely, female monkeys were affected more than the males. At higher dose levels, both species exhibited an early, but transient, azotemia and oliguria with an increase in specific gravity and reduced pH. In rats, microscopic examination revealed treatment-related renal cortical tubular degenerative and regenerative changes with associated interstitial inflammation and fibrosis and diffuse urothelial hyperplasia in the urinary bladder. In general, female rats were less severely affected, and in both sexes there was a trend to recovery of most of these effects. In monkeys given 600 mg/kg of the test material, renal cortical tubular degeneration was seen only in those females that died in the first 5 wk of dosing. In other animals at this dose level, the renal lesions were determined to be reversible.

  6. Segmental distribution of the motor neuron columns that supply the rat hindlimb: A muscle/motor neuron tract-tracing analysis targeting the motor end plates.

    PubMed

    Mohan, R; Tosolini, A P; Morris, R

    2015-10-29

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) that disrupts input from higher brain centers to the lumbar region of the spinal cord results in paraplegia, one of the most debilitating conditions affecting locomotion. Non-human primates have long been considered to be the most appropriate animal to model lower limb dysfunction. More recently, however, there has been a wealth of scientific information gathered in the rat regarding the central control of locomotion. Moreover, rodent models of SCI at lumbar levels have been widely used to validate therapeutic scenarios aimed at the restoration of locomotor activities. Despite the growing use of the rat as a model of locomotor dysfunction, knowledge regarding the anatomical relationship between spinal cord motor neurons and the hindlimb muscles that they innervate is incomplete. Previous studies performed in our laboratory have shown the details of the muscle/motor neuron topographical relationship for the mouse forelimb and hindlimb as well as for the rat forelimb. The present analysis aims to characterize the segmental distribution of the motor neuron pools that innervate the muscles of the rat hindlimb, hence completing this series of studies. The location of the motor end plate (MEP) regions on the main muscles of the rat hindlimb was first revealed with acetylcholinesterase histochemistry. For each muscle under scrutiny, injections of Fluoro-Gold were then performed along the length of the MEP region. Targeting the MEPs gave rise to columns of motor neurons that span more spinal cord segments than previously reported. The importance of this study is discussed in terms of its application to gene therapy for SCI. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute stress modulates the histamine content of mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract through interleukin-1 and corticotropin-releasing factor release in rats.

    PubMed

    Eutamene, Helene; Theodorou, Vassilia; Fioramonti, Jean; Bueno, Lionel

    2003-12-15

    Stress results in activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and affects illnesses such as neuroinflammatory syndrome. In vivo acute stress (restraint stress) induces gastrointestinal function disturbances through colonic mast cell activation. This study investigated the effect of acute stress in histamine content of colonic mast cells, and the central role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in this effect. After a restraint stress session colonic segments were isolated and submitted to three protocols: (i) determination of histamine levels by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after incubation with 48/80 compound, (ii) evaluation by histology of mucosal mast cell (MMC) number and (iii) determination of histamine immunoreactivity of MMC. These procedures were conducted (1) in sham or stressed rats, (2) in stressed rats previously treated with intracerebroventricular (I.C.V.) IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41, (3) in naive rats pretreated with I.C.V. rhIL-1beta or CRF and (4) in rats treated with central IL-1beta and CRF plus alpha-helical CRF and IL-1ra, respectively (cross-antagonism reaction). Acute stress increases histamine content in colonic mast cells, without degranulation. I.C.V. pretreatment with IL-1ra or alpha-helical CRF9-41 blocked stress-induced mast cell histamine content increase. Both I.C.V. rhIL-1beta and CRF injections reproduced the stress-linked changes. I.C.V. treatment with CRF antagonist blocked I.C.V. rhIL-1beta-induced mast cell histamine content increase, whereas central IL-1ra did not affect stress events induced by I.C.V. CRF administration. These results suggest that in rats acute stress increases colonic mast cell histamine content. This effect is mediated by the release in cascade in the brain first of IL-1 and secondly of CRF.

  8. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Richard E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein. PMID:25858911

  9. Histologic and cytologic detection of endocrine and reproductive tract effects of exemestane in female rats treated for up to twenty-eight days.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Michael L; Sivaraman, Lakshmi; Houle, Christopher; Potter, David M; Chapin, Robert E; Cappon, Gregg D

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the shortest period of time necessary to detect histologic evidence of estrous cycle disruption in Sprague-Dawley rats treated for up to 28 days with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane at 1,000 mg/kg. Rats were evaluated on day 5, 8, 15, or 29. Vaginal mucification, uterine and cervical epithelial atrophy, uterine luminal epithelial vacuolation, decreased uterine granulocytes, and hypertrophy/hyperplasia of mammary ducts and alveoli were noted by day 5 and persisted throughout the study. From day 8 to day 29, absence of recent basophilic corpora lutea, increased atresia of antral follicles, interstitial cell hyperplasia, and increased luteinized follicles were present in the ovaries of treated rats. Vaginal smears detected persistent diestrus, confirming estrous cycle disruption between days 5 and 8. Ovary and uterine weights were largely unaffected. Serum hormone levels were not useful due to the study design employed. Other effects of exemestane included decreased adrenal weights and decreased cell size in both the adrenal zona fasciculata and the pituitary pars distalis. While early histologic changes were evident on day 5, only after 8 days of treatment were findings considered sufficient to clearly identify exemestane-induced estrous cycle disruption using microscopy alone.

  10. Antimicrobial agent, tetracycline, enhanced upper alimentary tract Candida albicans infection and its related mucosal proliferation in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sano, Tomoya; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Kodama, Yasushi; Matsuura, Tetsuro; Narama, Isao

    2012-10-01

    Alloxan-induced diabetic rats showed proliferative changes in the forestomach, accompanied by chronic inflammation, and one lesion progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) without distant metastasis. The authors demonstrated that these lesions might be caused by Candida albicans infection. Antimicrobial therapy, particularly tetracycline treatment, has been blamed for a reduction in the number of competing bacterial organisms, which is frequently mentioned as a cause of candidiasis. The objective of this study is to ascertain whether or not tetracycline treatment can accelerate early-onset of C. albicans infection and the proliferative changes in this diabetic model. Alloxan-induced diabetic rats were given chlorinated water (AL group) and tetracycline solution (0.1% during week 1 and 0.01% thereafter) as drinking water (AT group). They were sacrificed after 25 weeks of drinking the treated water. The infection rate with C. albicans in the AT group was significantly higher than in the AL group. The incidence and severity of the squamous cell hyperplasia were enhanced in the AT group compared to the AL group. The proliferative lesions were consistently accompanied by inflammation and C. albicans infection in both groups. SCC was detected in one case in the AT group. These findings demonstrate that tetracycline induces C. albicans infection and enhances forestomach proliferative lesions in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

  11. Nonspecific labeling limits the utility of Cre-Lox bred CST-YFP mice for studies of corticospinal tract regeneration.

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Rafer; Steward, Oswald

    2015-12-15

    Studies of axon regeneration in the spinal cord often assess regeneration of the corticospinal tract (CST). Emx1-Cre x Thy1-STOP-YFP mice have been reported to have yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) selectively expressed in forebrain neurons leading to genetic labeling of CST axons in the spinal cord, and it was suggested that these CST-YFP mice would be useful for studies of CST regeneration. Because regeneration past a lesion may involve only a few axons, the presence of labeled non-CST axons compromises interpretation. We show here that in CST-YFP mice, some YFP-labeled axons are not from the CST. Specifically, YFP-labeled axons are present in regions beyond those with anterogradely labeled CST axons, most YFP-labeled axons beyond established CST locations do not undergo Wallerian degeneration following a large lesion of the sensorimotor cortex, some rubrospinal and reticulospinal neurons are labeled with YFP, and some YFP-labeled cells in the spinal gray matter have YFP-labeled projections into the spinal cord white matter. We further demonstrate that the density of YFP-labeled axon arbors hinders tracing of single axons to their point of origin in the main descending tracts. In light of recent advances in 3D imaging for visualizing axons in unsectioned blocks of spinal cord, we also assessed CST-YFP mice for 3D imaging and found that YFP fluorescence in CST-YFP mice is faint for clearing-based 3D imaging in comparison with fluorescence in Thy1-YFP-H mice and fluorescence of mini-ruby biotinylated dextran amine (BDA). Overall, the nonspecific and faint YFP labeling in CST-YFP mice limits their utility for assessments of CST axon regeneration.

  12. [Comparative analysis of the susceptibility and productivity of respiratory tract target cells of mice and rats exposed to inflienza virus in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhukov, V A; Shishkina, L N; Sergeev, A A; Malkova, E M; Riabchikova, E I; Petrishchenko, V A; Sergeev, A N; Ustiuzhanina, N V; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Vorob'ev, A A

    2008-01-01

    The levels of susceptibility to influenza virus A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2 and the virus yield were determined using primary cells of the trachea and lungs of CD-1 mice and Wistar rats, and for 3 sets of cells obtained from primary lung cells of the both species by centrifugation in the gradient of density and by sedimentation on a surface. The values of ID50 virus dose for 10(6) cells and virus yield per 1 infected cell determined for primary mice cells were 4.0+/-0.47 and 3.2+/-0.27 IgEID50 (lung cells), 3.8+/-0.17 and 3.3+/-0.20 IgEID50 (tracheal cells), and those determined for primary rat cells were 4.0+/-0.35 and 2.1+/-0.24 IgEID50 (lung cells), 3.7+/-0.27 and 2.2+/-0.46 IgEID50 (tracheal cells). The values of ID50 and yield measured for mixtures of cells obtained from primary lung cells by centrifugation in gradient of density and by sedimentation on a surface differed insignificantly (p = 0.05) from the values of the corresponding parameters measured for lung and tracheal cells for both rats and mice. The analysis of data on the variation of the concentrations of different cell types in the experimental cell mixtures shows that type 1 and 2 alveolocytes possess significantly lower (p = 0.05) susceptibility and productivity vs. ciliated cells of the both species. The investigation was conducted within the frame of the ISTC/DARPA#450p project.

  13. Acute administration of AMPA/Kainate blocker combined with delayed transplantation of neural precursors improves lower urinary tract function in spinal injured rats.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Neuhuber, Birgit; Fischer, Itzhak

    2011-10-18

    To evaluate bladder function recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in response to a combination treatment of an acutely administered AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist and delayed transplantation of neuronal precursors. Female rats received a contusion injury at T8/9. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX was directly administered into the lesion site immediately after injury. Nine days post-injury, NRP/GRP were delivered into the lesion site. Controls received NRP/GRP grafts only or no treatment (OP-Controls). Animals underwent bladder function testing during the course of the experiment and at the endpoint. Motor function was evaluated as well. After sacrifice, histological analysis of lesion site and lumbosacral spinal cord regions was performed. Rats receiving the combined treatment (NBQX&NRP/GRP) had voided volumes/micturition resembling that of normal animals and showed greater improvement of urodynamic parameters, compared to NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. Similarly, NBQX&NRP/GRP induced more spouting, regeneration or sparing of descending projections to the lumbosacral cord. The density of primary afferent projections at the lumbosacral spinal cord in rats with combined treatments was similar to that of NRP/GRP alone with decreased sprouting of primary afferents in lumbosacral cord, compared to OP-Control. Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that the combined treatment reduced the size of the lesion to a greater extent than NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. NRP/GRP with and without NBQX produced a significant recovery of hindlimb compared to OP-Controls. In conclusion, transplants of NRP/GRP combined with NBQX promote recovery of micturition function following spinal cord injury, likely through increased neuroprotection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Function and expression of the proton-coupled amino acid transporter PAT1 along the rat gastrointestinal tract: implications for intestinal absorption of gaboxadol

    PubMed Central

    Broberg, ML; Holm, R; Tønsberg, H; Frølund, S; Ewon, KB; Nielsen, AL; Brodin, B; Jensen, A; Kall, MA; Christensen, KV; Nielsen, CU

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Intestinal absorption via membrane transporters may determine the pharmacokinetics of drug compounds. The hypothesis is that oral absorption of gaboxadol (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c] pyridine-3-ol) in rats occurs via the proton-coupled amino acid transporter, rPAT1 (encoded by the gene rSlc36a1). Consequently, we aimed to elucidate the in vivo role of rPAT1 in the absorption of gaboxadol from various intestinal segments obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The absorption of gaboxadol was investigated following its administration into four different intestinal segments. The intestinal expression of rSlc36a1 mRNA was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, the hPAT1-/rPAT1-mediated transport of gaboxadol or L-proline was studied in hPAT1-expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes, Caco-2 cell monolayers and excised segments of the rat intestine. KEY RESULTS The absorption fraction of gaboxadol was high (81.3–91.3%) following its administration into the stomach, duodenum and jejunum, but low (4.2%) after administration into the colon. The pharmacokinetics of gaboxadol were modified by the co-administration of L-tryptophan (an hPAT1 inhibitor) and L-proline (an hPAT1 substrate). The in vitro carrier-mediated uptake rate of L-proline in the excised intestinal segments was highest in the mid jejunum and lowest in the colon. The in vitro uptake and the in vivo absorption correlated with the expression of rSlc36a1 mRNA along the rat intestine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that PAT1 mediates the intestinal absorption of gaboxadol and therefore determines its oral bioavailability. This has implications for the in vivo role of PAT1 and may have an influence on the design of pharmaceutical formulations of PAT1 substrates. PMID:22577815

  15. Hypoxia may increase rat insulin mRNA levels by promoting binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich insulin mRNA 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Linda; Welsh, Nils

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent reports identify the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA as crucial for control of insulin messenger stability. This region contains a pyrimidine-rich sequence, which is similar to the hypoxia-responsive mRNA-stabilizing element of tyrosine hydroxylase. This study aimed to determine whether hypoxia affects insulin mRNA levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rat islets were incubated at normoxic or hypoxic conditions and with or without hydrogen peroxide and a nitric oxide donor. Insulin mRNA was determined by Northern hybridization. Islet homogenates were used for electrophoretic mobility shift assay with an RNA-oligonucleotide, corresponding to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of rat insulin I mRNA. The expression of reporter gene mRNA, in islets transfected with reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type or mutated insulin mRNA pyrimidine-rich sequences, was measured by semiquantitive RT-PCR. RESULTS: Insulin mRNA was increased in response to hypoxia. This was paralleled by increased binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA, which was counteracted by hydrogen peroxide. The reporter gene mRNA level containing the wild-type binding site was not increased in response to hypoxia, but mutation of the site resulted in a destabilization of the mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: The complete understanding of different diabetic conditions requires the elucidation of mechanisms that control insulin gene expression. Our data show that hypoxia may increase insulin mRNA levels by promoting the binding of PTB to the insulin mRNA 3'-UTR. Hydrogen peroxide abolishes the hypoxic effect indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species and/or the redox potential in the oxygen-signaling pathway. PMID:12359957

  16. [Effect of green tea (matcha) on gastrointestinal tract absorption of polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins in rats].

    PubMed

    Morita, K; Matsueda, T; Iida, T

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents the liver distribution and fecal excretion of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) congeners and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) congeners, in male rats fed with powdered green tea (matcha). The rats were given a treatment diet containing 10% matcha for the first five days. Then, the animals were administered 4 g of 10% matcha diet containing 0.5 ml of the casual rice-bran oil of Yusho that had occurred in the Southwest part of Japan in 1968 and kept on the same diet for another five days. The fecal excretion of PCB, PCDF and PCDD in the group fed with 10% matcha were 4.4, 2.4-9.1 and 2.5-4.7 times higher (p < 0.01), respectively, than that in the control group. The liver distribution of PCB, PCDF and PCDD in the same groups were 79%, 20-75% and 26-67% of the control group, respectively. These findings suggest that administration of matcha is useful as a treatment of Yusho patients exposed to PCB, PCDF and PCDD.

  17. Congenital optic tract hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Fujio, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Taylor, David

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral optic tract hypoplasia, described only twice previously. Bilateral optic disk hypoplasia was seen ophthalmoscopically and visual field studies showed an incongruous right homonymous hemianopia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral hypoplasia of both optic nerves and the left optic tract. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography mapping correlated well with the visual field studies.

  18. Urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2013-07-01

    The urinary tract is a common source for life-threatening infections. Most patients with sepsis or septic shock from a urinary source have complicated urinary tract infection. This article explains the epidemiology, risk factors, and treatment. Effective management, appropriate collection of microbiology specimens, prompt initiation of antimicrobial therapy, source control, and supportive therapy are described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  20. Effects of in utero exposure to DI(n-Butyl) phthalate on development of male reproductive tracts in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Sung; Jung, Ki Kyung; Kim, Soon Sun; Kang, Il Hyun; Baek, Jung Hee; Nam, Hye-Seon; Hong, Soon-Keun; Lee, Byung Mu; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki Wan; Kim, Hyung Sik; Han, Soon Young; Kang, Tae Seok

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) administration on male reproductive organ development in F1 Sprague-Dawley rats following in utero exposure. During gestation days (GD) 10-19, pregnant rats were administered daily, orally, DBP at 250, 500, or 700 mg/kg or flutamide (1, 12.5, or 25 mg/kg/d) as a positive control. The male offspring were sacrificed at 31 d of age. DBP and flutamide dose-dependently significantly increased the incidence of hypospadias and cryptorchidism in F1 male offspring. The weights of testes and accessory sex organs (epididymides, seminal vesicles, ventral prostate, levator ani plus bulbocavernosus muscles (LABC), and Cowper's glands) were significantly reduced in DBP-treated animals. Furthermore, cauda agenesis of epididymides and ventral prostate atrophy were observed in high-dose 700-mg/kg DBP males. Anogenital distance (AGD) and levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone were significantly decreased in the DBP (700 mg/kg/d)-treated groups. In particular, the expression of androgen receptor (AR) and 5α-reductase type 2 in the proximal penis was markedly depressed following administration of DBP (700 mg/kg/d) or flutamide (25 mg/kg/d). The expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh) in the urethral epithelium of the proximal penis was significantly less in the DBP (700 mg/kg/d)- or flutamide (25 mg/kg/d)-treated groups. In addition, DBP dose-dependently significantly increased the expression of estrogen receptor (ER α) in the undescended testis. Data demonstrated that in utero exposure to DBP produced several abnormal responses in male reproductive organs, and these effects may be due to disruption of the stage-specific expression of genes related to androgen-dependent organs development.

  1. Production of high quality brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) RNA from isolated populations of rat spinal cord motor neurons obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Prachi; Premkumar, Brian; Morris, Renée

    2016-08-03

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is composed of multiple cellular elements, making it challenging to segregate one particular cell type to study their gene expression profile. For instance, as motor neurons represent only 5-10% of the total cell population of the spinal cord, meaningful transcriptional analysis on these neurons is almost impossible to achieve from homogenized spinal cord tissue. A major challenge faced by scientists is to obtain good quality RNA from small amounts of starting material. In this paper, we used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) techniques to identify and isolate spinal cord motor neurons. The present analysis revealed that perfusion with paraformaldehyde (PFA) does not alter RNA quality. RNA integrity numbers (RINs) of tissue samples from rubrospinal tract (RST)-transected, intact spinal cord or from whole spinal cord homogenate were all above 8, which indicates intact, high-quality RNA. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or for its tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) were not affected by rubrospinal tract (RST) transection, a surgical procedure that deprive motor neurons from one of their main supraspinal input. The isolation of pure populations of neurons with LCM techniques allows for robust transcriptional characterization that cannot be achieved with spinal cord homogenates. Such preparations of pure population of motor neurons will provide valuable tools to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury and neuromuscular diseases. In the near future, LCM techniques might be instrumental to the success of gene therapy for these debilitating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrophysiological characterisation of tachykinin receptors in the rat nucleus of the solitary tract and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maubach, Karen A; Jones, Roland S G

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown antagonists at the NK1 subtype of receptor for tachykinins are anti-emetics and suggested that this may result from blockade of tachykinin-mediated synaptic transmission at a central site in the emetic reflex. We have used intracellular recording in vitro to study the pharmacology of tachykinins in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV). Neurones in the NST were depolarized by substance P (SP), the presumed endogenous ligand for the NK1 receptor and these effects were mimicked by the NK1 agonists, SP-O-methylester (SPOMe), GR73632 and septide; however, SP was nearly an order of magnitude less potent than the latter two agonists. In the DMNV, SP and NK1 receptor agonists evoked similar depolarising responses but SP appeared to be more potent than in the NST and was closer in potency to the other agonists. NK1-receptor antagonists blocked responses to septide and GR73632 in the NST but had little effect on responses to SP and SPOMe. In contrast, in the DMNV the NK1-receptor antagonists blocked responses to septide and GR73632 but also reduced responses to SP and SPOMe. Neurokinin A (NKA) was almost equipotent with septide and GR73632 in depolarizing both NST and DMNV neurones but these effects were not mimicked by a specific NK2-receptor agonist. Responses to NKA were unaffected by an NK2-receptor antagonist; however, the depolarizing effects of NKA were blocked by NK1-receptor antagonists. Neurones in both DMNV and NST were unaffected by the endogenous NK3-receptor ligand, neurokinin B and by a specific agonist for this site, senktide. The results with NK1 receptor agonists and antagonists suggest that the septide-sensitive NK1 site is involved in the excitation of both NST and DMNV neurones. The ‘classical' NK1 receptor may play more of a role in the DMNV and a third unknown site may be responsible for the depolarizing response to SP in the NST. The effects of NKA are best interpreted as an

  3. Use of Inert Gases to Study the Interaction of Blood Flow and Diffusion during Passive Absorption from the Gastrointestinal Tract of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Michael D.; Levitt, David G.

    1973-01-01

    Measurement of the relative absorption rates of inert gases (H2, He, CH4, SF6, and 133Xe) was used to investigate the interaction between diffusion and blood flow during passive absorption from the stomach, small bowel, and colon of the rat. If uptake is blood flow limited, the gases should be absorbed in proportion to their solubilities in blood, but if diffusion limited, uptake should be proportional to the diffusion rate of the gases in mucosal tissues. The observed absorption data were fitted to a series of models of interaction between perfusion and diffusion. A simple model accurately predicted the absorption rates of the gases from all segments of bowel. In this model, gas is absorbed into two distinct blood flows: one which flows in proximity to the lumen and completely equilibrates with the lumen, and a second which is sufficiently rapid and distant from the lumen that its gas uptake is entirely diffusion limited. The fraction of the total absorption attributable to the equilibrating flow can be readily calculated and equalled 93%, 77%, and 33% for the small bowel, colon, and stomach, respectively. Thus the rate of passive absorption of gases from the small bowel is limited almost entirely by the blood flow to the mucosa, and absorption from the stomach is largely limited by the diffusion rate of the gases. The flow which equilibrates with the lumen can be quantitated, and this flow may provide a useful measure of “effective” mucosal blood flow. Images PMID:4719667

  4. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as “Ecstasy”, is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum. PMID:26378923

  5. [Effects of hypothalamic microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on estral cycle and morphology of the genital tract in the female rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sala, M A; Oteui, J T; Benedetti, W I

    1975-01-01

    To determine whether central catecholaminergic pathways are involved in the neural contral of gonadotrophin secretion, they were interrupted at the hypothalamic level by microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The effects on ovulation, estral cycle and ovarian and uterine histology were studied. Microinjections of 50 mug of 6-OHDA hydrobromyde were made bilaterally into the anterolateral hypothalamus in a group of rats. Another group was injected with 25 mug of 6-OHDA, while a control group recieved an equivalent volume (5 mul) of saline with ascorbic acid. Animals injected with 50 mug of 6-OHDA showed blockade of ovulation, vaginal cytology characteristics of persistent estrous, polyfollicular ovaries and enlarged uteri with hypertrophic endometrial glands. In the group injected with 25 mug, similiar effects were demonstrated, but the number of affected animals was smaller than that in the 50 mug group. Control animals dit not show modifications, either in estral cycle or in ovarian and uterine histology. These results suggest that 6-OHDA injected into the anterolateral hypothalmus interferes with catecholaminergic pathways that participate in the neural control of ovulation.

  6. Gallbladder and Biliary Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... switch to the Professional version Home Digestive Disorders Biology of the Digestive System Gallbladder and Biliary Tract ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Biology of the Digestive System Overview of the Digestive ...

  7. [Urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H

    2011-09-01

    Urinary tract infections occur very frequently in the community and in hospitalized patients and are mainly caused by Escherichia (E.) coli. Depending on virulence determinants of uropathogenic microorganisms and host-specific defense mechanisms, urinary tract infections can manifest as cystitis, pyelonephritis (bacterial interstitial nephritis), bacteremia or urosepsis. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections in otherwise healthy women should be treated for 3-7 days depending on the antibiotic therapy chosen, even if spontaneous remission rates of up to 40% have been reported. Antibiotics of the first choice for empirical treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infection are fluoroquinolones, pivmecillinam and fosfomycin. A huge problem is the increasing antimicrobial resistance of uropathogenic microorganisms. Complicated urinary tract infections associated with anatomical and/or functional abnormalities of the urinary tract and/or comorbidities such as diabetes or immunosuppressive therapy, need longer antibiotic treatment (e.g. 10-14 days) as well as interdisciplinary diagnostic procedures. Treatment of community acquired urosepsis includes cephalosporins of the third generation, piperacillin/tazobactam or ciprofloxacin. For nosocomial urosepsis the combination with an aminoglycoside or a carbapenem is recommended.

