Science.gov

Sample records for rat rubrospinal tract

  1. Unilateral dorsal column and rubrospinal tract injuries affect overground locomotion in the unrestrained rat.

    PubMed

    Webb, Aubrey A; Muir, Gillian D

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of the rubrospinal pathway and the ascending components of the dorsal column for overground locomotion in adult, unrestrained rats. The dorsal column (excluding the corticospinal tract), the rubrospinal tract or both were damaged unilaterally in rats at the level of the upper cervical spinal cord. Behavioural analysis consisted of skilled locomotion (an evaluation of footslips during ladder walking), a paw usage task and the assessment of ground reaction forces during unrestrained locomotion. All lesioned animals used the forepaw ipsilateral to the lesions less while rearing. Animals with dorsal column injuries used the forelimb contralateral to the spinal injury significantly more while rearing compared with uninjured animals. All lesioned animals produced more footfalls while crossing the ladder compared with uninjured animals. All injuries, regardless of the pathway affected, resulted in significant alterations in body weight support and reduced braking forces from the forelimb ipsilateral to the injury during overground locomotion. Animals typically bore less weight on the hindlimb ipsilateral to the lesion compared with the hindlimb contralateral to the spinal injury. Taken together with previously published work, our data indicate that the rubrospinal and dorsal column pathways are important for forelimb support while rearing and for skilled locomotion. Additionally, the ascending dorsal column pathways and the rubrospinal tract play a role during flat surface overground locomotion and combined damage to these pathways does not alter the acquired gait. PMID:12887423

  2. Evolution of the red nucleus and rubrospinal tract.

    PubMed

    ten Donkelaar, H J

    1988-01-01

    A red nucleus, defined by its relative position in the tegmentum mesencephali, its contralateral rubrospinal or rubrobulbar projections and by crossed cerebellar afferents, is found in terrestrial vertebrates and certain rays. A crossed rubrospinal tract occurs in anurans, limbed urodeles and reptiles, birds and mammals, but is apparently absent in boid snakes, caecilians and sharks. A distinct rubrospinal tract is found in certain rays which use their enlarged pectoral fins for locomotion. A crossed tegmentospinal tract, possibly a rubrospinal tract, is found in lungfishes. Although evidence was presented for a rubrospinal tract in more advanced snakes, the available experimental data in lower vertebrates suggest that the presence of a rubrospinal tract is related to the presence of limbs or limb-like structures. In the connectivity of the red nucleus in terrestrial vertebrates, 'levels' of complexity can be distinguished, paralleled by the development of the cerebellum. These 'grades of organization' are probably related to the type of motor performance the particular terrestrial vertebrates are capable of.

  3. Evolution of the red nucleus and rubrospinal tract.

    PubMed

    ten Donkelaar, H J

    1988-01-01

    A red nucleus, defined by its relative position in the tegmentum mesencephali, its contralateral rubrospinal or rubrobulbar projections and by crossed cerebellar afferents, is found in terrestrial vertebrates and certain rays. A crossed rubrospinal tract occurs in anurans, limbed urodeles and reptiles, birds and mammals, but is apparently absent in boid snakes, caecilians and sharks. A distinct rubrospinal tract is found in certain rays which use their enlarged pectoral fins for locomotion. A crossed tegmentospinal tract, possibly a rubrospinal tract, is found in lungfishes. Although evidence was presented for a rubrospinal tract in more advanced snakes, the available experimental data in lower vertebrates suggest that the presence of a rubrospinal tract is related to the presence of limbs or limb-like structures. In the connectivity of the red nucleus in terrestrial vertebrates, 'levels' of complexity can be distinguished, paralleled by the development of the cerebellum. These 'grades of organization' are probably related to the type of motor performance the particular terrestrial vertebrates are capable of. PMID:3289562

  4. A Proposal for a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Injury Featuring the Rubrospinal Tract and its Contributions to Locomotion and Skilled Hand Movement

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Renée; Whishaw, Ian Q.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury and repair is a dynamic field of research. The development of reliable animal models of traumatic spinal cord injury has been invaluable in providing a wealth of information regarding the pathological consequences and recovery potential of this condition. A number of injury models have been instrumental in the elaboration and the validation of therapeutic interventions aimed at reversing this once thought permanent condition. In general, the study of spinal cord injury and repair is made difficult by both its anatomical complexity and the complexity of the behavior it mediates. In this perspective paper, we suggest a new model for spinal cord investigation that simplifies problems related to both the functional and anatomical complexity of the spinal cord. We begin by reviewing and contrasting some of the most common animal models used for investigating spinal cord dysfunction. We then consider two widely used models of spinal deficit-recovery, one involving the corticospinal tracts (CTS) and the other the rubrospinal tract (RST). We argue that the simplicity of the function of the RST makes it a useful model for studying the cord and its functional repair. We also reflect on two obstacles that have hindered progress in the pre-clinical field, delaying translation to the clinical setup. The first is recovery of function without reconnection of the transected descending fibers and the second is the use of behavioral paradigms that are not under the control of the descending fiber pathway under scrutiny. PMID:26858587

  5. Preferential and Bidirectional Labeling of the Rubrospinal Tract with Adenovirus-GFP for Monitoring Normal and Injured Axons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Smith, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The rodent rubrospinal tract (RST) has been studied extensively to investigate regeneration and remodeling of central nervous system (CNS) axons. Currently no retrograde tracers can specifically label rubrospinal axons and neurons (RSNs). The RST can be anterogradely labeled by injecting tracers into the red nucleus (RN), but accurately locating the RN is a technical challenge. Here we developed a recombinant adenovirus carrying a green fluorescent protein reporter gene (Adv-GFP) which can preferentially, intensely, and bi-directionally label the RST. When Adv-GFP was injected into the second lumbar spinal cord, the GFP was specifically transported throughout the entire RST, with peak labeling seen at 2 weeks post-injection. When Adv-GFP was injected directly into the RN, GFP was anterogradely transported throughout the RST. Following spinal cord injury (SCI), injection of Adv-GFP resulted in visualization of GFP in transected, spared, or sprouted RST axons bi-directionally. Thus Adv-GFP could be used as a novel tool for monitoring and evaluating strategies designed to maximize RST axonal regeneration and remodeling following SCI. PMID:21299337

  6. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System.

    PubMed

    Williams, Preston T J A; Martin, John H

    2015-09-30

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. Significance statement: Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  7. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  8. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System.

    PubMed

    Williams, Preston T J A; Martin, John H

    2015-09-30

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. Significance statement: Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  9. Postnatal Maturation of the Red Nucleus Motor Map Depends on Rubrospinal Connections with Forelimb Motor Pools

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T. J. A.; Kim, Sangsoo

    2014-01-01

    The red nucleus (RN) and rubrospinal tract (RST) are important for forelimb motor control. Although the RST is present postnatally in cats, nothing is known about when rubrospinal projections could support motor functions or the relation between the development of the motor functions of the rubrospinal system and the corticospinal system, the other major system for limb control. Our hypothesis is that the RN motor map is present earlier in development than the motor cortex (M1) map, to support early forelimb control. We investigated RN motor map maturation with microstimulation and RST cervical enlargement projections using anterograde tracers between postnatal week 3 (PW3) and PW16. Microstimulation and tracer injection sites were verified histologically to be located within the RN. Microstimulation at PW4 evoked contralateral wrist, elbow, and shoulder movements. The number of sites producing limb movement increased and response thresholds decreased progressively through PW16. From the outset, all forelimb joints were represented. At PW3, RST projections were present within the cervical intermediate zone, with a mature density of putative synapses. In contrast, beginning at PW5 there was delayed and age-dependent development of forelimb motor pool projections and putative rubromotoneuronal synapses. The RN has a more complete forelimb map early in development than previous studies showed for M1, supporting our hypothesis of preferential rubrospinal rather than corticospinal control for early movements. Remarkably, development of the motor pool, not intermediate zone, RST projections paralleled RN motor map development. The RST may be critical for establishing the rudiments of motor skills that subsequently become refined with further CST development. PMID:24647962

  10. Postnatal maturation of the red nucleus motor map depends on rubrospinal connections with forelimb motor pools.

    PubMed

    Williams, Preston T J A; Kim, Sangsoo; Martin, John H

    2014-03-19

    The red nucleus (RN) and rubrospinal tract (RST) are important for forelimb motor control. Although the RST is present postnatally in cats, nothing is known about when rubrospinal projections could support motor functions or the relation between the development of the motor functions of the rubrospinal system and the corticospinal system, the other major system for limb control. Our hypothesis is that the RN motor map is present earlier in development than the motor cortex (M1) map, to support early forelimb control. We investigated RN motor map maturation with microstimulation and RST cervical enlargement projections using anterograde tracers between postnatal week 3 (PW3) and PW16. Microstimulation and tracer injection sites were verified histologically to be located within the RN. Microstimulation at PW4 evoked contralateral wrist, elbow, and shoulder movements. The number of sites producing limb movement increased and response thresholds decreased progressively through PW16. From the outset, all forelimb joints were represented. At PW3, RST projections were present within the cervical intermediate zone, with a mature density of putative synapses. In contrast, beginning at PW5 there was delayed and age-dependent development of forelimb motor pool projections and putative rubromotoneuronal synapses. The RN has a more complete forelimb map early in development than previous studies showed for M1, supporting our hypothesis of preferential rubrospinal rather than corticospinal control for early movements. Remarkably, development of the motor pool, not intermediate zone, RST projections paralleled RN motor map development. The RST may be critical for establishing the rudiments of motor skills that subsequently become refined with further CST development.

  11. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Autoradiography using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat.

  12. [Microbiocenosis of parietal mucin in the gastrointestinal tract of rats].

    PubMed

    Vorob'ev, A A; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Bogdanova, E A; Korneev, L M

    2005-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative composition of the microbial community in parietal mucin at different areas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of rats was revealed. The pronounced variability in the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of microbiocenosis in parietal mucin of rats at different sections was revealed. The differences were most pronounced in the passage from upper to lower GIT sections, the large intestine found to be the richest biocenosis. The microbial composition of rat feces was faintly associated with the GIT parietal microbiocenosis. The individual areas of GIT mucosa were unique of their microbial characteristics and organization. This makes it possible to regard them as relatively independent biotopes and indicates that it is impossible to evaluate the microbial community by one of the colonic mucosal sifes. PMID:16438365

  13. A rat uterine horn model of genital tract wound healing.

    PubMed

    Schlaff, W D; Cooley, B C; Shen, W; Gittlesohn, A M; Rock, J A

    1987-11-01

    A rat uterine horn model of genital tract wound healing is described. Healing was reflected by acquisition of strength and elasticity, measured by burst strength (BS) and extensibility (EX), respectively. A tensiometer (Instron Corp., Canton, MA) was used to assess these characteristics in castrated and estrogen-supplemented or nonsupplemented animals. While the horn weights (HW), BS, and EX of contralateral horns were not significantly different, the intra-animal variation of HW was 7.2%, BS was 17.7% and EX was 38.2%. In a second experiment, one uterine horn was divided and anastomosed, and the animal given estrogen supplementation or a placebo pellet. Estrogen administration was found to increase BS and EX of anastomosed horns prior to 14 days, but had no beneficial effect at 21 or 42 days. The data suggest that estrogen may be required for optimal early healing of genital tract wounds.

  14. The distribution of rat testibumin in the male reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C Y; Grima, J; Lee, W M; Bardin, C W

    1987-11-01

    A glycoprotein, designated CMB-1, has been identified in media from Sertoli cell-enriched cultures that increases in concentration in response to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone. Subsequent studies indicated that CMB-1 is immunologically related to albumin and alpha-fetoprotein and is concentrated in the luminal compartment of the testis in adult rats. Thus, CMB-1 was termed testibumin. The goal of the present study was to determine the concentrations of this protein in testes, epididymides, and serum of normal rats between 10 and 180 days of age and to compare them to rat androgen-binding protein (rABP). Testibumin concentration in rat testes increased with age and peaked at Day 60; thereafter, unlike rABP, its concentration declined, reaching a plateau by 150 days of age. Testibumin concentration in the epididymal compartment also increased with age and peaked at Day 90; thereafter, its concentration remained relatively unchanged. Unlike rABP, which accumulates in the caput epididymis, testibumin did not accumulate preferentially in any particular region of the epididymis. In spite of the marked changes of testibumin concentration in the male reproductive tract, the levels in blood remained relatively constant between 10 and 180 days of age. In adult male and female rats, the serum concentrations of testibumin were similar. Following orchiectomy, serum testibumin concentration decreased by 50% with an apparent t1/2 of approximately 8 h. The presence of immunoreactive macromolecules in other species that share epitopes with rat testibumin was also investigated. Material in human sera and extracts of human and monkey testes cross-reacts with rat testibumin. After [35S]methionine was added to the primary Sertoli cell-enriched cultures, anti-testibumin antiserum selectively immunoprecipitated a radiolabeled protein with the same electrophoretic mobility as purified testibumin on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. We conclude that 1

  15. Transport of nattokinase across the rat intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Hong, K; Ito, Y; Misawa, S; Takeuchi, N; Kariya, K; Nishimuro, S

    1995-09-01

    Intraduodenal administration of nattokinase (NK) at a dose of 80 mg/kg, resulted in the degradation of fibrinogen in plasma suggesting transport of NK across the intestinal tract in normal rats. The action of NK on the cleavage of fibrinogen in the plasma from blood samples drawn at intervals after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis with an anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody. The 270 kDa fragment carrying antigenic sites for the binding of the anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody appeared within 0.5 h and was then degraded gradually to a 105 kDa fragment via a 200 kDa fragment. This suggests that fibrinogen was degraded to a 105 kDa fragment via several intermediates (270 and 200 kDa). In parallel with the degradation process, plasma recalcification times were remarkably prolonged NK was also detected in the plasma from blood samples drawn 3 and 5 h after administration of the enzyme by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis with an anti-NK antibody. The results indicate that NK is absorbed from the rat intestinal tract and that NK cleaves fibrinogen in plasma after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme.

  16. Characterization of pruriceptive trigeminothalamic tract neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, Hannah R; Giesler, Glenn J

    2014-04-01

    Rodent models of facial itch and pain provide a valuable tool for distinguishing between behaviors related to each sensation. In rats, pruritogens applied to the face elicit scratching using the hindlimb while algogens elicit wiping using the forelimb. We wished to determine the role of trigeminothalamic tract (VTT) neurons in carrying information regarding facial itch and pain to the forebrain. We have characterized responses to facially applied pruritogens (serotonin, BAM8-22, chloroquine, histamine, capsaicin, and cowhage) and noxious stimuli in 104 VTT neurons recorded from anesthetized rats. Each VTT neuron had a mechanically sensitive cutaneous receptive field on the ipsilateral face. All pruriceptive VTT neurons also responded to noxious mechanical and/or thermal stimulation. Over half of VTT neurons responsive to noxious stimuli also responded to at least one pruritogen. Each tested pruritogen, with the exception of cowhage, produced an increase in discharge rate in a subset of VTT neurons. The response to each pruritogen was characterized, including maximum discharge rate, response duration, and spike timing dynamics. Pruriceptive VTT neurons were recorded from throughout superficial and deep layers of the spinal trigeminal nucleus and were shown to project via antidromic mapping to the ventroposterior medial nucleus or posterior thalamic nuclei. These results indicate that pruriceptive VTT neurons are a subset of polymodal nociceptive VTT neurons and characterize a system conducive to future experiments regarding the similarities and differences between facial itch and pain.

  17. GM crops and the rat digestive tract: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Zdziarski, I M; Edwards, J W; Carman, J A; Haynes, J I

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the relationship between genetically modified (GM) crops and health, based on histopathological investigations of the digestive tract in rats. We reviewed published long-term feeding studies of crops containing one or more of three specific traits: herbicide tolerance via the EPSPS gene and insect resistance via cry1Ab or cry3Bb1 genes. These genes are commonly found in commercialised GM crops. Our search found 21 studies for nine (19%) out of the 47 crops approved for human and/or animal consumption. We could find no studies on the other 38 (81%) approved crops. Fourteen out of the 21 studies (67%) were general health assessments of the GM crop on rat health. Most of these studies (76%) were performed after the crop had been approved for human and/or animal consumption, with half of these being published at least nine years after approval. Our review also discovered an inconsistency in methodology and a lack of defined criteria for outcomes that would be considered toxicologically or pathologically significant. In addition, there was a lack of transparency in the methods and results, which made comparisons between the studies difficult. The evidence reviewed here demonstrates an incomplete picture regarding the toxicity (and safety) of GM products consumed by humans and animals. Therefore, each GM product should be assessed on merit, with appropriate studies performed to indicate the level of safety associated with them. Detailed guidelines should be developed which will allow for the generation of comparable and reproducible studies. This will establish a foundation for evidence-based guidelines, to better determine if GM food is safe for human and animal consumption.

  18. Channeling of developing rat corticospinal tract axons by myelin-associated neurite growth inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, M.E.; Schnell, L. )

    1991-03-01

    CNS myelin contains 2 membrane proteins that are potent inhibitors of neurite growth (NI-35 and NI-250). Because myelin formation starts at different times in different regions and tracts of the CNS, this inhibitory property of myelin could serve boundary and guidance functions for late-growing fiber tracts. In the rat, the corticospinal tract (CST) grows into and down the spinal cord during the first 10 postnatal days, in close proximity to the sensory tracts fasciculus cuneatus and gracilis. Immunofluorescence for myelin constituents showed that, in the rostral half of the spinal cord, the myelinating tissue of these ascending tracts surrounds the growing, myelin-free CST in a channellike fashion. Elimination of oligodendrocytes by x-irradiation of the newborn rats, or application of antibody IN-1, which neutralizes the inhibitory substrate property of CNS myelin, resulted in significant anatomical aberration of CST fibers. In particular, the tract was larger in cross-section, and aberrant CST fibers and fascicles intermixed with the neighboring sensory ascending tracts. These results assign an important channeling and guard-rail function to the oligodendrocyte-associated neurite growth inhibitors for the developing CST in the rat spinal cord.

  19. Convergence pattern of cortical and interposital influences on rubrospinal neurons of the cat.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, R; Palmeri, A; Raffaele, R; Ricca, G; Sapienza, S

    1988-01-01

    In adult semi-chronically implanted sedated cats discharges of single rubrospinal (RS) neurons were tested for selective activation of movement-evoking foci within pericruciate cortex (CX; area 4) and anterior division of cerebellar interpositus nucleus (IN). It was found that a very high incidence of neuronal responses was obtained only when stimulating IN and CX foci which controlled the same joint with respect to that moved from activation of the rubral foci including the recorded neurons. In these cases very frequent convergence phenomena were observed by activating IN and/or CX foci. Analysis of response patterns showed that RS neurons included in a focus controlling a given muscle were excited by IN foci for the same muscle (agonist foci) and inhibited from IN foci for the antagonist muscle (antagonist foci). In contrast, the same RS neurons were inhibited by agonist CX foci and excited by antagonist CX foci. Such an organization suggests that the motor cortex plays a competitive role in modulating the action of the interposito-rubrospinal system.

  20. Respiratory tract lung geometry and dosimetry model for male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2014-08-26

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague- Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  1. Respiratory Tract Lung Geometry and Dosimetry Model for Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Frederick J.; Asgharian, Bahman; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Price, Owen; Corley, Richard A.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Cox, Timothy C.; Kabilan, Senthil; Bentley, Timothy

    2015-07-24

    While inhalation toxicological studies of various compounds have been conducted using a number of different strains of rats, mechanistic dosimetry models have only had tracheobronchial (TB) structural data for Long-Evans rats, detailed morphometric data on the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats and limited alveolar data on other strains. Based upon CT imaging data for two male Sprague-Dawley rats, a 15-generation, symmetric typical path model was developed for the TB region. Literature data for the alveolar region of Sprague-Dawley rats were analyzed to develop an eight-generation model, and the two regions were joined to provide a complete lower respiratory tract model for Sprague-Dawley rats. The resulting lung model was used to examine particle deposition in Sprague-Dawley rats and to compare these results with predicted deposition in Long-Evans rats. Relationships of various physiologic variables and lung volumes were either developed in this study or extracted from the literature to provide the necessary input data for examining particle deposition. While the lengths, diameters and branching angles of the TB airways differed between the two Sprague-Dawley rats, the predicted deposition patterns in the three major respiratory tract regions were very similar. Between Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats, significant differences in TB and alveolar predicted deposition fractions were observed over a wide range of particle sizes, with TB deposition fractions being up to 3- to 4-fold greater in Sprague-Dawley rats and alveolar deposition being significantly greater in Long-Evans rats. Thus, strain-specific lung geometry models should be used for particle deposition calculations and interspecies dose comparisons.

  2. Distribution dynamics of recombinant Lactobacillus in the gastrointestinal tract of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Bao, Sujin; Zhu, Libin; Zhuang, Qiang; Wang, Lucia; Xu, Pin-Xian; Itoh, Keiji; Holzman, Ian R; Lin, Jing

    2013-01-01

    One approach to deliver therapeutic agents, especially proteins, to the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is to use commensal bacteria as a carrier. Genus Lactobacillus is an attractive candidate for use in this approach. However, a system for expressing exogenous proteins at a high level has been lacking in Lactobacillus. Moreover, it will be necessary to introduce the recombinant Lactobacillus into the GI tract, ideally by oral administration. Whether orally administered Lactobacillus can reach and reside in the GI tract has not been explored in neonates. In this study, we have examined these issues in neonatal rats. To achieve a high level of protein expression in Lactobacillus, we tested the impact of three promoters and two backbones on protein expression levels using mRFP1, a red fluorescent protein, as a reporter. We found that a combination of an L-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhL) promoter of Lactobacillus sakei with a backbone from pLEM415 yielded the highest level of reporter expression. When this construct was used to transform Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus acidophilus, high levels of mRFP1 were detected in all these species and colonies of transformed Lactobacillus appeared pink under visible light. To test whether orally administered Lactobacillus can be retained in the GI tract of neonates, we fed the recombinant Lactobacillus casei to neonatal rats. We found that about 3% of the bacteria were retained in the GI tract of the rats at 24 h after oral feeding with more recombinant Lactobacillus in the stomach and small intestine than in the cecum and colon. No mortality was observed throughout this study with Lactobacillus. In contrast, all neonatal rats died within 24 hours after fed with transformed E. coli. Taken together, our results indicate that Lactobacillus has the potential to be used as a vehicle for the delivery of therapeutic agents to neonates.

  3. Medial prefrontal cortex depressor response: role of the solitary tract nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Owens, N C; Sartor, D M; Verberne, A J

    1999-01-01

    The depressor response elicited by unilateral low intensity electrical stimulation of the rat ventral medial prefrontal cortex may be mediated by a connection with the solitary tract nucleus. We tested this hypothesis by (i) examining the influence of medial prefrontal cortex stimulation on the induction of Fos-like immunoreactivity in neurons in the medulla oblongata, and (ii) by testing the effect of inhibition of solitary tract nucleus neurons on the medial prefrontal cortex stimulation-evoked depressor response. Depressor responses (>10 mmHg) were elicited by electrical stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex every minute for 1 h ('Stimulated' group). Control animals were treated identically but did not receive electrical stimulation ('Unstimulated' group). Neurons exhibiting Fos-like immunoreactivity were abundant at the stimulation site which included the infralimbic area, and dorsal peduncular cortex. Medullary Fos-like immunoreactivity observed in the 'Stimulated' and 'Unstimulated' groups exceeded levels observed in untreated rats and was detected in the rostral, caudal and intermediate areas of the ventrolateral medulla, and the commissural, intermediate, medial and lateral regions of the solitary tract nucleus, as well as the medial vestibular nucleus, and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. The number of neurons displaying Fos-like immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral solitary tract nucleus and caudal ventrolateral medulla of the 'Stimulated' group was found to be significantly elevated compared to the contralateral side (P<0.05), and the 'Unstimulated' group bilaterally. Inhibition of solitary tract nucleus neurons using bilateral injections of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (44 pmol/25 nl) inhibited the sympathetic vasomotor baroreflex and attenuated the depressor and sympathoinhibitory response to medial prefrontal cortex stimulation by 62% and 65%, respectively. These findings suggest that the projection from the medial prefrontal

  4. Exercise promotes motor functional recovery in rats with corticospinal tract injury: anti-apoptosis mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Ting-ting; Yang, Xiao-yu; Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Liu, Jian; Qi, Zhi-ping

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that exercise interventions can improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury, but the mechanism of action remains unclear. To investigate the mechanism, we established a unilateral corticospinal tract injury model in rats by pyramidotomy, and used a single pellet reaching task and horizontal ladder walking task as exercise interventions postoperatively. Functional recovery of forelimbs and forepaws in the rat models was noticeably enhanced after the exercises. Furthermore, TUNEL staining revealed significantly fewer apoptotic cells in the spinal cord of exercised rats, and western blot analysis showed that spinal cord expression of the apoptosis-related protein caspase-3 was significantly lower, and the expression of Bcl-2 was significantly higher, while the expression of Bax was not signifiantly changed after exercise, compared with the non-exercised group. Expression of these proteins decreased with time after injury, towards the levels observed in sham-operated rats, however at 4 weeks postoperatively, caspase-3 expression remained significantly greater than in sham-operated rats. The present findings indicate that a reduction in apoptosis is one of the mechanisms underlying the improvement of functional recovery by exercise interventions after corticospinal tract injury. PMID:26170828

  5. Exercise promotes motor functional recovery in rats with corticospinal tract injury: anti-apoptosis mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ting-Ting; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Liu, Jian; Qi, Zhi-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Studies have shown that exercise interventions can improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury, but the mechanism of action remains unclear. To investigate the mechanism, we established a unilateral corticospinal tract injury model in rats by pyramidotomy, and used a single pellet reaching task and horizontal ladder walking task as exercise interventions postoperatively. Functional recovery of forelimbs and forepaws in the rat models was noticeably enhanced after the exercises. Furthermore, TUNEL staining revealed significantly fewer apoptotic cells in the spinal cord of exercised rats, and western blot analysis showed that spinal cord expression of the apoptosis-related protein caspase-3 was significantly lower, and the expression of Bcl-2 was significantly higher, while the expression of Bax was not signifiantly changed after exercise, compared with the non-exercised group. Expression of these proteins decreased with time after injury, towards the levels observed in sham-operated rats, however at 4 weeks postoperatively, caspase-3 expression remained significantly greater than in sham-operated rats. The present findings indicate that a reduction in apoptosis is one of the mechanisms underlying the improvement of functional recovery by exercise interventions after corticospinal tract injury. PMID:26170828

  6. Specific and nonspecific antibody responses in different segments of the respiratory tract in rats infected with Mycoplasma pulmonis.

    PubMed Central

    Simecka, J W; Patel, P; Davis, J K; Ross, S E; Otwell, P; Cassell, G H

    1991-01-01

    Murine respiratory mycoplasmosis resulting from Mycoplasma pulmonis infection in rats provides a useful model for the study of immunological and inflammatory mechanisms operative in the respiratory tract. We have previously shown that LEW rats develop more severe disease than do F344 rats. To further study the production of antibody responses in chronic respiratory disease due to M. pulmonis infection, we examined the distribution and development of M. pulmonis-specific antibody-forming cells (AFC) in different segments of the respiratory tracts of infected LEW and F344 rats. In these studies, the upper respiratory nodes were the initial site of antibody production after infection and remained the major site for recovery of AFC. Since infected LEW rats had equal or higher numbers of AFC than did infected F344 rats, these results suggest that the level of local antibody production alone is not responsible for the decreased susceptibility of F344 rats to murine respiratory mycoplasmosis. The differences in total antibody responses appear to be due to the greater numbers of cells recovered from the tissues of infected LEW rats compared with those recovered from F344 rats, suggesting that LEW rats may have greater production of chemotactic factors. Also, we demonstrate that nonspecific activation and/or recruitment of B cells occurs in the respiratory tracts of both LEW and F344 rats after infection with M. pulmonis. PMID:1894371

  7. CUMULATIVE EFFECTS OF DIBUTYL PHTHALATE AND DIETHYLHEXYL PHTHALATE ON MALE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT DEVELOPMENT: ALTERED FETAL STEROID HORMONES AND GENES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the plasticizers diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) during sexual differentiation causes male reproductive tract malformations in rats and rabbits. In the fetal male rat, these two phthalate esters decrease testosterone (T) production and i...

  8. Experimental genital tract infection with Chlamydia psittaci (GPIC agent) in male rats.

    PubMed

    Jantos, C A; Augustin, J; Durchfeld-Meyer, B; Baumgärtner, W; Schiefer, H G

    1998-01-01

    The course of experimental chlamydial infection of the male genital tract was studied. Inoculation of the Chlamydia psittaci agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC agent) into the vas deferens of rats resulted in chlamydial infection of the epididymis, testis and the prostate gland. The inflammatory response was most prominent at 14 days after infection. Chlamydiae were recovered from the epididymides and the prostate glands for up to 90 and 60 days post inoculation, respectively. Histopathological changes associated with chlamydial infection of the epididymis or prostate gland were characterized by intratubular and interstitial purulent inflammation. Chlamydia-specific IgM- and IgG-antibodies were found in sera of nearly all infected animals. Results of this study indicate that this animal model may be useful to study the pathogenesis, immune responses and sequelae of chlamydial infections of the male genital tract.

  9. Sexual dimorphism in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Guillamón, A; Valencia, A; Segovia, S

    1990-11-01

    This work investigates the existence of sex differences in the volume and number of neurons and glial cells in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT). Males showed larger volume and number of cells than female rats. Early postnatal (day 1 after birth) orchidectomy in males, and androgenization in females, reversed these differences. No sex differences were found in BAOT glial cells. The sexual dimorphism found in the neuron/glial cell ratio reflects sex differences in neuron number. The existence of sexual dimorphism in the BAOT supports our earlier hypothesis which states that the vomeronasal system (VNS) is sexually dimorphic.

  10. Endogenous leptin contributes to baroreflex suppression within the solitary tract nucleus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Diz, Debra I

    2014-12-01

    The decline in cardiovagal baroreflex function that occurs with aging is accompanied by an increase in circulating leptin levels. Our previous studies showed that exogenous leptin impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for control of heart rate in younger rats, but the contribution of this hormone to baroreflex dysfunction during aging is unknown. Thus we assessed the effect of bilateral leptin microinjection (500 fmol/60 nl) within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) on the baroreflex sensitivity in older (66 ± 2 wk of age) urethane/chloralose anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats with elevated circulating leptin levels. In contrast to the 63% reduction observed in younger rats, leptin did not alter the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia evoked by phenylephrine in older rats (0.76 ± 0.19 baseline vs. 0.71 ± 0.15 ms/mmHg after leptin; P = 0.806). We hypothesized that this loss of sensitivity reflected endogenous suppression of the baroreflex by elevated leptin, rather than cardiovascular resistance to the peptide. Indeed, NTS administration of a leptin receptor antagonist (75 pmol/120 nl) improved the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in older rats (0.73 ± 0.13 baseline vs. 1.19 ± 0.26 at 10 min vs. 1.87 ± 0.32 at 60 min vs. 1.22 ± 0.54 ms/mmHg at 120 min; P = 0.002), with no effect in younger rats. There was no effect of the leptin antagonist on the baroreflex sensitivity for tachycardia, responses to cardiac vagal chemosensitive fiber activation, or resting hemodynamics in older rats. These findings suggest that the actions of endogenous leptin within the NTS, either produced locally or derived from the circulation, contribute to baroreflex suppression during aging. PMID:25260611

  11. The digestive tract of rat after flight in the biosatellite Cosmos 1667.

    PubMed

    Groza, P; Bordeianu, A; Boca, A

    1987-01-01

    From the histochemical investigation carried out on the digestive tract of rats after 7 days space flight in the soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1667 it resulted that neutral and acid glycoproteins diminished slightly in the sublingual gland, stomach, small intestine and the colon. Some intestinal enzymes augmented (leucineaminopeptidase, acid phosphatase, adenosinetriphosphatase and glucose-6-phosphatase). The changes observed after this flight were less marked than after an 18 day flight (in the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 936 and 1129) and similar to those revealed after 7 days of hypokinesia. The glycoprotein changes were close to those observed after a 5-day flight (Cosmos 1514) but in which there were pregnant rats; after these last flights, the enzymes were not studied.

  12. Inhalation of uranium nanoparticles: respiratory tract deposition and translocation to secondary target organs in rats.

    PubMed

    Petitot, Fabrice; Lestaevel, Philippe; Tourlonias, Elie; Mazzucco, Charline; Jacquinot, Sébastien; Dhieux, Bernadette; Delissen, Olivia; Tournier, Benjamin B; Gensdarmes, François; Beaunier, Patricia; Dublineau, Isabelle

    2013-03-13

    Uranium nanoparticles (<100 nm) can be released into the atmosphere during industrial stages of the nuclear fuel cycle and during remediation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Explosions and fires in nuclear reactors and the use of ammunition containing depleted uranium can also produce such aerosols. The risk of accidental inhalation of uranium nanoparticles by nuclear workers, military personnel or civilian populations must therefore be taken into account. In order to address this issue, the absorption rate of inhaled uranium nanoparticles needs to be characterised experimentally. For this purpose, rats were exposed to an aerosol containing 10⁷ particles of uranium per cm³ (CMD=38 nm) for 1h in a nose-only inhalation exposure system. Uranium concentrations deposited in the respiratory tract, blood, brain, skeleton and kidneys were determined by ICP-MS. Twenty-seven percent of the inhaled mass of uranium nanoparticles was deposited in the respiratory tract. One-fifth of UO₂ nanoparticles were rapidly cleared from lung (T(½)=2.4 h) and translocated to extrathoracic organs. However, the majority of the particles were cleared slowly (T(½)=141.5 d). Future long-term experimental studies concerning uranium nanoparticles should focus on the potential lung toxicity of the large fraction of particles cleared slowly from the respiratory tract after inhalation exposure. PMID:23296105

  13. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves.

  14. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    PubMed

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  15. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005–0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P < 0.0001). Exposure of one eye to a blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  16. Inhibitory effects of kratom leaf extract (Mitragyna speciosa Korth.) on the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chittrakarn, Somsmorn; Sawangjaroen, Kitja; Prasettho, Supaporn; Janchawee, Benjamas; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2008-02-28

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa Korth.) is an indigenous plant of Thailand used traditionally in folk medicine although it is claimed to cause addiction. It is used to treat diarrhea, however, there is no scientific evidence to support the use. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of methanolic extract of kratom leaves on the rat gastrointestinal tract. Kratom extract at 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg (p.o.) caused a dose dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats and also inhibited intestinal transit. The antidiarrheal effect was not antagonized by naloxzone. The inhibition of intestinal transit by kratom extract was significantly different from the control when treated with a single dose for 1 day. For longer-term treatments of 15 and 30 days, kratom extract did not decrease the intestinal transit time indicating that adaptation had occurred. Kratom extract at a dose level of 200 and 400 mg/kg for 30 days and morphine at 3 mg/kg (i.p.) caused a decrease in the increment of body weight that was significantly different from the control and kratom extract at lower doses (50 and 100 mg/kg). However it had no effect on the level of plasma cholecystokinin. The results suggested that methanolic kratom extract exhibited its antidiarrheal effect on rat gastrointestinal tract. The effects may occur via pathways in addition to the action on opioid receptors. High does of kratom extract decreased the increment of body weight similar to the effect of morphine. PMID:18191353

  17. Effects of pyperonyl butoxide on the female reproductive tract in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Seigo; Taketa, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Matsuo, Saori; Irie, Kaoru; Watanabe, Gen; Yoshida, Midori

    2013-01-01

    This study was investigated the effects of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) on the female reproductive tract. Female Crj:Donryu rats were fed a basal diet containing 5,000, 10,000 or 20,000 ppm PBO for 28 days, and compared with food-restricted rats of comparable body weights to those in the PBO 10,000 or 20,000 ppm groups. Although treatment with 20,000 ppm PBO for 28 days depressed body weight gain, the abnormal estrous cyclicity, mainly prolonged diestrus, was also induced by the PBO treatment which was not correlated with body weight change. 20,000 ppm PBO treatment markedly decreased uterine weights and slightly decreased ovarian weights. 10,000 and 20,000 ppm PBO treatment increased liver weights. These cycle and organ weight changes were linked to atrophic uterus and increased atretic follicles in the ovary. In hormone assays, PBO at both doses reduced serum E2 levels, but did not affect corticosterone levels. An anti-uterotrophic assay showed a slight but significant decrease in absolute uterine weight and a reduction of endometrial epithelium height in the 20,000 ppm group. PBO was positive in an ER α antagonist reporter gene assay, although the activity was much weaker than that of 4-hydroxytamoxifen. These results indicate that high-dose PBO treatment directly induces atrophic changes in the female reproductive tract in rats, and these effects are likely the result of a hypoestrogenic state and the anti-estrogenic activity of PBO. PMID:24213009

  18. Urinary tract toxicity in rats following administration of beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Waghe, M; Westwood, R; Nunn, G; Kalinowski, A; Aldridge, A

    1999-01-01

    ZD7114, [(S)-4-[2-(2-hydroxy-3 phenoxypropylamine)ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl) phenoxyacetamide], and ZD2079, [(R)-N-(2-[4- (carboxymethyl)phenoxy]ethyl)-N-(beta-hydroxyphenethyl)ammonium chloride], are beta 3-adrenoceptor stimulants with selectivity for brown adipose tissue. ZD7144 is the hydrochloride salt of the S-enantiomer of the racemic amide ZD2079. They were developed as potential novel treatments for obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Male and female rats were dosed separately by gavage for a minimum of 28 days with 0, 10, 50, and 500 mg/kg/day of ZD7114 or with 0, 10, 30, and 150 mg/kg/day of ZD2079. Two further groups of male and female rats were dosed with 0 and 500 mg/kg/day of ZD7114 for 28 days and were then allowed a 6-wk, undosed withdrawal period. At high doses, both compounds caused urinary tract toxicity, which primarily affected the distal tubules and collecting ducts of the kidney via tubular necrosis. They also caused ureteric inflammation, cystitis, and accumulation of crystalline inclusions throughout the urinary tract. As a result of urinary tract toxicity, affected animals from one or both studies showed reduced red blood cell indices, lower platelet counts, and higher white cell counts. Blood chemistry revealed lower plasma concentrations of glucose (7.28 +/- 1.37 compared to 8.11 +/- 0.65 for the control) and total protein (63.42 +/- 3.65 compared to 69.17 +/- 3.24 for the control) and increased plasma urea (37.15 +/- 19.96 compared to 8.09 +/- 0.87 for the control). Urinalysis showed an increase in the number of crystals, blood, and protein. In the urinary tract, the severe crystalluria with accumulation of crystalline material indicated that this may have a role in the etiology of the target organ toxicity. Poor solubility of the compounds at normal urinary pH was considered a possible mechanism for the crystalluria. PMID:10207980

  19. Morphology of respiratory tract lesions in rats exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T.; Gies, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    We will discuss the morphologic features of lesions in the respiratory tract of rats exposed to radon and radon progeny. Groups of male Wister rats were exposed to from 10 to 1000 working levels (WL) of radon progeny in the presence of less than 1 to about 15 mg m{sup {minus}3} uranium ore dust. Cumulative exposures ranged from 20 to approximately 10,000 working level months (WLM). Higher exposure levels produced radiation pneumonitis characterized by interstitial fibrosis, associated with alveolar epithelial cell hyperplasia and accumulations of alveolar macrophages containing phagocytosed uranium ore dust. Nodular fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis were correlated with deposits of uranium ore dust. Vesicular emphysema also occurred at higher exposure levels. Pulmonary adenomatosis appeared to be a preneoplastic lesion; it was composed of nodular proliferation of bronchioloalveolar epithelium without disruption of the general architecture of the parenchyma. At exposure levels where rats lived longer than 1 y, lung tumors and a few tumors of the nasal cavity developed. The principal lung tumors were pulmonary adenomas, bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, papillary adenocarcinomas, epidermoid carcinomas, and adenosquamous carcinomas. Occasionally, malignant mesotheliomas and sarcomas were also present. The malignant lung tumors were characterized by invasion and occasionally metastasized to regional lymph nodes. Lower exposure rates produced more tumors, generally of different histologic types, and more fatal tumors than higher exposure rates. The similarity to relationships of human radon progeny exposure as far as incidence and types of lung tumors establish the validity of this animal model for studying radon carcinogenesis in humans.

  20. Lesioned corticospinal tract axons regenerate in myelin-free rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Savio, T.; Schwab, M.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS) of higher vertebrates lesioned axons seemed unable to regenerate and reach their former target regions due to influences of the CNS microenvironment. Evidence from in vitro and biochemical experiments has demonstrated the presence of inhibitory substrate components in CNS tissue, in particular in white matter. These CNS components, which strongly inhibit neurite growth, were identified as minor membrane proteins of defined molecular mass (35 and 250 kDa) in oligodendrocyte membranes and CNS myelin. Oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation can be prevented by x-irradiation of newborn rats. Here we show that in myelin-free spinal cords cortico-spinal tract fibers transected at 2 weeks of age show reelongation of many millimeters within 2-3 weeks after the lesion. In normally myelinated controls, regenerative sprouts grew less than 1.7 mm caudal to the lesion.

  1. Lesioned corticospinal tract axons regenerate in myelin-free rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Savio, T; Schwab, M E

    1990-01-01

    In the adult central nervous system (CNS) of higher vertebrates lesioned axons seemed unable to regenerate and reach their former target regions due to influences of the CNS microenvironment. Evidence from in vitro and biochemical experiments has demonstrated the presence of inhibitory substrate components in CNS tissue, in particular in white matter. These CNS components, which strongly inhibit neurite growth, were identified as minor membrane proteins of defined molecular mass (35 and 250 kDa) in oligodendrocyte membranes and CNS myelin. Oligodendrocyte development and myelin formation can be prevented by x-irradiation of newborn rats. Here we show that in myelin-free spinal cords cortico-spinal tract fibers transected at 2 weeks of age show reelongation of many millimeters within 2-3 weeks after the lesion. In normally myelinated controls, regenerative sprouts grew less than 1.7 mm caudal to the lesion. Images PMID:2349222

  2. Terahertz spectroscopic imaging and properties of gastrointestinal tract in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Young Bin; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jeong, Kiyoung; Choi, Yuna; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Lee, Sang Kil; Oh, Seung Jae; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated basic properties of normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues, including glandular stomach (GS), fore stomach (FS), large intestine (LI), small intestine (SI), and esophagus (ESO), from a rat model using terahertz (THz) reflection imaging and spectroscopy. The THz images collected from stratified squamous epithelia (SSE) of FS and ESO show a lower peak-to-peak value compared to those from columnar epithelia (CE) of GS, LI, or SI because the SSE contains less water than CE. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of FS were less than those of GS or LI, both having values similar to those of water. Additionally, we report internal reflection THz signals from ESO, although we were unable to determine the exact interface for this internal reflection. PMID:25574429

  3. Inosine stimulates extensive axon collateral growth in the rat corticospinal tract after injury

    PubMed Central

    Benowitz, Larry I.; Goldberg, David E.; Madsen, Joseph R.; Soni, Deepa; Irwin, Nina

    1999-01-01

    The purine nucleoside inosine has been shown to induce axon outgrowth from primary neurons in culture through a direct intracellular mechanism. For this study, we investigated the effects of inosine in vivo by examining whether it would stimulate axon growth after a unilateral transection of the corticospinal tract. Inosine applied with a minipump to the rat sensorimotor cortex stimulated intact pyramidal cells to undergo extensive sprouting of their axons into the denervated spinal cord white matter and adjacent neuropil. Axon growth was visualized by anterograde tracing with biotinylated dextran amine and by immunohistochemistry with antibodies to GAP-43. Thus, inosine, a naturally occurring metabolite without known side effects, might help to restore essential circuitry after injury to the central nervous system. PMID:10557347

  4. Terahertz spectroscopic imaging and properties of gastrointestinal tract in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Young Bin; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jeong, Kiyoung; Choi, Yuna; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Lee, Sang Kil; Oh, Seung Jae; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated basic properties of normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues, including glandular stomach (GS), fore stomach (FS), large intestine (LI), small intestine (SI), and esophagus (ESO), from a rat model using terahertz (THz) reflection imaging and spectroscopy. The THz images collected from stratified squamous epithelia (SSE) of FS and ESO show a lower peak-to-peak value compared to those from columnar epithelia (CE) of GS, LI, or SI because the SSE contains less water than CE. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of FS were less than those of GS or LI, both having values similar to those of water. Additionally, we report internal reflection THz signals from ESO, although we were unable to determine the exact interface for this internal reflection. PMID:25574429

  5. Sensory innervation of the suprarenal gland in the albino rat: a fluorescent tract tracer study.

    PubMed

    Sangari, S K; Khatri, K; Sengupta, P

    1998-01-01

    The afferent innervation of the suprarenal gland was studied by using a fluorescent tract tracer in the adult albino rat. The left suprarenal gland was injected slowly with 5 microl of 2% aqueous suspension of Fast blue. After a survival period of 4-5 days, the dorsal root ganglia were dissected out and 15-microm-thick plastic (JB 4) sections were examined under the fluorescent microscope. The labelled neurons were seen from the third thoracic to second lumbar dorsal root ganglia, ipsilateral to the site of injection with maximum concentration from T6 to T11. These primary sensory neurons were round to oval in shape, varied from 7 microm to 40 microm in size, and were distributed randomly in the dorsal root ganglia. The labelling of the primary sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia confirms the presence of sensory nerve endings in the suprarenal gland that may be responsible for the vascular distension and hormonal release.

  6. Carboxylesterases in the respiratory tracts of rabbits, rats and Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Dahl, A R; Miller, S C; Petridou-Fischer, J

    1987-04-01

    Esters are a widespread class of organic compounds found both in industry and the environment. Because esters are often volatile and, therefore, readily inhaled, the capacity of respiratory tract tissues as well as liver S-9 homogenates from rats, rabbits, and Syrian hamsters to hydrolyze a variety of esters was investigated. A new technique to determine hydrolysis rates by measuring carboxylic acid residues using ion chromatography was proven effective. The results indicated that esters, including potentially carcinogenic beta-lactones, are readily hydrolyzed by respiratory tract enzymes. Species and tissue differences were apparent. The nasal ethmoturbinates had especially high levels of esterase activity with tissue weight-normalized activities from rabbits and hamsters for most substrates exceeding all other tissues tested, including liver. Phenyl acetate was the most rapidly hydrolyzed by ethmoturbinate tissue of the esters tested. Among straight chain aliphatic alcohol acetates, hydrolysis rates increased with carbon number up to pentyl alcohol and then decreased. Branched 4-carbon alcohol acetates were less rapidly hydrolyzed than n-butyl acetate. Correlation of hydrophobicity constants with hydrolysis rates indicated that, for the straight chain aliphatic acetates, a bilinear model best fit the data. PMID:3576643

  7. Expression of GFAP immunoreactivity during development of long fiber tracts in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Valentino, K L; Jones, E G; Kane, S A

    1983-09-01

    Astrocyte maturation in the developing corpus callosum and dorsal columns of the spinal cord was studied immunocytochemically in the rat, using antiserum to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) with a view to determining the relationships of astrocytes to the advancing axons of the corpus callosum and corticospinal tract. Between the eighteenth and nineteenth days of gestation, when the corpus callosum commences forming, most of the GFAP staining in the cerebral hemispheres is contained in radial processes, but some staining of glial cell bodies is also seen in the ventricular zone. At the region of interhemispheric fusion, where the corpus callosum will form, an accumulation of astrocytic processes demonstrable electron microscopically shows light immunocytochemical staining for GFAP. These processes do not adopt a stereotyped orientation. Rather, the overall impression as one moves towards the midline, is of radially disposed processes being disrupted and disoriented by the growing callosal axons at the fusion of the hemispheres. At no time can any orderly arrangement of GFAP-containing processes be seen which might indicate that the processes are serving to guide the growing axons across the midline. There is no immunoreactive staining of cell bodies or processes ventral to the corpus callosum, except in postnatal animals. Prior to the arrival of corticospinal axons in the spinal cord on the first postnatal day (PO)21, GFAP immunoreactivity is greatest in radial processes of the lateral funiculi and in the dorsal median septum. Oblique or vertical processes increase in the cuneate fasciculus from P0 tot P4 but do not appear in the gracile fasciculus until P4. Virtually no stained processes appear in the region to be traversed by the principal corticospinal tract, nor later in the tract itself until late in postnatal development. Only by 3 weeks postnatal is the adult pattern of GFAP staining observed in the corticospinal tract. These results also indicate that

  8. Effect of Condensed Tannins on Bacterial Diversity and Metabolic Activity in the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra H.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dietary condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins) on rat fecal bacterial populations was ascertained in order to determine whether the proportion on tannin-resistant bacteria increased and if there was a change in the predominant bacterial populations. After 3 weeks of tannin diets the proportion of tannin-resistant bacteria increased significantly (P < 0.05) from 0.3% ± 5.5% to 25.3% ± 8.3% with a 0.7% tannin diet and to 47.2% ± 5.1% with a 2% tannin diet. The proportion of tannin-resistant bacteria returned to preexposure levels in the absence of dietary tannins. A shift in bacterial populations was confirmed by molecular fingerprinting of fecal bacterial populations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Posttreatment samples were generally still distinguishable from controls after 3.5 weeks. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands and characterization of tannin-resistant isolates indicated that tannins selected for Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides species. Dot blot quantification confirmed that these gram-negative bacterial groups predominated in the presence of dietary tannins and that there was a corresponding decrease in the gram-positive Clostridium leptum group and other groups. Metabolic fingerprint patterns revealed that functional activities of culturable fecal bacteria were affected by the presence of tannins. Condensed tannins of Acacia angustissima altered fecal bacterial populations in the rat gastrointestinal tract, resulting in a shift in the predominant bacteria towards tannin-resistant gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae and Bacteroides species. PMID:14766594

  9. Morphometric study of the testis and reproductive tract (including sperm granuloma) after vasectomy in mature rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Guo, Yang; Yuan, Yong; Li, Yu-Gen; Deng, Xian-Zhong; Yang, Zheng-Wei

    2016-01-01

    By utilizing the rabbit model, previous studies have found good evidence indicating that vasectomy-induced spermatogenic damage is pressure-mediated: the damage occurs when the occluded reproductive tract is unable to accommodate additional spermatozoa produced by the testis. More studies with the more commonly used rat model have shown, however, controversial results on whether and why the damage occurs. In this study, 12 mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to unilateral vasectomy: double ligation (without severing) of the vas deferens exposed via a small inguinal incision; 37 days after the operation, the testes, epididymides, vasa deferentia (juxta-epididymal segments), and sperm granulomas (at the vasectomy site) were removed to obtain methacrylate resin-embedded sections and morphometric studies carried out with light microscopy. Marked spermatogenic damage with spermatids and spermatocytes depleted in the seminiferous epithelium in 43% of the seminiferous tubule profiles was demonstrated in 5 of the 12 testes on the vasectomized side, and the damage was associated with smaller or absent sperm granulomas; in the other 7 testes with essentially normal spermatogenesis, there was an increase (by 111% on average) in the volume of the tubule lumen, associated with larger granulomas or granulomas containing more spermatozoa. There was an overall increase (by 66%) in the thickness of the rete testis in the 12 testes; the epididymis or vas deferens showed no distension. It seems therefore that the spermatogenic damage induced by vasectomy in rats is pressure-mediated as well, and that variation in the damage depends mainly on the postoperative development of the sperm granuloma. PMID:25791731

  10. Task specific adaptations in rat locomotion: runway versus horizontal ladder.

    PubMed

    Bolton, David A E; Tse, Arthur D Y; Ballermann, Mark; Misiaszek, John E; Fouad, Karim

    2006-04-01

    In walking quadrupeds the alternating activity pattern of antagonistic leg muscles and the coordination between legs is orchestrated by central pattern generating networks within the spinal cord. These networks are activated by tonic input from the reticular formation in the brainstem. Under more challenging conditions, such as walking on a horizontal ladder, successful locomotion relies upon additional context dependent input from pathways such as the cortico- and rubro-spinal tracts. In this study we used electromyographic and kinematic approaches to characterize the adaptations in the walking pattern in adult uninjured rats crossing a horizontal ladder. We found that the placement of a hind limb on a rung precisely followed the placement of the ipsilateral fore limb. This is different to normal walking where the hind limb is placed behind the position of the ipsilateral fore limb. The increased reach of the hind limbs is achieved by increased flexion of the hip and rotation of the pelvis during the swing phase. Electromyographic observations showed decreased burst duration in Tibialis anterior an ankle flexor muscle. Further changes in the muscle activity pattern were likely due to the reduced stepping frequency during ladder walking. Following a lesion of the dorsal column, containing major parts of the corticospinal tract, we found an increased number of stepping errors and changes in the stepping strategy. The step length of the fore limbs was reduced and the hind limbs were frequently positioned on rungs other than those occupied by the fore limb. PMID:16406145

  11. Comparative morphometric analysis of the gastrointestinal tract of the captive greater cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus) and African giant pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus).

    PubMed

    Byanet, Obadiah; Abayomi, Akileye O; Aondohemba, Tyagher J

    2015-01-01

    The greater cane rats (Thryonomys swinderianus) and African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) are among the largest rodents in Africa, undergoing domestications for meat and research purposes. The aim of this study was to explore whether there are any quantitative anatomical gastrointestinal adaptations associated with their omnivorous or herbivorous diets. In the African giant rat, the mean gastrointestinal tract length and colon width of the males were significantly higher than their females counterpart (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). In a similar way, the mean gastrointestinal tract weight, stomach length and jejunal width in males greater cane rat were significantly higher than in the females (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively). The monogastric, omnivores African giant pouched rats had mean significant stomach length and width than greater cane rat (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively). Also, the duodenal length, jejunal and ileal widths were higher in the former than in the latter (P < 0.05, P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 respectively). The monogastric, herbivore greater cane rats had higher mean cecal width and colon length than the African giant pouched rat (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively). In conclusion, the African giant pouched rat had larger stomach and longer and wider small intestine, compared to the greater cane rat, which instead had more prominent cecum and wider and longer colon. This suggests that greater cane rats are hindgut fermenting herbivores (cecal fermenter), as is the case in most rodent species. PMID:26738259

  12. Comparative morphometric analysis of the gastrointestinal tract of the captive greater cane rat (Thryonomys swinderianus) and African giant pouched rat (Cricetomys gambianus).

    PubMed

    Byanet, Obadiah; Abayomi, Akileye O; Aondohemba, Tyagher J

    2015-01-01

    The greater cane rats (Thryonomys swinderianus) and African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) are among the largest rodents in Africa, undergoing domestications for meat and research purposes. The aim of this study was to explore whether there are any quantitative anatomical gastrointestinal adaptations associated with their omnivorous or herbivorous diets. In the African giant rat, the mean gastrointestinal tract length and colon width of the males were significantly higher than their females counterpart (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). In a similar way, the mean gastrointestinal tract weight, stomach length and jejunal width in males greater cane rat were significantly higher than in the females (P < 0.05, P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively). The monogastric, omnivores African giant pouched rats had mean significant stomach length and width than greater cane rat (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively). Also, the duodenal length, jejunal and ileal widths were higher in the former than in the latter (P < 0.05, P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 respectively). The monogastric, herbivore greater cane rats had higher mean cecal width and colon length than the African giant pouched rat (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01 respectively). In conclusion, the African giant pouched rat had larger stomach and longer and wider small intestine, compared to the greater cane rat, which instead had more prominent cecum and wider and longer colon. This suggests that greater cane rats are hindgut fermenting herbivores (cecal fermenter), as is the case in most rodent species.

  13. A non-surgical rat model of foreign body-associated urinary tract infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Y; Ishida, Y; Yamamura, E; Takase, H; Otani, T; Kumon, H

    2001-01-01

    This study established a rat model of foreign body-associated urinary tract infection. A spiral polyethylene tube (PT) was placed transurethrally into the bladder without surgical manipulation, followed by transurethral inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The persistence of P. aeruginosa in the kidneys and bladder was significantly enhanced by placement of the PT, whereas the bacteria were eliminated rapidly from the urinary tract in the animals without the PT. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a thick biofilm on the surface of the PT from the early stage of infection. Histopathologically, acute pyelonephritis was followed by chronic renal inflammation as well as continuous and sporadic polymorphonuclear leukocyte accumulation and hemorrhage in the pelvis and adjacent tissues, suggesting continuous ascending introduction of the bacteria from the biofilm adhering to the PT. We believe our model simulates the pathophysiology of foreign body-associated urinary tract infection characterized by biofilm formation on the surface of a foreign body.

  14. Injected TFF1 and TFF3 bind to TFF2-immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract in rats.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, S S; Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Kissow, H L; Nexø, E; Thim, L

    2003-09-15

    Peptides of the trefoil factor family (TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3) are co-secreted with mucus in most organ systems and are believed to interact with mucins to produce high-viscosity, stable gel complexes. We have previously demonstrated that cells in the GI tract possess binding sites to TFF2 and that injected TFF2 ends up in the mucus layer. In the present study, tissue binding and metabolism of parenterally administered human TFF1 and TFF3 in rats were described and compared to the immunohistochemical localization of the TFF peptides. 125I-TFF1 monomer and 125I-TFF3 mono- and dimer were given intravenously to female Wistar rats. The tissue distribution was assessed by gamma counting of organ samples and by autoradiography of histological sections. The degradation of 125I-TFF3 was studied by means of trichloracetic acid (TCA) precipitation and the saturability of the binding by administration of excess unlabelled peptide. The TFF peptides were localized in histologic sections from the GI tract by immunohistochemistry. Injected TFF3 dimer (12%) was taken up by the GI tract. At autoradiography, grains were localized to the same cells that were immunoreactive to TFF2. The binding could be displaced by excess TFF3. Similar binding was observed for the TFF1 and TFF3 monomers apart from binding in the stomach, where the uptake was only 15% in comparison to the dimer. There was no specific binding outside the GI tract and no binding to TFF1 or TFF3 immunoreactive cells. In conclusion, the TFF2-binding cells in the gastrointestinal tract seem to have basolateral, receptor-like activity to all three TFF peptides. The mucous neck cells of the stomach predominantly take up TFFs with two trefoil domains, indicating a different receptor-like activity in the stomach compared to the rest of the GI tract.