  8. Modulating effects in human diets of dietary fibre and beef, and of time and dose on the reactive microcapsule trapping of benzo[a]pyrene metabolites in the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, I K; Bingham, S; Povey, A C; Brouet, I; Bereziat, J C

    1990-04-01

    Trapping by magnetic polyethyleneimine (PEI) microcapsules was utilized to investigate the influence in male rats of dose, human dietary composition and time-dependence on reactive metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract; also, PEI microcapsules modified with copper phthalocyanine tetrasulphonic acid (CPTS) were tested in vivo for trapping of endogenous mutagens having planar molecular structure. In a preliminary experiment the PEI microcapsules were administered by gavage at 0, 24 and 48 h, with [14C]B[a]P at 2 h to chow-fed BDVI rats; microcapsules were recovered from faeces collected at 24, 48 and 72 h, and then subjected to an extraction sequence showing that the trapped B[a]P metabolites were inconsistent with B[a]P diol epoxide trapping (as previously found) and unaltered by elapsed time or 5-fold dose alteration of B[a]P. Then five groups of F344 rats were fed isocalorically either one of four low-fat human diets or rat chow; in order to investigate influences of diet both on B[a]P and endogenous mutagens, half of each group was tested at 2 weeks with this PEI microcapsule/[14C]B[a]P protocol and then at 3 weeks, PEI-CPTS microcapsules (two gavages). So as to provide a cross-over comparison, the other half of each group was first tested with PEI-CPTS microcapsules followed by PEI microcapsules/[14C]B[a]P 1 week later. The human diets were prepared from cooked British foods so as to simulate the adequate intake of all nutrients required by humans; but with 3-fold differences in intake levels of beef and dietary fibre non-starch polysaccharide (NSP), while ensuring the same intake of available energy, protein, fat and calcium. They gave very similar body-weight gains in the four groups but greatly reduced faecal weight, protein and total faecal enzyme activity compared with chow; the extraction pattern of microcapsule-trapped B[a]P metabolite radioactivity was not significantly altered. However, human diet consumption caused a

  9. Urinary Tract Infections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  10. Urinary Tract Infections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  11. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  12. Digestive-tract sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghrenassia, Etienne; Mekinian, Arsene; Chapelon-Albric, Catherine; Levy, Pierre; Cosnes, Jacques; Sève, Pascal; Lefèvre, Guillaume; Dhôte, Robin; Launay, David; Prendki, Virginie; Morell-Dubois, Sandrine; Sadoun, Danielle; Mehdaoui, Anas; Soussan, Michael; Bourrier, Anne; Ricard, Laure; Benamouzig, Robert; Valeyre, Dominique; Fain, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Digestive tract sarcoidosis (DTS) is rare and case-series are lacking. In this retrospective case–control study, we aimed to compare the characteristics, outcome, and treatment of patients with DTS, nondigestive tract sarcoidosis (NDTS), and Crohn disease. We included cases of confirmed sarcoidosis, symptomatic digestive tract involvement, and noncaseating granuloma in any digestive tract. Each case was compared with 2 controls with sarcoidoisis without digestive tract involvement and 4 with Crohn disease. We compared 25 cases of DTS to 50 controls with NDTS and 100 controls with Crohn disease. The major digestive clinical features were abdominal pain (56%), weight loss (52%), nausea/vomiting (48%), diarrhea (32%), and digestive bleeding (28%). On endoscopy of DTS, macroscopic lesions were observed in the esophagus (9%), stomach (78%), duodenum (9%), colon, (25%) and rectum (19%). As compared with NDTS, DTS was associated with weight loss (odds ratio [OR] 5.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44–23.3) and the absence of thoracic adenopathy (OR 5.0; 95% CI 1.03–25). As compared with Crohn disease, DTS was associated with Afro-Caribbean origin (OR 27; 95% CI 3.6–204) and the absence of ileum or colon macroscopic lesions (OR 62.5; 95% CI 10.3–500). On the last follow-up, patients with DTS showed no need for surgery (versus 31% for patients with Crohn disease; P = 0.0013), and clinical digestive remission was frequent (76% vs. 35% for patients with Crohn disease; P = 0.0002). The differential diagnosis with Crohn disease could be an issue with DTS. Nevertheless, the 2 diseases often have different clinical presentation and outcome. PMID:27442665

  13. Xenobiotic transporter expression along the male genital tract.

    PubMed

    Klein, David M; Wright, Stephen H; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2014-08-01

    The male genital tract plays an important role in protecting sperm by forming a distinct compartment separate from the body which limits exposure to potentially toxic substrates. Transporters along this tract can influence the distribution of xenobiotics into the male genital tract through efflux back into the blood or facilitating the accumulation of toxicants. The aim of this study was to quantitatively determine the constitutive mRNA expression of 30 xenobiotic transporters in caput and cauda regions of the epididymis, vas deferens, prostate, and seminal vesicles from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The epididymis was found to express at least moderate levels of 18 transporters, vas deferens 15, seminal vesicles 23, and prostate 18. Constitutive expression of these xenobiotic transporters in the male genital tract may provide insight into the xenobiotics that can potentially be transported into these tissues and may provide the molecular mechanism for site specific toxicity of select agents.

  14. Xenobiotic Transporter Expression along the Male Genital Tract1

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David M.; Wright, Stephen H.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    The male genital tract plays an important role in protecting sperm by forming a distinct compartment separate from the body which limits exposure to potentially toxic substrates. Transporters along this tract can influence the distribution of xenobiotics into the male genital tract through efflux back into the blood or facilitating the accumulation of toxicants. The aim of this study was to quantitatively determine the constitutive mRNA expression of 30 xenobiotic transporters in caput and cauda regions of the epididymis, vas deferens, prostate, and seminal vesicles from adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The epididymis was found to express at least moderate levels of 18 transporters, vas deferens 15, seminal vesicles 23, and prostate 18. Constitutive expression of these xenobiotic transporters in the male genital tract may provide insight into the xenobiotics that can potentially be transported into these tissues and may provide the molecular mechanism for site specific toxicity of select agents. PMID:24814985

  15. [Nocosomial urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Pigrau, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTI) are mainly related to urinary catheterisation. In this paper we review the pathogenic mechanisms, particularly the route by which the microorganisms colonise the urinary tract, their adhesion ability, and their capacity to form biofilms, and are related not only to the microorganism but also to the type of urinary catheter. The aetiology of catheter related UTI is variable, and multiresistant microorganisms are often isolated, making empirical antibiotic therapy complex. Clinical findings are frequently atypical, and its diagnosis is difficult. The therapeutic management of catheter-related UTI should be stratified according to the type of UTI: asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be habitually treated, but patients with septic shock should receive a broad spectrum antibiotic. In this review, the value of the different preventive measures are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Hawaii Census 2000 Tracts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Tiger line files are the source of the geometry representing the Census blocks. Attributes include total population counts, racial/ethnic, and poverty/income information. Racial/ethnic classifications are represented in units of blocks, blockgroups and tracts. Poverty and income data are represented in units of blockgroups and tracts. Percentages of each racial/ethnic group have been calculated from the population counts. Total Minority counts and percentages were compiled from each racial/ethnic non-white category. Categories compiled to create the Total Minority count includes the following: African American, Asian, American Indian, Pacific Islander, White Hispanic, Other and all mixed race categories. The percentage poverty attribute represents the percent of the population living at or below poverty level. The per capita income attribute represents the sum of all income within the geographic entity, divided by the total population of that entity. Special fields designed to be used for EJ analysis have been derived from the PL data and include the following: Percentage difference of block, blockgroup and total minority from the state and county averages, percentile rank for each percent total minority within state and county entitie

  17. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  18. Guanine tracts enhance sequence directed DNA bends.

    PubMed Central

    Milton, D L; Casper, M L; Wills, N M; Gesteland, R F

    1990-01-01

    Synthetic DNA fragments were constructed to determine the effect of G tracts, in conjunction with periodically spaced A tracts, on DNA bends. Relative length measurements showed that the G tracts spaced at the half helical turn enhanced the DNA bend. When the G tract was interrupted with a thymine or shortened to one or two guanines, the relative lengths decreased. If the G tract was replaced with either an A tract or a T tract, the bend was cancelled. Replacement with a C tract decreased the relative length to that of a thymine interruption suggesting that bend enhancement due to G tracts requires A tracts on the same strand. PMID:2315040

  19. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Litza, Janice A; Brill, John R

    2010-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common urologic disorder and one of the most common conditions for which physicians are consulted. Patients at increased risk for UTI include women; diabetics; the immunocompromised; and those with anatomic abnormalities, impaired mobility, incontinence, advanced age, and instrumentation. Antibiotic therapy aims to relieve symptoms and prevent complications such as pyelonephritis and renal scarring. Distinguishing asymptomatic bacteriuria from a UTI can be difficult, especially in those with comorbidities. Most experts do not recommend screening for UTI, except in the first trimester of pregnancy.

  20. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications.

  1. 30 CFR 256.28 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tract size. 256.28 Section 256.28 Mineral... IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Area Identification and Tract Size § 256.28 Tract size. (a) A tract.... (b) The tract size for the leasing of other minerals shall be specified in the notice of sale. ...

  2. Managing urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Sermin A; Mattoo, Tej K

    2011-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in childhood. Presence of pyuria and bacteriuria in an appropriately collected urine sample are diagnostic of UTI. The risk of UTI is increased with an underlying urological abnormality such as vesicoureteral reflux, constipation, and voiding dysfunction. Patients with acute pyelonephritis are at risk of renal scarring and subsequent complications such as hypertension, proteinuria with and without FSGS, pregnancy-related complications and even end-stage renal failure. The relevance and the sequence of the renal imaging following initial UTI, and the role of antimicrobial prophylaxis and surgical intervention are currently undergoing an intense debate. Prompt treatment of UTI and appropriate follow-up of those at increased risk of recurrence and/or renal scarring are important.

  3. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    PubMed

    Emonet, Stéphane; Harbarth, Stephan; van Delden, Christian

    2011-04-27

    Urinary tract infections are commonly seen by general practitioners. Quinolones are frequently prescribed in this setting. The emergence of resistance to these antibiotics has led to new guidelines for the management of uncomplicated UTI, based on the use of fosfomycin and furadantine. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment of urinary tract infections in adults.

  4. Advances in alimentary tract imaging.

    PubMed

    Maglinte, Dean-Dt; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Tann, Mark

    2006-05-28

    Advances in imaging techniques are changing the way radiologists undertake imaging of the gastrointestinal tract and their ability to answer questions posed by surgeons. In this paper we discuss the technological improvements of imaging studies that have occurred in the last few years and how these help to better diagnosing alimentary tract disease.

  5. Comparative characteristics of the information content of biochemical and electrical parameters of biotissues in the modeling of the induced development of precancerous abnormalities of the gastrointestinal tract in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevskiy, Matvey V.; Galitskaya, Anna A.; Mironova, Irina K.; Velikov, Vladimir A.; Konnova, Svetlana A.; Pleshakova, Ekaterina V.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oksana V.

    2017-03-01

    We obtained impedance dispersion curves of stomach and liver tissues of rats in dynamics, while affecting with tumorigenic inductors: sodium nitrite (0.2%) and m-toluidine (25 mg per 1 kg body weight) in chronic experiment (over 10 months) in male outbred white rats aged 3 and 14 months at the beginning of the experiment. A substantial decrease in the impedance values for all test frequencies (50 Hz to 1 MHz) was shown.

  6. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Carol E; Saint, Sanjay

    2011-03-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) account for approximately 40% of all health care-associated infections. Despite studies showing benefit of interventions for prevention of CAUTI, adoption of these practices has not occurred in many healthcare facilities in the United States. As urinary catheters account for the majority of healthcare-associated UTIs, the most important interventions are directed at avoiding placement of urinary catheters and promoting early removal when appropriate. Alternatives to indwelling catheters such as intermittent catheterization and condom catheters should be considered. If indwelling catheterization is appropriate, proper aseptic practices for catheter insertion and maintenance and use of a closed catheter collection system are essential for preventing CAUTI. The use of antimicrobial catheters also may be considered when the rates of CAUTI remain persistently high despite adherence to other evidence-based practices, or in patients deemed to be at high risk for CAUTI or its complications. Attention toward prevention of CAUTI will likely increase as Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services and other third-party payers no longer reimburse for hospital-acquired UTI.

  7. [Recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Pigrau-Serrallach, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are a frequent clinical problem in sexually active young women, pregnant or postmenopausal women and in patients with underlying urological abnormalities. The present chapter reviews RUTI based on their classification: relapses, which usually occur early (< 1 month), are caused by the same microorganism and are associated with underlying urological abnormalities, and reinfections, which usually occur later and are caused by a new distinct microorganism (or by the same microorganism usually located in the rectum or uroepithelial cells). The pathogenesis of RUTI is reviewed and the risk factors associated with RUTI in premenopausal women (usually related to sexual activity), postmenopausal women (in whom estrogen deficiency has a significant effect on the vaginal Lactobacillus flora), and in pregnant women are discussed. Likewise, an extensive review of the distinct therapeutic strategies to prevent RUTI is provided: self-treatment of cystitis, continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, postcoital antibiotic prophylaxis, topical vaginal estrogens, Lactobacillus, cranberry juice, intravesical administration of non-virulent E. coli strains and vaccines, among others. Several diagnostic-therapeutic algorithms are included. These algorithms are based on the type of urinary infection (relapse-reinfection), on the type of patient (young, postmenopausal, or pregnant women) and on the number of episodes of RUTI.

  8. Cardiac outflow tract anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Neeb, Zachary; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D.; Bolanis, Esther; Conway, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The mature outflow tract (OFT) is, in basic terms, a short conduit. It is a simple, although vital, connection situated between contracting muscular heart chambers and a vast embryonic vascular network. Unfortunately, it is also a focal point underlying many multifactorial congenital heart defects (CHDs). Through the use of various animal models combined with human genetic investigations, we are beginning to comprehend the molecular and cellular framework that controls OFT morphogenesis. Clear roles of neural crest cells (NCC) and second heart field (SHF) derivatives have been established during OFT formation and remodeling. The challenge now is to determine how the SHF and cardiac NCC interact, the complex reciprocal signaling that appears to be occurring at various stages of OFT morphogenesis, and finally how endocardial progenitors and primary heart field (PHF) communicate with both these colonizing extra-cardiac lineages. Although we are beginning to understand that this dance of progenitor populations is wonderfully intricate, the underlying pathogenesis and the spatiotemporal cell lineage interactions remain to be fully elucidated. What is now clear is that OFT alignment and septation are independent processes, invested via separate SHF and cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineages. This review will focus on our current understanding of the respective contributions of the SHF and CNC lineage during OFT development and pathogenesis. PMID:24014420

  9. Vaccination with a neural-derived peptide plus administration of glutathione improves the performance of paraplegic rats.

    PubMed

    Martiñon, S; García, E; Flores, N; Gonzalez, I; Ortega, T; Buenrostro, M; Reyes, R; Fernandez-Presas, A M; Guizar-Sahagún, G; Correa, D; Ibarra, A

    2007-07-01

    After damage to the central nervous system (CNS) the body is protected by an adaptive immune response which is directed against myelin-associated proteins. Active immunization with nonpathogenic derivatives of CNS-associated peptides (DCAP) reduces the degeneration of neurons and promotes motor recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. In order to improve even more the neurological outcome obtained with this therapy, either a combination of DCAP immunization plus glutathione monoethyl ester (GSHE) or a double DCAP immunization were performed. GSHE is a cell-permeant derivative of glutathione, a potent antioxidant agent that significantly inhibits lipid peroxidation after SCI. After a contusive or compressive SCI, the combination of GSHE + DCAP immunization, induced better motor recovery, a higher number of myelinated axons and better rubrospinal neuron survival than immunization alone. On the other hand, double-DCAP immunization counteracted the protective effect of DCAP therapy. Motor recovery and neuronal survival of double-immunized rats were similar to those observed in control animals (PBS-treated). Further studies revealed that double immunization was not encephalitogenic but inhibited the proliferative response of T-cells specific to the DCAP-immunized peptide. This clonal dysfunction was probably secondary to anergy. GSHE improves the protective effect induced by DCAP immunization while double immunization, reverts it.

  10. Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland) can cause lower urinary tract disease in cats. Although they are much less common causes, FLUTD ... your veterinarian about the best diet for your cat. Many commercial diets are acceptable, but some urinary ...

  11. Urinary tract infections in children.

    PubMed

    Sedberry-Ross, Sherry; Pohl, Hans G

    2008-03-01

    Urinary tract infections can be a significant source of morbidity in the pediatric population. The mainstay of evaluating urinary tract infections in children has been physical examination, urinalysis and culture, and renal and bladder sonography and contrast cystography. However, novel clinical paradigms now consider the importance of various risk factors, such as bacterial virulence and antibiotic-resistance patterns, elimination disorders, and the role of innate immunity and inflammation in determining the likelihood of renal cortical scarring.

  12. Implementation of fiber tract navigation.

    PubMed

    Nimsky, Christopher; Ganslandt, Oliver; Fahlbusch, Rudolf

    2007-07-01

    To implement fiber tracking in a common neuronavigation environment for routine clinical use to visualize major white matter tracts intraoperatively. A single-shot, spin-echo diffusion weighted echo planar imaging sequence with six diffusion directions on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner was used for diffusion tensor imaging. For three-dimensional (3-D) tractography, we applied a knowledge-based multiple volume of interest approach. Tracking was initiated in each voxel of the initial seed volume in retrograde and orthograde directions according to the direction of the major eigenvector by applying a tensor deflection algorithm. Tractography results were displayed as streamlines assigned direction encoding color. After selecting the fiber tract bundle of interest by defining inclusion and exclusion volumes, a 3-D object was generated automatically by wrapping the whole fiber tract bundle. This 3-D object was displayed along with other contours representing tumor outline and further functional data with the microscope heads-up display. In 16 patients (three cavernomas, 13 gliomas), major white matter tracts (pyramidal tract, n = 14; optic radiation, n = 2) were visualized intraoperatively with a standard navigation system. Three patients developed a postoperative paresis, which resolved in two in the postoperative course. Additional planning time for tractography amounted to up to 10 minutes. Comparing the tractography results with a fiber bundle generated on a different platform by applying a distortion-free sequence revealed a good congruency of the defined 3-D outlines in the area of interest. Fiber tract data can be reliably integrated into a standard neuronavigation system, allowing for intraoperative visualization and localization of major white matter tracts such as the pyramidal tract or optic radiation.

  13. Implementation of fiber tract navigation.

    PubMed

    Nimsky, Christopher; Ganslandt, Oliver; Fahlbusch, Rudolf

    2006-04-01

    To implement fiber tracking in a common neuronavigation environment for routine clinical use to visualize major white matter tracts intraoperatively. A single-shot, spin-echo diffusion weighted echo planar imaging sequence with six diffusion directions on a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner was used for diffusion tensor imaging. For three-dimensional (3-D) tractography, we applied a knowledge-based multiple volume of interest approach. Tracking was initiated in each voxel of the initial seed volume in retrograde and orthograde directions according to the direction of the major eigenvector by applying a tensor deflection algorithm. Tractography results were displayed as streamlines assigned direction encoding color. After selecting the fiber tract bundle of interest by defining inclusion and exclusion volumes, a 3-D object was generated automatically by wrapping the whole fiber tract bundle. This 3-D object was displayed along with other contours representing tumor outline and further functional data with the microscope heads-up display. In 16 patients (three cavernomas, 13 gliomas), major white matter tracts (pyramidal tract, n = 14; optic radiation, n = 2) were visualized intraoperatively with a standard navigation system. Three patients developed a postoperative paresis, which resolved in two in the postoperative course. Additional planning time for tractography amounted to up to 10 minutes. Comparing the tractography results with a fiber bundle generated on a different platform by applying a distortion-free sequence revealed a good congruency of the defined 3-D outlines in the area of interest. Fiber tract data can be reliably integrated into a standard neuronavigation system, allowing for intraoperative visualization and localization of major white matter tracts such as the pyramidal tract or optic radiation.

  14. Atrio-His bundle tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Brechenmacher, C

    1975-01-01

    The atrio-His bundle tracts are very rare; only two have been found in 687 hearts studied histologically. These tracts have a similar appearance to those of the atrioventricular bundle and form a complete bypass of the atrioventricular node. In their presence the electrocardiogram may show a short or normal PR interval. They may be responsible for some cases of very rapid ventricular response to supraventricular arrhythmias. Images PMID:1191446

  15. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Evan B; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2004-06-07

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an exceedingly common problem prompting seven million office visits and one million hospitalizations in the United States each year. Advances in the understanding of both host and bacterial factors involved in UTI have led to many improvements in therapy. While there have also been advances in the realm of antimicrobials, there have been numerous problems with multiple drug resistant organisms. Providing economical care while minimizing drug resistance requires appropriate diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of urinary tract infections.

  16. Urinary Tract and How It Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract & How It Works The Urinary Tract & How It Works What is the urinary tract and how does it work? The urinary tract is the body’s drainage ... hollow, muscular, balloon-shaped organ that expands as it fills with urine. Although a person does not ...

  17. 30 CFR 556.28 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tract size. 556.28 Section 556.28 Mineral... AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Area Identification and Tract Size § 556.28 Tract size. (a) A... production unit. (b) The tract size for the leasing of other minerals shall be specified in the notice of...

  18. 30 CFR 556.28 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tract size. 556.28 Section 556.28 Mineral... AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Area Identification and Tract Size § 556.28 Tract size. (a) A... production unit. (b) The tract size for the leasing of other minerals shall be specified in the notice of...

  19. 30 CFR 556.28 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tract size. 556.28 Section 556.28 Mineral... AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Area Identification and Tract Size § 556.28 Tract size. (a) A... production unit. (b) The tract size for the leasing of other minerals shall be specified in the notice of...

  20. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  1. Simultaneous determination of nine lignans from Schisandra chinensis extract using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in rat plasma, urine, and gastrointestinal tract samples: application to the pharmacokinetic study of Schisandra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Jin; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Han, Sun-Young; Chin, Young-Won; Choi, Young Hee

    2014-10-01

    The fruit of Schisandra chinensis is a well-known herbal medicine and dietary supplement due to a variety of biological activities including antihepatotoxic and antihyperlipidemic activities. However, the simultaneous validation methodology and pharmacokinetic investigation of nine lignans of S. chinensis extract in biological samples have not been proved yet. Thus, the present study was undertaken to develop the proper sample preparation method and simultaneous analytical method of schisandrol A, gomisin J, schisandrol B, tigloylgomisin H, angeloylgomisin H, schisandrin A, schisandrin B, gomisin N, and schisandrin C in the hexane-soluble extract of S. chinensis to apply for the pharmacokinetic study in rats. All intra- and interprecisions of nine lignans were below 13.7% and accuracies were 85.1-115% and it is enough to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters after both intravenous and oral administration of hexane-soluble extract of S. chinensis to rats.

  2. Fine motor skill training enhances functional plasticity of the corticospinal tract after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Yang, Xiao-yu; Xia, Wei-wei; Dong, Jian; Yang, Mao-guang; Jiao, Jian-hang

    2016-01-01

    Following central nervous system injury, axonal sprouts form distal to the injury site and extend into the denervated area, reconstructing neural circuits through neural plasticity. How to facilitate this plasticity has become the key to the success of central nervous system repair. It remains controversial whether fine motor skill training contributes to the recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury. Therefore, we established a rat model of unilateral corticospinal tract injury using a pyramidal tract cutting method. Horizontal ladder crawling and food ball grasping training procedures were conducted 2 weeks before injury and 3 days after injury. The neurological function of rat forelimbs was assessed at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks after injury. Axon growth was observed with biotinylated dextran amine anterograde tracing in the healthy corticospinal tract of the denervated area at different time periods. Our results demonstrate that compared with untrained rats, functional recovery was better in the forelimbs and forepaws of trained rats. The number of axons and the expression of growth associated protein 43 were increased at the injury site 3 weeks after corticospinal tract injury. These findings confirm that fine motor skill training promotes central nervous system plasticity in spinal cord injury rats. PMID:28197197

  3. Syntactic processing depends on dorsal language tracts.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Stephen M; Galantucci, Sebastiano; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Rising, Kindle; Patterson, Dianne K; Henry, Maya L; Ogar, Jennifer M; DeLeon, Jessica; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2011-10-20

    Frontal and temporal language areas involved in syntactic processing are connected by several dorsal and ventral tracts, but the functional roles of the different tracts are not well understood. To identify which white matter tract(s) are important for syntactic processing, we examined the relationship between white matter damage and syntactic deficits in patients with primary progressive aphasia, using multimodal neuroimaging and neurolinguistic assessment. Diffusion tensor imaging showed that microstructural damage to left hemisphere dorsal tracts--the superior longitudinal fasciculus including its arcuate component--was strongly associated with deficits in comprehension and production of syntax. Damage to these dorsal tracts predicted syntactic deficits after gray matter atrophy was taken into account, and fMRI confirmed that these tracts connect regions modulated by syntactic processing. In contrast, damage to ventral tracts--the extreme capsule fiber system or the uncinate fasciculus--was not associated with syntactic deficits. Our findings show that syntactic processing depends primarily on dorsal language tracts.

  4. Urinary tract infections during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gilstrap, L C; Ramin, S M

    2001-09-01

    Urinary tract infections are relatively common in pregnancy and may result in significant morbidity for the pregnant woman and fetus. The authors recommend that all pregnant women be screened for the presence of bacteriuria at their first prenatal visit. Failure to treat bacteriuria during pregnancy may result in as many as 25% of women experiencing acute pyelonephritis. Women with acute pyelonephritis may sustain significant complications, such as preterm labor, transient renal failure, ARDS, sepsis and shock, and hematologic abnormalities. Pregnant women with urinary tract infections should be followed up closely after treatment because as many as one third will experience a recurrence.

  5. Candida urinary tract infection: pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John F; Kavanagh, Kevin; Sobel, Jack D; Kauffman, Carol A; Newman, Cheryl A

    2011-05-01

    Candida species are unusual causes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in healthy individuals, but common in the hospital setting or among patients with predisposing diseases and structural abnormalities of the kidney and collecting system. The urinary tract may be invaded in either an antegrade fashion from the bloodstream or retrograde via the urethra and bladder. Candida species employ a repertoire of virulence factors, including phenotypic switching, dimorphism, galvano - and thigmotropism, and hydrolytic enzymes, to colonize and then invade the urinary tract. Antegrade infection occurs primarily among patients predisposed to candidemia. The process of adherence to and invasion of the glomerulus, renal blood vessels, and renal tubules by Candida species was elegantly described in early histopathologic studies. Armed with modern molecular biologic techniques, the various virulence factors involved in bloodborne infection of the kidney are gradually being elucidated. Disturbances of urine flow, whether congenital or acquired, instrumentation of the urinary tract, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobial therapy, and immunosuppression underlie most instances of retrograde Candida UTI. In addition, bacterial UTIs caused by Enterobacteriaceae may facilitate the initial step in the process. Ascending infections generally do not result in candidemia in the absence of obstruction.

  6. [Urinary tract infections in adults].

    PubMed

    Ali, Adel Ben; Bagnis, Corinne Isnard

    2014-09-01

    Urinary tract infections in adults are frequent and can induce several septic situations. Their economic cost (drugs, microbiologic samples, consultations and/or hospitalizations and stop working) and ecologic cost (second reasons of antibiotic prescription in winter and first in the rest of the year) are important. A better respect of recommendations can improve the outcome of this different infections and decrease their cost.

  7. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ovalle, A; Levancini, M

    2001-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are very common during pregnancy. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen isolated from pregnant women. Ampicillin should not be used because of its high resistance to Escherichia coli. Pyelonephritis can cause morbidity and can be life-threatening to both mother and fetus. Second and third-generation cephalosporins are recommended for treatment, administered initially intravenously during hospitalization. Cultures and the study of virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli are recommended for the adequate management of pyelonephritis. The lower genital tract infection associated with pyelonephritis is responsible for the failure of antibiotic treatment. Asymptomatic bacteriuria can evolve into cystitis or pyelonephritis. All pregnant women should be routinely screened for bacteriuria using urine culture, and should be treated with nitrofurantoin, sulfixosazole or first-generation cephalosporins. Recurrent urinary infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics. Pregnant women who develop urinary tract infections with group B streptococcal infection should be treated with prophylactic antibiotics during labour to prevent neonatal sepsis. Preterm delivery is frequent. Evidence suggests that infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of preterm labour. Experimental models in pregnant mice support the theory that Escherichia coli propagated by the transplacental route, involving bacterial adhesins, induces preterm delivery, but this has not been demonstrated in humans. Ascending lower genital tract infections are the most probable cause of preterm delivery, but this remains to be proved.

  8. [Temocillin and urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Vallée, M; Bruyère, F; Roblot, F; Brureau, L

    2017-08-28

    Temocillin is an alternative to treat urinary tract infections with bacteria producing extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). The objective is to evaluate the use of temocillin in urinary tract infections. A systematic review of literature was carried out according to PRISMA criteria. All national and international recommendations have been reviewed regarding the indication of the use of temocillin in urology. Data collection on the use of temocillin in urinary tract infection has been performed from the Cochrane, LILACS and the Medline database. The following keywords were used: temocillin, extended spectrum beta-lactamase, urinary tract infections, urine, prostate, epididymis, testis, diffusion, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics. The selection was based on the methodology, language of publication (English/French), relevance to the topic and date of publication of the articles collected. The endpoint was to provide exhaustive scientific information allowing urologists to use this antibiotic in febrile urinary infections. Bacteria producing ESBL has a relatively high susceptible to temocillin, ranging from 61 % to 90 %. These rates would allow its use in probabilistic. The dosage recommended is currently, in the normo-renal patient, 4g per day by intermittent infusion or continuously after a loading dose of 2g. Some studies argue, particularly in case of difficult clinical situations or obese patients, for administration of high doses (6g/24h) rather continuous infusion. There is no evident relationship between high doses and side effects. With an excellent urinary and prostatic diffusion, temocilllin might be recommend for the treatment of ESBL prostatitis. Temocillin is known to have good urinary and prostatic diffusion. According to our results, this antibiotics is now a reliable alternative for the treatment of documented ESBL urinary tract infections. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Tract Profiles of White Matter Properties: Automating Fiber-Tract Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Yeatman, Jason D.; Dougherty, Robert F.; Myall, Nathaniel J.; Wandell, Brian A.; Feldman, Heidi M.

    2012-01-01

    Tractography based on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) data is a method for identifying the major white matter fascicles (tracts) in the living human brain. The health of these tracts is an important factor underlying many cognitive and neurological disorders. In vivo, tissue properties may vary systematically along each tract for several reasons: different populations of axons enter and exit the tract, and disease can strike at local positions within the tract. Hence quantifying and understanding diffusion measures along each fiber tract (Tract Profile) may reveal new insights into white matter development, function, and disease that are not obvious from mean measures of that tract. We demonstrate several novel findings related to Tract Profiles in the brains of typically developing children and children at risk for white matter injury secondary to preterm birth. First, fractional anisotropy (FA) values vary substantially within a tract but the Tract FA Profile is consistent across subjects. Thus, Tract Profiles contain far more information than mean diffusion measures. Second, developmental changes in FA occur at specific positions within the Tract Profile, rather than along the entire tract. Third, Tract Profiles can be used to compare white matter properties of individual patients to standardized Tract Profiles of a healthy population to elucidate unique features of that patient's clinical condition. Fourth, Tract Profiles can be used to evaluate the association between white matter properties and behavioral outcomes. Specifically, in the preterm group reading ability is positively correlated with FA measured at specific locations on the left arcuate and left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the magnitude of the correlation varies significantly along the Tract Profiles. We introduce open source software for automated fiber-tract quantification (AFQ) that measures Tract Profiles of MRI parameters for 18 white matter tracts. With further validation, AFQ Tract

  10. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents computed tomography of the major disease states involving the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery, and peritoneal cavity. Computed Tomography of the Gastrointestinal Tract combined experience of l5 authorities includes illustrations (most of these radiographs).

  11. Urinary tract infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-10-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based approach to diagnosis of urinary tract infection does not exist. In the absence of a gold standard definition of urinary tract infection that clinicians agree upon, overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected urinary tract infection remains a significant problem, and leads to a variety of negative consequences including the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Future studies improving the diagnostic accuracy of urinary tract infections are needed. This review will cover the prevalence, diagnosis and diagnostic challenges, management, and prevention of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults.

  12. Urinary tract infection in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based approach to diagnosis of urinary tract infection does not exist. In the absence of a gold standard definition of urinary tract infection that clinicians agree upon, overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected urinary tract infection remains a significant problem, and leads to a variety of negative consequences including the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Future studies improving the diagnostic accuracy of urinary tract infections are needed. This review will cover the prevalence, diagnosis and diagnostic challenges, management, and prevention of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults. PMID:24391677

  13. Lower urinary tract symptoms: thinking beyond the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Akbar; Winkle, David

    2014-07-17

    We present a case of a 54-year-old man with progressive lower urinary tract symptoms over 12 months. Physical examination, urinalysis, serum biochemistry and ultrasound of the renal tract were all unremarkable. Flexible cystoscopy was normal. Urodynamic assessment revealed an overactive bladder of unknown aetiology. The patient went on to have an MRI of the lumbosacral spine which showed a spinal cord tumour of the conus medullaris. The patient underwent a laminectomy and resection of the tumour. Histology showed myxopapillary ependymoma of the spinal cord. This case highlights the need to consider the full spectrum of causes, urological and non-urological, in assessing a patient with voiding dysfunction. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. The Pediatric Urinary Tract and Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Penny, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    The pediatric urinary tract often is assessed with medical imaging. Consequently, it is essential for medical imaging professionals to have a fundamental understanding of pediatric anatomy, physiology, and common pathology of the urinary tract to provide optimal patient care. This article provides an overview of fetal development, pediatric urinary anatomy and physiology, and common diseases and conditions of the pediatric urinary tract.

  15. 30 CFR 256.28 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tract size. 256.28 Section 256.28 Mineral... OFFSHORE LEASING OF SULPHUR OR OIL AND GAS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Area Identification and Tract... comprise a reasonable economic production unit. (b) The tract size for the leasing of other minerals shall...

  16. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  17. Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, David; Morris, Rachel K; Kilby, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Fetal lower urinary tract obstruction affects 2.2 per 10,000 births. It is a consequence of a range of pathological processes, most commonly posterior urethral valves (64%) or urethral atresia (39%). It is a condition of high mortality and morbidity associated with progressive renal dysfunction and oligohydramnios, and hence fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Accurate detection is possible via ultrasound, but the underlying pathology is often unknown. In future, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be increasingly used alongside ultrasound in the diagnosis and assessment of fetuses with lower urinary tract obstruction. Fetal urine analysis may provide improvements in prenatal determination of renal prognosis, but the optimum criteria to be used remain unclear. It is now possible to decompress the obstruction in utero via percutaneous vesico-amniotic shunting or cystoscopic techniques. In appropriately selected fetuses intervention may improve perinatal survival, but long-term renal morbidity amongst survivors remains problematic.

  18. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Herráiz, Miguel Angel; Hernández, Antonio; Asenjo, Eloy; Herráiz, Ignacio

    2005-12-01

    Urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB), acute cystitis (AC) and acute pyelonephritis (AP), are favored by the morphological and functional changes involved in pregnancy. AB increases the risk of preterm labor, low birth weight and AP. AB should be detected by uroculture (other methods are not sufficiently effective) and treated early. Approximately 80% of cases are caused by Escherichia coli. The risks and effectiveness of the distinct antibiotic regimens should be evaluated: fosfomycin trometamol in monotherapy or as short course therapy is safe and effective for the treatment of AB and AC. AP is the most frequent cause of hospital admission for medical reasons in pregnant women and can lead to complications in 10% of cases, putting the lives of the mother and fetus at risk. Currently outpatient treatment of AP is recommended in selected cases. Adequate follow-up of pregnant women with urinary tract infections is required due to frequent recurrence.

  19. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    MacLean, A B

    2001-04-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most frequently seen 'medical' complications in pregnancy. The pioneering work of Edward Kass discovered that 6% of pregnant women had asymptomatic bacteriuria associated with increased prematurity and perinatal mortality compared to women with sterile urine. Screening for bacteriuria in pregnancy has become routine. The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria as well as the associated complications described by Kass in 1962 are higher compared to most data collected in the 1980s and late 1990s in different populations in various parts of the world. Other factors such as vaginal colonization have been recognized as important contributors to preterm labour. The value of screening for bacteriuria has to be re-addressed considering methods, significance and costs. Treatment of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is critically reviewed.

  20. Repeated exposures of the male Sprague Dawley rat reproductive tract to environmental toxicants: Do earlier exposures to di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) alter the effects of later exposures?

    PubMed

    Traore, Kassim; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Chen, Haolin; Zirkin, Barry R

    2016-06-01

    Although exposures to environmental toxicants occur throughout life, little attention has been paid to the possible effects of exposures early in life on later exposure effects. We asked whether DEHP administered in utero (GD14-parturition) affects how male rats respond to later exposures. Neither in utero nor juvenile (PND21-35) exposures to 100mg/kg/day DEHP affected testis weight or histology as assessed on PND35. However, after in utero DEHP, subsequent juvenile exposure resulted in significantly reduced testis weight and altered testicular histology. Both in utero and juvenile exposures resulted in significant reductions in serum testosterone, but there was no effect of earlier on later exposure. Whether or not there had been in utero DEHP exposure, juvenile DEHP exposure had no effect on body, kidney or liver weights. These observations indicate that in utero exposure can, but will not necessarily, alter later exposure effects, with outcomes dependent upon endpoints measured and dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  2. Hyperammonemia in Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kenzaka, Tsuneaki; Kato, Ken; Kitao, Akihito; Kosami, Koki; Minami, Kensuke; Yahata, Shinsuke; Fukui, Miho; Okayama, Masanobu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study investigated the incidence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections and explored the utility of urinary obstruction relief and antimicrobial administration to improve hyperammonemia. Methods This was an observational study. Subjects were patients who were diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized between June 2008 and June 2009. We measured plasma ammonia levels on admission in patients who were clinically diagnosed with urinary tract infection and hospitalized. We assessed each patient's level of consciousness on admission using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and performed urine and blood cultures. We also assessed hearing prior to hospitalization using the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG-PS). In cases with high ammonia levels on admission, plasma ammonia and GCS were measured 24 hours and 5–7 days later. Results Sixty-seven candidates were enrolled; of these, 60 cases (89.6%) with bacterial cell counts ≥104 CFU/mL were studied. Five cases (8.3%) presented with high plasma ammonia levels. Cases with hyperammonemia were significantly more likely to present with low GCS scores and urinary retention rate. All five cases received antimicrobial therapy with an indwelling bladder catheter to relieve urinary retention. The case 5 patient died shortly after admission due to complicated aspiration pneumonia; in the remaining cases, plasma ammonia levels were rapidly normalized and the level of consciousness improved. Conclusions The occurrence of hyperammonemia in urinary tract infections is not rare. The cause of hyperammonemia is urinary retention obstruction. Therefore, along with antimicrobial administration, relief of obstruction is important for the treatment of hyperammonemia caused by this mechanism. PMID:26292215

  3. Mucoadhesion and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; McConnell, Emma L; Sousa, Joao J S; Veiga, Francisco; Basit, Abdul W

    2008-01-01

    The concept of mucoadhesion is one that has the potential to improve the highly variable residence times experienced by drugs and dosage forms at various sites in the gastrointestinal tract, and consequently, to reduce variability and improve efficacy. Intimate contact with the mucosa should enhance absorption or improve topical therapy. A variety of approaches have been investigated for mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract, particularly for the stomach and small intestine. Despite interesting results in these sites, mucoadhesive approaches have not yet shown success in humans. The potential of the lower gut for these applications has been largely neglected, although the large intestine in particular may benefit, and the colon has several factors that suggest mucoadhesion could be successful there, including lower motility and the possibility of a lower mucus turnover and thicker mucus layer. In vitro studies on colonic mucoadhesion show promise, and rectal administration has shown some positive results in vivo. This review considers the background to mucoadhesion with respect to the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the principles that underlie this concept. Mucoadhesive approaches to gastrointestinal drug delivery will be examined, with particular attention given to the lower gut.

  4. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, R; Wong, E S

    1999-03-01

    Urinary tract infections remain a significant cause of morbidity in all age groups. Recent studies have helped to better define the population groups at risk for these infections, as well as the most cost-effective management strategies. Initially, a urinary tract infection should be categorized as complicated or uncomplicated. Further categorization of the infection by clinical syndrome and by host (i.e., acute cystitis in young women, acute pyelonephritis, catheter-related infection, infection in men, asymptomatic bacteriuria in the elderly) helps the physician determine the appropriate diagnostic and management strategies. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections are caused by a predictable group of susceptible organisms. These infections can be empirically treated without the need for urine cultures. The most effective therapy for an uncomplicated infection is a three-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complicated infections are diagnosed by quantitative urine cultures and require a more prolonged course of therapy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria rarely requires treatment and is not associated with increased morbidity in elderly patients.

  5. Prophylactic neuroprotection with A91 improves the outcome of spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, A; Sosa, M; García, E; Flores, A; Cruz, Y; Mestre, H; Martiñón, S; Pineda-Rodríguez, B A; Gutiérrez-Ospina, G

    2013-10-25

    Iatrogenic injury to the spinal cord (SC) is not an uncommon complication of spinal surgery. In an attempt to establish a preventive therapy for anticipated SC injury, we tested the effect of a single dose (SD) vaccine vs. the addition of a booster dose (BD) of a neural-derived peptide (A91) prior to SC contusion. Immunization with A91 immediately after SC injury has demonstrated to induce significant tissue protection and motor recovery. After injury, only the BD vaccination schedule had a neuroprotective effect. It was capable of improving neurological recovery that was always significantly higher than the one observed in rats with SD immunization or those only treated with PBS. Toward the end of study, animals treated with an A91 BD presented a BBB score of 9.75±0.17 (mean±standard deviation) while rats treated with SD or PBS had a score of 6.6±0.7 and 5.6±0.6 respectively. In the next step we attempted to corroborate the neuroprotective effect induced by A91 immunization. For this purpose, we assessed the survival of rubrospinal neurons (RSNs) and ventral horn neurons (VHNs) sixty days after SC injury. BD vaccination induced a significant survival of both RSNs and VHNs after injury. Finally, the failure or success of this therapy (SD or BD respectively) was associated with a lower (SD) or higher (BD) A91-specific T cell proliferation. Prophylactic neuroprotection with an initial and subsequent booster dose of A91 may improve recovery after SC injury sustained during invasive spinal surgery procedures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Fe(2)O(3) on the capacity of benzo(a)pyrene to induce polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-metabolizing enzymes in the respiratory tract of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Guillaume; Gosset, Pierre; Zerimech, Farid; Grave-Descampiaux, Béatrice; Shirali, Pirouz

    2004-04-21

    In this work, the question that needs to be answered was whether concurrent exposure to iron oxides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could affect the induction of PAH-metabolizing enzymes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with hematite (Fe(2)O(3); 3mg), benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P; 3mg), or B(a)P (3mg)-coated onto Fe(2)O(3) particles (3mg). Forty-eight hours later, we investigated mRNA expressions of cytochrome p4501a1 (cyp1a1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase (meh), and glutathione-S-transferase-ya and -yc (gst-ya and gst-yc, respectively), protein concentrations of CYP1A1, and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities in lungs. Exposure to B(a)P alone or coated-onto Fe(2)O(3) particles induced cyp1a1 gene transcription (P < 0.01) and increased both the CYP1A1 protein levels (P < 0.01) and the EROD activities (P < 0.001). However, in this work, we focused our attention on the potential of Fe(2)O(3) in B(a)P/Fe(2)O(3) mixtures to affect the capacity of B(a)P to induce PAH-metabolizing enzymes. Exposure to B(a)P-coated onto Fe(2)O(3) particles increased meh mRNA expressions (1.15-fold, P < 0.05), CYP1A1 protein concentrations (1.85-fold, P < 0.05), and EROD activities (1.95-fold, P < 0.01), versus exposure to B(a)P alone. Hence, animal short-term exposure to B(a)P-coated onto Fe(2)O(3) particles favored dramatically the induction of PAH-bioactivating enzymes to the detriment of PAH-inactivating enzymes in lungs. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Fe(2)O(3)-induced increase of the metabolic activation of B(a)P might rely on several properties of Fe(2)O(3), including its capacity to enhance the rate of CYP1A1 hemoprotein elaboration. The influence of Fe(2)O(3) in B(a)P/Fe(2)O(3) mixtures on the ability of B(a)P to induce PAH-metabolizing enzymes will also be one of the fundamental ways that Fe(2)O(3) can affect B(a)P carcinogenicity in lungs.

  7. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully.

  8. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  9. Genomic Characterization of Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sfakianos, John P.; Cha, Eugene K.; Iyer, Gopa; Scott, Sasinya N.; Zabor, Emily C.; Shah, Ronak H.; Ren, Qinghu; Bagrodia, Aditya; Kim, Philip H.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Ramirez, Ricardo; Hanrahan, Aphrothiti J.; Desai, Neil B.; Sun, Arony; Pinciroli, Patrizia; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Dalbagni, Guido; Schultz, Nikolaus; Bajorin, Dean F.; Reuter, Victor E.; Berger, Michael F.; Bochner, Bernard H.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A.; Solit, David B.; Coleman, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite a similar histologic appearance, upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) and urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) tumors have distinct epidemiologic and clinicopathologic differences. Objective To investigate whether the differences between UTUC and UCB result from intrinsic biological diversity. Design, setting, and participants Tumor and germline DNA from patients with UTUC (n = 83) and UCB (n = 102) were analyzed using a custom next-generation sequencing assay to identify somatic mutations and copy-number alterations in 300 cancer-associated genes. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis We described co-mutation patterns and copy-number alterations in UTUC. We also compared mutation frequencies in high-grade UTUC (n = 59) and high-grade UCB (n = 102). Results and limitations Comparison of high-grade UTUC and UCB revealed significant differences in the prevalence of somatic alterations. Alterations more common in high-grade UTUC included fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3; 35.6% vs 21.6%; p = 0.065), Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS; 13.6% vs 1.0%; p = 0.001), and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (p15, inhibits CDK4) (CDKN2B; 15.3% vs 3.9%; p = 0.016). Genes less frequently mutated in high-grade UTUC included tumor protein p53 (TP53; 25.4% vs 57.8%; p < 0.001), retinoblastoma 1 (RB1; 0.0% vs 18.6%; p < 0.001), and AT rich interactive domain 1A (SWI-like) (ARID1A; 13.6% vs 27.5%; p = 0.050). Because our assay was restricted to genomic alterations in a targeted panel, rare mutations and epigenetic changes were not analyzed. Conclusions High-grade UTUC tumors display a spectrum of genetic alterations similar to high-grade UCB. However, there were significant differences in the prevalence of several recurrently mutated genes including HRAS, TP53, and RB1. As relevant targeted inhibitors are being developed and tested, these results may have important implications for the site-specific management of patients

  10. Genital tract infections and infertility.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Mylonakis, Ioannis; Bertoloni, Giulio; Fiore, Cristina; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Armanini, Decio

    2008-09-01

    Infectious agents can impair various important human functions, including reproduction. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites are able to interfere with the reproductive function in both sexes. Infections of male genito-urinary tract account for about 15% of the case of male infertility. Infections can affect different sites of the male reproductive tract, such as the testis, epididymis and male accessory sex glands. Spermatozoa themselves subsequently can be affected by urogenital infections at different levels of their development, maturation and transport. Among the most common microorganisms involved in sexually transmitted infections, interfering with male fertility, there are the Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Less frequently male infertility is due to non-sexually transmitted epididymo-orchitis, mostly caused by Escherichia coli. In female, the first two microorganisms are certainly involved in cervical, tubal, and peritoneal damage, while Herpes simplex cervicitis is less dangerous. The overall importance of cervical involvement is still under discussion. Tubo-peritoneal damage seems to be the foremost manner in which microorganisms interfere with human fertility. C. trachomatis is considered the most important cause of tubal lacerations and obstruction, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and adhesions. N. gonorrhoeae, even though its overall incidence seems to decline, is still to be considered in the same sense, while bacterial vaginosis should not be ignored, as causative agents can produce ascending infections of the female genital tract. The role of infections, particularly co-infections, as causes of the impairment of sperm quality, motility and function needs further investigation. Tropical diseases necessitate monitoring as for their diffusion or re-diffusion in the western world.

  11. [Urinary tract infections in elderly].

    PubMed

    Ben Dhaou Hmaidi, Besma; Boussema, Fatma; Aydi, Zohra; Baili, Lilia; Ketari, Sonia; Ben Rhouma, Samir; Lachgar, Ahmed; Cherif, Ouahida; Rokbani, Lilia

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) in elderly are frequent and polymorphic clinical symptoms. This is a public health problem both in support and cost they generate. To study the epidemiological, clinical, paraclinical and therapeutic aspects of UTI in the elderly. We conducted a retrospective study of 50 cases of UTI in the elderly collected in the Internal Medicine Department at Habib Thameur Hospital between January 2002 and December 2006 (Group I). We compared this group to another group of patients aged below 60 years also explored for UTI in the same service and during the same period (Group II). They were 37 women and 13 men in group I and 41 women and 9 men in the group II. In group I, the average age was 74.10 ± 6.7 years, in group II 43.58 ± 11.26 years. In group I, 35 patients (70%) showed no evidence of suspicion of a UTI on admission. 15 patients (30%) were admitted for suspected UTI. In group II, 36 patients (72%) showed no evidence of suspicion of a UTI on admission. 14 patients (28%) were admitted for suspected UTI. Urological abnormalities underlying the UTI, detected by ultrasound, were more frequent in Group I (40%) than in Group II (12%). Second-line antibiotics, due to the likely resistance of the microorganism, had to be prescribed in 16% cases in Group I vs. 4% of cases in Group II. The evolution under antibiotic treatment was marked by the occurrence of 3 deaths and transition to renal failure in 4 cases for Group I. In Group II, the outcome was favorable in all cases. Urinary tract infection is a significant factor in morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Female is much more concerned than male. Clinical manifestations of UTI are often crude and misleading in a pathological and poly polymedicated patient. The preventive arm accounts for most of the management of urinary tract infection in the elderly.