  15. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Carmel, Jason B.; Martin, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal system—with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST) – is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout, and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that 10 days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay. PMID:24994971

  16. Proteus vulgaris urinary tract infections in rats; treatment with nitrofuran derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, D. J. N.

    1962-01-01

    Ascending urinary tract infections with stone formation have been produced experimentally in rats, using a modification of the method of Vermuelen & Goetz (1954a, b). A zinc disc infected with a culture of Proteus vulgaris was inserted into the bladder by suprapubic cystotomy under ether anaesthesia. The pH of the urine rises from 6.9 to 8 or 9 and calculi develop in the bladder within a few days of infection. The bladder and ureters become swollen, distended and inflamed, and renal abscesses develop. Death from renal failure generally occurs within 10 days of infection. Oral treatment with nitrofurantoin was commenced three days after infection and continued for one month. This arrested the initial rise in urine alkalinity and stone formation, and few, if any, macroscopic lesions were found at post-mortem examination. Of nine nitrofuran derivatives examined for activity against this infection several showed slight activity, but only one, N-(5-Nitrofurfurylidene)-γ-butyric acid, was as active as nitrofurantoin when given at four times the dose, but it was also one-third as toxic. It is concluded that this technique is suitable for the examination of potential urinary antiseptics. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:13964160

  17. Detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity identifies neuronal integrity in damaged rat central nervous system after application of bacterial melanin

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Tigran R.; Ter-Markosyan, Anna S.; Hovsepyan, Anna S.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to confirm the neuroregenerative effects of bacterial melanin (BM) on central nervous system injury using a special staining method based on the detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to undergo either unilateral destruction of sensorimotor cortex (group I; n = 12) or unilateral rubrospinal tract transection at the cervical level (C3–4) (group II; n = 12). In each group, six rats were randomly selected after surgery to undergo intramuscular injection of BM solution (BM subgroup) and the remaining six rats were intramuscularly injected with saline (saline subgroup). Neurological testing confirmed that BM accelerated the recovery of motor function in rats from both BM and saline subgroups. Two months after surgery, Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity detection in combination with Chilingarian’s calcium adenoside triphosphate method revealed that BM stimulated the sprouting of fibers and dilated the capillaries in the brain and spinal cord. These results suggest that BM can promote the recovery of motor function of rats with central nervous system injury; and detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity is a fast and easy method used to study the regeneration-promoting effects of BM on the injured central nervous system.

  18. Detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity identifies neuronal integrity in damaged rat central nervous system after application of bacterial melanin

    PubMed Central

    Petrosyan, Tigran R.; Ter-Markosyan, Anna S.; Hovsepyan, Anna S.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to confirm the neuroregenerative effects of bacterial melanin (BM) on central nervous system injury using a special staining method based on the detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to undergo either unilateral destruction of sensorimotor cortex (group I; n = 12) or unilateral rubrospinal tract transection at the cervical level (C3–4) (group II; n = 12). In each group, six rats were randomly selected after surgery to undergo intramuscular injection of BM solution (BM subgroup) and the remaining six rats were intramuscularly injected with saline (saline subgroup). Neurological testing confirmed that BM accelerated the recovery of motor function in rats from both BM and saline subgroups. Two months after surgery, Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity detection in combination with Chilingarian’s calcium adenoside triphosphate method revealed that BM stimulated the sprouting of fibers and dilated the capillaries in the brain and spinal cord. These results suggest that BM can promote the recovery of motor function of rats with central nervous system injury; and detection of Ca2+-dependent acid phosphatase activity is a fast and easy method used to study the regeneration-promoting effects of BM on the injured central nervous system. PMID:27630700

  19. Detection of Ca(2+)-dependent acid phosphatase activity identifies neuronal integrity in damaged rat central nervous system after application of bacterial melanin.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Tigran R; Ter-Markosyan, Anna S; Hovsepyan, Anna S

    2016-07-01

    The study aims to confirm the neuroregenerative effects of bacterial melanin (BM) on central nervous system injury using a special staining method based on the detection of Ca(2+)-dependent acid phosphatase activity. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to undergo either unilateral destruction of sensorimotor cortex (group I; n = 12) or unilateral rubrospinal tract transection at the cervical level (C3-4) (group II; n = 12). In each group, six rats were randomly selected after surgery to undergo intramuscular injection of BM solution (BM subgroup) and the remaining six rats were intramuscularly injected with saline (saline subgroup). Neurological testing confirmed that BM accelerated the recovery of motor function in rats from both BM and saline subgroups. Two months after surgery, Ca(2+)-dependent acid phosphatase activity detection in combination with Chilingarian's calcium adenoside triphosphate method revealed that BM stimulated the sprouting of fibers and dilated the capillaries in the brain and spinal cord. These results suggest that BM can promote the recovery of motor function of rats with central nervous system injury; and detection of Ca(2+)-dependent acid phosphatase activity is a fast and easy method used to study the regeneration-promoting effects of BM on the injured central nervous system. PMID:27630700

  20. Application of computational fluid dynamics to regional dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kimbell, J S; Gross, E A; Joyner, D R; Godo, M N; Morgan, K T

    1993-08-01

    For certain inhaled air pollutants, such as reactive, water soluble gases, the distribution of nasal lesions observed in F344 rats may be closely related to regional gas uptake patterns in the nose. These uptake patterns can be influenced by the currents of air flowing through the upper respiratory tract during the breathing cycle. Since data on respiratory tract lesions in F344 rats are extrapolated to humans to make predictions of risk to human health, a better understanding of the factors affecting these responses is needed. To assess potential effects of nasal airflow on lesion location and severity, a methodology was developed for creation of computer simulations of steady-state airflow and gas transport using a three-dimensional finite element grid reconstructed from serial step-sections of the nasal passages of a male F344 rat. Simulations on a supercomputer used the computational fluid dynamics package FIDAP (FDI, Evanston, IL). Distinct streams of bulk flow evident in the simulations matched inspiratory streams reported for the F344 rat. Moreover, simulated regional flow velocities matched measured velocities in concurrent laboratory experiments with a hollow nasal mold. Computer-predicted flows were used in simulations of gas transport to nasal passage walls, with formaldehyde as a test case. Results from the uptake simulations were compared with the reported distribution of formaldehyde-induced nasal lesions observed in the F344 rat, and indicated that airflow-driven uptake patterns probably play an important role in determining the location of certain nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde. This work demonstrated the feasibility of applying computational fluid dynamics to airflow-driven dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract.

  1. Serotonin in the solitary tract nucleus shortens the laryngeal chemoreflex in anaesthetized neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, William T; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J C

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Failure to terminate apnoea and arouse is likely to contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Serotonin is deficient in the brainstems of babies who died of SIDS. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that serotonin in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) would shorten reflex apnoea. What is the main finding and its importance? Serotonin microinjected into the NTS shortened the apnoea and respiratory inhibition associated with the laryngeal chemoreflex. Moreover, this effect was achieved through a 5-HT3 receptor. This is a new insight that is likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of SIDS. The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR), an airway-protective reflex that causes apnoea and bradycardia, has long been suspected as an initiating event in the sudden infant death syndrome. Serotonin (5-HT) and 5-HT receptors may be deficient in the brainstems of babies who die of sudden infant death syndrome, and 5-HT seems to be important in terminating apnoeas directly or in causing arousals or as part of the process of autoresuscitation. We hypothesized that 5-HT in the brainstem would limit the duration of the LCR. We studied anaesthetized rat pups between 7 and 21 days of age and made microinjections into the cisterna magna or into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Focal, bilateral microinjections of 5-HT into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. The 5-HT1a receptor antagonist, WAY 100635, did not affect the LCR consistently, nor did a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, alter the duration of the LCR. The 5-HT3 specific agonist, 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-biguanide, microinjected bilaterally into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. Thus, endogenous 5-HT released within the NTS may curtail the respiratory depression that is part of the LCR, and serotonergic shortening of the LCR may be attributed to activation of 5-HT3 receptors within the NTS. 5-HT3 receptors are expressed presynaptically on C

  2. Identification in rats of a programming window for reproductive tract masculinization, disruption of which leads to hypospadias and cryptorchidism

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michelle; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Fisken, Mark; Scott, Hayley M.; Hutchison, Gary R.; Smith, Lee B.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    Becoming a phenotypic male is ultimately determined by androgen-induced masculinization. Disorders of fetal masculinization, resulting in hypospadias or cryptorchidism, are common, but their cause remains unclear. Together with the adult-onset disorders low sperm count and testicular cancer, they can constitute a testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS). Although masculinization is well studied, no unifying concept explains normal male reproductive development and its abnormalities, including TDS. We exposed rat fetuses to either anti-androgens or androgens and showed that masculinization of all reproductive tract tissues was programmed by androgen action during a common fetal programming window. This preceded morphological differentiation, when androgen action was, surprisingly, unnecessary. Only within the programming window did blocking androgen action induce hypospadias and cryptorchidism and altered penile length in male rats, all of which correlated with anogenital distance (AGD). Androgen-driven masculinization of females was also confined to the same programming window. This work has identified in rats a common programming window in which androgen action is essential for normal reproductive tract masculinization and has highlighted that measuring AGD in neonatal humans could provide a noninvasive method to predict neonatal and adult reproductive disorders. Based on the timings in rats, we believe the programming window in humans is likely to be 8–14 weeks of gestation. PMID:18340380

  3. Maternal behavior induced in male rats by bilateral lesions of the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, M A; Collado, P; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A; del Cerro, M C

    1992-10-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effect of bilateral electrolytic lesions of the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) in male Wistar rats that did not have care-pups experience, using a test of induced maternal behavior. Consistent with our previous findings in virgin female rats (10), there was a significantly shorter sensitization (3 days) and retrieval (2 days) latencies in the BAOT-lesioned group than in the sham-lesioned and intact-control male groups (12 days for both). Based on these findings, we propose that BAOT, a sexually dimorphic nucleus of the vomeronasal system, exerts an inhibitory modulation in the expression of parental behavior in male and female virgin rats. It may do so by maintaining an olfactory-based tonic inhibition of maternal behavior, thereby resulting in the adults' tonic avoidance of the pups until this inhibition is abolished by lesion, or reduced or overridden by appropriate hormonal and/or sensory influences.

  4. [Functional state of the gastrointestinal tract organs in rats after a flight on the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, K V; Goland-Ruvinova, L G; Goncharova, N P; Zhiznevskaia, O V; Medkova, I L

    1982-01-01

    The enzyme-excretory and motor functions of the gastrointestinal tract of rats flown for 18.5 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-1129 were studied. Immediately postflight, the pepsin synthesis decreased and the dipeptide parietal hydrolysis increased. At R + 6, the activity of the enzymes responsible for the cavitary and parietal hydrolysis of lipids significantly grew and that of the enzymes involved in protein hydrolysis fell. At R + 30, the carbohydrate hydrolysis was inhibited and the activity of lipolytic enzymes enhanced markedly. The amplitude and rhythm of stomach biopotentials were dysbalanced. The so-called immobilization stress of intact rats brought about activation of lipase, monoglyceridyl lipase, dipeptidase and inhibition of amylase and invertase. The immobilization exposure of flight rats caused inhibition of the membrane hydrolysis of proteins and carbohydrates and lack of the pancreatic reaction.

  5. The differential contributions of the parvocellular and the magnocellular subdivisions of the red nucleus to skilled reaching in the rat.

    PubMed

    Morris, R; Vallester, K K; Newton, S S; Kearsley, A P; Whishaw, I Q

    2015-06-01

    During the execution of the skilled reaching task, naïve rats bring their elbow to the midline of their body to aim at the food target, perform the arpeggio movement to grasp it and supinate the paw to bring the food to their mouth. Red nucleus lesions in the rat interfere with each of these three movement elements of reaching. On the other hand, lesions to the rubrospinal tract, which originate from the magnocellular subdivision of the red nucleus, only interfere with the arpeggio movement. This latter evidence strongly suggests that impairment in aiming and supinating could be under the control of the parvocellular subdivision of the red nucleus. In order to test this hypothesis, rats were trained on the skilled reaching task and then received either complete lesions of the red nucleus or lesions restricted to its parvo- or magnocellular subdivision. In line with previous data, complete excitotoxic lesions of the red nucleus compromised limb aiming, arpeggio and supination. Lesions restricted to the parvocellular division of the red nucleus abolish supination and interfere with aiming, although the latter result did not reach significance. The results are discussed in terms of the distinct connectivity and functional significance of these two architectonic subdivisions of the red nucleus.

  6. Complete and Partial Lesions of the Pyramidal Tract in the Rat Affect Qualitative Measures of Skilled Movements: Impairment in Fixations as a Model for Clumsy Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Whishaw, Ian Q.; Piecharka, Dionne M.; Drever, Felicia R.

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about prenatal and perinatal brain injury resulting in subsequent clumsy behavior in children. One candidate motor system is the pyramidal tract. The tract traverses the entire central nervous system and, through direct and indirect connections to the brainstem and spinal cord sensory and motor nuclei, is involved in the learning and execution of skilled movements. Here, rats, either naive or pretrained on a number of motor tasks, were assessed for acute and chronic impairments following complete or incomplete pyramidal tract lesions. Postsurgery rats with complete lesions were impaired on the qualitative measures of limb aiming, supination, and posture. Impaired movements require fixations, complementary movements in different body segments. The impairment in fixations was manifest acutely and underwent no improvement with subsequent training/testing. The finding that complete and partial pyramidal tract lesions produce chronic impairment in fixations provides insight for understanding clumsy behavior in humans and its potential remediation via specific training in making fixations. PMID:14640310

  7. Respiratory tract changes in guinea pigs, rats, and mice following a single six-hour exposure to methyl isocyanate vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, E.H.; Dodd, D.E.

    1987-06-01

    Groups of male and female Fischer 344 rats, B6C3F1 mice, and Hartley guinea pigs were exposed once for 6 hr to mean concentrations of 10.5, 5.4, 2.4, 1.0, or 0 (control) ppm of methyl isocyanate (MIC) vapor. Rats and mice were also exposed to 20.4 ppm of MIC. The majority of deaths occurred during postexposure days 1 through 3. The 6-hr LC/sub 50/ values were 6.1 ppm for rats, 12.2 ppm for mice, and 5.4 ppm for guinea pigs. Notable clinical observations during and immediately following MIC exposure were lacrimation, perinasal/perioral wetness, respiratory difficulty (e.g., mouth breathing), decreased activity, ataxia, and hypothermia. Body weight losses were common in all species following MIC exposures of 2.4 ppm or greater. Microscopic lesions included acute necrosis of the epithelial lining throughout the respiratory tract in animals that died shortly after exposure, coupled with congestion, edema, and inflammation. A microscopic lesion that appeared unique to guinea pigs was bronchiolitis obliterans. Additional microscopic lesions observed in some animals that died or were sacrificed at the end of the study (postexposure day 14) consisted of squamous metaplasia of respiratory epithelium in the nasal cavity, which extended into the larynx, trachea, and in some cases, the bronchi. In addition, epithelial regeneration throughout the tract and submucosal fibroplasia in the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles were observed, the latter lesion being primarily confined to rodents. Only in guinea pigs were there lesions in the 1.0 ppm group attributed to MIC exposure. In conclusion, guinea pigs were more sensitive to the MIC vapor than were rats, which were in turn more sensitive than mice.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast enhancement study of the gastrointestinal tract of rats and a human volunteer using nontoxic oral iron solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wesbey, G.E.; Brasch, R.C.; Engelstad, B.L.; Moss, A.A.; Crooks, L.E.; Brito, A.C.

    1983-10-01

    Two dilute oral iron solutions, made from commonly available nonprescription dietary supplements, were found to enhance the gastrointestinal tract in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of live rats and one human volunteer. The paramagnetic and pharmacologic properties of ferric ammonium citrate were more favorable than those of ferrous sulfate heptahydrate. The paramagnetic iron solutions shorten T1 and T2 relaxation times of water protons in the contrast media-filled gastrointestinal tract, producing easily observable change in NMR intensity. Because these iron solutions are available commercially and are known to be well tolerated, the clinical use of iron-containing NMR contrast agent for the gastrointestinal tract is feasible.

  9. COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF AIRFLOWS AND VAPOR DOSIMETY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACTS OF RAT, MONKEY, AND HUMAN

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb W.; Pipavath, Sudhaker; Cox, Timothy C.; Wallis, Chris; Larson, Richard; Fanucchi, M.; Postlewait, Ed; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-07-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. Historically, these models were limited to discrete regions of the respiratory system. CFD/PBPK models have now been developed for the rat, monkey, and human that encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A PBPK model previously developed to describe acrolein uptake in nasal tissues was adapted to the extended airway models as an example application. Model parameters for each anatomic region were obtained from the literature, measured directly, or estimated from published data. Airflow and site-specific acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steadystate inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasalonly simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was dependent upon airflow rates and acrolein concentrations with nasal extraction efficiencies predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, then the human. For human oral-breathing simulations, acrolein uptake rates in oropharyngeal and laryngeal tissues were comparable to nasal tissues following nasal breathing under the same exposure conditions. For both breathing modes, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheo-bronchial tissues of humans than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing dosimetry across a significantly more extensive range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  10. Systematic analysis of axonal damage and inflammatory response in different white matter tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Gomes-Leal, W; Corkill, D J; Picanço-Diniz, C W

    2005-12-20

    The mechanisms of white matter (WM) damage during secondary degeneration are a fundamental issue in the pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Our main goal was to describe the pattern of an acute inflammatory response and secondary damage to axons in different WM tracts of acutely injured rat spinal cord. Adult rats were deeply anesthetized and injected with 20 nmol of NMDA into the spinal cord ventral horn on T7. Animals were perfused after survival times of 1 day, 3 days and 7 days. Ten micrometer sections were submitted to immunocytochemical analysis for activated macrophages/microglia, neutrophils and damaged axons. There were inflammatory response and progressive tissue destruction of ventral WM (VWM) with formation of microcysts in both VWM and lateral WM (LWM). In the VWM, the number of beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) end-bulbs increased from 1 day with a peak at 3 days, decreasing by 7 days following the injection. APP end-bulbs were present in the dorsal WM (DWM) at 3 days survival time but were not in the LWM. Electron microscopic analysis revealed different degrees of myelin disruption and axonal pathology in the vacuolated WM up to 14 mm along the rostrocaudal axis. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant loss of medium and large axons (P < 0.05), but not of small axons (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that bystander axonal damage and myelin vacuolation are important secondary component of the pathology of WM tracts following rat SCI. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of these pathological events.

  11. Comparative computational modeling of airflows and vapor dosimetry in the respiratory tracts of rat, monkey, and human.

    PubMed

    Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P; Carson, James P; Minard, Kevin R; Jacob, Richard E; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Cox, Timothy; Wallis, Christopher D; Larson, Richard F; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Postlethwait, Edward M; Einstein, Daniel R

    2012-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. We improved the imaging and model development methods to the point where CFD models for the rat, monkey, and human now encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A total of 1272, 2172, and 135 pulmonary airways representing 17±7, 19±9, or 9±2 airway generations were included in the rat, monkey and human models, respectively. A CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic model previously developed for acrolein was adapted for these anatomically correct extended airway models. Model parameters were obtained from the literature or measured directly. Airflow and acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steady-state inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasal-only simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was sensitive to airway geometry, airflow rates, acrolein concentrations, air:tissue partition coefficients, tissue thickness, and the maximum rate of metabolism. Nasal extraction efficiencies were predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, and then the human. For both nasal and oral breathing modes in humans, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheobronchial tissues than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing material transport and site-specific tissue uptake across a significantly greater range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  12. An investigation of horizontal transfer of feed introduced DNA to the aerobic microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Horizontal gene transfer through natural transformation of members of the microbiota of the lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of mammals has not yet been described. Insufficient DNA sequence similarity for homologous recombination to occur has been identified as the major barrier to interspecies transfer of chromosomal DNA in bacteria. In this study we determined if regions of high DNA similarity between the genomes of the indigenous bacteria in the GIT of rats and feed introduced DNA could lead to homologous recombination and acquisition of antibiotic resistance genes. Results Plasmid DNA with two resistance genes (nptI and aadA) and regions of high DNA similarity to 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA genes present in a broad range of bacterial species present in the GIT, were constructed and added to standard rat feed. Six rats, with a normal microbiota, were fed DNA containing pellets daily over four days before sampling of the microbiota from the different GI compartments (stomach, small intestine, cecum and colon). In addition, two rats were included as negative controls. Antibiotic resistant colonies growing on selective media were screened for recombination with feed introduced DNA by PCR targeting unique sites in the putatively recombined regions. No transformants were identified among 441 tested isolates. Conclusions The analyses showed that extensive ingestion of DNA (100 μg plasmid) per day did not lead to increased proportions of kanamycin resistant bacteria, nor did it produce detectable transformants among the aerobic microbiota examined for 6 rats (detection limit < 1 transformant per 1,1 × 108 cultured bacteria). The key methodological challenges to HGT detection in animal feedings trials are identified and discussed. This study is consistent with other studies suggesting natural transformation is not detectable in the GIT of mammals. PMID:22463741

  13. Comparative Computational Modeling of Airflows and Vapor Dosimetry in the Respiratory Tracts of Rat, Monkey, and Human

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. We improved the imaging and model development methods to the point where CFD models for the rat, monkey, and human now encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A total of 1272, 2172, and 135 pulmonary airways representing 17±7, 19±9, or 9±2 airway generations were included in the rat, monkey and human models, respectively. A CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic model previously developed for acrolein was adapted for these anatomically correct extended airway models. Model parameters were obtained from the literature or measured directly. Airflow and acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steady-state inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasal-only simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was sensitive to airway geometry, airflow rates, acrolein concentrations, air:tissue partition coefficients, tissue thickness, and the maximum rate of metabolism. Nasal extraction efficiencies were predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, and then the human. For both nasal and oral breathing modes in humans, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheobronchial tissues than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing material transport and site-specific tissue uptake across a significantly greater range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models. PMID:22584687

  14. Simvastatin reduces fetal testosterone production and permanently alters reproductive tract development in the male rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling by fetal Leydig cells is critical in the proper development of the male reproductive tract. As cholesterol is a precursor for hormone biosynthesis,inhibition of the cholesterol pathway during sex differentiation may reduce testosterone {T). We hypothesized tha...

  15. RESPIRATORY RESPONSE AND INTERNAL TISSUE DOSE OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF F344 RATS: SEX AND SPECIES COMPARISONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. Females of various toxicological studies show more severe effects than males, notably a decrease in survivability observed in rats of a 2-year bioassay (CIIT, 1993; Wolf et al., 1995, Fundam. Appl. Toxic...

  16. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.

    Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.

    Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  17. Defining the Borders of Dose Addition: Mixture Effects of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and Dibutyl phthalate on Male Rat Reproductive Tract Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    In utero exposure to either dibutyl phthalate (DBP) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) disrupts male rat reproductive tract differentiation. However, they act via different modes of toxicity and induce distinct postnatal phenotypes. DBP exposure decreases anogenital di...

  18. NEONATAL LOW- AND HIGH-DOSE EXPOSURE TO ESTRADIOL BENZOATE IN THE MALE RAT: II. EFFECTS ON THE MALE PUBERTY AND THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    NEONATAL LOW- AND HIGH-DOSE EXPOSURE TO ESTRADIOL BENZOATE IN THE MALE RAT: II. EFFECTS ON MALE PUBERTY AND THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT. Oliver Putz, Christian B. Schwartz, Gerald A. LeBlanc, Ralph L. Cooper, Gail S. Prins

    ABSTRACT
    Environmental contaminants with estrogen...

  19. EFFECT OF RAPID SHALLOW BREATHING ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF 18-O-LABELED OZONE REACTION PRODUCT IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effect of breathing pattern on ozone reaction product content within the respiratory tract. Thirty-four anesthetized, maleWistar rats were exposed to oxygen-18 (18O)-labeled ozone at 1.0 ppm for 2 h using a dual-chamber, negative-pressure ventilation system. Fre...

  20. [Morphologic and functional heterogeneous changes of the urinary bladder different parts at rats with infravesical obstruction of the urinary tracts].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtsev, Iu V; Kirpatovskiĭ, V I; Mudraia, I S; Khromov, R A; Kudriavtseva, L V

    2012-01-01

    Infravesical obstruction of the lower urinary tracts of 30 rats was carried out by the measured constriction of the urethral prevesical parts. Morphologic and functional changes of the urinary bladder different parts were studied in 1 week and in 3 months. Compensatory hypertrophy of the detrusor was accompanied increasing of hypertrophied, atrophic and native forms of leiomyocytes, as so their transformation into myofibroblasts with connective tissue formation between the muscle fibers mainly in the neck of urinary bladder Contractility of the detrusor decreased with their tonus increasing mainly in the neck of urinary bladder too. Weakening effect of adrenalin in 3 month after obstruction significantly decreased, while in the body and neck of urinary bladder it virtually disappeared. Blockade of alpha-adrenoreceptors after noradrenalin stimulation resulted in enchancement of the hypertrophic detrusor contraction when tonus of the urinary neck decreased. On the contrary, in the intact urinary bladder the similarly influence resulted in weakening of contraction.

  1. The cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) as an animal model for respiratory tract infections with human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Green, M Gia; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Respiratory viral infection is a great human health concern, resulting in disease, death and economic losses. Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) have been particularly useful in the study of the pathogenesis of human respiratory virus infections, including the development and testing of antiviral compounds and vaccines. In this article, the authors outline the advantages of the cotton rat compared with the mouse as a model for infection with measles virus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, human parainfluenza virus and human metapneumovirus. From the literature and their own experience, the authors summarize guidelines for handling, maintaining and breeding cotton rats. In addition, they offer technical tips for carrying out infection experiments and provide information about the large array of immunological assays and reagents available for the study of immune responses (macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, B cells, antibodies, chemokines and cytokines) in cotton rats.

  2. Unilateral Pyramidotomy of the Corticospinal Tract in Rats for Assessment of Neuroplasticity-inducing Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kathe, Claudia; Hutson, Thomas H.; Chen, Qin; Shine, Harold D.; McMahon, Stephen B.; Moon, Lawrence D. F.

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal tract (CST) can be completely severed unilaterally in the medullary pyramids of the rodent brainstem. The CST is a motor tract that has great importance for distal muscle control in humans and, to a lesser extent, in rodents. A unilateral cut of one pyramid results in loss of CST innervation of the spinal cord mainly on the contralateral side of the spinal cord leading to transient motor disability in the forelimbs and sustained loss of dexterity. Ipsilateral projections of the corticospinal tract are minor. We have refined our surgical method to increase the chances of lesion completeness. We describe postsurgical care. Deficits on the Montoya staircase pellet reaching test and the horizontal ladder test shown here are detected up to 8 weeks postinjury. Deficits on the cylinder rearing test are only detected transiently. Therefore, the cylinder test may only be suitable for detection of short term recovery. We show how, electrophysiologically and anatomically, one may assess lesions and plastic changes. We also describe how to analyse fibers from the uninjured CST sprouting across the midline into the deprived areas. It is challenging to obtain >90% complete lesions consistently due to the proximity to the basilar artery in the medulla oblongata and survival rates can be low. Alternative surgical approaches and behavioural testing are described in this protocol. The pyramidotomy model is a good tool for assessing neuroplasticity-inducing treatments, which increase sprouting of intact fibers after injury. PMID:25549050

  3. Forebrain Projections of Arcuate Neurokinin B Neurons Demonstrated by Anterograde Tract-Tracing and Monosodium Glutamate Lesions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Sally J.; Burke, Michelle C.; Anderson, Miranda J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin receptor signaling are essential components of the reproductive axis. A population of neurons resides within the arcuate nucleus of the rat that expresses NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and estrogen receptor α. Here we investigate the projections of these neurons using NKB-immunocytochemistry as a marker. First, the loss of NKB-immunoreactive (ir) somata and fibers was characterized after ablation of the arcuate nucleus by neonatal injections of monosodium glutamate. Second, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the arcuate nucleus and anterogradely labeled NKB-ir fibers were identified using dual-labeled immunofluorescence. Four major projection pathways are described: 1) Local projections within the arcuate nucleus bilaterally, 2) Projections to the median eminence including the lateral palisade zone, 3) Projections to a periventricular pathway extending rostrally to multiple hypothalamic nuclei, the septal region and BNST and dorsally to the dorsomedial nucleus and 4) Projections to a ventral hypothalamic tract to the lateral hypothalamus and medial forebrain bundle. The diverse projections provide evidence that NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons could integrate the reproductive axis with multiple homeostatic, behavioral and neuroendocrine processes. Interestingly, anterograde tract-tracing revealed NKB-ir axons originating from arcuate neurons terminating on other NKB-ir somata within the arcuate nucleus. Combined with previous studies, these experiments reveal a bilateral interconnected network of sex-steroid responsive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat that express NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and ERα and project to GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This circuitry provides a mechanism for bilateral synchronization of arcuate NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons to modulate the pulsatile secretion of GnRH. PMID:20038444

  4. Surgical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Its Vasculature in the Laboratory Rat.

    PubMed

    Vdoviaková, Katarína; Petrovová, Eva; Maloveská, Marcela; Krešáková, Lenka; Teleky, Jana; Elias, Mario Zefanias Joao; Petrášová, Darina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate the morphology of the stomach, liver, intestine, and their vasculature to support the planning of surgical therapeutic methods in abdominal cavity. On adult Wistar rats corrosion casts were prepared from the arterial system and Duracryl Dental and PUR SP were used as a casting medium and was performed macroscopic anatomical dissection of the stomach, liver, and intestine was performed. The rat stomach was a large, semilunar shaped sac with composite lining. On the stomach was very marked fundus, which formed a blind sac (saccus cecus). The rat liver was divided into six lobes, but without gall bladder. Intestine of the rat was simple, but cecum had a shape as a stomach. The following variations were observed in the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. On the corrosion cast specimens we noticed the presence of the anastomosis between middle colic artery (a. colica media) and left colic artery (a. colica sinistra). We investigated the second anastomosis between middle colic artery and left colic artery. The results of this study reveal that the functional anatomical relationship between the rat stomach, liver and intestine is important for the development of surgical research in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:26819602

  5. Surgical Anatomy of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Its Vasculature in the Laboratory Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vdoviaková, Katarína; Petrovová, Eva; Maloveská, Marcela; Krešáková, Lenka; Teleky, Jana; Elias, Mario Zefanias Joao; Petrášová, Darina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate the morphology of the stomach, liver, intestine, and their vasculature to support the planning of surgical therapeutic methods in abdominal cavity. On adult Wistar rats corrosion casts were prepared from the arterial system and Duracryl Dental and PUR SP were used as a casting medium and was performed macroscopic anatomical dissection of the stomach, liver, and intestine was performed. The rat stomach was a large, semilunar shaped sac with composite lining. On the stomach was very marked fundus, which formed a blind sac (saccus cecus). The rat liver was divided into six lobes, but without gall bladder. Intestine of the rat was simple, but cecum had a shape as a stomach. The following variations were observed in the origin of the cranial mesenteric artery. On the corrosion cast specimens we noticed the presence of the anastomosis between middle colic artery (a. colica media) and left colic artery (a. colica sinistra). We investigated the second anastomosis between middle colic artery and left colic artery. The results of this study reveal that the functional anatomical relationship between the rat stomach, liver and intestine is important for the development of surgical research in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:26819602

  6. [Influence of Bacillus cereus on microbiocenosis of gastrointestinal tract in rats].

    PubMed

    Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Bogdanova, E A; Zverev, V V

    2007-01-01

    The modifying effect of Bacillus cereus on intestinal microbiocenosis was investigated in eubiotic and disbiotic female rats. Qualitative and quantitative characteristics of gut and mucosal microflora from different parts of rats' intestine were studied before and after intragastral application of B. cereus suspension. The single application of B. cereus suspension resulted in appearance of this bacterium in feces and in parietal mucin from all parts of the intestine. In eubiotic rats compared with disbiotic, B. cereus adhere to parietal mucin much more efficiently and supplanted indigenous microflora. During disbiosis B. cereus sometimes had stimulating effect on the intestinal microbiocenosis. Gut microbiocenosis appeared to be more resistant to B. cereus invasion than mucosal. This fact was considered to be the evidence of higher sensitivity of mucosal microbiocenosis to short-term influence of exogenous microbial factor.

  7. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats.

    PubMed

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Herman, James P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NTS NA A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n = 5; HPA study, n = 5] or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n = 6; HPA study, n = 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 d of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress.

  8. Allethrin induced toxicity in the male reproductive tract of rats contributes to disruption in the transcription of genes involved in germ cell production.

    PubMed

    Madhubabu, Golla; Yenugu, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    Pyrethroids are known to be neurotoxic. However, their toxic effects including that of allethrin on the male reproductive tract are not elucidated. Adult male rats were treated orally with 25, 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg body weight allethrin every day for 60 days. Lipid peroxidation was increased (p < 0.001) in the caput, cauda, and testes. Nitric oxide production was increased (p < 0.001) in the caput, but unaltered in the cauda and testes. The activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase were decreased in the caput and cauda where as a decrease was observed in the testis obtained from allethrin treated rats. In the epididymides and testes, damage to tubular architecture, congestion, degeneration of epithelial cell lining, intestinal edema, and presence of dead or degenerating spermatids were observed in a dose dependent manner. The expression profile of genes involved in spermatogenesis (Tgf-beta1), sperm maturation (Spag11e), and sperm function (Defb22) were reduced (p < 0.001) in allethrin rats. The expression of p53 gene was decreased and increased phosphorylation of MAPK (p42/p44) expression was observed the male reproductive tract tissues of allethrin treated rats. Although earlier studies have reported the effects of allethrin inhalation because of the use of mosquito coils and vaporizers, our results for the first time prove that oral exposure to allethrin could affect fertility and may contribute to deregulation of cell cycle in the male reproductive tract.

  9. In situ absorption in rat intestinal tract of solid dispersion of annonaceous acetogenins.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yun-Jie; Feng, Han-Zhou; Zhang, Limei; Hu, Chun-Hui; Zhu, Chun-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Isolated from Annona squamosa L, Annonaceous acetogenins (ACGs) exhibit a broad range of biological properties yet absorbed badly due to the low solubility. Solid dispersion in polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG 4000) has been developed to increase the solubility and oral absorption of ACGs. The formulation of ACGS-solid dispersion was optimized by a simplex lattice experiment design and carried out by a solvent-fusion method. We studied the absorption property of ACGs in rat's intestine, which showed there was a good absorption and uptake percentages with solid dispersion. The study on uptake percentage in different regions of rat's intestine attested that the duodenum had the best permeability, followed by jejunum, ileum, and colon in order with no significant differences. So the paper drew the conclusion that solid dispersion could improve the solubility and oral absorption of annonaceous acetogenins. PMID:22536222

  10. Changes of the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the diabetic rat's alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Erzsébet; Batbayar, Bayarchimeg; Vér, Agota; Zelles, Tivadar

    2006-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, where neuropeptides and immunocells might play important roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this article we have quantified the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat's alimentary tract (tongue, duodenum, colon) using immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical methods. The immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were found in all layers of the alimentary tract and their distribution pattern was similar in both control and diabetic groups. Mast cell-nerve fiber contacts were rarely found in the controls. However, after 4 weeks duration of diabetes the number of IR nerve fibers and the immunocompetent cells increased significantly (P < 0.05), and the number of mast cell-nerve fiber contacts was even more significantly increased (P < 0.001). The distance between nerve fibers and immunocells was about 1 mum or even less. Some of the mast cells were degranulated in the vicinity of nerve fibers. No immunocompetent cells were IR for any antisera in the control. However, after the streptozotocin treatment, a large number of the immunocompetent cells showed immunoreactivity for SP and NPY. Counting all immunocompetent cells in whole sections showed that 12.3% of them were IR for SP and 25.4% were IR for NPY. Increased number of SP-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in diabetes mellitus might be the reason for painful neuropathy and might amplify the inflammatory reaction in an axon reflex manner; the released histamine and leukotrienes, cytokines, and chemokines might cause inflammations and lesions of the mucosa. PMID:17151308

  11. Effect of edetate disodium and reduced glutathione on absorption of acetazolamide from GI tract of rats.

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, R D; Ward, R L

    1976-05-01

    The absorption of acetazolamide suspensions from in situ rat gastric and intestinal loop segments was studied. In 1 hr, 66.2 and 64.3% remained unabsorbed from the rat stomach and intestine, respectively. Although 1% (w/v) reduced glutathione and 1% (w/v) (24 mM) edetate disodium had no effect on gastric absorption, drug absorption from the rat intestine (1 hr) was increased 1.5 and 2 times, respectively. It was hypothesized that the relatively poor intestinal absorption was due primarily to the formation of a pH-dependent (pH 4.5-10), nonabsorbable complex between acetazolamide and carbonic anhydrase present in the gut and that reduced glutathione acted as an inhibitor to promote intestinal absorption. Equilibrium dialysis studies showed that reduced glutathion could reduce the fraction of drug bound to human carbonic anhydrase B by one-half when present in a molar ratio 10 times that of acetazolamide; edetate disodium had no effect on the in vitro binding. It was, therefore, assumed that edetate disodium promoted an increase in intestinal absorption by altering the permeability of intestinal epithelium. Based upon present experimentation, however, the alteration of intestinal epithelium by reduced glutathione cannot be ruled out. PMID:6773

  12. Effect of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on volume and albumin content of respiratory tract fluid but not on epithelial secretory cell number in "smoking" rats.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N; Brattsand, R; Dahlbäck, M

    1990-03-01

    This study was designed to look at the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on epithelial secretory cells and the respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content from the lower airways of "bronchitic" rats. Rats were exposed either to tobacco smoke (TS), TS and NAC, or NAC alone. TS caused a significant increase in epithelial secretory cell number which was not reduced by concomitant NAC administration; NAC alone had no effect on cell numbers. TS increased respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content by a small but non-significant amount, whereas TS and NAC increased the volume and albumin content by a greater and significant amount; NAC alone was also shown to significantly increase both fluid volume and albumin content. PMID:2340888

  13. Effect of oral N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on volume and albumin content of respiratory tract fluid but not on epithelial secretory cell number in "smoking" rats.

    PubMed

    Robinson, N; Brattsand, R; Dahlbäck, M

    1990-03-01

    This study was designed to look at the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on epithelial secretory cells and the respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content from the lower airways of "bronchitic" rats. Rats were exposed either to tobacco smoke (TS), TS and NAC, or NAC alone. TS caused a significant increase in epithelial secretory cell number which was not reduced by concomitant NAC administration; NAC alone had no effect on cell numbers. TS increased respiratory tract fluid volume and albumin content by a small but non-significant amount, whereas TS and NAC increased the volume and albumin content by a greater and significant amount; NAC alone was also shown to significantly increase both fluid volume and albumin content.

  14. Combined effect of selected mineral fibres and tobacco smoke on respiratory tract in rats.

    PubMed

    Hurbánková, Marta; Hraškov, Dominika; Beňo, Milan; Černa, Silvia; Wimmerova, Soňa; Moricová, Štefánia

    2014-09-01

    The rats were inhaling amosite and wollastonite fibres at two concentrations (30 and 60 mg/m3) one hour every second day and cigarette smoke of 3 cigarettes per day (with the exception of Saturdays and Sundays). They were sacrificed after 6 month of exposure. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and selected inflammatory and cytotoxic parameters were examined. Amosite: inflammatory parameters were the most changed after 60 mg/m3 in both groups with or without smoking; the cytotoxic parameters were strongly influenced by smoking. Wollastonite (asbestos substitute) inhalation confirmed lower inflammatory and cytotoxic effects on all examined animal groups in comparison with amosite. PMID:25438392

  15. Effects of fasting and/or oxidizing and reducing agents on absorption of neptunium from the gastrointestinal tract of mice and adult or neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Ruemmler, P S; Ryan, J L

    1984-12-01

    Neptunium-237(V) nitrate was administered by gavage to groups of fed or fasted adult and 5-day-old rats. Some groups also received the oxidants quinhydrone or ferric iron, and others received the reducing agent ferrous iron. Adult mice received ferric or ferrous iron and 235Np. When the adult rats were killed at 7 days after gavage, measurements showed that, compared with rats that were fed, a 24-hr fast caused a fivefold increase in 237Np absorption and retention. Both quinhydrone and ferric iron caused an even greater increase in absorption in both fed and fasted rats. Ferrous iron, on the other hand, decreased absorption in fasted rats to values lower than those obtained in fed rats. Similar results were obtained in mice treated with 235Np and either ferric or ferrous iron. The highest absorption obtained after gavage of ferric iron to fasted rats and mice was about two orders of magnitude higher than the value obtained in animals that were fed before gavage. The effects of ferric and ferrous iron on neptunium absorption by neonatal rats were similar to their effects on adult animals but of lesser magnitude. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that Np(V), when given in small mass quantities to fed animals, is reduced in the gastrointestinal tract to Np(IV), which is less well absorbed than Np(V).

  16. Bromochloromethane, a Methane Analogue, Affects the Microbiota and Metabolic Profiles of the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Mu, Chun-Long; Luo, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bromochloromethane (BCM), an inhibitor of methanogenesis, has been used in animal production. However, little is known about its impact on the intestinal microbiota and metabolic patterns. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of BCM on the colonic bacterial community and metabolism by establishing a Wistar rat model. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups (control and treated with BCM) and raised for 6 weeks. Bacterial fermentation products in the cecum were determined, and colonic methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were quantified. The colonic microbiota was analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, and metabolites were profiled by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results showed that BCM did not affect body weight and feed intake, but it did significantly change the intestinal metabolic profiles. Cecal protein fermentation was enhanced by BCM, as methylamine, putrescine, phenylethylamine, tyramine, and skatole were significantly increased. Colonic fatty acid and carbohydrate concentrations were significantly decreased, indicating the perturbation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by BCM. BCM treatment decreased the abundance of methanogen populations, while SRB were increased in the colon. BCM did not affect the total colonic bacterial counts but significantly altered the bacterial community composition by decreasing the abundance of actinobacteria, acidobacteria, and proteobacteria. The results demonstrated that BCM treatment significantly altered the microbiotic and metabolite profiles in the intestines, which may provide further information on the use of BCM in animal production. PMID:26567308

  17. Bromochloromethane, a Methane Analogue, Affects the Microbiota and Metabolic Profiles of the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Mu, Chun-Long; Luo, Zhen; Zhu, Wei-Yun

    2016-02-01

    Bromochloromethane (BCM), an inhibitor of methanogenesis, has been used in animal production. However, little is known about its impact on the intestinal microbiota and metabolic patterns. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of BCM on the colonic bacterial community and metabolism by establishing a Wistar rat model. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups (control and treated with BCM) and raised for 6 weeks. Bacterial fermentation products in the cecum were determined, and colonic methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were quantified. The colonic microbiota was analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, and metabolites were profiled by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results showed that BCM did not affect body weight and feed intake, but it did significantly change the intestinal metabolic profiles. Cecal protein fermentation was enhanced by BCM, as methylamine, putrescine, phenylethylamine, tyramine, and skatole were significantly increased. Colonic fatty acid and carbohydrate concentrations were significantly decreased, indicating the perturbation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by BCM. BCM treatment decreased the abundance of methanogen populations, while SRB were increased in the colon. BCM did not affect the total colonic bacterial counts but significantly altered the bacterial community composition by decreasing the abundance of actinobacteria, acidobacteria, and proteobacteria. The results demonstrated that BCM treatment significantly altered the microbiotic and metabolite profiles in the intestines, which may provide further information on the use of BCM in animal production. PMID:26567308

  18. Is Remodelling of Corticospinal Tract Terminations Originating in the Intact Hemisphere Associated with Recovery following Transient Ischaemic Stroke in the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Emma J.; Dewar, Deborah; Maxwell, David J

    2016-01-01

    Following large strokes that encompass the cerebral cortex, it has been suggested that the corticospinal tract originating from the non-ischaemic hemisphere reorganises its pattern of terminal arborisation within the spinal cord to compensate for loss of function. However many strokes in humans predominantly affect subcortical structures with minimal involvement of the cerebral cortex. The aim of the present study was to determine whether remodelling of corticospinal terminals arising from the non-ischaemic hemisphere was associated with spontaneous recovery in rats with subcortical infarcts. Rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham surgery and 28 days later, when animals exhibited functional recovery, cholera toxin b subunit was injected into the contralesional, intact forelimb motor cortex in order to anterogradely label terminals within cervical spinal cord segments. Infarcts were limited to subcortical structures and resulted in partial loss of corticospinal tract axons from the ischaemic hemisphere. Quantitative analysis revealed there was no significant difference in the numbers of terminals on the contralesional side of the spinal grey matter between ischaemic and sham rats. The results indicate that significant remodelling of the corticospinal tract from the non-ischaemic hemisphere is not associated with functional recovery in animals with subcortical infarcts. PMID:27014870

  19. Heterogeneity of morphological and functional changes in various compartments of rat urinary bladder in infravesical obstruction of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kirpatovskii, V I; Kudryavtsev, Yu V; Mudraya, I S; Belik, S M; Khromov, R A

    2009-01-01

    Infravesical obstruction of the lower urinary tract was simulated in rats by dosed constriction of the prevesical portion of the urethra. The functional and morphological changes in various urinary bladder compartments were evaluated after 1 week and 3 months. The development of compensatory hypertrophy of the detrusor was associated with an increase in the number of hypertrophic, atrophic, and young leiomyocyte forms and their transformation into myofibroblasts, with the formation of connective tissue laminae between myofibril bundles mainly in the zone of urinary urinary bladder neck. Specific contractility of the detrusor strips decreased with increasing their tone, which was most pronounced in the neck zone. The relaxing effect of norepinephrine was significantly lower after 3 months of obstruction and virtually disappeared in the zone of the urinary bladder body and neck. Blockade of a-adrenoceptors after adrenostimulation with norepinephrine stimulated contractions of the hypertrophic detrusor against the background of reduced tone of the urinary bladder neck, in contrast to intact urinary bladder where this treatment reduced contractions.

  20. Central connectivity of the chorda tympani afferent terminals in the rat rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Kyung; Lee, Dae Seop; Bae, Jin Young; Bae, Yong Chul

    2016-03-01

    The rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives gustatory input via chorda tympani (CT) afferents from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and transmits it to higher brain regions. To help understand how the gustatory information is processed at the 1st relay nucleus of the brain stem, we investigated the central connectivity of the CT afferent terminals in the central subdivision of the rat rNST through retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, immunogold staining for GABA, glycine, and glutamate, and quantitative ultrastructural analysis. Most CT afferents were small myelinated fibers (<5 µm(2) in cross-sectional area) and made simple synaptic arrangements with 1-2 postsynaptic dendrites. It suggests that the gustatory signal is relayed to a specific group of neurons with a small degree of synaptic divergence. The volume of the identified synaptic boutons was positively correlated with their mitochondrial volume and active zone area, and also with the number of their postsynaptic dendrites. One-fourth of the boutons received synapses from GABA-immunopositive presynaptic profiles, 27 % of which were also glycine-immunopositive. These results suggest that the gustatory information mediated by CT afferents to the rNST is processed in a simple and specific manner. They also suggest that the minority of CT afferents are presynaptically modulated by GABA- and/or glycine-mediated mechanism.

  1. Temporal coding of intensity of NaCl and HCl in the nucleus of the solitary tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Victor, Jonathan D; Di Lorenzo, Patricia M

    2011-02-01

    Sensory neurons are generally tuned to a subset of stimulus qualities within their sensory domain and manifest this tuning by the relative size of their responses to stimuli of equal intensity. However, response size alone cannot unambiguously signal stimulus quality, since response size also depends on stimulus intensity. Thus a common problem faced by sensory systems is that response size (e.g., spike count) confounds stimulus quality and intensity. Here, using the gustatory system as a model, we asked whether temporal firing characteristics could disambiguate these axes. To address this question, we recorded taste responses of single neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, the first central gustatory relay) in anesthetized rats to a range of concentrations of NaCl and HCl and their binary mixtures. To assess the contribution of the temporal characteristics of the response to discrimination among tastants, a family of metrics that quantifies the similarity of two spike trains in terms of spike count and spike timing was used. Results showed that the spike count produced by different taste qualities and different concentrations overlapped in most cells, implying that information conveyed by spike count is imprecise. Multidimensional scaling analysis of taste responses using similarity of temporal characteristics showed that different taste qualities, intensities, and mixtures formed distinct clusters in this "temporal coding" taste space and were arranged in a logical order. Thus the temporal structure of taste responses in single cells in the NTS can simultaneously convey information about both taste quality and intensity. PMID:21106899

  2. Hydrogen sulfide depolarizes neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rishi; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gasotransmitter that has been described to affect the membrane potential of neurons in a number of brain areas. Using whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques, we investigated the effects of H2S on the membrane potential of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Whole cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from 300 µm coronal NTS brain slices and bath application of the H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS)(1mM, 5mM and 10mM) was shown to have clear concentration-dependent, reversible, depolarizing effects on the membrane potential of 95% of neurons tested (72/76), an effect which in 64% (46/72) of these responding neurons was followed by a hyperpolarization. In the presence of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and the glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KA), these depolarizing effects of 5 mM NaHS (5.0 ± 2.2 mV (n=7)) were still observed, although they were significantly reduced compared to regular aCSF (7.7 ± 2.0 mV (n=7), p*<0.05, paired t-test). We also demonstrated that hyperpolarizations in response to 5mM NaHS resulted from modulation of the KATP channel with recordings showing that following KATP channel block with glibenclamide these hyperpolarizing effects were abolished (Control -7.9 ± 1.2 mV, Glibenclamide -1.9 ± 0.9 mV (n=8) p<0.05, paired t-test). This study has for the first time described post-synaptic effects of this gasotransmitter on the membrane potential of NTS neurons and thus implicates this transmitter in regulating the diverse autonomic systems controlled by the NTS.

  3. Sialomucin complex in the rat respiratory tract: a model for its role in epithelial protection.

    PubMed Central

    McNeer, R R; Huang, D; Fregien, N L; Carraway, K L

    1998-01-01

    The pulmonary epithelium has a multitude of specialized functions, which depend on regulated growth and differentiation of several cell types. One such function is the synthesis and secretion of mucins, which offer the epithelium protection from and a means for removal of noxious environmental factors. Sialomucin complex (SMC) is a heterodimeric glycoprotein consisting of a mucin subunit (ASGP-1, ascites sialoglycoprotein-1) and a transmembrane protein (ASGP-2) with two epidermal-growth-factor-like domains. SMC was originally discovered in a highly metastatic rat mammary adenocarcinoma and has been implicated in metastasis and in the protection of the tumour cells from natural killer cells. It can also act as a ligand for the receptor tyrosine kinase 185(neu), suggesting that it is bifunctional as well as heterodimeric. SMC is expressed on the epithelium of rat conducting airways, with the highest levels occurring in the proximal trachea and progressively decreasing into the bronchioles. Airway SMC consists of two forms: a soluble form that lacks the C-terminal cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains and accounts for about 70% of the total, and a membrane-associated form that has the C-terminal domains. Immunocytochemical analyses show that SMC is predominantly present on the apical surfaces of the airway epithelium, but not in goblet cells. Soluble form can be removed from the trachea by rinsing, suggesting that a fraction of the protein is adsorbed to the apical surface. Based on these results, we propose a protective mechanism in which membrane and soluble forms of SMC are produced by airway luminal epithelial cells to provide a cell-associated epithelial glycoprotein barrier that also serves as an interface with flowing mucus. In support of this mechanism, we demonstrated secretion of soluble SMC by primary cultures of tracheal epithelial cells. This model suggests that SMC is a critical element in the protective barrier of the airway epithelium. PMID:9480884

  4. Inhibition by tianeptine of neuronally mediated contractions in the rat isolated gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Victoria N; Bassil, Anna K; Lee, Kevin; Sanger, Gareth J

    2008-05-01

    The antidepressant tianeptine is associated with a small but significant incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) side effects, including nausea and constipation. Since the site of action of tianeptine is not clear, we looked for an ability of this drug to directly interfere with GI motility. The effects of tianeptine were studied in rat isolated stomach and colon preparations, in which neuronally mediated (predominantly cholinergic) contractions were evoked by electrical field stimulation. Tianeptine concentration dependently inhibited these contractions in both stomach (0.3-10microM; n=2-5) and colon (1-10microM; n=3-6). This activity was likely to be prejunctional, since contractions evoked by carbachol were unaffected by tianeptine 1microM. Further, the inhibitory activity of tianeptine was unaffected by inhibitors of 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline re-uptake, adenosine metabolism, nitric oxide synthesis and tryptophan dehydroxylase. Thus, our experiments demonstrate a pathway by which tianeptine affects GI functions and this could explain the side effects observed. It is not known if the mechanism of this activity is also related in any way to the therapeutic action of tianeptine within the CNS.

  5. Deposition of dibasic esters in the upper respiratory tract of the male and female Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Morris, J B; Clay, R J; Trela, B A; Bogdanffy, M S

    1991-05-01

    Inhalation exposure of the male and female rat to high concentrations of a mixture of the dibasic esters dimethyl succinate (DMS), dimethyl glutarate (DMG), and dimethyl adipate (DMA) results in mild olfactory toxicity. This response is thought to be due to the in situ formation of acidic metabolites via nasal carboxylesterases. The current study was designed to provide inhalation dosimetric information for these vapors. Deposition of DMS, DMG, and DMA was measured in the surgically isolated upper respiratory tracts (URT) of ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized male and female rats under constant velocity flow conditions at a flow rate of 100 ml/min. Deposition of acetone was measured in both genders for comparative purposes. URT deposition efficiencies in excess of 98.3% were observed for DMS, DMG, and DMA in animals exposed to each vapor individually. No gender differences in deposition efficiency were observed for these vapors or for acetone. Deposition of DMS, DMG, and DMA was also measured in animals exposed to all three vapors simultaneously. Deposition efficiency under simultaneous exposure conditions ranged between 97.3 and 98.5%. These values were slightly lower (about 1%) than those obtained under individual exposure conditions (p less than 0.0001). The reduced deposition efficiency may have resulted from competitive inhibition of nasal metabolism due to the simultaneous presence of all three carboxylesterase substrate vapors in nasal tissues. If so, inhalation of dibasic ester vapors would be expected to inhibit the uptake of other carboxylesterase substrate vapors without influencing uptake of vapors which are not substrates for this enzyme. Such was observed in studies using DMS, ethyl acetate (the substrate vapor), and isoamyl alcohol (the nonsubstrate vapor). Specifically, simultaneous exposure to DMS markedly inhibited uptake of ethyl acetate without altering uptake of isoamyl alcohol. Gender differences were not observed in URT deposition of any of the

  6. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) induced antimicrobial gene expression in the male reproductive tract of rat: evaluation of the potential of Defensin 21 to limit infection.

    PubMed

    Biswas, B; Bhushan, S; Rajesh, A; Suraj, S K; Lu, Y; Meinhardt, A; Yenugu, S

    2015-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is a common pathogen in epididymitis, which represents a prevalent entity in male reproductive tract infections (RTI). Although current treatment regimens using antibiotics are satisfactory, development of antimicrobial resistance by the pathogen represents a challenge in the management of RTI. Hence, identification of antimicrobial peptides as alternatives to antibiotics has gained importance. We demonstrate that in a rat epididymo-orchitis model induced with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain MTCC 729, the expression of defensins and defensin-like Spag11 genes are induced in the epididymis and testes. The induction of antimicrobial gene expression is paralleled by phosphorylation of the NF-kB subunit p65 and the inhibitor of NFkB (IkB-alpha), decreased levels of histone deacetylase 1 and increased methylation of Histone 3, indicating the role of classical Toll-like receptor mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation. Recombinant Defensin 21, when administered to UPEC-infected rats, substantially reduced the bacterial load in the epididymis and testis and proved to be more effective than gentamycin. The ability of Defensin 21 to limit RTI provides support that antibacterial proteins of the male reproductive tract may be used as potential alternatives to antibiotics in treatment of this disease.

  7. Dietary sodium chloride deprivation throughout development selectively influences the terminal field organization of gustatory afferent fibers projecting to the rat nucleus of the solitary tract.

    PubMed

    King, C T; Hill, D L

    1991-01-01

    In order to determine whether the developing central gustatory system responds to altered sensory experience, terminal fields of the chorda tympani nerve (CT) within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in control, NaCl deprived, and rats in which CT taste responses "recovered" from NaCl deprivation were investigated via anterograde transport of HRP. Rats fed a low sodium diet (0.03% NaCl) from the third day of gestation to at least 35 days postnatal exhibited both abnormally distributed and irregularly shaped CT terminal fields. Specifically, the dorsal zone of the field was the smallest in controls whereas it was the largest in deprived rats, occupying more medial and caudal territory within the nucleus. The portion of the field immediately ventral to the dorsalmost zone was characterized by a compact, oval shape in control rats and an irregular, broad configuration in deprived rats. Although it has been observed that deprivation-induced changes in the neurophysiology of the CT are reversible, the central morphological alterations reported here remain abnormal. Restoration of 1.0% NaCl in the diet at 28 days postnatally, for at least 60 days, did not result in normal CT terminal fields. The pattern of the field in rats "recovered" from NaCl deprivation was comparable to that found in deprived rats, and the size of the field was three times that found in control and deprived rats. The terminal fields of another nerve containing gustatory afferents, the lingual-tonsilar branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve (LT-IX), were studied for comparison. Interestingly, the pattern of the LT-IX field was not altered by sodium deprivation. The relative size and topography of the LT-IX fields in deprived rats were similar to controls. Thus, sodium deprivation appears to alter selectively the anatomical organization of the CT. Differences in vulnerability between the CT and LT-IX terminal fields may derive from differences in the responsiveness of these nerves to NaCl, and

  8. UPTAKE AND INTERNAL DOSIMETRY OF INHALED CHLORINE IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to large-volume commercial uses as an intermediate and for water disinfection, chlorine (Cl2) is an important hazardous air pollutant (HAP). Inhaled Cl2 causes irritant effects in the respiratory tract. We conducted studies to characterize determinants...

  9. Inflammation and Edema in the Lung and Kidney of Hemorrhagic Shock Rats Are Alleviated by Biliary Tract External Drainage via the Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhao, Bing; Chen, Ying; Ma, Li; Chen, Er-Zhen; Mao, En-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    The lung and kidney are two organs that are easily affected by hemorrhagic shock (HS). We investigated roles of biliary tract external drainage (BTED) in inflammation and edema of the lung and kidney in HS and its relationship with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Rat models of HS were induced by drawing blood from the femoral artery until a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 40 ± 5 mmHg was achieved. A MAP of 40 ± 5 mmHg was maintained for 60 min. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to the following groups: sham group; HS group; HS + zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, group; HS + BTED group; HS + BTED + ZnPP group; and HS + BTED + bile infusion (BI) group. HO-1 levels, aquaporin-1 levels, and ratios of dry/wet in the lung and kidney increased markedly after BTED, but tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase levels in the lung and kidney decreased significantly after BTED under HS conditions. Under the condition that HO-1 was inhibited by ZnPP, all these effects induced by BTED disappeared in the lung and kidney. These results demonstrated that inflammation and edema of the lung and kidney of HS rats are alleviated by BTED via the HO-1 pathway.

  10. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC) Ultrastructure and Connexin 43 Protein Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Functional Dyspepsia (FD) Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoshan; Xie, Shen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuer; Liu, Mailan; Liu, Mi; Chang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal motility disorder is the main clinical manifestation in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. Electroacupuncture is effective in improving gastrointestinal motility disorder in FD; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and the pacemaker potential is transmitted to nearby cells through gap junctions between ICC or ICC and the smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture on ICC ultrastructure and expression of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in FD rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS The animals were randomized into 3 groups: control, model, and electroacupuncture. Electroacupuncture was applied at Zusanli (ST36) in the electroacupuncture group daily for 10 days, while no electroacupuncture was applied to model group animals. RESULTS Ultrastructure of ICC recovered normally in gastric antrum and small intestine specimens was improved, with Cx43 expression levels in these tissues significantly increased in the electroacupuncture group compared with the model group. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicated that electroacupuncture is effective in alleviating ICC damage and reduces Cx43 levels in FD rats, and suggest that ICC and Cx43 are involved in electroacupuncture treatment in rats with FD to improve gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:27297942

  11. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC) Ultrastructure and Connexin 43 Protein Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Functional Dyspepsia (FD) Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoshan; Xie, Shen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuer; Liu, Mailan; Liu, Mi; Chang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal motility disorder is the main clinical manifestation in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. Electroacupuncture is effective in improving gastrointestinal motility disorder in FD; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and the pacemaker potential is transmitted to nearby cells through gap junctions between ICC or ICC and the smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture on ICC ultrastructure and expression of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in FD rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS The animals were randomized into 3 groups: control, model, and electroacupuncture. Electroacupuncture was applied at Zusanli (ST36) in the electroacupuncture group daily for 10 days, while no electroacupuncture was applied to model group animals. RESULTS Ultrastructure of ICC recovered normally in gastric antrum and small intestine specimens was improved, with Cx43 expression levels in these tissues significantly increased in the electroacupuncture group compared with the model group. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicated that electroacupuncture is effective in alleviating ICC damage and reduces Cx43 levels in FD rats, and suggest that ICC and Cx43 are involved in electroacupuncture treatment in rats with FD to improve gastrointestinal motility disorders.

  12. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC) Ultrastructure and Connexin 43 Protein Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Functional Dyspepsia (FD) Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guoshan; Xie, Shen; Hu, Wei; Liu, Yuer; Liu, Mailan; Liu, Mi; Chang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal motility disorder is the main clinical manifestation in functional dyspepsia (FD) patients. Electroacupuncture is effective in improving gastrointestinal motility disorder in FD; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract, and the pacemaker potential is transmitted to nearby cells through gap junctions between ICC or ICC and the smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the effects of electroacupuncture on ICC ultrastructure and expression of the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in FD rats. Material/Methods The animals were randomized into 3 groups: control, model, and electroacupuncture. Electroacupuncture was applied at Zusanli (ST36) in the electroacupuncture group daily for 10 days, while no electroacupuncture was applied to model group animals. Results Ultrastructure of ICC recovered normally in gastric antrum and small intestine specimens was improved, with Cx43 expression levels in these tissues significantly increased in the electroacupuncture group compared with the model group. Conclusions These findings indicated that electroacupuncture is effective in alleviating ICC damage and reduces Cx43 levels in FD rats, and suggest that ICC and Cx43 are involved in electroacupuncture treatment in rats with FD to improve gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:27297942

  13. Alterations of action potentials and the localization of Nav1.6 sodium channels in spared axons after hemisection injury of the spinal cord in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Hunanyan, Arsen S.; Alessi, Valentina; Patel, Samik; Pearse, Damien D.; Matthews, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported a pronounced reduction in transmission through surviving axons contralateral to chronic hemisection (HX) of adult rat spinal cord. To examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for this diminished transmission, we recorded intracellularly from lumbar lateral white matter axons in deeply anesthetized adult rats in vivo and measured the propagation of action potentials (APs) through rubrospinal/reticulospinal tract (RST/RtST) axons contralateral to chronic HX at T10. We found decreased excitability in these axons, manifested by an increased rheobase to trigger APs and longer latency for AP propagation passing the injury level, without significant differences in axonal resting membrane potential and input resistance. These electrophysiological changes were associated with altered spatial localization of Nav1.6 sodium channels along axons: a subset of axons contralateral to the injury exhibited a diffuse localization (>10 μm spread) of Nav1.6 channels, a pattern characteristic of demyelinated axons (Craner MJ, Newcombe J, Black JA, Hartle C, Cuzner ML, Waxman SG. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 101: 8168–8173, 2004b). This result was substantiated by ultrastructural changes seen with electron microscopy, in which an increased number of large-caliber, demyelinated RST axons were found contralateral to the chronic HX. Therefore, an increased rheobase, pathological changes in the distribution of Nav1.6 sodium channels, and the demyelination of contralateral RST axons are likely responsible for their decreased conduction chronically after HX and thus may provide novel targets for strategies to improve function following incomplete spinal cord injury. PMID:21177993

  14. Dose Addition Models Based on Biologically Relevant Reductions in Fetal Testosterone Accurately Predict Postnatal Reproductive Tract Alterations by a Phthalate Mixture in Rats.

    PubMed

    Howdeshell, Kembra L; Rider, Cynthia V; Wilson, Vickie S; Furr, Johnathan R; Lambright, Christy R; Gray, L Earl

    2015-12-01

    Challenges in cumulative risk assessment of anti-androgenic phthalate mixtures include a lack of data on all the individual phthalates and difficulty determining the biological relevance of reduction in fetal testosterone (T) on postnatal development. The objectives of the current study were 2-fold: (1) to test whether a mixture model of dose addition based on the fetal T production data of individual phthalates would predict the effects of a 5 phthalate mixture on androgen-sensitive postnatal male reproductive tract development, and (2) to determine the biological relevance of the reductions in fetal T to induce abnormal postnatal reproductive tract development using data from the mixture study. We administered a dose range of the mixture (60, 40, 20, 10, and 5% of the top dose used in the previous fetal T production study consisting of 300 mg/kg per chemical of benzyl butyl (BBP), di(n)butyl (DBP), diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP), di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP), and 100 mg dipentyl (DPP) phthalate/kg; the individual phthalates were present in equipotent doses based on their ability to reduce fetal T production) via gavage to Sprague Dawley rat dams on GD8-postnatal day 3. We compared observed mixture responses to predictions of dose addition based on the previously published potencies of the individual phthalates to reduce fetal T production relative to a reference chemical and published postnatal data for the reference chemical (called DAref). In addition, we predicted DA (called DAall) and response addition (RA) based on logistic regression analysis of all 5 individual phthalates when complete data were available. DA ref and DA all accurately predicted the observed mixture effect for 11 of 14 endpoints. Furthermore, reproductive tract malformations were seen in 17-100% of F1 males when fetal T production was reduced by about 25-72%, respectively. PMID:26350170

  15. Fate and effect of ingested Bacillus cereus spores and vegetative cells in the intestinal tract of human-flora-associated rats.

    PubMed

    Wilcks, Andrea; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Licht, Tine Rask

    2006-02-01

    The fate and effect of Bacillus cereus F4433/73R in the intestine of human-flora-associated rats was studied using bacteriological culturing techniques and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in combination with cell assays and immunoassays for detection of enterotoxins. In faecal samples from animals receiving vegetative cells, only few B. cereus cells were detected. Spores survived the gastric barrier well, and were in some cases detected up to 2 weeks after ingestion. Selective growing revealed no major changes in the intestinal flora during passage of B. cereus. However, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis with universal 16S rRNA gene primers revealed significant changes in the intestinal microbiota of animals dosed with spores. Vero cell assays and a commercial kit (BCET-RPLA) did not reveal any enterotoxin production from B. cereus F4433/73R in the intestinal tract.

  16. Manifestation of the Se, Cd and Mo levels in different components of the peripheral blood of Sprague-Dawley rats poisoned via the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Fang; Sun, Xuan; Cao, Bing; Wen, Hua; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Duo-Jian; Yan, Lai-Lai; Liu, Ya-Qiong; Lu, Qing-Bin; Wang, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of exogenous element exposure via the respiratory tract on the Se, Cd and Mo concentrations in different components of the peripheral blood in rats as well as to determine the correlations of the three trace elements concentrations among the components. The Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and several experimental groups treated with different doses. The rats were exposed to a mixed trace element solution through 10 days of intratracheal instillation. The whole blood of all rats was collected and separated into three parts with Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The Se, Cd and Mo levels in whole blood, plasma, red blood cells (RBCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The concentrations of the three trace elements increased together with the increase of the given doses (P<0.05), except Cd and Mo in the PBMCs. The three trace elements lacked linearity with the exposure doses in the PBMCs (r, 0.249-0.508), while the opposite was the case for the other components of the peripheral blood (r, 0.806-0.934). The correlation coefficients were higher (0.842-0.962) among the whole blood, plasma and RBCs than between PBMCs and other components, such as Se (0.376-0.529), Cd (0.495-0.604) and, especially, Mo (0.160-0.257). In conclusion, PBMCs might provide information about endogenous factors, and whole blood could more accurately reflect the effects of exogenous factors compared to other blood components. PMID:26770359

  17. Implications of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) with codissolved brain-derived neurotrophic factor injectable scaffold on motor function recovery rate following cervical dorsolateral funiculotomy in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Grous, Lauren Conova; Vernengo, Jennifer; Jin, Ying; Himes, B. Timothy; Shumsky, Jed S.; Fischer, Itzhak; Lowman, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Object In a follow-up study to their prior work, the authors evaluated a novel delivery system for a previously established treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), based on a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), lightly cross-linked with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) injectable scaffold. The primary aim of this work was to assess the recovery of both spontaneous and skilled forelimb function following a cervical dorsolateral funiculotomy in the rat. This injury ablates the rubrospinal tract (RST) but spares the dorsal and ventral corticospinal tract and can severely impair reaching and grasping abilities. Methods Animals received an implant of either PNIPAAm-g-PEG or PNIPAAm-g-PEG + brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The single-pellet reach-to-grasp task and the staircase-reaching task were used to assess skilled motor function associated with reaching and grasping abilities, and the cylinder task was used to assess spontaneous motor function, both before and after injury. Results Because BDNF can stimulate regenerating RST axons, the authors showed that animals receiving an implant of PNIPAAm-g-PEG with codissolved BDNF had an increased recovery rate of fine motor function when compared with a control group (PNIPAAm-g-PEG only) on both a staircase-reaching task at 4 and 8 weeks post-SCI and on a single-pellet reach-to-grasp task at 5 weeks post-SCI. In addition, spontaneous motor function, as measured in the cylinder test, recovered to preinjury values in animals receiving PNIPAAm-g-PEG + BDNF. Fluorescence immunochemistry indicated the presence of both regenerating axons and BDA-labeled fibers growing up to or within the host-graft interface in animals receiving PNIPAAm-g-PEG + BDNF. Conclusions Based on their results, the authors suggest that BDNF delivered by the scaffold promoted the growth of RST axons into the lesion, which may have contributed in part to the increased recovery rate. PMID:23581453

  18. ATRAZINE-INDUCED REPRODUCTIVE TRACT ALTERATIONS AFTER TRANSPLACENTAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE IN LONG-EVANS RAT PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies have shown that early postnatal exposure to the common herbicide atrazine (ATR) will delay preputial separation (PPS) in Wistar rats and increase incidence of prostate inflammation in adults. To evaluate ATR exposure parameters required for pubertal delays (PPS), we used...

  19. ATRAZINE-INDUCED REPRODUCTIVE TRACT ALTERATIONS AFTER TRANSPLACENTAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE IN MALE LONG-EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR wou...

  20. Immunoreactivity for Thymosin Beta 4 and Thymosin Beta 10 in the Adult Rat Oro-Gastro-Intestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Nemolato, S; Ekstrom, J.; Cabras, T.; Gerosa, C.; Fanni, D.; Di Felice, E.; Locci, A.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2013-01-01

    Thymosin beta 4 (Tβ4) and thymosin beta 10 (Tβ10) are two members of the β-thymosin family, involved in multiple cellular activities in different organs in multiple animal species. Here we report the expression pattern of Tβ4 and Tβ10 in rat tissues, in the gut and in annexed glands. The two peptide were differently expressed: Tβ4 was absent in salivary glands whereas Tβ10 was expressed in parotid and in submandibular glands. Tβ4 was mildly expressed in the tongue and in the esophagus, where Tβ10 was absent. A similar expression was found in the stomach, ileum and colon mucosa. In pancreas Tβ4 reactivity was restricted to the Langerhans islet cells; Tβ4 was also detected in the exocrine cells. Both peptide were not expressed in liver cells. When the rat expression pattern in rat organs was compared to reactivity for Tβ4 and Tβ10 in humans, marked differences were found. Our data clearly indicate a species-specific expression of Tβ4 and Tβ10, characterized by the actual unpredictability of the expression of these peptides in different cells and tissues. The common high expression of Tβ4 in mast cells, both in humans and in rats, represents one of the few similarities between these two species. PMID:23807296

  1. The effect of x rays, DTPA, and aspirin on the absorption of plutonium from the gastrointestinal tract of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.F.; Gorham, L.S.; Miller, B.M.

    1983-04-01

    To measure the effect of radiation on plutonium transport, rats that were exposed to 250-kVp X rays were given /sup 238/Pu 3 days afterwards by either gavage or injection into a ligated segment of the duodenum. In a second group of experiments, rats were either injected intraduodenally with /sup 238/Pu-DTPA or administered the chelate intravenously and the /sup 238/Pu by gavage. In a third experiment, rats that had been gavaged with 200 or 400 mg/kg/day of aspirin for 2 days were injected intragastrically with /sup 238/Pu nitrate. Results of the first experiment showed a dose-dependent increase in /sup 238/Pu absorption between 800 and 1500 rad of lower-body X irradiation. Intravenous or intraduodenal injections of DTPA caused a marked increase in /sup 238/Pu absorption but resulted in decreased plutonium deposition in the skeleton and liver. Retention of /sup 238/Pu in the skeleton of rats given aspirin was double that of controls, but the effect on plutonium absorption was less marked than that of DTPA.

  2. Atrazine-induced reproductive tract alterations after transplacental and/or lactational exposure in male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rayner, Jennifer L.; Enoch, Rolondo R.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Fenton, Suzanne E. . E-mail: fenton.suzanne@epa.gov

    2007-02-01

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR would also result in altered puberty and reproductive tissue effects in the male rat. Timed-pregnant Long-Evans (LE) rats were dosed by gavage on gestational days (GD) 15-19 with 100 mg ATR/kg body weight (BW) or 1% methylcellulose (controls, C). On postnatal day (PND)1, half litters were cross-fostered, creating 4 treatment groups; C-C, ATR-C, C-ATR, and ATR-ATR (transplacental-milk as source, respectively). On PND4, male offspring in the ATR-ATR group weighed significantly less than the C-C males. ATR-ATR male pups had significantly delayed preputial separation (PPS). BWs at PPS for C-ATR and ATR-ATR males were reduced by 6% and 9%, respectively, from that of C-C. On PND120, lateral prostate weights of males in the ATR-ATR group were significantly increased over C-C. Histological examination of lateral and ventral prostates identified an increased distribution of inflammation in the lateral prostates of C-ATR males. By PND220, lateral prostate weights were significantly increased for ATR-C and ATR-ATR, but there were no significant changes in inflammation in either the lateral or ventral prostate. These results suggest that in LE rats, gestational ATR exposure delays PPS when male offspring suckle an ATR dam, but leads to increased lateral prostate weight via transplacental exposure alone. Inflammation present at PND120 does not increase in severity with time.

  3. [Cellobiohydrolase Activity in the Digestive Tract of two African Rodent Species the African Grass Rat Arvicanthis niloticus and Vlei Rat Otomys helleri].

    PubMed

    Varshavskiy, A Al; Varshavskiy, A A

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolase activity (CBHA) of endosymbionts in the digestive tract of two African rodent species differing in its morphology and in feeding specialization--Arvicanthis niloticus and Otomys helleri--has been studied as a characteristic of their physiological and ecological adaptation to phytophagy A statistically significant correlation of CBHA with obesity has been revealed in A. niloticus, with the CBHA level being significantly higher in corpus ceci than in ampulla ceci. The possible morphophysiological and ecological significance of the observed features of symbiotic digestion are discussed. PMID:26349239

  4. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  5. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Pancreas and Salivary Glands of the Rat and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Thomas; Brander-Weber, Patricia; Dangler, Charles; Deschl, Ulrich; Elwell, Michael R.; Greaves, Peter; Hailey, Richard; Leach, Michael W.; Pandiri, Arun R.; Rogers, Arlin; Shackelford, Cynthia C.; Spencer, Andrew; Tanaka, Takuji; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) project is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP), and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for nonproliferative and proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for classifying lesions in the digestive system including the salivary glands and the exocrine pancreas of laboratory rats and mice. Most lesions are illustrated by color photomicrographs. The standardized nomenclature, the diagnostic criteria, and the photomicrographs are also available electronically on the Internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous and age related lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test items. Relevant infectious and parasitic lesions are included as well. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for the digestive system will decrease misunderstandings among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. PMID:26973378

  6. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Pancreas and Salivary Glands of the Rat and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Thomas; Brander-Weber, Patricia; Dangler, Charles; Deschl, Ulrich; Elwell, Michael R; Greaves, Peter; Hailey, Richard; Leach, Michael W; Pandiri, Arun R; Rogers, Arlin; Shackelford, Cynthia C; Spencer, Andrew; Tanaka, Takuji; Ward, Jerrold M

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) project is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP), and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for nonproliferative and proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for classifying lesions in the digestive system including the salivary glands and the exocrine pancreas of laboratory rats and mice. Most lesions are illustrated by color photomicrographs. The standardized nomenclature, the diagnostic criteria, and the photomicrographs are also available electronically on the Internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous and age related lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test items. Relevant infectious and parasitic lesions are included as well. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for the digestive system will decrease misunderstandings among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists.

  7. Temporal and spatial expression of Muc2 and Muc5ac mucins during rat respiratory and digestive tracts development.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, V A; Segal-Eiras, A; Barbeito, C G; Croce, M V

    2016-02-01

    Secreted mucins constitute a crucial part of the gel that protects respiratory and digestive epithelia, being MUC2/Muc2 the predominant gel-forming mucin of the intestine while MUC5AC/Muc5ac is one of the gel-forming mucins most expressed at the airways. In this study, we have analyzed Muc2 and Muc5ac during rat development by using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and RT-PCR. We demonstrated that rat Muc2 was expressed in fetal intestinal goblet cells of surface epithelium of villi and developing Lieberkühn crypts. In neonates and adults, Muc2 was expressed at luminal goblet cells of small and large intestine and at gastric mucous and glandular cells. Muc5ac protein was observed in embryonic gastric and lung samples; expression increased during development and postnatal and adult life. After birth, a low reaction was detected at the tracheal surface epithelium and glands, which increased in adults. PMID:26850552

  8. Caudal Nuclei Of The Rat Nucleus Of The Solitary Tract Differentially Innervate Respiratory Compartments Within The Ventrolateral Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Alheid, George F.; Jiao, Weijie; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial array of respiratory, cardiovascular, visceral and somatic afferents are relayed via the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to the brainstem (and forebrain). Despite some degree of overlap within the NTS, specificity is maintained in central respiratory reflexes driven by 2nd order afferent relay neurons in the NTS. While the topographical arrangement of respiratory-related afferents targeting the NTS has been extensively investigated, their higher order brainstem targets beyond the NTS has only rarely been defined with any precision. Nonetheless, the various brainstem circuits serving blood gas homeostasis and airway protective reflexes must clearly receive a differential innervation from the NTS in order to evoke stimulus appropriate behavioral responses. Accordingly, we have examined the question of which specific NTS nuclei project to particular compartments within the ventral respiratory column (VRC) of the ventrolateral medulla. Our analyses of NTS labeling after retrograde tracer injections in the VRC and the nearby neuronal groups controlling autonomic function indicate a significant distinction between projections to the Bötzinger complex and preBötzinger complex compared to the remainder of the VRC. Specifically, the caudomedial NTS, including caudal portions of the medial solitary nucleus and the commissural division of NTS project relatively densely to the region of the retrotrapezoid nucleus and rostral ventrolateral medullary nucleus as well as to the rostral ventral respiratory group while avoiding the intervening Bötzinger and preBötzinger complexes. Area postrema appears to demonstrate a pattern of projections similar to that of caudal medial and commissural NTS nuclei. Other, less pronounced differential projections of lateral NTS nuclei to the various VRC compartments are additionally noted. PMID:21704133

  9. [Effect of veralipride on the estral cycle, genital tract, mammary gland and pituitary gland in female rats (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tuchmann-Duplessis, H

    1980-10-15

    A study of the potential biological effects of veralipride was conducted in female rats. A definite stimulating action on the mammary gland was noted, but doses of 5 to 20 mg/kg/day are required to produce secretion, which is varying from one animal to another. Follicular maturation is preserved, though there is an increase in the number of corpora lutea with more marked development in some of them. Progesterone impregnation of the uterus occurs in a variable way and then only at doses of 5 + 0 20 mg/kg/day. Vaginal mucification, from a reduction in estrogen in relation to progesterone impregnation, is noted after 1 mg/kg/day (though 25 p. cent of the animals still demonstrate vaginal keratinization after 20 mg/kg/day). Finally, degranulation of the carminophile cells of the anterior pituitary gland, occurs after 5 mg/kg/day.

  10. Protective role of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes in the male reproductive tract of the F-344 rat

    SciTech Connect

    Teaf, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purposes of this study were fourfold: to quantify GSH concentration and GSH-S-transferase activity in testis and epididymis of the F-344 rat; to screen selected compounds for capacity to depress GSH in male reproductive tissue; to determine the effect of pretreatment with agents which depress testicular/epididymal GSH on the dominant lethal (DL) mutagenic effect of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), which undergoes GSH-dependent metabolism; and to investigate the correlation between binding of radiolabelled EMS (/sup 3/H-EMS) and the temporal pattern of EMS-induced germ cell mutations. Cadmium (Cd), at a dosage which did not cause testicular necrosis was not effective in depressing GSH. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) depressed testicular and epididymal GSH to a minimum of 40% of concurrent controls in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. 1,2-dibromethane (EDB) depressed epididymal and testicular GSH in a dose-dependent fashion at 2 hours post-injection. Cd and EDB inhibited GSH-S transferase activity in edpididymis but no testis. Pretreatment of male F-344 rats with BSO or EDB potentiated the rate of EMS-induced DL mutations. The rate of /sup 3/H-EMS binding to isolated sperm heads was well correlated with the temporal pattern of DL mutations induced by EMS. BSO and EDB significantly increased /sup 3/H-EMS binding to sperm heads at time points during which potentiation of germ cell mutagenicity was observed. Data from these studies demonstrate that GSH depression is functionally correlated with enhancement of germ cell toxicity, establishing the importance of this biochemical protective mechanism GSH in male reproductive tissue.

  11. Little or no ability of obestatin to interact with ghrelin or modify motility in the rat gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, A K; Häglund, Y; Brown, J; Rudholm, T; Hellström, P M; Näslund, E; Lee, K; Sanger, G J

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Obestatin, encoded by the ghrelin gene may inhibit gastrointestinal (GI) motility. This activity was re-investigated. Experimental approach: Rat GI motility was studied in vitro (jejunum contractility and cholinergically-mediated contractions of forestomach evoked by electrical field stimulation; EFS) and in vivo (gastric emptying and intestinal myoelectrical activity). Ghrelin receptor function was studied using a GTPγS assay and transfected cells. Key results: Contractions of the jejunum or forestomach were unaffected by obestatin 100 nM or 0.01–1000 nM, respectively (P>0.05 each; n=4-18). Obestatin (0.1-1 nM) reduced the ability of ghrelin 1 μM to facilitate EFS-evoked contractions of the stomach (increases were 42.7±7.8% and 21.2±5.0 % in the absence and presence of obestatin 1 nM; P<0.05; n=12); higher concentrations (10–1000 nM) tended to reduce the response to ghrelin but changes were not statistically significant. Similar concentrations of obestatin did not significantly reduce a facilitation of contractions caused by the 5-HT4 receptor agonist prucalopride, although an inhibitory trend occurred at the higher concentrations (increases were 69.3±14.0% and 42.6±8.7% in the absence and presence of 1000 nM obestatin; n=10). Obestatin (up to 10 μM) did not modulate recombinant ghrelin receptor function. Ghrelin increased gastric emptying and reduced MMC cycle time; obestatin (1000 and 30,000 pmol kg−1 min−1) had no effects. Obestatin (2500 pmol kg−1 min−1, starting 10 min before ghrelin) did not prevent the ability of ghrelin (500 pmol kg−1 min−1) to shorten MMC cycle time. Conclusions and implications: Obestatin has little ability to modulate rat GI motility. PMID:17128285

  12. Intramuscular Neurotrophin-3 normalizes low threshold spinal reflexes, reduces spasms and improves mobility after bilateral corticospinal tract injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kathe, Claudia; Hutson, Thomas Haynes; McMahon, Stephen Brendan; Moon, Lawrence David Falcon

    2016-01-01

    Brain and spinal injury reduce mobility and often impair sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord leading to spasticity. Here, we establish that complete transection of corticospinal pathways in the pyramids impairs locomotion and leads to increased spasms and excessive mono- and polysynaptic low threshold spinal reflexes in rats. Treatment of affected forelimb muscles with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) encoding human Neurotrophin-3 at a clinically-feasible time-point after injury reduced spasticity. Neurotrophin-3 normalized the short latency Hoffmann reflex to a treated hand muscle as well as low threshold polysynaptic spinal reflexes involving afferents from other treated muscles. Neurotrophin-3 also enhanced locomotor recovery. Furthermore, the balance of inhibitory and excitatory boutons in the spinal cord and the level of an ion co-transporter in motor neuron membranes required for normal reflexes were normalized. Our findings pave the way for Neurotrophin-3 as a therapy that treats the underlying causes of spasticity and not only its symptoms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18146.001 PMID:27759565

  13. Effect of carcinogen release rate on the incidence of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions of the respiratory tract epithelium in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, M.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Marchok, A.C.; Pal, B.C.; Nettesheim, P.

    1982-11-01

    Inbred F344 rat tracheal transplants were exposed to 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) delivered at different release rates from intraluminal pellets made of various matrices to study the effect of carcinogen dose rate on the induction of lesions in the epithelium. These matrices were beeswax, beeswax-stearyl alcohol, and beeswax-cholesterol. In addition, DMBA adsorbed onto carbon particles was dispersed in beeswax-stearyl alcohol. The fastest release was obtained from beeswax pellets from which 99% of the carcinogen (198 ..mu..g) was released in 4 weeks, and the slowest release was from DMBA adsorbed on carbon at a ratio of 1:9 from which only 56% (113 ..mu..g) was released in 16 weeks. Morphometry of histologic sections showed marked differences in the percentage of luminal surface covered by dysplastic-neoplastic epithelium (i.e., 7.5% in the tracheas exposed to the fastest releasing pellets and 46.3% in the tracheas exposed to the slowest releasing pellets). An inverse linear correlation was found between the cumulative amount of DMBA release from the different pellet matrices at 2 weeks and the incidence of dysplastic plus neoplastic lesions of tracheal epithelium at 16 weeks. The results indicated that lower doses of carcinogen delivered slowly are more effective in producing dysplastic plus neoplastic lesions than higher doses delivered rapidly.

  14. Three-Dimensional Histology Volume Reconstruction of Axonal Tract Tracing Data: Exploring Topographical Organization in Subcortical Projections from Rat Barrel Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zakiewicz, Izabela M.; Majka, Piotr; Wójcik, Daniel K.; Bjaalie, Jan G.; Leergaard, Trygve B.

    2015-01-01

    Topographical organization is a hallmark of the mammalian brain, and the spatial organization of axonal connections in different brain regions provides a structural framework accommodating specific patterns of neural activity. The presence, amount, and spatial distribution of axonal connections are typically studied in tract tracing experiments in which axons or neurons are labeled and examined in histological sections. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction techniques are used to achieve more complete visualization and improved understanding of complex topographical relationships. 3-D reconstruction approaches based on manually or semi-automatically recorded spatial points representing axonal labeling have been successfully applied for investigation of smaller brain regions, but are not practically feasible for whole-brain analysis of multiple regions. We here reconstruct serial histological images from four whole brains (originally acquired for conventional microscopic analysis) into volumetric images that are spatially registered to a 3-D atlas template. The aims were firstly to evaluate the quality of the 3-D reconstructions and the usefulness of the approach, and secondly to investigate axonal projection patterns and topographical organization in rat corticostriatal and corticothalamic pathways. We demonstrate that even with the limitations of the original routine histological material, the 3-D reconstructed volumetric images allow efficient visualization of tracer injection sites and axonal labeling, facilitating detection of spatial distributions and across-case comparisons. Our results further show that clusters of S1 corticostriatal and corticothalamic projections are distributed within narrow, elongated or spherical subspaces extending across the entire striatum / thalamus. We conclude that histology volume reconstructions facilitate mapping of spatial distribution patterns and topographical organization. The reconstructed image volumes are shared via the

  15. Systemic administration of leptin potentiates the response of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract to chemoreceptor activation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, J; Moreau, J M

    2013-01-15

    Leptin microinjections into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) have been shown to elicit sympathoexcitatory responses, and potentiate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the chemoreflex. In this study, experiments were done in Sprague-Dawley rats initially to provide a detailed mapping within the NTS complex of cells containing immunoreactivity to the long form of the leptin receptor (Ob-Rb). In a second series, this NTS region containing Ob-Rb immunoreactive cells was explored for single units antidromically activated by stimulation of pressor sites in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). These antidromically identified neurons were then tested for their response to intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-100 ng/0.1 ml), and to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors following an injection of potassium cyanide (KCN) (80 μg/0.1 ml) into the carotid artery. Cells containing Ob-Rb-like immunoreactivity were found predominantly in the caudal NTS: within the medial, commissural and gelatinous (sub-postremal area) subnuclei of the NTS complex. Of 73 single units tested in these NTS regions, 48 were antidromically activated by stimulation of RVLM pressor sites and 25 of these single units responded with an increase in discharge rate after intra-carotid injections of leptin. In addition, 17 of these leptin responsive neurons were excited by the intra-carotid injections of KCN (80 μg/0.1 ml). Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to KCN was potentiated (59-83%) immediately following the leptin injection. These data indicate that leptin responsive neurons in NTS mediate chemoreceptor afferent information to pressor sites in the RVLM, and suggest that leptin may act as a facilitator on neuronal circuits within the NTS that potentiates the sympathoexcitatory responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial chemoreceptors.

  16. A HYBRID CFD-PBPK MODEL OF INHALED CHLORINE GAS UPTAKE AND TISSUE DOSIMETRY IN THE ISOLATED UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT (URT) OF F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine (Cl2), an important commercial gas, is highly reactive in water, causing irritant effects in the respiratory tract on inhalation. Nasal extraction of Cl2 is high and resultant lesions in the respiratory tract show a proximal to distal distribution ...

  17. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePlus

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  18. Plasticity of Intact Rubral Projections Mediates Spontaneous Recovery of Function after Corticospinal Tract Injury

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Chad S.; Fink, Kathren L.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Axons in the adult CNS fail to regenerate after injury, and therefore recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited. Although full recovery is rare, a modest degree of spontaneous recovery is observed consistently in a broad range of clinical and nonclinical situations. To define the mechanisms mediating spontaneous recovery of function after incomplete SCI, we created bilaterally complete medullary corticospinal tract lesions in adult mice, eliminating a crucial pathway for voluntary skilled movement. Anatomic and pharmacogenetic tools were used to identify the pathways driving spontaneous functional recovery in wild-type and plasticity-sensitized mice lacking Nogo receptor 1. We found that plasticity-sensitized mice recovered 50% of normal skilled locomotor function within 5 weeks of lesion. This significant, yet incomplete, spontaneous recovery was accompanied by extensive sprouting of intact rubrofugal and rubrospinal projections with the emergence of a de novo circuit between the red nucleus and the nucleus raphe magnus. Transient silencing of this rubro–raphe circuit in vivo via activation of the inhibitory DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs) receptor hM4di abrogated spontaneous functional recovery. These data highlight the pivotal role of uninjured motor circuit plasticity in supporting functional recovery after trauma, and support a focus of experimental strategies on enhancing intact circuit rearrangement to promote functional recovery after SCI. PMID:25632122

  19. Effects of estradiol on the development of sexual dimorphism in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Valencia, A; Del Abril, A; Rodríguez-Zafra, M; Pérez-Laso, C; Segovia, S; Guillamón, A

    1993-10-15

    Orchidectomized males injected with a single dose of estradiol benzoate (EB) on the day of birth (D1) showed a volume and neuron number in the nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT) similar to that of control males. However, orchidectomized males and those orchidectomized and given a single dose of DHT on D1 showed a decrease in BAOT volume and neuron number with respect to control males. These results support the notion that estradiol induces the morphological masculinization of this structure. The inability of DHT in counteracting the effect of orchidectomy is addressed taking into account the inhibitory action of androgens.

  20. Pubertal administration of DEHP delays puberty, suppresses testosterone production, and inhibits reproductive tract development in male Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Nigel C; Howdeshell, Kembra L; Furr, Jonathan; Lambright, Christy R; Wilson, Vickie S; Gray, L Earl

    2009-09-01

    Although is clear that exposure to high dosage levels of some phthalates delays the onset of puberty in the male rat, it has been hypothesized that low levels of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) accelerate puberty by enhancing testicular androgen synthesis. The current study was designed to determine if the dose response to DEHP was nonmonotonic, as hypothesized. Pubertal administration of DEHP delayed the onset of puberty and reduced androgen-dependent tissue weights in both Long-Evans (LE) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats 300 and 900 mg DEHP/kg/day. These effects were generally of greater magnitude in LE than SD rats. By contrast, alterations in testis histopathology (300 and 900 mg/kg/day) were more severe in SD than in LE rats. Taken together, these results suggest that DEHP may be acting on the pubertal male rat testis via two modes of action; one via the Leydig cells and the other via the Sertoli cells. Treatment with DEHP generally reduced serum testosterone and increased serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels, demonstrating that the reduction in testosterone was due to the effect of DEHP on the testis and not via an inhibition of LH from hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Testosterone production ex vivo (with and without human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation) was consistently reduced in males at the time of puberty and shortly thereafter. DEHP treatment did not accelerate the age at puberty or enhance testosterone levels at 10 or 100 mg/kg/day in either LE or SD rats, as some have hypothesized. Taken together, these results do not provide any evidence of a nonmonotonic dose response to DEHP during puberty.

  1. 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) DISRUPTS EARLY MORPHOGENETIC EVENTS THAT FORM THE LOWER REPRODUCTIVE TRACT IN FEMALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rats, in utero exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) during critical periods of organogenesis causes a permanent thread of tissue across the vaginal opening, which consists of a core of mesenchyme surrounded by keratinized epithelia. The objective of t...

  2. Immunological control of drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract: the mechanism whereby intestinal anaphylaxis interferes with the intestinal absorption of bromthymol blue in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Utsumi, E; Sakane, T; Hamaura, T; Nakamura, J; Hashida, M; Sezaki, H

    1986-05-01

    Rats were immunized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin and the disappearance of bromthymol blue (BTB) from the intestinal lumen, its accumulation in the tissue, and its net absorption were examined by means of an in-situ recirculation technique during local anaphylaxis. The disappearance of BTB from the intestinal lumen and its net absorption were significantly reduced, but there was no significant effect on its accumulation in the tissue. The pH value of the luminal solution and the perfusate volume were not influenced by intraluminal challenge with the antigen in ovalbumin-immunized rats. In addition, no significant effect was observed on intestinal permeability to BTB in the in-vitro everted sac technique. The intestinal blood flow, measured by a hydrogen clearance method, was not reduced significantly by the intraluminal exposure to antigen. There was enhanced Evans Blue leakage and mucus release in the perfusate after intraluminal challenge with ovalbumin in ovalbumin-immunized rats, but not in non-immunized rats. A significant increase of BTB binding with macromolecular substances in the perfusate was observed during the local anaphylaxis. These findings suggest that the decreased absorption of BTB is due to the interaction with the macromolecular substances in the perfusate during local anaphylaxis. PMID:2872311

  3. Pubertal administration of DEHP delays puberty, suppresses testosterone production and inhibits reproductive tract development in male Sprague-Dawley and Long-Evans Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    While is clear that exposure to high dosage levels of some phthalates delays the onset of puberty in the male rat it has been hypothesized that low levels of DEHP accelerate puberty by enhancing testicular androgen synthesis. The current study was designed to determine if the do...

  4. Acupuncture at “Zusanli” (St.36) and “Sanyinjiao” (SP.6) Points on the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Study of the Bioavailability of 99mTc-Sodium Pertechnetate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Senna-Fernandes, Vasco; França, Daisy L. M.; de Souza, Deise; Santos, Kelly C. M.; Sousa, Rafael S.; Manoel, Cristiano V.; Santos-Filho, Sebastião D.; Cortez, Célia M.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Guimarães, Marco Antonio M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the differences of acupuncture effect between the Zusanli (St.36) and Sanyinjiao (SP.6) points on the gastrointestinal-tract (GIT) segment performed by the bioavailability of 99mTc-sodium-pertechnetate (Na99mTcO4) in rats. Male Wistar rats (n = 21) were allocated into three groups of seven each. Group 1 was treated by acupuncture bilaterally at St.36; Group 2 at SP.6; and Group 3 was untreated (control). After 10 min of needle insertion in anesthetized rats, 0.3 mL of Na99mTcO4 (7.4 MBq) was injected via ocular-plexus. After 20 min, the exitus of animals was induced by cervical-dislocation and GIT organs isolated. However, immediately before the exitus procedure, blood was collected by cardiac-puncture for blood radio-labeling (BRL). The radioactivity uptake of the blood constituents was calculated together with the GIT organs by a well gamma counter. The percentage of injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) of Na99mTcO4 was calculated for each GIT organs, while BRL was calculated in %ID. According to the one-way ANOVA, the stomach, jejunum, ileum from the treated groups (Group 1 and Group 2) had significant differences compared to the controls (Group 3). However, between the treated groups (Group 1 and Group 2), there were significant differences (P < .05) in the stomach, jejunum, ileum, cecum, transverse and rectum. In BRL analysis, Group 2 showed significant increase and decrease of the insoluble and soluble fractions of the blood cells, respectively (P < .0001). The authors suggest that St.36 may have a tendency of up-regulation effect on GIT, whereas SP.6, down-regulation effect. However, further rigorous experimental studies to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture in either acupuncture points need to be carried out. PMID:19213853

  5. Segmental distribution of the motor neuron columns that supply the rat hindlimb: A muscle/motor neuron tract-tracing analysis targeting the motor end plates.

    PubMed

    Mohan, R; Tosolini, A P; Morris, R

    2015-10-29

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) that disrupts input from higher brain centers to the lumbar region of the spinal cord results in paraplegia, one of the most debilitating conditions affecting locomotion. Non-human primates have long been considered to be the most appropriate animal to model lower limb dysfunction. More recently, however, there has been a wealth of scientific information gathered in the rat regarding the central control of locomotion. Moreover, rodent models of SCI at lumbar levels have been widely used to validate therapeutic scenarios aimed at the restoration of locomotor activities. Despite the growing use of the rat as a model of locomotor dysfunction, knowledge regarding the anatomical relationship between spinal cord motor neurons and the hindlimb muscles that they innervate is incomplete. Previous studies performed in our laboratory have shown the details of the muscle/motor neuron topographical relationship for the mouse forelimb and hindlimb as well as for the rat forelimb. The present analysis aims to characterize the segmental distribution of the motor neuron pools that innervate the muscles of the rat hindlimb, hence completing this series of studies. The location of the motor end plate (MEP) regions on the main muscles of the rat hindlimb was first revealed with acetylcholinesterase histochemistry. For each muscle under scrutiny, injections of Fluoro-Gold were then performed along the length of the MEP region. Targeting the MEPs gave rise to columns of motor neurons that span more spinal cord segments than previously reported. The importance of this study is discussed in terms of its application to gene therapy for SCI. PMID:26304758

  6. 2,3,6-triaminopyridine, a metabolite of the urinary tract analgesic phenazopyridine, causes muscle necrosis and renal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Munday, R; Manns, E

    1998-01-01

    Some aromatic polyamines form very stable free radicals and readily undergo autoxidation with concomitant formation of 'active oxygen' species. These substances cause necrosis of striated muscle in rats, and it has been suggested that this is due to free radical formation and disruption of energy production through their oxidation via the cytochrome c/cytochrome oxidase system of mitochondria. 2,3,6-Triaminopyridine, which is structurally related to the myotoxic amines and likewise undergoes autoxidation and disrupts mitochondrial metabolism, is a metabolite of the widely used urinary analgesic phenazopyridine. When administered to rats, triaminopyridine caused extensive necrosis of skeletal muscle and a lesser degree of damage to heart muscle. It also induced vacuolation and necrosis of distal tubules of the kidney, associated with tubular dilatation and cast formation. Both muscle damage and renal tubular necrosis have been reported following use or abuse of phenazopyridine, and it is likely that triaminopyridine is responsible for both of these effects.

  7. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts.

    PubMed

    Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P; Carson, James P; Jacob, Richard E; Minard, Kevin R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein.

  8. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Richard E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein. PMID:25858911

  9. [Comparative analysis of the susceptibility and productivity of respiratory tract target cells of mice and rats exposed to inflienza virus in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhukov, V A; Shishkina, L N; Sergeev, A A; Malkova, E M; Riabchikova, E I; Petrishchenko, V A; Sergeev, A N; Ustiuzhanina, N V; Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Vorob'ev, A A

    2008-01-01

    The levels of susceptibility to influenza virus A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2 and the virus yield were determined using primary cells of the trachea and lungs of CD-1 mice and Wistar rats, and for 3 sets of cells obtained from primary lung cells of the both species by centrifugation in the gradient of density and by sedimentation on a surface. The values of ID50 virus dose for 10(6) cells and virus yield per 1 infected cell determined for primary mice cells were 4.0+/-0.47 and 3.2+/-0.27 IgEID50 (lung cells), 3.8+/-0.17 and 3.3+/-0.20 IgEID50 (tracheal cells), and those determined for primary rat cells were 4.0+/-0.35 and 2.1+/-0.24 IgEID50 (lung cells), 3.7+/-0.27 and 2.2+/-0.46 IgEID50 (tracheal cells). The values of ID50 and yield measured for mixtures of cells obtained from primary lung cells by centrifugation in gradient of density and by sedimentation on a surface differed insignificantly (p = 0.05) from the values of the corresponding parameters measured for lung and tracheal cells for both rats and mice. The analysis of data on the variation of the concentrations of different cell types in the experimental cell mixtures shows that type 1 and 2 alveolocytes possess significantly lower (p = 0.05) susceptibility and productivity vs. ciliated cells of the both species. The investigation was conducted within the frame of the ISTC/DARPA#450p project.

  10. Acute administration of AMPA/Kainate blocker combined with delayed transplantation of neural precursors improves lower urinary tract function in spinal injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Neuhuber, Birgit; Fischer, Itzhak

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate bladder function recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in response to a combination treatment of an acutely administered AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist and delayed transplantation of neuronal precurors. Female rats received a contusion injury at T8/9. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX was directly administered into the lesion site immediately after injury. Nine days post-injury, NRP/GRP were delivered into the lesion site. Controls received NRP/GRP grafts only or no treatment (OP-Controls). Animals underwent bladder function testing during the course of the experiment and at the endpoint. Motor function was evaluated as well. After sacrifice, histological analysis of lesion site and lumbosacral spinal cord regions was performed. Rats receiving the combined treatment (NBQX&NRP/GRP) had voided volumes/micturition resembling that of normal animals and showed greater improvement of urodynamic parameters, compared to NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. Similarly, NBQX&NRP/GRP induced more spouting, regeneration or sparing of descending projections to the lumbosacral cord. The density of primary afferent projections at the lumbosacral spinal cord in rats with combined treatments was similar to that of NRP/GRP alone with decreased sprouting of primary afferents in lumbosacral cord, compared to OP-Control. Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that the combined treatment reduced the size of the lesion to a greater extent than NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. NRP/GRP with and without NBQX produced significant recovery of hindlimb compared to OP-Controls. In conclusions, transplants of NRP/GRP combined with NBQX promote recovery of micturition function following spinal cord injury, likely through increased neuroprotection. PMID:21937028

  11. Hypoxia may increase rat insulin mRNA levels by promoting binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich insulin mRNA 3'-untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Tillmar, Linda; Welsh, Nils

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent reports identify the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA as crucial for control of insulin messenger stability. This region contains a pyrimidine-rich sequence, which is similar to the hypoxia-responsive mRNA-stabilizing element of tyrosine hydroxylase. This study aimed to determine whether hypoxia affects insulin mRNA levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rat islets were incubated at normoxic or hypoxic conditions and with or without hydrogen peroxide and a nitric oxide donor. Insulin mRNA was determined by Northern hybridization. Islet homogenates were used for electrophoretic mobility shift assay with an RNA-oligonucleotide, corresponding to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of rat insulin I mRNA. The expression of reporter gene mRNA, in islets transfected with reporter gene constructs containing the wild-type or mutated insulin mRNA pyrimidine-rich sequences, was measured by semiquantitive RT-PCR. RESULTS: Insulin mRNA was increased in response to hypoxia. This was paralleled by increased binding of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) to the pyrimidine-rich sequence of the 3'-UTR of insulin mRNA, which was counteracted by hydrogen peroxide. The reporter gene mRNA level containing the wild-type binding site was not increased in response to hypoxia, but mutation of the site resulted in a destabilization of the mRNA. CONCLUSIONS: The complete understanding of different diabetic conditions requires the elucidation of mechanisms that control insulin gene expression. Our data show that hypoxia may increase insulin mRNA levels by promoting the binding of PTB to the insulin mRNA 3'-UTR. Hydrogen peroxide abolishes the hypoxic effect indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species and/or the redox potential in the oxygen-signaling pathway. PMID:12359957

  12. Congenital optic tract hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Fujio, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Taylor, David

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral optic tract hypoplasia, described only twice previously. Bilateral optic disk hypoplasia was seen ophthalmoscopically and visual field studies showed an incongruous right homonymous hemianopia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral hypoplasia of both optic nerves and the left optic tract. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography mapping correlated well with the visual field studies. PMID:26228965

  13. Vector-induced NT-3 expression in rats promotes collateral growth of injured corticospinal tract axons far rostral to a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, N; Mason, A L O; Hurd, C; May, Z; Zmyslowski, D C; Galleguillos, D; Sipione, S; Fouad, K

    2014-07-11

    Rewiring the injured corticospinal tract (CST) by promoting connections between CST axons and spared neurons is a strategy being explored experimentally to achieve improved recovery of motor function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Reliable interventions to promote and direct growth of collaterals from injured CST axons are in high demand to promote functionally relevant detour pathways. A promising tool is neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which has shown growth-stimulating and chemo-attractive effects for spared CST axons caudal to a CST lesion. Yet, efforts to promote growth of injured CST axons rostral to a SCI with NT-3 have been less successful to date. Evidence indicates that immune activation in the local growth environment, either intrinsic or induced by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), can play a decisive role in the CST's responsiveness to NT-3. Here, we test the potential of NT-3 as a tool to enhance and direct collateral growth from the injured CST rostral to a SCI (1) using long-term expression of NT-3 by adeno-associated viral vectors, (2) with and without stimulating the immune system with LPS. Our results indicate that inducing a growth response from injured CST axons into a region of vector-mediated NT-3 expression is possible in the environment of the spinal cord rostral to a SCI, but seems dependent on the distance between the responding axon and the source of NT-3. Our findings also suggest that injured CST axons do not increase their growth response to NT-3 after immune activation with LPS in this environment. In conclusion, this is to our knowledge the first demonstration that NT-3 can be effective at promoting growth of injured CST collaterals far rostral to a SCI. Making NT-3 available in close proximity to CST target axons may be the key to success when using NT-3 to rewire the injured CST in future investigations.

  14. [Effects of hypothalamic microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on estral cycle and morphology of the genital tract in the female rat (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sala, M A; Oteui, J T; Benedetti, W I

    1975-01-01

    To determine whether central catecholaminergic pathways are involved in the neural contral of gonadotrophin secretion, they were interrupted at the hypothalamic level by microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The effects on ovulation, estral cycle and ovarian and uterine histology were studied. Microinjections of 50 mug of 6-OHDA hydrobromyde were made bilaterally into the anterolateral hypothalamus in a group of rats. Another group was injected with 25 mug of 6-OHDA, while a control group recieved an equivalent volume (5 mul) of saline with ascorbic acid. Animals injected with 50 mug of 6-OHDA showed blockade of ovulation, vaginal cytology characteristics of persistent estrous, polyfollicular ovaries and enlarged uteri with hypertrophic endometrial glands. In the group injected with 25 mug, similiar effects were demonstrated, but the number of affected animals was smaller than that in the 50 mug group. Control animals dit not show modifications, either in estral cycle or in ovarian and uterine histology. These results suggest that 6-OHDA injected into the anterolateral hypothalmus interferes with catecholaminergic pathways that participate in the neural control of ovulation.

  15. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum. PMID:26378923

  16. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  17. Production of high quality brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) RNA from isolated populations of rat spinal cord motor neurons obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM).

    PubMed

    Mehta, Prachi; Premkumar, Brian; Morris, Renée

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is composed of multiple cellular elements, making it challenging to segregate one particular cell type to study their gene expression profile. For instance, as motor neurons represent only 5-10% of the total cell population of the spinal cord, meaningful transcriptional analysis on these neurons is almost impossible to achieve from homogenized spinal cord tissue. A major challenge faced by scientists is to obtain good quality RNA from small amounts of starting material. In this paper, we used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) techniques to identify and isolate spinal cord motor neurons. The present analysis revealed that perfusion with paraformaldehyde (PFA) does not alter RNA quality. RNA integrity numbers (RINs) of tissue samples from rubrospinal tract (RST)-transected, intact spinal cord or from whole spinal cord homogenate were all above 8, which indicates intact, high-quality RNA. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or for its tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) were not affected by rubrospinal tract (RST) transection, a surgical procedure that deprive motor neurons from one of their main supraspinal input. The isolation of pure populations of neurons with LCM techniques allows for robust transcriptional characterization that cannot be achieved with spinal cord homogenates. Such preparations of pure population of motor neurons will provide valuable tools to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury and neuromuscular diseases. In the near future, LCM techniques might be instrumental to the success of gene therapy for these debilitating conditions.

  18. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body. You may have a UTI if you notice ...

  19. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. And when you do, phew! Your pee smells bad. These changes occur because bacteria have caused an infection somewhere in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ...

  20. Postcircumcision urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H A; Drucker, M M; Vainer, S; Ashkenasi, A; Amir, J; Frydman, M; Varsano, I

    1992-06-01

    The possible association of urinary tract infection (UTI) with ritual circumcision on the eighth day of life was studied by analyzing the epidemiology of urinary tract infections during the first year of life in 169 children with UTI (56 males and 113 females) born in Israel from 1979 to 1984. Forty-eight percent of the episodes of UTI occurring in males appeared during the 12 days following circumcision, and the increased incidence during that period was highly significant. The median age of the males at the time of the UTI was 16 days, compared with seven months in females. Ritual Jewish circumcision as practiced in Israel may be a predisposing factor for UTI during the 12-day period following that procedure.

  1. Urinary tract endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Koszczuk, J C; Foglietti, M; Perez, J F; Dono, F V; Thomas, R J

    1989-01-01

    Although endometriosis is a common gynecologic pathologic phenomenon, involvement of the urinary tract is relatively rare. The clinical presentation and course of urinary system disease is extremely variable, as illustrated by the seven cases presented in this report. Therapy primarily is surgical, but a thorough understanding of the disease process and a complete knowledge of the patient's history and desires for fertility conservation are necessary to plot the most appropriate treatment course. Bladder involvement is more common, and usually less devastating, than either ureteral or kidney involvement. No signs, symptoms, or physical findings are pathognomonic, and the clinician must maintain a high index of suspicion in all cases of advanced pelvic endometriosis.

  2. Urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alina; Nizran, Parminder; Malone, Michael A; Riley, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Clinical presentation helps differentiate between upper and lower urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs are classified as either complicated or uncomplicated. A complicated UTI is associated with an underlying condition that increases the risk of failing therapy. Primary laboratory tests for UTIs consist of urinalysis and urine culture. The most common pathogen for uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis is Escherichia coli. Nitrofurantoin, fosfomycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are first-line therapies for acute uncomplicated cystitis. Decisions regarding antibiotic agents should be individualized based on patients' allergies, tolerability, community resistance rates, cost, and availability.

  3. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. PMID:26177232

  4. Urinary Tract Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej, Anna; Krajewski, Wojciech; Dołowy, Łukasz; Hirnle, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Recently, occurrence of urinary tract endometriosis (UTE) is more frequently diagnosed. According to literature, it refers to approximately 0.3 to even 12% of all women with endometriosis. The pathogenesis of UTE has not been clearly explained so far. The actually proposed hypotheses include embryonic, migration, transplantation, and iatrogenic theory. Most frequently UTE affects bladder, less often ureters and kidneys. One-third of patients remains asymptomatic or exhibits only minor manifestations. In symptomatic patients main complaints include dysuria, urinary urgency, and/or frequency, painful micturition, and burning sensation in the urethra and discomfort in the retropubic area. Treatment of UTE is challenging and can be pharmacological, surgical or can be a combination of both methods. In this paper we present a review of the literature concerning the UTE, its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26341760

  5. Mammilliothalamic tract lesions disrupt tests of visuo-spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew J D; Vann, Seralynne D

    2014-08-01

    The mammillary bodies and their projections via the mammilliothalamic tract to the anterior thalamic nuclei are known to be important for spatial memory in rodents, but their precise role remains unclear. To determine whether transection of the mammilliothalamic tract can produce deficits on tests of spatial memory even when the navigational demands placed on the animal are limited, rats with discrete mammilliothalamic tract lesions were tested on the ability to use distal visual cues to discriminate between 2 locations within a room, irrespective of the direction traveled (Experiment 1). Animals with mammilliothalamic tract lesions acquired this task more slowly and less accurately than control animals. Consistent with this impairment in discriminating different spatial locations, the same lesions also severely disrupted object-in-place memory but spared performance on standard tests of object recognition memory (Experiment 2). Finally, to compare performance on a task that is known to be sensitive to mammilliothalamic transection and requires animals to actively navigate within their environment, the effect of the lesions on spatial working memory in the radial-arm maze was examined. Taken together, the results suggest that even when there are little or no navigational demands, mammilliothalamic tract damage still results in impoverished encoding of spatial location.

  6. Cardiac outflow tract anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Neeb, Zachary; Lajiness, Jacquelyn D.; Bolanis, Esther; Conway, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    The mature outflow tract (OFT) is, in basic terms, a short conduit. It is a simple, although vital, connection situated between contracting muscular heart chambers and a vast embryonic vascular network. Unfortunately, it is also a focal point underlying many multifactorial congenital heart defects (CHDs). Through the use of various animal models combined with human genetic investigations, we are beginning to comprehend the molecular and cellular framework that controls OFT morphogenesis. Clear roles of neural crest cells (NCC) and second heart field (SHF) derivatives have been established during OFT formation and remodeling. The challenge now is to determine how the SHF and cardiac NCC interact, the complex reciprocal signaling that appears to be occurring at various stages of OFT morphogenesis, and finally how endocardial progenitors and primary heart field (PHF) communicate with both these colonizing extra-cardiac lineages. Although we are beginning to understand that this dance of progenitor populations is wonderfully intricate, the underlying pathogenesis and the spatiotemporal cell lineage interactions remain to be fully elucidated. What is now clear is that OFT alignment and septation are independent processes, invested via separate SHF and cardiac neural crest (CNC) lineages. This review will focus on our current understanding of the respective contributions of the SHF and CNC lineage during OFT development and pathogenesis. PMID:24014420

  7. Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland) can cause lower urinary tract disease in cats. Although they are much less common causes, FLUTD ... your veterinarian about the best diet for your cat. Many commercial diets are acceptable, but some urinary ...

  8. Atrio-His bundle tracts.

    PubMed Central

    Brechenmacher, C

    1975-01-01

    The atrio-His bundle tracts are very rare; only two have been found in 687 hearts studied histologically. These tracts have a similar appearance to those of the atrioventricular bundle and form a complete bypass of the atrioventricular node. In their presence the electrocardiogram may show a short or normal PR interval. They may be responsible for some cases of very rapid ventricular response to supraventricular arrhythmias. Images PMID:1191446

  9. Simultaneous determination of nine lignans from Schisandra chinensis extract using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in rat plasma, urine, and gastrointestinal tract samples: application to the pharmacokinetic study of Schisandra chinensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Jin; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Chul Young; Han, Sun-Young; Chin, Young-Won; Choi, Young Hee

    2014-10-01

    The fruit of Schisandra chinensis is a well-known herbal medicine and dietary supplement due to a variety of biological activities including antihepatotoxic and antihyperlipidemic activities. However, the simultaneous validation methodology and pharmacokinetic investigation of nine lignans of S. chinensis extract in biological samples have not been proved yet. Thus, the present study was undertaken to develop the proper sample preparation method and simultaneous analytical method of schisandrol A, gomisin J, schisandrol B, tigloylgomisin H, angeloylgomisin H, schisandrin A, schisandrin B, gomisin N, and schisandrin C in the hexane-soluble extract of S. chinensis to apply for the pharmacokinetic study in rats. All intra- and interprecisions of nine lignans were below 13.7% and accuracies were 85.1-115% and it is enough to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters after both intravenous and oral administration of hexane-soluble extract of S. chinensis to rats.