  12. Approach to urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Najar, M S; Saldanha, C L; Banday, K A

    2009-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection experienced by humans after respiratory and gastro-intestinal infections, and also the most common cause of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections for patients admitted to hospitals. For better management and prognosis, it is mandatory to know the possible site of infection, whether the infection is uncomplicated or complicated, re-infection or relapse, or treatment failure and its pathogenesis and risk factors. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in certain age groups and has different connotations. It needs to be treated and completely cured in pregnant women and preschool children. Reflux nephropathy in children could result in chronic kidney disease; otherwise, urinary tract infections do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. Symptomatic urinary tract infections occur most commonly in women of child-bearing age. Cystitis predominates, but needs to be distinguished from acute urethral syndrome that affects both sexes and has a different management plan than UTIs. The prostatitis symptoms are much more common than bacterial prostatic infections. The treatment needs to be prolonged in bacterial prostatitis and as cure rates are not very high and relapses are common, the classification of prostatitis needs to be understood. The consensus conference convened by National Institute of Health added two more groups of patients, namely, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, in addition to acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Although white blood cells in urine signify inflammation, they do not always signify UTI. Quantitative cultures of urine provide definitive evidence of UTI. Imaging studies should be done 3-6 weeks after cure of acute infection to identify abnormalities predisposing to infection or renal damage or which may affect management. Treatment of cystitis in women should be a three-day course and if

  13. Approach to urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Najar, M. S.; Saldanha, C. L.; Banday, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection experienced by humans after respiratory and gastro-intestinal infections, and also the most common cause of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections for patients admitted to hospitals. For better management and prognosis, it is mandatory to know the possible site of infection, whether the infection is uncomplicated or complicated, re-infection or relapse, or treatment failure and its pathogenesis and risk factors. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in certain age groups and has different connotations. It needs to be treated and completely cured in pregnant women and preschool children. Reflux nephropathy in children could result in chronic kidney disease; otherwise, urinary tract infections do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. Symptomatic urinary tract infections occur most commonly in women of child-bearing age. Cystitis predominates, but needs to be distinguished from acute urethral syndrome that affects both sexes and has a different management plan than UTIs. The prostatitis symptoms are much more common than bacterial prostatic infections. The treatment needs to be prolonged in bacterial prostatitis and as cure rates are not very high and relapses are common, the classification of prostatitis needs to be understood. The consensus conference convened by National Institute of Health added two more groups of patients, namely, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, in addition to acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Although white blood cells in urine signify inflammation, they do not always signify UTI. Quantitative cultures of urine provide definitive evidence of UTI. Imaging studies should be done 3-6 weeks after cure of acute infection to identify abnormalities predisposing to infection or renal damage or which may affect management. Treatment of cystitis in women should be a three-day course and if

  14. [Leiomyoma of the urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Fekkak, H; Moufid, K; Joual, A; Bennani, S; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    2001-01-01

    Leiomyomas of the urinary tract are benign and uncommon forms of tumor. In the present study, two cases have been described of leiomyomas situated in the bladder. Following this description, the pathological characteristics and the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these lesions have been examined. The clinical symptomatology depends on the tumor site, and this type of lesion is more frequently found in women.. Treatment mainly consists of endoscopic resection, but may involve cystectomy. The prognosis for patients with this type of tumor is invariably favorable.

  15. Urinary tract infections in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ky; Sivalingam, N

    2007-01-01

    Urinary tract infections frequently affect pregnant mothers. This problem causes significant morbidity and healthcare expenditure. Three common clinical manifestations of UTIs in pregnancy are: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli remains the most frequent organism isolated in UTIs. All pregnant mothers should be screened for UTIs in pregnancy and antibiotics should be commenced without delay. Urine culture and sensitivity is the gold standard in diagnosing UTIs. Without treatment, asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is associated with preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia and anaemia. Acute pyelonephritis can lead to maternal sepsis. Recurrent UTIs in pregnancy require prophylactic antibiotic treatment.

  16. Anatomy and embryology of the biliary tract.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, Kara M; Bloomston, Mark

    2014-04-01

    Working knowledge of extrahepatic biliary anatomy is of paramount importance to the general surgeon. The embryologic development of the extrahepatic biliary tract is discussed in this article as is the highly variable anatomy of the biliary tract and its associated vasculature. The salient conditions related to the embryology and anatomy of the extrahepatic biliary tract, including biliary atresia, choledochal cysts, gallbladder agenesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and ducts of Luschka, are addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials.

  18. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials. PMID:22760907

  19. Urinary tract infections. An overview.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, O B

    1987-06-01

    Urinary tract infection remains the most prevalent infection acquired by hospitalized patients. The association with manipulations of the urinary tract is well known and the etiology of these infections is studied in detail. The excess cost of preventable UTI has not been established. It may be negligible for the single case but a high prevalence of nosocomial UTI could add substantially to hospital expenses. Differences in practices of bladder drainage between hospitals and countries have been identified, and educational efforts would seem effective in the management of incontinent patients when hospitalized. Though the infection is often self-limiting, when the catheter is removed, complications are seen. The lower survival with bacteriuria in old age is best explained by the presence of fatal disease in bacteriuric patients. Prevention of the infection with the catheter in situ is discouraging, and measures intended to interfere with the endogenous source of infection have largely failed or postponed infection. A radical approach to the use of indwelling catheters in hospitalized patients may seem the only way out, requiring highly skilled nursing care instead.

  20. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Wei; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-09-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance.

  1. Urinary tract infections in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei Tan, Chee; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. PMID:27662890

  2. Treatment of urinary tract stones.

    PubMed Central

    Wickham, J E

    1993-01-01

    Replacement of open surgery with minimally invasive techniques for treating stones in the renal tract has greatly reduced patients' morbidity and mortality and the period of hospitalisation and convalescence. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy does not require anaesthesia and requires little analgesia so that treatment can be given on an outpatient basis, and there is no wound to heal. Only a small puncture site is needed for percutaneous endoscopic lithotomy, and with the advent of prophylactic antibiotics there are few complications. Of renal stones, about 85% can now be successfully treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy alone, and almost all of the stones too large or hard for lithotripsy can be treated endoscopically, with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes being used to fragment the stone. Stones in the upper and lower thirds of the ureter can be treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy, but stones in the middle third, which cannot normally be visualised to allow focusing of the shockwaves, usually require ureteroscopy. Nearly all bladder stones can be treated by transurethral endoscopy with an electrohydraulic probe. Only the largest renal tract stones still require open surgery. Images FIG 10 p1415-a p1415-b p1416-a p1416-b p1417-a PMID:8274898

  3. Clostridium tetani growth and toxin production in the intestines of germfree rats.

    PubMed Central

    Wells, C L; Balish, E

    1983-01-01

    Germfree rats were challenged orally and intrarectally with spores of Clostridium tetani. Although C. tetani spores remained viable in the intestinal tract, they were unable to germinate. Germfree rats were then challenged orally with vegetative cells of C. tetani. Vegetative cells were able to colonize the intestinal tract, replicate, and produce toxin. Tetanus antitoxin, but no tetanus toxin, was detected in the sera of monoassociated rats. PMID:6347898

  4. [Phytotherapy of respiratory tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Bylka, Wiesława; Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Studzińska-Sroka, Elzbieta; Matławska, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in cough due to their antitussive and expectorant activity. Antitussives act either centrally on the cough center of the brain or peripherally on the cough receptors in the respiratory passages. The antitussive effect of many herbs results from the content of mucilage, which exerts protective and demulcent activity. The activity of expectorant herbs results primarily from their influence on the gastric mucose (saponins and ipec alkaloids). This proves reflex stimulation which leads to an increase in the secretion of bronchial glands. Volatile-oil type expectorant herbs exert a direct stimulatory effect on the bronchial glands by means of local irritation with antibacterial activity. In colds and flu, herbs containing volatile oil can be used; also, volatile oils are ingredients of syrups and liquids as well as external phytomedicines in the form of liniments, ointments, and inhalations. The paper shows the herbs and phytomedicines present on the Polish market used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases.

  5. [Urinary tract infections in children].

    PubMed

    Lellig, E; Apfelbeck, M; Straub, J; Karl, A; Tritschler, S; Stief, C G; Riccabona, M

    2017-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections in children. The symptoms are not very specific and range from abdominal pain, poor feeding to nocturnal urinary incontinence. The technique of collecting urine plays an important role for securing the diagnosis. The best way to obtain urine in non-toilet-trained children is catheterization or suprapubic bladder aspiration. In toilet-trained children midstream urine is an acceptable alternative after cleaning the foreskin or labia. In the case of an infection a prompt empirical antibiotic therapy is necessary to reduce the risk of parenchymal scarring of the kidneys. There are different approaches to diagnose vesicoureteral reflux in different countries. The commonly used standard approach in Germany is voiding cystourethrography. In the case of reflux dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy should be performed additionally to exclude renal scarring (bottom-up approach).

  6. Urinary tract infection in children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Up to 11.3% of girls and 3.6% of boys will have had a urinary tract infection (UTI) by the age of 16 years, and recurrence of infection is common. Vesicoureteric reflux is identified in up to 40% of children being investigated for a first UTI, and is a risk factor for, but weak predictor of, renal parenchymal defects. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatment of acute urinary tract infection in children? What are the effects of interventions to prevent recurrence? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 25 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (short initial intravenous antibiotics, long initial intravenous antibiotics, initial oral antibiotics, single-dose or single-day courses of oral antibiotics, short courses of oral antibiotics, long courses of oral antibiotics, immediate empirical antibiotics, delayed antibiotics, prolonged delay of antibiotics, prophylactic antibiotics); immunotherapy; surgical correction of minor functional abnormalities; and surgical correction of moderate to severe vesicoureteric reflux. PMID:21733199

  7. GI tract tumors with melanocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karamchandani, Dipti M; Patil, Deepa T; Goldblum, John R

    2013-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) tract tumors with melanocytic differentiation may present significant diagnostic challenges both for the pathologist and the clinician. This comprehensive review discusses the relatively common as well as rare entities that have melanocytic differentiation in the GI tract. Clinical, histologic, immunohistochemical and molecular features are discussed along with prognosis and differential diagnosis.

  8. Kidneys and Urinary Tract (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Kidneys and Urinary Tract KidsHealth > For Parents > Kidneys and ... en español Los riñones y las vías urinarias Kidneys and Urinary Tract Basics Our bodies produce several ...

  9. [Hospital-acquired urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Adukauskiene, Dalia; Cicinskaite, Ilona; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Macas, Andrius; Tamosiūnas, Ramūnas; Kinderyte, Aida

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are responsible for 40-60% of all hospital-acquired infections. Increased age of patients and comorbid diseases render hospitalized patients more susceptible to infection. Almost 80% of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are associated with urinary catheters, and only 5-10% of urinary infections are caused by invasive manipulations in the urogenital tract. Pathogens of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections are frequently multi-resistant, and antibiotic therapy can only be successful when the complicating factors are eliminated or urodynamic function is restored. For treatment of complicated hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, the antibiotics must exhibit adequate pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties: high renal clearance of unmetabolized form with good antimicrobial activity in both acidic and alkaline urine. For selection of empirical treatment of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections, it is necessary to evaluate localization of infection, its severity, possible isolates, and the most frequent pathogens in the department where patient is treated. The best choice for the starting the antimicrobial therapy is the cheapest narrow-spectrum effective antibiotic in the treatment of urinary tract infection until microbiological evaluation of pathogens will be received. Adequate management of urinary tract infections lowers the rate of complications, requirements for antibacterial treatment, selection of multi-resistant isolates and is cost effective.

  10. [Impairments of gastrointestinal tract in autism].

    PubMed

    Grechanina, Iu B; Grechanina, E Ia; Beletskaia, S V

    2014-11-01

    In the article the peculiarities of the gastrointestinal tract in children with autism. Presents the algorithm for evaluation of children with autism in KhSMGC, the statistical data about the frequency of lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The main directions of correction of digestive disorders and its results.

  11. [Urinary tract infections in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Naline, Charlotte; Cudennec, Tristan; Teillet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    In the elderly, urinary tract infections are frequent. Diagnosis is not always evident because symptoms are often absent. In doubt, a urinary strip evaluation must be performed. Prevention begins with simple lifestyle and dietary rules, such as good voiding and adequate fluid intake. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is treated only in certain cases. Other urinary tract infections require antibiotics, which must be adapted to renal function.

  12. Infectious keratitis in a paracentesis tract.

    PubMed

    Azuara-Blanco, A; Katz, L J

    1997-04-01

    A paracentesis is performed in glaucoma procedures as a flat, beveled tract to allow access into the anterior chamber after the filtration fistula is made. Complications related to the paracentesis are infrequent because it is a self-sealing wound. The authors report a case of infectious keratitis that developed in a paracentesis tract.

  13. 25 CFR 213.9 - Noncontiguous tracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... No lease will be approved covering two or more noncontiguous tracts of land, but in such case a lease... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noncontiguous tracts. 213.9 Section 213.9 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF...

  14. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Leasing Procedures § 281.15 Tract size. The...

  15. A mixture of five phthalate esters inhibits fetal testicular testosterone production in a cummulative manner consistent with their predicted reproductive toxicity in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate diesters are plasticizers to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. Exposure to certain phthalates during sexual differentiation causes reproductive tract malformations in male rats. In the fetal rat, exposure to the phthalates benzylbutyl (BBP), di(n)butyl (DBP), and...

  16. A mixture of five phthalate esters inhibits fetal testicular testosterone production in a cummulative manner consistent with their predicted reproductive toxicity in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate diesters are plasticizers to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. Exposure to certain phthalates during sexual differentiation causes reproductive tract malformations in male rats. In the fetal rat, exposure to the phthalates benzylbutyl (BBP), di(n)butyl (DBP), and...

  17. Monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, W. Tecumseh; de Boer, Bart; Mathur, Neil; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2016-01-01

    For four decades, the inability of nonhuman primates to produce human speech sounds has been claimed to stem from limitations in their vocal tract anatomy, a conclusion based on plaster casts made from the vocal tract of a monkey cadaver. We used x-ray videos to quantify vocal tract dynamics in living macaques during vocalization, facial displays, and feeding. We demonstrate that the macaque vocal tract could easily produce an adequate range of speech sounds to support spoken language, showing that previous techniques based on postmortem samples drastically underestimated primate vocal capabilities. Our findings imply that the evolution of human speech capabilities required neural changes rather than modifications of vocal anatomy. Macaques have a speech-ready vocal tract but lack a speech-ready brain to control it. PMID:27957536

  18. The habenulo-interpeduncular and mammillothalamic tracts: early developed fiber tracts in the human fetal diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang Ho; Mori, Shigemi; Jang, Hyung Suk; Kim, Ji Hyun; Abe, Hiroshi; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Jose Francisco; Murakami, Gen

    2014-09-01

    The habenulo-interpeduncular (HI) and mammillothalamic (MT) tracts are phylogenetically ancient. The clinical relevance of these tracts has recently received attention. In this work, we map the anatomy the developing HI and MT. To investigate the topographical anatomy of developing fiber tracts in and around the diencephalon, we examined the horizontal, frontal, and sagittal serial paraffin sections of 28 human fetuses at 8-12 weeks of gestation. In all specimens, eosinophilic early fiber bundles were limited to the bilateral HI and MT tracts in contrast to pale-colored later developing fibers such as the thalamocortical projections and optic tract. The HI and MT tracts ran nearly parallel and sandwiched the thalamus from the dorsal and ventral sides, respectively. The nerve tract course appeared to range from 5-7 mm for the HI tract and 3-5 mm for the MT tract in 15 specimens at 11-12 weeks. The HI tract was embedded in, adjacent to, or distant from the developing parvocellular red nucleus. In early human fetuses, HI and MT tracts might be limited pathways for primitive cholinergic fiber connections between the ventral midbrain and epithalamic limbic system.

  19. Characterization of Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat, and proposal for the reclassification of five closely related members of the genus Clostridium into the genera Romboutsia gen. nov., Intestinibacter gen. nov., Terrisporobacter gen. nov. and Asaccharospora gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Jacoline; Fuentes, Susana; Grievink, Wieke; van Niftrik, Laura; Tindall, Brian J; Timmerman, Harro M; Rijkers, Ger T; Smidt, Hauke

    2014-05-01

    A Gram-positive staining, rod-shaped, non-motile, spore-forming obligately anaerobic bacterium, designated CRIBT, was isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat and characterized. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CRIBT were saturated and unsaturated straight-chain C12-C19 fatty acids, with C16:0 being the predominant fatty acid. The polar lipid profile comprised six glycolipids, four phospholipids and one lipid that did not stain with any of the specific spray reagents used. The only quinone was MK-6. The predominating cell-wall sugars were glucose and galactose. The peptidoglycan type of strain CRIBT was A1σ lanthionine-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CRIBT was 28.1 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain CRIBT was most closely related to a number of species of the genus Clostridium, including Clostridium lituseburense (97.2%), Clostridium glycolicum (96.2%), Clostridium mayombei (96.2%), Clostridium bartlettii (96.0%) and Clostridium irregulare (95.5%). All these species show very low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (<85%) to the type strain of Clostridium butyricum, the type species of the genus Clostridium. DNA-DNA hybridization with closely related reference strains indicated reassociation values below 32%. On the basis of phenotypic and genetic studies, a novel genus, Romboutsia gen. nov., is proposed. The novel isolate CRIBT (=DSM 25109T=NIZO 4048T) is proposed as the type strain of the type species, Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., of the proposed novel genus. It is proposed that C. lituseburense is transferred to this genus as Romboutsia lituseburensis comb. nov. Furthermore, the reclassification into novel genera is proposed for C. bartlettii, as Intestinibacter bartlettii gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. glycolicum, as Terrisporobacter glycolicus gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. mayombei, as Terrisporobacter mayombei gen. nov., comb. nov., and C

  20. METHOXYCHLOR ACCELERATES EMBRYO TRANSPORT THROUGH THE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is known to reduce implantation, and, in our previous work, this reduction has been attributed to a direct effect on uterine function. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of MXC on embryo transport rate, another phe...

  1. METHOXYCHLOR ACCELERATES EMBRYO TRANSPORT THROUGH THE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is known to reduce implantation, and, in our previous work, this reduction has been attributed to a direct effect on uterine function. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of MXC on embryo transport rate, another phe...

  2. [Urinary tract infection in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Geraldo; Marcolin, Alessandra Cristina; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Cavalli, Ricardo Carvalho

    2008-02-01

    Several factors cause urinary tract infection (UTI) to be a relevant complication of the gestational period, aggravating both the maternal and perinatal prognosis. For many years, pregnancy has been considered to be a factor predisposing to all forms of UTI. Today, it is known that pregnancy, as an isolated event, is not responsible for a higher incidence of UTI, but that the anatomical and physiological changes imposed on the urinary tract by pregnancy predispose women with asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) to become pregnant women with symptomatic UTI. AB affects 2 to 10% of all pregnant women and approximately 30% of these will develop pyelonephritis if not properly treated. However, a difficult-to-understand resistance against the identification of AB during this period is observed among prenatalists. The diagnosis of UTI is microbiological and it is based on two urine cultures presenting more than 10(5) colonies/mL urine of the same germ. Treatment is facilitated by the fact that it is based on an antibiogram, with no scientific foundation for the notion that a pre-established therapeutic scheme is an adequate measure. For the treatment of pyelonephritis, it is not possible to wait for the result of culture and previous knowledge of the resistance profile of the antibacterial agents available for the treatment of pregnant women would be the best measure. Another important variable is the use of an intravenous bactericidal antibiotic during the acute phase, with the possibility of oral administration at home after clinical improvement of the patient. At our hospital, the drug that best satisfies all of these requirements is cefuroxime, administered for 10-14 days. Third-generation cephalosporins do not exist in the oral form, all of them involving the inconvenience of parenteral administration. In view of their side effects, aminoglycosides are considered to be inadequate for administration to pregnant women. The inconsistent insinuation of contraindication of

  3. Urinary tract infection and hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Hülya; Ozek, Eren; Unver, Tamer; Biyikli, Neşe; Alpay, Harika; Cebeci, Dilşat

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in newborns with asymptomatic, unexplained indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two weeks of life. Jaundiced infants, otherwise clinically well, less than two weeks of ages, with a total bilirubin level above 15 mg/dl were eligible for the study. A bilirubin work-up including glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6 PD) level, as well as urinalysis and a urine culture were performed in all patients. Patients with UTI, defined as more than 10,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of a single pathogen obtained by bladder catheterization, were evaluated for sepsis. Renal function tests and renal ultrasound were performed in cases with UTI. During follow-up, voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy (DMSA) were performed as well. A total of 102 patients were enrolled. The bilirubin work-up of patients did not demonstrate any significant underlying disorder. None of the infants had a high direct bilirubin level. UTI was diagnosed in eight (8%) cases [Enterobacter aerogenes (3/8:38%), Enterococcus faecalis (2/8:25%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2/8:25%) and Escherichia coli (1/8:12%)]. Of those eight patients, only four (50%) had pyuria. Bacteriuria was present in seven (88%) patients. The sepsis screen was negative in all but one case with a high C-reactive protein (CRP) level. None of the patients had a positive blood culture. Renal function tests were within normal levels in all patients. Renal ultrasound showed urinary tract abnormalities in three (38%) patients (hydronephrosis, n=1 and pelviectasis, n=2). VCUG was performed in all patients during the study period and one had unilateral grade 3-4 reflux, while only one patient had a diverticulum of the bladder. DMSA was performed in seven patients and none had renal scars. It is of importance that UTI can occur in asymptomatic, jaundiced infants even in the first week of life. Although it is well known

  4. Renal tract malformations: perspectives for nephrologists.

    PubMed

    Kerecuk, Larissa; Schreuder, Michiel F; Woolf, Adrian S

    2008-06-01

    Renal tract malformations are congenital anomalies of the kidneys and/or lower urinary tract. One challenging feature of these conditions is that they can present not only prenatally but also in childhood or adulthood. The most severe types of malformations, such as bilateral renal agenesis or dysplasia, although rare, lead to renal failure. With advances in dialysis and transplantation for young children, it is now possible to prevent the early death of at least some individuals with severe malformations. Other renal tract malformations, such as congenital pelviureteric junction obstruction and primary vesicoureteric reflux, are relatively common. Renal tract malformations are, collectively, the major cause of childhood end-stage renal disease. Their contribution to the number of adults on renal replacement therapy is less clear and has possibly been underestimated. Renal tract malformations can be familial, and specific mutations of genes involved in renal tract development can sometimes be found in affected individuals. These features provide information about the causes of malformations but also raise questions about whether to screen relatives. Whether prenatal decompression of obstructed renal tracts, or postnatal initiation of therapies such as prophylactic antibiotics or angiotensin blockade, improve long-term renal outcomes remains unclear.

  5. Management of urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Nassar, N T

    2000-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are commonly encountered in medical practice and range from asymptomatic bacteruria to acute pyelonephritis. Enterobacteriaceae with E. coli being the most prevalent, are responsible for most commonly acquired uncomplicated UTIs and usually respond promptly to oral antibiotics. In contradistinction, more resistant pathogens cause nosocomially acquired infections which often require parenteral antibiotic therapy. Patients with acute bacterial prostatitis, usually caused by Enterobacteriaceae present with a tender prostate gland and respond promptly to antibiotic therapy. Chronic bacterial prostatitis on the other hand, is a subacute infection characterized by recurrent episodes of bacterial UTI where the patient presents with vague symptoms of pelvic pain and voiding problems. Treatment is protracted and may be frustrating. Nonbacterial prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome produce symptoms similar to those of chronic bacterial prostatitis. Treatment is not well defined due to their uncertain etiologies. Most episodes of catheter associated bacteruria are asymptomatic, where less than 5% will be complicated by bacteremia. The use of systemic antibiotics for treatment or prevention of bacteruria is not recommended, particularly in the geriatric age group, since it helps select for resistant organisms. Prevention thus remains the best option to control it. Few patients without catheters who have asymptomatic bacteruria develop serious complications and therefore routine antimicrobial therapy is not justified with only two exceptions : before urologic surgery and during pregnancy.

  6. Pulmonary and respiratory tract receptors.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, J G

    1982-10-01

    Nervous receptors in the lungs and respiratory tract can be grouped into four general categories. 1. Deep, slowly adapting end-organs, which respond to stretch of the airway wall and have large-diameter myelinated fibres; those in the lungs are responsible for the Breuer-Hering reflex. 2. Endings in and under the epithelium which respond to a variety of chemical and mechanical stimuli (i.e. are polymodal), usually with a rapidly adapting discharge, and with small-diameter myelinated fibres; they are responsible for defensive reflexes such as cough and sneeze, and for the reflex actions to inhaled irritants and to some respiratory disease processes. 3. Receptors with nonmyelinated nerve fibres which, being polymodal, are stimulated by tissue damage and oedema and by the mediators released in these conditions; these receptors may be similar in function to 'nociceptors' in other viscera, and set up appropriate reflexes as a reaction to respiratory damage. 4. Specialized receptors such as those for taste and swallowing, and those around joints and in skeletal muscle. Stimulation of any group of receptors may cause reflex changes in breathing (including defensive reflexes), bronchomotor tone, airway mucus secretion, the cardiovascular system (including the vascular bed of the airways), laryngeal calibre, spinal reflexes and sensation. The total pattern of motor responses is unique for each group of receptors, although it is probably unusual for one type of receptor to be stimulated in isolation. The variety of patterns of motor responses must reflect the complexity of brainstem organization of these systems.