  10. Subcortical effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, F; Bączyk, M; Jankowska, E

    2013-08-15

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) affects neurons at both cortical and subcortical levels. The subcortical effects involve several descending motor systems but appeared to be relatively weak, as only small increases in the amplitude of subcortically initiated descending volleys and a minute shortening of latencies of these volleys were found. The aim of the present study was therefore to evaluate the consequences of facilitation of these volleys on the ensuing muscle activation. The experiments were carried out on deeply anaesthetized rats without neuromuscular blockade. Effects of tDCS were tested on EMG potentials recorded from neck muscles evoked by weak (20-60 μA) single, double or triple stimuli applied in the medial longitudinal fascicle (MLF) or in the red nucleus (RN). Short latencies of these potentials were compatible with monosynaptic or disynaptic actions of reticulospinal and disynaptic or trisynaptic actions of rubrospinal neurons on neck motoneurons. Despite only weak effects on indirect descending volleys, the EMG responses from both the MLF and the RN were potently facilitated by cathodal tDCS and depressed by anodal tDCS. Both the facilitation and the depression developed relatively rapidly (within the first minute) but both outlasted tDCS and were present for up to 1 h after tDCS. The study thus demonstrates long-lasting effects of tDCS on subcortical neurons in the rat, albeit evoked by an opposite polarity of tDCS to that found to be effective on subcortical neurons in the cat investigated in the preceding study, or for cortical neurons in the humans. PMID:23774279

  11. Gas in the Digestive Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... digestive tract when you swallow air and when bacteria in your large intestine break down certain undigested foods. ​​​​ Diagnosis of Gas Doctors may diagnose the causes of gas with a medical history and physical exam. If your doctor suspects you ...

  12. Tract profiles of white matter properties: automating fiber-tract quantification.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F; Myall, Nathaniel J; Wandell, Brian A; Feldman, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    Tractography based on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) data is a method for identifying the major white matter fascicles (tracts) in the living human brain. The health of these tracts is an important factor underlying many cognitive and neurological disorders. In vivo, tissue properties may vary systematically along each tract for several reasons: different populations of axons enter and exit the tract, and disease can strike at local positions within the tract. Hence quantifying and understanding diffusion measures along each fiber tract (Tract Profile) may reveal new insights into white matter development, function, and disease that are not obvious from mean measures of that tract. We demonstrate several novel findings related to Tract Profiles in the brains of typically developing children and children at risk for white matter injury secondary to preterm birth. First, fractional anisotropy (FA) values vary substantially within a tract but the Tract FA Profile is consistent across subjects. Thus, Tract Profiles contain far more information than mean diffusion measures. Second, developmental changes in FA occur at specific positions within the Tract Profile, rather than along the entire tract. Third, Tract Profiles can be used to compare white matter properties of individual patients to standardized Tract Profiles of a healthy population to elucidate unique features of that patient's clinical condition. Fourth, Tract Profiles can be used to evaluate the association between white matter properties and behavioral outcomes. Specifically, in the preterm group reading ability is positively correlated with FA measured at specific locations on the left arcuate and left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the magnitude of the correlation varies significantly along the Tract Profiles. We introduce open source software for automated fiber-tract quantification (AFQ) that measures Tract Profiles of MRI parameters for 18 white matter tracts. With further validation, AFQ Tract

  13. Polypyrimidine tract sequences direct selection of alternative branch sites and influence protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, P A

    1994-01-01

    IVS1, an intron derived from the rat fibronectin gene, is spliced inefficiently in vitro, involving the use of three alternative branch sites. Mutation of one branch point site, BP3, so as to increase complementarity to U2 snRNA resulted in exclusive use of that site and improved splicing efficiency, indicating that the wild type BP3 site is one determinant of poor IVS1 splicing. Deletions within the polypyrimidine tract had a variable effect on splicing efficiency and altered the pattern of branch site usage. Selection of each branch site was influenced negatively by purine substitutions ca. 20 nucleotides downstream. It is proposed that all three IVS1 branch sites are pyrimidine tract-dependent. Pyrimidine tract deletions also influenced the crosslinking of PTB (the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein), hnRNP C, and splicing factor U2AF65. All three proteins bound preferentially to distinct regions within the polypyrimidine tract and thus are candidates for mediating pyrimidine tract-dependent branch site selection. The findings indicate the complexity of the IVS1 polypyrimidine tract and suggest a crucial role for this region in modulating branch site selection and IVS1 splicing. Images PMID:7937104

  14. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  15. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, also ...

  16. Diffusion tensor microscopy data (15.6 μm in-plane) of white matter tracts in the human, pig, and rat spinal cord with corresponding tissue histology.

    PubMed

    Flint, Jeremy J; Hansen, Brian; Blackband, Stephen J

    2016-12-01

    The following article contains nine diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) datasets acquired with magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM, 15.6 μm in-plane). All data was collected in the region bordering the ventral horn and white matter of cross sections from the spinal cord enlargements along with each sample׳s corresponding tissue histology. These data are collected in fixed spinal cord sections of varying thicknesses taken from rat (2×21 direction DTI datasets), pig (1×21 direction DTI dataset), and human (5×21 direction DTI datasets + 1×6 direction DTI dataset) tissue sources. Following MRM acquisition, the sections were histologically processed using Nissl or Black-Gold II (Histo-Chem Inc., 1BGII) myelin stain and imaged again using light microscopy techniques. Methodological procedures are an amalgamation of protocol components described previously (doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.04.031 [1], doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.04.052 [2]). PMID:27668273

  17. Diffusion tensor microscopy data (15.6 μm in-plane) of white matter tracts in the human, pig, and rat spinal cord with corresponding tissue histology.

    PubMed

    Flint, Jeremy J; Hansen, Brian; Blackband, Stephen J

    2016-12-01

    The following article contains nine diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) datasets acquired with magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM, 15.6 μm in-plane). All data was collected in the region bordering the ventral horn and white matter of cross sections from the spinal cord enlargements along with each sample׳s corresponding tissue histology. These data are collected in fixed spinal cord sections of varying thicknesses taken from rat (2×21 direction DTI datasets), pig (1×21 direction DTI dataset), and human (5×21 direction DTI datasets + 1×6 direction DTI dataset) tissue sources. Following MRM acquisition, the sections were histologically processed using Nissl or Black-Gold II (Histo-Chem Inc., 1BGII) myelin stain and imaged again using light microscopy techniques. Methodological procedures are an amalgamation of protocol components described previously (doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.04.031 [1], doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.04.052 [2]).

  18. Musculature of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Skandalakis, J E

    2000-04-01

    Leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas are derived from smooth muscle tissues. Smooth muscle cells also surround the blood vessels that supply the alimentary tract. These cells have at times been said to contribute to the formation of smooth muscle tumors in the alimentary canal. With such an abundance of smooth muscle, there is little reason at present to implicate the smooth muscle elements of blood vessel walls.

  19. Extensive upper respiratory tract sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Mafalda Trindade; Sousa, Carolina; Garanito, Luísa; Freire, Filipe

    2016-04-18

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. It can affect any part of the organism, although the lung is the most frequently affected organ. Upper airway involvement is rare, particularly if isolated. Sarcoidosis is a diagnosis of exclusion, established by histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas and the absence of other granulomatous diseases. The authors report a case of a man with sarcoidosis manifesting as a chronic inflammatory stenotic condition of the upper respiratory tract and trachea.

  20. The effects of additional flora on the response of salmonella mutants lodged in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, L A; Carter, J H; Ingelfinger, J A; Soderberg, F B; Goldman, P

    1977-02-01

    A histidine auxotroph of Salmonella typhimurium, strain TA1538, will lodge for several months in the gastrointestinal tract of otherwise germ-free rats and of rats additionally associated with bacteria characteristic of the normal flora such as Lactobacillus plantarum and Bacteroides vulgatus. In the presence of the additional flora, the concentration of strain TA1538 is diminished in the stomach but not in the lower gastrointestinal tract or in the feces. Following the ingestion of 2-nitrofluorene, there is an increase in the concentration of revertants in the feces which reflects that observed in the colon and cecum. A dose-response relationship can be demonstrated between the amount of 2-nitrofluorene ingested and the concentration of revertants in the feces. A given dose of 2-nitrofluorene, however, produces fewer revertants in the feces of rats with the additional flora than in the feces of rats associated only with strain TA1538. It is not clear whether the decreased number of revertants in the feces in the presence of the additional flora is a result of metabolic transformations of 2-nitrofluorene by B. vulgatus, which can be demonstrated in vitro, or a result of the displacement of strain TA1538 from the stomach. The rat associated with strain TA1538, or other Ames tester strains, may be useful for detecting carcinogens as mutagens within the gastrointestinal tract and for determining the influence of various constituents of the bacterial flora on the concentration of mutagenic compounds. PMID:318921

  1. Immune Cells in the Female Reproductive Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Dong-Jae; Kang, Jee-hyun

    2015-01-01

    The female reproductive tract has two main functions: protection against microbial challenge and maintenance of pregnancy to term. The upper reproductive tract comprises the fallopian tubes and the uterus, including the endocervix, and the lower tract consists of the ectocervix and the vagina. Immune cells residing in the reproductive tract play contradictory roles: they maintain immunity against vaginal pathogens in the lower tract and establish immune tolerance for sperm and an embryo/fetus in the upper tract. The immune system is significantly influenced by sex steroid hormones, although leukocytes in the reproductive tract lack receptors for estrogen and progesterone. The leukocytes in the reproductive tract are distributed in either an aggregated or a dispersed form in the epithelial layer, lamina propria, and stroma. Even though immune cells are differentially distributed in each organ of the reproductive tract, the predominant immune cells are T cells, macrophages/dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, neutrophils, and mast cells. B cells are rare in the female reproductive tract. NK cells in the endometrium significantly expand in the late secretory phase and further increase their number during early pregnancy. It is evident that NK cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are extremely important in decidual angiogenesis, trophoblast migration, and immune tolerance during pregnancy. Dysregulation of endometrial/decidual immune cells is strongly related to infertility, miscarriage, and other obstetric complications. Understanding the immune system of the female reproductive tract will significantly contribute to women's health and to success in pregnancy. PMID:25713505

  2. Effect of Fe(2)O(3) on the capacity of benzo(a)pyrene to induce polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-metabolizing enzymes in the respiratory tract of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Garçon, Guillaume; Gosset, Pierre; Zerimech, Farid; Grave-Descampiaux, Béatrice; Shirali, Pirouz

    2004-04-21

    In this work, the question that needs to be answered was whether concurrent exposure to iron oxides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could affect the induction of PAH-metabolizing enzymes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally instilled with hematite (Fe(2)O(3); 3mg), benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P; 3mg), or B(a)P (3mg)-coated onto Fe(2)O(3) particles (3mg). Forty-eight hours later, we investigated mRNA expressions of cytochrome p4501a1 (cyp1a1), microsomal epoxide hydrolase (meh), and glutathione-S-transferase-ya and -yc (gst-ya and gst-yc, respectively), protein concentrations of CYP1A1, and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities in lungs. Exposure to B(a)P alone or coated-onto Fe(2)O(3) particles induced cyp1a1 gene transcription (P < 0.01) and increased both the CYP1A1 protein levels (P < 0.01) and the EROD activities (P < 0.001). However, in this work, we focused our attention on the potential of Fe(2)O(3) in B(a)P/Fe(2)O(3) mixtures to affect the capacity of B(a)P to induce PAH-metabolizing enzymes. Exposure to B(a)P-coated onto Fe(2)O(3) particles increased meh mRNA expressions (1.15-fold, P < 0.05), CYP1A1 protein concentrations (1.85-fold, P < 0.05), and EROD activities (1.95-fold, P < 0.01), versus exposure to B(a)P alone. Hence, animal short-term exposure to B(a)P-coated onto Fe(2)O(3) particles favored dramatically the induction of PAH-bioactivating enzymes to the detriment of PAH-inactivating enzymes in lungs. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Fe(2)O(3)-induced increase of the metabolic activation of B(a)P might rely on several properties of Fe(2)O(3), including its capacity to enhance the rate of CYP1A1 hemoprotein elaboration. The influence of Fe(2)O(3) in B(a)P/Fe(2)O(3) mixtures on the ability of B(a)P to induce PAH-metabolizing enzymes will also be one of the fundamental ways that Fe(2)O(3) can affect B(a)P carcinogenicity in lungs.

  3. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully.

  4. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. Material and methods For writing this review, Google Scholar –a scholarly search engine– (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Results Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Conclusions Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future. PMID:25914847

  5. Genital tract infections and infertility.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Mylonakis, Ioannis; Bertoloni, Giulio; Fiore, Cristina; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Armanini, Decio

    2008-09-01

    Infectious agents can impair various important human functions, including reproduction. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites are able to interfere with the reproductive function in both sexes. Infections of male genito-urinary tract account for about 15% of the case of male infertility. Infections can affect different sites of the male reproductive tract, such as the testis, epididymis and male accessory sex glands. Spermatozoa themselves subsequently can be affected by urogenital infections at different levels of their development, maturation and transport. Among the most common microorganisms involved in sexually transmitted infections, interfering with male fertility, there are the Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Less frequently male infertility is due to non-sexually transmitted epididymo-orchitis, mostly caused by Escherichia coli. In female, the first two microorganisms are certainly involved in cervical, tubal, and peritoneal damage, while Herpes simplex cervicitis is less dangerous. The overall importance of cervical involvement is still under discussion. Tubo-peritoneal damage seems to be the foremost manner in which microorganisms interfere with human fertility. C. trachomatis is considered the most important cause of tubal lacerations and obstruction, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and adhesions. N. gonorrhoeae, even though its overall incidence seems to decline, is still to be considered in the same sense, while bacterial vaginosis should not be ignored, as causative agents can produce ascending infections of the female genital tract. The role of infections, particularly co-infections, as causes of the impairment of sperm quality, motility and function needs further investigation. Tropical diseases necessitate monitoring as for their diffusion or re-diffusion in the western world. PMID:18456385

  6. Approach to urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Najar, M. S.; Saldanha, C. L.; Banday, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection experienced by humans after respiratory and gastro-intestinal infections, and also the most common cause of both community-acquired and nosocomial infections for patients admitted to hospitals. For better management and prognosis, it is mandatory to know the possible site of infection, whether the infection is uncomplicated or complicated, re-infection or relapse, or treatment failure and its pathogenesis and risk factors. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common in certain age groups and has different connotations. It needs to be treated and completely cured in pregnant women and preschool children. Reflux nephropathy in children could result in chronic kidney disease; otherwise, urinary tract infections do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of end-stage renal disease. Symptomatic urinary tract infections occur most commonly in women of child-bearing age. Cystitis predominates, but needs to be distinguished from acute urethral syndrome that affects both sexes and has a different management plan than UTIs. The prostatitis symptoms are much more common than bacterial prostatic infections. The treatment needs to be prolonged in bacterial prostatitis and as cure rates are not very high and relapses are common, the classification of prostatitis needs to be understood. The consensus conference convened by National Institute of Health added two more groups of patients, namely, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis, in addition to acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Although white blood cells in urine signify inflammation, they do not always signify UTI. Quantitative cultures of urine provide definitive evidence of UTI. Imaging studies should be done 3-6 weeks after cure of acute infection to identify abnormalities predisposing to infection or renal damage or which may affect management. Treatment of cystitis in women should be a three-day course and if

  7. Advances in Urinary Tract Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-01-01

    The use of endoscopy in veterinary medicine has become the mainstay of diagnosis and treatment in the subspecialty of small animal urology over the past decade. This subspecialty is termed endourology. With the common incidence of urinary tract obstructions, stones disease, renal disease, and urothelial malignancies, combined with the recognized invasiveness and morbidity associated with traditional surgical techniques, the use of endoscopic-assisted alternatives using interventional endoscopic techniques has become appealing to both owners and clinicians. This article provides a brief overview of some of the most common urologic procedures being performed in veterinary medicine. PMID:26440205

  8. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals. PMID:27573953

  9. ARTERIAL EPONYMS IN GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.

    PubMed

    Kutia, S A; Kiselev, V V; Lyashchenko, O I

    2015-01-01

    Eponym--name of the disease, certain structure or method after the person who usually first discovered and described them. Eponyms are widely spread in medicine which appeared to be in the area of a great interest for a lot of scientists. They can serve as a reflection of the evolution of the medical knowledge and making up the majority of anatomical terms. The article describes 12 arterial eponyms of the gastrointestinal tract giving a full anatomical description. It also gives an explanation of why and how those structures were named after certain scientists and what contribution they've made into the development of medicine. PMID:26817114

  10. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals.

  11. Dosimetry of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.F.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.

    1986-10-01

    In order to obtain information on radiation doses to the intestine, doses were determined in dogs for beta-emitters that might be delivered to critical cells in the bowel in the event of an accident. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were implanted beneath the large-bowel mucosa of dogs that had ingested /sup 106/Ru-/sup 106/Rh (1.4 MeV anti E/sub ..beta../). Results were related to toxicity in the dogs and extrapolated to toxicity observed in other experiments with suckling, weanling and adult rats similarly treated. That information enabled us to calculate the depth of the critical cells in both dogs and rats. Further studies, in rats, with a weak beta-emitter, /sup 147/Pm, and an intermediate-energy beta-emitter, /sup 91/Y, supported that extrapolation. The doses delivered to target cells differed from the doses calculated at the mucosal surface of the large bowel by a factor of as much as 50, depending on the beta-emitter ingested. In the neonatal rats, death resulted from damage to cells within the mucosa of the small bowel, demonstrating that these animals were more sensitive to intestinal irradiation from /sup 106/Ru-/sup 106/Rh, on a body-weight basis, than weanlings or adult rats. Studies with isotopes, of thorium, uranium, protactinium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, and einsteinium showed that substantial amounts of these alpha-emitting actinides were retained in the intestines of neonatal rats, guinea pigs, dogs, and swine after gavage. 26 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention.

    PubMed

    Hisano, Marcelo; Bruschini, Homero; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Srougi, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials.

  13. Treatment of urinary tract stones.

    PubMed

    Wickham, J E

    1993-11-27

    Replacement of open surgery with minimally invasive techniques for treating stones in the renal tract has greatly reduced patients' morbidity and mortality and the period of hospitalisation and convalescence. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy does not require anaesthesia and requires little analgesia so that treatment can be given on an outpatient basis, and there is no wound to heal. Only a small puncture site is needed for percutaneous endoscopic lithotomy, and with the advent of prophylactic antibiotics there are few complications. Of renal stones, about 85% can now be successfully treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy alone, and almost all of the stones too large or hard for lithotripsy can be treated endoscopically, with ultrasonic or electrohydraulic probes being used to fragment the stone. Stones in the upper and lower thirds of the ureter can be treated by extracorporeal lithotripsy, but stones in the middle third, which cannot normally be visualised to allow focusing of the shockwaves, usually require ureteroscopy. Nearly all bladder stones can be treated by transurethral endoscopy with an electrohydraulic probe. Only the largest renal tract stones still require open surgery.

  14. Urinary tract infections in adults

    PubMed Central

    Wei Tan, Chee; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-01-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. PMID:27662890

  15. Urinary tract infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Wei; Chlebicki, Maciej Piotr

    2016-09-01

    A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a collective term for infections that involve any part of the urinary tract. It is one of the most common infections in local primary care. The incidence of UTIs in adult males aged under 50 years is low, with adult women being 30 times more likely than men to develop a UTI. Appropriate classification of UTI into simple or complicated forms guides its management and the ORENUC classification can be used. Diagnosis of a UTI is based on a focused history, with appropriate investigations depending on individual risk factors. Simple uncomplicated cystitis responds very well to oral antibiotics, but complicated UTIs may require early imaging, and referral to the emergency department or hospitalisation to prevent urosepsis may be warranted. Escherichia coli remains the predominant uropathogen in acute community-acquired uncomplicated UTIs and amoxicillin-clavulanate is useful as a first-line antibiotic. Family physicians are capable of managing most UTIs if guided by appropriate history, investigations and appropriate antibiotics to achieve good outcomes and minimise antibiotic resistance. PMID:27662890

  16. A mixture of five phthalate esters inhibits fetal testicular testosterone production in a cummulative manner consistent with their predicted reproductive toxicity in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate diesters are plasticizers to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. Exposure to certain phthalates during sexual differentiation causes reproductive tract malformations in male rats. In the fetal rat, exposure to the phthalates benzylbutyl (BBP), di(n)butyl (DBP), and...

  17. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Leasing Procedures § 281.15 Tract size. The...

  18. An analog integrated-circuit vocal tract.

    PubMed

    Keng Hoong Wee; Turicchia, L; Sarpeshkar, R

    2008-12-01

    We present the first experimental integrated-circuit vocal tract by mapping fluid volume velocity to current, fluid pressure to voltage, and linear and nonlinear mechanical impedances to linear and nonlinear electrical impedances. The 275 muW analog vocal tract chip includes a 16-stage cascade of two-port pi-elements that forms a tunable transmission line, electronically variable impedances, and a current source as the glottal source. A nonlinear resistor models laminar and turbulent flow in the vocal tract. The measured SNR at the output of the analog vocal tract is 64, 66, and 63 dB for the first three formant resonances of a vocal tract with uniform cross-sectional area. The analog vocal tract can be used with auditory processors in a feedback speech locked loop-analogous to a phase locked loop-to implement speech recognition that is potentially robust in noise. Our use of a physiological model of the human vocal tract enables the analog vocal tract chip to synthesize speech signals of interest, using articulatory parameters that are intrinsically compact and linearly interpolatable. PMID:23853134

  19. Haemophilus influenzae: comparison of respiratory tract isolates with genitourinary tract isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, W L; Brunton, J L; Meier, M; Bowman, M N; Slaney, L A

    1982-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae isolates recovered from the genitourinary (GU) tract were shown to have a significantly different biotype distribution compared with respiratory tract isolates. Biotype IV strains were recovered more commonly from the GU tract, and most strains were non-serotypable. Antibiotic-susceptible strains isolated from the GU tract more frequently harbored plasmids of less than 10 megadaltons than did antibiotic-susceptible respiratory tract strains. One 2.8-megadalton plasmid resident in a GU tract isolate and one 1.8-megadalton plasmid resident in a respiratory tract isolate were shown to be related to the small ampicillin resistance plasmids previously described in H. influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus ducreyi, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This supports the suggestion that these ampicillin resistance plasmids originated by transposition or recombination of the ampicillin transposon (TnA) with cryptic endogenous Haemophilus plasmids. Images PMID:6984048

  20. Characterization of Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat, and proposal for the reclassification of five closely related members of the genus Clostridium into the genera Romboutsia gen. nov., Intestinibacter gen. nov., Terrisporobacter gen. nov. and Asaccharospora gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Jacoline; Fuentes, Susana; Grievink, Wieke; van Niftrik, Laura; Tindall, Brian J; Timmerman, Harro M; Rijkers, Ger T; Smidt, Hauke

    2014-05-01

    A Gram-positive staining, rod-shaped, non-motile, spore-forming obligately anaerobic bacterium, designated CRIBT, was isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat and characterized. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CRIBT were saturated and unsaturated straight-chain C12-C19 fatty acids, with C16:0 being the predominant fatty acid. The polar lipid profile comprised six glycolipids, four phospholipids and one lipid that did not stain with any of the specific spray reagents used. The only quinone was MK-6. The predominating cell-wall sugars were glucose and galactose. The peptidoglycan type of strain CRIBT was A1σ lanthionine-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CRIBT was 28.1 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain CRIBT was most closely related to a number of species of the genus Clostridium, including Clostridium lituseburense (97.2%), Clostridium glycolicum (96.2%), Clostridium mayombei (96.2%), Clostridium bartlettii (96.0%) and Clostridium irregulare (95.5%). All these species show very low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (<85%) to the type strain of Clostridium butyricum, the type species of the genus Clostridium. DNA-DNA hybridization with closely related reference strains indicated reassociation values below 32%. On the basis of phenotypic and genetic studies, a novel genus, Romboutsia gen. nov., is proposed. The novel isolate CRIBT (=DSM 25109T=NIZO 4048T) is proposed as the type strain of the type species, Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., of the proposed novel genus. It is proposed that C. lituseburense is transferred to this genus as Romboutsia lituseburensis comb. nov. Furthermore, the reclassification into novel genera is proposed for C. bartlettii, as Intestinibacter bartlettii gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. glycolicum, as Terrisporobacter glycolicus gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. mayombei, as Terrisporobacter mayombei gen. nov., comb. nov., and C

  1. Characterization of Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat, and proposal for the reclassification of five closely related members of the genus Clostridium into the genera Romboutsia gen. nov., Intestinibacter gen. nov., Terrisporobacter gen. nov. and Asaccharospora gen. nov.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Jacoline; Fuentes, Susana; Grievink, Wieke; van Niftrik, Laura; Tindall, Brian J; Timmerman, Harro M; Rijkers, Ger T; Smidt, Hauke

    2014-05-01

    A Gram-positive staining, rod-shaped, non-motile, spore-forming obligately anaerobic bacterium, designated CRIBT, was isolated from the gastro-intestinal tract of a rat and characterized. The major cellular fatty acids of strain CRIBT were saturated and unsaturated straight-chain C12-C19 fatty acids, with C16:0 being the predominant fatty acid. The polar lipid profile comprised six glycolipids, four phospholipids and one lipid that did not stain with any of the specific spray reagents used. The only quinone was MK-6. The predominating cell-wall sugars were glucose and galactose. The peptidoglycan type of strain CRIBT was A1σ lanthionine-direct. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CRIBT was 28.1 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain CRIBT was most closely related to a number of species of the genus Clostridium, including Clostridium lituseburense (97.2%), Clostridium glycolicum (96.2%), Clostridium mayombei (96.2%), Clostridium bartlettii (96.0%) and Clostridium irregulare (95.5%). All these species show very low 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (<85%) to the type strain of Clostridium butyricum, the type species of the genus Clostridium. DNA-DNA hybridization with closely related reference strains indicated reassociation values below 32%. On the basis of phenotypic and genetic studies, a novel genus, Romboutsia gen. nov., is proposed. The novel isolate CRIBT (=DSM 25109T=NIZO 4048T) is proposed as the type strain of the type species, Romboutsia ilealis gen. nov., sp. nov., of the proposed novel genus. It is proposed that C. lituseburense is transferred to this genus as Romboutsia lituseburensis comb. nov. Furthermore, the reclassification into novel genera is proposed for C. bartlettii, as Intestinibacter bartlettii gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. glycolicum, as Terrisporobacter glycolicus gen. nov., comb. nov. (type species of the genus), C. mayombei, as Terrisporobacter mayombei gen. nov., comb. nov., and C

  2. METHOXYCHLOR ACCELERATES EMBRYO TRANSPORT THROUGH THE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estrogenic pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is known to reduce implantation, and, in our previous work, this reduction has been attributed to a direct effect on uterine function. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of MXC on embryo transport rate, another phe...

  3. [Phytotherapy of respiratory tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Bylka, Wiesława; Witkowska-Banaszczak, Ewa; Studzińska-Sroka, Elzbieta; Matławska, Irena

    2012-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used in cough due to their antitussive and expectorant activity. Antitussives act either centrally on the cough center of the brain or peripherally on the cough receptors in the respiratory passages. The antitussive effect of many herbs results from the content of mucilage, which exerts protective and demulcent activity. The activity of expectorant herbs results primarily from their influence on the gastric mucose (saponins and ipec alkaloids). This proves reflex stimulation which leads to an increase in the secretion of bronchial glands. Volatile-oil type expectorant herbs exert a direct stimulatory effect on the bronchial glands by means of local irritation with antibacterial activity. In colds and flu, herbs containing volatile oil can be used; also, volatile oils are ingredients of syrups and liquids as well as external phytomedicines in the form of liniments, ointments, and inhalations. The paper shows the herbs and phytomedicines present on the Polish market used for the treatment of respiratory tract diseases. PMID:23289257

  4. The postural function of the iliotibial tract.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, P.

    1979-01-01

    A new definition of the iliotibial tract is made. Its anatomical and physical characteristics are summarised and its known functions discussed. The various postures adopted by standing Man are looked at and one resting posture is closely analysed. Hence a new role is proposed for the iliotibial tract. In the hip bone a new bony effect of the iliotibial tract is proposed. The presence of this structure is traced in the fossil record and linked to the anthropological evidence of upright posture. Images FIG. 1-8 FIG. 9-16 FIG. 17-25 FIG. 26-34 PMID:475270

  5. Hydatid disease of the genitourinary tract.

    PubMed

    Halim, A; Vaezzadeh, K

    1980-04-01

    Seventeen patients were treated surgically for hydatid disease of the genitourinary tract. The diagnosis of echinococcosis was facilitated by a positive Casoni test with evidence suggestive of a cystic tumour following intravenous urography, angiography, ultrasound or renal scan. Barium enemas, cystography and cystoscopy were of great help in cases of lower urinary tract hydatid disease. Seven patients with hydatid disease of the kidney underwent nephrectomy. The other 6 patients with renal involvement had excision of the cysts only. Treatment of the 4 patients with lower genitourinary tract hydatid disease was on an individual basis. There was no mortality and no significant morbidity.

  6. [Metagenomics in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Yang, Yunjuan; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-12-01

    Animal gastrointestinal tract contains a complex community of microbes, whose composition ultimately reflects the co-evolution of microorganisms with their animal host. The gut microbial community of humans and animals has received significant attention from researchers because of its association with health and disease. The application of metagenomics technology enables researchers to study not only the microbial composition but also the function of microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. In this paper, combined with our own findings, we summarized advances in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism with metagenomics and the bioinformatics technology.

  7. Autonomic receptors in urinary tract: Sex and age differences

    SciTech Connect

    Latifpour, J.; Kondo, S.; O'Hollaren, B.; Morita, T.; Weiss, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    As age and sex affect the function of the lower urinary tract, we studied the characteristics of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors in various parts of lower urinary tract smooth muscle of young (6 months) and old (4 1/2-5 years) male and female rabbits. Saturation experiments performed with (3H)prazosin, (3H)yohimbine, (3H)dihydroalprenolol and (3H)quinuclidinyl benzylate in rabbit bladder base, bladder dome and urethra indicate the presence of regional, sex- and age-related differences in the density of alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor density is considerably higher in the female than in the male urethra of both age groups, whereas the higher density of beta adrenergic receptors in the female than in the male bladder base is observed only in the younger animals. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in bladder dome than in bladder base or urethra in young rabbits of both sexes. In the old animals, the density of muscarinic receptors in bladder base increases to the level observed in bladder dome. Inhibition experiments with selective adrenergic agonists and antagonists indicate that the pharmacological profiles of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in the urethra and beta adrenergic receptors in the bladder dome and bladder base are similar in both sexes and at both ages. Beta-2 adrenergic receptors are shown to be predominant in bladder base and bladder dome of rabbits. Parallel studies in rabbit urethra, adult rat cortex and neonatal rat lung show that the urethral alpha-2 adrenergic receptors are of the alpha-2A subtype.

  8. Etiologic Diagnosis of Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hoeprich, Paul D.

    1970-01-01

    Decision as to the role of infection in lower respiratory tract disease requires examination by culture of specimens known to be derived from the infra-laryngeal respiratory tract. Methods that involve the upper respiratory tract in collection of specimens entail the hazard of contamination by microbiota resident in the upper respiratory tract. The extrapulmonary approaches of cutting-needle biopsy and needle aspiration of intrathoracic disease have not been impressively productive of etiologic diagnosis of infections. While open-chest surgical biopsy has been a highly effective means to diagnosis, this approach does have special requirements in facilities and technical skills. Percutaneous transtracheal aspiration of tracheo-broncho-pulmonary secretions-exudates has been productive of useful information. Because of inherent simplicity and safety, transtracheal aspiration should precede resort to more demanding, difficult, dangerous procedures. PMID:5470140

  9. Urinary tract complications with rectal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Beahrs, J R; Beahrs, O H; Beahrs, M M; Leary, F J

    1978-01-01

    The possibility of urinary tract injury should always be considered in the course of anterior resection or combined abdominoperineal resection of the lower colon and rectum. Controlled studies of ureteral and other injuries and fistulas cannot be made; but fortunately, unanticipated damage to the lower urinary tract does not occur often. The surgeon operating in the pelvis should be aware of the problems rarely encountered and should be capable of their management. If a urologic surgeon is available, consultation often is desirable. Prompt intraoperative recognition is most important so remedial procedures can be carried out immediately. Delay in recognition and treatment jeopardizes the patient's course and the function of the urinary tract. Postoperative urinary tract infections should be diagnosed early so prompt treatment can be instituted. PMID:646493

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide and Urogenital Tract.

    PubMed

    di Villa Bianca, Roberta d'Emmanuele; Cirino, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter the role played by H2S in the physiopathology of urogenital tract revising animal and human data available in the current relevant literature is discussed. H2S pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in the mechanism underlying penile erection in human and experimental animal. Both cystathionine-β synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) are expressed in the human corpus cavernosum and exogenous H2S relaxes isolated human corpus cavernosum strips in an endothelium-independent manner. Hydrogen sulfide pathway also accounts for the direct vasodilatory effect operated by testosterone on isolated vessels. Convincing evidence suggests that H2S can influence the cGMP pathway by inhibiting the phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) activity. All these findings taken together suggest an important role for the H2S pathway in human corpus cavernosum homeostasis. However, H2S effect is not confined to human corpus cavernosum but also plays an important role in human bladder. Human bladder expresses mainly CBS and generates in vitro detectable amount of H2S. In addition the bladder relaxant effect of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil involves H2S as mediator. In conclusion the H2S pathway is not only involved in penile erection but also plays a role in bladder homeostasis. In addition the finding that it involved in the mechanism of action of PDE-5 inhibitors strongly suggests that modulation of this pathway can represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and bladder diseases. PMID:26162831

  11. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: novel therapy in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, Predrag; Seiwerth, Sven; Rucman, Rudolf; Turkovic, Branko; Rokotov, Dinko Stancic; Brcic, Luka; Sever, Marko; Klicek, Robert; Radic, Bozo; Drmic, Domagoj; Ilic, Spomenko; Kolenc, Danijela; Vrcic, Hrvoje; Sebecic, Bozidar

    2011-01-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 is an anti-ulcer peptidergic agent, safe in inflammatory bowel disease clinical trials (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL 14736) and wound healing, stable in human gastric juice and has no reported toxicity. We focused on BPC 157 as a therapy in peridontitis, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, intestine, liver and pancreas lesions. Particularly, it has a prominent effect on alcohol-lesions (i.e., acute, chronic) and NSAIDs-lesions (interestingly, BPC 157 both prevents and reverses adjuvant arthritis). In rat esophagitis and failed function of both lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and pyloric sphincters (PS), BPC 157 increased pressure in both sphincters till normal and reduced esophagitis. However, in healthy rats, it may decrease (PS) or increase (LES) the pressure in sphincters. It has strong angiogenic potential, it acts protectively on endothelium, prevents and reverses thrombus formation after abdominal aorta anastomosis, affects many central disturbances (i.e., dopamine and 5-HT system), the NO-system (either L-arginine and L-NAME effects), endothelin, acts as a free radical scavenger (counteracting CCl4-, paracetamol-, diclofenac-injuries) and exhibits neuroprotective properties. BPC 157 successfully heals the intestinal anastomosis, gastrocutaneous, duodenocutaneous and colocutaneous fistulas in rats, as well as interacting with the NO-system. Interestingly, the fistula closure was achieved even when the BPC 157 therapy was postponed for one month. In short-bowel syndrome escalating throughout 4 weeks, the constant weight gain above preoperative values started immediately with peroral and parental BPC 157 therapy and the villus height, crypth depth and muscle thickness (inner (circular) muscular layer) additionally increased. Thus, BPC 157 may improve gastrointestinal tract therapy. PMID:21548867

  12. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  13. Investigation of the mechanism for phthalate-induced toxicity during male sexual differentiation in the rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male rats exposed to phthalate esters during sexual differentiation (GDI4-GDI8) display various developmental abnormalities of the reproductive tract that are manifested later in adult life. Induction of these malformations is associated with declines in fetal testicular testoste...

  14. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  15. [Physiology of microflora in the digestive tract].

    PubMed

    Zboril, V

    2002-01-01

    The microflora of the digestive tract is a complex microbial ecosystem, well balanced, which in an aboral direction undergoes specific changes as to the ratio of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms the functions of which supplement each other--the aerobes ensure for the whole ecosystem the scavenger effect. The microbial profile of the digestive tract is typical by the absence of anaerobic microorganisms in the stomach and conversely their absolute predominance in the distal colon. The basic physiological functions of the microflora of the digestive tract can be characterized as follows: 1. microbial barrier against pathogens and potential pathogens, 2. formation of products of the microflora and their influence on the blood supply of the intestinal mucosa and peristaltics, 3. stimulation of the immune system in the gut, 4. reduction of bacterial translocation, 5. production of vitamins. To this problem in the world literature, contrary to ours, deserved attention has been paid for many years. Knowledge of the problem opens the door to expedient manipulation with the microbial flora of the digestive tract by the use of diet or prebiotics, probiotics as well as antibiotic treatment. The author presents a summary of basic findings which developed on the subject of physiological microflora of the digestive tract successively up to their present shape.

  16. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Morris, C Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E; Zweben, Jesse A; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D; Nutman, Thomas B; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent "hidden antigens" with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins appear

  17. [Ultrasound diagnostics of upper urinary tract calculi].

    PubMed

    Belyĭ, L E

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to ultrasonography of the upper urinary tract in patients with nephrolithiasis. Ultrasonographic semiotics of urolithiasis, the ability of unlrasonography to detect nephrolithiasis, and methods of the optimization of these diagnostic techniques in patients with upper urinary tract calculi are covered. The author discusses difficulties that may be faced while differentiating between nephrolithiasis and such conditions as spongious kidney, nephrocalcinosis, calcification of renal papillae, cysts, tumors, and vascular walls, as well as other kinds of renal calcification, associated with ultrasonographic acoustic path phenomenon. The advantages and disadvantages of ultrasonography in cases of X-ray urolithiasis are evaluated in the paper. The article describes hardships in ultrasound visualization of ureteral calculi causing acute upper urinary tract obstruction, and the ways of getting over them.

  18. Botulinum toxin for the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Kuo, Hann-Chorng; Chancellor, Michael B

    2010-04-01

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are known for their ability to potently and selectively modulate neurotransmission for successful long-term treatment of muscle hypercontractility. Recent studies suggest that BoNT has effects on modulation of sensory processing, inflammation and glandular function. Urologists and urogynaecologists have become interested in the potential application of BoNTs in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms, including detrusor and sphincter overactivity, bladder hypersensitivity, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia. We review the biological action of BoNT in bladder and prostate, and present the techniques and results of the clinical studies with BoNT in the lower urinary tract.

  19. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections Management in Women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Badr, Ahmed; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most frequent clinical bacterial infections in women, accounting for nearly 25% of all infections. Around 50–60% of women will develop UTIs in their lifetimes. Escherichia coli is the organism that causes UTIs in most patients. Recurrent UTIs (RUTI) are mainly caused by reinfection by the same pathogen. Having frequent sexual intercourse is one of the greatest risk factors for RUTIs. In a subgroup of individuals with coexisting morbid conditions, complicated RUTIs can lead to upper tract infections or urosepsis. Although the initial treatment is antimicrobial therapy, use of different prophylactic regimens and alternative strategies are available to reduce exposure to antibiotics. PMID:23984019

  20. Urinary tract infections: treatment/comparative therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Olin, Shelly J; Bartges, Joseph W

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) occurs when there is compromise of host defense mechanisms and a virulent microbe adheres, multiplies, and persists in a portion of the urinary tract. Most commonly, UTI is caused by bacteria, but fungi and viruses are possible. Urine culture and sensitivity are the gold standards for diagnosis of bacterial UTI. Identifying the location of infection (eg, bladder, kidney, prostate) as well as comorbidities (eg, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression) is essential to guide the diagnostic and therapeutic plan. Antimicrobial agents are the mainstay of therapy for bacterial UTI and selected ideally based on culture and sensitivity.

  1. Papillomaviral Infections of the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Malcolm G.

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common organism to infect the human genital tract, affecting as much as half, or more, of the sexually active population. This virus has become widely recognized through the well publicized relationship with genital tract neoplasia and through new diagnostic technologies, such as monoclonal antibody analysis, DNA hybridization, and the polymerase chain reaction. This paper describes the full spectrum of HPV infections, starting with pathogenesis and continuing to clinical manifestations, and discusses significance, diagnosis, and management. PMID:21221347

  2. Expanded HOXA13 polyalanine tracts in a monotreme.

    PubMed

    Lehoczky, Jessica A; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2008-01-01

    The N-terminal region of human HOXA13 has seven discrete polyalanine tracts. Our previous analysis of these tracts in multiple major vertebrate clades suggested that three are mammal-specific. We now report the N-terminal HOXA13 repetitive tract structures in the monotreme Tachyglossus aculeatus (echidna). Contrary to our expectations, echidna HOXA13 possesses a unique set of polyalanine tracts and an unprecedented polyglycine tract. The data support the conclusion that the emergence of expanded polyalanine tracts in proteins occurred very early in the stem lineage that gave rise to mammals, between 162 and 315 Ma. PMID:18638320

  3. Reduced functional recovery by delaying motor training after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Norrie, B A; Nevett-Duchcherer, J M; Gorassini, M A

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if a delay in rehabilitative motor training after spinal cord injury affects functional motor recovery. We studied a skilled motor task in which rats traversed a raised horizontal ladder and we quantified errors in accurate stepping, i.e., foot slips between rungs. After lesions to the dorsal quadrant of the thoracic (T8) spinal cord that aimed to unilaterally sever the corticospinal and rubrospinal tracts, rats were re-trained to walk across the ladder, either immediately after injury or after a 3-mo delay. Before training, the error rate in accurate stepping of the affected hindlimb was similar in the immediately (69.4 +/- 5.3%) and delay (62.7 +/- 4.1%; means +/- SE)-trained animals (not significantly different), suggesting that accurate stepping did not improve spontaneously if rats were not exposed to the ladder. After a 3-wk course of training (30 runs across the ladder per day, 5 day/wk), improvements in accurate stepping performance were greater if training was implemented immediately after injury. On average, immediately trained animals improved stepping performance by 61.5 +/- 28.2%, whereas the delay trained group improved by only 34.9 +/- 28.8% (significantly different). The degree of damage to the corticospinal and rubrospinal tracts was very similar in the two groups of animals, indicating that differences in lesion size did not contribute to the differences in performance improvement. Animals with large lesions to the corticospinal and rubrospinal tracts (>70%) displayed poor recovery from training (especially for delay-trained animals), suggesting that these two pathways were important in mediating improvements in accurate stepping. In addition, recovery of stepping-like reflexes appeared not to contribute to the recovery of accurate stepping given that the time course of reflex recovery was not related to the time course of recovery of accurate stepping. We conclude that training of a skilled motor task that

  4. Centrally administered glucagon stimulates sympathetic nerve activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Krzeski, R; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A; Millhorn, D E

    1989-12-18

    The effect of pancreatic glucagon given intravenously, intracerebroventricularly and microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract on sympathetic activity in the cervical trunk and adrenal nerve was examined in rat. In each case glucagon caused a relatively long-lasting substantial increase in discharge of both nerves. This finding shows that glucagon can act centrally to stimulate sympathetic activity. The most probable site for the sympathoexcitatory effect of glucagon is the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:2598031

  5. Computational Modeling of Nanoscale and Microscale Particle Deposition, Retention and Dosimetry in the Mouse Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, B.; Price, O.T.; Oldham, M.; Chen, L.C.; Saunders, E.L.; Gordon, T.; Mikheev, V.B.; Minard, K.R.; Teeguarden, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Comparing effects of inhaled particles across rodent test systems and between rodent test systems and humans is a key obstacle to the interpretation of common toxicological test systems for human risk assessment. These comparisons, correlation with effects and prediction of effects, are best conducted using measures of tissue dose in the respiratory tract. Differences in lung geometry, physiology and the characteristics of ventilation can give rise to differences in the regional deposition of particles in the lung in these species. Differences in regional lung tissue doses cannot currently be measured experimentally. Regional lung tissue dosimetry can however be predicted using models developed for rats, monkeys, and humans. A computational model of particle respiratory tract deposition and clearance was developed for BALB/c and B6C3F1 mice, creating a cross species suite of available models for particle dosimetry in the lung. Airflow and particle transport equations were solved throughout the respiratory tract of these mice strains to obtain temporal and spatial concentration of inhaled particles from which deposition fractions were determined. Particle inhalability (Inhalable fraction, IF) and upper respiratory tract (URT) deposition were directly related to particle diffusive and inertial properties. Measurements of the retained mass at several post-exposure times following exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles, micro and nanoscale C60 fullerene, and nanoscale silver particles were used to calibrate and verify model predictions of total lung dose. Interstrain (mice) and interspecies (mouse, rat, human) differences in particle inhalability, fractional deposition and tissue dosimetry are described for ultrafine, fine and coarse particles. PMID:25373829

  6. Gastrointestinal tract modelling in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dong-Hua; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the system of organs within multi-cellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste. The various patterns of GI tract function are generated by the integrated behaviour of multiple tissues and cell types. A thorough study of the GI tract requires understanding of the interactions between cells, tissues and gastrointestinal organs in health and disease. This depends on knowledge, not only of numerous cellular ionic current mechanisms and signal transduction pathways, but also of large scale GI tissue structures and the special distribution of the nervous network. A unique way of coping with this explosion in complexity is mathematical and computational modelling; providing a computational framework for the multilevel modelling and simulation of the human gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of biomechanical modelling work of the GI tract in humans and animals, which can be further used to integrate the physiological, anatomical and medical knowledge of the GI system. Such modelling will aid research and ensure that medical professionals benefit, through the provision of relevant and precise information about the patient’s condition and GI remodelling in animal disease models. It will also improve the accuracy and efficiency of medical procedures, which could result in reduced cost for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19132766

  7. Recurrent urinary tract infections in children.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. W.; Lirenman, D. S.; Anderson, J. D.; Nielsen, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in children and present in various ways. Diagnosis is based on findings of pyuria and bacteriuria. Management includes adequate and timely investigation, appropriate antibiotics, treatment of underlying contributing factors, and follow-up advice. Images p1625-a p1628-a p1629-a PMID:8348023

  8. 30 CFR 281.15 - Tract size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tract size. 281.15 Section 281.15 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF...

  9. Radionuclide imaging of the biliary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.E.; Daly, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Cholescintigraphy with technetium-labeled biliary agents has great value in evaluation of the patient with suspected acute cholecystitis. Visualization of the gall bladder virtually excludes acute cholecystitis and obstruction of the cystic duct. Nonvisualization of the gall bladder, however, is not specific for acute cholecystitis and may also occur in some patients with chronic cholecystitis or pancreatitis. Interpretation of gall bladder nonvisualization, therefore, must be correlated with the clinical presentation. Biliary tract imaging is also useful in evaluation of some focal abnormalities within the liver, neonatal jaundice, detection of bile leaks or bile reflux, and biliary-enteric shunts. The role of technetium-labeled biliary agents in the evaluation of patients with jaundice is less clear. Excretion of tracer into the gut excludes complete biliary tract obstruction, but the test may be nonconclusive at higher serum bilirubin levels. If persistent common bile duct activity is observed with delayed excretion into the gut, the diagnosis of partial obstruction may be made, but this procedure will be inconclusive if the common bile duct is not visualized and/or significant hepatocellular disease is present. Ultrasonography and abdominal CT are the preferred tools for the diagnosis of biliary tract obstruction at present, but newer biliary tract agents which achieve better hepatic extraction and greater bile concentration at high serum bilirubin levels may improve the diagnostic efficacy of cholescintigraphy.

  10. Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of Archaea in the intestinal tract of pigs is limited. In order to investigate archaeal community structure, samples were taken from the cecum and proximal colon of finishing pigs (24) fed diets with either corn or solvent extracted corn germ meal (CGM). Corn germ meal feeding began in w...

  11. Ruthenium-97 hepatobiliary agents for delayed studies of the bilary tract I: Ru-97 PIPIDA: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Schachner, E.R.; Gil, M.C.; Atkins, H.L.; Som, P.; Srivastava, S.C.; Badia, J.; Sacker, D.F.; Fairchild, R.G.; Richards, P.

    1981-04-01

    Failure of early diagnosis of biliary atresia results in the development of cirrhosis and death. Commonly used hepatobiliary agents are not ideal for follow-up studies because of their unfavorable physical properties or short half-life. The excellent physical properties of Ru-97 should overcome these limitations. Therefore, Ru-97 PIPIDA (N,..cap alpha..-(p-isopropyl acetanilide) iminoacetic acid) is being investigated as a potential hepatobiliary agent that would allow an improved diagnosis of the disease. Ruthenium-97 PIPIDA and Tc-99m PIPIDA showed similar blood clearance rates in dogs. Ru-97 PIPIDA scintigrams in dogs showed early uptake in liver and gallbladder and slow excretion through the gastrointestinal tract. Biodistribution studies were performed in normal rats and rats with biliary obstruction. The findings suggest that Ru-97 PIPIDA should be useful for delayed studies ( 1 to 3 days) of the biliary tract.

  12. Biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Chao, C M; Lai, C C; Tang, H J; Ko, W C; Hsueh, P-R

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. Patients with bile cultures positive for Aeromonas species during the period July 2004 to December 2011 were identified from a computerized database of a hospital in Taiwan. Patients with Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract were further identified. During the study period, a total of 1,142 isolates of Aeromonas species were obtained from 750 patients. Of those patients, 91 (12.1 %) had Aeromonas infections of the biliary tract. The annual incidence (episodes per 10,000 patient-days) of biliary tract infections caused by all Aeromonas species was 0.31 in 2007, 0.12 in 2010, and 0.27 in 2011. A. hydrophila was the most common species isolated (n = 41, 45.1 %), followed by A. caviae (n = 30, 33.0 %), A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 15, 16.5 %), and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 5, 5.5 %). The majority of patients (n = 77, 84.6 %) had polymicrobial infections. Hepatobiliary stones (n = 50, 54.9 %) and hepatobiliary cancer (n = 38, 41.8 %) were the most common underlying diseases, followed by diabetes mellitus (n = 29, 31.9 %) and liver cirrhosis (n = 7, 7.7 %). The in-hospital mortality rate was 8.8 %. Infection-related mortality was associated with underlying immunocompromised condition (p = 0.044) and use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.004), but was not associated with inappropriate antibiotic usage or concomitant bacteremia (n = 8, 8.8 %). In conclusion, biliary tract infections caused by Aeromonas species are not uncommon and can develop in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients; however, patients with underlying hepatobiliary diseases are particularly susceptible to these infections.

  13. Tuberoinfundibular transport of intrahypothalamic-administered dopamine in normo- and hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, M.K.

    1988-01-01

    The dopamine transport system in the tuberoinfundibular tract of the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was investigated. The results show that the rate of dopamine transport in this tract is strain-specific. SD rats transported twice as much dopamine (in 30 minutes) as WKY and SHR. The dopamine transport system in the SHR, being at par with that of the WKY, remained intact. These findings suggest that hypertension and the alleged reduced central dopaminergic activity in the SHR is not related to the transport of dopamine in the tuberoinfundibular tract.

  14. Chemical Carcinogenesis of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Rodents: An Overview with Emphasis on NTP Carcinogenesis Bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sundeep A.; Nolan, Michael W.; Malarkey, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Cancers of the stomach and large intestine (LI) are the second and fourth leading causes of human cancer mortality. A review of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) database and the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) reveals that chemically induced neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are relatively common. Within the GIT, epithelial tumors of the forestomach in mice and rats and LI of the rat are most common. Generally, there is a high species concordance for forestomach with at least 26 chemicals inducing tumors in both species. Glandular stomach tumors are rare, and the few reported are usually neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) originating from the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells. Of 290 carcinogenic agents identified by the NTP, 19 (7%) caused intestinal neoplasia, 14 in the rat and 5 in the mouse. Neoplasms occurred in both males and females, exclusively in the small intestine (SI) of the mouse and in the LI or both SI and LI in the rat. Enteric carcinogens (NTP) frequently induced neoplasms at other alimentary sites (oral cavity, esophagus, and stomach). In conclusion, the most common induced GIT tumors are squamous neoplasms of the forestomach, glandular neoplasms of the stomach are rare, and rats appear more prone to developing LI (colorectal) cancer compared to mice. PMID:20019352

  15. Enhanced tumor development by butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in liver, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.

    1986-04-03

    Continuous feeding of 0.5% or 0.05% of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) enhances the development of spontaneously occurring liver tumors in C3H mice, but not in BALB/c mice. In mouse lung, the tumor-enhancing effects of BHT vary with the carcinogen used and in the gastrointestinal tract of mice and rats BHT enhances development of dimethylhydrazine-induced tumors but is without effect on tumors produced by methylnitrosourea. Strain differences, effect upon various carcinogens, paradoxical dose-responses and mechanisms of action remain major questions in the toxicology of BHT. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. A Proteomic Analysis of the Body Wall, Digestive Tract, and Reproductive Tract of Brugia malayi

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. Paul; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Kropp, Laura E.; Zweben, Jesse A.; Meng, Zhaojing; Taylor, Rebekah T.; Chan, King; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filarial worms are parasitic nematodes that cause devastating diseases such as lymphatic filariasis (LF) and onchocerciasis. Filariae are nematodes with complex anatomy including fully developed digestive tracts and reproductive organs. To better understand the basic biology of filarial parasites and to provide insights into drug targets and vaccine design, we conducted a proteomic analysis of different anatomic fractions of Brugia malayi, a causative agent of LF. Approximately 500 adult female B. malayi worms were dissected, and three anatomical fractions (body wall, digestive tract, and reproductive tract) were obtained. Proteins from each anatomical fraction were extracted, desalted, trypsinized, and analyzed by microcapillary reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 4,785 B. malayi proteins. While 1,894 were identified in all three anatomic fractions, 396 were positively identified only within the digestive tract, 114 only within the body wall, and 1,011 only within the reproductive tract. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed a bias for transporters to be present within the digestive tract, suggesting that the intestine of adult filariae is functional and important for nutrient uptake or waste removal. As expected, the body wall exhibited increased frequencies of cytoskeletal proteins, and the reproductive tract had increased frequencies of proteins involved in nuclear regulation and transcription. In assessing for possible vaccine candidates, we focused on proteins sequestered within the digestive tract, as these could possibly represent “hidden antigens” with low risk of prior allergic sensitization. We identified 106 proteins that are enriched in the digestive tract and are predicted to localize to the surface of cells in the the digestive tract. It is possible that some of these proteins are on the luminal surface and may be accessible by antibodies ingested by the worm. A subset of 27 of these proteins

  17. COMBINATION DOSE OF TWO PHTHALATES ADDITIVELY DEPRESSES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AND INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) are phthalate esters used to modify plastic and polymer textures. Individually,DEHP and DBP reduce testosterone production, inhibit reproductive tract development, andinduce reproductive organ malformationsin male rats...

  18. White matter tracts of speech and language.

    PubMed

    Smits, Marion; Jiskoot, Lize C; Papma, Janne M

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been used to investigate the white matter (WM) tracts underlying the perisylvian cortical regions known to be associated with language function. The arcuate fasciculus is composed of 3 segments (1 long and 2 short) whose separate functions correlate with traditional models of conductive and transcortical motor or sensory aphasia, respectively. DTI mapping of language fibers is useful in presurgical planning for patients with dominant hemisphere tumors, particularly when combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. DTI has found damage to language networks in stroke patients and has the potential to influence poststroke rehabilitation and treatment. Assessment of the WM tracts involved in the default mode network has been found to correlate with mild cognitive impairment, potentially explaining language deficits in patients with apparently mild small vessel ischemic disease. Different patterns of involvement of language-related WM structures appear to correlate with different clinical subtypes of primary progressive aphasias.

  19. Microbes and the developing gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neu, Josef; Douglas-Escobar, Martha; Lopez, Mariela

    2007-04-01

    During the course of mammalian evolution, there has been a close relationship between microbes residing in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the mammalian host. Although the host provides the microbes with a warm environment and nutrients, they, in turn, undergo various metabolic processes that aid the host. The host has developed weapons against microbes that are considered foreign, as well as mechanisms to tolerate and live synergistically with most of the microbes in the GI tract. This relationship is proving to be important not only in the neonatal period and during infancy, but it is becoming increasingly evident that microbial colonization in early life may affect the individual's health throughout life. Here we will review this relationship in terms of health and disease, with a focus on the aspects of this relationship during maturation of the host. PMID:17374791

  20. Lower respiratory tract infections: prevention using vaccines.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Cynthia G; Harper, Scott A

    2004-12-01

    In summary, vaccines are available to prevent two of the most common and most deadly causes of lower respiratory tract infections: pneumococcal disease and influenza. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents pneumococcal bacteremia; influenza vaccines prevent influenza as well as several complications of influenza. Despite all that is known about how well these vaccines work, influenza and pneumococcal vaccines are underused markedly, especially among some minority groups that are affected dis-proportionately by disease. Coverage also remains low among health care workers, although providing influenza vaccine to health care workers saves lives among patients. Tools such as standing orders can help clinicians increase vaccine coverage in their patient populations. While research for new and improved vaccines to prevent lower respiratory tract infections continues,focusing on simple measures for increasing vaccine use can help prevent morbidity and mortality now.

  1. Reproductive tract microbiome in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason M; Scott, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    The human microbiome has gained much attention recently for its role in health and disease. This interest has come as we have begun to scratch the surface of the complexity of what has been deemed to be our "second genome" through initiatives such as the Human Microbiome Project. Microbes have been hypothesized to be involved in the physiology and pathophysiology of assisted reproduction since before the first success in IVF. Although the data supporting or refuting this hypothesis remain somewhat sparse, thanks to sequencing data from the 16S rRNA subunit, we have begun to characterize the microbiome in the male and female reproductive tracts and understand how this may play a role in reproductive competence. In this review, we discuss what is known about the microbiome of the reproductive tract as it pertains to assisted reproductive technologies.

  2. Functional lumen imaging of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, Christian; Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Fynne, Lotte; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Krogh, Klaus; Regan, Julie; Kunwald, Peter; McMahon, Barry P

    2015-10-01

    This nonsystematic review aims to describe recent developments in the use of functional lumen imaging in the gastrointestinal tract stimulated by the introduction of the functional lumen imaging probe. When ingested food in liquid and solid form is transported along the gastrointestinal tract, sphincters provide an important role in the flow and control of these contents. Inadequate function of sphincters is the basis of many gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, traditional methods of sphincter diagnosis and measurement such as fluoroscopy, manometry, and the barostat are limited in what they can tell us. It has long been thought that measurement of sphincter function through resistance to distension is a better approach, now more commonly known as distensibility testing. The functional lumen imaging probe is the first medical measurement device that purports in a practical way to provide geometric profiling and measurement of distensibility in sphincters. With use of impedance planimetry, an axial series of cross-sectional areas and pressure in a catheter-mounted allantoid bag are used for the calculation of distensibility parameters. The technique has been trialed in many valvular areas of the gastrointestinal tract, including the upper esophageal sphincter, the esophagogastric junction, and the anorectal region. It has shown potential in the biomechanical assessment of sphincter function and characterization of swallowing disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, achalasia, and fecal incontinence. From this early work, the functional lumen imaging technique has the potential to contribute to a better and more physiological understanding of narrowing regions in the gastrointestinal tract in general and sphincters in particular. PMID:25980822

  3. Bifidobacteria in the digestive tract of bumblebees.

    PubMed

    Killer, Jirí; Kopecný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Rada, Vojtech; Dubná, Sona; Marounek, Milan

    2010-04-01

    Bifidobacteria and other bacterial groups (lactobacilli, facultative anaerobes, anaerobes) from the digestive tract of three bumblebee species (Bombus lucorum (34 samples), Bombus pascuorum (18 samples) and Bombus lapidarius (9 samples)) were enumerated and characterised. Counts of facultative anaerobic bacteria and lactobacilli (5.41+/-2.92 and 2.69+/-3.02 log CFU/g of digestive tract content) were lower than those of anaerobes (7.66+/-0.86 log CFU/g). Counts of bifidobacteria were determined using two selective media: MTPY (Modified Trypticase Phytone Yeast extract agar) and a new medium with pollen extract. There was no significant difference between the counts of bifidobacteria from both media, 5.00+/-2.92 log CFU/g on MTPY and 5.00+/-2.87 on the pollen medium. Subsequently, 187 bacterial strains of the family Bifidobacteriaceae (fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase-positive) were isolated from three different localities and from all three species of bumblebees. Bifidobacteria were found in 42 out of 61 specimens (69%). Twenty-three (38%) specimens had counts of bifidobacteria higher than 7.0 log CFU/g. Bifidobacteria represented the dominant group of anaerobes (>70% of total anaerobes), i.e., the principal group of bacteria in the bumblebee digestive tract, in only fourteen specimens (23% of total). For the first time, bifidobacteria were isolated from the digestive tract of bumblebees. In addition, we suggest, on the basis of biochemical tests (API 50 CHL and RAPID ID 32) and genetic methods (PCR and DGGE), that these bacteria may represent new species within the family of Bifidobacteriaceae.

  4. Computed tomography of the genitourinary tract.

    PubMed

    Stanley, R J; Sagel, S S; Fair, W R

    1978-06-01

    Eighteen months of experience with computed body tomography have revealed that this radiologic modality is useful in the diagnostic evaluation and management of urologic patients. Renal masses, perirenal lesions, poorly functioning kidneys, pelvic tumors and associated retroperitoneal nodal spread and other diagnostic problems related to the urinary tract have been imaged successfully with computed body tomography. Accuracy is high in the differentiation of benign renal cysts from renal neoplasms. Tumor staging and computed body tomography is being explored currently.

  5. Postoperative Morganella morganii endophthalmitis associated with subclinical urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Tsanaktsidis, Gina; Agarwal, Smita A; Maloof, Anthony J; Chandra, Jay; Mitchell, Paul

    2003-05-01

    We report a case of Morganella morganii acute endophthalmitis following clear corneal phacoemulsification cataract surgery in which a coincident asymptomatic chronic urinary tract infection was detected postoperatively. Morganella morganii is a gram-negative bacillus that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract and is part of the normal fecal flora. It is an opportunistic pathogen usually encountered in postoperative and nosocomial settings, causing urinary tract and wound infections. Chronic urinary tract infection may be a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. A dipstick urinalysis before elective cataract surgery in elderly patients with a history of recurrent urinary tract infections may be considered.

  6. A new animal model for human respiratory tract disease due to adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Pacini, D L; Dubovi, E J; Clyde, W A

    1984-07-01

    Cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) were tested as a model for human respiratory tract infection due to adenovirus. After intranasal instillation of 10(6.1) 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50) of adenovirus type 5 into one-month-old cotton rats, groups were killed at intervals for nasal and lung titration of virus and lung histopathology. In lung, eclipse occurred at 8 hr followed by peak viral titer (10(7.5) TCID50/g of lung) on day 5. Titers fell to 10(3.2) TCID50/g by day 10 and persisted at that level through the remainder of the study (day 28) despite appearance of serum neutralizing antibody after day 6. Interstitial pneumonia paralleled viral growth, and peribronchial mononuclear infiltration followed one to two days later. Titers in nasal mucosa peaked on day 3 but were undetectable beyond day 21. Pulmonary histopathology and viral replicative patterns paralleled findings in natural human disease.

  7. Fourier Tract Sampling (FouTS): A framework for improved inference of white matter tracts from diffusion MRI by explicitly modelling tract volume.

    PubMed

    Close, Thomas G; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Johnston, Leigh A; Calamante, Fernando; Mareels, Iven; Connelly, Alan

    2015-10-15

    Diffusion MRI tractography algorithm development is increasingly moving towards global techniques to incorporate "downstream" information and conditional probabilities between neighbouring tracts. Such approaches also enable white matter to be represented more tangibly than the abstract lines generated by the most common approaches to fibre tracking. However, previously proposed algorithms still use fibre-like models of white matter corresponding to thin strands of white matter tracts rather than the tracts themselves, and therefore require many components for accurate representations, which leads to poorly constrained inverse problems. We propose a novel tract-based model of white matter, the 'Fourier tract', which is able to represent rich tract shapes with a relatively low number of parameters, and explicitly decouples the spatial extent of the modelled tract from its 'Apparent Connection Strength (ACS)'. The Fourier tract model is placed within a novel Bayesian framework, which relates the tract parameters directly to the observed signal, enabling a wide range of acquisition schemes to be used. The posterior distribution of the Bayesian framework is characterised via Markov-chain Monte-Carlo sampling to infer probable values of the ACS and spatial extent of the imaged white matter tracts, providing measures that can be directly applied to many research and clinical studies. The robustness of the proposed tractography algorithm is demonstrated on simulated basic tract configurations, such as curving, twisting, crossing and kissing tracts, and sections of more complex numerical phantoms. As an illustration of the approach in vivo, fibre tracking is performed on a central section of the brain in three subjects from 60 direction HARDI datasets.

  8. Fourier Tract Sampling (FouTS): A framework for improved inference of white matter tracts from diffusion MRI by explicitly modelling tract volume.

    PubMed

    Close, Thomas G; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Johnston, Leigh A; Calamante, Fernando; Mareels, Iven; Connelly, Alan

    2015-10-15

    Diffusion MRI tractography algorithm development is increasingly moving towards global techniques to incorporate "downstream" information and conditional probabilities between neighbouring tracts. Such approaches also enable white matter to be represented more tangibly than the abstract lines generated by the most common approaches to fibre tracking. However, previously proposed algorithms still use fibre-like models of white matter corresponding to thin strands of white matter tracts rather than the tracts themselves, and therefore require many components for accurate representations, which leads to poorly constrained inverse problems. We propose a novel tract-based model of white matter, the 'Fourier tract', which is able to represent rich tract shapes with a relatively low number of parameters, and explicitly decouples the spatial extent of the modelled tract from its 'Apparent Connection Strength (ACS)'. The Fourier tract model is placed within a novel Bayesian framework, which relates the tract parameters directly to the observed signal, enabling a wide range of acquisition schemes to be used. The posterior distribution of the Bayesian framework is characterised via Markov-chain Monte-Carlo sampling to infer probable values of the ACS and spatial extent of the imaged white matter tracts, providing measures that can be directly applied to many research and clinical studies. The robustness of the proposed tractography algorithm is demonstrated on simulated basic tract configurations, such as curving, twisting, crossing and kissing tracts, and sections of more complex numerical phantoms. As an illustration of the approach in vivo, fibre tracking is performed on a central section of the brain in three subjects from 60 direction HARDI datasets. PMID:26070265

  9. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    PubMed

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern. PMID:25451882

  10. Vocal Tract Articulation in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Verena R.; Snelderwaard, Peter Ch.; ten Cate, Carel; Beckers, Gabriël J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Birdsong and human vocal communication are both complex behaviours which show striking similarities mainly thought to be present in the area of development and learning. Recent studies, however, suggest that there are also parallels in vocal production mechanisms. While it has been long thought that vocal tract filtering, as it occurs in human speech, only plays a minor role in birdsong there is an increasing number of studies indicating the presence of sound filtering mechanisms in bird vocalizations as well. Methodology/Principal Findings Correlating high-speed X-ray cinematographic imaging of singing zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) to song structures we identified beak gape and the expansion of the oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity (OEC) as potential articulators. We subsequently manipulated both structures in an experiment in which we played sound through the vocal tract of dead birds. Comparing acoustic input with acoustic output showed that OEC expansion causes an energy shift towards lower frequencies and an amplitude increase whereas a wide beak gape emphasizes frequencies around 5 kilohertz and above. Conclusion These findings confirm that birds can modulate their song by using vocal tract filtering and demonstrate how OEC and beak gape contribute to this modulation. PMID:20689831

  11. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  12. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  13. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abbo, Lilian M.; Hooton, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections. PMID:27025743

  14. Recurrent respiratory tract infections in paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bellanti, J A

    1997-01-01

    Paediatric respiratory tract infections are one of the most common reasons for physician visits and hospitalisation, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The role of physicians and other healthcare professionals has expanded from merely treating disease to implementing measures aimed at health maintenance and disease prevention. Therefore, children with recurrent respiratory tract infections represent a great challenge for the paediatrician, from both therapeutic and preventive standpoints. The paediatrician must first determine whether these recurrent infections are because of host-derived factors or are the result of increased environmental exposure. Host-derived factors may be nonimmunological or related to host immunodeficiency. The leading cause of recurrent respiratory tract infections throughout the world is increased environmental exposure in children attending nursery school or daycare centres. Acute otitis media in children is of particular concern because of its high incidence, frequent recurrence, and serious long term sequelae, e.g. hearing loss. The socioeconomic impact of these recurrent infections is staggering, and there remains much scope for devising methods for their treatment and prevention. Recent approaches have included the encouragement of breastfeeding, the use of intravenous immunoglobulin and respiratory syncytical virus immune globulin, as well as methods of stimulating immunity, such as ribosomal immunotherapy. PMID:9378072

  15. Pharmacology of the lower urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Hennenberg, Martin; Stief, Christian G.; Gratzke, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacology of the lower urinary tract provides the basis for medical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Therapy of LUTS addresses obstructive symptoms (frequently explained by increased prostate smooth muscle tone and prostate enlargement) in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and storage symptoms in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). Targets for medical treatment include G protein-coupled receptors (α1-adrenoceptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, β3-adrenoceptors) or intracellular enzymes (5α-reductase; phosphodiesterase-5, PDE5). Established therapies of obstructive symptoms aim to induce prostate smooth muscle relaxation by α1-blockers or PDE5 inhibitors, or to reduce prostate growth and volume with 5α-reductase inhibitors. Available options for treatment of OAB comprise anitmuscarinics, β3-adrenoceptor agonists, and botulinum toxin A, which improve storage symptoms by inhibition of bladder smooth muscle contraction. With the recent approval of β3-antagonists, PDE inhibitors, and silodosin for therapy of LUTS, progress from basic research of lower urinary tract pharmacology was translated into new clinical applications. Further targets are in preclinical stages of examination, including modulators of the endocannabinoid system and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. PMID:24744518

  16. Allopregnanolone and neurogenesis in the nigrostriatal tract

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun Ming

    2014-01-01

    Reinstalling the neurobiological circuits to effectively change the debilitating course of neurodegenerative diseases is of utmost importance. This reinstallation requires generation of new cells which are able to differentiate into specific types of neurons and modification of the local environment suitable for integration of these new neurons into the neuronal circuits. Allopregnanolone (APα) seems to be involved in both of these processes, and therefore, is a potential neurotrophic agent. Loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) is one of the main pathological features of Parkinson’s and also in, at least, a subset of Alzheimer’s patients. Therefore, reinstallation of the dopamine neurons in nigrostriatal tract is of unique importance for these neurodegenerative diseases. However, for the neurogenic status and the roles of allopregnanolone in the nigrostriatal tract, the evidence is accumulating and debating. This review summarizes recent studies regarding the neurogenic status in the nigrostriatal tract. Furthermore, special attention is placed on evidence suggesting that reductions in allopregnenalone levels are one of the major pathological features in PD and AD. This evidence has also been confirmed in brains of mice that were lesioned with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or those bearing neurodegenerative mutations. Lastly, we highlight studies showing that allopregnanalone can augment the number of total cells and dopaminergic neurons via peripheral exogenous administration. PMID:25161608

  17. Congenital urinary tract obstruction: the long view.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Robert L

    2015-07-01

    Maldevelopment of the collecting system resulting in urinary tract obstruction (UTO) is the leading identifiable cause of CKD in children. Specific etiologies are unknown; most cases are suspected by discovering hydronephrosis on prenatal ultrasonography. Congenital UTO can reduce nephron number and cause bladder dysfunction, which contribute to ongoing injury. Severe UTO can impair kidney growth in utero, and animal models of unilateral ureteral obstruction show that ischemia and oxidative stress cause proximal tubular cell death, with later development of interstitial fibrosis. Congenital obstructive nephropathy, therefore, results from combined developmental and obstructive kidney injury. Because of inadequacy of available biomarkers, criteria for surgical correction of upper tract obstruction are poorly established. Lower tract obstruction requires fetal or immediate postnatal intervention, and the rate of progression of CKD is highly variable. New biomarkers based on proteomics and determination of glomerular number by magnetic resonance imaging should improve future care. Angiotensin inhibitors have not been effective in slowing progression, although avoidance of nephrotoxins and timely treatment of hypertension are important. Because congenital UTO begins in fetal life, smooth transfer of care from perinatologist to pediatric and adult urology and nephrology teams should optimize quality of life and ultimate outcomes for these patients. PMID:26088076

  18. Along-tract statistics allow for enhanced tractography analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colby, John B.; Soderberg, Lindsay; Lebel, Catherine; Dinov, Ivo D.; Thompson, Paul M.; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion imaging tractography is a valuable tool for neuroscience researchers because it allows the generation of individualized virtual dissections of major white matter tracts in the human brain. It facilitates between-subject statistical analyses tailored to the specific anatomy of each participant. There is prominent variation in diffusion imaging metrics (e.g., fractional anisotropy, FA) within tracts, but most tractography studies use a “tract-averaged” approach to analysis by averaging the scalar values from the many streamline vertices in a tract dissection into a single point-spread estimate for each tract. Here we describe a complete workflow needed to conduct an along-tract analysis of white matter streamline tract groups. This consists of 1) A flexible MATLAB toolkit for generating along-tract data based on B-spline resampling and compilation of scalar data at different collections of vertices along the curving tract spines, and 2) Statistical analysis and rich data visualization by leveraging tools available through the R platform for statistical computing. We demonstrate the effectiveness of such an along-tract approach over the tract-averaged approach in an example analysis of 10 major white matter tracts in a single subject. We also show that these techniques easily extend to between-group analyses typically used in neuroscience applications, by conducting an along-tract analysis of differences in FA between 9 individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) and 11 typically-developing controls. This analysis reveals localized differences between FASD and control groups that were not apparent using a tract-averaged method. Finally, to validate our approach and highlight the strength of this extensible software framework, we implement 2 other methods from the literature and leverage the existing workflow tools to conduct a comparison study. PMID:22094644

  19. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Carrazana, E J; Pasieka, K B; Majzoub, J A

    1988-01-01

    We developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, we studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, approximately 250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was approximately 30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from approximately 250 to approximately 400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation. Images PMID:2841576

  20. The vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tract is unusually long and increases during stimulation of vasopressin gene expression in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Carrazana, E.J.; Pasieka, K.B.; Majzoub, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    The authors developed a method, termed an H-blot, by which the poly(A) tract of any specific mRNA may be detected by RNA filter hybridization after its removal from the body of the mRNA by a RNase H-catalyzed endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region. Using this method, they studied the modulation of the length of the poly(A) tract of rat vasopressin mRNA in vivo during changes in the levels of this mRNA resulting from a physiologic stimulus, osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract of hypothalamic vasopressin mRNA in hydrated rats was, quite remarkably, --250 nucleotides in length, in contrast to that of somatostatin mRNA, which was --30 nucleotides long. Vasopressin mRNA poly(A) tail length increased progressively from --250 to --400 nucleotides with the application of the hyperosmotic stimulus and declined to base line after its removal; somatostatin mRNA poly(A) tail length did not change during osmotic stress. The poly(A) tract length of total hypothalamic mRNA was between 35 and 140 nucleotides and also did not change with osmotic stress. Modulation of poly(A) tract length of specific mRNAs during stimulation of gene expression may provide an additional level of genetic regulation.

  1. The Genetics of Urinary Tract Infections and the Innate Defense of the Kidney and Urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Ambite, Ines; Rydstrom, Gustav; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Hains, David S

    2016-03-01

    The urinary tract is a sterile organ system. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common and often serious infections. Research has focused on uropathogen, environment, and host factors leading to UTI pathogenesis. A growing body of evidence exists implicating genetic factors that can contribute to UTI risks. In this review, we highlight genetic variations in aspects of the innate immune system critical to the host response to uropathogens. This overview includes genetic variations in pattern recognition receptor molecules, chemokines/cytokines, and neutrophil activation. We also comprehensively cover murine knockout models of UTI, genetic variations involved in renal scarring as a result of ascending UTIs, and asymptomatic bacteriuria. PMID:27617139

  2. Mutagenesis within the gastrointestinal tract determined by histidine auxotrophs of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Goldman, P; Carter, J H; Wheeler, L A

    1980-03-15

    The Ames Salmonella mutants can be maintained for months within the gastrointestinal tract of otherwise germfree rats. The ingestion of various carcinogens, but not structurally related non-carcinogens, results in an increased concentration of his+ revertants in the feces. Rats, associated with strain TA1538, were also associated with either L. plantarum of B. vulgatus and with both of these strains. After 2-nitrofluorene ingestion (3.4 mg) the concentration of fecal revertants increased except in rats associated only with strains TA1538 and B. vulgatus. The concentration of B. vulgatus. The concentration of B. vulgatus in the stomach of individual rats correlated negatively with their response to 2-nitrofluorene. Since only B. vulgatus reduces nitrofluorene to the less mutagenic 2-aminofluorene, it appears that B. vulgatus diminishes the revertant response by metabolic removal of the more potent direct acting mutagen from the gut. The ingestion of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (21 mg/kg) and azoxymethane (19 mg/kg) provokes increased fecal revertants only in some animals associated with strain TA1535 or TA100. PMID:6986973

  3. Stimulation of sympathetic innervation in the upper gastrointestinal tract as a treatment for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jolene; DiLorenzo, Daniel J.; McLaughlin, Leslie; Roberts, Andrew T.; Greenway, Frank L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Sympathetic activity and obesity have a reciprocal relationship. Firstly, hypothalamic obesity is associated with decreased sympathetic activity. Caffeine and ephedrine increase sympathetic activity and induce weight loss, of which 25% is due to increased metabolic rate and 75% is due to a reciprocally decreased food intake. Secondly, hormones and drugs that affect body weight have an inverse relationship between food intake and metabolic rate. Neuropeptide Y decreases sympathetic activity and increases food intake and body weight. Thirdly, a gastric pacemaker Transcend® and vagotomy increase the ratio of sympathetic to parasympathetic activation, decrease food intake, and block gut satiety hormones. Weight loss with the pacemaker or vagotomy is variable. Significant weight reduction is seen only in a small group of those treated. This suggests that activation of the sympathetic arm of the autonomic nervous system may be most important for weight loss. Systemic sympathetic activation causes weight loss in obese patients, but side effects limited its use. We hypothesize that selective local electrical sympathetic stimulation of the upper gastrointestinal tract may induce weight loss and offer a safer, yet effective, obesity treatment. Celiac ganglia delivers sympathetic innervation to the upper gastrointestinal tract. Voltage regulated electrical simulation of the rat celiac ganglia increased metabolic rate in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of 6, 3, or 1.5 V increased metabolic rate 15.6%, 6.2%, and 5%, respectively in a single rat. These responses support our hypothesis that selective sympathetic stimulation of the upper GI tract may treat obesity while avoiding side effects of systemic sympathetic activation. PMID:19246162

  4. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  5. Assessment of infective urinary tract disorders.

    PubMed

    Sixt, R; Stokland, E

    1998-06-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children, particularly in the youngest age groups. There is a risk for progressive deterioration of renal function in these children if aggravating factors such as gross reflux and/or outflow obstruction of the urinary tract are present. In this review the pros and cons of available scintigraphic and radiological imaging techniques for the work-up of these children are presented. Ultrasound can be used in the acute phase to exclude obstruction but can not reliably show transient or permanent parenchymal lesions. The presence of reflux can be established with X-ray or direct nuclide cystography. The X-ray technique gives good morphological information and has a grading system with prognostic relevance. Both techniques are invasive and great care must be taken to keep the radiation burden down with the X-ray technique. Indirect nuclide cystography following a renographic study is non-invasive but has a lower sensitivity than direct techniques. More experience is needed with the indirect technique to evaluate the consequences of its apparently low sensitivity. Urography has a limited place in the acute work-up of urinary tract infection but can be used to look for renal scarring 1-2 years after an acute pyelonephritis. The 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan can be used during the acute UTI to show pyelonephritic lesions with good accuracy and/or during the follow-up after six months to show permanent lesions. The acute DMSA scan can be omitted. An early treatment is more important than an early scan! PMID:9695664

  6. Urinary tract infections in the infant.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Mehreen; Seed, Patrick C

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in an infant may be the first indication of an underlying renal disorder. Early recognition and initiation of adequate therapy for UTI is important to reduce the risk of long-term renal scarring. Ampicillin and gentamicin are traditionally the empiric treatment of choice; however, local antibiotic resistance patterns should be considered. Maternal antibiotics during pregnancy also increase the risk of resistant pathogens during neonatal UTI. Long-term management after the first UTI in infants remains controversial because of lack of specific studies in this age group and the risk-benefit issues for antibiotic prophylaxis between reduced recurrent disease and emergent antibiotic resistance.

  7. Microbial Translocation Across the GI Tract*

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  8. Nitrogen partitioning along the equine digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Glade, M J

    1983-10-01

    Twelve adult horses were fed a corn-oats-timothy hay diet containing 2.87% nitrogen (N) for 4 wk and were then killed. Fresh digesta samples were immediately harvested from the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, large colon, small colon, rectum and feces. Total N content of the digesta (on a dry matter basis) increased from the stomach (2.74%) to the duodenum (5.58%; P less than .01), decreased in the cecum (3.10%, P less than .01), remained constant through the large intestine and decreased in the feces (2.10%; P less than .01). High-speed centrifugation of wet digesta and low-speed centrifugation following tungstic acid treatment of wet digesta were comparable in their effectiveness in separating water soluble N-containing compounds (S-N) from insoluble N-containing compounds (P-N). The P-N was further partitioned into neutral detergent soluble (NDS-N) and neutral detergent insoluble (NDF-N) fractions. The NDF-N constituted from 6 to 17% of the total digesta N at any location along the digestive tract. The S-N constituted about 20% of the total digesta N in the stomach, increased to about 80% at mid-jejunum (P less than .01), decreased to 30% in the cecum (P less than .01) and increased throughout the large intestine. The calculation of cumulative apparent digestibilities indicated that total digesta N underwent net disappearance along the entire tract, except in the duodenum. Dietary NDF-N underwent net disappearance throughout the digestive tract. The NDS-N portion of the P-N disappeared in the duodenum, jejunum and small colon, but underwent net appearance in the ileum, cecum and large colon. There was a net appearance of S-N in the duodenum and net disappearances in the ileum and cecum. The shifts in N partitioning along the lower digestive tract and the decreases in N concentrations suggest that the jejunum, ileum, cecum and small colon are major sites of the net absorption of N and that much of the N absorbed in the small colon was supplied by the

  9. [Progresses on macrophages of male reproductive tract].

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Jing; Wang, Tao; Wang, Geng-Xin

    2002-12-01

    The review summarized the recent progress on macrophages of male reproductive tract and the action of macrophages on male reproductive physiology and pathology. The close correlation and effect between testicular macrophages and Leydig cells, Sertoli cells, germ cells, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were introduced, respectively. At the same time, it pointed out the changes of macrophages' morphology and function in immune orchitis, and their regulation on the development of orchitis. So the complex immune regulation network in testes and testicular macrophages playing an important role on spermatogenesis and the stableness of spermatogenetic microenvironment in testes were further illuminated, which can provide theoretical basis for clinic therapy.

  10. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. PMID:26475949

  11. Endoscopic management of upper urinary tract stones.

    PubMed Central

    Tolley, D. A.; Buist, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    In a two year period from March 1983, 157 patients with upper urinary tract stones were managed primarily by endoscopy. Of 90 patients with renal stones, extraction was achieved in 91% of patients with complete extraction in 76%. Of the remaining patients with ureteric stones, successful extraction was achieved in 75%. Ten patients required open surgery which was for failed extraction in 9. Morbidity is low with a mean hospital stay of 4.7 days for patients with kidney stones, and of 3.7 days for patients undergoing extraction of ureteric stones. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3954313

  12. Microbial translocation across the GI tract.

    PubMed

    Brenchley, Jason M; Douek, Daniel C

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  13. Reconstruction and Visualization of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong-guo; Guo, Xu-dong; Xu, Changqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Converting the two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional photographs into an intuitive three-dimensional (3D) model is a basic task for medical imaging data for auxiliary disease-linked diagnosis purpose. Methods: Reconstruction and visualization process of gastrointestinal cross-sectional photographs includes image preparation, image registration, image segmentation, 3D surface-rendering reconstruction, and implementation of 3D digital visualization. Results: Using the visualization toolkit (VTK), we implemented 3D digital reconstruction and visualization of gastrointestinal tract, whose visualized model can be zoomed, paned, and rotated, including the stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine. PMID:23675253

  14. Urinary tract infections in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Alangaden, George

    2007-11-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication after renal transplantation. Although Escherichia coli remains the most common cause of UTI, Enterococcus spp and drug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have emerged as important uropathogens in these patients. As a result, symptomatic UTIs warrant pathogen-specific antibiotic therapy guided by culture and susceptibility data. In the early transplant period, prophylaxis of UTI with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is generally effective. Until the natural history and optimal management of asymptomatic bacteruria are better defined, therapy of asymptomatic bacteruria is generally unnecessary. PMID:17999883

  15. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterised patients.

    PubMed

    Howe, Pam; Adams, John

    2015-01-20

    Urinary tract infections in catheterised patients continue to present a challenge in reducing healthcare-associated infection. In this article, an infection prevention and control team in one NHS trust reports on using audit results to focus attention on measures to reduce bacterial infections. Educational initiatives have an important role in reducing infection, but there is no single solution to the problem. Practice can be improved using a multi-targeted approach, peer review and clinical audit to allow for shared learning and experiences. These, along with informal education in the clinical area and more formal classroom lectures, can ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes.

  16. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  17. Select Neoplasms of the Sinonasal Tract.

    PubMed

    García, Joaquín J; Wenig, Bruce M

    2011-12-01

    The sinonasal tract (SNT) includes the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses (maxillary, ethmoid, frontal, and sphenoid) and may give rise to a variety of nonneoplastic and neoplastic proliferations, including benign and malignant neoplasms. The benign neoplasms of the SNT include epithelial neoplasms of surface epithelial origin, minor salivary gland origin, and mesenchymal origin. The spectrum of malignant neoplasms of the SNT includes epithelial malignancies, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant salivary gland neoplasms, neuroectodermal neoplasms, neuroendocrine neoplasms, melanocytic neoplasm, and sarcomas. This article concentrates on some of the more common types of benign and malignant neoplasms.

  18. Maturation Along White Matter Tracts in Human Brain Using a Diffusion Tensor Surface Model Tract-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhang; Zhang, Hui; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Liu, Min; Beaulieu, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging tractography studies have demonstrated exponential patterns of developmental changes for diffusion parameters such as fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) averaged over all voxels in major white matter (WM) tracts of the human brain. However, this assumes that the entire tract is changing in unison, which may not be the case. In this study, a surface model based tract-specific analysis was applied to a cross-sectional cohort of 178 healthy subjects (83 males/95 females) aged from 6 to 30 years to spatially characterize the age-related changes of FA and MD along the trajectory of seven major WM tracts – corpus callosum (CC) and six bilateral tracts. There were unique patterns of regions that showed different exponential and linear rates of increasing FA or decreasing MD and age at which FA or MD levels off along each tract. Faster change rate of FA was observed in genu of CC and frontal-parietal part of superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). Inferior corticospinal tract (CST), posterior regions of association tracts such as inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior frontal occipital fasciculus and uncinate fasciculus also displayed earlier changing patterns for FA. MD decreases with age also exhibited this posterior-to-anterior WM maturation pattern for most tracts in females. Both males and females displayed similar FA/MD patterns of change with age along most large tracts; however, males had overall reached the FA maxima or MD minima later compared with females in most tracts with the greater differences occurring in the CST and frontal-parietal part of SLF for MD. Therefore, brain WM development has spatially varying trajectories along tracts that depend on sex and the tract. PMID:26909027

  19. Gastrointestinal Tract Perforation in the Newborn and Child: Imaging Assessment.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Gary R; Davis, Joseph T; Lee, Edward Y

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal tract perforation can arise from various underlying etiologies ranging from congenital causes to ingested foreign bodies in the pediatric patient population. Imaging assessment in patients with suspected gastrointestinal tract perforation plays a central role in making the diagnosis and follow-up evaluation. This article reviews the more common etiologies of gastrointestinal tract perforation in pediatric patients, their imaging manifestations, and strategies for imaging assessment to assist the radiologist in arriving at a timely and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26827739

  20. Lack of Correlation of Vaginal Impedance Measurements with Hormone Levels in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    SINGLETARY, SYLVIA J.; KIRSCH, ALAN J.; WATSON, JULIE; KARIM, BAKTIAR O.; HUSO, DAVID L.; HURN, PATRICIA D.; MURPHY, STEPHANIE J.

    2005-01-01

    Hormone levels vary in female rats depending on estrous cycle stage. Vaginal cytology is a reliable method of staging female rats, but vaginal impedance offers an alternative depending on application. We sought to correlate vaginal impedance in cycling female rats with hormone levels. Vaginal cytology was the standard for comparison and verification of estrous cycle stage. Female rats (n = 41) were evaluated twice daily for 15 days via vaginal cytology and impedance to evaluate two or three estrous cycles per rat. During the last 5 days of the study, selected anesthetized sampling groups (n = 3 or 4 rats per group) were bled terminally at each time point to allow hormone determinations concurrently with vaginal cytology and impedance. Rats with abnormal vaginal smears or discharges (n = 5) were evaluated for reproductive tract histology. Rats classified in estrus by vaginal cytology had significantly higher vaginal impedance values than did nonestrus rats, but vaginal impedance and estrous cycle stage as determined by vaginal cytology did not correlate. Because of small sampling size in nonproestrus groups, correlation between vaginal impedance and hormone levels was evaluated only in proestrus rats (n = 22) and was nonsignificant. No correlation occurred between vaginal impedance and hormone levels in unstaged rats (n = 41). Two animals evaluated for reproductive tract histology showed evidence of pseudopregnancy. Vaginal impedance may be useful in distinguishing estrus from nonestrus rats but may be limited for chronic estrous cycle monitoring because of the possible risk of inducing pseudo pregnancy. PMID:16370578

  1. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt perforations of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Thiong'o, Grace Muthoni; Luzzio, Christopher; Albright, A Leland

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT The purposes of this study were to evaluate the frequency with which children presented with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt perforations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, to determine the type of shunts that caused the perforations, and to compare the stiffness of perforating catheters with the stiffness of catheters from other manufacturers. METHODS Medical records were reviewed of 197 children who were admitted with VP shunt malfunction. Catheter stiffness was evaluated by measuring relative resistance to cross-sectional compression, resistance to column buckling, and elasticity in longitudinal bending. Catheter frictional force was measured per unit length. RESULTS Six children were identified whose VP shunts had perforated the GI tract; 2 shunts subsequently protruded through the anal orifice, 1 protruded through the oral cavity, and 3 presented with subcutaneous abscesses that tracked upward from the intestine to the chest. All perforating shunts were Chhabra shunts. Catheter stiffness and resistance to bending were greatest with a Medtronic shunt catheter, intermediate with a Codman catheter, and least with a Chhabra catheter. Frictional force was greatest with a Chhabra catheter and least with a Medtronic catheter. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of perforations by Chhabra shunts appears to be higher than the frequency associated with other shunts. The increased frequency does not correlate with their stiffness but may reflect their greater frictional forces.

  2. Urinary tract infection following ritual Jewish circumcision.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Barr, J; Bistritzer, T; Aladjem, M

    1996-11-01

    Circumcision seems to reduce the overall incidence of urinary tract infections (UTI), although a few studies have suggested that ritual circumcision may be a predisposing factor for UTI within the first 2 weeks following the procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible causal relationship between ritual circumcision and UTI. The study comprised 82 infants with UTI, 55 females and 27 males under the age of 1 year. All males were circumcised on the eighth day of life. The median age of infection was 0.75 and 7.0 months for males and females, respectively. Fifty-two percent (14/27) of UTI episodes were diagnosed within the 2 weeks following circumcision. A significantly lower incidence in Escherichia coli-induced UTI was observed in males compared to females, 67% and 93%, respectively. Similarly, the incidence of E. coli-induced UTI was also significantly lower in males presenting within 2 weeks following circumcision (57%) compared to infants presenting prior or more than 2 weeks following the procedure (92%). Positive blood cultures of an identical microorganism were observed in 6/27 males compared to 2/55 females. The incidence of urinary tract malformations and their severity were similar in both sexes. We conclude that the high incidence of UTI following a ritual Jewish circumcision, as well as the relatively high preponderance of bacteria other than E. coli, may suggest a causal relationship between circumcision and UTI.

  3. Neurotransmitters of the retino-hypothalamic tract.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Jens

    2002-07-01

    The brain's biological clock, which, in mammals, is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), generates circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology. These biological rhythms are adjusted daily (entrained) to the environmental light/dark cycle via a monosynaptic retinofugal pathway, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). In this review, the anatomical and physiological evidence for glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) as principal transmitters of the RHT will be considered. A combination of immunohistochemistry at both the light- and electron-microscopic levels and tract-tracing studies have revealed that these two transmitters are co-stored in a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells projecting to the retino-recipient zone of the ventral SCN. The PACAP/glutamate-containing cells, which constitute the RHT, also contain a recently identified photoreceptor protein, melanopsin, which may function as a "circadian photopigment". In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that glutamate and glutamate agonists such as N-methyl- D-aspartate mimic light-induced phase shifts and that application of glutamate antagonists blocks light-induced phase shifts at subjective night indicating that glutamate mediates light signalling to the clock. PACAP in nanomolar concentrations has similar phase-shifting capacity as light and glutamate, whereas PACAP in micromolar concentrations modulates glutamate-induced phase shifts. Possible targets for PACAP and glutamate are the recently identified clock genes Per1 and Per2, which are induced in the SCN by light, glutamate and PACAP at night.

  4. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  5. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  6. [Carcinosarcomas in female genital tracts: general review].

    PubMed

    Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Casteillo, François; Forest, Fabien; Pacaut, Cécile; Moncharmont, Coralie; Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Langrand Escure, Julien; Collard, Olivier; Peoc'h, Michel; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma, also known as mixed mesodermal tumor or malignant mixed Mullerian tumor (MMMT) is a pathological entity combining a sarcomatous and a carcinomatous component. Found in thoracic, digestive, genitourinary, liver or skin locations, the most common location is the female genital tract. In gynecological tumors, carcinosarcoma accounts for about 2-5% of endometrial cancers, and 1% of ovarian cancers. To date, there is no consensus on the therapeutic strategy. It relies mostly on maximum cytoreductive surgery. Adjuvant therapy remains controversial, and few prospective studies investigating its interest. Retrospective studies show the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy based on platinum in most cases. Radiation therapy has a place in the adjuvant situations of endometrial and cervical carcinosarcoma. A more detailed pathological knowledge, and the use of targeted therapies may be promising in this histological subtype whose prognosis remains very poor. The objective of this study is to present the main principles of carcinosarcoma management in female genital tracts, describing pathological and prognostic features at the same time.

  7. Botulinum Toxin and Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; Kennedy, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The history of botulinum toxin is fascinating. First recognized as the cause of botulism nearly 200 years ago, it was originally feared as a deadly poison. Over the last 30 years, however, botulinum toxin has been transformed into a readily available medication used to treat a variety of medical disorders. Interest in the use of botulinum toxin has been particularly strong for patients with spastic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, gastroparesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and anal fissures have all been treated with botulinum toxin injections, often with impressive results. However, not all patients respond to botulinum toxin therapy, and large randomized controlled trials are lacking for many conditions commonly treated with botulinum toxin. This paper reviews the history, microbiology, and pharmacology of botulinum toxin, discusses its mechanism of action, and then presents recent evidence from the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. PMID:21960915

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  9. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  10. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  11. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  12. Lower urinary tract symptoms in men

    PubMed Central

    Hollingsworth, John M

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent and costly condition that affects older men worldwide. Many affected men develop lower urinary tract symptoms, which can have a negative impact on their quality of life. In the past, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was the mainstay of treatment. However, several efficacious drug treatments have been developed, which have transformed BPH from an acute surgical entity to a chronic medical condition. Specifically, multiple clinical trials have shown that α adrenoceptor antagonists can significantly ameliorate lower urinary tract symptoms. Moreover, 5α reductase inhibitors, alone or combined with an α adrenoceptor antagonist, can reverse the natural course of BPH, reducing the risk of urinary retention and the need for surgical intervention. Newer medical regimens including the use of antimuscarinic agents or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, have shown promise in men with predominantly storage symptoms and concomitant erectile dysfunction, respectively. For men who do not adequately respond to conservative measures or pharmacotherapy, minimally invasive surgical techniques (such as transurethral needle ablation, microwave thermotherapy, and prostatic urethral lift) may be of benefit, although they lack the durability of TURP. A variety of laser procedures have also been introduced, whose improved hemostatic properties abrogate many of the complications associated with traditional surgery. PMID:25125424

  13. Toward tetherless insufflation of the GI Tract.

    PubMed

    Toennies, Jenna L; Ciuti, Gastone; Smith, Byron F; Menciassi, Arianna; Valdastri, Pietro; Webster, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Toward increasing the diagnostic ability of wireless capsule endoscopy, we propose a method to wirelessly insufflate the Gastrointestinal Tract. By increasing the viewable surface area, it appears likely that capsule-based insufflation may reduce the number of false negative diagnoses made by endoscopic capsules. Our approach to wireless insufflation is to utilize controlled phase transition of a small volume of fluid stored onboard the capsule to a large volume of gas that is then emitted into the intestine. We begin by describing experiments designed to evaluate the amount of gas a capsule must produce to have a beneficial impact on visualization in the colon. We then describe experiments evaluating how much gas can be generated from a given volume of fluid, using Hydrogen Peroxide as our working fluid. We also evaluate thermal effects of the Hydrogen Peroxide reaction. The cumulative result of these experiments is an illustration of the feasibility of carrying a sufficient volume of fluid onboard a wireless capsule to generate a beneficial enhancement in visualization of the interior of the Gastrointestinal Tract, and specifically the colon.

  14. Origin of the Cheney-Palouse Scabland tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patton, P. C.; Baker, V. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Cheney-Palouse tract of the channeled scabland is the largest continuous tract of scabland in eastern Washington. The tract is composed of a varied assortment of bedrock erosional forms, loess islands, and gravel bars. Prominent bedrock longitudinal grooves and inner channels formed by macroturbulent plucking erosion of the jointed rock. Loess island forms vary as a function of their position within the flow. The three major types (submerged, partially submerged, and subaerially exposed) created sedimentologic conditions and resulting bar forms distinct from one another. Other bar forms, notably expansion bars, account for most of the sedimentation in the tract.

  15. Ecological determinants in microbial colonization of the murine gastrointestinal tract: adherence of Torulopsis pintolopesii to epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Suegara, N; Siegel, J E; Savage, D C

    1979-01-01

    Torulopsis pintolopesii is a yeast indigenous to the gastrointestinal tracts of conventional mice and rats from many colonies. In such natively colonized animals, the organism forms layers on the surface of the epithelium in the secreting portion of the stomach and can be cultured from all areas of the gastrointestinal tract. When given in water or food to germfree mice or specific pathogen-free mice possessing an indigenous microbiota free of yeast, T. pintolopesii also can be cultured from all areas of the tract at population levels ranging from 10(5) to 10(8) cells per g (wet weight). Likewise, as in its native hosts, the organism forms layers on gastric surfaces in the associated animals. The layers form on the secreting surface in both the specific pathogen-free and monoassociated ex-germfree mice. In the latter animal, however, a layer of yeast also forms on the nonsecreting gastric surface. In tests of its capacity to adhere to gastrointestinal surfaces in vitro, the organism adheres to epithelia from all areas of the mouse tract. These findings support an hypothesis that the capacity of T. pintolopesii to adhere to epithelial surfaces may be only one determinant influencing it to form layers on the gastric secreting surface in its native hosts. PMID:157978

  16. Tract Specific Reproducibility of Tractography Based Morphology and Diffusion Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Besseling, René M. H.; Jansen, Jacobus F. A.; Overvliet, Geke M.; Vaessen, Maarten J.; Braakman, Hilde M. H.; Hofman, Paul A. M.; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Backes, Walter H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The reproducibility of tractography is important to determine its sensitivity to pathological abnormalities. The reproducibility of tract morphology has not yet been systematically studied and the recently developed tractography contrast Tract Density Imaging (TDI) has not yet been assessed at the tract specific level. Materials and Methods Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) tractography are performed twice in 9 healthy subjects. Tractography is based on common space seed and target regions and performed for several major white matter tracts. Tractograms are converted to tract segmentations and inter-session reproducibility of tract morphology is assessed using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) are calculated of the following tract metrics: fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume, and TDI. Analyses are performed both for proximal (deep white matter) and extended (including subcortical white matter) tract segmentations. Results Proximal DSC values were 0.70–0.92. DSC values were 5–10% lower in extended compared to proximal segmentations. COV/ICC values of FA, ADC, volume and TDI were 1–4%/0.65–0.94, 2–4%/0.62–0.94, 3–22%/0.53–0.96 and 8–31%/0.48–0.70, respectively, with the lower COV and higher ICC values found in the proximal segmentations. Conclusion For all investigated metrics, reproducibility depended on the segmented tract. FA and ADC had relatively low COV and relatively high ICC, indicating clinical potential. Volume had higher COV but its moderate to high ICC values in most tracts still suggest subject-differentiating power. Tract TDI had high COV and relatively low ICC, which reflects unfavorable reproducibility. PMID:22485157

  17. Kinetics of DNA duplex formation: A-tracts versus AT-tracts.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Jean Ann; Kristensen, Mads Bejder; Jones, Nykola C; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2014-09-21

    The hybridisation and melting of DNA strands are critical steps in many biological processes, but still a deeper understanding of the kinetics is lacking. This is evident from the absence of a clear correlation between rate constants for duplex formation and the number of bases in the strand or the sequence. Here we have probed differences between formation times of A-tracts and AT-tracts by studying complementary model strands mainly comprised of adenine (A) and thymine (T) in stopped-flow (SF) experiments. These strands are relevant as DNA replication begins in regions with a large number of AT base pairs. Interpretation of our results is aided by secondary-structure modelling where both the fractions of the different types of structures and the number of paired bases in the lowest-energy ones are determined. The model is based on calculation of free energies using fixed values for enthalpies and entropies associated with base pairing and a stochastic sampling of the possible structures. We find that the strand length affects rates: the activation energy for the formation of short (16-base pairs) A-tracts is larger than that for longer ones (20-base pairs). Activation energies for the formation of AT-tracts are an order of magnitude larger, and larger for shorter strands than for long ones. These higher activation energies are in agreement with the fact that the fraction of unpaired bases in the constituent AT-tract strands is less than in those which comprise the A-tracts. That the pre-structures of the single strands significantly affect rates is also used to rationalise the results obtained for two pairs of complementary 12-mer strands that have the same bases but in a different sequence; we report here similar activation energies as reported earlier and that these are strongly sequence dependent. Finally, we demonstrate that SF can be coupled with the measurement of circular dichroism (CD) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region, taking advantage of a

  18. Updating the ICRP human respiratory tract model.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M R; Ansoborlo, E; Guilmette, R A; Paquet, F

    2007-01-01

    The ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry is developing new Occupational Intakes of Radionuclides (OIR) documents. Application of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) requires a review of the lung-to-blood absorption characteristics of inhaled compounds of importance in radiological protection. Where appropriate, material-specific absorption parameter values will be given, and for other compounds, assignments to default Types will be made on current information. Publication of the OIR provides an opportunity for updating the HRTM in the light of experience and new information. The main possibilities under consideration relate to the two main clearance pathways. Recent studies provide important new data on rates of particle transport from the nasal passages, bronchial tree (slow phase) and alveolar region. The review of absorption rates provides a database of parameter values from which consideration can be given to deriving typical values for default Types F, M and S materials, and element-specific rapid dissolution rates. PMID:18192668

  19. Leukaemic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Cornes, J. S.; Jones, T. Gwynfor; Fisher, Gloria B.

    1962-01-01

    This study is based on the clinical records and post-mortem findings of 264 patients with leukaemia. Gross leukaemic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract were found in 39 patients, an overall incidence of 14·8%. The incidence in all types of acute leukaemia was 18·4%, in chronic leukaemias 9·6%, and in myeloid leukaemia 10·9%. The ileum, stomach, and proximal colon were the sites most commonly affected. Four types of lesion were found: raised leukaemic nodules, leukaemic plaques, diffuse infiltrations with a convoluted brain-like appearance of the mucosal folds, and a multiple leukaemic polyposis. The clinical and pathological features of these lesions are described, and references are given to similar cases reported in the literature. Images PMID:13881389

  20. Abdominal tuberculosis of the gastrointestinal tract: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Ravisankar, Vasudevan; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis is an increasingly common disease that poses diagnostic challenge, as the nonspecific features of the disease which may lead to diagnostic delays and development of complications. This condition is regarded as a great mimicker of other abdominal pathology. A high index of suspicion is an important factor in early diagnosis. Abdominal involvement may occur in the gastrointestinal tract, peritoneum, lymphnodes or solid viscera. Various investigative methods have been used to aid in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis. Early diagnosis and initiation of antituberculous therapy and surgical treatment are essential to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most of the patients respond very well to standard antitubercular therapy and surgery is required only in a minority of cases. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis because early recognition of this condition is important. We reviewed our experience with the findings on various imaging modalities for diagnosis of this potentially treatable disease. PMID:25356043

  1. Do cranberries help prevent urinary tract infections?

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Janet

    Cranberries are widely used in the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and for those at risk of such infections. With the growing resistance to antibiotics, cranberries can be viewed as a useful non-pharmaceutical remedy (Lavender, 2000). The initial studies that looked at the effects of cranberries on urine showed that the excretion of hippuric acid from the berries helped the urine to remain acidic, which could explain why they could be used to treat and prevent infection (Harkin, 2000). Recent studies argue that cranberries prevent Escherichia coli (E. coli) from adhering to uroepithelial cells in the bladder (Howell and Foxman, 2002). Cranberries contain a group of compounds, called proanthocyanidins, which are condensed tannins (Gray, 2002; Lowe and Fagelman, 2001; Kuzminski, 1996). These are thought to be the key factors in inhibiting E. coli adherence.

  2. Biliary tract cancers: SEOM clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Benavides, M; Antón, A; Gallego, J; Gómez, M A; Jiménez-Gordo, A; La Casta, A; Laquente, B; Macarulla, T; Rodríguez-Mowbray, J R; Maurel, J

    2015-12-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is an uncommon and highly fatal malignancy. It is composed of three main different entities; Gall bladder carcinoma (GBC), intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCC) and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (eCC) sharing different genetic, risk factors and clinical presentation. Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP) are the more important diagnostic techniques. Surgery is the only potentially curative therapy but disease recurrence is frequent. Treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or both has not demonstrated survival benefit in the adjuvant setting. Cisplatin plus gemcitabine constitutes the gold standard in metastatic disease. New ongoing studies mainly in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting along with molecular research will hopefully help to improve survival and quality of life of this disease. PMID:26607930

  3. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, S.; Hughes, T.; Boettcher, T.; Barman, R.; Langer, R.; Swiston, A.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage. PMID:26580216

  4. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Traverso, G; Ciccarelli, G; Schwartz, S; Hughes, T; Boettcher, T; Barman, R; Langer, R; Swiston, A

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage.

  5. Condylomatous lesions of the upper aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Nash, M; Lucente, F E; Srinivasan, K; Gould, W J

    1987-12-01

    Condyloma acuminatum is one of four types of common human verrucous lesions that are of viral etiology. Also known as "moist wart," condyloma acuminatum is most often seen on the mucosal surfaces of the anogenital area. However, occurrences in the mucosal lined areas of the head and neck region are quite rare. Since 1901, 30 cases of condylomatous lesions have been reported in the upper aerodigestive tract, occurring mainly in the various regions of the oral cavity. Eighteen of the cases were confirmed by histopathologic documentation, while the remainder were anecdotal. We have recently encountered six new cases of condyloma acuminatum, verified by histologic examination. One occurred on the tongue, another in the tonsillar fossa, one in the hypopharynx and three on the vocal cords. We present these cases and review the previously reported cases. In addition, we will discuss the differential diagnosis of these lesions, and their importance to the practicing otolaryngologist.

  6. Managing lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Kenneth R; Aning, Jonathan J

    2016-04-01

    Male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common and increase in prevalence with age. Up to 90% of men aged 50 to 80 may suffer from troublesome LUTS. Men may attend expressing direct concern about micturition, describing one or more LUTS and the related impact on their quality of life. Frequently men may present for other medical or urological reasons such as concern regarding their risk of having prostate cancer or erectile dysfunction but on taking a history bothersome LUTS are identified. Men may present late in the community with urinary retention: the inability to pass urine. A thorough urological history is essential to inform management. It is important to determine whether men have storage or voiding LUTS or both. All patients must have a systematic comprehensive examination including genitalia and a digital rectal examination. Investigations performed in primary care should be guided by the history and examination findings, taking into account the impact of the LUTS on the individual's quality of life. Current NICE guidelines recommend the following to be performed at initial assessment: frequency volume chart (FVC); urine dipstick to detect blood, glucose, protein, leucocytes and nitrites; and prostate specific antigen. Men should be referred for urological review if they have: bothersome LUTS which have not responded to conservative management or medical therapy; LUTS in association with recurrent or persistent UTIs; urinary retention; renal impairment suspected to be secondary to lower urinary tract dysfunction; or suspected urological malignancy. All patients not meeting criteria for immediate referral to urology can be managed initially in primary care. Based on history, examination and investigation findings an individualised management plan should be formulated. Basic lifestyle advice should be given regarding reduction or avoidance of caffeinated products and alcohol. The FVC should guide advice regarding fluid intake management and all

  7. Myocardialization of the cardiac outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    van den Hoff, M. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Ruijter, J. M.; Lamers, W. H.; Bennington, R. W.; Markwald, R. R.; Wessels, A.

    1999-01-01

    During development, the single-circuited cardiac tube transforms into a double-circuited four-chambered heart by a complex process of remodeling, differential growth, and septation. In this process the endocardial cushion tissues of the atrioventricular junction and outflow tract (OFT) play a crucial role as they contribute to the mesenchymal components of the developing septa and valves in the developing heart. After fusion, the endocardial ridges in the proximal portion of the OFT initially form a mesenchymal outlet septum. In the adult heart, however, this outlet septum is basically a muscular structure. Hence, the mesenchyme of the proximal outlet septum has to be replaced by cardiomyocytes. We have dubbed this process "myocardialization." Our immunohistochemical analysis of staged chicken hearts demonstrates that myocardialization takes place by ingrowth of existing myocardium into the mesenchymal outlet septum. Compared to other events in cardiac septation, it is a relatively late process, being initialized around stage H/H28 and being basically completed around stage H/H38. To unravel the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the induction and regulation of myocardialization, an in vitro culture system in which myocardialization could be mimicked and manipulated was developed. Using this in vitro myocardialization assay it was observed that under the standard culture conditions (i) whole OFT explants from stage H/H20 and younger did not spontaneously myocardialize the collagen matrix, (ii) explants from stage H/H21 and older spontaneously formed extensive myocardial networks, (iii) the myocardium of the OFT could be induced to myocardialize and was therefore "myocardialization-competent" at all stages tested (H/H16-30), (iv) myocardialization was induced by factors produced by, most likely, the nonmyocardial component of the outflow tract, (v) at none of the embryonic stages analyzed was ventricular myocardium myocardialization-competent, and finally

  8. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  9. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  10. Pharmacological effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) with focus on the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Vinter-Jensen, L

    1999-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) belongs to a family of growth factor ligands and receptors. At present, five ligands have been recognized which as EGF exert their effects via binding to the same EGF receptor. The family has three other receptors erbB2, erbB3, and erbB4, which have their own ligands (the heregulins). The system is ubiquitously distributed in mammals, and has important roles in normal development, and in regenerative and neoplastic growth. Mouse and human EGF were discovered in 1962 and 1975 by Stanley Cohen and Harry Gregory, respectively, due to EGFs potent systemic effects. EGF accelerated eyelid opening in newborn mice and inhibited gastric acid secretion in humans. Already in the late thirties, a factor in human urine was recognized which prevented or accelerated healing of experimental damage in the gastrointestinal tract. This factor appeared to be EGF. Around 1980, an effect of commercial interest was described-EGF caused shedding of the fleece in sheep. In line with the original observations, several studies have examined effects of EGF on developmental processes. Amongst other effects, EGF accelerates lung and intestinal maturation before birth and in newborn mammals. Due to the possible use of EGF in the wool industry, it was mandatory to know more about EGF. Amongst other effects in mature sheep and other animals are haemodynamic changes, changes in electrolyte homeostasis, and endocrinological changes. In relation to experimental damage, the therapeutic potential of systemic EGF has been demonstrated in all parts of the gastrointestinal tract, in the kidneys, in the liver and in the trachea. EGF has even been tried in humans in gastric ulcer healing and in necrotising enterocolitis. Studies on prolonged treatment with EGF have first recently appeared. We described effects of 4-5 weeks of treatment in Goettingen minipigs and in rats, and two other groups described effects in monkeys and in rats. In summary, species differences were observed

  11. The effect of spaceflight on retino-hypothalamic tract development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, D. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Tang, I. H.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers examined the effect of late prenatal exposure to microgravity on the development of the retina, retinohypothalamic tract, geniculo-hypothalamic tract, and suprachiasmatic nucleus. Results indicate an effect on c-fos activity in the intergeniculate leaflet between gestational day 20 and postnatal day 8, suggesting a delay in development of the circadian timing system.