  7. Vasculitides of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eric; Luk, Adriana; Chetty, Runjan; Butany, Jagdish

    2009-05-01

    Systemic vasculitis is often not considered as a possible diagnosis by clinicians because of its low prevalence compared with other more common diseases. Vasculitis can affect any end organ, and it is therefore often missed early on in disease progression. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations of vasculitis are considered rare and the presentation is often nonspecific. However, if there is significant involvement of the major vessels of the gastrointestinal system, life-threatening sequelae, including perforation and bowel ischemia, may occur. This makes early and immediate management crucial to improve long-term morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of various GI vasculitides often relies on correlation of clinical manifestations with pathology and additional investigations. This paper reviews the various vasculitides that affect the GI tract, including systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, Henoch Schönlein purpura, polyarteritis nodosa, Churg-Strauss syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, enterocolic lymphocytic phlebitis, and Behcet's disease. Segmental arterial mediolysis, mistakenly believed to be a vasculitis, is also discussed.

  8. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  9. Moxifloxacin in respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Miravitlles, Marc

    2005-02-01

    Moxifloxacin is a fourth-generation fluoroquinolone that has been shown to be effective against respiratory pathogens, including Gram-positive (Streptococcus pneumoniae), Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis), and atypical strains (Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae), as well as multi-drug resistant S. pneumoniae, including strains resistant to penicillin, macrolides, tetracyclines, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and some fluoroquinolones. Moxifloxacin is highly concentrated in lung tissue, and has demonstrated rapid eradication rates. The bioavailability and half-life of moxifloxacin provides potent bactericidal effects at a dose of 400mg/day. The ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve to MIC of moxifloxacin is the highest among the fluoroquinolones against S. pneumoniae. The clinical efficacy of moxifloxacin has been shown in controlled studies of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (CB) and acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Moxifloxacin has demonstrated a faster resolution of symptoms in CAP and exacerbations of CB patients compared with first-line therapy. It has also demonstrated better eradication in exacerbations of CB compared with standard therapy, in particular the macrolides. Treatment guidelines should take into account the results of clinical trials with moxifloxacin in order to establish the role of this antimicrobial in the therapeutic arsenal against respiratory tract infections.

  10. Prevalence of urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Van Batavia, Jason P; Ahn, Jennifer J; Fast, Angela M; Combs, Andrew J; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common pediatric urological problem that is often associated with urinary tract infection. We determined the prevalence of a urinary tract infection history in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and its association, if any, with gender, bowel dysfunction, vesicoureteral reflux and specific lower urinary tract conditions. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of children diagnosed with and treated for lower urinary tract dysfunction, noting a history of urinary tract infection with or without fever, gender, bowel dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux in association with specific lower urinary tract conditions. Of the 257 boys and 366 girls with a mean age of 9.1 years 207 (33%) had a urinary tract infection history, including 88 with at least 1 febrile infection. A total of 64 patients underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 44 (69%). In 119 of the 207 patients all infections were afebrile and 18 underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 5 (28%). A urinary tract infection history was noted in 53% of girls but only 5% of boys (p <0.001). Patients with detrusor underutilization disorder were statistically more likely to present with an infection history than patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder or primary bladder neck dysfunction (each p <0.01). Females with lower urinary tract dysfunction have a much higher urinary tract infection incidence than males. This association was most often noted for lower urinary tract conditions in which urinary stasis occurs, including detrusor underutilization disorder and dysfunctional voiding. Reflux was found in most girls with a history of febrile infections. Since reflux was identified in more than a quarter of girls with only afebrile infections who were evaluated for reflux, it may be reasonable to perform voiding cystourethrogram or videourodynamics in some of them to identify reflux

  11. Urinary Tract Infection and Bacteriuria in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Alexander P; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    Bacteriuria during pregnancy may be classified as asymptomatic bacteriuria, infections of the lower urinary tract (cystitis), or infections of the upper urinary tract (pyelonephritis). Lower tract bacteriuria is associated with an increased risk of developing pyelonephritis in pregnancy, which is itself associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnant women should be screened for the presence of bacteriuria early in pregnancy. All bacteriuria in pregnancy should be treated, and antimicrobial choice in pregnancy should reflect safety for both the mother and the fetus. After treatment of bacteriuria, patients should be followed closely due to risk of recurrent bacteriuria.

  12. Autonomic receptors in urinary tract: Sex and age differences

    SciTech Connect

    Latifpour, J.; Kondo, S.; O'Hollaren, B.; Morita, T.; Weiss, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    As age and sex affect the function of the lower urinary tract, we studied the characteristics of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors in various parts of lower urinary tract smooth muscle of young (6 months) and old (4 1/2-5 years) male and female rabbits. Saturation experiments performed with (3H)prazosin, (3H)yohimbine, (3H)dihydroalprenolol and (3H)quinuclidinyl benzylate in rabbit bladder base, bladder dome and urethra indicate the presence of regional, sex- and age-related differences in the density of alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor density is considerably higher in the female than in the male urethra of both age groups, whereas the higher density of beta adrenergic receptors in the female than in the male bladder base is observed only in the younger animals. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in bladder dome than in bladder base or urethra in young rabbits of both sexes. In the old animals, the density of muscarinic receptors in bladder base increases to the level observed in bladder dome. Inhibition experiments with selective adrenergic agonists and antagonists indicate that the pharmacological profiles of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in the urethra and beta adrenergic receptors in the bladder dome and bladder base are similar in both sexes and at both ages. Beta-2 adrenergic receptors are shown to be predominant in bladder base and bladder dome of rabbits. Parallel studies in rabbit urethra, adult rat cortex and neonatal rat lung show that the urethral alpha-2 adrenergic receptors are of the alpha-2A subtype.

  13. Leptin impairs cardiovagal baroreflex function at the level of the solitary tract nucleus.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Diz, Debra I

    2009-11-01

    Circulating leptin is elevated in some forms of obesity-related hypertension, associated with impaired baroreflex function. Leptin receptors are present on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus, providing an anatomic distribution consistent with baroreflex modulation. Although solitary tract nucleus microinjection of 144 fmol/60 nL of leptin had no significant effect on baroreflex sensitivity for control of the heart rate in urethane/chloralose-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, 500 fmol of leptin impaired baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in response to increases in pressure (1.15+/-0.04 versus 0.52+/-0.12 ms/mm Hg; P<0.01). Transgenic ASrAOGEN rats with low brain angiotensinogen have an upregulation of the leptin receptor and p85 alpha mRNA in the dorsal medulla relative to Sprague-Dawley rats. Consistent with these observations, the response to leptin was enhanced in ASrAOGEN rats, because both the 144-fmol (1.46+/-0.08 versus 0.75+/-0.10 ms/mm Hg; P<0.001) and 500-fmol (1.36+/-0.32 versus 0.44+/-0.06 ms/mm Hg; P<0.05) leptin microinjections impaired baroreflex sensitivity. At these doses, leptin microinjection had no effect on resting pressure, heart rate, or the tachycardic response to decreases in pressure in Sprague-Dawley or ASrAOGEN rats. Thus, exogenous leptin at sites within the solitary tract nucleus impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia induced by increases in arterial pressure, consistent with a permissive role in mediating increases in arterial pressure. Baroreflex inhibition was enhanced in animals with evidence of increased leptin receptor and relevant signaling pathway mRNA.

  14. Alcohol consumption and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Stermer, Edy

    2002-03-01

    Alcohol is one of the most commonly abused drugs, with a per capita consumption of approximately 10 L pure ethanol per year in the United States and even higher in Spain and France. In terms of mortality, the effect of alcohol on the liver and the pancreas is probably more significant than on the tubular gastrointestinal tract. However, alcohol is a very important cause of morbidity in the tubular gastrointestinal tract. Alcohol influences the motility in the esophagus, stomach and small bowel and has direct effects on the mucosa of the upper tract. While the stimulation of gastric acid secretion is inversely correlated with the alcohol concentration of the beverage, a direct pathogenetic role in peptic ulcer disease has not been demonstrated. Some alcohols, like red wine, have been shown to possess an anti-Helicobacter pylori effect. Alcohol also has a role in the development of tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. [Urolithiasis in surgically modified urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Saussine, C; Lechevallier, E; Traxer, O

    2008-12-01

    Urinary tract modifications by surgical treatment of invasive bladder cancer or renovesical reflux will require some technical tricks to treat urolithiasis. Papers illustrating theses specific tricks will be presented.

  16. Unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, S; Rai, R R; Agarwal, S; Vijayvergiya, R

    1995-01-01

    We report management of unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract, namely beer bottle cap, raisins and pistachu, mango peel, betelnut and plum seed at a university hospital in Northern India.

  17. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... end of the penis in boys and in front of the vagina in girls. Front view of the urinary tract Side view of ... some children are more prone to getting coughs, colds, or ear infections. Who gets UTIs? Any child ...

  18. 43 CFR 3922.40 - Tract delineation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Application Processing § 3922.40 Tract... the oil shale resource. (b) The BLM may delineate more or less lands than were covered by...

  19. Cranberry and urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Guay, David R P

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) refers to the presence of clinical signs and symptoms arising from the genitourinary tract plus the presence of one or more micro-organisms in the urine exceeding a threshold value for significance (ranges from 102 to 103 colony-forming units/mL). Infections are localized to the bladder (cystitis), renal parenchyma (pyelonephritis) or prostate (acute or chronic bacterial prostatitis). Single UTI episodes are very common, especially in adult women where there is a 50-fold predominance compared with adult men. In addition, recurrent UTIs are also common, occurring in up to one-third of women after first-episode UTIs. Recurrences requiring intervention are usually defined as two or more episodes over 6 months or three or more episodes over 1 year (this definition applies only to young women with acute uncomplicated UTIs). A cornerstone of prevention of UTI recurrence has been the use of low-dose once-daily or post-coital antimicrobials; however, much interest has surrounded non-antimicrobial-based approaches undergoing investigation such as use of probiotics, vaccines, oligosaccharide inhibitors of bacterial adherence and colonization, and bacterial interference with immunoreactive extracts of Escherichia coli. Local (intravaginal) estrogen therapy has had mixed results to date. Cranberry products in a variety of formulations have also undergone extensive evaluation over several decades in the management of UTIs. At present, there is no evidence that cranberry can be used to treat UTIs. Hence, the focus has been on its use as a preventative strategy. Cranberry has been effective in vitro and in vivo in animals for the prevention of UTI. Cranberry appears to work by inhibiting the adhesion of type I and P-fimbriated uropathogens (e.g. uropathogenic E. coli) to the uroepithelium, thus impairing colonization and subsequent infection. The isolation of the component(s) of cranberry with this activity has been a daunting task, considering the

  20. [Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance].

    PubMed

    Okrągła, Emilia; Szychowska, Katarzyna; Wolska, Lidia

    2014-06-02

    Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system's action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI) are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy), but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  1. Corticospinal tract degeneration in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Mascalchi, M; Salvi, F; Valzania, F; Marcacci, G; Bartolozzi, C; Tassinari, C A

    1995-04-01

    Long-repetition-time spin-echo MR images showed symmetric hyperintensity of the intracerebral corticospinal tracts in two patients with clinical and neurophysiologic diagnosis of primary lateral sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In both, axial low-flip-angle gradient-echo images of the cervical spine showed hyperintensity of the lateral columns of the cord consistent with antegrade degeneration of the crossed corticospinal tracts.

  2. Anthony Eden's (Lord Avon) biliary tract saga.

    PubMed

    Braasch, John W

    2003-11-01

    Anthony Eden (Lord Avon) was the youngest foreign secretary in Great Britain's history. He subsequently became Prime Minister, succeeding Winston Churchill. Eden had the misfortune to have, during cholecystectomy, a biliary tract injury which required four subsequent biliary tract operations. He was subject to recurrent fevers and postoperative disability at important times in his career and during international crises. This report details the operative procedures used and his clinical status at crucial times in national and international affairs.

  3. Massive Intradural Dermoid Cyst Without Sinus Tract.

    PubMed

    Abouhassan, William; Chao, John Kuang; Lehman, James A

    2017-10-01

    Dermoid cysts can present as a rare, benign, congenital intracranial tumor of neuroectoderm origin trapped during embryogenesis. Past clinical reports have reported lesions in the posterior fossa, at the midline, and in the intradural region all in conjunction with a superficial sinus tract. The authors present a unique patient of a completely intracranial, intradural, dermoid tumor of the midline cerebellum devoid of any evidence of sinus tract. The histological characteristics, radiological features, and management of this unusual patient are described.

  4. [Imaging in urinary tract infections in adults].

    PubMed

    Puech, P; Lagard, D; Leroy, C; Dracon, M; Biserte, J; Lemaître, L

    2004-02-01

    Uncomplicated infection of the urinary tract is frequent and usually resolves rapidly with treatment and imaging is unnecessary. Progression to complex infection often occurs in patients with predisposing factors. Imaging assists in evaluating the extent of disease, plays a role in directing therapy and guides interventional procedures if necessary. This pictorial essay reviews the role of imaging and intervention in infections of the urinary tract.

  5. Immunization of the Female Genital Tract with a DNA-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Julie B.; Lu, Shan; Robinson, Harriet; Anderson, Deborah J.

    1998-01-01

    Vaccines are being sought for contraception and the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. However, progress is slow in this area largely because of lack of information on induction of protective immune responses in genital tract mucosa. In this study, we investigated whether in vivo transfection with a model DNA-based antigen delivered by gene gun technology would induce an antibody response detectable in vaginal secretions. Female rats were immunized with plasmids encoding human growth hormone (HGH) under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV/HGH) via vaginal mucosa (V), Peyer’s patch (PP), and/or abdominal skin (S) routes. Localization of HGH in the target tissues demonstrated that all three sites can be transfected in vivo with pCMV/HGH. Vaginal tissues expressed roughly the same level of plasmid as skin. Antibodies to HGH were detectable in serum and vaginal secretions in rats immunized with pCMV/HGH. In the rats primed and boosted vaginally, vaginal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibody titers to HGH were sustained for at least 14 weeks, whereas rats immunized via other routes and protocols (S/V, S/S, PP/PP, or PP/V) did not consistently sustain significant vaginal antibody titers beyond week 6. DNA-based immunizations administered by the gene gun may be an effective method of inducing local immunity in the female genital tract. PMID:9423874

  6. The nature of immune responses to urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Soman N.; Miao, Yuxuan

    2016-01-01

    The urinary tract is constantly exposed to microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, but generally the urinary tract resists infection by gut microorganisms. This resistance to infection is mainly ascribed to the versatility of the innate immune defences in the urinary tract as the adaptive immune responses are limited, particularly when only the lower urinary tract is infected. In recent years, as the strengths and weaknesses of the immune system of the urinary tract have emerged and as the virulence attributes of uropathogens are recognized, several potentially effective and unconventional strategies to contain or prevent urinary tract infections have emerged. PMID:26388331

  7. Myotonic dystrophy type 2: human founder haplotype and evolutionary conservation of the repeat tract.

    PubMed

    Liquori, Christina L; Ikeda, Yoshio; Weatherspoon, Marcy; Ricker, Kenneth; Schoser, Benedikt G H; Dalton, Joline C; Day, John W; Ranum, Laura P W

    2003-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults, can be caused by a mutation on either chromosome 19 (DM1) or 3 (DM2). In 2001, we demonstrated that DM2 is caused by a CCTG expansion in intron 1 of the zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) gene. To investigate the ancestral origins of the DM2 expansion, we compared haplotypes for 71 families with genetically confirmed DM2, using 19 short tandem repeat markers that we developed that flank the repeat tract. All of the families are white, with the majority of Northern European/German descent and a single family from Afghanistan. Several conserved haplotypes spanning >700 kb appear to converge into a single haplotype near the repeat tract. The common interval that is shared by all families with DM2 immediately flanks the repeat, extending up to 216 kb telomeric and 119 kb centromeric of the CCTG expansion. The DM2 repeat tract contains the complex repeat motif (TG)(n)(TCTG)(n)(CCTG)(n). The CCTG portion of the repeat tract is interrupted on normal alleles, but, as in other expansion disorders, these interruptions are lost on affected alleles. We examined haplotypes of 228 control chromosomes and identified a potential premutation allele with an uninterrupted (CCTG)(20) on a haplotype that was identical to the most common affected haplotype. Our data suggest that the predominant Northern European ancestry of families with DM2 resulted from a common founder and that the loss of interruptions within the CCTG portion of the repeat tract may predispose alleles to further expansion. To gain insight into possible function of the repeat tract, we looked for evolutionary conservation. The complex repeat motif and flanking sequences within intron 1 are conserved among human, chimpanzee, gorilla, mouse, and rat, suggesting a conserved biological function.

  8. The Forminalized Rat: A Convenient Microbial Ecosystem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Adrian

    1984-01-01

    Presents a series of experiments built around the bacteria found in the intestinal tract of formalinized rats as a model for discussing microbial ecology. Describes methods of examination of intestinal content, student tasks, and discussion questions; also gives a challenge problem to solve.

  9. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: novel therapy in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, Predrag; Seiwerth, Sven; Rucman, Rudolf; Turkovic, Branko; Rokotov, Dinko Stancic; Brcic, Luka; Sever, Marko; Klicek, Robert; Radic, Bozo; Drmic, Domagoj; Ilic, Spomenko; Kolenc, Danijela; Vrcic, Hrvoje; Sebecic, Bozidar

    2011-01-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 is an anti-ulcer peptidergic agent, safe in inflammatory bowel disease clinical trials (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL 14736) and wound healing, stable in human gastric juice and has no reported toxicity. We focused on BPC 157 as a therapy in peridontitis, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, intestine, liver and pancreas lesions. Particularly, it has a prominent effect on alcohol-lesions (i.e., acute, chronic) and NSAIDs-lesions (interestingly, BPC 157 both prevents and reverses adjuvant arthritis). In rat esophagitis and failed function of both lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and pyloric sphincters (PS), BPC 157 increased pressure in both sphincters till normal and reduced esophagitis. However, in healthy rats, it may decrease (PS) or increase (LES) the pressure in sphincters. It has strong angiogenic potential, it acts protectively on endothelium, prevents and reverses thrombus formation after abdominal aorta anastomosis, affects many central disturbances (i.e., dopamine and 5-HT system), the NO-system (either L-arginine and L-NAME effects), endothelin, acts as a free radical scavenger (counteracting CCl4-, paracetamol-, diclofenac-injuries) and exhibits neuroprotective properties. BPC 157 successfully heals the intestinal anastomosis, gastrocutaneous, duodenocutaneous and colocutaneous fistulas in rats, as well as interacting with the NO-system. Interestingly, the fistula closure was achieved even when the BPC 157 therapy was postponed for one month. In short-bowel syndrome escalating throughout 4 weeks, the constant weight gain above preoperative values started immediately with peroral and parental BPC 157 therapy and the villus height, crypth depth and muscle thickness (inner (circular) muscular layer) additionally increased. Thus, BPC 157 may improve gastrointestinal tract therapy.

  10. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  11. Congenital anomalies of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hans G; Belman, A Barry

    2014-01-01

    The upper urinary tract forms as a consequence of the reciprocal inductive signals between the metanephric mesenchyme and ureteric bud. A clue to the timing of events leading to an abnormality of the upper urinary tract can be the presence also of associated anomalies of internal genitalia since separation of these systems occurs at about the 10th week of gestation. Prenatal sonography has facilitated the detection of urological abnormalities presenting with hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis suggests obstruction, but by itself cannot be equated with it. Instead, further radiographic imaging is required to delineate anatomy and function. Now, moreover, non-surgical management of CAKUT should be considered whenever possible. Despite the widespread use of prenatal screening sonography that usually identifies the majority of congenital anomalies of the urinary tract, many children still present with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI). Regardless of the etiology for the presentation, the goal of management is preservation of renal function through mitigation of the risk for recurrent UTI and/or obstruction. In the past many children underwent surgical repair aimed at normalization of the appearance of the urinary tract. Today, management has evolved such that in most cases surgical reconstruction is performed only after a period of observation - with or without urinary prophylaxis. The opinions presented in this section are not espoused by all pediatric urologists but represent instead the practice that has evolved at Children's National Medical Center (Washington DC) based significantly on information obtained by nuclear renography, in addition to sonography and contrast cystography.

  12. [Urinary tract infections and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Sobotová, D

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes issues related to urinary tract infections in adults: predispositions and risk factors, classification, assessment of pathogenicity of bacterial agents, the role of bacteriuria and leucocyturia, interpretation of findings, treatment principles and an association with chronic renal failure. Urinary tract infections are the second most frequent infectious disease in the population. They most often affect women of childbearing potential and then seniors of both sexes who have multiple risk factors. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus are the most pathogenic towards urinary tract; they are responsible for 85% and 10-15% of cases of acute uncomplicated urinary infections, respectively. Chronic pyelonephritis, a chronic interstitial nephritis, is the fourth most frequent cause of chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure is a risk factor for the development of urinary infections due to metabolic disorders resulting in secondary immunodeficiencywith a disorder of all components of immunity. In patients with chronic renal failure, urinary tract infections occur most frequently after kidney transplantation when graft pyelonephritis is a life-threatening complication. Therefore, urinary tract infection prevention with co-trimoxazole once daily over at least 6 months is recommended in renal allograft recipients.

  13. [Physiology of microflora in the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Zboril, V

    2002-01-01

    The microflora of the digestive tract is a complex microbial ecosystem, well balanced, which in an aboral direction undergoes specific changes as to the ratio of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms the functions of which supplement each other--the aerobes ensure for the whole ecosystem the scavenger effect. The microbial profile of the digestive tract is typical by the absence of anaerobic microorganisms in the stomach and conversely their absolute predominance in the distal colon. The basic physiological functions of the microflora of the digestive tract can be characterized as follows: 1. microbial barrier against pathogens and potential pathogens, 2. formation of products of the microflora and their influence on the blood supply of the intestinal mucosa and peristaltics, 3. stimulation of the immune system in the gut, 4. reduction of bacterial translocation, 5. production of vitamins. To this problem in the world literature, contrary to ours, deserved attention has been paid for many years. Knowledge of the problem opens the door to expedient manipulation with the microbial flora of the digestive tract by the use of diet or prebiotics, probiotics as well as antibiotic treatment. The author presents a summary of basic findings which developed on the subject of physiological microflora of the digestive tract successively up to their present shape.

  14. Noninvasive stimulation of the human corticospinal tract.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J L; Gandevia, S C

    2004-04-01

    Spinal tracts can be stimulated noninvasively in human subjects by passing a high-voltage stimulus between the mastoids or by magnetic stimulation over the back of the head. The stimulus probably activates the corticospinal tract at the cervicomedullary junction (pyramidal decussation) and evokes large, short-latency motor responses in the arm muscles. These responses have a large monosynaptic component. Responses in leg muscles can be elicited by cervicomedullary junction stimulation or by stimulation over the cervical or thoracic spine. Because nerve roots are more easily activated than spinal tracts, stimulus spread to motor axons can occur. Facilitation of responses by voluntary activity confirms that the responses are evoked synaptically. Stimulation of the corticospinal tract is useful in studies of central conduction and studies of the behavior of motoneurons during different tasks. It also provides an important comparison to allow interpretation of changes in responses to stimulation of the motor cortex. The major drawback to the use of electrical stimulation of the corticospinal tract is that each stimulus is transiently painful.

  15. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  16. Investigation of the mechanism for phthalate-induced toxicity during male sexual differentiation in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male rats exposed to phthalate esters during sexual differentiation (GDI4-GDI8) display various developmental abnormalities of the reproductive tract that are manifested later in adult life. Induction of these malformations is associated with declines in fetal testicular testoste...

  17. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  18. Investigation of the mechanism for phthalate-induced toxicity during male sexual differentiation in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male rats exposed to phthalate esters during sexual differentiation (GDI4-GDI8) display various developmental abnormalities of the reproductive tract that are manifested later in adult life. Induction of these malformations is associated with declines in fetal testicular testoste...

  19. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Morris, C Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E; Zweben, Jesse A; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D; Nutman, Thomas B; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent "hidden antigens" with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins appear

  20. Source-tract coupling in birdsong production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2009-06-01

    Birdsong is a complex phenomenon, generated by a nonlinear vocal device capable of displaying complex solutions even under simple physiological motor commands. Among the peripheral physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of complex sounds in songbirds, the understanding of the dynamics emerging from the interaction between the sound source and the upper vocal tract remains most elusive. In this work we study a highly dissipative limit of a simple sound source model interacting with a tract, mathematically described in terms of a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically and, by means of reducing the problem to a phase equation, we are capable of studying its periodic solutions. Close in parameter space to the point where the resonances of the tract match the frequencies of the uncoupled source solutions, we find coexistence of periodic limit cycles. This hysteresis phenomenon allows us to interpret recently reported features found in the vocalization of some songbirds, in particular, “frequency jumps.”