  12. Reproductive tract infections in northern Vietnam: health providers' diagnostic dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, My Hu'o'ng; Gammeltoft, Tine; Christoffersen, Sarah Vigh; Tran, Thu Thuy; Rasch, Vibeke

    2009-01-01

    Research was conducted on reproductive tract infections among women obtaining induced abortions at Ph[image omitted]-[image omitted] hospital in Haiphong City, a major maternity hospital in northern Vietnam. The research aimed to explore how clinicians and lab-technicians diagnose reproductive tract infections and the difficulties they experience in establishing exact diagnoses. A combination of both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies was employed. The quantitative research involved 748 abortion-seeking women; the qualitative research was conducted with 10 doctors and 10 lab-technicians providing reproductive health services. A marked tendency was observed among both clinicians and lab-technicians to overdiagnose reproductive tract infections and to prescribe antibiotics routinely. Social, cultural, and clinical factors associated with the tendency to overdiagnose reproductive tract infections included: inadequate training of health staff, lack of equipment, and cultural assumptions regarding the overwhelming prevalence of reproductive tract infections in Vietnamese women, especially among those who receive abortion services. Misconceptions of reproductive tract infections led to substantial over-diagnosis and unnecessary treatment of reproductive tract infections in this hospital. To enhance reproductive tract infection care, providers need to be sensitized to the social and medical consequences of their own cultural perceptions and to increase their awareness of the risks associated with overuse of antibiotics. PMID:19533512

  13. Fistulas of the genitourinary tract: a radiologic review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nam C; Raman, Steven S; Patel, Monica; Barbaric, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Fistulas of the genitourinary tract have diverse anatomic locations, causes, and clinical features. They can involve the upper urinary tract (kidney, ureter), the lower urinary tract (bladder, urethra), or the female reproductive tract (vagina, uterus). Causes include infection, inflammatory disease, neoplasms, congenital conditions, trauma, and iatrogenic injury. Diagnosis of genitourinary tract fistulas usually requires radiologic studies performed with fluoroscopic or cross-sectional modalities. Fistulography is the most direct means of visualizing a fistula and should be considered when feasible (eg, cutaneous fistulas). Intravenous urography and pyelography or ureterography are mainstays of investigation of the upper tract. Likewise, voiding cystourethrography and urethrography are central to study of the lower tract. Cross-sectional techniques, in particular computed tomography, are increasingly useful for diagnosis and are considered the primary test in some cases. Radiologists should be familiar with the radiologic features of genitourinary tract fistulas for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Management approaches depend on the type of fistula, the degree of morbidity, and the overall functional status of the patient and vary from conservative observation to aggressive surgical repair. PMID:15371612

  14. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  15. Pkd1 is Required for Male Reproductive tract Development

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xuguang; Arend, Lois J.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive tract abnormalities and male infertility have higher incidence in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients than in general population. In this work, we revealed that Pkd1, whose mutations account for 85% of ADPKD cases, is essential for male reproductive tract development. Disruption of Pkd1 caused a spectrum of defects in the murine male reproductive tract. The earliest visible defect in Pkd1-/- reproductive tract was cystic dilation of the efferent ducts, which are derivatives of the mesonephric tubules. Epididymis development was delayed or arrested in the Pkd1-/- mice. No sign of epididymal coiling was seen in the Pkd1 null mice. Disruption of Pkd1 in epithelia alone using the Pax2-cre mice was sufficient to cause efferent duct dilation and coiling defect in the epididymis, suggesting that Pkd1 is critical for epithelial development and maintenance in male reproductive tract. In-depth analysis showed that Pkd1 is required to maintain tubulin cytoskeleton and important for Tgf-β/Bmp signal transduction in the epithelia of male reproductive tract. Altogether, our results provide the first direct evidence for developmental roles of Pkd1 in male reproductive tract and provide new insights in reproductive tract abnormalities and infertility in ADPKD patients. PMID:23933588

  16. Healing of the esophageal suture line: does it differ from the rest of the alimentary tract?

    PubMed

    Levi, A; Ramadan, E; Gelber, E; Koren, R; Chaimoff, C; Kyzer, S

    1996-12-01

    We investigated the healing pattern of the esophageal suture line in rats. Fifty male wistar rats were divided into experimental (n = 40) and control (n = 10) groups. The rats in the experimental group underwent esophogostomy at the abdominal esophagus, which was immediately sutured, and sacrificed 2, 4, 7 and 14 days later. Esophageal bursting pressure and hydroxyproline content were determined in both groups. The measured bursting pressures in the experimental group on days 2, 4, 7 and 14 were (mean +/- SD) 78 +/- 35, 95 +/- 12, 1,163 +/- 98 and 1,224 +/- 22 cm H2O, respectively, and 1,308 +/- 87 cm H2O in the control group (P <0.05 vs. all the experimental group values). The hydroxyproline content in the experimental group on days 2, 4, 7 and 14 were 13.9 +/- 2.1, 12.53 +/- 2.68, 15.6 +/- 0.85 and 17.75 +/- 5.65 microg/mg, respectively, and 27.88 +/- 2.5 microg/mg in the control group (P <0.05 vs. all the experimental group values). We conclude that the esophagus demonstrates the same healing pattern as the rest of the alimentary tract, but its healing seems to occur at a slower pace. PMID:9007179

  17. Development and Morphology of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert H; Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E; Brown, Nigel A; Mohun, Timothy J

    2016-09-01

    It is customary, at the current time, to consider many, if not most, of the lesions involving the ventricular outflow tract in terms of conotruncal malformations. This reflects the introduction, in the early 1940s, of the terms conus and truncus to describe the components of the developing outflow tract. The definitive outflow tracts in the postnatal heart, however, possess three, rather than two, components. These are the intrapericardial arterial trunks, the arterial roots, and the subvalvar ventricular outflow tracts. Congenital lesions afflicting the arterial roots, however, are not currently considered to be conotruncal malformations. This suggests a lack of logic in the description of cardiac development and its use as a means of categorizing congenital malformations. It is our belief that the developing outflow tract, like the postnatal outflow tracts, can readily be described in tripartite fashion, with its distal, intermediate, and proximal components forming the primordiums of the postnatal parts. In this review, we present evidence obtained from developing mice and human hearts to substantiate this notion. We show that the outflow tract, initially with a common lumen, is divided into its aortic and pulmonary components by a combination of an aortopulmonary septum derived from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and outflow tract cushions that spiral through its intermediate and proximal components. These embryonic septal structures, however, subsequently lose their septal functions as the outflow tracts develop their own discrete walls. We then compare the developmental findings with the anatomic arrangements seen postnatally in the normal human heart. We show how correlations with the embryologic findings permit logical analysis of the congenital lesions involving the outflow tracts. PMID:27587491

  18. Development and Morphology of the Ventricular Outflow Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shumpei; Spicer, Diane E.; Brown, Nigel A.; Mohun, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    It is customary, at the current time, to consider many, if not most, of the lesions involving the ventricular outflow tract in terms of conotruncal malformations. This reflects the introduction, in the early 1940s, of the terms conus and truncus to describe the components of the developing outflow tract. The definitive outflow tracts in the postnatal heart, however, possess three, rather than two, components. These are the intrapericardial arterial trunks, the arterial roots, and the subvalvar ventricular outflow tracts. Congenital lesions afflicting the arterial roots, however, are not currently considered to be conotruncal malformations. This suggests a lack of logic in the description of cardiac development and its use as a means of categorizing congenital malformations. It is our belief that the developing outflow tract, like the postnatal outflow tracts, can readily be described in tripartite fashion, with its distal, intermediate, and proximal components forming the primordiums of the postnatal parts. In this review, we present evidence obtained from developing mice and human hearts to substantiate this notion. We show that the outflow tract, initially with a common lumen, is divided into its aortic and pulmonary components by a combination of an aortopulmonary septum derived from the dorsal wall of the aortic sac and outflow tract cushions that spiral through its intermediate and proximal components. These embryonic septal structures, however, subsequently lose their septal functions as the outflow tracts develop their own discrete walls. We then compare the developmental findings with the anatomic arrangements seen postnatally in the normal human heart. We show how correlations with the embryologic findings permit logical analysis of the congenital lesions involving the outflow tracts. PMID:27587491

  19. Methimazole slows hepatocyte streaming in rats.

    PubMed

    Oren, R; Zajicek, G; Maaravi, Y; Kenet, G; Karmely, F; Hubert, A; Raanani, P; Arber, N

    1997-07-01

    Hepatocytes are hypothesized to continually stream from the portal tract to the terminal hepatic vein. By this model, when a cell divides, one of its progeny replaces the dividing ancestor and the other is displaced into a more remote location. The present experiment aims to demonstrate that hypothyroidism affects liver cell turnover. Thirty male adult rats were divided into two groups. One received methimazole for two weeks and the other served as control. Each rat was injected intraperitoneally with 18.5 KBq [3H]thymidine/g body weight. Rats were killed after 1 hr and two and four weeks. Autoradiography was done. The distance of the labeled cells from the portal tract was measured. The mean TSH levels of the methimazole-treated group and controls were 1.45 and 0.25 mM/liter, respectively (P < 0.01). Hepatocyte streaming was lower in hypothyroid (1.8 microns/day) than in untreated rats (2.5 microns/day) (P < 0.01). The respective labeling indices 1 hr after labeling were 0.9% and 1.24% (P < 0.05). We conclude that hypothyroidism diminishes hepatocyte and littoral cell turnover and slows down their streaming.

  20. Comparison of the carcinogenicity of methylazoxymethanol-beta-D-glucosiduronic acid in conventional and germfree Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Laqueur, G L; Matsumoto, H; Yamamoto, R S

    1981-11-01

    Methylazoxymethanol-beta-D-glucosiduronic acid (MAM-GlcUA) was administered to young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats by oral and ip routes. Most neoplasms developed in rats that had received the compound orally. The most prevalent site for the neoplasms was the intestinal tract, predominantly the colon. Comparatively fewer tumors occurred in the liver and kidneys. Germfree rats did not develop tumors when MAM-GlcUA was administered either orally or ip.

  1. Vocal tract resonances in speech, singing, and playing musical instruments.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Joe; Garnier, Maëva; Smith, John

    2009-01-01

    IN BOTH THE VOICE AND MUSICAL WIND INSTRUMENTS, A VALVE (VOCAL FOLDS, LIPS, OR REED) LIES BETWEEN AN UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM DUCT: trachea and vocal tract for the voice; vocal tract and bore for the instrument. Examining the structural similarities and functional differences gives insight into their operation and the duct-valve interactions. In speech and singing, vocal tract resonances usually determine the spectral envelope and usually have a smaller influence on the operating frequency. The resonances are important not only for the phonemic information they produce, but also because of their contribution to voice timbre, loudness, and efficiency. The role of the tract resonances is usually different in brass and some woodwind instruments, where they modify and to some extent compete or collaborate with resonances of the instrument to control the vibration of a reed or the player's lips, andor the spectrum of air flow into the instrument. We give a brief overview of oscillator mechanisms and vocal tract acoustics. We discuss recent and current research on how the acoustical resonances of the vocal tract are involved in singing and the playing of musical wind instruments. Finally, we compare techniques used in determining tract resonances and suggest some future developments.

  2. Vocal tract resonances in speech, singing, and playing musical instruments

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Joe; Garnier, Maëva; Smith, John

    2009-01-01

    In both the voice and musical wind instruments, a valve (vocal folds, lips, or reed) lies between an upstream and downstream duct: trachea and vocal tract for the voice; vocal tract and bore for the instrument. Examining the structural similarities and functional differences gives insight into their operation and the duct-valve interactions. In speech and singing, vocal tract resonances usually determine the spectral envelope and usually have a smaller influence on the operating frequency. The resonances are important not only for the phonemic information they produce, but also because of their contribution to voice timbre, loudness, and efficiency. The role of the tract resonances is usually different in brass and some woodwind instruments, where they modify and to some extent compete or collaborate with resonances of the instrument to control the vibration of a reed or the player’s lips, and∕or the spectrum of air flow into the instrument. We give a brief overview of oscillator mechanisms and vocal tract acoustics. We discuss recent and current research on how the acoustical resonances of the vocal tract are involved in singing and the playing of musical wind instruments. Finally, we compare techniques used in determining tract resonances and suggest some future developments. PMID:19649157

  3. Tissue damage and nutritional factors in experimental respiratory tract (Co-)carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reuzel, P G; Feron, V J; Spit, B J; Beems, R B; Kroes, R

    1983-04-01

    Cofactors involved in respiratory tract carcinogenesis were studied in Syrian golden hamsters or in rats using benzo(a)pyrene as the carcinogenic agent. These factors included severe tissue damage induced by electro-coagulation, glass fibers administered by intratracheal instillation, acetaldehyde as irritant vapor, food restriction, and nutrients such as vitamin A and saturated and unsaturated fats. In addition, the effects of a combined exposure to four different major gaseous cigarette smoke components--methyl nitrate, isoprene, methyl chloride and acetaldehyde--and to one solid cigarette smoke component--norharman--were examined in short- and long-term inhalation studies. An interesting finding was the carcinogenicity of acetaldehyde, of which the possible mechanism is briefly discussed. Another conspicuous observation was the substantial increase in number and size of lipid droplets in alveolar fibroblasts of hamsters fed a high vitamin A diet. PMID:6307680

  4. Some aspects of the effects of PL-10.1.AK-15 on the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Erceg, D; Simicevic, V N; Kolega, M; Dohoczky, C

    1997-01-01

    PL-10.1.AK-15 is an active fragment of a naturally occurring protein first isolated from human gastric juice. Among its other protective effects, PL-10.1.AK-15 has demonstrated a protective effect on the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of PL-10.1.AK-15 on two functional parameters of gastrointestinal function: gastric acid secretion and gastrointestinal motility. Gastric acid secretion was assessed in male Wistar rats using a modified method of Shay, while gastrointestinal motility was assessed in male NMRI mice by charcoal propulsion. PL-10.1.AK-15 was given in three different doses (3, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg body weight) in accordance with the experimental protocol. The results of these experiments indicate that PL-10.1.AK-15 in the investigated doses had no influence on gastric acid secretion or gastrointestinal motility. PMID:9403791

  5. Anticholinergic action of pirenzepine (Gastrozepin) on isolated gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, J A

    1983-01-01

    The effects of pirenzepine, a new anti-ulcer drug, have been examined on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions of the guinea-pig isolated ileum, rat colon, rainbow lizard rectum, and chick isolated oesophagus. Pirenzepine (10(-9)-10(-6) M), like atropine (2.5 x 10(-10)-10(-6) M) competitively blocked the contractile effects of acetylcholine on all the isolated gastrointestinal tract smooth muscles examined. The pA2 values for pirenzepine and atropine against acetylcholine on all the muscle preparations were not significantly different (P greater than 0.05). It is concluded that the anti-ulcer action of pirenzepine might be due, at least in part, to its (anticholinergic) muscarinic cholinoceptor blocking activity.

  6. Tissue damage and nutritional factors in experimental respiratory tract (Co-)carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reuzel, P G; Feron, V J; Spit, B J; Beems, R B; Kroes, R

    1983-04-01

    Cofactors involved in respiratory tract carcinogenesis were studied in Syrian golden hamsters or in rats using benzo(a)pyrene as the carcinogenic agent. These factors included severe tissue damage induced by electro-coagulation, glass fibers administered by intratracheal instillation, acetaldehyde as irritant vapor, food restriction, and nutrients such as vitamin A and saturated and unsaturated fats. In addition, the effects of a combined exposure to four different major gaseous cigarette smoke components--methyl nitrate, isoprene, methyl chloride and acetaldehyde--and to one solid cigarette smoke component--norharman--were examined in short- and long-term inhalation studies. An interesting finding was the carcinogenicity of acetaldehyde, of which the possible mechanism is briefly discussed. Another conspicuous observation was the substantial increase in number and size of lipid droplets in alveolar fibroblasts of hamsters fed a high vitamin A diet.

  7. Pythiosis of the digestive tract in sheep.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Clarice R M; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Pimentel, Luciano A; Garino, Felício; Dantas, Antônio F M; Kommers, Glaucia D; Tabosa, Ivon M; Reis-Júnior, Janildo L

    2012-11-01

    Cutaneous and rhinofacial infections by Pythium insidiosum have previously been reported in sheep in Brazil. In the current study, a new form of pythiosis involving the alimentary tract of 2 nursing lambs from 2 different farms in the semiarid region of Brazil is described. The first lamb showed food regurgitation, lethargy, and anorexia, and died 5 days after the presentation of clinical signs. The second lamb had no history of gastrointestinal disease before death. Necropsy findings were similar in both lambs. The mucosa of the esophagus, reticulum, rumen, omasum, and abomasum showed ulcerated areas covered by yellowish caseous granular exudate. The lesions were transmural and extended to the serosal surfaces, and adhesions were observed between the serosa of the forestomachs and abomasum to the liver and diaphragm. Histologic lesions consisted of pyogranulomatous necrotizing transmural esophagitis, rumenitis, reticulitis, omasitis, and abomasitis with vascular thrombosis and intralesional hyphae. Pythium insidiosum was confirmed as the etiology by immunohistochemistry and culture. The presence of sheep in the vicinity of water ponds during the hot, dry season when forage is not available in the pastures seems to be the main predisposing factor for the occurrence of pythiosis in sheep in the Brazilian semiarid region. PMID:23051827

  8. Pediatric urinary tract infections: current controversies.

    PubMed

    MacNeily, A E

    2001-06-01

    Few topics in pediatric urology engender such vigorous debate as the who, when, how, and why related to the investigation of pediatric urinary tract infections (UTIs). Further controversy stems from management of the underlying pathology. This article first discusses the patient characteristics that are important in the evaluation of pediatric patients with UTIs, and the indications for screening tests (such as voiding cystourethrograms, ultrasound, dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy, and intravenous pyelography). Following this, the author reviews what is known about three controversial aspects about the management of these patients. First, although the role of the prepuce in pediatric UTI is well established, the role of routine circumcision is not. Second, the natural history and etiology of antenatally detected vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) has provoked us to view the concept of "primary reflux" in a new light. Third, although the way to diagnose vesicoureteral reflux is generally agreed upon, the utility of our surgical management in view of long-term follow-up is less clear.

  9. Reducing urinary tract infections in catheterized patients.

    PubMed

    Hardyck, C; Petrinovich, L

    1998-12-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two drainage systems in controlling urinary tract infections (UTIs), 65 elderly home care patients with indwelling urinary catheters participated in a retrospective intervention study. The patients first used a Foley drainable bag (DB) system, followed by a nondrainable one (NDB). Both systems used a Foley catheter. Data were obtained from physicians, nurses, caregivers, and patients regarding the number of UTIs and hospitalizations that occurred when using each system. Using the DB, 65 patients had 1,395 UTIs, 27 of which required hospitalization. Using the NDB, 2 patients had 71 UTIs, 2 of which required hospitalization. The cost for the non-hospitalization UTIs with DBs was estimated at $1,153,665 compared to $57,890 with NDBs. The hospital costs with DBs were estimated at $274,170 and $15,540 with NDBs. Because DBs were used longer than NDBs (mean = 44.4 months and 8.8 months, respectively), patients who used each bag for the same period of time were compared. When these patients used NDBs they had significantly fewer UTIs (56, with one hospitalization for 7 days) than when they used DBs (242, with 10 hospitalizations for 37 days). Although the cost of purchasing the non-replaceable NDBs is greater, the use of NDBs drastically reduced levels of infection as well as the overall cost to maintain catheterized patients.

  10. Fluorescence diagnosis of upper respiratory tract infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Kate C.; Inada, Natalia M.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    The pharyngitis and laryngitis are respiratory tract infections highly common. Pharyngitis can be accompanied by fever, especially if caused by a systemic infection. Laryngitis is an inflammation of your voice box (larynx) from irritation or infection. The conventional treatment is the antibiotics administration, which may be responsible by an increase of identification of bacterial strains resistant to drug. This fact associated to high incidence of these infections become important to develop new technologies for diagnosis. This study aims to evaluate the use of widefield fluorescence imaging for the characterization of oropharynx infections, in order to diagnose the bacteria colonization. The imaging system for wide field fluorescence visualization is Evince® (MMOptics, São Carlos, SP, Brazil) coupled to an Apple iPhone® cell phone device. The system consists of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) operating in the violet blue region centered at green-red spectrum 450 nm and optical filters that allow viewing of fluorescence. A tongue depressor was adapted to Evince® for mouth opening. The same images were captured with white light and fluorescence with an optical system. The red fluorescence may be a bacterial marker for physiological monitoring of oropharynx infection processes. The bacterial biofilm on tissue were assigned to the presence of protoporphyrin IX. This work indicates that the autofluorescence of the tissue may be used as a non-invasive technique to aid in the oropharynx infection diagnostic.

  11. "Duck stamp" dollars reserve native prairie tracts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ducks and wetlands are inseparable in the prairies. Hunters know this, bird watchers know this, wildlife managers know this, and most importantly people who manage the croplands and rangelands know this. The 1,746 tracts of native prairie within these upland-wetland complexes known as Waterfowl Production Areas are not the only lands purchased with "duck stamp" dollars. Considerable acreages have also been purchased in central and southern parts of the United States to provide staging, resting, and wintering areas for waterfowl. Since 1934, when "duck stamps" were first sold, nearly 2.5 million acres of waterfowl habitats have been acquired or taken under easement within the United States with revenue from these sales. By purchasing "duck stamps", more than 2.2 million people provide over $16.5 million in annual revenue. It is certainly gratifying to know that some of the remaining native prairie remnants in the Northern Great Plains are being reserved for the future with "duck stamp" dollars.

  12. THE TREATMENT OF URINARY TRACT CALCULI

    PubMed Central

    Leadbetter, Wyland F.

    1958-01-01

    From review of recent information relative to calculus formation in the kidney, the conclusion reached that we do not yet understand, despite much effort, the basic physicochemical mechanisms involved. Since this is so, it has seemed best to the author for the present to rely, in treating patients with renal stones, on simple therapeutic concepts, which, if carefully and conscientiously applied, produce good results. The concepts are the elimination of known causes such as parathyroid adenomas and obstructive lesions, elimination or at least treatment of infections, diminution of urinary components which form the basis of calculi by limiting the oral intake or absorption from the gastrointestinal tract and maintenance of a dilute urine of desired pH. A plan for preoperative study is suggested to allow planned therapy. Indications for operative removal of calculi as well as some points of technique are discussed. It is emphasized that surgical removal of a calculus is but an incident in the care of patients with calculi and that treatment during the postoperative period and followup therapy is most important if success is to be achieved. Reports of cases to illustrate the application of these concepts are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16 PMID:13523394

  13. Environmentally mediated disorders of the respiratory tract

    SciTech Connect

    Utell, M.J.; Samet, J.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Although much of the evidence in environmental lung disease remains equivocal, some environmental exposures are known to be clinically relevant. Ambient air pollution remains of concern as a source of morbidity, particularly for susceptible populations such as persons with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or cardiac disease and the elderly. The adverse effects of several components of indoor air pollution have been established. Environmental tobacco smoke contributes to lower-respiratory illness in infants; office workers exposed to thermophilic actinomycetes contaminating ventilation systems have developed hypersensitivity pneumonitis; and in the home, components of house dust and fungus spores may provoke asthma via immediate hypersensitivity. The evidence is less compelling for a link between other exposures and disorders of the respiratory tract. For example, formaldehyde may be responsible for provoking vague respiratory symptoms and even nasal cancers; however, the associations are unproved. Likewise, the relation between low-level exposure to asbestos and the development of lung cancer, although a concern, is not conclusively established. The clinician should be aware of practical measures for patients who inquire about air cleaning. Often, relatively simple solutions are effective. A knowledge of sources and exposures as well as an understanding of the principles of inhalation lung injury should prove useful in directing patient care. 33 references.

  14. Adipokines and the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Reverchon, Maxime; Ramé, Christelle; Bertoldo, Michael; Dupont, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that adipose tissue can influence puberty, sexual maturation, and fertility in different species. Adipose tissue secretes molecules called adipokines which most likely have an endocrine effect on reproductive function. It has been revealed over the last few years that adipokines are functionally implicated at all levels of the reproductive axis including the gonad and hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Many studies have shown the presence and the role of the adipokines and their receptors in the female reproductive tract of different species. These adipokines regulate ovarian steroidogenesis, oocyte maturation, and embryo development. They are also present in the uterus and placenta where they could create a favorable environment for embryonic implantation and play a key role in maternal-fetal metabolism communication and gestation. Reproductive functions are strongly dependent on energy balance, and thereby metabolic abnormalities can lead to the development of some pathophysiologies such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Adipokines could be a link between reproduction and energy metabolism and could partly explain some infertility related to obesity or PCOS. PMID:24695544

  15. Use of antioxidants in urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Allameh, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is an inflammatory process, and oxidative stress plays a major role in it. Anti-inflammatory or antioxidant therapy given concomitantly with antibiotics should lower the risk of postpyelonephritic scarring. As the lack of review studies in the use of antioxidants in urinary tract infections was detected, this study was designed. We conducted a review of available articles in PubMed and Google Scholar with a simple review, using keywords of “antioxidant” and “pyelonephritis” with all their possible synonyms and combinations. Only interventional studies were collected. There were neither limitations on time, nor the location of the study, type of subjects, administration rout of the antioxidant drug, and the antioxidant drug used. After studying the abstracts or in some cases the full text of articles, they were categorized based on the type of antioxidant, type and number of subjects, rout of administration, dosing, duration of treatment, year of publication of the paper, and the results. A total of 66 articles published from 1991 to 2015 were found by studying just the title of the papers. Studying the abstracts reduced this number to 51 studies. Antioxidants used for this condition were Vitamins A, E, and C, cytoflavin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, ebselen, allopurinol, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, oleuropein, montelukast, oxytocin, ozon, dapsone, pentoxifyllin, tadalafil, bilirubin, cranberry, meloxicam, L-carnitine, colchicine, perfluoran, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone. Studies show that antioxidants are capable of reducing oxidative stress and can be used effectively along with antibiotics to reduce the scar formation. PMID:27162800

  16. Use of antioxidants in urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Allameh, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Pyelonephritis is an inflammatory process, and oxidative stress plays a major role in it. Anti-inflammatory or antioxidant therapy given concomitantly with antibiotics should lower the risk of postpyelonephritic scarring. As the lack of review studies in the use of antioxidants in urinary tract infections was detected, this study was designed. We conducted a review of available articles in PubMed and Google Scholar with a simple review, using keywords of "antioxidant" and "pyelonephritis" with all their possible synonyms and combinations. Only interventional studies were collected. There were neither limitations on time, nor the location of the study, type of subjects, administration rout of the antioxidant drug, and the antioxidant drug used. After studying the abstracts or in some cases the full text of articles, they were categorized based on the type of antioxidant, type and number of subjects, rout of administration, dosing, duration of treatment, year of publication of the paper, and the results. A total of 66 articles published from 1991 to 2015 were found by studying just the title of the papers. Studying the abstracts reduced this number to 51 studies. Antioxidants used for this condition were Vitamins A, E, and C, cytoflavin, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, ebselen, allopurinol, melatonin, N-acetylcysteine, oleuropein, montelukast, oxytocin, ozon, dapsone, pentoxifyllin, tadalafil, bilirubin, cranberry, meloxicam, L-carnitine, colchicine, perfluoran, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone. Studies show that antioxidants are capable of reducing oxidative stress and can be used effectively along with antibiotics to reduce the scar formation. PMID:27162800

  17. Urinary tract infection in renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Giessing, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infection (UTI), especially recurrent UTI, is a common problem, occurring in >75% of kidney transplant (KTX) recipients. UTI degrades the health-related quality of life and can impair graft function, potentially reducing graft and patient survival. As urologists are often involved in treating UTI after KTX, previous reports were searched to elucidate underlying causes, risk factors and treatment options, as well as recommendations for prophylaxis of UTI after KTX. Methods Pubmed/Medline was searched and international guidelines and recommendations for prevention and treatment of UTI after KTX were also assessed. Results Most studies on UTI after KTX have a small sample, and are descriptive and retrospective. Many transplant- and recipient-related risk factors have been identified. While asymptomatic bacteriuria is often treated, even though some studies advise against it, symptomatic UTI should be treated empirically after collecting urine for microbiological analysis, to avoid the development of transplant pyelonephritis with a high chance of urosepsis. The duration of treatment has not been determined in studies and recommendations refer to the treatment of complicated UTI in the non-transplant population. Prophylaxis has not been the focus of studies either. Conclusion UTI after KTX is still largely an under-represented field of study, despite many recipients developing UTI after KTX. Prospective studies on this topic are urgently needed. PMID:26558020

  18. TRP channels in lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Franken, J; Uvin, P; De Ridder, D; Voets, T

    2014-01-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTd) represents a major healthcare problem. Although it is mostly not lethal, associated social disturbance, medical costs, loss of productivity and especially diminished quality of life should not be underestimated. Although more than 15% of people suffer from a form of LUTd to some extent, pathophysiology often remains obscure. In the past 20 years, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have become increasingly important in this field of research. These intriguing ion channels are believed to be the main molecular sensors that generate bladder sensation. Therefore, they are intensely pursued as new drug targets for both curative and symptomatic treatment of different forms of LUTd. TRPV1 was the first of its class to be investigated. Actually, even before this channel was cloned, it had already been targeted in the bladder, with clinical trials of intravesical capsaicin instillations. Several other polymodally gated TRP channels, particularly TRPM8, TRPA1 and TRPV4, also appear to play a prominent role in bladder (patho)physiology. With this review, we provide a brief overview of current knowledge on the role of these TRP channels in LUTd and their potential as molecular targets for treatment. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24895732

  19. Chewing gum bezoars of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Milov, D E; Andres, J M; Erhart, N A; Bailey, D J

    1998-08-01

    Children have chewed gum since the Stone Age. Black lumps of prehistoric tar with human tooth impressions have been found in Northern Europe dating from approximately 7000 BC (Middle Stone Age) to 2000 BC (Bronze Age). The bite impressions suggest that most chewers were between 6 and 15 years of age. The Greeks chewed resin from the mastic tree (mastic gum). North American Indians chewed spruce gum. The first manufacturing patent for chewing gum was issued in 1869 for a natural gum, chicle, derived from the Sopadilla tree, indigenous to Central America. Chewing gum sold today is a mixture of natural and synthetic gums and resins, with added color and flavor sweetened with corn syrup and sugar. Chewing gum is big business. A significant amount of the $21 billion US candy industry sales is from chewing gums, many of which appeal almost exclusively to children. Despite the history and prevalence of gum chewing, the medical literature contains very little information about the adverse effects of chewing gum. In the present report, we briefly review gum-chewing complications and describe three children who developed intestinal tract and esophageal obstruction as a consequence of swallowing gum. PMID:9685468

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S; Panda, P K; Mishra, S R; Parida, R K; Ellaiah, P; Dash, S K

    2008-09-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  1. Antibacterial Activity of Barringtonia acutangula against Selected Urinary Tract Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, S.; Panda, P. K.; Mishra, S. R.; Parida, R. K.; Ellaiah, P.; Dash, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Barringtonia acutangula (L.) Gaertn belonging to family Barringtoniaceae was investigated to evaluate In vitro antibacterial activity of aqueous, ethanolic, petroleum ether and chloroform extracts against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli the major urinary tract infection causing pathogens were tested by disc diffusion assay method and the minimum inhibitory concentration was evaluated. Ethanol (95%) extract exhibited broader spectrum of inhibition followed by chloroform, petroleum ether and aqueous extracts against the urinary tract pathogens under test. An attempt has been made to compare the activity of extracts with standard antibiotics against selected urinary tract infection causing pathogens. PMID:21394275

  2. Effects of exercise training on urinary tract function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hubscher, Charles H; Montgomery, Lynnette R; Fell, Jason D; Armstrong, James E; Poudyal, Pradeepa; Herrity, April N; Harkema, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes dramatic changes in the quality of life, including coping with bladder dysfunction which requires repeated daily and nightly catheterizations. Our laboratory has recently demonstrated in a rat SCI model that repetitive sensory information generated through task-specific stepping and/or loading can improve nonlocomotor functions, including bladder function (Ward PJ, Herrity AN, Smith RR, Willhite A, Harrison BJ, Petruska JC, Harkema SJ, Hubscher CH. J Neurotrauma 31: 819-833, 2014). To target potential underlying mechanisms, the current study included a forelimb-only exercise group to ascertain whether improvements may be attributed to general activity effects that impact target organ-neural interactions or to plasticity of the lumbosacral circuitry that receives convergent somatovisceral inputs. Male Wistar rats received a T9 contusion injury and were randomly assigned to three groups 2 wk postinjury: quadrupedal locomotion, forelimb exercise, or a nontrained group. Throughout the study (including preinjury), all animals were placed in metabolic cages once a week for 24 h to monitor water intake and urine output. Following the 10-wk period of daily 1-h treadmill training, awake cystometry data were collected and bladder and kidney tissue harvested for analysis. Metabolic cage frequency-volume measurements of voiding and cystometry reveal an impact of exercise training on multiple SCI-induced impairments related to various aspects of urinary tract function. Improvements in both the quadrupedal and forelimb-trained groups implicate underlying mechanisms beyond repetitive sensory information from the hindlimbs driving spinal network excitability of the lumbosacral urogenital neural circuitry. Furthermore, the impact of exercise training on the upper urinary tract (kidney) underscores the health benefit of activity-based training on the entire urinary system within the SCI population. PMID:26984956

  3. Correlation between electrophysiological properties, morphological maturation, and olig gene changes during postnatal motor tract development.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jun; Zhang, Yi Ping; Shields, Lisa B E; Zhang, Zoe Z; Liu, Naikui; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Feng, Shi-Qing; Shields, Christopher B

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated electrophysiological and histological changes as well as alterations of myelin relevant proteins of descending motor tracts in rat pups. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) represent descending conducting responses following stimulation of the motor cortex to responses being elicited from the lower extremities. MEP responses were recorded biweekly from postnatal (PN) week 1 to week 9 (adult). MEP latencies in PN week 1 rats averaged 23.7 ms and became shorter during early maturation, stabilizing at 6.6 ms at PN week 4. During maturation, the conduction velocity (CV) increased from 2.8 ± 0.2 at PN week 1 to 35.2 ± 3.1 mm/ms at PN week 8. Histology of the spinal cord and sciatic nerves revealed progressive axonal myelination. Expression of the oligodendrocyte precursor markers PDGFRα and NG2 were downregulated in spinal cords, and myelin-relevant proteins such as GalC, CNP, and MBP increased during maturation. Oligodendrocyte-lineage markers Olig2 and MOG, expressed in myelinated oligodendrocytes, peaked at PN week 3 and were downregulated thereafter. A similar expression pattern was observed in neurofilament M/H subunits that were extensively phosphorylated in adult spinal cords but not in neonatal spinal cords, suggesting an increase in axon diameter and myelin formation. Ultrastructural morphology in the ventrolateral funiculus (VLF) showed axon myelination of the VLF axons (99.3%) at PN week 2, while 44.6% were sheathed at PN week 1. Increased axon diameter and myelin thickness in the VLF and sciatic nerves were highly correlated to the CV (rs > 0.95). This suggests that MEPs could be a predicator of morphological maturity of myelinated axons in descending motor tracts.

  4. Effects of exercise training on urinary tract function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hubscher, Charles H; Montgomery, Lynnette R; Fell, Jason D; Armstrong, James E; Poudyal, Pradeepa; Herrity, April N; Harkema, Susan J

    2016-06-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes dramatic changes in the quality of life, including coping with bladder dysfunction which requires repeated daily and nightly catheterizations. Our laboratory has recently demonstrated in a rat SCI model that repetitive sensory information generated through task-specific stepping and/or loading can improve nonlocomotor functions, including bladder function (Ward PJ, Herrity AN, Smith RR, Willhite A, Harrison BJ, Petruska JC, Harkema SJ, Hubscher CH. J Neurotrauma 31: 819-833, 2014). To target potential underlying mechanisms, the current study included a forelimb-only exercise group to ascertain whether improvements may be attributed to general activity effects that impact target organ-neural interactions or to plasticity of the lumbosacral circuitry that receives convergent somatovisceral inputs. Male Wistar rats received a T9 contusion injury and were randomly assigned to three groups 2 wk postinjury: quadrupedal locomotion, forelimb exercise, or a nontrained group. Throughout the study (including preinjury), all animals were placed in metabolic cages once a week for 24 h to monitor water intake and urine output. Following the 10-wk period of daily 1-h treadmill training, awake cystometry data were collected and bladder and kidney tissue harvested for analysis. Metabolic cage frequency-volume measurements of voiding and cystometry reveal an impact of exercise training on multiple SCI-induced impairments related to various aspects of urinary tract function. Improvements in both the quadrupedal and forelimb-trained groups implicate underlying mechanisms beyond repetitive sensory information from the hindlimbs driving spinal network excitability of the lumbosacral urogenital neural circuitry. Furthermore, the impact of exercise training on the upper urinary tract (kidney) underscores the health benefit of activity-based training on the entire urinary system within the SCI population.

  5. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI.

  6. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  7. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Kline, Kimberly A; Lewis, Amanda L

    2016-04-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary-tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  8. On the presence of nucleus ruber in the urodele Salamandra salamandra and the caecilian Ichthyophis kohtaoensis.

    PubMed

    Naujoks-Manteuffel, C; Manteuffel, G; Himstedt, W

    1988-01-01

    The presence of nucleus ruber in urodeles and caecilians (amphibia) was investigated. For that purpose, horseradish peroxidase was applied to the rostral spinal cord, the medulla oblongata at various levels and the dorsolateral funiculus. Whereas Salamandra salamandra possesses a rubrospinal tract, it is absent in the limbless caecilian Ichthyophis kohtaoensis. PMID:3382518

  9. In vivo digestion of bovine milk fat globules: effect of processing and interfacial structural changes. II. Upper digestive tract digestion.

    PubMed

    Gallier, Sophie; Zhu, Xiang Q; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Ye, Aiqian; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of milk processing on the in vivo upper digestive tract digestion of milk fat globules. Fasted rats were serially gavaged over a 5h period with cream from raw, pasteurised, or pasteurised and homogenised milk. Only a few intact dietary proteins and peptides were present in the small intestinal digesta. Significantly (P<0.05) more longer chain (C≥10) fatty acids were present in the digesta of rats gavaged with raw (448 mg g(-1) digesta dry matter (DDM)) and homogenised creams (528 mg g(-1) DDM), as compared to pasteurised and homogenised cream (249 mg g(-1) DDM). Microscopy techniques were used to investigate the structural changes during digestion. Liquid-crystalline lamellar phases surrounding the fat globules, fatty acid soap crystals and lipid-mucin interactions were evident in all small intestinal digesta. Overall, the pasteurised and homogenised cream appeared to be digested to a greater extent. PMID:23871080

  10. A Therapeutic Dose of Ketoprofen Causes Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Erosions, and Ulcers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shientag, Lisa J; Wheeler, Suzanne M; Garlick, David S; Maranda, Louise S

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative treatment of several rats in our facility with ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) resulted in blood loss, peritonitis, and death within a day to a little more than a week after surgery that was not related to the gastrointestinal tract. Published reports have established the 5-mg/kg dose as safe and effective for rats. Because ketoprofen is a nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug that can damage the gastrointestinal tract, the putative diagnosis for these morbidities and mortalities was gastrointestinal toxicity caused by ketoprofen (5 mg/kg). We conducted a prospective study evaluating the effect of this therapeutic dose of ketoprofen on the rat gastrointestinal tract within 24 h. Ketoprofen (5 mg/kg SC) was administered to one group of rats that then received gas anesthesia for 30 min and to another group without subsequent anesthesia. A third group was injected with saline followed by 30 min of gas anesthesia. Our primary hypothesis was that noteworthy gastrointestinal bleeding and lesions would occur in both groups treated with ketoprofen but not in rats that received saline and anesthesia. Our results showed marked gastrointestinal bleeding, erosions, and small intestinal ulcers in the ketoprofen-treated rats and minimal damages in the saline-treated group. The combination of ketoprofen and anesthesia resulted in worse clinical signs than did ketoprofen alone. We conclude that a single 5-mg/kg dose of ketoprofen causes acute mucosal damage to the rat small intestine. PMID:23294892

  11. Iatrogenic Urinary Tract Injuries: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Esparaz, Anthony M.; Pearl, Jeffrey A.; Herts, Brian R.; LeBlanc, Justin; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic injury to the urinary tract, including the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, is a potential complication of surgical procedures performed in or around the retroperitoneal abdominal space or pelvis. While both diagnostic and interventional radiologists often play a central and decisive role in the identification and initial management of a variety of iatrogenic injuries, discussions of these injuries are often directed toward specialists such as urologists, obstetricians, gynecologists, and general surgeons whose procedures are most often implicated in iatrogenic urinary tract injuries. Interventional radiologic procedures can also be a source of an iatrogenic urinary tract injury. This review describes the clinical presentation, risk factors, imaging findings, and management of iatrogenic renal vascular and urinary tract injuries, as well as the radiologist's role in the diagnosis, treatment, and cause of these injuries. PMID:26038626

  12. PERIVASCULAR EPITHELIOID TUMOURS (PEComas) OF THE GYNAECOLOGICAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Niamh; Soslow, Robert A.; Murali, Rajmohan

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid tumour (PEComas) of the gynaecological tract are rare tumours which were first recognised and diagnosed within the last twenty years. They represent a unique diagnostic challenge with regard to their accurate and reproducible distinction from more common entities such as smooth muscle tumours of the uterine corpus. In this review article we trace the development of the concept of the PEComa tumour family, highlight what is known about extra-gynaecological tract PEComa at an immunohistochemical, molecular and therapeutic level and then present a summary of all reported cases of gynaecological tract PEComa to date. In the summary, we highlight rare subtypes of gynaecological tract PEComa, and compare the performances of extant prognostic classification systems for malignancy in these tumours. PMID:25750268

  13. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  14. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    UTI - self-care; Cystitis - self-care; Bladder infection - self-care ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, you should: Choose sanitary pads instead of tampons, which some doctors believe make infections more likely. Change your ...

  15. Nasal Sinus Tract of Odontogenic Origin: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Sagar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Purwar, Parth; Dixit, Jaya; Singhal, Divya; Sajjanhar, Isha; Goel, Kopal; Gupta, Vaibhav Sheel

    2015-01-01

    Extraoral sinus tract often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician owing to its rare occurrence and absence of symptoms. The accurate diagnosis and comprehensive management are inevitable as the aetiology of such lesions is often masked and requires holistic approach. The present case report encompasses the management of an extraoral discharging sinus tract at the base of the right nostril in a chronic smoker. The lesion which was earlier diagnosed to be of nonodontogenic origin persisted even after erratic treatment modalities. Our investigations showed the aetiology of sinus tract to be odontogenic. Initially, a five-step program as recommended by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality was used for smoking cessation followed by root canal therapy (RCT) and surgical management of the sinus tract. The patient has been under stringent follow-up and no reoccurrence has been noted. PMID:26649208

  16. Comparative Screening of Digestion Tract Toxic Genes in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaolu; Lin, Yiman; Qiu, Yaqun; Li, Yinghui; Jiang, Min; Chen, Qiongcheng; Jiang, Yixiang; Yuan, Jianhui; Cao, Hong; Hu, Qinghua; Huang, Shenghe

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a common urinary tract pathogen, and may induce various inflammation symptoms. Its notorious ability to resist multiple antibiotics and to form urinary tract stones makes its treatment a long and painful process, which is further challenged by the frequent horizontal gene transferring events in P. mirabilis genomes. Three strains of P. mirabilis C02011/C04010/C04013 were isolated from a local outbreak of a food poisoning event in Shenzhen, China. Our hypothesis is that new genes may have been acquired horizontally to exert the digestion tract infection and toxicity. The functional characterization of these three genomes shows that each of them independently acquired dozens of virulent genes horizontally from the other microbial genomes. The representative strain C02011 induces the symptoms of both vomit and diarrhea, and has recently acquired a complete type IV secretion system and digestion tract toxic genes from the other bacteria. PMID:27010388

  17. Particle size and pathogenicity in the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Richard James

    2013-01-01

    Particle size dictates where aerosolized pathogens deposit in the respiratory tract, thereafter the pathogens potential to cause disease is influenced by tissue tropism, clearance kinetics and the host immunological response. This interplay brings pathogens into contact with a range of tissues spanning the respiratory tract and associated anatomical structures. In animal models, differential deposition within the respiratory tract influences infection kinetics for numerous select agents. Greater numbers of pathogens are required to infect the upper (URT) compared with the lower respiratory tract (LRT), and in comparison the URT infections are protracted with reduced mortality. Pathogenesis in the URT is characterized by infection of the URT lymphoid tissues, cervical lymphadenopathy and septicemia, closely resembling reported human infections of the URT. The olfactory, gastrointestinal, and ophthalmic systems are also infected in a pathogen-dependent manner. The relevant literature is reviewed with respect to particle size and infection of the URT in animal models and humans. PMID:24225380

  18. Update on hidradenitis suppurativa: connecting the tracts

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Liza; Williams, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a debilitating skin disease characterized by recurrent abscesses, sinus tract formation, and scarring. Prevalence estimates range from 0.053% to 4.1%, although HS is likely an underdiagnosed disease. Although the first reports of HS date back to the mid-19th century, the disease continues to plague patients and physicians desperate for a definitive treatment. Advances in the understanding of the disease process include the possibility of a defective basement membrane at the sebofollicular junction of the folliculopilosebaceous unit (FPSU; that is, where the sebaceous gland empties into the hair follicle) as an initiating event followed by secondary bacterial colonization. New evidence suggests that bacteria living in a community, known as a biofilm, rather than single planktonic bacteria in HS lesions may explain why HS can be resistant to current antibiotic treatment regimens. Available treatment options have expanded to include triple-antibiotic therapy, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) inhibitors (biologics), laser therapy, and surgical excision, including the skin tissue-sparing excision with electrosurgical peeling procedure. Despite the array of treatments available, many patients continue to struggle with the embarrassment, pain, odor, and frustration that accompany this often isolating disease. Physicians should address comorbidities in HS, including the psychosocial issues patients with HS frequently encounter. Patients can be directed to HS support groups, where they can openly discuss their frustrations, share their experiences in dealing with HS, and band together to advocate for themselves. HS is misunderstood by both patients and physicians, often resulting in a delay in clinical presentation and diagnosis. Patients and physicians across multiple specialties must work together to expand awareness of and interest in HS, so that one day, individuals with HS can be freed from this crippling disease

  19. Responsible prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Turnidge, J

    2001-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) are responsible for a large amount of community antibacterial use worldwide. Recent systematic reviews have demonstrated that most URTIs resolve naturally, even when bacteria are the cause. The high consumer expectation for antibacterials in URTIs requires intervention by the general practitioner and a number of useful strategies have been developed. Generic strategies, including eliciting patient expectations, avoiding the term 'just a virus', providing a value-for-money consultation, providing verbal and written information, empowering patients, conditional prescribing, directed education campaigns, and emphasis on symptomatic treatments, should be used as well as discussion of alternative medicines when relevant. The various conditions have differing rates of bacterial infection and require different approaches. For acute rhinitis, laryngitis and tracheitis, viruses are the only cause and, therefore, antibacterials are never required. In acute sore throat (pharyngitis) Streptococcus pyogenes is the only important bacterial cause. A scoring system can help to increase the likelihood of distinguishing a streptococcal as opposed to viral infection, or alternatively patients should be given antibacterials only if certain conditions are fulfilled. Strategies for treating acute otitis media vary in different countries. Most favour the strategy of prescribing antibacterials only when certain criteria are fulfilled, delaying antibacterial prescribing for at least 24 hours. In otitis media with effusion, on the other hand, there is no primary role for antibacterials, as the condition resolves naturally in almost all patients aged >3 months. Detailed strategies for acute sinusitis have not been worked out but restricting antibacterial prescribing to certain clinical complexes is currently recommended by several authorities because of the high natural resolution rate.

  20. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  1. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ). PMID:16922629

  2. Role of scintigraphy in urinary tract infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, J.J.

    1988-10-01

    There is controversy regarding the role of radiological imaging for urinary tract infection (UTI). The gold standard has been the intravenous pyelogram (IVP). Yet, the IVP has a very limited value with only about 25% of children with pyelonephritis demonstrating abnormalities. Ultrasound (US) has recently been advocated as a replacement for the poorly sensitive and poorly specific IVP. However, comparative studies between US and IVP indicate only an equivalent sensitivity and specificity. Cortical scintigraphy with Technetium-99m glucoheptonate (99mTc GH) or 99mTc dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc DMSA) has also been advocated as a means of differentiating parenchymal (pyelonephritis) from nonparenchymal (lower UTI) involvement in UTI. The clinical presentation may be misleading especially in the infant and child in whom an elevated temperature, flank pain, shaking chills, or an elevated sedimentation rate are often lacking. The clinician attempts to localize the site of infection for it has a direct bearing upon the therapy. A collecting system infection can often be eradicated with a single oral dose of an appropriate antibiotic, whereas renal parenchymal involvement requires IV therapy for an extended interval. Cortical scintigraphy can localize the site of infection with a high degree of accuracy. Recent studies report a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 81% of pyelonephritis. This is in contrast to the IVP with a sensitivity of only 24% and US with a sensitivity of only 42%. The scintigraphic appearance of parenchymal infection of the kidney is a spectrum of minimal to gross defects reflecting the degree of histologic involvement that spans from a mild infection to frank abscess. Cortical scintigraphy can be used to monitor the evolution of scarring following infection. Cortical scintigraphy with 99mTc DMSA or 99mTc GH is the method of choice for the initial evaluation of UTI. 37 references.

  3. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  4. [Recurrence of upper aerodigestive tract tumors].

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurent; Zoubir, Mustapha; Le Tourneau, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Recurrences of tumours of the upper aerodigestive tract are frequent despite the improvement of the primary treatment and they limit the rate of survival long-term. They occur in patients with multiple co-morbidities, often associated with sequelae or side effects of earlier treatments. The salvage treatment will add a cumulative toxicity and therapeutic options are limited. The choice will go from curator to palliative treatment. The report benefit-risk must be assessed in each case depending on the terrain and prognostic factors that have been identified, such as performance status, the time between initial disease and the recurrence, the site and the stratification of the recurrence. In operable non-metastatic recurrence surgery remains the treatment of choice. Multimodal treatment involving surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy in this context is being evaluated. Non-operable tumors have long been considered only in a palliative context. The evaluation of detailed irradiation as bifractionnated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy helped establish protocols allowing long-term survivals and consider these treatments as potentially curators. However, the toxicity of these treatments is important. That is why the technical innovations of the radiation and the development of new chemotherapeutic agents today offer opportunities remaining to assess. The use of irradiation targeted by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and stereotactic radiotherapy by decreasing the irradiated volume should decrease the toxicity. Generally better tolerated than conventional chemotherapy agents, targeted therapies also took their places associated with radiotherapy in the treatment of these patients already treated. Cetuximab was the first agent obtaining an indication. Other agents are being evaluated in metastatic recurrent tumors, including exploring the possibilities of radiopotentialisation nanoparticles and the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins.

  5. Biotypes of Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from urinary tract.

    PubMed

    González-Pedraza Avilés, A; Ortíz-Zaragoza, M C; Inzunza-Montiel, A E; Ponce-Rosas, E R

    1996-01-01

    A modified scheme is proposed for biotyping Gardnerella vaginalis isolated from urinary tract of symptomatic and asymptomatic women based on detection of hippurate hydrolysis, beta-galactosidase (ONPG) and lipase, and fermentation of arabinose, galactose and xylose. Thirty biotypes were found among 73 strains. The distribution of biotypes was similar in both populations but the biotypes 1H, 5G and 7G were found more frequently in women without symptoms of urinary tract infection.

  6. SnapShot: Hormones of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Coate, Katie C; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-12-01

    Specialized endocrine cells secrete a variety of peptide hormones all along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, making it one of the largest endocrine organs in the body. Nutrients and developmental and neural cues trigger the secretion of gastrointestinal (GI) hormones from specialized endocrine cells along the GI tract. These hormones act in target tissues to facilitate digestion and regulate energy homeostasis. This SnapShot summarizes the production and functions of GI hormones.

  7. Automated Tract Extraction via Atlas Based Adaptive Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Tunç, Birkan; Parker, William A.; Ingalhalikar, Madhura; Verma, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in imaging protocols such as the high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (HARDI) and in tractography techniques are expected to cause an increase in the tract-based analyses. Statistical analyses over white matter tracts can contribute greatly towards understanding structural mechanisms of the brain since tracts are representative of the connectivity pathways. The main challenge with tract-based studies is the extraction of the tracts of interest in a consistent and comparable manner over a large group of individuals without drawing the inclusion and exclusion regions of interest. In this work, we design a framework for automated extraction of white matter tracts. The framework introduces three main components, namely a connectivity based fiber representation, a fiber clustering atlas, and a clustering approach called Adaptive Clustering. The fiber representation relies on the connectivity signatures of fibers to establish an easy correspondence between different subjects. A group-wise clustering of these fibers that are represented by the connectivity signatures is then used to generate a fiber bundle atlas. Finally, Adaptive Clustering incorporates the previously generated clustering atlas as a prior, to cluster the fibers of a new subject automatically. Experiments on the HARDI scans of healthy individuals acquired repeatedly, demonstrate the applicability, the reliability and the repeatability of our approach in extracting white matter tracts. By alleviating the seed region selection or the inclusion/exclusion ROI drawing requirements that are usually handled by trained radiologists, the proposed framework expands the range of possible clinical applications and establishes the ability to perform tract-based analyses with large samples. PMID:25134977

  8. Salmonella-related urinary tract infection in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Scott Anthony

    2014-01-01

    An elderly female patient with an uncomplicated urinary tract infection from Salmonella newport is presented. Radiological and laboratory studies were performed because of her systemic and exposure risk factors as well as prior urinary tract abnormalities. While this patient was successfully treated as an outpatient with oral antibiotics, complications and recurrence are common and deserve close follow-up with repeat urine cultures at a minimum. Further laboratory and radiological testing should be guided by patient gender, risk factors and recurrence. PMID:25193813

  9. [Pharmacological effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the respiratory tract. (I). Quantitative and qualitative changes in respiratory tract fluid and sputum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kogi, K; Saito, T; Kasé, Y; Hitoshi, T

    1981-06-01

    The following three experiments were performed to determine the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the quantity and quality of respiratory tract fluid (RTF) and sputum. All drugs used were administered into the stomach through a gastric tube. 1) Indirect measurement of bronchial secretion in rats, which was expressed by the amounts of dye excreted into the respiratory tract, was carried out according the the Sakuno's method, with some modification. Some expectorants of the secretomotor type, such as bromhexine and pilocarpine, significantly increased the secretion, even at low doses. On the other hand, mucolytic agents such as NAC augmented the secretion only in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg. 2)As a direct method of measurements, Kasé's modification of Perry and Boyd's method was used to collect RTF, quantitatively, from rabbits. The RTF of healthy rabbits was colorless and watery. The administration of NAC in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg augmented the output volume and RTF became slightly turbid, probably due to an increase in the viscous mucus. 3) Rabbits with subacute bronchitis were prepared by long-term exposure to air contaminated with SO2 gas and sputa were collected before and after administration of NAC, respectively, according to the Kase's method. The sputa were opalescent and viscous gel included nodular masses. The administration of NAC, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg resulted in a dose dependent decrease in the relative viscosity. The percent-decreased in viscosity with NAC was statistically correlated with that in amounts of dry matter, those in protein and polysaccharide in the sputa. From the results described above, it was concluded that NAC given into the stomach can liquefy sputum by splitting mucoprotein disulphide linkages, that is, altering the rheological characteristics of sputum to facilitate expectoration. PMID:7286849

  10. [Pharmacological effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the respiratory tract. (I). Quantitative and qualitative changes in respiratory tract fluid and sputum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kogi, K; Saito, T; Kasé, Y; Hitoshi, T

    1981-06-01

    The following three experiments were performed to determine the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) on the quantity and quality of respiratory tract fluid (RTF) and sputum. All drugs used were administered into the stomach through a gastric tube. 1) Indirect measurement of bronchial secretion in rats, which was expressed by the amounts of dye excreted into the respiratory tract, was carried out according the the Sakuno's method, with some modification. Some expectorants of the secretomotor type, such as bromhexine and pilocarpine, significantly increased the secretion, even at low doses. On the other hand, mucolytic agents such as NAC augmented the secretion only in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg. 2)As a direct method of measurements, Kasé's modification of Perry and Boyd's method was used to collect RTF, quantitatively, from rabbits. The RTF of healthy rabbits was colorless and watery. The administration of NAC in doses of 500 to 1500 mg/kg augmented the output volume and RTF became slightly turbid, probably due to an increase in the viscous mucus. 3) Rabbits with subacute bronchitis were prepared by long-term exposure to air contaminated with SO2 gas and sputa were collected before and after administration of NAC, respectively, according to the Kase's method. The sputa were opalescent and viscous gel included nodular masses. The administration of NAC, 1000 and 1500 mg/kg resulted in a dose dependent decrease in the relative viscosity. The percent-decreased in viscosity with NAC was statistically correlated with that in amounts of dry matter, those in protein and polysaccharide in the sputa. From the results described above, it was concluded that NAC given into the stomach can liquefy sputum by splitting mucoprotein disulphide linkages, that is, altering the rheological characteristics of sputum to facilitate expectoration.

  11. Sonographic investigations of the gastrointestinal tract of granivorous birds.

    PubMed

    Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Stahl, Anja; Pees, Michael; Enders, Frank; Bartels, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the sonographic examination of the normal gastrointestinal tract of granivorous birds. Preliminary tests with dead birds were performed to get an idea of the sonographic echotexture of the avian gastrointestinal tract. Later, clinically healthy seedeaters of different weights were examined sonographically. As equipment a convex microcurved scanner with a particularly small coupling surface and an adjustable frequency from 5.5-7.5 MHz was used. For the investigation of the gastrointestinal tract, six sonographic approaches are described. After a starving time of 18 hours in the granivorous birds and water input, the best sonographic image quality could be obtained. Using this method, the crop, ventriculus, intestines, and cloaca could be demonstrated sonographically; whereas, it was not possible to visualize the normal proventriculus in granivorous birds. In contrast to mammals, the different layers of the wall of the gastrointestinal tract could not be visualized with the equipment used. Motility of individual parts of the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract), however, could be well demonstrated.

  12. Urinary tract infection in individuals with spinal cord lesion.

    PubMed

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2002-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most frequently reported secondary impairment in individuals with spinal cord lesion. The most prevalent risk indicator is an indwelling catheter. Hydrophilic catheters for clean intermittent catheterization may induce lower rates of bacteriuria and long-term urethral complications. Due to chronic bacterial infection within biofilms, an antibacterial treatment based on a urinary culture of bacteria in the urine and its antimicrobial susceptibility may fail to eradicate catheter-associated urinary tract infection. No commercially available drugs are sufficiently active against the bacteria in a mature biofilm. Biomaterials may be modified to decrease the formation of a biofilm. Silver alloy catheters are effective in preventing urinary tract infection when indwelling urinary catheterization is necessary. The risk of systemic argyria in long-term use needs to be evaluated. Suprapubic cystostomy drainage in patients with neurogenic bladder is preferred to an indwelling urethral catheter. In cases of recurring urinary tract infection in patients with a permanent urinary catheter, it may be beneficial to change the catheter every 1 or 2 weeks. There is some evidence that cranberry products may prevent urinary tract infection. In the future, bacterial interference and vaccination may be a possibility for prevention of urinary tract infection.

  13. Manifestations of immune tolerance in the human female reproductive tract

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Gary F.; Schust, Danny J.

    2012-01-01

    Like other mucosal surfaces (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract, the respiratory tract), the human female reproductive tract acts as an initial barrier to foreign antigens. In this role, the epithelial surface and subepithelial immune cells must balance protection against pathogenic insults against harmful inflammatory reactions and acceptance of particular foreign antigens. Two common examples of these acceptable foreign antigens are the fetal allograft and human semen/sperm. Both are purposely deposited into the female genital tract and appropriate immunologic response to these non-self antigens is essential to the survival of the species. In light of the weight of this task, it is not surprising that multiple, redundant and overlapping mechanisms are involved. For instance, cells at the immunologic interface between self (female reproductive tract epithelium) and non-self (placental trophoblast cells or human sperm) express glycosylation patterns that mimic those on many metastatic cancer cells and successful pathogens. The cytokine/chemokine milieu at this interface is altered through endocrine and immunologic mechanisms to favor tolerance of non-self. The “foreign” cells themselves also play an integral role in their own immunologic acceptance, since sperm and placental trophoblast cells are unusual and unique in their antigen presenting molecule expression patterns. Here, we will discuss these and other mechanisms that allow the human female reproductive tract to perform this delicate and indispensible balancing act. PMID:23407606

  14. Expression of bitter taste receptors of the T2R family in the gastrointestinal tract and enteroendocrine STC-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, S. Vincent; Rozengurt, Nora; Yang, Moon; Young, Steven H.; Sinnett-Smith, James; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2002-01-01

    Although a role for the gastric and intestinal mucosa in molecular sensing has been known for decades, the initial molecular recognition events that sense the chemical composition of the luminal contents has remained elusive. Here we identified putative taste receptor gene transcripts in the gastrointestinal tract. Our results, using reverse transcriptase–PCR, demonstrate the presence of transcripts corresponding to multiple members of the T2R family of bitter taste receptors in the antral and fundic gastric mucosa as well as in the lining of the duodenum. In addition, cDNA clones of T2R receptors were detected in a rat gastric endocrine cell cDNA library, suggesting that these receptors are expressed, at least partly, in enteroendocrine cells. Accordingly, expression of multiple T2R receptors also was found in STC-1 cells, an enteroendocrine cell line. The expression of α subunits of G proteins implicated in intracellular taste signal transduction, namely Gαgust, and Gαt-2, also was demonstrated in the gastrointestinal mucosa as well as in STC-1 cells, as revealed by reverse transcriptase–PCR and DNA sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Furthermore, addition of compounds widely used in bitter taste signaling (e.g., denatonium, phenylthiocarbamide, 6-n-propil-2-thiouracil, and cycloheximide) to STC-1 cells promoted a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. These results demonstrate the expression of bitter taste receptors of the T2R family in the mouse and rat gastrointestinal tract. PMID:11854532

  15. Spectrum of Renal and Urinary Tract Diseases in Kashmiri Children

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Virender; Bano, Rifat Ara; Wani, Khursheed Ahmed; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmed, Kaisar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Definite paucity of data pertaining to spectrum of renal and urinary tract diseases in our state and in various parts of India forms the basis of this study. Available data has emphasized more on specific clinical syndromes and chronic renal diseases rather than over all spectrums of renal and urinary tract diseases, that too in adult population. Aim The present study a retrospective analysis, forms one of the basic data of paediatric nephrology and urology related disorders in our state. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of the case records of all the hospitalized patients with renal and urinary tract diseases between 2012 and 2013 were performed. Case records were analysed and categorized into various groups like; Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN), Nephrotic Syndrome (NS), haematuria, Polycystic Kidney Disease (PCKD), Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV), Vesicoureteric Reflux (VUR), Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Iract (CAKUT) and others. These groups were divided into subgroups to get more insight about the pattern of these diseases. Results Out of 28114 patients hospitalized between 2012 and 2013 years, 447 (232 males and 215 females) patients were diagnosed of renal and urinary tract diseases which forms 1.58% the total admitted patients. Among these patients 32.9% (147/447) were diagnosed Acute Kidney Injury (AKI); 24.1% (108/447): Urinary Tract Infection (UTI); 9.6% (43/447): Acute Glomerulonephritis (AGN); 5.6% (25/447): bilateral hydronephrosis with UTI; 4.47% (20/447): nephrotic syndrome (NS); 3.5% (16/447): haematuria; and 4% (18/447) were having CAKUT (Congenital Anomalies Of Kidney And Urinary Tract). In addition to this there were 17 cases of Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA), 3 cases of Barter syndrome and one case of Liddle syndrome. Conclusion A substantial number of children are hospitalized with renal and urinary tract diseases with

  16. Screening for cancer of the aerodigestive tract.

    PubMed

    Smart, C R

    1993-08-01

    In the United States, cancer of the oral cavity is the only region of the aerodigestive tract that lends itself to routine screening of the asymptomatic population older than 50 years. Although the incidence and mortality rate for oral cancer is nearly double that of cancer of the cervix (30,300 versus 13,500 and 7950 versus 4400, respectively), conducting a pelvic examination and Pap smear appears more acceptable than looking in the mouth. The inspection of the oral cavity should be part of every physical examination in the dentist's or the physician's office, particularly in patients older than 50 years who are heavy users of tobacco and alcohol. Ninety percent of all squamous cell cancers arise from the floor of the mouth, the ventrolateral aspect of the tongue, and the soft palate complex. The detection rate is increased from approximately 1 per 1000 in asymptomatic individuals older than 50 years to 1 per 200 in high-risk smokers and drinkers and to 1 in 7 for individuals once treated for oral cancer. Screening detects earlier stage cancers, for which treatment results in higher survival rates. While no randomized screening trials with a mortality end-point have been conducted (or are likely), there is evidence that population-based case-fatality rates are lower in races treated with earlier stages of oral cancer. This evidence is of little solace when the majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced disease when symptoms appear, rather than through screening at an earlier stage when asymptomatic. In one study, 94% of patients with oral cancer were seen by a doctor within the previous year. The average oral cancer patient had 10.7 physician encounters within 3 years of the diagnosis. In the United States, the early detection of cancers of the larynx and esophagus should be based upon early symptoms rather than on screening. A routine oral screening examination should be a part of every physical examination by a doctor or a dentist. It will detect earlier

  17. Role of melatonin in upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Konturek, P C; Brzozowski, T; Bubenik, G A

    2007-12-01

    Melatonin, an indole formed enzymatically from L-tryptophan, is the most versatile and ubiquitous hormone molecule produced not only in all animals but also in some plants. This review focuses on the role of melatonin in upper portion of gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including oral cavity, esophagus, stomach and duodenum, where this indole is generated and released into the GIT lumen and into the portal circulation to be uptaken, metabolized by liver and released with bile into the duodenum. The biosynthetic steps of melatonin with two major rate limiting enzymes, arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT), transforming tryptophan to melatonin, originally identified in pinealocytes have been also detected in entero-endocrine (EE) cells of GIT wall, where this indole may act via endocrine, paracrine and/or luminal pathway through G-protein coupled receptors. Melatonin in GIT was shown to be generated in about 500 times larger amounts than it is produced in pineal gland. The production of melatonin by pineal gland shows circadian rhythm with high night-time peak, especially at younger age, followed by the fall during the day-light time. As a highly lipophilic substance, melatonin reaches all body cells within minutes, to serve as a convenient circadian timing signal for alteration of numerous body functions.. Following pinealectomy, the light/dark cycle of plasma melatonin levels disappears, while its day-time blood concentrations are attenuated but sustained mainly due to its release from the GIT. After oral application of tryptophan, the plasma melatonin increases in dose-dependent manner both in intact and pinealectomized animals, indicating that extrapineal sources such as GIT rather than pineal gland are the major producers of this indole. In the upper portion of GIT, melatonin exhibits a wide spectrum of activities such as circadian entrainment, free radicals scavenging activity, protection of mucosa against

  18. Preventing urinary tract infections in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gabrielle J; Craig, Jonathan C; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in children, causes them considerable discomfort, as well as distress to parents and has a tendency to recur. Approximately 20% of those children who experience one infection will have a repeat episode. Since 1975, 11 trials of long-term antibiotics compared with placebo or no treatment in 1,550 children have been published. Results have been heterogeneous, but the largest trial demonstrated a small reduction (6% absolute risk reduction, risk ratio 0.65) in the risk of repeat symptomatic UTI over 12 months of treatment. This effect was consistent across sub groups of children based upon age, gender, vesicoureteric reflux status and number of prior infections. Trials involving re-implantation surgery (and antibiotics compared with antibiotics alone) for the sub-group of children with vesicoureteric reflux have not shown a reduction in repeat UTI, with the possible exception of a very small benefit for febrile UTI. Systematic reviews have shown that circumcision reduces the risk of repeat infection but 111 circumcisions would need to be performed to prevent one UTI in unpredisposed boys. Given the need for anaesthesia and the risk of surgical complication, net clinical benefit is probably restricted to those who are predisposed (such as those with recurrent infection). Many small trials in complementary therapies have been published and many suggest some benefit, however inclusion of children is limited. Only three trials involving 394 children for cranberry products, two trials with a total of 252 children for probiotics and one trial with 24 children for vitamin A are published. Estimates of efficacy vary widely and imprecision is evident. Multiple interventions to prevent UTI in children exist. Of those, long-term low dose antibiotics has the strongest evidence base, but the benefit is small. Circumcision in boys reduces the risk substantially, but should be restricted to those at risk. There is little evidence of benefit of

  19. Specific pharmacokinetic aspects of the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Cees; Krauwinkel, Walter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evidence for "specific" pharmacokinetics playing a role in currently marketed drugs intended to treat lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms. Principles of drug targeting include intrinsic properties of drugs or organs as well as drug formulations to modify drug release or to create confinement of drug presence. Prodrugs and specific formulations to deliver high drug concentrations at the site(s) of action as well as other ways to manipulate drug distribution to achieve enrichment in target tissues are considered. In overactive bladder (OAB), specific formulations for oxybutynin have been introduced to reduce the level of side effects of the active drug. Extended release tablet formulations and a topical gel formulation have been introduced, with efficacy similar to immediate release (IR) tablets, but with a reduction in anticholinergic adverse effects. However, these modifications have not led to outstanding performance parameters compared to other anticholinergic drugs marketed as IR formulations. Urinary excretion is discussed as potential mechanism for targeting LUT symptoms, but no strong indications appear to exist that this mechanism would contribute for currently available drugs. Intravesical administration of drugs is not a preferred option and only considered for drugs like botulinum toxin, where the inconvenient application compensates for a reasonable degree of long-term efficacy in severe refractory OAB. Alpha acid glycoprotein binding is discussed as a potential factor to influence drug tissue distribution, and it is concluded that there is reasonable evidence that for tamsulosin this mechanism is responsible for the difference in free fraction of the drug observed in plasma and prostate, which could contribute to its relative absence of blood pressure effects in patients with LUT symptoms related to benign prostate hyperplasia (LUTS-BPH). The principle of irreversible inhibition of type II 5α-reductase as a tool to develop drugs

  20. NUT midline carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Westra, William H

    2012-08-01

    NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a highly lethal tumor defined by translocations involving the NUT gene on chromosome 15q14. NMC involves midline structures including the sinonasal tract, but its overall incidence at this midline site and its full morphologic profile are largely unknown because sinonasal tumors are not routinely tested for the NUT gene translocation. The recent availability of an immunohistochemical probe for the NUT protein now permits a more complete characterization of sinonasal NMCs. The archival files of The Johns Hopkins Hospital Surgical Pathology were searched for all cases of primary sinonasal carcinomas diagnosed from 1995 to 2011. Tissue microarrays were constructed, and NUT immunohistochemical analysis was performed. All NUT-positive cases underwent a more detailed microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis. Among 151 primary sinonasal carcinomas, only 3 (2%) were NUT positive. NUT positivity was detected in 2 of 13 (15%) carcinomas diagnosed as sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma and in 1 of 87 (1%) carcinomas diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. All occurred in men (26, 33, and 48 y of age). The NMCs grew as nests and sheets of cells with a high mitotic rate and extensive necrosis. Two were entirely undifferentiated, and 1 tumor showed abrupt areas of squamous differentiation. Each case had areas of cell spindling, and 2 were heavily infiltrated by neutrophils. Immunohistochemical staining was observed for cytokeratins (3 of 3), epithelial membrane antigen (3 of 3), p63 (2 of 3), CD34 (1 of 3), and synaptophysin (1 of 3). All patients died of the disease (survival time range, 8 to 16 mo; mean, 12 mo) despite combined surgery and chemoradiation. NMC represents a rare form of primary sinonasal carcinoma, but its incidence is significantly increased in those carcinomas that exhibit an undifferentiated component. Indiscriminant analysis for evidence of the NUT translocation is unwarranted. Instead, NUT analysis can be restricted to

  1. Solution structure of an A-tract DNA bend.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, D; Herbert, K; Zhang, X; Pologruto, T; Lu, P; Polgruto, T

    2001-03-01

    The solution structure of a DNA dodecamer d(GGCAAAAAACGG)/d(CCGTTTTTTGCC) containing an A-tract has been determined by NMR spectroscopy with residual dipolar couplings. The structure shows an overall helix axis bend of 19 degrees in a geometry consistent with solution and gel electrophoresis experiments. Fourteen degrees of the bending occurs in the GC regions flanking the A-tract. The remaining 5 degrees is spread evenly over its six AT base-pairs. The A-tract is characterized by decreasing minor groove width from the 5' to the 3' direction along the A strand. This is a result of propeller twist in the AT pairs and the increasing negative inclination of the adenine bases at the 3' side of the run of adenine bases. The four central thymine bases all have negative inclination throughout the A-tract with an average value of -6.1 degrees. Although this negative inclination makes the geometry of the A-tract different from all X-ray structures, the proton on N6 of adenine and the O4 of thymine one step down the helix are within distance to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds. The 5' bend of 4 degrees occurs at the junction between the GC flank and the A-tract through a combination of tilt and roll. The larger 3' bend, 10 degrees, occurs in two base steps: the first composed of tilt, -4.1 degrees, and the second a combination of tilt, -4.2 degrees, and roll, 6.0 degrees. This second step is a direct consequence of the change in inclination between an adjacent cytosine base, which has an inclination of -12 degrees, and the next base, a guanine, which has 3 degrees inclination. This bend is a combination of tilt and roll. The large change in inclination allows the formation of a hydrogen bond between the protons of N4 of the 3' cytosine and the O6 of the next 3' base, a guanine, stabilizing the roll component in the bend. These structural features differ from existing models for A-tract bends.For comparison, we also determined the structure of the control sequence, d

  2. Leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to aortic baroreceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-06-01

    Recent data suggests that neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor form at least two distinct groups within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS): a group within the lateral NTS (Slt) and one within the medial (Sm) and gelantinosa (Sg) NTS. Discrete injections of leptin into Sm and Sg, a region that receives chemoreceptor input, elicit increases in arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). However, the effect of microinjections of leptin into Slt, a region that receives baroreceptor input is unknown. Experiments were done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar or Zucker obese rat to determine leptin's effect in Slt on heart rate (HR), AP and RSNA during electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Depressor sites within Slt were first identified by the microinjection of l-glutamate (Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) followed by leptin microinjections. In the Wistar rat leptin microinjection (50ng; 20nl) into depressor sites within the lateral Slt elicited increases in HR and RSNA, but no changes in AP. Additionally, leptin injections into Slt prior to Glu injections at the same site or to stimulation of the ADN were found to attenuate the decreases in HR, AP and RSNA to both the Glu injection and ADN stimulation. In Zucker obese rats, leptin injections into NTS depressor sites did not elicit cardiovascular responses, nor altered the cardiovascular responses elicited by stimulation of ADN. Those data suggest that leptin acts at the level of NTS to alter the activity of neurons that mediate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the aortic baroreceptor reflex. PMID:23535030

  3. Leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to aortic baroreceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-06-01

    Recent data suggests that neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor form at least two distinct groups within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS): a group within the lateral NTS (Slt) and one within the medial (Sm) and gelantinosa (Sg) NTS. Discrete injections of leptin into Sm and Sg, a region that receives chemoreceptor input, elicit increases in arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). However, the effect of microinjections of leptin into Slt, a region that receives baroreceptor input is unknown. Experiments were done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar or Zucker obese rat to determine leptin's effect in Slt on heart rate (HR), AP and RSNA during electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Depressor sites within Slt were first identified by the microinjection of l-glutamate (Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) followed by leptin microinjections. In the Wistar rat leptin microinjection (50ng; 20nl) into depressor sites within the lateral Slt elicited increases in HR and RSNA, but no changes in AP. Additionally, leptin injections into Slt prior to Glu injections at the same site or to stimulation of the ADN were found to attenuate the decreases in HR, AP and RSNA to both the Glu injection and ADN stimulation. In Zucker obese rats, leptin injections into NTS depressor sites did not elicit cardiovascular responses, nor altered the cardiovascular responses elicited by stimulation of ADN. Those data suggest that leptin acts at the level of NTS to alter the activity of neurons that mediate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the aortic baroreceptor reflex.

  4. Vocal tract imaging: a comparison of MRI and EBCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Titze, Ingo R.

    1996-04-01

    Vocal tract imaging for the vowels /i/ and /a/ using both EBCT and MRI was carried out for one subject (29 yr old male, native of midwestern United States) using an Imatron C-150 electron beam CT scanner and a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla scanner, respectively. Each image set was analyzed using a general display and quantitation package called VIDATM (Volumetric Image Display and Analysis). The image analysis consisted of segmenting the airspace from the surrounding tissue, obtaining a 3D vocal tract shape via shape based interpolation, and finally using an iterative bisection algorithm to determine the vocal tract area function. The results show that the 3D representations of the vocal tract shapes derived from EBCT show subtle deformations of the airway by articulatory structures and teeth that are not observed in the MRI based representations. Shaded surface renderings of each vocal tract shape and for each imaging technique are shown and the apparent trade-offs between the two imaging methods are discussed.

  5. The iliopubic tract: an important anatomical landmark in surgery

    PubMed Central

    TEOH, LAURENCE S. G.; HINGSTON, GUY; AL-ALI, SAAD; DAWSON, BRENDA; WINDSOR, JOHN A.

    1999-01-01

    A band of fascial thickening, termed the iliopubic tract, lies on the posterior aspect of the inguinal region and has been described in the surgical literature as playing an important role during herniorraphy. This study was undertaken to examine the gross and microscopic anatomy of the iliopubic tract in 12 cadavers. The results confirmed that the iliopubic tract can be readily identified as a thickening of the transversalis fascia running deep and parallel to the inguinal ligament. It attaches to the superomedial part of the pubic bone medially, but laterally its fibres fan out within the fascia transversalis and fascia iliaca without bony attachment to the iliac spines. In contrast to the inguinal ligament, the histological analysis of the iliopubic tract shows a high elastin to collagen ratio. The functional signficance of this structure merits further study, but there is no doubt that it is important in many approaches to inguinal herniorraphy. For this reason it is considered that the iliopubic tract deserves greater emphasis in the anatomy teaching of the inguinal region. PMID:10227675

  6. Variations in lowstand systems tracts: Constraints on exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.F. Jr.

    1991-03-01

    Results of worldwide exploration of lowstand systems tracts support continued application and evaluation of Exxon's cyclic sequence concepts but indicate the need for a better understanding of erosional and depositional variations possible along ancient lowstand coastlines. Exxon's idealized siliciclastic (type 1) model applies where a major highstand fluvial system was entrenched during falling relative sea level, eroding canyons and contributing sediments to lowstand depositional systems. Canyons and incised valleys were filled by late lowstand and retrogradational (transgressive) systems. Not explicit in Exxon's scenario are lowstand tracts at sites of minor entrenched coastal-plain streams or along interdeltaic or nondeltaic margins. A spectrum of systems tracts, identified along ancient basin margins, provides clues for predicting lowstand targets. In the absence of rivers, basin-floor sediments were supplied locally by headward-slumping submarine canyons and erosion of contributary valleys into subaerially exposed highstand shelf and/or strandline systems. Submarine erosion typically continued during subsequent rise and highstand of sea level, and sediments may have been introduced to basin floors through canyons from active retrogradational and highstand longshore systems. Headwardly eroded canyons and valleys were not always filled during subsequent transgression and highstand, leading to long-term multiple erosional/depositional cycles to produce some of the world's major ancient canyon complexes. The type and distribution of highstand systems tracts strongly influenced the quality and distribution of sandstone reservoir potential in subsequent lowstand tracts and, therefore, may help guide deep-water exploration along ancient basin margins.

  7. Catheter-related urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Lindsay E

    2005-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are used frequently in older populations. For either short- or long-term catheters, the infection rate is about 5% per day. Escherichia coli remains the most common infecting organism, but a wide variety of other organisms may be isolated, including yeast species. Bacteria tend to show increased resistance because of the repeated antimicrobial courses. Urinary tract infection (UTI) usually follows formation of biofilm on both the internal and external catheter surface. The biofilm protects organisms from both antimicrobials and the host immune response. Morbidity from UTI with short-term catheter use is limited if appropriate catheter care is practised. In patients with long-term catheters, fever from a urinary source is common with a frequency varying from 1 per 100 to 1 per 1000 catheter days. Long-term care facility residents with chronic indwelling catheters have a much greater risk for bacteraemia and other urinary complications than residents without catheters. Asymptomatic catheter-acquired UTI should not be treated with antimicrobials. Antimicrobial treatment does not decrease symptomatic episodes but will lead to emergence of more resistant organisms. For treatment of symptomatic infection, many antimicrobials are effective. Wherever possible, antimicrobial selection should be delayed until culture results are available. Whether to administer initial treatment by an oral or parenteral route is determined by clinical presentation. If empirical therapy is required, antimicrobial selection is based on variables such as route of administration, anticipated infecting organism and susceptibility, and patient tolerance. Renal function, concomitant medications, local formulary and cost may also be considered in selection of the antimicrobial agent. The duration of therapy is usually 10-14 days, but patients who respond promptly and in whom the catheter must remain in situ may be treated with a shorter 7-day course to reduce

  8. Abnormal Anatomical Variations of Extra-Hepatic Biliary Tract, and Their Relation to Biliary Tract Injuries and Stones Formation

    PubMed Central

    Khayat, Meiaad F.; Al-Amoodi, Munaser S.; Aldaqal, Saleh M.; Sibiany, Abdulrahman

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the most common abnormal anatomical variations of extra-hepatic biliary tract (EHBT), and their relation to biliary tract injuries and stones formation. Methods This is a retrospective review of 120 patients, who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) and/or magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP), between July 2011 and June 2013. The patients’ ERCP and MRCP images were reviewed and evaluated for the anatomy of EHBT; the medical records were reviewed for demographic data, biliary tracts injuries and stones formation. Results Out of 120 patients, 50 were males (41.7%) and 70 were females (58.3%). The mean age was 54 years old (range 20 - 88). Abnormal anatomy was reported in 30% (n = 36). Short cystic duct (CD) was found in 20% (n = 24), left CD insertion in 5% (n = 6), CD inserted into the right hepatic duct (RHD) in 1.7% (n = 2), duct of Luschka in 3.33% (n = 4) and accessory hepatic duct in also 3.33% (n = 4). Biliary tract injuries were reported in 15% (n = 18) and stones in 71.7% (n = 86). Biliary tract injuries were higher in abnormal anatomy (P = 0.04), but there was no relation between abnormal anatomy and stones formation. Conclusion Abnormal anatomy of EHBT was found to be 30%. The most common abnormality is short CD followed by left CD insertion. Surgeons should be aware of these common abnormalities in our patients, hence avoiding injuries to the biliary tract during surgery. The abnormal anatomy was associated with high incidence of biliary tract injury but has no relation to biliary stone formation.

  9. Toluene alters p75NTR expression in the rat brainstem.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Jesús; Morón, Lena; Zárate, Jon; Gutiérrez, Arantza; Churruca, Itziar; Echevarría, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    Toluene is a neurotoxic organic solvent widely used in industry. Acute toluene administration in rats induced a significant increase in the numbers of neural cells immunostained for p75NTR in several brainstem regions, such as the raphe magnus and the nucleus of the solitary tract, as well as in the lateral reticular, gigantocellular, vestibular and ventral cochlear nuclei, without any in the facial and spinal trigeminal nuclei and the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. These data suggest that p75NTR could be involved in toluene-induced neurotoxic efffects in the rat brainstem.

  10. The Impact of Prenatal Exposure to Dexamethasone on Gastrointestinal Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramalhosa, Fátima; Soares-Cunha, Carina; Seixal, Rui Miguel; Sousa, Nuno; Carvalho, Ana Franky

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids is commonly used in pregnant women at risk of preterm delivery to accelerate tissue maturation. Exposure to glucocorticoids during development has been hypothesized to underlie different functional gastrointestinal (GI) and motility disorders. Herein, we investigated the impact of in utero exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids (iuGC) on GI function of adult rats. Wistar male rats, born from pregnant dams treated with dexamethasone (DEX), were studied at different ages. Length, histologic analysis, proliferation and apoptosis assays, GI transit, permeability and serotonin (5-HT) content of GI tract were measured. iuGC treatment decreased small intestine size and decreased gut transit. However, iuGC had no impact on intestinal permeability. iuGC differentially impacts the structure and function of the GI tract, which leads to long-lasting alterations in the small intestine that may predispose subjects prone to disorders of the GI tract. PMID:27584049

  11. The Impact of Prenatal Exposure to Dexamethasone on Gastrointestinal Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ramalhosa, Fátima; Soares-Cunha, Carina; Seixal, Rui Miguel; Sousa, Nuno; Carvalho, Ana Franky

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids is commonly used in pregnant women at risk of preterm delivery to accelerate tissue maturation. Exposure to glucocorticoids during development has been hypothesized to underlie different functional gastrointestinal (GI) and motility disorders. Herein, we investigated the impact of in utero exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids (iuGC) on GI function of adult rats. Wistar male rats, born from pregnant dams treated with dexamethasone (DEX), were studied at different ages. Length, histologic analysis, proliferation and apoptosis assays, GI transit, permeability and serotonin (5-HT) content of GI tract were measured. iuGC treatment decreased small intestine size and decreased gut transit. However, iuGC had no impact on intestinal permeability. iuGC differentially impacts the structure and function of the GI tract, which leads to long-lasting alterations in the small intestine that may predispose subjects prone to disorders of the GI tract. PMID:27584049

  12. Microneedles for drug delivery via the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Giovanni; Schoellhammer, Carl M; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Polat, Baris E; Anderson, Daniel G; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Both patients and physicians prefer the oral route of drug delivery. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract, though, limits the bioavailability of certain therapeutics because of its protease and bacteria-rich environment as well as general pH variability from pH 1 to 7. These extreme environments make oral delivery particularly challenging for the biologic class of therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate proof-of-concept experiments in swine that microneedle-based delivery has the capacity for improved bioavailability of a biologically active macromolecule. Moreover, we show that microneedle-containing devices can be passed and excreted from the GI tract safely. These findings strongly support the success of implementation of microneedle technology for use in the GI tract.

  13. Microneedles for Drug Delivery via the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, Giovanni; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Polat, Baris E.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Both patients and physicians prefer the oral route of drug delivery. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract, though, limits the bioavailability of certain therapeutics because of its protease and bacteria-rich environment as well as general pH variability from pH 1–7. These extreme environments make oral delivery particularly challenging for the biologic class of therapeutics. Here we demonstrate proof-of-concept experiments in swine that microneedle-based delivery has the capacity for improved bioavailability of a biologically-active macromolecule. Moreover, we show that microneedle-containing devices can be passed and excreted from the GI tract safely. These findings strongly support the success of implementation of microneedle technology for use in the GI tract. PMID:25250829

  14. [Gynaecological and obstetrical aspects of recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Hoyme, U B; Schneede, P

    2006-04-01

    The microbial colonization of vulva, vagina and cervix uteri represents the reservoir for recurrent urinary tract infection. All bacterial species of normal cutaneous or gastrointestinal flora can be found in the external genital tract even under physiological conditions. The higher concentration of microbes adds to the predisposition for urinary tract infection in cases of dysbiosis or inflammation, apart from specific infection by Trichomonas vaginalis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis. The specific immunological interaction between bacteria and host, i.e. between virulence factors and intrinsic defense, appears to be the major mechanism paving the way for recurrent infection. The elimination of predisposing factors is the clue for successful therapy as well as for prevention of recurrence. PMID:16586054

  15. Managing the Cutaneous Sinus Tract of Dental Origine

    PubMed Central

    Janev, Edvard; Redzep, Enis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Draining cutaneous sinus tract in chin area may be caused by chronic periapical dental infections. Misdiagnosis of these lesions usually leads to destructive invasive treatment of the sinus tract that is not correct and curative. CASE REPORT: A 31-year-old male patient referred to us with a chronically draining lesion on his chin. The lesion previously was misdiagnosed by medical doctors and had undergone two times surgery with a focus on the skin lesion and had received antibiotic therapy for a prolonged period of time. After clinical and radiologic examination the dental origin of the lesion was evident and proper endodontic and surgical treatment was performed. Three months later, after the treatment, the lesion showed total healing and reoccurrence occurred. CONCLUSION: The key to successful treatment of cutaneous sinus tract of dental origin must be in appropriate communication between the dentist and the physician in order to achieve correct diagnosis and therapy in such cases. PMID:27703580

  16. Multi-scale characterization of white matter tract geometry.

    PubMed

    Savadjiev, Peter; Rathi, Yogesh; Bouix, Sylvain; Verma, Ragini; Westin, Carl-Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of white matter tracts is of increased interest for a variety of neuroscientific investigations, as it is a feature reflective of normal neurodevelopment and disease factors that may affect it. In this paper, we introduce a novel method for computing multi-scale fibre tract shape and geometry based on the differential geometry of curve sets. By measuring the variation of a curve's tangent vector at a given point in all directions orthogonal to the curve, we obtain a 2D "dispersion distribution function" at that point. That is, we compute a function on the unit circle which describes fibre dispersion, or fanning, along each direction on the circle. Our formulation is then easily incorporated into a continuous scale-space framework. We illustrate our method on different fibre tracts and apply it to a population study on hemispheric lateralization in healthy controls. We conclude with directions for future work.

  17. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: antigenic and genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Fulton, R W; Ridpath, J F; Burge, L J

    2013-01-30

    BoCV isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine strains based on Spike protein coding sequences and VNT using convalescent antisera. Based on this study, the BoCV isolates belong to one of two genomic clades (clade 1 and 2) which can be differentiated antigenically. The respiratory isolates from Oklahoma in this study were further divided by genetic differences into three subclades, 2a, 2b, and 2c. Reference enteric BoCV strains and a vaccine strain were in clade 1. Currently available vaccines designed to control enteric disease are based on viruses from one clade while viruses isolated from respiratory tracts, in this study, belong to the other clade. PMID:23246548

  18. Capecitabine-induced leukoencephalopathy involving the bilateral corticospinal tracts

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mark Bang-Wei; McAdory, Louis Elliott

    2016-01-01

    An 80 year old lady with a history of metastatic sigmoid carcinoma presented with expressive dysphasia and unsteady gait 4 days after commencement of adjuvant capecitabine chemotherapy. MRI demonstrated restricted diffusion and T2/FLAIR hyperintensity involving the course of the bilateral corticospinal tracts, the corpus callosum and the middle cerebellar peduncles. Discontinuation of chemotherapy lead to symptom resolution in 2 days; repeat MRI at 2 months demonstrated reversal of the diffusion changes and improvement of the previous T2W/FLAIR hyperintensity. This report describes the first case of capecitabine induced leukoencephalopathy causing restricted diffusion along the corticospinal tracts, which should be differentiated from other entities that involve the corticospinal tracts (i.e. amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), hypoglycemic coma, etc.) PMID:27200161

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGENS: LOW DOSES OF VINCLOZOLIN ALTER SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION OF THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In humans and rodents, exposure to antiandrogenic chemicals during sexual differentiation can produce malformations of the reproductive tract. Perinatal administration of 100 or 200 mg vinclozolin (V) kg-1 day-1 during sexual differentiation in rats induces female-like anogenital...

  20. SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR, SPERM QUANTITY AND QUALITY AFTER SHORT-TERM STREPTOZOTOCIN-INDUCED HYPERGLYCAEMIA IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of diabetes mellitus in the streptozotocin rat model suggest that sexual dysfunctions may result from diabetes-induced alterations of the neuroendocrine-reproductive tract axis. Our investigation was performed to better define the effects of short-term hyperglycemia on ra...

  1. Interpolating U.S. Decennial Census Tract Data from as Early as 1970 to 2010: A Longtitudinal Tract Database.

    PubMed

    Logan, John R; Xu, Zengwang; Stults, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Differences in the reporting units of data from diverse sources and changes in units over time are common obstacles to analysis of areal data. We compare common approaches to this problem in the context of changes over time in the boundaries of U.S. census tracts. In every decennial census many tracts are split, consolidated, or changed in other ways from the previous boundaries to reflect population growth or decline. We examine two interpolation methods to create a bridge between years, one that relies only on areal weighting and another that also introduces population weights. Results demonstrate that these approaches produce substantially different estimates for variables that involve population counts, but they have a high degree of convergence for variables defined as rates or averages. Finally the paper describes the Longitudinal Tract Data Base (LTDB), through which we are making available public-use tools to implement these methods to create estimates within 2010 tract boundaries for any tract-level data (from the census or other sources) that are available for prior years as early as 1970. PMID:25140068

  2. Interpolating U.S. Decennial Census Tract Data from as Early as 1970 to 2010: A Longtitudinal Tract Database

    PubMed Central

    Logan, John R.; Xu, Zengwang; Stults, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Differences in the reporting units of data from diverse sources and changes in units over time are common obstacles to analysis of areal data. We compare common approaches to this problem in the context of changes over time in the boundaries of U.S. census tracts. In every decennial census many tracts are split, consolidated, or changed in other ways from the previous boundaries to reflect population growth or decline. We examine two interpolation methods to create a bridge between years, one that relies only on areal weighting and another that also introduces population weights. Results demonstrate that these approaches produce substantially different estimates for variables that involve population counts, but they have a high degree of convergence for variables defined as rates or averages. Finally the paper describes the Longitudinal Tract Data Base (LTDB), through which we are making available public-use tools to implement these methods to create estimates within 2010 tract boundaries for any tract-level data (from the census or other sources) that are available for prior years as early as 1970. PMID:25140068

  3. Human Bocavirus: Passenger or Pathogen in Acute Respiratory Tract Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Schildgen, Oliver; Müller, Andreas; Allander, Tobias; Mackay, Ian M.; Völz, Sebastian; Kupfer, Bernd; Simon, Arne

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified virus tentatively assigned to the family Parvoviridae, subfamily Parvovirinae, genus Bocavirus. HBoV was first described in 2005 and has since been detected in respiratory tract secretions worldwide. Herein we review the literature on HBoV and discuss the biology and potential clinical impact of this virus. Most studies have been PCR based and performed on patients with acute respiratory symptoms, from whom HBoV was detected in 2 to 19% of the samples. HBoV-positive samples have been derived mainly from infants and young children. HBoV DNA has also been detected in the blood of patients with respiratory tract infection and in fecal samples of patients with diarrhea with or without concomitant respiratory symptoms. A characteristic feature of HBoV studies is the high frequency of coinciding detections, or codetections, with other viruses. Available data nevertheless indicate a statistical association between HBoV and acute respiratory tract disease. We present a model incorporating these somewhat contradictory findings and suggest that primary HBoV infection causes respiratory tract symptoms which can be followed by prolonged low-level virus shedding in the respiratory tract. Detection of the virus in this phase will be facilitated by other infections, either simply via increased sample cell count or via reactivation of HBoV, leading to an increased detection frequency of HBoV during other virus infections. We conclude that the majority of available HBoV studies are limited by the sole use of PCR diagnostics on respiratory tract secretions, addressing virus prevalence but not disease association. The ability to detect primary infection through the development of improved diagnostic methods will be of great importance for future studies seeking to assign a role for HBoV in causing respiratory illnesses. PMID:18400798

  4. White matter tracts critical for recognition of sarcasm.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cameron L; Oishi, Kenichi; Faria, Andreia V; Hsu, John; Gomez, Yessenia; Mori, Susumu; Hillis, Argye E

    2016-01-01

    Failure to recognize sarcasm can lead to important miscommunications. Few previous studies have identified brain lesions associated with impaired recognition of sarcasm. We tested the hypothesis that percent damage to specific white matter tracts, age, and education together predict accuracy in sarcasm recognition. Using multivariable linear regression, with age, education, and percent damage to each of eight white matter tracts as independent variables, and percent accuracy on sarcasm recognition as the dependent variable, we developed a model for predicting sarcasm recognition. Percent damage to the sagittal stratum had the greatest weight and was the only independent predictor of sarcasm recognition.

  5. [Urinary tract abnormalities with anorrectal malformations (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Nogués, A; Ceres, M L; Olagüe, R; Andrés, V; Lanuza, A

    1978-01-01

    Thirty five patients with anorrectal malformations are reviewed. These are divided in high and low anomalies according to some simple clinical data, better than the drawing of reference lines to determinate the height of puborrectalis muscle. Malformations were associated in 13 cases with urinary tract estructural anomalies and in four cases with isolated vesico-ureteral reflux. Diagnosis of urinary tract infection was made in 14 patients, 12 of them with recto-urinary fistula. A point is made about the complete and early exploration of all these patients to prevent irreparable renal damage that could be developed. PMID:655503

  6. Pathophysiology of Clinical Symptoms in Acute Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, E; Miśkiewicz, K; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Szenborn, L

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the pathophysiology of common symptoms of acute viral respiratory infections (e.g., sneezing, nasal discharge, sore throat, cough, muscle pains, malaise, and mood changes). Since clinical symptoms are not sufficient to determine the etiology of viral respiratory tract infections, we believe that the host defense mechanisms are critical for the symptomatology. Consequently, this review of literature is focused on the pathophysiology of respiratory symptoms regardless of their etiology. We assume that despite a high prevalence of symptoms of respiratory infection, their pathogenesis is not widely known. A better understanding of the symptoms' pathogenesis could improve the quality of care for patients with respiratory tract infections.

  7. Whole-mount immunostaining of the adult Drosophila gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Micchelli, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract harbors an essential barrier epithelium that separates an organism from its changing external environment. As such, the gut epithelium is a fascinating nexus of stem cell biology, immunology and physiology. Investigators have sought to mine this rich interface for new biological and mechanistic insights. Many of the powerful genetic approaches developed in Drosophila have proven effective in the study of the gut. The goal of this article is to present a method for dissecting, immunostaining and mounting samples of the adult Drosophila GI tract. This protocol combines readily with techniques to label cell lineages and/or challenge the system with environmental perturbations, which are briefly discussed. PMID:24680702

  8. Stenting of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2010-08-15

    Minimally invasive image-guided insertion of self-expanding metal stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the current treatment of choice for palliation of malignant esophageal or gastroduodenal outlet obstructions. A concise review is presented of contemporary stenting practice of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and the procedures in terms of appropriate patient evaluation, indications, and contraindications for treatment are analyzed, along with available stent designs, procedural steps, clinical outcomes, inadvertent complications, and future technology. Latest developments include biodegradable polymeric stents for benign disease and radioactive or drug-eluting stents for malignant obstructions.

  9. [Biochemical features of gallbladder bile in biliary tract diseases].

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, E Iu; Aleksandrova, A Iu; Beloborodova, E I; Didlovslaia, N A

    2007-06-01

    Sixty-two and 58 patients with hypo- and hypermotor biliary tract dysfunction (BTD), respectively, as well as 59 patients with chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) and 63 with opisthorchiasis-complicated CAC were examined. A control group comprised 33 patients of the same sex and age. All the patients underwent fractional duodenal intubation, followed by clinical, biochemical, and serological bile studies. All the examinees were found to increased gallbladder bile lithogenicity, minor changes being observed in biliary tract dysfunction and more pronounced ones being in opisthorchiasis. A biochemical study of gallbladder bile, followed by its lithogenicity correction, is recommended in the treatment of different forms of BTD. PMID:17682480

  10. Abdomen: Retroperitoneum, peritoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this book the author explores aspiration biopsy as it can be applied to lesions of the retroperitoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, peritoneum, and adrenal gland. With experience from two different institutions - one an acute general care hospital, the other a cancer referral center - Dr. Suen has achieved in creating a text that reflects a wide range of experience. Throughout the work, Dr. Suen stresses pattern recognition of cytologic material. And a chapter on unusual and interesting lesions is included. Contents: Introduction and General Considerations; Abdomen Imaging Techniques; Clinical Relevance; Indentification of Normal ABC; retroperitoneum; Gastrointestinal Tract; Kidney; Adrenal Gland; Unusual Lesions; Immunocytochemistry and Electron Microscopy; Index.

  11. The effect of phytoestrogens on the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Burton, J L; Wells, M

    2002-01-01

    Environmental oestrogens have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hormonally treated cancers (such as breast and prostate cancer), male infertility, and abnormalities of the male and female reproductive tracts. They may be derived from plants (phytoestrogens), pharmaceuticals, or other synthetic compounds not originally intended to have oestrogenic activity (including soy based infant formulas). This review will discuss the evidence from both animal studies and humans for an effect of these ubiquitous compounds on the development of the human female genital tract, in addition to prolonging the menstrual cycle, alleviating symptoms of the menopause, and protecting against the development of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:12037019

  12. The Chlamydia muridarum Organisms Fail to Auto-Inoculate the Mouse Genital Tract after Colonization in the Gastrointestinal Tract for 70 days

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Luying; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Tianyuan; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhu, Cuiming; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Nu; Xue, Min; Zhong, Guangming

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia muridarum is known to colonize in the gastrointestinal tract for long periods of time, which has been hypothesized to serve as a reservoir for spreading to the genital tract. To test this hypothesis, a luciferase-expressing C. muridarum was used to establish a long-lasting infection in the mouse gastrointestinal tract following either intragastric or intrarectal inoculations. In vivo imaging revealed significant bioluminescent signals mainly in the mouse abdominal area throughout the experiments. Ex vivo imaging localized the signals to the mouse gastrointestinal tract, which was confirmed by monitoring the C. muridarum organisms in the mouse organs/tissues. Despite the long-lasting colonization in the gastrointestinal tract and active shedding of infectious organisms in the rectal swabs, the organisms did not cause any significant infection or pathology in the genital tract throughout the experiments, which was reproduced in multiple strains of mice and with an increased inoculation dose to the gastrointestinal tract. The above observations have demonstrated that the long-lasting C. muridarum organisms from the gastrointestinal tract are inefficient in auto-inoculating the genital tract, suggesting that the gastrointestinal tract Chlamydia may utilize an indirect mechanism to affect its pathogenicity in the genital tract. PMID:27192556

  13. Aminomethyl Spectinomycins as Novel Therapeutics for Drug Resistant Respiratory Tract and Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Dora B.; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Jiuyu; Abdelrahman, Yasser M.; Singh, Aman P.; Duscha, Stefan; Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Robin B.; Belland, Robert J.; Meibohm, Bernd; Rosch, Jason W.; Böttger, Erik C.; Lee, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis with a unique mechanism of action and an excellent safety index, but it lacks antibacterial activity against most clinically important pathogens. A novel series of N-benzyl substituted 3'-(R)- 3'-aminomethyl-3'-hydroxy spectinomycins was developed based on a computational analysis of the aminomethyl spectinomycin binding site and structure guided synthesis. These compounds had ribosomal inhibition values comparable to spectinomycin but showed increased potency against common respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella pneumophila, and Moraxella catarrhalis as well as the sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Non-ribosome binding 3'-(S) isomers of the leads demonstrated weak inhibitory activity in in vitro protein translation assays and poor antibacterial activity, indicating that the antibacterial activity of the series remains on target. In addition to improved antibacterial potency, compounds also demonstrated no mammalian cytotoxicity, improved microsomal stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The lead compound from the series, compound 1, exhibited excellent chemical stability, which was superior to spectinomycin and had no significant interaction with a panel of human receptors and drug metabolism enzymes suggesting low potential for adverse reactions or drug-drug interactions in vivo. Compound 1 was active in vitro against a panel of penicillin, macrolide, and cephalosporin resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates and cured mice of fatal pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Together, these studies indicate N-benzyl aminomethyl spectinomycins possess suitable properties for further development as novel antibacterial agents to treat drug resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:25995221

  14. Glass fibers and vapor phase components of cigarette smoke as cofactors in experimental respiratory tract carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feron, V.J.; Kuper, C.F.; Spit, B.J.; Reuzel, P.G.; Woutersen, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Syrian golden hamsters were given intratracheal instillations of glass fibers with or without BP suspended in saline, once a fortnight for 52 weeks; the experiment was terminated at week 85. No tumors of the respiratory tract were observed in hamsters treated with glass fibers alone. There was no indication that glass fibers enhanced the development of respiratory tract tumors induced by BP. In another study Syrian golden hamsters were exposed to fresh air or to a mixture of 4 major vapor phase components of cigarette smoke, viz. isoprene (800----700 ppm), methyl chloride (1000----900 ppm), methyl nitrite (200----190 ppm) and acetaldehyde (1400----1200 ppm) for a period of at most 23 months. Some of the animals were also given repeated intratracheal instillations of BP or norharman in saline. Laryngeal tumors were found in 7/31 male and 6/32 female hamsters exposed only to the vapor mixture, whereas no laryngeal tumors occurred in controls. The tumor response of the larynx most probably has to be ascribed entirely to the action of acetaldehyde. Simultaneous treatment with norharman or BP did not affect the tumor response of the larynx. Acetaldehyde may occur in the vapor phase of cigarette smoke at levels up to 2000 ppm. Chronic inhalation exposure of rats to acetaldehyde at levels of 0 (controls), 750, 1500 or 3000----1000 ppm resulted in a high incidence of nasal carcinomas, both squamous cell carcinomas of the respiratory epithelium and adenocarcinomas of the olfactory epithelium. It was discussed that acetaldehyde may significantly contribute to the induction of bronchogenic cancer by cigarette smoke in man.

  15. Vanilloids selectively sensitize thermal glutamate release from TRPV1 expressing solitary tract afferents.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Andresen, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Vanilloids, high temperature, and low pH activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In spinal dorsal root ganglia, co-activation of one of these gating sites on TRPV1 sensitized receptor gating by other modes. Here in rat brainstem slices, we examined glutamate synaptic transmission in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) neurons where most cranial primary afferents express TRPV1, but TRPV1 sensitization is unknown. Electrical shocks to the solitary tract (ST) evoked EPSCs (ST-EPSCs). Activation of TRPV1 with capsaicin (100 nM) increased spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) but inhibited ST-EPSCs. High concentrations of the ultra-potent vanilloid resiniferatoxin (RTX, 1 nM) similarly increased sEPSC rates but blocked ST-EPSCs. Lowering the RTX concentration to 150 pM modestly increased the frequency of the sEPSCs without causing failures in the evoked ST-EPSCs. The sEPSC rate increased with raising bath temperature to 36 °C. Such thermal responses were larger in 150 pM RTX, while the ST-EPSCs remained unaffected. Vanilloid sensitization of thermal responses persisted in TTX but was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Our results demonstrate that multimodal activation of TRPV1 facilitates sEPSC responses in more than the arithmetic sum of the two activators, i.e. co-activation sensitizes TRPV1 control of spontaneous glutamate release. Since action potential evoked glutamate release is unaltered, the work provides evidence for cooperativity in gating TRPV1 plus a remarkable separation of calcium mechanisms governing the independent vesicle pools responsible for spontaneous and evoked release at primary afferents in the NTS.

  16. Aminomethyl spectinomycins as therapeutics for drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, David F; Waidyarachchi, Samanthi L; Madhura, Dora B; Shcherbakov, Dimitri; Zheng, Zhong; Liu, Jiuyu; Abdelrahman, Yasser M; Singh, Aman P; Duscha, Stefan; Rathi, Chetan; Lee, Robin B; Belland, Robert J; Meibohm, Bernd; Rosch, Jason W; Böttger, Erik C; Lee, Richard E

    2015-05-20

    The antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial protein synthesis with a unique mechanism of action and an excellent safety index, but it lacks antibacterial activity against most clinically important pathogens. A series of N-benzyl-substituted 3'-(R)-3'-aminomethyl-3'-hydroxy spectinomycins was developed on the basis of a computational analysis of the aminomethyl spectinomycin binding site and structure-guided synthesis. These compounds had ribosomal inhibition values comparable to spectinomycin but showed increased potency against the common respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella pneumophila, and Moraxella catarrhalis, as well as the sexually transmitted bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. Non-ribosome-binding 3'-(S) isomers of the lead compounds demonstrated weak inhibitory activity in in vitro protein translation assays and poor antibacterial activity, indicating that the antibacterial activity of the series remains on target against the ribosome. Compounds also demonstrated no mammalian cytotoxicity, improved microsomal stability, and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The lead compound from the series exhibited excellent chemical stability superior to spectinomycin; no interaction with a panel of human receptors and drug metabolism enzymes, suggesting low potential for adverse reactions or drug-drug interactions in vivo; activity in vitro against a panel of penicillin-, macrolide-, and cephalosporin-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates; and the ability to cure mice of fatal pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis at a dose of 5 mg/kg. Together, these studies indicate that N-benzyl aminomethyl spectinomycins are suitable for further development to treat drug-resistant respiratory tract and sexually transmitted bacterial infections. PMID:25995221

  17. Kv1.3 channels regulate synaptic transmission in the nucleus of solitary tract.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Navarro, Angelina; Glazebrook, Patricia A; Kane-Sutton, Michelle; Padro, Caroline; Kline, David D; Kunze, Diana L

    2011-06-01

    The voltage-gated K(+) channel Kv1.3 has been reported to regulate transmitter release in select central and peripheral neurons. In this study, we evaluated its role at the synapse between visceral sensory afferents and secondary neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We identified mRNA and protein for Kv1.3 in rat nodose ganglia using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. In immunohistochemical experiments, anti-Kv1.3 immunoreactivity was very strong in internal organelles in the soma of nodose neurons with a weaker distribution near the plasma membrane. Anti-Kv1.3 was also identified in the axonal branches that project centrally, including their presynaptic terminals in the medial and commissural NTS. In current-clamp experiments, margatoxin (MgTx), a high-affinity blocker of Kv1.3, produced an increase in action potential duration in C-type but not A- or Ah-type neurons. To evaluate the role of Kv1.3 at the presynaptic terminal, we examined the effect of MgTx on tract evoked monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in brain slices of the NTS. MgTx increased the amplitude of evoked EPSCs in a subset of neurons, with the major increase occurring during the first stimuli in a 20-Hz train. These data, together with the results from somal recordings, support the hypothesis that Kv1.3 regulates the duration of the action potential in the presynaptic terminal of C fibers, limiting transmitter release to the postsynaptic cell. PMID:21430270

  18. Tools for the tract: understanding the functionality of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Venema, Koen; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke

    2009-07-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract comprises a series of complex and dynamic organs ranging from the stomach to the distal colon, which harbor immense microbial assemblages that are known to be vital for human health. Until recently, most of the details concerning our gut microbiota remained obscure. Over the past several years, however, a number of crucial technological and conceptual innovations have been introduced to shed more light on the composition and functionality of human gut microbiota. Recently developed high throughput approaches, including next-generation sequencing technologies and phylogenetic microarrays targeting ribosomal RNA gene sequences, allow for comprehensive analysis of the diversity and dynamics of the gut microbiota composition. Nevertheless, most of the microbes especially in the human large intestine still remain uncultured, and the in situ functions of distinct groups of the gut microbiota are therefore largely unknown, but pivotal to the understanding of their role in human physiology. Apart from functional and metagenomics approaches, stable isotope probing is a promising tool to link the metabolic activity and diversity of microbial communities, including yet uncultured microbes, in a complex environment. Advancements in current stable isotope probing approaches integrated with the application of high-throughput diagnostic microarray-based phylogenetic profiling and metabolic flux analysis should facilitate the understanding of human microbial ecology and will enable the development of innovative strategies to treat or prevent intestinal diseases of as yet unknown etiology.

  19. Effects of ghrelin and motilin on smooth muscle contractility of the isolated gastrointestinal tract from the bullfrog and Japanese fire belly newt.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takio; Shimazaki, Misato; Kikuta, Ayumi; Yaosaka, Noriko; Teraoka, Hiroki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    Ghrelin has been identified in some amphibians and is known to stimulate growth hormone release and food intake as seen in mammals. Ghrelin regulates gastrointestinal motility in mammals and birds. The aim of this study was to determine whether ghrelin affects gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility in bullfrogs (anuran) and Japanese fire belly newts (urodelian) in vitro. Neither bullfrog ghrelin nor rat ghrelin affected longitudinal smooth muscle contractility of gastrointestinal strips from the bullfrog. Expression of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) mRNA was confirmed in the bullfrog gastrointestinal tract, and the expression level in the gastric mucosa was lower than that in the intestinal mucosa. In contrast, some gastrointestinal peptides, including substance P, neurotensin and motilin, and the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol showed marked contraction, indicating normality of the smooth muscle preparations. Similar results were obtained in another amphibian, the Japanese fire belly newt. Newt ghrelin and rat ghrelin did not cause any contraction in gastrointestinal longitudinal muscle, whereas substance P and carbachol were effective causing contraction. In conclusion, ghrelin does not affect contractility of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle in anuran and urodelian amphibians, similar to results for rainbow trout and goldfish (fish) but different from results for rats and chickens. The results suggest diversity of ghrelin actions on the gastrointestinal tract across animals. This study also showed for the first time that motilin induces gastrointestinal contraction in amphibians. PMID:26704852

  20. Radiation induced brain injury: assessment of white matter tracts in a pre-clinical animal model using diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Silun; Qiu, Deqiang; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Ed X; Leung, Lucullus H T; Gu, Jing; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2013-03-01

    We aim to study radiation induced white matter injury in a pre-clinical model using Diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI). Nineteen 12-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated to the right hemisphere using a linear accelerator. The dose distribution map was coregistered to the DTI map to generate the actual radiation dose to each white matter tract. Rats underwent longitudinal DTI scans at five time points from 4 to 48 weeks post-radiation with histological evaluations. Fractional anisotropy (FA) of the external capsule, fornix, cerebral peduncle, anterior commissure, optic tract and optic nerve was evaluated. Radiation dose was highest at the ipsilateral external capsule and fornix (29.4 ± 1.3 and 29.8 ± 1.1 Gy, respectively). Optic nerve received 50 % dose to the external capsule and other white matter tracts received 80 % dose. Significantly lower FA was firstly found in the ipsilateral external capsule at 4 weeks post-radiation and in the ipsilateral fornix at 40 weeks post-radiation compared to the contralateral side. Significantly lower FA was found in contralateral optic nerve compared to ipsilateral optic nerve at 48 weeks post-radiation despite ipsilateral optic nerves receiving higher radiation dose than contralateral optic nerve (p = 0.021). No differences were found in other white matter regions until 48 weeks. Histology indicated demyelination, axonal degeneration and coagulative necrosis in all injured white matter. DTI can serve as a promising tool for assessment of radiation induced white matter injury and regional radiosensitivity of white matter tracts. PMID:23334608

  1. A strategy for management of upper tract calculus disease.

    PubMed

    Payne, S R; Webb, D R; Wickham, J E

    1985-12-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, percutaneous nephrolithotomy and ureterorenoscopy now mean that approximately 98% of all renal and 85% of all ureteric calculi can be treated effectively, without recourse to open operative intervention, in centres possessing the necessary equipment and expertise. Experience with these techniques allows us to propose a strategy for the surgical treatment of upper tract stone disease.

  2. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Tract Infections in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Ronald P.; Haith, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance to antibiotics of "Escherichia coli" in uncomplicated urinary tract infections (uUTIs) in female college students. Participants: Symptomatic patients presenting to a student health service from September 2008 to December 2009. Methods: Clean catch midstream urine samples were tested for urinalysis (UA) and…

  3. Case report: pseudotail with dermal sinus tract and tethered cord.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul; Davidson, Laurence

    2016-09-01

    A pseudotail is a very rare, dermal appendage arising from the lumbosacral region with an association with spinal dysraphism. We report a case of a pseudotail in a healthy newborn female with sonographic imaging of a tethered cord and dermal sinus tract with MRI and surgical correlation. PMID:27635168

  4. A novel case of Raoultella planticola urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Olson, D S; Asare, K; Lyons, M; Hofinger, D M

    2013-02-01

    Raoultella species are Gram-negative, non-motile bacilli primarily considered to be environmental bacteria (Bagley et al.; Curr Microbiol 6:105-109, 1981). R. planticola has rarely been documented as a cause of human infections and has never been reported to cause urinary tract infections. We report the first case of R. planticola cystitis.

  5. Immunologic uniqueness of the genital tract: challenge for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Mestecky, Jiri; Moldoveanu, Zina; Russell, Michael W

    2005-05-01

    Although the genital tract is considered to be a component of the mucosal immune system, it displays several distinct features not shared by other typical mucosal tissues and external secretions. Both male and female genital tract tissues lack inductive mucosal sites analogous to intestinal Peyer's patches. Consequently, local humoral and cellular immune responses stimulated by infections [with e.g. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, papilloma virus, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1)] are weak or absent, and repeated local intravaginal immunizations result in minimal humoral responses. In contrast to typical external secretions such as intestinal fluid that contain secretory immunoglobulin A (S-IgA) as the dominant isotype, semen and cervico-vaginal fluid contain more IgG than IgA. Furthermore, irrespective of the route of infection, humoral immune responses to HIV-1 are dominated by specific IgG and low or absent IgA antibodies in all external secretions. Because a significant proportion of IgG in genital tract secretions is derived from the circulation, systemic immunization may provide protective IgG antibody-mediated immunity in the genital tract. Furthermore, combined systemic and mucosal (oral, rectal, and especially intranasal) immunization may induce protective humoral responses in both the systemic and mucosal compartments of the immune system.