  1. Comprehensive Management of Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, Georgios; Zacharias, Georgios; Koukourakis, Michael; Pistevou-Gobaki, Kiriaki; Papaloukas, Christos; Kostakopoulos, Athanasios; Kouloulias, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract represents only 5% of all urothelial cancers. The 5-year cancer-specific survival in the United States is roughly 75% with grade and stage being the most powerful predictors of survival. Nephroureterectomy with excision of the ipsilateral ureteral orifice and bladder cuff en bloc remains the gold standard treatment of the upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, while endoscopic and laparoscopic approaches are rapidly evolving as reasonable alternatives of care depending on grade and stage of disease. Several controversies remain in their management, including a selection of endoscopic versus laparoscopic approaches, management strategies on the distal ureter, the role of lymphadenectomy, and the value of chemotherapy in upper tract disease. Aims of this paper are to critically review the management of such tumors, including endoscopic management, laparoscopic nephroureterectomy and management of the distal ureter, the role of lymphadenectomy, and the emerging role of chemotherapy in their treatment. PMID:19096525

  2. [Urinary tract infections in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Becher, Klaus Friedrich; Klempien, Ingo; Wiedemann, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Acute infection of the urinary tract is one of the most commonly encountered bacterial infections in the frail elderly population and is responsible for substantial morbidity and recurrent infections with antibiotic resistance. Although generally considered to be self-limiting without treatment or easily treated with a short antibiotic regime, urinary tract infections (UTIs) often have a dramatic history, associated with incomplete resolution and frequent recurrence. The biological complexity of the infections combined with a dramatic rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens highlight the need for an anticipating strategy for therapy necessary for a rapid recovery. The first crucial step is the classification in asymptomatic bacteriuria or complicated pyelonephritis, on which the decision for the intensity of treatment and diagnostic effort is based. For the selection of empiric antibiotic therapy, knowledge about the predominant uropathogens as well as local resistance patterns is important. In this manner, most urinary tract infections in the elderly can be treated without greater expense.

  3. Mathematical modelling of the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Paya, Antonio Soriano; Fernandez, Daniel Ruiz; Gil, David; Garcia Chamizo, Juan Manuel; Perez, Francisco Macia

    2013-03-01

    The lower urinary tract is one of the most complex biological systems of the human body as it involved hydrodynamic properties of urine and muscle. Moreover, its complexity is increased to be managed by voluntary and involuntary neural systems. In this paper, a mathematical model of the lower urinary tract it is proposed as a preliminary study to better understand its functioning. Furthermore, another goal of that mathematical model proposal is to provide a basis for developing artificial control systems. Lower urinary tract is comprised of two interacting systems: the mechanical system and the neural regulator. The latter has the function of controlling the mechanical system to perform the voiding process. The results of the tests reproduce experimental data with high degree of accuracy. Also, these results indicate that simulations not only with healthy patients but also of patients with dysfunctions with neurological etiology present urodynamic curves very similar to those obtained in clinical studies.

  4. An anatomic study of the iliotibial tract.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Eduardo Luís Cruells; Vieira, Eduardo Alvaro; da Silva, Rogério Teixeira; Berlfein, Paulo Augusto dos Santos; Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés

    2007-03-01

    To identify the structure of the iliotibial tract at knee level, as well as its insertions, layer arrangement, and relationship with other structures of the lateral region of the knee and to compare the findings with available literature. Ten detailed anatomic dissections were performed by using incisions as recommended by the literature in fresh cadaver knees identifying the iliotibial tract components. The authors observed an iliotibial tract arrangement in superficial, deep, and capsular-osseous layers. Insertions have been described as follows: at linea aspera, at the upper border of the lateral epicondyle, at the patella, and at Gerdy's tibial tuberculum and across the capsular-osseous layer. The iliotibial tract (ITT) has important interconnections to the femur, the patella, and the lateral tibia; the iliopatellar band joins the ITT to the patella through the superficial oblique retinaculum and the lateral femoropatellar ligament, and the ITT capsular-osseous layer presents differentiated fibers in an arched arrangement that borders the femoral condyle and inserts laterally to the Gerdy's tubercle. The iliotibial tract can be considered as an anterolateral knee stabilizer, particularly its capsular-osseous layer, which, together with the anterior cruciate ligament, constitutes a functional unit forming a spatial "horseshoe" form. The detailed description of the structures forming iliotibial tract plays an important role in the study of knee instabilities. Its important tibial, femoral, and patellar connections are described so that better understanding of tibial femoral instability on the lateral side as well as patellofemoral instability can be achieved and mechanisms of repair can be conceived.

  5. Urinary tract infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chacón-Mora, Natalia; Pachón Díaz, Jerónimo; Cordero Matía, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    Infectious complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among transplant recipients. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication in kidney transplant recipients with a reported incidence from 25% to 75%, varies widely likely due to differences in definition, diagnostic criteria, study design, and length of observation. We sought reviews the incidence and importance of urinary tract infection on graft survival, the microbiology with special emphasis on multidrug resistant microorganisms, the therapeutic management of UTI and the prophylaxis of recurrent UTI among solid organ transplant recipients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical trials to unify the clinical management in this population.

  6. Foreign Bodies in the Aerodigestive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Victor G.; Middleton, William G.

    1986-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the aerodigestive tract are common. They may cause minimal disturbance of function, severe morbidity or even sudden death. They enter the aerodigestive tract because of haste during eating, disturbances in physical function, impairments due to extreme youth or age, or contamination of food with foreign bodies. Common symptoms are pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, cough, airway distress, hemoptysis and hematemesis. Signs include point tenderness, respiratory distress and surgical emphysema. Clinical, radiological and endoscopic investigations are described, as are principles of crisis and elective management. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:21267132

  7. Urinary tract infections: treatment/comparative therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Olin, Shelly J; Bartges, Joseph W

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) occurs when there is compromise of host defense mechanisms and a virulent microbe adheres, multiplies, and persists in a portion of the urinary tract. Most commonly, UTI is caused by bacteria, but fungi and viruses are possible. Urine culture and sensitivity are the gold standards for diagnosis of bacterial UTI. Identifying the location of infection (eg, bladder, kidney, prostate) as well as comorbidities (eg, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression) is essential to guide the diagnostic and therapeutic plan. Antimicrobial agents are the mainstay of therapy for bacterial UTI and selected ideally based on culture and sensitivity.

  8. Fungal infections of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Sobel, J D; Vazquez, J A

    1999-12-01

    Funguria, fungal urinary tract infections, are most commonly caused by Candida species but may also be caused by Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus species, and the endemic mycoses. Candiduria presents as an increasingly common nosocomial infection, which may involve all anatomic levels of the urinary tract, resulting in a spectrum of disease varying from asymptomatic candiduria to clinical sepsis. Although several successful systemic or local therapeutic options exist for the eradication of candiduria, knowledge of the pathogenesis and natural history of candiduria has lagged. This has resulted in confusion among practitioners as to when antifungal therapy is indicated. Treatment guidelines have recently been formulated and are described herein.

  9. Disorders of the Reproductive Tract of Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Harcourt-Brown, Frances Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Disorders of the reproductive tract are common in rabbits. Conditions are different in rabbits that are farmed for their meat or fur and those that are kept as pets. Farmed rabbits suffer from infections and diseases associated with pregnancy. Congenital abnormalities are more likely to be recognized and treated in pet rabbits. Pet rabbits suffer from age-related changes to their genital tract (hyperplasia, neoplasia, or hernias). Neutering is an important part of prevention and treatment of reproductive disorders. Knowledge of normal male and female reproductive anatomy is essential to prevent complications. These are described and illustrated. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Badr, Ahmed; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50–60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI) are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics. PMID:23984019

  11. Immunohistochemical features of the gastrointestinal tract tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hannah H.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract tumors include a wide variety of vastly different tumors and on a whole are one of the most common malignancies in western countries. These tumors often present at late stages as distant metastases which are then biopsied and may be difficult to differentiate without the aid of immunohistochemical stains. With the exception of pancreatic and biliary tumors where there are no distinct immunohistochemical patterns, most gastrointestinal tumors can be differentiated by their unique immunohistochemical profile. As the size of biopsies decrease, the role of immunohistochemical stains will become even more important in determining the origin and differentiation of gastrointestinal tract tumors. PMID:22943017

  12. Diagnostic imaging of lower urinary tract disease.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic imaging is routinely performed in small animals with lower urinary tract disease. Survey radiographs allow identification of radiopaque calculi, gas within the urinary tract, and lymph node or bone metastases. Cystography and urethrography remain useful in the evaluation of bladder or urethral rupture, abnormal communication with other organs, and lesions of the pelvic or penile urethra. Ultrasonography is the modality of choice for the diagnosis of most disorders. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in evaluating the ureterovesical junction and intrapelvic lesions, monitoring the size of lesions, and evaluating lymph nodes and osseous structures for metastases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Herpes simplex virus and the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Eric A; Coyle, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is well known as a sexually transmitted disease. However, relatively little has been published concerning the presentations and treatment of HSV infection within the gastrointestinal tract, where HSV most commonly affects the esophagus in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. HSV proctitis is not uncommon and occurs primarily in males having sex with males. In patients with normal immune systems, gastrointestinal HSV infections are generally self-limited and rarely require antiviral therapy. Treatment of infection is suggested for immunocompromised patients, though no large randomized controlled trials have been performed. This article reviews the manifestations of HSV infection within the luminal gastrointestinal tract and options for diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Lower urinary tract infections in women.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cathy; Rantell, Angie

    2017-05-11

    In her lifetime, a woman is highly likely to develop at least one lower urinary tract infection. Early detection and treatment are key. Being aware of predisposing factors for infection and understanding appropriate diagnosis and treatment regimens will help nurses in both primary and acute care manage these patients correctly. This will not only benefit patients but will also help prevent incorrect antimicrobial management and avoid unplanned admissions. This aim of this article is to provide nurses with the information they need to best advise both colleagues and patients on how to manage lower urinary tract infections in women.

  15. Ultrasonography of bovine urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Floeck, Martina

    2009-11-01

    Ultrasonography is a helpful diagnostic tool in cattle with urinary tract disorders. It can be used to diagnose pyelonephritis, urolithiasis, hydronephrosis, renal cysts, renal tumors, amyloidosis, cystitis, bladder paralysis, bladder rupture, bladder neoplasms, and, occasionally, nephrosis, glomerulonephritis, and embolic nephritis. This article describes the anatomy, scanning technique, indications, limitations, normal and pathologic sonographic appearance of the bovine urinary tract. References from horses and humans are included, especially when the sonographic findings in these species may complement the understanding of similar diseases reported in cattle.

  16. [Urinary tract infection in the newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Vilanova Juanola, J M; Canos Molinos, J; Rosell Arnold, E; Figueras Aloy, J; Comas Masmitja, L L; Jiménez González, R

    1989-08-01

    Twenty-eight cases of urinary tract infection in newborns with positive urinoculture and suggestive clinical symptomatology are reviewed. The incidence was 0.24%, being most frequent in preterm and postterm newborns. Male neonates was more affected. Failure to thrive, excessive weight loss, poor feeding, diarrhoea, vomiting and jaundice are the most relevant clinical signs. E. coli and Klebsiella are the most frequent organism isolated, followed by Enterobacter and Candida. The presence of metabolic acidosis and leukocituria using a bag technique were the most accurate laboratory data to suspect a urinary tract infection.

  17. Urinary tract infection by chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Swain, Bichitrananda; Otta, Sarita; Sahu, Kundan Kumar; Panda, Kirtika; Rout, Subhrajita

    2014-08-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum, a facultative anaerobic proteobacterium, is particularly isolated from water and soil in tropical areas and has been implicated in few infections like septicemia, visceral abscesses, skin and soft tissue infections, meningitis and diarrhea. But urinary tract infection caused by it is very rare. Limited awareness about this pathogen and inappropriate antibiotic therapy contribute to a high mortality rate. Here, we describe an unusual case of urinary tract infection by Chromobacterium violaceum in a young immuno-competent male which was managed aggressively with proper antibiotics as per the culture sensitivity report.

  18. [Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients].

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Carlos; Méndez, Santiago; Salinas, Jesús

    2016-11-18

    Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients has a multifactorial aetiology and is not a uniform clinical condition. Changes due to physiological ageing as well as comorbidity and polypharmacy, can produce several dynamic conditions such as urinary incontinence and urinary retention. Lower urinary tract symptoms increase with age in both sexes and are a major problem in older patients due to their medical and psychosocial consequences. For these reasons, in assessing urinary dysfunction in older patients, we should consider external circumstances such as polypharmacy, poor mobility, affective and cognitive disorders and also accessibility to housing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Expanded HOXA13 polyalanine tracts in a monotreme.

    PubMed

    Lehoczky, Jessica A; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2008-01-01

    The N-terminal region of human HOXA13 has seven discrete polyalanine tracts. Our previous analysis of these tracts in multiple major vertebrate clades suggested that three are mammal-specific. We now report the N-terminal HOXA13 repetitive tract structures in the monotreme Tachyglossus aculeatus (echidna). Contrary to our expectations, echidna HOXA13 possesses a unique set of polyalanine tracts and an unprecedented polyglycine tract. The data support the conclusion that the emergence of expanded polyalanine tracts in proteins occurred very early in the stem lineage that gave rise to mammals, between 162 and 315 Ma.

  20. Tanshinone IIA improves functional recovery in spinal cord injury-induced lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-dong; Yu, Xing; Wang, Xiu-mei; Mu, Xiao-hong; He, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA, extracted from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, exerts neuroprotective effects through its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties. This study intravenously injected tanshinone IIA 20 mg/kg into rat models of spinal cord injury for 7 consecutive days. Results showed that tanshinone IIA could reduce the inflammation, edema as well as compensatory thickening of the bladder tissue, improve urodynamic parameters, attenuate secondary injury, and promote spinal cord regeneration. The number of hypertrophic and apoptotic dorsal root ganglion (L6–S1) cells was less after treatment with tanshinone IIA. The effects of tanshinone IIA were similar to intravenous injection of 30 mg/kg methylprednisolone. These findings suggested that tanshinone IIA improved functional recovery after spinal cord injury-induced lower urinary tract dysfunction by remodeling the spinal pathway involved in lower urinary tract control. PMID:28400810

  1. The antidromic compound action potential of the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial tract, a tool for assessing posterior pituitary activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Baertschi, A J; Dreifuss, J J

    1979-08-10

    A sensitive technique was developed for measuring continuously the summated neural activity of the rat hypothalamo-neurohypophysial tract. Large compound potentials of 4-9 mV peak amplitude were recorded from the fibre tract in response to electrical stimulation of the neurohypophysis. It was estimated that all fibres in the tract were electrically activated and contributed to the compound potential. It was shown that a decrease of peak amplitude could be used as a measure of changes in endogenous neural activity. The decrease in peak amplitude during an increase of endogenous neural activity was due to fatigue and temporal spread of the compound potential, and also to collision of antidromic and orthodromic action potentials. Decrease of the compound potentials was related to the intensity of vaginal distension, haemorrhage and plasma hyperosmolality, and it correlated with neurohypophysial hormone release. This method may usefully complement hormone assays and single cell analysis.

  2. Best pharmacological practice: urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay

    2003-05-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most frequent bacterial infection. Acute uncomplicated urinary infection and acute non-obstructive pyelonephritis occur in young women with normal genitourinary tracts. Empirical short-course therapy is preferred for the management of acute cystitis, but evolving resistance requires continuing reassessment of optimal antimicrobial selection. Empirical trimethoprim or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole has been recommended, but increasing resistance to these agents suggests that pivmecillinam, nitrofurantoin and perhaps fosfomycin trometamol should be considered. Although flouroquinolones are effective as short-course therapy, widespread empirical use of these agents should be discouraged because of potential promotion of resistance. For acute non-obstructive pyelonephritis, flouroquinolones are the empirical oral treatment of choice, although urine culture results should direct continuing therapy. Complicated urinary tract infection occurs in men or women of all ages with underlying abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. Treatment of complicated urinary infection is individualised, taking into consideration the underlying abnormality and susceptibilities of the infecting organism. Asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated except in pregnant women, in patients prior to undergoing an invasive surgical procedure, or renal transplant recipients in the early postrenal transplant period.

  3. [Lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Aoun, F; Roumeguère, T

    2015-12-01

    Radical hysterectomy is associated with a significant amount of urinary functional complications and a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the neurological etiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy and to establish an optimal postoperative management strategy. We performed a comprehensive overview using the following terms: "radical hysterectomy" and "urologic diseases etiology" or "urologic disease prevention and control". The reported incidence of lower urinary tract dysfunction after radical hysterectomy varies from 12 to 85%. Several animal and clinical urodynamic studies corroborate the neurologic etiology of the dysfunction. Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common postoperative finding (70-85%) but spontaneous recovery is to be expected within 6-12 months after surgery. The most frequent long term sequela is stress urinary incontinence (40% of cases) and its management is complex and challenging. Postoperative refractory overactive bladder and bladder underactivity can be treated by neuromodulation of sacral roots and superior hypogastric plexus, respectively. In the absence of good clinical predictors, preoperative urodynamic examinations could have a role in understanding the pathophysiology of the dysfunction before such interventions. The pathophysiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy is multifactorial. Its management is complex and should be multidisciplinary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Management of suspected bacterial urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Beckford-Ball, Jason

    New guidelines on the management of suspected bacterial urinary tract infection in adults have just been released by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). The guidance states that the presence of bacteriuria should lead to antibiotic treatment only when there is definitive evidence that eradicating the bacterial infection will result in a tangible health gain at a reasonable level of risk (SIGN, 2006).

  5. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  6. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  7. Ureaplasma urealyticum serotypes in urinary tract disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hewish, M J; Birch, D F; Fairley, K F

    1986-01-01

    Ureaplasma urealyticum cultures from 124 patients with urinary tract disease were serotyped by indirect immunofluorescence, using antisera to serotypes I to VIII. A similar range of serotypes was recovered from first-voided, midstream, and bladder-aspiration (SPA) urine, upper urinary tract samples, and vaginal swabs. Serotype VI was predominant (44/124) among the samples, whereas serotypes V (1/124 samples) and VII (0/124 samples) were uncommon. Twenty of 124 cultures contained more than one serotype, and three cultures were untypeable. Serotypes cultured from bladder urine were also present in vaginal and urethral samples, although these samples often carried additional serotypes. Consecutive SPA samples from the same patient invariably contained the same serotype, whereas some consecutive midstream urine samples showed a loss or gain of serotypes with time. One patient carried the same serotype in SPA urine over a period of 13 months. The pattern of serotypes recovered from the urinary tract was similar irrespective of the sampling site, the site of infection, the clinical diagnosis and renal function of the patient, and the presence or absence of other microorganisms. Colonization above the urethra and association with urinary tract disease appeared to be serotype independent. PMID:3700599

  8. Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Brandt, L J

    1999-08-01

    Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increased international travel means that gastroenterologists are now more likely to care for patients with parasitic diseases. This article reviews various aspects of the more common intestinal parasites and their infections, including epidemiology, life cycle, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  9. Sexually acquired Salmonella Typhi urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wielding, Sally; Scott, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of isolated urinary Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi in an HIV-positive man who has sex with men. He was clinically well and blood and stool cultures were negative, indicating that this may have been a sexually acquired urinary tract infection.

  10. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children.

    PubMed

    Doern, Christopher D; Richardson, Susan E

    2016-09-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review.

  11. Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common occurrence in children. The management and laboratory diagnosis of these infections pose unique challenges that are not encountered in adults. Important factors, such as specimen collection, urinalysis interpretation, culture thresholds, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing, require special consideration in children and will be discussed in detail in the following review. PMID:27053673

  12. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF...

  13. Computational Modeling of Nanoscale and Microscale Particle Deposition, Retention and Dosimetry in the Mouse Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, B.; Price, O.T.; Oldham, M.; Chen, L.C.; Saunders, E.L.; Gordon, T.; Mikheev, V.B.; Minard, K.R.; Teeguarden, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparing effects of inhaled particles across rodent test systems and between rodent test systems and humans is a key obstacle to the interpretation of common toxicological test systems for human risk assessment. These comparisons, correlation with effects and prediction of effects, are best conducted using measures of tissue dose in the respiratory tract. Differences in lung geometry, physiology and the characteristics of ventilation can give rise to differences in the regional deposition of particles in the lung in these species. Differences in regional lung tissue doses cannot currently be measured experimentally. Regional lung tissue dosimetry can however be predicted using models developed for rats, monkeys, and humans. A computational model of particle respiratory tract deposition and clearance was developed for BALB/c and B6C3F1 mice, creating a cross species suite of available models for particle dosimetry in the lung. Airflow and particle transport equations were solved throughout the respiratory tract of these mice strains to obtain temporal and spatial concentration of inhaled particles from which deposition fractions were determined. Particle inhalability (Inhalable fraction, IF) and upper respiratory tract (URT) deposition were directly related to particle diffusive and inertial properties. Measurements of the retained mass at several post-exposure times following exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, micro and nanoscale C60 fullerene, and nanoscale silver particles were used to calibrate and verify model predictions of total lung dose. Interstrain (mice) and interspecies (mouse, rat, human) differences in particle inhalability, fractional deposition and tissue dosimetry are described for ultrafine, fine and coarse particles. PMID:25373829

  14. Inflammatory response to Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder of the spinal cord injured host.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Rajeev; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J; Ortiz, Tara K; Balsara, Zarine; Tang, Yuping; Nseyo, Unwanaobong; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Seed, Patrick C

    2014-05-01

    Urinary tract infections cause significant morbidity in patients with spinal cord injury. An in vivo spinal cord injured rat model of experimental Escherichia coli urinary tract infection mimics human disease with enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection compared to controls. We hypothesized that a dysregulated inflammatory response contributes to enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection. Spinal cord injured and sham injured rats were inoculated transurethrally with E. coli. Transcript levels of 84 inflammatory pathway genes were measured in bladder tissue of each group before infection, 24 hours after infection and after 5 days of antibiotic therapy. Before infection quantitative polymerase chain reaction array revealed greater than twofold up-regulation in the proinflammatory factor transcripts slc11a1, ccl4 and il1β, and down-regulation of the antimicrobial peptides lcn2 and mpo in spinal cord injured vs control bladders. At 24 hours after infection spinal cord injured bladders showed an attenuated innate immune response with decreased expression of il6, slc11a1, il1β and lcn2, and decreased il10 and slpi expression compared to controls. Despite clearance of bacteriuria with antibiotics spinal cord injured rats had delayed induction of il6 transcription and a delayed anti-inflammatory response with decreased il10 and slpi transcript levels relative to controls. Spinal cord injured bladders fail to mount a characteristic inflammatory response to E. coli infection and cannot suppress inflammation after infection is eliminated. This may lead to increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection and persistent chronic inflammation through neural mediated pathways, which to our knowledge remain to be defined. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of pain from urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Rosen, John M; Klumpp, David J

    2014-04-01

    The pain response to urinary tract infection is largely uncharacterized, but the symptomatic response to urinary tract infection contrasts with the lack of pain response among individuals with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Quantifying pelvic pain in a murine urinary tract infection model, uropathogenic Escerichia coli induces transient pelvic pain, whereas an asymptomatic bacteriuria E. coli isolate causes no pain, thus recapitulating the spectrum of clinical responses to intravesical E. coli. These differential pain responses are not correlated with bladder colonization or inflammation, but instead are intrinsic to E. coli lipopolysaccharide and dependent on the lipopolysaccharide receptor, TLR4. Epidemiological data suggest a link between interstitial cystitis and a history of urinary tract infection, so it was evaluated whether repetitive uropathogenic E. coli instillation would result in chronic pain through central sensitization. Although repeated infection with wild type uropathogenic E. coli results in only transient episodes of acute pain, a uropathogenic E. coli mutant lacking O-antigen causes chronic, post-urinary tract infection pelvic pain. Similarly, a K-12 E. coli strain lacking O-antigen induces chronic pain that persisted long after bacterial clearance, and expressing O-antigen nullified the pain phenotype. Spinal cords isolated from mice with post-urinary tract infection chronic pain showed deficits in short-term depression consistent with central sensitization. Deleting O-antigen gene complex from a uropathogenic E. coli strain and subsequent heterologous expression of O-antigen gene clusters shows that a single bacterial isolate can exhibit pain phenotypes ranging from a null phenotype, an acute pain phenotype, to a chronic pain phenotype. Post-urinary tract infection chronic pain is also associated with voiding dysfunction and anxious/depressive behavior. These effects are also mediated by TRPV1 at the level of pain establishment

  16. Ruthenium-97 hepatobiliary agents for delayed studies of the bilary tract I: Ru-97 PIPIDA: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Schachner, E.R.; Gil, M.C.; Atkins, H.L.; Som, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Badia, J.; Sacker, D.F.; Fairchild, R.G.; Richards, P.

    1981-04-01

    Failure of early diagnosis of biliary atresia results in the development of cirrhosis and death. Commonly used hepatobiliary agents are not ideal for follow-up studies because of their unfavorable physical properties or short half-life. The excellent physical properties of Ru-97 should overcome these limitations. Therefore, Ru-97 PIPIDA (N,..cap alpha..-(p-isopropyl acetanilide) iminoacetic acid) is being investigated as a potential hepatobiliary agent that would allow an improved diagnosis of the disease. Ruthenium-97 PIPIDA and Tc-99m PIPIDA showed similar blood clearance rates in dogs. Ru-97 PIPIDA scintigrams in dogs showed early uptake in liver and gallbladder and slow excretion through the gastrointestinal tract. Biodistribution studies were performed in normal rats and rats with biliary obstruction. The findings suggest that Ru-97 PIPIDA should be useful for delayed studies ( 1 to 3 days) of the biliary tract.