  6. Digestive tract morphology and digestion in the wombats (Marsupialia: Vombatidae).

    PubMed

    Barboza, P S; Hume, I D

    1992-01-01

    Wombats consume grasses and sedges which are often highly fibrous. The morphology of the digestive tract and the sequence of digestion were studied in two species of wombats from contrasting habitats: Vombatus ursinus from mesic habitats and Lasiorhinus latifrons from xeric regions. Studies were performed on wild wombats consuming their natural winter diets, and on captive wombats fed a high-fibre pelleted straw diet. Vombatus had a shorter digestive tract (9.2 vs 12.5 times body length) of greater capacity (wet contents 17.9 vs 13.7% body weight) than Lasiorhinus. The most capacious region of the digestive tract was the proximal colon (62-79% of contents). The proportional length and surface area of the proximal colon were greater in Vombatus, but those of the distal colon were greater in Lasiorhinus. These digestive morphologies may reflect adaptations for greater capacity and longer retention of digesta in Vombatus, but greater absorption and lower faecal water loss in Lasiorhinus. Apparent digestion along the digestive tract was estimated by reference to lignin. The proximal colon was the principal site of fibre and dry matter digestion, whereas nitrogen was mainly digested in the small intestine. Depot fats in captive wombats were highly unsaturated and reflected those in the diet. Therefore, lipids, proteins and soluble carbohydrates in the plant cell contents were digested and absorbed in the stomach and small intestine. Conversely, dietary fibre was probably retained and digested by microbial fermentation along the proximal colon. PMID:1430423

  7. Two Cases of Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Propionimicrobium lymphophilum.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glynne D

    2015-09-01

    The first case reports involving Propionimicrobium lymphophilum, a rarely encountered anaerobic Gram-positive non-spore-forming rod, are presented here as urinary tract infections. Initial detection of these bacteria required urine Gram stains. Comparison of the type strain to the two isolates by various methods is depicted and includes antimicrobial susceptibility data. PMID:26135862

  8. Two Cases of Urinary Tract Infection Caused by Propionimicrobium lymphophilum

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The first case reports involving Propionimicrobium lymphophilum, a rarely encountered anaerobic Gram-positive non-spore-forming rod, are presented here as urinary tract infections. Initial detection of these bacteria required urine Gram stains. Comparison of the type strain to the two isolates by various methods is depicted and includes antimicrobial susceptibility data. PMID:26135862

  9. Traditional serrated adenomas of the upper digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C A

    2016-01-01

    For many years, it was generally accepted that the vast majority of the colorectal carcinomas (CRCs) evolved from conventional adenomas, via the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. More recently, serrated colorectal polyps (hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated polyps and traditional serrated adenomas (TSAs)) have emerged as an alternative pathway of colorectal carcinogenesis. It has been estimated that about 30% of the CRC progress via the serrated pathway. Recently, TSAs were also detected in the upper digestive tract. In this work, we review the literature on TSA in the oesophagus, the stomach, the duodenum, the pancreatic main duct and the gallbladder. The review indicated that 53.4% (n=39) out of the 73 TSA of the upper digestive tract now in record showed a simultaneously growing invasive carcinoma. As a corollary, TSAs of the upper digestive tract are aggressive adenomas that should be radically excised, either endoscopically or surgically, to rule out the possibility of a synchronously growing invasive adenocarcinoma or to prevent cancer progression. The present findings substantiate a TSA pathway of carcinogenesis in the upper digestive tract. PMID:26468393

  10. Dynamic 3D Visualization of Vocal Tract Shaping During Speech

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yinghua; Kim, Yoon-Chul; Proctor, Michael I.; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.; Nayak, Krishna S.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging is widely used in speech research as a means to investigate the shaping and dynamics of the vocal tract during speech production. 3D dynamic MRI would be a major advance, as it would provide 3D dynamic visualization of the entire vocal tract. We present a novel method for the creation of 3D dynamic movies of vocal tract shaping based on the acquisition of 2D dynamic data from parallel slices and temporal alignment of the image sequences using audio information. Multiple sagittal 2D real-time movies with synchronized audio recordings are acquired for English vowel-consonant-vowel stimuli /ala/, /aɹa/, /asa/ and /aʃa/. Audio data are aligned using mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) extracted from windowed intervals of the speech signal. Sagittal image sequences acquired from all slices are then aligned using dynamic time warping (DTW). The aligned image sequences enable dynamic 3D visualization by creating synthesized movies of the moving airway in the coronal planes, visualizing desired tissue surfaces and tube-shaped vocal tract airway after manual segmentation of targeted articulators and smoothing. The resulting volumes allow for dynamic 3D visualization of salient aspects of lingual articulation, including the formation of tongue grooves and sublingual cavities, with a temporal resolution of 78 ms. PMID:23204279

  11. Molecular genetics and targeted therapeutics in biliary tract carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Eric I; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-01-01

    The primary malignancies of the biliary tract, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, often present at an advanced stage and are marginally sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that molecularly targeted agents may provide new hope for improving treatment response in biliary tract carcinoma (BTC). In this article, we provide a critical review of the pathogenesis and genetic abnormalities of biliary tract neoplasms, in addition to discussing the current and emerging targeted therapeutics in BTC. Genetic studies of biliary tumors have identified the growth factors and receptors as well as their downstream signaling pathways that control the growth and survival of biliary epithelia. Target-specific monoclonal antibodies and small molecules inhibitors directed against the signaling pathways that drive BTC growth and invasion have been developed. Numerous clinical trials designed to test these agents as either monotherapy or in combination with conventional chemotherapy have been completed or are currently underway. Research focusing on understanding the molecular basis of biliary tumorigenesis will continue to identify for targeted therapy the key mutations that drive growth and invasion of biliary neoplasms. Additional strategies that have emerged for treating this malignant disease include targeting the epigenetic alterations of BTC and immunotherapy. By integrating targeted therapy with molecular profiles of biliary tumor, we hope to provide precision treatment for patients with malignant diseases of the biliary tract. PMID:26819503

  12. Neoplasms of the genital tract in a Vietnamese potbellied pig.

    PubMed

    Augustijn, Marieke; Kuller, Wikke; Kimpfler, Simon; van Nes, Arie

    2010-01-01

    A 9-year-old, female potbellied pig showed loss of appetite and abdominal distension. After clinical examination and ultrasonography, a tumour was suspected. At laparotomy a large mass was present in the genital tract. Because the mass could not be excised, the pig was euthanized. Pathological examination revealed leiomyoma of the cervix and uterus wall in addition to multifocal adenocarcinomas of the uterus.

  13. Mammalian sperm interactions with the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Susan S

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian female reproductive tract interacts with sperm in various ways in order to facilitate sperm migration to the egg while impeding migrations of pathogens into the tract, to keep sperm alive during the time between mating and ovulation, and to select the fittest sperm for fertilization. The two main types of interactions are physical and molecular. Physical interactions include the swimming responses of sperm to the microarchitecture of walls, to fluid flows, and to fluid viscoelasticity. When sperm encounter walls, they have a strong tendency to remain swimming along them. Sperm will also orient their swimming into gentle fluid flows. The female tract seems to use these tendencies of sperm to guide them to the site of fertilization. When sperm hyperactivate, they are better able to penetrate highly viscoelastic media, such as the cumulus matrix surrounding eggs. Molecular interactions include communications of sperm surface molecules with receptors on the epithelial lining of the tract. There is evidence that specific sperm surface molecules are required to enable sperm to pass through the uterotubal junction into the oviduct. When sperm reach the oviduct, most bind to the oviductal epithelium. This interaction holds sperm in a storage reservoir until ovulation and serves to maintain the fertilization competence of stored sperm. When sperm are released from the reservoir, they detach from and re-attach to the epithelium repeatedly while ascending to the site of fertilization. We are only beginning to understand the communications that may pass between sperm and epithelium during these interactions.

  14. 3-D PARTICLE TRANSPORT WITHIN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study trajectories of inhaled particulate matter (PM) were simulated within a three-dimensional (3-D) computer model of the human upper respiratory tract (URT). The airways were described by computer-reconstructed images of a silicone rubber cast of the human head, throat...

  15. FLOW SIMULATION IN THE HUMAN UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    EPA Science Inventory


    ABSTRACT

    Computer simulations of airflow patterns within the human upper respiratory tract (URT) are presented. The URT model includes airways of the head (nasal and oral), throat (pharyngeal and laryngeal), and lungs (trachea and main bronchi). The head and throat mor...

  16. Vocal Tract Representation in the Recognition of Cerebral Palsied Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzicz, Frank; Hirst, Graeme; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors explored articulatory information as a means of improving the recognition of dysarthric speech by machine. Method: Data were derived chiefly from the TORGO database of dysarthric articulation (Rudzicz, Namasivayam, & Wolff, 2011) in which motions of various points in the vocal tract are measured during speech.…

  17. Digestive tract morphology and digestion in the wombats (Marsupialia: Vombatidae).

    PubMed

    Barboza, P S; Hume, I D

    1992-01-01

    Wombats consume grasses and sedges which are often highly fibrous. The morphology of the digestive tract and the sequence of digestion were studied in two species of wombats from contrasting habitats: Vombatus ursinus from mesic habitats and Lasiorhinus latifrons from xeric regions. Studies were performed on wild wombats consuming their natural winter diets, and on captive wombats fed a high-fibre pelleted straw diet. Vombatus had a shorter digestive tract (9.2 vs 12.5 times body length) of greater capacity (wet contents 17.9 vs 13.7% body weight) than Lasiorhinus. The most capacious region of the digestive tract was the proximal colon (62-79% of contents). The proportional length and surface area of the proximal colon were greater in Vombatus, but those of the distal colon were greater in Lasiorhinus. These digestive morphologies may reflect adaptations for greater capacity and longer retention of digesta in Vombatus, but greater absorption and lower faecal water loss in Lasiorhinus. Apparent digestion along the digestive tract was estimated by reference to lignin. The proximal colon was the principal site of fibre and dry matter digestion, whereas nitrogen was mainly digested in the small intestine. Depot fats in captive wombats were highly unsaturated and reflected those in the diet. Therefore, lipids, proteins and soluble carbohydrates in the plant cell contents were digested and absorbed in the stomach and small intestine. Conversely, dietary fibre was probably retained and digested by microbial fermentation along the proximal colon.

  18. Reproductive tract infections: prevalence and risk factors in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Sarah; Morison, Linda; Chakraborty, Jyotsnamoy; Gausia, Kaniz; Ahmed, Farid; Islam, Shamim Sufia; Alam, Nazmul; Brown, David; Mabey, David

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for reproductive tract infections among men and women in a rural community in Bangladesh. METHODS: In the Matlab area a systematic sample of married non-pregnant women aged 15-50 years was drawn from a comprehensive household registration system for married women. A systematic sample of married and unmarried men in the same age group was drawn from a census-derived demographic surveillance list. Private interviews were conducted with 804 women in a clinic, and cervical, vaginal, urinary and serological samples were collected. Urine and blood specimens were obtained from 969 men who were interviewed at home. FINDINGS: The prevalence of bacterial and viral reproductive tract infections was low to moderate. For example, fewer than 1% of the women had a cervical infection. No cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were found. However, among men there was a high level of reported risk behaviour and a low level of protection against infection. CONCLUSION: A low prevalence of reproductive tract infections, coupled with a high level of reported risk behaviour, indicated a need for primary programmes that would prevent an increase in the incidence of reproductive tract infections, sexually transmitted infections and HIV infection. PMID:11984603

  19. Gas in the urinary tract: its aetiology and management.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J

    1988-01-01

    Gas within the urinary tract may be an incidental finding or it may be detected in the course of investigating a patient with urinary or abdominal symptoms. In the immediate postoperative period it is unlikely to be of any significance, but at any other time it is a sign of serious underlying pathology. In this article its aetiology and management are discussed.

  20. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Joy T.; Vaidya, Jatin G.; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e. prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATR), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. PMID:26179962

  1. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Joy T; Vaidya, Jatin G; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3717-3732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Integration of aortic nerve inputs in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Mifflin, S W

    2000-01-01

    The integration of arterial baroreceptor afferent inputs was studied in renal wrap hypertensive (HT) and normotensive (NT) rats. In anesthetized and paralyzed rats, aortic nerve (AN)-evoked depressor responses were reduced in HT compared with NT rats (P<0.05). We tested the hypothesis that the attenuated baroreflex was associated with altered integration of baroreceptor inputs within the nucleus of the solitary tract. Based on onset latency and the ability of monosynaptic neurons (MSNs) to respond to each of 2 AN stimuli separated by 5 ms, cells in HT and NT rats were divided into 3 groups: short-latency MSNs (SLMSNs), long-latency MSNs (LLMSNs), and polysynaptic neurons (PSNs). A higher percentage of PSNs (73% versus 61%) and a lower percentage of SLMSNs (20% versus 27%) or LLMSNs (7% versus 12%) were found in HT rats (P<0.05). In addition, in HT compared with NT rats, the AN onset latency was greater in PSNs (29. 9+/-1.1 versus 26.7+/-0.8 ms) but not in SLMSNs (5.0+/-0.5 versus 5. 0+/-0.3 ms) or LLMSNs (22.9+/-1.2 versus 24.1+/-0.7 ms) (P<0.05). Finally, in HT compared with NT rats, the number of PSNs responding to a single AN stimulus with multiple action potentials was increased (40% versus 19%) (P<0.05). This was not observed in SLMSNs (26% versus 13%) or LLMSNs (12% versus 18%). The results indicate that renal wrap hypertension is associated with reduced AN-evoked depressor responses. There also were alterations in the integration of AN afferent inputs within the nucleus of the solitary tract, and these alterations were most marked in the PSN population.

  3. Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Reduces Vitamin D3 in the Blood Stream and Respiratory Tract

    MedlinePlus

    ... respiratory tract Share | Exposure to cigarette smoke reduces vitamin D3 in the blood stream and respiratory tract ... be understood as to how smoke causes inflammation. Vitamin D3 has anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects. ...

  4. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  5. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors. PMID:23792336

  6. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors.

  7. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  8. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  9. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  10. 43 CFR 2711.1-1 - Identification of tracts by land use planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Identification of tracts by land use... POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.1-1 Identification of tracts by land use planning. (a) Tracts of public lands shall only be offered for sale in implementation of land use planning prepared...

  11. Recent Advances in Urinary Tract Reconstruction for Neuropathic Bladder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Roberto I.; Lorenzo, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic bladder usually causes several limitations to patients’ quality of life, including urinary incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections, and upper urinary tract damage. Its management has significantly changed over the last few years. The aim of our paper is to address some salient features of recent literature dealing with reconstructive procedures in pediatric and adolescent patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26962441

  12. Phonation Threshold Pressure Measurement with a Semi-Occluded Vocal Tract

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to determine if a semi-occluded vocal tract could be used to measure phonation threshold pressure. This is in contrast to the shutter technique, where an alternation between a fully occluded tract and an unoccluded tract is used. Method: Five male and 5 female volunteers phonated through a thin straw held…

  13. Differential susceptibilities to azithromycin treatment of chlamydial infection in the gastrointestinal tract and cervix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence from animal studies suggests that chlamydiae may persist in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and be a reservoir for reinfection of the genital tract. We hypothesize that there may be a differential susceptibility of organisms in the GI and genital tracts. To determine the effect of azithromy...

  14. Acute Alpha-Naphthylisothiocyanate-induced Liver Toxicity in Germfree and Conventional Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Cullen, John M; Faiola, Brenda; Melich, David H; Peterson, Richard A; Jordan, Holly L; Kimbrough, Carie L; Miller, Richard T

    2016-10-01

    Differences in the responses of conventional and germfree male Sprague-Dawley rats to acute injury induced by alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), a well-characterized biliary epithelial toxicant, were evaluated. Conventional and germfree rats were dosed once orally with 50 mg/kg of ANIT or corn oil alone and serially sacrificed daily for the next 3 days. Germfree rats treated with ANIT tended to have greater increases in virtually all liver and biliary-related analytes compared with conventional rats treated with ANIT; however, significant differences were found only in a few of these analytes including increased bile acids on day 3, total bilirubin on day 4, glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) on day 3, and reduced paraoxonase 1 (PON1) on days 2 and 3. Histologic differences between the conventional and germfree rats were modest, but most pronounced on day 2 (24-hr post dosing). Based on subjective scoring, biliary necrosis, neutrophilic cholangitis, and portal tract edema were more severe in germfree rats at 24 hr post dosing compared with conventional rats. Biliary epithelial replication did not differ between treated groups, however. Overall, germfree rats had a modestly greater level of biliary tract injury based on subjective histologic scoring and clinical chemistry measurements following an acute exposure to the well-characterized biliary toxin, ANIT; however, the difference between the ANIT-treated germfree and conventional groups was modest and most evident only within the first day following exposure. These findings suggest that the microbiome did not significantly affect ANIT-induced acute biliary tract injury in the conditions of this study. PMID:27519817

  15. Rats! Oh No, Not Rats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Gary E.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of problems encountered in a new library building--including rats and humidity--and a description of the library's collections provide a framework for this presentation of the California State Library's emergency management planning. Current preservation efforts are documented and the library's disaster and security plans are described.…

  16. Antigen-presenting cells in the female reproductive tract: influence of sex hormones on antigen presentation in the vagina.

    PubMed Central

    Wira, C R; Rossoll, R M

    1995-01-01

    We report here that the stage of the reproductive cycle and the administration of physiological amounts of oestradiol to ovariectomized rats influences antigen presentation by macrophage/dendritic cells in the vagina. Antigen presentation is elevated when oestradiol levels in blood are low, and reduced just prior to ovulation. Of those hormones tested, only oestradiol lowered vaginal antigen presentation. When progesterone was given along with oestradiol, the inhibitory effect of oestradiol on vaginal antigen presentation was reversed. These studies demonstrate that the vagina is an inductive site and that antigen presentation is under hormonal control. Our results suggest that immunization studies designed to enhance mucosal immunity in the female reproductive tract should take into account the stage of the reproductive cycle when antigen is deposited. PMID:7790022

  17. Distribution and ultrastructural characteristics of dark cells in squamous metaplasias of the respiratory tract epithelium. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.; Nettesheim, P.; Pine, A.; Martin, D.

    1981-05-01

    Dark epithelial basal cells were found in both carcinogen-induced and non-carcinogen-induced squamous metaplasias of the tracheal epithelium. Formaldehyde-induced squamous metaplasias exhibited 4% dark cells in the basal layer. Metaplasias induced by vitamin A deficiency and those induced by dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) without atypia showed 18-20% basal dark cells. DMBA-induced metaplasias with moderate to severe atypia exhibited 50% basal dark cells. The labeling index of basal cells in metaplastic epithelia, regardless of the inducing agent, was 16-18%, ie, the same as that of the normal esophageal stratified squamous epithelium. The percentage of labeled dark basal cells per total dark cell population was approximately 19% in the non-carcinogen-induced metaplasias and in the DMBA-induced metaplasias without atypia. In the atypical metaplasias induced by DMA this percentage increased to 26. On the basis of ultrastructural observations, five types of dark epithelial cells could be distinguished in the metaplastic epithelia. Each type of squamous metaplasia could thus be recognized by a determined numerical distribution of dark cells in the basal layer and a specific pattern of distribution of the ultrastructurally defined dark cell categories.

  18. Diverse mechanisms of anti-androgen action: impact on male rat reproductive tract development.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists have identified environmental chemicals that display anti-androgenic activity via multiple mechanisms of action. Early studies focused on pesticides acting as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists but it soon became apparent that was not the only endocrine mode by which c...

  19. Dose-dependent lipid peroxidation induction on ex vivo intestine tracts exposed to chyme samples from fumonisins contaminated corn samples.

    PubMed

    Garbetta, A; Debellis, L; De Girolamo, A; Schena, R; Visconti, A; Minervini, F

    2015-08-01

    Fumonisins (FBs), Fusarium mycotoxins common food contaminant, are a potent inducer of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in intestinal cells. In order to verify this toxic effect in intestine tract, the aim was to assess lipid peroxidation (as malondialdehyde MDA increased levels) on intestine rat samples exposed to chyme samples from in vitro digestion of FBs contaminated corn samples. Naturally (9.61±3.2 μg/gr), artificially (726±94 μg/gr) and spiked corn samples at EU permitted FBs levels were digested and added to luminal side of Ussing chamber for 120 min. Fumonisins-free corn sample was used as control. The MDA increase was observed just in 83% of intestine samples exposed at EU FBs levels and the digestion process seems to reduce this incidence (50% of samples). Malondialdehyde levels were FBs dose- and subject-related and ranged from 0.07±0.01 to 3.59±0.6 nmol/mg. Highest incidence and MDA % increment (I) were found when intestine tracts were exposed to chymes from artificially corn sample. The induction of lipid peroxidation induced by FBs could be due to interactions between FBs and intestinal membranes, with consequent modifications in membrane permeability and oxygen diffusion-concentration, as suggested by other authors. PMID:25956791

  20. The biopharmaceutics of successful controlled release drug product: Segmental-dependent permeability of glipizide vs. metoprolol throughout the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zur, Moran; Cohen, Noa; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to study the challenges and prospects of regional-dependent absorption in a controlled-release scenario, through the oral biopharmaceutics of the sulfonylurea antidiabetic drug glipizide. The BCS solubility class of glipizide was determined, and its physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability were thoroughly investigated, both in-vitro (PAMPA and Caco-2) and in-vivo in rats. Metoprolol was used as the low/high permeability class boundary marker. Glipizide was found to be a low-solubility compound. All intestinal permeability experimental methods revealed similar trend; a mirror image small intestinal permeability with opposite regional/pH-dependency was obtained, a downward trend for glipizide, and an upward trend for metoprolol. Yet the lowest permeability of glipizide (terminal Ileum) was comparable to the lowest permeability of metoprolol (proximal jejunum). At the colon, similar permeability was evident for glipizide and metoprolol, that was higher than metoprolol's jejunal permeability. We present an analysis that identifies metoprolol's jejunal permeability as the low/high permeability class benchmark anywhere throughout the intestinal tract; we show that the permeability of both glipizide and metoprolol matches/exceeds this threshold throughout the entire intestinal tract, accounting for their success as controlled-release dosage form. This represents a key biopharmaceutical characteristic for a successful controlled-release dosage form.

  1. Dose-dependent lipid peroxidation induction on ex vivo intestine tracts exposed to chyme samples from fumonisins contaminated corn samples.

    PubMed

    Garbetta, A; Debellis, L; De Girolamo, A; Schena, R; Visconti, A; Minervini, F

    2015-08-01

    Fumonisins (FBs), Fusarium mycotoxins common food contaminant, are a potent inducer of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in intestinal cells. In order to verify this toxic effect in intestine tract, the aim was to assess lipid peroxidation (as malondialdehyde MDA increased levels) on intestine rat samples exposed to chyme samples from in vitro digestion of FBs contaminated corn samples. Naturally (9.61±3.2 μg/gr), artificially (726±94 μg/gr) and spiked corn samples at EU permitted FBs levels were digested and added to luminal side of Ussing chamber for 120 min. Fumonisins-free corn sample was used as control. The MDA increase was observed just in 83% of intestine samples exposed at EU FBs levels and the digestion process seems to reduce this incidence (50% of samples). Malondialdehyde levels were FBs dose- and subject-related and ranged from 0.07±0.01 to 3.59±0.6 nmol/mg. Highest incidence and MDA % increment (I) were found when intestine tracts were exposed to chymes from artificially corn sample. The induction of lipid peroxidation induced by FBs could be due to interactions between FBs and intestinal membranes, with consequent modifications in membrane permeability and oxygen diffusion-concentration, as suggested by other authors.

  2. Licking and gaping elicited by microstimulation of the nucleus of the solitary tract

    PubMed Central

    Kinzeler, Nicole R.; Travers, Susan P.

    2008-01-01

    Intraoral infusions of bitter tastants activate expression of the immediate-early gene c-Fos in neurons located in the medial third of the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST). The distribution of these neurons is distinct from that activated by sour or sweet stimuli. Bitter stimuli are also distinctive because of their potency for eliciting gaping, an oral reflex that functions to actively reject potentially toxic substances. Glossopharyngeal nerve transection profoundly reduces, whereas decerebration spares, the bitter-evoked Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) pattern and gaping, implicating the medial rNST as a substrate for the sensory limb of oral rejection. The present experiment tested this hypothesis using microstimulation (100 Hz, 0.2 ms, 5–40 μA) to activate the rNST in awake rats. NST microstimulation elicited licking and gaping, and gaping was evoked from a restricted rNST region. The results indicated some topographic organization in sites effective for evoking gaping, but, in direct conflict with the hypothesis, lateral sites farther from bitter-evoked FLI were more effective than medial sites centered closer to FLI-expressing neurons. The gape-effective sites resemble locations of bitter-responsive neurons recently observed in neurophysiological recordings. These results indicate that bitter-responsive rNST neurons critical for triggering gaping may not express FLI and imply an alternate function for bitter-responsive neurons that do. PMID:18495833

  3. CoCoMac 2.0 and the future of tract-tracing databases

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Rembrandt; Wachtler, Thomas; Diesmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The CoCoMac database contains the results of several hundred published axonal tract-tracing studies in the macaque monkey brain. The combined results are used for constructing the macaque macro-connectome. Here we discuss the redevelopment of CoCoMac and compare it to six connectome-related projects: two online resources that provide full access to raw tracing data in rodents, a connectome viewer for advanced 3D graphics, a partial but highly detailed rat connectome, a brain data management system that generates custom connectivity matrices, and a software package that covers the complete pipeline from connectivity data to large-scale brain simulations. The second edition of CoCoMac features many enhancements over the original. For example, a search wizard is provided for full access to all tables and their nested dependencies. Connectivity matrices can be computed on demand in a user-selected nomenclature. A new data entry system is available as a preview, and is to become a generic solution for community-driven data entry in manually collated databases. We conclude with the question whether neuronal tracing will remain the gold standard to uncover the wiring of brains, thereby highlighting developments in human connectome construction, tracer substances, polarized light imaging, and serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. PMID:23293600

  4. Glucocorticoid receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decrease endocrine and behavioral stress responses.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Sriparna; Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Dolgas, C Mark; Myers, Brent; Herman, James P

    2014-07-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, leading to adrenocortical secretion of glucocorticoids. The magnitude and duration of the HPA axis response is mediated in large part by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) abundantly expresses the GR and is a key brain region for processing autonomic and endocrine stress responses. This study tests the hypothesis that GR within the NTS plays an important role in inhibiting stress-induced endocrine and behavioral responses. Cohorts of rats received bilateral micropellet (30 μg) implantations of crystalline corticosterone, mifepristone (a GR antagonist) or cholesterol (control) directed into the region of the NTS, and were subsequently subjected to either acute psychogenic (restraint) stress or chronic variable stress (CVS). We found that NTS GR antagonism increased acute stress-induced corticosterone levels, whereas GR activation within the NTS attenuated this response. Following CVS, basal and 15 min post-restraint plasma corticosterone levels were increased by NTS GR antagonism, which was associated with an increase in Fos immunoreactivity within the PVN. Using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swim test (FST), we assessed the effect of NTS GR inhibition on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, respectively. GR inhibition within the NTS decreased open arm exploratory behavior in the EPM and increased immobility in the FST relative to controls. Together, the findings reveal a novel role of NTS GR signaling for inhibiting both endocrine and behavioral responses to stress.

  5. Preventive obesity agent montmorillonite adsorbs dietary lipids and enhances lipid excretion from the digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengfei; Dai, Shu; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jin; Wang, Fang; Zhai, Yonggong

    2016-01-01

    Western diets are typically high in fat and are associated with long-term complications such as obesity and hepatic steatosis. Because of the enjoyable taste of high-fat diets (HFDs), we are interested in determining how to decrease lipid absorption and enhance lipid excretion from the digestive tract after the consumption of eating fatty foods. Montmorillonite was initially characterized as a gastrointestinal mucosal barrier protective agent for the treatment of diarrhoea. Dietary lipid adsorbent- montmorillonite (DLA-M) was isolated and purified from Xinjiang montmorillonite clay via the water extraction method. Here, we show that DLA-M has an unexpected role in preventing obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis in HFD-fed rats. Interestingly, combined application of polarized light microscopy and lipid staining analyses, showed that DLA-M crystals have dietary lipid-adsorbing ability in vitro and in vivo, which enhances lipid excretion via bowel movements. In summary, our results indicate that DLA-M prevent HFD-induced obesity. This novel dietary lipid-adsorbing agent can help prevent obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:26891902

  6. Tract shape modeling detects changes associated with preterm birth and neuroprotective treatment effects

    PubMed Central

    Anblagan, Devasuda; Bastin, Mark E.; Sparrow, Sarah; Piyasena, Chinthika; Pataky, Rozalia; Moore, Emma J.; Serag, Ahmed; Wilkinson, Alastair Graham; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Semple, Scott I.; Boardman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with altered connectivity of neural circuits. We developed a tract segmentation method that provides measures of tract shape and integrity (probabilistic neighborhood tractography, PNT) from diffusion MRI (dMRI) data to test the hypotheses: 1) preterm birth is associated with alterations in tract topology (R), and tract-averaged mean diffusivity (〈D〉) and fractional anisotropy (FA); 2) neural systems are separable based on tract-averaged dMRI parameters; and 3) PNT can detect neuroprotective treatment effects. dMRI data were collected from 87 preterm infants (mean gestational age 29+1 weeks, range 23+2 –34+6) at term equivalent age and 24 controls (mean gestational age 39+6 weeks). PNT was used to segment eight major fasciculi, characterize topology, and extract tract-averaged 〈D〉 and FA. Tract topology was altered by preterm birth in all tracts except the splenium (p < 0.05, false discovery rate [FDR] corrected). After adjustment for age at scan, tract-averaged 〈D〉 was increased in the genu and splenium, right corticospinal tract (CST) and the left and right inferior longitudinal fasciculi (ILF) in preterm infants compared with controls (p < 0.05, FDR), while tract-averaged FA was decreased in the splenium and left ILF (p < 0.05, FDR). Specific fasciculi were separable based on tract-averaged 〈D〉 and FA values. There was a modest decrease in tract-averaged 〈D〉 in the splenium of preterm infants who had been exposed to antenatal MgSO4 for neuroprotection (p = 0.002). Tract topology is a biomarker of preterm brain injury. The data provide proof of concept that tract-averaged dMRI parameters have utility for evaluating tissue effects of perinatal neuroprotective strategies. PMID:26106527

  7. Late injury of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Russell, A.; Bruner, D.

    1995-03-30

    The purpose of this article is to review the late effects of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract. The anatomic sites detailed are the vulva, vagina, cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. The available pathophysiology is discussed. Clinical syndromes are presented. Tolerance doses of irradiation for late effects are rarely presented in the literature and are reviewed where available. Management strategies for surgical, radiotherapeutic, and chemotherapeutic late effects are discussed. Endpoints for evaluation of therapeutic late effects have been formulated utilizing the symptons, objective, management, and analytic (SOMA) format. Late effects on the female reproductive tract from cancer therapy should be recognized and managed appropriately. A grading system for these effects is presented. Endpoints for late effects and tolls for the evaluation need to be further developed. 61 refs., 9 figs., 13 tabs.

  8. Antibacterial perineal washing for prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Cass, A S; Ireland, G W

    1985-05-01

    Antibacterial ointment applied to the urethral meatus in females with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been reported to decrease the incidence of UTIs. The value of perineal washing with the antibacterial lotion, hexachlorophene, in preventing urinary tract infections was determined in 56 females with recurrent UTIs. Of three groups of females one group used hexachlorophene perineal washings morning and night, another group used hexachlorophene perineal washings and an oral antibacterial daily (nitrofurantoin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), and the third group used the oral antibacterials daily alone. The infections per patient were 3.4 with hexachlorophene washings, 0.5 with hexachlorophene washing and oral antibacterials daily, and 0.9 with oral antibacterials alone. These results suggest that hexachlorophene perineal washing was not effective in preventing UTI in females.

  9. Liver and biliary tract cancer among chemical workers

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, G.G.; McLaren, E.A.; Sabel, F.L.; Bodner, K.M.; Lipps, T.E.; Cook, R.R. )

    1990-01-01

    A recent cohort mortality study of male, hourly wage employees of a large Michigan chemical production and research facility had found a greater than expected number of deaths coded to liver and biliary tract cancer. In response, an additional investigation was then undertaken of the 44 liver and biliary tract cancer deaths observed between 1940 and 1982. A random sample (N = 1,888) of subjects was selected from the total cohort (N = 21,437) to serve as referents. Company work history records were used to classify cases and referents by work area assignment and potential for exposure to 11 selected chemical agents which have been shown to produce cancer of the liver or biliary passages in experimental animals. Statistically significant associations in both positive and negative directions were found for several work areas within the facility. A suggestive association was found for vinyl chloride monomer, based on five cases with presumed exposure.

  10. Clinical implications of rhinoceros reproductive tract anatomy and histology.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, N E; Foley, G L; Gill, S; Pope, C E

    2001-03-01

    Reproductive tracts or tissues from five male black rhinoceroses (Diceros bicornis), two male white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum), two male one-horned Asian rhinoceroses (Rhinoceros unicornis), seven female black rhinoceroses, and six female white rhinoceroses from multiple institutions were examined to characterize their anatomy and histology. Some observations and measurements were obtained from in situ tracts of intact animals before or during necropsy. Formalin-fixed tissues were dissected and examined histologically. Retrospective reproductive data from each rhinoceros was obtained from the institutions of origin. Reproductive histology of these species was similar to that of other mammals. Male accessory gland structure varied among species, and the Asian rhinoceros epididymis was more loosely attached and had larger duct diameters than did the epididymides of the African species. Although histology was typically mammalian, rhinoceros reproductive morphology combined characteristics of several different mammals. Defining this unique morphology of rhinoceroses may help in understanding their reproductive physiology and will effect the development of appropriate reproductive techniques.

  11. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  12. Acoustics: the vocal tract and the sound of a didgeridoo.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Alex; Fletcher, Neville; Hollenberg, Lloyd; Lange, Benjamin; Smith, John; Wolfe, Joe

    2005-07-01

    The Australian didgeridoo (or yidaki in the Yolngu language of northern Australia) is a simple musical instrument that, at the lips of an experienced player, is capable of a spectacular variety of timbres--considerably greater than those that can be coaxed from orchestral instruments, for example. To understand this phenomenon, we simultaneously measured the sound produced by the didgeridoo and the acoustic impedance of the player's vocal tract. We find that the maxima in the envelope of the sound spectrum are associated with minima in the impedance of the vocal tract, as measured just inside the lips. This acoustic effect is similar to the production of vowel sounds made during human speech or singing, although the mechanism is different, and leads to the surprising conclusion that experienced players are subconsciously using their glottis to accentuate the instrument's tonal variation.

  13. Liver and biliary tract cancer among chemical workers.

    PubMed

    Bond, G G; McLaren, E A; Sabel, F L; Bodner, K M; Lipps, T E; Cook, R R

    1990-01-01

    A recent cohort mortality study of male, hourly wage employees of a large Michigan chemical production and research facility had found a greater than expected number of deaths coded to liver and biliary tract cancer. In response, an additional investigation was then undertaken of the 44 liver and biliary tract cancer deaths observed between 1940 and 1982. A random sample (N = 1,888) of subjects was selected from the total cohort (N = 21,437) to serve as referents. Company work history records were used to classify cases and referents by work area assignment and potential for exposure to 11 selected chemical agents which have been shown to produce cancer of the liver or biliary passages in experimental animals. Statistically significant associations in both positive and negative directions were found for several work areas within the facility. A suggestive association was found for vinyl chloride monomer, based on five cases with presumed exposure.

  14. [The characteristic of biocenosis of urogenital tract in women].

    PubMed

    Andosova, L D; Kontorshchikova, K N; Kachalina, O V; Belov, A V; Gonova, E S; Kudel'kina, S Iu

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with the study of characteristics of biocenosis of urogenital tract in women of reproductive age with using of "Femoflor" test. The scrapings of posterolateral wall of vagina were analyzed using the technique of real-time polymerase chain reaction using the reagents "Femoflor". The complex evaluation of urogenital biota identified three main types of biocenosis of vagina: type I--normocenosis (n = 50 or 11.5%): type II--mild dysbiosis (n = 88 or 21%); type III--marked dysbiosis (n = 133 or 30.6%). In the structure of alterations of biocenosis of urogenital tract the main role play the anaerobic bacteria with involvement of candida, ureoplasma and mcoplasma. PMID:23807998

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and non-digestive tract diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) showed an increasing trend resulting from factors, including lifestyle and dietary habits; however, both etiology and pathological mechanisms remain controversial. GERD occurs as a result of a variety of mechanisms and there is no single factor. Symptoms of GERD are often non-typical, with a likelihood of being overlooked by non-gastroenterology professionals. Therefore, improving GERD awareness in non-gastroenterology practitioners, along with early diagnosis and treatment, provide potential benefit to clinicians and patients alike. Increasing evidence suggests GERD has specific connections with a variety of non-digestive tract conditions, may contribute an aggravating compounding effect on other diseases, prolong hospitalization, and increase subsequent medical costs. This review considers and emphasizes the association between GERD and non-digestive tract conditions, including atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, primary pulmonary fibrosis and energy metabolism related to diet.

  16. Covert operations of uropathogenic Escherichia coli within the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Bower, Jean M; Eto, Danelle S; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2005-01-01

    Entry into host cells is required for many bacterial pathogens to effectively disseminate within a host, avoid immune detection and cause disease. In recent years, many ostensibly extracellular bacteria have been shown to act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens. Among these are strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs). UPEC are able to transiently invade, survive and multiply within the host cells and tissues constituting the urinary tract. Invasion of host cells by UPEC is promoted independently by distinct virulence factors, including cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Afa/Dr adhesins, and type 1 pili. Here we review the diverse mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by UPEC, focusing also on the impact of these processes on the persistence and recurrence of UTIs.

  17. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Genitourinary Tract Cancer, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1987-01-01

    An update of the state of the art of cancer chemotherapeutic treatment of genitourinary tract cancer is described in this multi-part series. Included in the review are cancers of the kidney, bladder, prostate, testicle, ovary, uterus, vulva, and gestational trophoblastic neoplasms. Part 1 focuses on the kidney. In this heterogeneous group of tumors, the major triumphs of cancer chemotherapy are in the control of the less common of these tumors, namely, gestational trophoblastic neoplasms in women, in combination with surgery in the control of the embryonal cell cancer of the testis in men, and in combination with surgery and radiation therapy in the control of the Wilms' tumor in children. Important progress is being made in the control of the other tumors of the genitourinary tract with the use of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:3323538

  18. Children with urinary tract infection; a critical diagnostic pathway.

    PubMed

    Brindle, M J

    1990-02-01

    A protocol for the radiological investigation of children with urinary tract infection was introduced in a district general hospital in 1985. Every boy, and every girl under 5 years was investigated after one documented infection, and every girl over 5 years after two infections. Each child had an abdominal radiograph and a sonar scan of the urinary tract. Four years later the results were assessed by reviewing the radiology file or contacting the general practitioner of each of the first 200 children examined. Ten of 15 children diagnosed as not normal on screening and investigated further had an abnormality confirmed. Four of 25 children thought normal on screening had minor abnormalities shown on further examination. The results are assessed in the light of a review of recent literature and indicate that this screening protocol is efficient and effective.

  19. Simulation of singing qualities governed by lower vocal tract adjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo R.

    2003-04-01

    In previous meetings, voice qualities such as pressed, ring, yawn, and twang were discussed in a speech context. It was shown that these qualities have unique spectral characteristics brought about by combinations of glottal and lower vocal tract adjustments (the epilarynx tube and the pharynx). Yawn has a wide glottis, a wide epilarynx tube, and a wide pharynx. On the contrary, twang has a general narrowing of all these airway sections. Ring has a wide pharynx and a relatively narrow epilarynx tube. A pressed voice is primary laryngeal, with a narrowed glottis. In this presentation, similar adjustments are made for singing with a voice simulator that controls vocal tract area functions and glottal flow pulses by rules. Results suggest that various singing styles, such as country-western, opera, or pop, may in part be characterized by these unique combinations of source and filter adjustments.

  20. Electroanalytical approaches to study signaling mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Patel, B A

    2011-07-01

    Electroanalytical techniques over the past few years have been applied to study real-time release of various signaling molecules in the GI tract. These approaches have become highly attractive as they provide dynamic spatial information on the amount of signaling molecules released. Although these approaches are relatively new to the field, the studies to date have provided useful insights into the alterations in signaling mechanisms during maturation, obesity and in a model of colitis. New methods and techniques have also allowed the possibility to obtain information on the signaling process and future developments will provide a wide diverse array of information that will be of benefit to all researchers in the field of gastroenterology. This review focuses on the types of techniques utilized, the information they can provide, their potential advantages and disadvantages in monitoring signaling processes in the gastrointestinal tract, the existing scientific studies that have utilized electroanalytical methods to date and the future potential impact of such approaches.

  1. Completely isolated alimentary tract duplication in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Tatsuya; Takamizawa, Shigeru; Yokoi, Akiko; Satoh, Shiiki; Nishijima, Eiji

    2008-10-01

    A rare case of a completely isolated, alimentary tract duplication cyst in a 27-day-old neonate is reported. The duplication cyst was detected on antenatal fetal ultrasound and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 27 weeks' gestational age. At surgery, the duplication cyst was in a retroperitoneal site with no apparent communication between the cyst and any portion of the alimentary tract. On histopathological examination, the diagnosis was a gastric duplication cyst. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. There have been eight cases of completely isolated duplication reported in the literature, of which seven were detected during the prenatal or neonatal period. No previous report in the English literature has described the fetal MR imaging findings of this type of duplication cyst.

  2. Diagnostic Work-Up of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Sarah L; Hedges, Jason C

    2016-08-01

    The goal of work-up of lower urinary tract symptoms is to establish the severity and cause of lower urinary tract symptoms and to predict with certainty which patients will respond to which treatments. Clinical guidelines exist to guide urologists in decision-making. All patients need a medical history with a validated symptom score, a physical examination, and a urinalysis. Prostate-specific antigen, postvoid urine residual, and peak urine flow rate provide additional information at little cost. For more invasive testing high-level data are lacking and guidelines defer to the urologist. Even the most extensive work-up is imperfect, and thus the attempt to balance costs with benefits of invasive testing. PMID:27476123

  3. Covert Operations of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli within the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Jean M.; Eto, Danelle S.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Entry into host cells is required for many bacterial pathogens to effectively disseminate within a host, avoid immune detection and cause disease. In recent years, many ostensibly extracellular bacteria have been shown to act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens. Among these are strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs). UPEC are able to transiently invade, survive and multiply within the host cells and tissues constituting the urinary tract. Invasion of host cells by UPEC is promoted independently by distinct virulence factors, including cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Afa/Dr adhesins, and type 1 pili. Here we review the diverse mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by UPEC, focusing also on the impact of these processes on the persistence and recurrence of UTIs. PMID:15569242

  4. Upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma with intratubular spread

    PubMed Central

    Sarungbam, Judy; Kurtis, Boaz; Phillips, John; Cai, Dongming; Zhang, David; Humayun, Islam; Yang, Ximing; Zhong, Minghao

    2014-01-01

    Upper urinary tract urothelial cell carcinomas (UUT-UCs) are uncommon and are defined as urothelial carcinoma involving the urinary tract from the renal calyces, renal pelvis to the distal ureter. One well-known an peculiar histopathological finding in UUT-UC is urothelial carcinoma with intratubular spread (retrograde spread within renal tubules). However, this special feature has not been systematically studied. We therefore collected a total of 53 consecutive cases of upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas (UUT-UCs), and studied the clinical and pathological features of intratubular spread (IS). A cocktail stain comprised of antibodies PAX8 and p63 together with PAS was validated and employed to facilitate the study of intratubular spread. Seventeen cases (31.5%) showed intratubular spread demonstrated by either H&E stain and/or the cocktail stain. All of the 17 cases wit intratubular spread had tumor involvement of the renal calyx; the majority of these (14/17, 82.4%) were high grade urothelial carcinoma and the remainder (3/17, 17.6%) were low grade. 4 of 17cases (23.5%) were non-invasive. We classified intratubular spread into 4 different types, based on histopathological patterns: pagetoid, typical, florid, and secondary invasion from intratubular spread. In conclusion, study shows intratubular spread of urothelial carcinoma is fairly common phenomenon in UUT-UC and is associated with a variety of clinical-pathological features. High grade UUT-UC tends to have more extensive intratubular spread and secondary invasion into renal parenchyma. Distinct morphological characteristics as well as the staining pattern from a unique cocktail stain help to identify and evaluate intratubular spread of urothelial carcinoma. Recognizing these different types of intratubular spreading (IS) is crucial for accurate staging of some upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas (UUT-UCs). PMID:25374911

  5. Vocal tract articulation revisited: the case of the monk parakeet

    PubMed Central

    Ohms, Verena R.; Beckers, Gabriël J. L.; ten Cate, Carel; Suthers, Roderick A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Birdsong and human speech share many features with respect to vocal learning and development. However, the vocal production mechanisms have long been considered to be distinct. The vocal organ of songbirds is more complex than the human larynx, leading to the hypothesis that vocal variation in birdsong originates mainly at the sound source, while in humans it is primarily due to vocal tract filtering. However, several recent studies have indicated the importance of vocal tract articulators such as the beak and oropharyngeal–esophageal cavity. In contrast to most other bird groups, parrots have a prominent tongue, raising the possibility that tongue movements may also be of significant importance in vocal production in parrots, but evidence is rare and observations often anecdotal. In the current study we used X-ray cinematographic imaging of naturally vocalizing monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) to assess which articulators are possibly involved in vocal tract filtering in this species. We observed prominent tongue height changes, beak opening movements and tracheal length changes, which suggests that all of these components play an important role in modulating vocal tract resonance. Moreover, the observation of tracheal shortening as a vocal articulator in live birds has to our knowledge not been described before. We also found strong positive correlations between beak opening and amplitude as well as changes in tongue height and amplitude in several types of vocalization. Our results suggest considerable differences between parrot and songbird vocal production while at the same time the parrot's vocal articulation might more closely resemble human speech production in the sense that both make extensive use of the tongue as a vocal articulator. PMID:22162856

  6. Vocal tract articulation revisited: the case of the monk parakeet.

    PubMed

    Ohms, Verena R; Beckers, Gabriël J L; ten Cate, Carel; Suthers, Roderick A

    2012-01-01

    Birdsong and human speech share many features with respect to vocal learning and development. However, the vocal production mechanisms have long been considered to be distinct. The vocal organ of songbirds is more complex than the human larynx, leading to the hypothesis that vocal variation in birdsong originates mainly at the sound source, while in humans it is primarily due to vocal tract filtering. However, several recent studies have indicated the importance of vocal tract articulators such as the beak and oropharyngeal-esophageal cavity. In contrast to most other bird groups, parrots have a prominent tongue, raising the possibility that tongue movements may also be of significant importance in vocal production in parrots, but evidence is rare and observations often anecdotal. In the current study we used X-ray cinematographic imaging of naturally vocalizing monk parakeets (Myiopsitta monachus) to assess which articulators are possibly involved in vocal tract filtering in this species. We observed prominent tongue height changes, beak opening movements and tracheal length changes, which suggests that all of these components play an important role in modulating vocal tract resonance. Moreover, the observation of tracheal shortening as a vocal articulator in live birds has to our knowledge not been described before. We also found strong positive correlations between beak opening and amplitude as well as changes in tongue height and amplitude in several types of vocalization. Our results suggest considerable differences between parrot and songbird vocal production while at the same time the parrot's vocal articulation might more closely resemble human speech production in the sense that both make extensive use of the tongue as a vocal articulator.

  7. Lactobacillus crispatus as biomarker of the healthy vaginal tract.

    PubMed

    Lepargneur, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Decades of research have shown that the lactobacilli inhabiting the human vagina are the first line of defense in the female urogenital and reproductive tracts. In healthy cervicovaginal microbiota, Lactobacillus crispatus is prevalent and beneficial with production of copious amounts of lactic acid potent broad spectrum bactericide virucide and immunomodulator. Future and preventic approaches may need to include probiotics, prebiotics also have the potential to optimize and restore the vaginal ecosystem. PMID:27492695

  8. Contemporary issues with pharmacotherapy for lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Osman, N; Chapple, C R

    2014-05-01

    Two articles appeared in the November 2012 edition of the journal evaluating aspects relating to the use of two important pharmacotherapeutic classes for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in real life clinical practice. LUTS is a non-specific term that encompasses urine storage, voiding and postmicturition symptoms. LUTS is a common bothersome problem affecting both men and women with a comparable prevalence in age-matched patients of both sexes that increases with ageing. PMID:24750526

  9. Smoothelin expression in the gastrointestinal tract: implication in colonic inertia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Owen T M; Chiles, Lauren; Levy, Mary; Zhai, Jing; Yerian, Lisa M; Xu, Haodong; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Soffer, Edy E; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Dhall, Deepti; Kahn, Melissa E; Balzer, Bonnie L; Amin, Mahul B; Wang, Hanlin L

    2013-10-01

    Colonic inertia is a frustrating motility disorder to patients, clinicians, and pathologists. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) characterize the expression of smoothelin, a novel smooth muscle-specific contractile protein expressed only by terminally differentiated smooth muscle cells, in the normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract; and (2) determine whether smoothelin is aberrantly expressed in patients with colonic inertia. A total of 57 resections of the normal GI tract (distal esophagus to left colon) were obtained from patients without GI motor dysfunction. Sixty-one colon resections were obtained from patients with a clinical diagnosis of colonic inertia. Smoothelin immunostaining was conducted on full-thickness tissue sections. In the nondysmotile controls, strong and diffuse cytoplasmic staining for smoothelin was observed in both the inner circular and outer longitudinal layers of the muscularis propria (MP) throughout the entire GI tract. The muscularis mucosae (MM) and muscular vessel walls were either completely negative or only patchily and weakly stained. The 1 exception to this pattern was observed in the distal esophagus, in which the MM was also diffusely and strongly stained. In cases with colonic inertia, a moderate to marked reduction of smoothelin immunoreactivity was observed in 15 of 61 (24.6%) colon resections, selectively seen in the outer layer of the MP. The data demonstrate that smoothelin is differentially expressed in the MP and MM of the normal GI tract and suggest that defective smoothelin expression may play a role in the pathogenesis of colonic inertia in a subset of patients.

  10. Aerodigestive tract burn from ingestion of microwaved food.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Aerodigestive tract burns represent a rare but potentially devastating injury pattern throughout the world. Although the majority of these injuries do not require intervention, these burns have the potential for poor outcomes. Traditionally this disease has been caused by superheated gases found in explosions or fire-related injury. However, as technology advances, it brings novel methods for injury that require physician awareness of potential hazards. We describe a case of laryngeal and esophageal thermal burn caused by a microwave heated food bolus.

  11. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  12. Salivary-type neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Manning, J T; Batsakis, J G

    1991-08-01

    Salivary-type neoplasms of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are numerically dominated by adenoid cystic carcinomas and pleomorphic adenomas. All others, benign or malignant, are rarely encountered and are usually biologically and histologically low-grade. Sites of origin in the sinonasal tract conform to the density and distribution of the seromucous glands and hence are most often nasal (septum and turbinates) or ostial.

  13. Replication of clinical measles virus strains in hispid cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Wyde, P R; Moore-Poveda, D K; Daley, N J; Oshitani, H

    1999-05-01

    An alternative model to nonhuman primates to study measles virus (MV) pathogenesis, to evaluate potential MV vaccines, or to screen for potential antivirals effective against this virus is highly desirable. The laboratory-adapted Edmonston strain of MV has been reported to replicate in the lungs of hispid cotton rats following intranasal inoculation, immunosuppress infected animals, and disseminate widely from the lungs, making these animals a candidate model. However, clinical MV strains have generally not been found to grow in these animals, limiting the utility and acceptance of this model. In the present studies we demonstrate reproducible replication of several clinical MV strains in hispid cotton rats. As with the Edmonston strain, leukocytes appear to be the primary target cells of these viruses following intranasal inoculation, and extrapulmonary dissemination is common. It is also demonstrated that prior MV infection or immunization of test animals with MV vaccine prevents pulmonary tract infection. These findings should make the MV-cotton rat model more acceptable.

  14. Urothelial cancer of the urinary bladder: can lessons learned be applied to the upper urinary tract?

    PubMed

    Krabbe, Laura M; Hutchinson, Ryan C; Margulis, Vitaly

    2016-08-01

    Even though urothelial cancer may occur anywhere in the urinary tract, it is most commonly found in the urinary bladder. Due to its higher incidence, this disease is studied in the bladder much more frequently than in the upper urinary tract. The question that arises is, to what extent can concepts and treatment paradigms derived from lower tract disease be applied to urothelial carcinoma of the upper urinary tract? This review aims at providing an overview of established care concepts in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and applicability of these findings to tumors of the upper urinary tract.

  15. Somatostatin receptors in the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The multiple actions of somatostatin are mediated by specific membrane-bound receptors present in all somatostatin target tissues, such as brain, pituitary, pancreas, and gastrointestinal tract. Three different types of tissues in the human gastrointestinal tract express somatostatin receptors: (1) the gastrointestinal mucosa, (2) the peripheral nervous system, and (3) the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, where the receptors are preferentially located in germinal centers. In all these cases, somatostatin binding is of high affinity and specific for bioactive somatostatin analogs. Somatostatin receptors are also expressed in pathological states, particularly in neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Ninety percent of the carcinoids and a majority of islet-cell carcinomas, including their metastases, usually have a high density of somatostatin receptors. Only 10 percent of the colorectal carcinomas and none of the exocrine pancreatic carcinomas, however, contain somatostatin receptors. The somatostatin receptors in tumors are identified with in vitro binding methods or with in vivo imaging techniques; the latter allow the precise localization of the tumors and their metastases in the patients. Since somatostatin receptors in gastroenteropancreatic tumors are functional, their identification can be used to assess the therapeutic efficacy of octreotide to inhibit excessive hormone release in the patients. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1340064

  16. Gastrointestinal chemosensation: chemosensory cells in the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Breer, H; Eberle, J; Frick, C; Haid, D; Widmayer, P

    2012-07-01

    Sensing potentially beneficial or harmful constituents in the luminal content by specialized cells in the gastrointestinal mucosa is an essential prerequisite for governing digestive processes, initiating protective responses and regulating food intake. Until recently, it was poorly understood how the gastrointestinal tract senses and responds to nutrients and non-nutrients in the diet; however, the enormous progress in unraveling the molecular machinery underlying the responsiveness of gustatory cells in the lingual taste buds to these compounds has been an important starting point for studying intestinal chemosensation. Currently, the field of nutrient sensing in the gastrointestinal tract is evolving rapidly and is benefiting from the deorphanization of previously unliganded G-protein-coupled receptors which respond to important nutrients, such as protein degradation products and free fatty acids as well as from the FACS-assisted isolation of distinct cell populations. This review focuses on mechanisms and principles underlying the chemosensory responsiveness of the alimentary tract. It describes the cell types which might potentially contribute to chemosensation within the gut: cells that can operate as specialized sensors and transducers for luminal factors and which communicate information from the gut lumen by releasing paracrine or endocrine acting messenger molecules. Furthermore, it addresses the current knowledge regarding the expression and localization of molecular elements that may be part of the chemosensory machinery which render some of the mucosal cells responsive to constituents of the luminal content, concentrating on candidate receptors and transporters for sensing nutrients. PMID:22527698

  17. Urinary tract infection in a rural community of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oladeinde, Bankole Henry; Omoregie, Richard; Olley, Mitsan; Anunibe, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine the prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in Okada, a rural community in Nigeria, and the effect of age and gender on its prevalence as well as the etiologic agents and the susceptibility profile of the bacterial agents. Patients and Method: Clean-catch midstream urine was collected from 514 patients (49 males and 465 females). The urine samples were processed and microbial isolates identified. Susceptibility testing was performed on all bacterial isolates. Result: The prevalence of urinary tract infection was significantly higher in females compared to males (female vs. male: 42.80% vs. 10.20%; OR = 6.583. 95% CI = 2.563,16.909; P < 0.0001). Age had no effect on the prevalence of UTI. Escherichia coli was the most prevalent isolate generally and in females, while Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant isolate causing urinary tract infection in males. The flouroquinnolones were the most active antibacterial agents. Conclusion: An overall prevalence of 39.69% was observed in this study. Females had a 3 to 17 fold increase risk of acquiring UTI, than their male counterpart. Escherichia coli were the predominant isolates causing UTI. PMID:22540069

  18. Differential adaptation of descending motor tracts in musicians.

    PubMed

    Rüber, Theodor; Lindenberg, Robert; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-06-01

    Between-group comparisons of musicians and nonmusicians have revealed structural brain differences and also functional differences in motor performance. In this study, we aimed to examine the relation between white matter microstructure and high-level motor skills by contrasting 2 groups of musicians with different instrument-specific motor requirements. We used diffusion tensor imaging to compare diffusivity measures of different corticospinal motor tracts of 10 keyboard players, 10 string players, and 10 nonmusicians. Additionally, the maximal tapping rates of their left and right index fingers were determined. When compared with nonmusicians, fractional anisotropy (FA) values of right-hemispheric motor tracts were significantly higher in both musician groups, whereas left-hemispheric motor tracts showed significantly higher FA values only in the keyboard players. Voxel-wise FA analysis found a group effect in white matter underlying the right motor cortex. Diffusivity measures of fibers originating in the primary motor cortex correlated with the maximal tapping rate of the contralateral index finger across all groups. The observed between-group diffusivity differences might represent an adaptation to the specific motor demands of the respective musical instrument. This is supported further by finding correlations between diffusivity measures and maximal tapping rates.

  19. Multivariate varying coefficient models for DTI tract statistics.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongtu; Styner, Martin; Li, Yimei; Kong, Linglong; Shi, Yundi; Lin, Weili; Coe, Christopher; Gilmore, John H

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is important for characterizing the structure of white matter fiber bundles as well as detailed tissue properties along these fiber bundles in vivo. There has been extensive interest in the analysis of diffusion properties measured along fiber tracts as a function of age, diagnostic status, and gender, while controlling for other clinical variables. However, the existing methods have several limitations including the independent analysis of diffusion properties, a lack of method for accounting for multiple covariates, and a lack of formal statistical inference, such as estimation theory and hypothesis testing. This paper presents a statistical framework, called VCMTS, to specifically address these limitations. The VCMTS framework consists of four integrated components: a varying coefficient model for characterizing the association between fiber bundle diffusion properties and a set of covariates, the local polynomial kernel method for estimating smoothed multiple diffusion properties along individual fiber bundles, global and local test statistics for testing hypotheses of interest along fiber tracts, and a resampling method for approximating the p-value of the global test statistic. The proposed methodology is applied to characterizing the development of four diffusion properties along the splenium and genu of the corpus callosum tract in a study of neurodevelopment in healthy rhesus monkeys. Significant time effects on the four diffusion properties were found. PMID:20879291

  20. Acoustic signatures of sound source-tract coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Ezequiel M.; Perl, Yonatan Sanz; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2011-04-01

    Birdsong is a complex behavior, which results from the interaction between a nervous system and a biomechanical peripheral device. While much has been learned about how complex sounds are generated in the vocal organ, little has been learned about the signature on the vocalizations of the nonlinear effects introduced by the acoustic interactions between a sound source and the vocal tract. The variety of morphologies among bird species makes birdsong a most suitable model to study phenomena associated to the production of complex vocalizations. Inspired by the sound production mechanisms of songbirds, in this work we study a mathematical model of a vocal organ, in which a simple sound source interacts with a tract, leading to a delay differential equation. We explore the system numerically, and by taking it to the weakly nonlinear limit, we are able to examine its periodic solutions analytically. By these means we are able to explore the dynamics of oscillatory solutions of a sound source-tract coupled system, which are qualitatively different from those of a sound source-filter model of a vocal organ. Nonlinear features of the solutions are proposed as the underlying mechanisms of observed phenomena in birdsong, such as unilaterally produced “frequency jumps,” enhancement of resonances, and the shift of the fundamental frequency observed in heliox experiments.