  17. Practical Immunohistochemistry in Neoplastic Pathology of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract, and Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanlin L; Kim, Christopher J; Koo, Jamie; Zhou, Wendi; Choi, Eunice K; Arcega, Ramir; Chen, Zongming Eric; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Lanjing; Lin, Fan

    2017-09-01

    - Immunomarkers with diagnostic, therapeutic, or prognostic values have been increasingly used to maximize the benefits of clinical management of patients with neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas. - To review the characteristics of immunomarkers that are commonly used in surgical pathology practice for neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas, and to summarize the clinical usefulness of immunomarkers that have been discovered in recent years in these fields. - Data sources include literature review, authors' research data, and personal practice experience. - Immunohistochemistry is an indispensable tool for the accurate diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas. Useful immunomarkers are available to help distinguish malignant neoplasms from benign conditions, determine organ origins, and subclassify neoplasms that are morphologically and biologically heterogeneous. Specific immunomarkers are also available to help guide patient treatment and assess disease aggressiveness, which are keys to the success of personalized medicine. Pathologists will continue to play a critical role in the discovery, validation, and application of new biomarkers, which will ultimately improve patient care.

  18. A Forested Tract-Size Profile of Virginia's NIPF Landowners.

    Treesearch

    Michael T Thompson; Tony G. Johnson

    1996-01-01

    Information gathered from 3,221 permanent Forest Survey sample plots showed that nearly 1.3 million acres, or 11 percent, of the nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) timberland in Virginia is in forested tracts 10 acres or less. Forested tracts ranging from 11 to 100 acres accounted for the largest proportion of NIPF timberland. Forested tract size varied significantly...

  19. Right ventricular outflow tract repair with a cardiac biologic scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, John M; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Fujimoto, Kazuro L; Remlinger, Nathaniel T; Pesyna, Colin; Wagner, William R; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W; Badylak, Stephen F

    2012-01-01

    Surgical reconstruction of congenital heart defects is often limited by the nonresorbable material used to approximate normal anatomy. In contrast, biologic scaffold materials composed of resorbable non-cross-linked extracellular matrix (ECM) have been used for tissue reconstruction of multiple organs and are replaced by host tissue. Preparation of whole organ ECM by decellularization through vascular perfusion can maintain much of the native three-dimensional (3D) structure, strength, and tissue-specific composition. A 3D cardiac ECM (C-ECM) biologic scaffold material would logically have structural and functional advantages over materials such as Dacron™ for myocardial repair, but the in vivo remodeling characteristics of C-ECM have not been investigated to date. A porcine C-ECM patch or Dacron patch was used to reconstruct a full-thickness right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) defect in a rat model with end points of structural remodeling function at 16 weeks. The Dacron patch was encapsulated by dense fibrous tissue and showed little cellular infiltration. Echocardiographic analysis showed that the right ventricle of the hearts patched with Dacron were dilated at 16 weeks compared to presurgery baseline values. The C-ECM patch remodeled into dense, cellular connective tissue with scattered small islands of cardiomyocytes. The hearts patched with C-ECM showed no difference in the size or function of the ventricles as compared to baseline values at both 4 and 16 weeks. The C-ECM patch was associated with better functional and histomorphological outcomes compared to the Dacron patch in this rat model of RVOT reconstruction. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Repair with a Cardiac Biologic Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, John M.; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Fujimoto, Kazuro L.; Remlinger, Nathaniel T.; Pesyna, Colin; Wagner, William R.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Gilbert, Thomas W.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Surgical reconstruction of congenital heart defects is often limited by the nonresorbable material used to approximate normal anatomy. In contrast, biologic scaffold materials composed of resorbable non-cross-linked extracellular matrix (ECM) have been used for tissue reconstruction of multiple organs and are replaced by host tissue. Preparation of whole organ ECM by decellularization through vascular perfusion can maintain much of the native three-dimensional (3D) structure, strength, and tissue-specific composition. A 3D cardiac ECM (C-ECM) biologic scaffold material would logically have structural and functional advantages over materials such as Dacron™ for myocardial repair, but the in vivo remodeling characteristics of C-ECM have not been investigated to date. Methods and Results A porcine C-ECM patch or Dacron patch was used to reconstruct a full-thickness right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) defect in a rat model with end points of structural remodeling function at 16 weeks. The Dacron patch was encapsulated by dense fibrous tissue and showed little cellular infiltration. Echocardiographic analysis showed that the right ventricle of the hearts patched with Dacron were dilated at 16 weeks compared to presurgery baseline values. The C-ECM patch remodeled into dense, cellular connective tissue with scattered small islands of cardiomyocytes. The hearts patched with C-ECM showed no difference in the size or function of the ventricles as compared to baseline values at both 4 and 16 weeks. Conclusions The C-ECM patch was associated with better functional and histomorphological outcomes compared to the Dacron patch in this rat model of RVOT reconstruction. PMID:22025093

  1. Axon guidance of outgrowing corticospinal fibres in the rat

    PubMed Central

    JOOSTEN, ELBERT A. J.; BÄR, DOP P. R.

    1999-01-01

    This review is concerned with the development of the rat corticospinal tract (CST). The CST is a long descending central pathway, restricted to mammals, which is involved both in motor and sensory control. The rat CST is a very useful model in experimental research on the development of fibre systems in mammals because of its postnatal outgrowth throughout the spinal cord as well as its experimental accessibility. Hence mechanisms underlying axon outgrowth and subsequent target cell finding can be studied relatively easily. In this respect the corticospinal tract forms an important example and model system for the better understanding of central nervous system development in general. PMID:10227663

  2. COMBINATION DOSE OF TWO PHTHALATES ADDITIVELY DEPRESSES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AND INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) are phthalate esters used to modify plastic and polymer textures. Individually,DEHP and DBP reduce testosterone production, inhibit reproductive tract development, andinduce reproductive organ malformationsin male rats...

  3. Transcutaneous ultrasonography of the avian urogenital tract.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, H; Krautwald-Junghanns, M E

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a survey of the diagnostic use of transcutaneous sonographic examination of the urogenital tract of pet birds. Possibilities and limitations in imaging normal and altered components of this organ system are discussed. Ultrasonographic examination of the avian urogenital tract was evaluated in 386 pet birds. Abnormal clinical signs were present in 289 birds; 97 birds were normal. Transcutaneous ultrasonography proved to be a useful, noninvasive, and fast diagnostic tool, especially in imaging laminated eggs and changes of the oviduct. Until now, these pathologic changes were not diagnosable in birds with other common noninvasive methods (e.g. radiography). The imaging of low-grade changes of the oviduct, disorders of the kidney without enlargement of the organ, as well as roughening of the egg shell proved to be difficult. Sonographic imaging of neither the normal kidney nor the inactive gonads was possible.

  4. Barrier function of airway tract epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Shyamala; Comstock, Adam T; Sajjan, Uma S

    2013-01-01

    Airway epithelium contributes significantly to the barrier function of airway tract. Mucociliary escalator, intercellular apical junctional complexes which regulate paracellular permeability and antimicrobial peptides secreted by the airway epithelial cells are the three primary components of barrier function of airway tract. These three components act cooperatively to clear inhaled pathogens, allergens and particulate matter without inducing inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis. Therefore impairment of one or more of these essential components of barrier function may increase susceptibility to infection and promote exaggerated and prolonged innate immune responses to environmental factors including allergens and pathogens resulting in chronic inflammation. Here we review the regulation of components of barrier function with respect to chronic airways diseases. PMID:24665407

  5. Sense of taste in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the investigation of the molecular mechanism by which chemicals such as odors and tastants are perceived by specific chemosensory organs. For example, G protein-coupled receptors expressed within the nasal epithelium and taste receptors in the oral cavity have been identified as odorant and taste receptors, respectively. However, there is much evidence to indicate that these chemosensory receptors are not restricted to primary chemosensory cells; they are also expressed and have function in other cells such as those in the airways and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This short review describes the possible mechanisms by which taste signal transduction occurs in the oral cavity and tastants/nutrients are sensed in the GI tract by taste-like cells, mainly enteroendocrine and brush cells. Furthermore, it discusses the future perspectives of chemosensory studies.

  6. Imaging in childhood urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Riccabona, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common query in pediatric radiology. Imaging for and after UTI is still a heavily debated topic with different approaches, as thorough evidence to decide upon a definite algorithm is scarce. This review article tries to address the clinical rational of the various approaches (general imaging, top-down or bottom-up, selected and individualized imaging concepts…), describes the available imaging modalities and the respective findings in imaging children with UTI, and proposes an imaging algorithm for the work-up of children during and after UTI discussing the "pros and cons" of the different attitudes. In summary, imaging by US is generally considered for all infants and children with a febrile or complicated (upper) UTI, particularly without previously known urinary tract anatomy. The further work-up (searching for renal scarring and assessment of vesico-ureteric reflux) is then decided according to these initial findings as well as the clinical presentation, course, and scenario.

  7. Urinary tract infections; problems in medical management.

    PubMed

    JAWETZ, E

    1953-08-01

    The lesion principally responsible for chronic, or recurrent, urinary tract infection is a focus in the interstitial tissue of the kidney. Most cursory antimicrobial therapy suppresses the manifestations of lower urinary tract involvement but does not eradicate the renal focus. In order to cure rather than merely suppress the infection, it is imperative that, as early as possible, steps be taken to isolate and identify the etiologic microorganism and to determine its sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. Based on this information sufficient amounts of drug should be given for an adequate period (probably at least two weeks) to eradicate the infection within the renal tissue. Such a program would tend to reduce the number of cases in which irreversible renal failure develops from chronic pyelonephritis.

  8. Urinary tract infection caused by Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Pant, Narayan Dutt; Sharma, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum, a proteobacterium, is a facultative anaerobe, which is generally present as the normal flora of water and soil in tropical and subtropical regions. The infection due to Chromobacterium violaceum is rare but mostly fatal. It is responsible for causing fatal cases of septicemia, visceral abscesses, skin and soft tissue infections, meningitis, diarrhea, and rarely urinary tract infection. The bacteria has high propensity to spread causing sepsis. Delayed proper treatment due to limited awareness related to the C. violaceum infection is responsible for the high mortality rate. Here, we describe a rare case of urinary tract infection by C. violaceum in a chronic kidney disease patient, which was managed with timely proper antimicrobial therapy as per the culture sensitivity report.

  9. White matter tracts of speech and language.

    PubMed

    Smits, Marion; Jiskoot, Lize C; Papma, Janne M

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to investigate the white matter (WM) tracts underlying the perisylvian cortical regions known to be associated with language function. The arcuate fasciculus is composed of 3 segments (1 long and 2 short) whose separate functions correlate with traditional models of conductive and transcortical motor or sensory aphasia, respectively. DTI mapping of language fibers is useful in presurgical planning for patients with dominant hemisphere tumors, particularly when combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. DTI has found damage to language networks in stroke patients and has the potential to influence poststroke rehabilitation and treatment. Assessment of the WM tracts involved in the default mode network has been found to correlate with mild cognitive impairment, potentially explaining language deficits in patients with apparently mild small vessel ischemic disease. Different patterns of involvement of language-related WM structures appear to correlate with different clinical subtypes of primary progressive aphasias.

  10. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    New generation CT scans combined with high-detail barium studies have now allowed radiologists to see and gain a more complete understanding of the wall and surrounding structures of the gastrointestinal tract. The editors state that their intent is to ''present in a comprehensive volume an up-to-date evaluation o the role, significance, indications, and limitations of computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract.'' There is an initial chapter on CT scanning techniques and the use of oral contrast agents. Chapters follow on Ct of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, small bowel, and colon. The chapters start with a description of the anatomic structures and then cover in detail common pathologic conditions that affect the organ. Indications for examinations are also included in many chapters. There are final chapters on percutaneous drainage of abscesses and fluid collections and on radiologic-patholoic correlation of some of the more common entities.

  11. AxTract: Toward microstructure informed tractography.

    PubMed

    Girard, Gabriel; Daducci, Alessandro; Petit, Laurent; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Whittingstall, Kevin; Deriche, Rachid; Wassermann, Demian; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2017-08-02

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography has become the tool of choice to probe the human brain's white matter in vivo. However, tractography algorithms produce a large number of erroneous streamlines (false positives), largely due to complex ambiguous tissue configurations. Moreover, the relationship between the resulting streamlines and the underlying white matter microstructure characteristics remains poorly understood. In this work, we introduce a new approach to simultaneously reconstruct white matter fascicles and characterize the apparent distribution of axon diameters within fascicles. To achieve this, our method, AxTract, takes full advantage of the recent development DW-MRI microstructure acquisition, modeling, and reconstruction techniques. This enables AxTract to separate parallel fascicles with different microstructure characteristics, hence reducing ambiguities in areas of complex tissue configuration. We report a decrease in the incidence of erroneous streamlines compared to the conventional deterministic tractography algorithms on simulated data. We also report an average increase in streamline density over 15 known fascicles of the 34 healthy subjects. Our results suggest that microstructure information improves tractography in crossing areas of the white matter. Moreover, AxTract provides additional microstructure information along the fascicle that can be studied alongside other streamline-based indices. Overall, AxTract provides the means to distinguish and follow white matter fascicles using their microstructure characteristics, bringing new insights into the white matter organization. This is a step forward in microstructure informed tractography, paving the way to a new generation of algorithms able to deal with intricate configurations of white matter fibers and providing quantitative brain connectivity analysis. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Acute Korsakoff syndrome following mammillothalamic tract infarction.

    PubMed

    Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Takeda, Norio; Inoue, Akira; Ibuchi, Yasuo; Kumagai, Takashi; Sugai, Tsutomu; Takeda, Ken-ichiro; Ueda, Kaoru

    2004-01-01

    There are limited case reports of structural lesions causing Korsakoff syndrome. This report describes acute Korsakoff syndrome following localized, bilateral infarction of the mammillothalamic tracts (MTTs). Axial T2-weighted imaging revealed the lesions at the lateral wall level of the third ventricle and diffusion-weighted imaging confirmed that the left lesion was new and the right old. Korsakoff syndrome persisted 6 months after the onset. This case suggests that bilateral MTT dysfunction can lead to Korsakoff syndrome.

  13. Contemporary Management of Biliary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    George, Josh; Baillie, John

    2005-03-01

    Biliary tract infections are a worldwide problem, with a large financial burden on health care. Biliary infections can result from multiple causes, but the most common culprit is cholelithiasis. In the past decade, our knowledge of the mechanism of disease, microbiology of infections, and management options has grown enormously. Although at times perplexing, it is important to understand this information to allow for efficient, quality, and cost-effective health care.

  14. Audit of cytology of upper urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Malta, F; Lenos, M; Leotsakos, I; Katafigiotis, I; Gakiopoulou, H; Constantinides, C; Mikou, P

    2016-10-01

    Cytology is an essential tool for the investigation of urinary tract malignancy. In this audit, we aimed to assess our laboratory performance in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract malignancy and to use the information provided to improve our service. We retrieved cytology reports of upper urinary tract specimens from two periods, re-evaluated the cases, compared the reports with histology data and estimated the sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value (PPV). In the time interval between the two periods, we adopted new terminology, established better communication with clinicians and gained experience in the field. Finally, the data from the two periods were compared. In phase A, we estimated a sensitivity of 73%, specificity of 86% and PPV of 84.6%. As a result of the cytological re-evaluation, correlation with histology and clinical follow-up, plus communication with the clinicians during the audit, we established new terminology and a new request form. A three tiered grading system of atypia (mild, moderate and severe) was replaced by a two tiered grading system. The first category "atypia probably benign" corresponded to "mild atypia" while the second category "atypia, not otherwise specified" corresponded to "moderate atypia". The cases diagnosed as "severe atypia" were reclassified as "suspicious for malignancy". In phase B, the sensitivity, specificity and PPV were 75%, 89% and 90%, respectively. Our laboratory performance is in concordance with reported data and has been improved through this study. The audit process is extremely valuable for the identification of problems, for taking action and, finally, for the improvement of the clinical cytology service in the field of upper urinary tract malignancy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Preoperative urinary tract obstruction in scoliosis patients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Kotani, Toshiaki; Mori, Kazuetsu; Kawamura, Ken; Ohtake, Akira

    2017-01-01

    While the association between scoliosis and cardiac and respiratory function impairments has been well characterized in clinical practice and research, the potential effect of scoliosis on urinary tract structure and renal function has received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the preoperative clinical characteristics of urinary tract structure and renal function in pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis, using a combination of blood tests, urinalysis, and imaging. Preoperative measures of urinary tract structure and renal function were obtained for 16 patients, 13-17 years old, scheduled for corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. Preoperative assessment included blood test and urinalysis, combined with structural imaging on ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and radioisotope tracing (RI), using technetium-99 m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ((99m) Tc-MAG3). Differences in blood and urine tests between patients with and without urinary tract obstruction (UTO) were evaluated for significance using Mann-Whitney U test. For all 16 patients, blood tests and MRU were within normal limits. Dilatation of the renal pelvis was identified on US in eight patients (50.0%). UTO was identified on RI in six patients (37.5%). UTO was associated with elevated β2-microglobulin concentration. Urinary β2-microglobulin concentration >0.7 μg/mg Cr differentiated patients with UTO from those without UTO, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. β2-Microglobulin concentration may be a useful marker to screen for asymptomatic UTO in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Urinary tract infections in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Duane, Therese M

    2014-12-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are common in surgical patients. CAUTI are associated with adverse patient outcomes, and negatively affects public safety reporting and reimbursement. Inappropriate catheter use and prolonged catheter duration are major risk factors for CAUTI. CAUTI pathogenesis and treatment are complicated by the presence of biofilms. Prevention strategies include accurate identification and tracking of CAUTIs, and the development of institutional guidelines for the appropriate use, duration, alternatives, and removal of indwelling urinary catheters.

  17. Diagnosis and management of fungal urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Carol A

    2014-03-01

    When the terms funguria or fungal urinary tract infection are used, most physicians are referring to candiduria and urinary tract infections due to Candida species. Other fungi, including yeasts and molds can involve the kidney during the course of disseminated infection, but rarely cause symptoms referable to the urinary tract. Candida species appear to be unique in their ability to both colonize and cause invasive disease in the urinary tract. This overview focuses only on candiduria and Candida urinary tract infection because they are common and many times present perplexing management issues. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Percutaneous nephrostomy tract incision using modified Otis urethrotome.

    PubMed

    Ireton, R C

    1990-02-01

    An Otis urethrotome has been modified to permit passage into the kidney over an 0.038-inch guidewire by drilling a 3/16-inch hole through the tip. I have used this instrument to aid in the performance of 36 nephrostomy tract dilations without significant complications. When compared with 20 Amplatz tract nephrostomy dilations, the new method was quicker, requiring 4.3 minutes versus 6.5 minutes. This instrument is especially useful for tracts where significant renal fascial scarring makes Amplatz dilation difficult. Ease of tract dilation, as well as decreased time to dilate, make this technique a useful addition to standard nephrostomy tract dilation techniques.

  19. [Treatment of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Horcajada, Juan Pablo; García-Palomo, Daniel; Fariñas, M Carmen

    2005-12-01

    Empirical antibiotic treatment of lower urinary tract infections should be based on the patient's clinical data and on local sensitivity data. Because of the increase in resistance among uropathogens, recommendations on the empirical treatment of urinary tract infections have been modified. Currently, the empirical use of co-trimoxazole, ampicillin, and first-generation cephalosporins and quinolones is not recommended. Fluoroquinolones have been demonstrated to be highly effective in comparative studies but, because of the increase in resistance, the type of patient who can benefit from these antimicrobial agents must be selected. Second- and third-generation cephalosporins still have high sensitivity rates, although the higher recurrence rates associated with their use and the emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing enterobacterial in the community should be taken into account. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is less effective in eradicating infections than quinolones. Fosfomycin-trometamol has resistance rates of below 2% and single-dose therapy has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. Nitrofurantoin is also currently active, although it must be administered for 7 days and can produce toxicity. Both agents are currently recommended as alternative therapeutic options to fluoroquinolones in uncomplicated infections of the lower urinary tract.

  20. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern.

  1. Congenital anomalies of kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Toka, Hakan R; Toka, Okan; Hariri, Ali; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2010-07-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract anatomy (CAKUT) are common in children and represent approximately 30% of all prenatally diagnosed malformations. CAKUT is phenotypically variable and can affect the kidney(s) alone and/or the lower urinary tract. The spectrum includes more common anomalies such as vesicoureteral reflux and, rarely, more severe malformations such as bilateral renal agenesis. In young children, congenital anomalies are the leading cause of kidney failure and for kidney transplantation or dialysis. CAKUT can also lead to significant renal problems in adulthood and may present itself with hypertension and/or proteinuria. Congenital renal anomalies can be sporadic or familial, syndromic (also affecting nonrenal or non-urinary tract tissues), or nonsyndromic. Genetic causes have been identified for the syndromic forms and have shed some light into the molecular mechanisms of kidney development in human beings. The genetic causes for the more common nonsyndromic forms of CAKUT are unknown. The role of prenatal interventions and postnatal therapies as well as the benefits of screening affected individuals and their family members are not clear.

  2. New markers of urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Masajtis-Zagajewska, Anna; Nowicki, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection independent of age. It is also one of the most common causes of hospitalizations for infections among elderly people and the most common indication for antibiotic prescriptions in primary care. Both diagnostics and management of lower and upper urinary tract infections provide challenges in clinical practice due to their high prevalence and recurrence, and worldwide increase of antibiotic resistance. The clinical symptoms of UTI are often uncharacteristic or asymptomatic. The accurate diagnosis and early treatment are crucial due to risk of septicaemia and long-term consequences. Currently the diagnosis of urinary tract infection is based on the presence of clinical symptoms in combination with the results of nitrite strip test indicating the presence of bacteria in urine and semi-quantitative measurement of white blood cells count in urine. Although urine culture is the gold standard in UTI diagnostics it is both time-consuming and costly. Searching for novel biomarkers of UTI has attracted much attention in recent years. The article reviews several promising serum and urine biomarkers of UTI such as leukocyte esterase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukins, elastase alpha (1)-proteinase inhibitor, lactofferin, secretory immunoglobulin A, heparin-binding protein, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, α-1 microglobulin (α1Mg) and tetrazolium nitroblue test (TNB). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of Inflammation on Male Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Azenabor, Alfred; Ekun, Ayodele Oloruntoba; Akinloye, Oluyemi

    2015-01-01

    Fertility in the male is dependent on the proper production of sperm cells. This process, called spermatogenesis is very complex and involves the synchronization of numerous factors. The presence of pro–inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF–α), interleukin–1 alpha (IL–1 α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL–1 β) cytokines in the male reproductive tract (testis, epididymis and sperm) may have certain physiological functions. However, when the levels of these cytokines are higher than normal, as seen in conditions of inflammation, they become very harmful to sperm production. Moreover, inflammation is also associated with oxidative stress and the latter is well known to impair sperm function. Epidemiological studies regarding male infertility have revealed that more and more infertile men suffer from acute or chronic inflammation of the genitourinary tract, which often occurs without any symptoms. The inflammatory reactions within the male genital tract are inevitably connected with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, especially in sperm, is harmful because it damages sperm DNA and causes apoptosis in sperm. This article reviewed the suggested mechanisms and contribution of inflammation to male infertility. In addition, the review was further strengthened by discussing how inflammation affects both fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). PMID:26913230

  4. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, Lilian M.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:27025743

  5. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  6. Atypical pathogens and respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Blasi, F

    2004-07-01

    The atypical respiratory pathogens Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are now recognised as a significant cause of acute respiratory-tract infections, implicated in community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, asthma, and less frequently, upper respiratory-tract infections. Chronic infection with C. pneumoniae is common among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may also play a role in the natural history of asthma, including exacerbations. The lack of a gold standard for diagnosis of these pathogens still handicaps the current understanding of their true prevalence and role in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic respiratory infections. While molecular diagnostic techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction, offer improvements in sensitivity, specificity and rapidity over culture and serology, the need remains for a consistent and reproducible diagnostic technique, available to all microbiology laboratories. Current treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia recognise the importance of atypical respiratory pathogens in its aetiology, for which macrolides are considered suitable first-line agents. The value of atypical coverage in antibiotic therapy for acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and exacerbations of asthma is less clear, while there is no evidence to suggest that atypical pathogens should be covered in antibiotic treatment of upper respiratory-tract infections.

  7. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  8. Protozoan infections in the male genital tract.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, F; Regadera, J; Mayer, R; Sanchez, S; Nistal, M

    1996-08-01

    We reviewed the literature on protozoan infections in the male genital tract, with special reference to histopathological findings and their repercussions on different andrological functions. A literature search of the MEDLINE data base from 1966 to May 1995 was done and related articles were identified. The considered terms were parasitology and the male genital organs. Additional searches on infertility, semen and sexually transmitted diseases were performed. Protozoan infections of the male genital tract are rare and only a few species of parasites are involved. Trichomonas vaginalis, Trypanosoma species, Leishmania donovani, Entamoeba histolytica, Acanthamoeba species, Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum have been described in the male genital tract as producing testicular damage or secondary hypogonadism via hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis alterations. Topics of interest were the role of sexual transmission by some parasites, principally T. vaginalis, relationship with subfertility or infertility in the male subject, clinical significance in differential diagnosis with other inflammatory processes, and for some parasites the relationship with opportunistic behavior and immunodeficiency syndromes, including the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

  9. Congenital Urinary Tract Obstruction: The Long View

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy therefore results from combined developmental and obstructive renal injury. Due to inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by MRI should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  10. Vocal Tract Articulation in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Verena R.; Snelderwaard, Peter Ch.; ten Cate, Carel; Beckers, Gabriël J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Birdsong and human vocal communication are both complex behaviours which show striking similarities mainly thought to be present in the area of development and learning. Recent studies, however, suggest that there are also parallels in vocal production mechanisms. While it has been long thought that vocal tract filtering, as it occurs in human speech, only plays a minor role in birdsong there is an increasing number of studies indicating the presence of sound filtering mechanisms in bird vocalizations as well. Methodology/Principal Findings Correlating high-speed X-ray cinematographic imaging of singing zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to song structures we identified beak gape and the expansion of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC) as potential articulators. We subsequently manipulated both structures in an experiment in which we played sound through the vocal tract of dead birds. Comparing acoustic input with acoustic output showed that OEC expansion causes an energy shift towards lower frequencies and an amplitude increase whereas a wide beak gape emphasizes frequencies around 5 kilohertz and above. Conclusion These findings confirm that birds can modulate their song by using vocal tract filtering and demonstrate how OEC and beak gape contribute to this modulation. PMID:20689831

  11. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Jessica N; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium and is well known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls'-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition, which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis.

  12. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Alcaino, C; Farrugia, G; Beyder, A

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types-epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechanosensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Alcaino, C.; Farrugia, G.; Beyder, A.

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types—epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechano-sensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. PMID:28728818

  14. The influence of alpha1-adrenoreceptors on neuropeptide release from primary sensory neurons of the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Trevisani, Marcello; Campi, Barbara; Gatti, Raffaele; André, Eunice; Materazzi, Serena; Nicoletti, Paola; Gazzieri, David; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-09-01

    Adrenergic alpha(1)-receptors agonists and antagonists have been reported to increase and reduce, respectively, neurogenic inflammatory responses mediated by capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons. However, the precise role and localization of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptors involved in these effects are not known. We have studied in the rat whether functional alpha(1)-adrenoreceptors are expressed in primary sensory neurons, and whether they regulate neurogenic inflammation and nociceptive responses in the urinary bladder. The alpha(1)-adrenoreceptor agonist phenylephrine (1 micromol/l) (1) mobilized intracellular Ca(2+) in cultured lumbar and sacral dorsal root ganglia neurons, (2) caused the release of substance P (SP) from terminals of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons from the lumbar enlargement of the dorsal spinal cord and urinary bladder, and (3) increased plasma protein extravasation in the urinary bladder. All these effects were abolished by the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist alfuzosin (10 micromol/l). Furthermore, alfuzosin (30 microg/kg, i.v.) partially, but significantly, inhibited cyclophosphamide-induced plasma protein extravasation in the rat urinary bladder. Phenylephrine-induced Ca(2+) mobilization in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons was exaggerated by pretreating the rats in vivo with cyclophosphamide. Finally, cyclophosphamide increased c-fos expression in the rat lumbar spinal cord. Also these in vitro and in vivo effects were inhibited by pretreatment with alfuzosin. Alpha(1)-adrenoceptors are functionally expressed by capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive, primary sensory neurons of the rat urinary tract, and their activation may contribute to signal irritative and nociceptive responses arising from the urinary tract. It is possible that, at least, part of the beneficial effects of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists in the amelioration of storage symptoms in the lower urinary tract derives from their inhibitory effect on neurogenic inflammatory

  15. Diffusion-based population statistics using tract probability maps.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Demian; Kanterakis, Efstathios; Gur, Ruben C; Deriche, Rachid; Verma, Ragini

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel technique for the tract-based statistical analysis of diffusion imaging data. In our technique, we represent each white matter (WM) tract as a tract probability map (TPM): a function mapping a point to its probability of belonging to the tract. We start by automatically clustering the tracts identified in the brain via tractography into TPMs using a novel Gaussian process framework. Then, each tract is modeled by the skeleton of its TPM, a medial representation with a tubular or sheet-like geometry. The appropriate geometry for each tract is implicitly inferred from the data instead of being selected a priori, as is done by current tract-specific approaches. The TPM representation makes it possible to average diffusion imaging based features along directions locally perpendicular to the skeleton of each WM tract, increasing the sensitivity and specificity of statistical analyses on the WM. Our framework therefore facilitates the automated analysis of WM tract bundles, and enables the quantification and visualization of tract-based statistical differences between groups. We have demonstrated the applicability of our framework by studying WM differences between 34 schizophrenia patients and 24 healthy controls.

  16. Pharmacological effects of saw palmetto extract in the lower urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mayumi; Ito, Yoshihiko; Fujino, Tomomi; Abe, Masayuki; Umegaki, Keizo; Onoue, Satomi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-01-01

    Saw palmetto extract (SPE), an extract from the ripe berries of the American dwarf palm, has been widely used as a therapeutic remedy for urinary dysfunction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Europe. Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed for SPE, including the inhibition of 5α-reductase. Today, α1-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of men with voiding symptoms secondary to BPH. The improvement of voiding symptoms in patients taking SPE may arise from its binding to pharmacologically relevant receptors in the lower urinary tract, such as α1-adrenoceptors, muscarinic cholinoceptors, 1,4-dihyropyridine receptors and vanilloid receptors. Furthermore, oral administration of SPE has been shown to attenuate the up-regulation of α1-adrenoceptors in the rat prostate induced by testosterone. Thus, SPE at clinically relevant doses may exert a direct effect on the pharmacological receptors in the lower urinary tract, thereby improving urinary dysfunction in patients with BPH and an overactive bladder. SPE does not have interactions with co-administered drugs or serious adverse events in blood biochemical parameters, suggestive of its relative safety, even with long-term intake. Clinical trials (placebo-controlled and active-controlled trials) of SPE conducted in men with BPH were also reviewed. This review should contribute to the understanding of the pharmacological effects of SPE in the treatment of patients with BPH and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). PMID:19262550

  17. Pharmacological effects of saw palmetto extract in the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mayumi; Ito, Yoshihiko; Fujino, Tomomi; Abe, Masayuki; Umegaki, Keizo; Onoue, Satomi; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-03-01

    Saw palmetto extract (SPE), an extract from the ripe berries of the American dwarf palm, has been widely used as a therapeutic remedy for urinary dysfunction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in Europe. Numerous mechanisms of action have been proposed for SPE, including the inhibition of 5alpha-reductase. Today, alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists and muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of men with voiding symptoms secondary to BPH. The improvement of voiding symptoms in patients taking SPE may arise from its binding to pharmacologically relevant receptors in the lower urinary tract, such as alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, muscarinic cholinoceptors, 1,4-dihyropyridine receptors and vanilloid receptors. Furthermore, oral administration of SPE has been shown to attenuate the up-regulation of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors in the rat prostate induced by testosterone. Thus, SPE at clinically relevant doses may exert a direct effect on the pharmacological receptors in the lower urinary tract, thereby improving urinary dysfunction in patients with BPH and an overactive bladder. SPE does not have interactions with co-administered drugs or serious adverse events in blood biochemical parameters, suggestive of its relative safety, even with long-term intake. Clinical trials (placebo-controlled and active-controlled trials) of SPE conducted in men with BPH were also reviewed. This review should contribute to the understanding of the pharmacological effects of SPE in the treatment of patients with BPH and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

  18. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E U; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-10-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  19. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  20. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L.; Hains, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  1. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  2. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  3. Microbial Translocation Across the GI Tract*

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  4. Urinary tract infections in the infant.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Mehreen; Seed, Patrick C

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in an infant may be the first indication of an underlying renal disorder. Early recognition and initiation of adequate therapy for UTI is important to reduce the risk of long-term renal scarring. Ampicillin and gentamicin are traditionally the empiric treatment of choice; however, local antibiotic resistance patterns should be considered. Maternal antibiotics during pregnancy also increase the risk of resistant pathogens during neonatal UTI. Long-term management after the first UTI in infants remains controversial because of lack of specific studies in this age group and the risk-benefit issues for antibiotic prophylaxis between reduced recurrent disease and emergent antibiotic resistance.

  5. Interventional Radiology of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-05-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options using interventional radiology and interventional endoscopy for urologic disease have become more common over the past decade in veterinary medicine. Urinary tract obstructions and urinary incontinence are the most common reasons for urinary interventions. Ureteral obstructions are underdiagnosed and a common clinical problem in veterinary medicine. Ureteral obstructions should be considered an emergency, and decompression should be performed as quickly as possible. Diagnostic imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing a ureteral obstruction and has changed in the last few years, with ultrasound and radiographs being the most sensitive tools in making this diagnosis preoperatively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2016-12-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI.

  7. Urinary tract infections in the elderly population.

    PubMed

    Matthews, S James; Lancaster, Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in the elderly population. The spectrum of disease varies from a relatively benign cystitis to potentially life-threatening pyelonephritis. This review covers the management of asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, antibiotic resistance, catheter-associated bacteriuria/symptomatic UTIs, and antibiotic prophylaxis for recurrent infections in elderly men and women. Literature was obtained from English-language searches of MEDLINE (1966-April 2011), Cochrane Library, BIOSIS (1993-April 2011), and EMBASE (1970-April 2011). Further publications were identified from citations of resulting articles. Search terms included, but were not limited to, urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, antibiotic resistance, catheter associated urinary tract infections, recurrent urinary tract infections, and elderly. The prevalence of UTIs in elderly women depends on the location in which these women are living. For elderly women living in the community, UTIs compromise the second most common infection, whereas in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) and hospitalized subjects, it is the number one cause of infection. The spectrum of patient presentation varies from classic signs and symptoms in the independent elderly population to atypical presentations, including increased lethargy, delirium, blunted fever response, and anorexia. Although there are few guidelines specifically directed toward the management of UTIs in the elderly population, therapy generally mirrors the recommendations for the younger adult age groups. When choosing a treatment regimen, special attention must be given to the severity of illness, living conditions, existing comorbidities, presence of external devices, local antibiotic resistance patterns, and the ability of the patient to comply with therapy. Improved guidelines

  8. Urinary tract infections in inpatients: that challenge.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, V; Ampuero, D; Padilla, B

    2017-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the major nosocomial infections. In more than 80% of cases it is related to the use of urological devices, especially linked to the misuse of urinary catheters. Empirical treatment should be based on local epidemiology, severity criteria and risk of multiresistant bacteria. This review shows the most important aspects of nosocomial UTI, as well as the recommendations for correct treatment adjustment; both empirical and definitive, that is the great challenge to avoid multiresistance, as well as to avoid unnecessary treatments.

  9. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Velchik, M G

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable.

  10. Right ventricular outflow tract aneurysm with thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Syed Murfad; Bhat, P.S. Seetharama; Furtado, Arul Dominic; Chikkatur, Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) aneurysm is a known complication of tetralogy of Fallot repair when a ventriculotomy is done. It leads to RV dysfunction and may require re-operation. We describe a rare instance of a patient who developed an RVOT aneurysm after trans-ventricular repair of tetralogy of Fallot, which was complicated with the formation of a thrombus in the aneurysm sac. The patient underwent re-operation with thrombectomy, excision of the RVOT aneurysm and pulmonary valve replacement. To the best of our knowledge, the occurrence of this combination and its implications have not been reported. PMID:22232231

  11. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes.

  12. Urinary Tract Infections in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2016-08-01

    Urinary infection is the most common bacterial infection in elderly populations. The high prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in both men and women is benign and should not be treated. A diagnosis of symptomatic infection for elderly residents of long-term care facilities without catheters requires localizing genitourinary findings. Symptomatic urinary infection is overdiagnosed in elderly bacteriuric persons with nonlocalizing clinical presentations, with substantial inappropriate antimicrobial use. Residents with chronic indwelling catheters experience increased morbidity from urinary tract infection. Antimicrobial therapy is selected based on clinical presentation, patient tolerance, and urine culture results.

  13. [Nosocomial urinary tract infection in adults].

    PubMed

    Hug, B L; Flückiger, U; Widmer, A F

    2006-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in hospitalized adults. Nosocomial UTIs are mainly associated with the use of urinary catheters. Thus, the decision for catheterization should be made carefully and catheters removed in time. In order to prevent unnecessary antibiotic use in patients with urinary catheters correct diagnosis is crucial. Chinolones, broad-spectrum penicillins and third-generation cephalosporins are the mainstay of therapy. Comorbidities should be considered and potential obstructions of urinary flow removed. Economically important are the normally higher prices of i.v. antibiotics compared to oral use.

  14. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor.

  15. Acid sensing in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Luminal acidity is a physiologic challenge in the foregut, and acidosis can occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract as a result of inflammation or ischemia. These conditions are surveyed by an elaborate network of acid-governed mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. Deviations from physiologic values of extracellular pH are monitored by multiple acid sensors expressed by epithelial cells and sensory neurons. Acid-sensing ion channels are activated by moderate acidification, whereas transient receptor potential ion channels of the vanilloid subtype are gated by severe acidosis. Some ionotropic purinoceptor ion channels and two-pore domain background K+ channels are also sensitive to alterations of extracellular pH. PMID:17122365

  16. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dendritic cells and macrophages in the uveal tract of the normal mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, P.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages are components of the immune cell populations in the uveal tract whose density, distribution, turnover, and function may play a role in the maintenance of immunological homeostasis in the eye. Little is known of these cells in the mouse eye despite this being the predominant experimental model in many studies of ocular immune responses and immunoinflammatory mediated eye diseases. The aim of the present study was to obtain further immunophenotypic data on resident tissue macrophages and DC populations in the mouse uveal tract.
METHODS—Pieces of iris, ciliary body, and choroid dissected from perfusion fixed BALB/c mice were incubated whole in a variety of anti-macrophage and DC monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Labelled cells were visualised using either single or double immunoperoxidase techniques.
RESULTS—Quantitative analysis and double immunolabelling revealed that 80% of F4/80+ cells (a mAb that recognises both DC and macrophages) in the iris are macrophages (SER4+). The iris contained a network of Ia+ cells (412 (SD 130) cells/mm2) of which two thirds appear to be DC. A similar pattern was observed in the ciliary body and choroid. Only a few DC in the uveal tract were very weakly reactive for mAbs which recognise B7-1 (CD80), B7-2 (CD86), β2 integrin (mAb N418), and multivesicular bodies associated with antigen presentation (mAb M342).
CONCLUSIONS—The present study reveals that the mouse uveal tract, like the rat, contains rich networks of DC and resident tissue macrophages. The networks of resident tissue macrophages in the mouse uveal tract closely resemble similar networks in non-ocular tissues. The phenotype of uveal tract DC suggests they are in the "immature" phase of their life cycle, similar to Langerhans cells of the skin, thus implying their role in situ within the eye is antigen capture and not antigen presentation.

 PMID:10216062

  19. Digestion of plant monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol in rat alimentary canal.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, T; Miyazawa, T

    2000-03-01

    We investigated digestion of orally fed galactoglycerolipids such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) from wheat flour in the rat alimentary canal, especially focusing on the digestive fates of deacylated galactosylglycerol structures. After a single oral administration of MGDG (20 mg/rat), monogalactosylmonoacylglycerol and monogalactosylglycerol (MGG) were found to be major digestion products in the intestinal tract. Similarly, digalactosylmonoacylglycerol and digalactosylglycerol (DGG) were confirmed to be present in the intestinal tract after DGDG ingestion (20 mg/rat). In rats fed wheat flour glycolipids (42 mg MGDG and 81 mg DGDG per rat), completely deacylated galactosylglycerols (MGG and DGG) were not detected in portal plasma. Although the deacylated galactosylglycerols were not significantly decomposed by intestinal mucosa in vitro, they were hydrolyzed by cecal contents. The results demonstrated that orally ingested plant galactoglycerolipids in the rat alimentary canal are rapidly hydrolyzed into constituent fatty acids and that hydrophilic galactosylglycerols and the hydrophilic backbone galactosylglycerols are not absorbed from intestine or degraded into galactose and glycerol in the intestinal tract. Therefore, the presence of deacylated galactosylglycerols may affect the fermentative activity of enterobacteria in the cecum and colon.

  20. Tumorigenesis by oxygenated nitrosopiperidines in rats.

    PubMed

    Lijinsky, W; Taylor, H W

    1975-09-01

    Three oxygenated N-nitrosopiperidines--nitroso-3-piperidinol, nitroso-4-piperidinol, and nitroso-4-piperidone--were prepared and given in drinking water at equivalent molar doses to Sprague-Dawley rats. All were potent carcinogens, 100% of the rats developed tumors in all treatment groups. Nitroso-3-piperidinol resembled nitrosopiperidine in inducing a high incidence of tumors of the nasal cavity and upper alimentary tract, and a few liver tumors. Nitroso-4-piperidinol and nitroso-4-piperidone caused a high incidence of tumors of the nasal cavity but very few tumors of the upper alimentary tract. After treatment with the 4-substituted compounds, a high incidence of liver tumors was observed in females but not in males.

  1. Histopathological changes in small and large intestines during hymenolepidosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Kolasa, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta is a chronic parasite living in the small intestine of rats, mice and humans. The aim of this study was to determine histopathological changes in the rat intestine during experimental hymenolepidosis. Our results showed that in rats infected with H. diminuta slight changes occurred in the length of the villus and crypts in different parts of the digestive tract. The changes were most distinct in the duodenum and jejunum on the 16 days post H. diminuta infection.

  2. The management of urinary tract infections in octogenarian women.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Dudley; Giarenis, Ilias; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Urinary Tract Infections are common in women of all ages and the incidence increases with age. Whilst they are a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in all women they may be associated with increased morbidity in the elderly. Appropriate investigation and treatment in primary and secondary care are essential to effectively manage urinary tract infection and decrease morbidity and hospitalisation rates. Loss of endogenous oestrogen at the time of the menopause is associated with the urogenital atrophy and an increased incidence of urinary tract infection. Consequently vaginal oestrogen therapy may offer a rationale for treatment and prevent of urinary tract infection. The aim of this paper is to review the clinical management of elderly women presenting with primary and recurrent urinary tract infection.

  3. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Gupta, Ashu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection is gaining importance as an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia due to its characteristic inherent resistance to many broad- spectrum antibiotics. In this study we evaluated the demographic, clinical and microbiological profile of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 33 patients diagnosed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lower respiratory tract infections during a period of two years from 2012 - 2013 was done. Results: The predominant predisposing factor observed was mechanical ventilation in 17(51.5%) cases. Fluoroquinolones were the most effective antibiotic (26;78.8%) followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (24;72.7%). Among the 19 patients treated with proper antibiotic, 13(68.4%) showed clinical improvement. Among the 14 patients who did not receive appropriate antibiotic for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection, 8(57.1%) showed improvement. Two (6%) had blood culture positive for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Mortality rate was 21.2%. Conclusion: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen with increased risk in patients on mechanical ventilation in ICU. Empiric therapy should include agents active against S.maltophilia such as newer flouroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. PMID:25653948

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Lower Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Gupta, Ashu

    2014-12-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection is gaining importance as an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia due to its characteristic inherent resistance to many broad- spectrum antibiotics. In this study we evaluated the demographic, clinical and microbiological profile of patients with lower respiratory tract infection due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A retrospective analysis of 33 patients diagnosed with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia lower respiratory tract infections during a period of two years from 2012 - 2013 was done. The predominant predisposing factor observed was mechanical ventilation in 17(51.5%) cases. Fluoroquinolones were the most effective antibiotic (26;78.8%) followed by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (24;72.7%). Among the 19 patients treated with proper antibiotic, 13(68.4%) showed clinical improvement. Among the 14 patients who did not receive appropriate antibiotic for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection, 8(57.1%) showed improvement. Two (6%) had blood culture positive for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Mortality rate was 21.2%. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is emerging as an important nosocomial pathogen with increased risk in patients on mechanical ventilation in ICU. Empiric therapy should include agents active against S.maltophilia such as newer flouroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

  5. Toxicologic disease of the digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Garland, T

    2000-03-01

    There is a diverse and long list of toxicants that can affect the digestive system of food-producing animals. The plants and other natural toxicants discussed in this article are those primarily affecting the GI system. A number of other plants may also affect the digestive tract, but the effects from these are considered secondary and less pronounced. Often, plant poisonings affecting the digestive tract present with similar clinical signs, and a good thorough history is necessary to help differentiate between them. Moreover, a careful walk through the pasture with a keen eye to note plants that have been browsed or grazed may greatly assist the history. In cases where toxins are suspected as the cause of a GI disorder, consultation with a veterinary toxicologist at a diagnostic laboratory may be indicated. These professionals are knowledgeable about a wide variety of natural and other toxicants that may be present in your area. They can help with developing a differential diagnosis and the selection of appropriate samples to confirm the diagnosis.

  6. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  7. Botulinum Toxin and Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; Kennedy, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The history of botulinum toxin is fascinating. First recognized as the cause of botulism nearly 200 years ago, it was originally feared as a deadly poison. Over the last 30 years, however, botulinum toxin has been transformed into a readily available medication used to treat a variety of medical disorders. Interest in the use of botulinum toxin has been particularly strong for patients with spastic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, gastroparesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and anal fissures have all been treated with botulinum toxin injections, often with impressive results. However, not all patients respond to botulinum toxin therapy, and large randomized controlled trials are lacking for many conditions commonly treated with botulinum toxin. This paper reviews the history, microbiology, and pharmacology of botulinum toxin, discusses its mechanism of action, and then presents recent evidence from the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. PMID:21960915

  8. Prion diseases and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Davies, G A; Bryant, Adam R; Reynolds, John D; Jirik, Frank R; Sharkey, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Although they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform (PrPsc) the process by which this isoform is propagated and transported to the brain remains poorly understood. M cells, dendritic cells and possibly enteroendocrine cells are important in the movement of infectious prions across the GI epithelium. From there, PrPsc propagation requires B lymphocytes, dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of Peyer's patches. The early accumulation of the disease-causing agent in the plexuses of the enteric nervous system supports the contention that the autonomic nervous system is important in disease transmission. This is further supported by the presence of PrPsc in the ganglia of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that innervate the GI tract. Additionally, the lymphoreticular system has been implicated as the route of transmission from the gut to the brain. Although normal cellular prion protein is found in the enteric nervous system, its role has not been characterized. Further research is required to understand how the cellular components of the gut wall interact to propagate and transmit infectious prions to develop potential therapies that may prevent the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

  9. Urinary Tract Infection/Vaginitis Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Conte, John E.

    1978-01-01

    A process, outcome and salary-cost analysis was made of the use of a urinary tract infection/vaginitis protocol. Three nurse practitioners, in a university-based, walk-in clinic, cared for 128 women presenting with complaints of dysuria or vaginal discharge, or both. There were no significant differences among the nurse practitioners in data collection, diagnostic accuracy or patient outcome. The diagnoses were correct in 92 percent, incorrect in 6 percent and indeterminate in 2 percent of the patients. Incorrect diagnoses were due to presumption of urinary tract infection in patients with the urethral syndrome or vaginitis. Of the patients, 78 percent were actually sent home without seeing a physician. Concordance with the nurse practitioners' physical examination was 100 percent in those patients examined by a physician. In 82 percent of the patients there was alleviation of symptoms. Patient satisfaction with this method of care was extraordinary, with 98 percent of the patients giving favorable reports. True physician extension was achieved with a reduction in physician time per patient from 20 minutes to 6 minutes. In contrast to previously reported data, only a modest reduction in salary cost savings (10 percent) could be shown. The author concludes that nurse practitioners working in an acute care clinic or emergency department can see the patients defined in the study and provide high-quality care at a reasonable cost. PMID:706355

  10. [Carcinosarcomas in female genital tracts: general review].

    PubMed

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Casteillo, François; Forest, Fabien; Pacaut, Cécile; Moncharmont, Coralie; Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Langrand Escure, Julien; Collard, Olivier; Peoc'h, Michel; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma, also known as mixed mesodermal tumor or malignant mixed Mullerian tumor (MMMT) is a pathological entity combining a sarcomatous and a carcinomatous component. Found in thoracic, digestive, genitourinary, liver or skin locations, the most common location is the female genital tract. In gynecological tumors, carcinosarcoma accounts for about 2-5% of endometrial cancers, and 1% of ovarian cancers. To date, there is no consensus on the therapeutic strategy. It relies mostly on maximum cytoreductive surgery. Adjuvant therapy remains controversial, and few prospective studies investigating its interest. Retrospective studies show the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy based on platinum in most cases. Radiation therapy has a place in the adjuvant situations of endometrial and cervical carcinosarcoma. A more detailed pathological knowledge, and the use of targeted therapies may be promising in this histological subtype whose prognosis remains very poor. The objective of this study is to present the main principles of carcinosarcoma management in female genital tracts, describing pathological and prognostic features at the same time.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discre