Science.gov

Sample records for rat type ii

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against type II rat brain protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, C.H.; Huang, K.P.

    1987-05-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (8/1, 10/10, and 25/3) against rat brain type II protein kinase C (PKC) were used to carry out the immunochemical characterization of this kinase. These antibodies immunoprecipitated the type II PKC in a dose-dependent manner but did neither to type I nor type III isozyme. Purified type II PKC has a molecular weight of 82,000 and consists of heterogeneous isoelectric point species, all of which are cross reactive with these antibodies. Immunoblot analysis of the tryptic fragments from PKC revealed that all three antibodies recognized the 33-38-KDa fragments, the phospholipid/phorbol ester-binding domain, but not the 45-48-KDa fragments, the kinase catalytic domain. The immune complexes of the kinase and the antibodies retained the kinase activity which was dependent on Ca/sup 2 +/ and phosphatidylserine (PS) and further activated by diacylglycerol. With antibody 8/1, the apparent Km values of the kinase for Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS were not influenced. The initial rate and final extent of autophosphorylation were reduced. The concentration of PS required for half-maximal (/sup 3/H)phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binding was increased and the total PDBu binding was reduced. In the presence of optimum concentrations of Ca/sup 2 +/ and PS, the Kd of PDBu was unaffected by the antibody but the total binding was reduced. These results demonstrate that the PS/PDBu-binding domain contains the major epitope for the antibodies and the antibody mainly influences the PS/PDBu binding to the kinase.

  2. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, C.C.; McCormick-Shannon, K.; Robinson, P.C.; Mason, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Restoration of the alveolar epithelium after injury is thought to be dependent on the proliferation of alveolar type II cells. To understand the factors that may be involved in promoting type II cell proliferation in vivo, we determined the effect of potential mitogens and culture substrata on DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. Type II cells cultured in basal medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) exhibited essentially no DNA synthesis. Factors that stimulated /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation included cholera toxin, epidermal growth factor, and rat serum. The greatest degree of stimulation was achieved by plating type II cells on an extracellular matrix prepared from bovine corneal endothelial cells and then by culturing the pneumocytes in medium containing rat serum, cholera toxin, insulin, and epidermal growth factor. Under conditions of stimulation of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation there was an increased DNA content per culture dish but no increase in cell number. The ability of various culture conditions to promote DNA synthesis in type II cells was verified by autoradiography. Type II cells were identified by the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions, which were visualized by tannic acid staining before autoradiography. These results demonstrate the importance of soluble factors and culture substratum in stimulating DNA synthesis in rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture.

  3. Isolation and properties of type II alveolar cells from rat lung.

    PubMed

    Mason, R J; Williams, M C; Greenleaf, R D; Clements, J A

    1977-06-01

    Type II alveolar cells can be isolated and partially purified from adult rat lung by a series of steps that includes enzymatic digestion of the lung with trypsin and separation of cells on a discontinuous albumin density gradient. The yield of the isolated type II cells depends on the supplier and the housing of the rats used to prepare the cells. With specific pathogen-free rats housed in a laminar flow hood, the yield was 20.3 x 10(6) cells per rat, of which 50 per cent were type II cells. With rats from 2 other suppliers and no special housing, the yields were 8.8 and 8.3 x 10(6) cells per rat, of which 67 and 65 per cent were type II cells. The ultrastructural appearance of the isolated cells was similar to that of cells from intact lung, except for some dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum and the perinuclear space. Most cells (92 +/- 5 per cent) excluded the vital dye, trypan blue. The cells consumed O2 at the rate of 76 +/- 12 nmole per 10(6) cells per hour and released only 5.7 +/- 2.0 per cent of their lactate dehydrogenase, a cytoplasmic enzyme, into the medium after 1 hour of incubation. The isolated type II cells contained disaturated phosphatidylcholine, a major component of purified surface-active material. The cells, however, had a low glucose utilization compared to their O2 consumption, which may indicate an abnormality in the metabolism of glucose. This population of cells could be further purified to 89 per cent type II cells by unit gravity velocity sedimentation.

  4. Localization of pro-collagen type II mRNA and collagen type II in the healing tooth socket of the rat.

    PubMed

    Devlin, H; Hoyland, J; Freemont, A J; Sloan, P

    1995-03-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats (50 days old) were anaesthetized and the maxillary right molars extracted. The rats were killed at 2, 3, 6, 8 and 10 days after extraction. The maxillae were dissected and prepared for either routine histology, in situ hybridization for pro-collagen type II mRNA, or immunohistochemical detection of collagen type II. Pro-collagen type II mRNA was expressed maximally in the healing tooth socket at 8 days after the extractions, but the protein was not expressed at any time. This suggests that the translation of pro-collagen type II mRNA does not occur in osteoblasts following tooth extraction. Ossification was present in the socket at 6 days after the extractions, which is consistent with the suggestion that an early feature of osteoblastic differentiation may be the expression of type II pro-collagen mRNA.

  5. Expression of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage in a rat knee contracture model.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Ando, Akira; Chimoto, Eiichi; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ichiro; Sasano, Yasuyuki; Onoda, Yoshito; Suda, Hideaki; Itoi, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to clarify the expression patterns of collagen types I and II on articular cartilage after immobilization in a rat knee contracture model in 3 specific areas (noncontact area, transitional area, contact area). The unilateral knee joints of adult male rats were rigidly immobilized at 150 degrees of flexion using screws and a rigid plastic plate. Sham-operated animals had holes drilled in the femur and the tibia and screws inserted but were not plated. The expression patterns of collagen types I and II in each area were evaluated by in situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression of collagen type II in the noncontact area was decreased by ISH but appeared unchanged when examined by IHC. In the transitional and contact areas, the expression of collagen type II was initially shown to have decreased and then increased at the hypertrophic chondrocytes by ISH but appeared decreased by IHC. Quantitative PCR revealed the decreased expression of type II collagen in the contact area. Immunostaining of collagen type I was increased at the noncontact area and transitional areas. Alterations of collagen types I and II expression may also affect the degeneration of articular cartilage after immobilization and the changes were different in the three areas.

  6. Enhanced proliferation of primary rat type II pneumocytes by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chassidy; Jahid, Sohail; Voelker, Dennis R.; Fan Hung

    2011-04-10

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer in sheep. The envelope protein (Env) is the oncogene, as it can transform cell lines in culture and induce tumors in animals, although the mechanisms for transformation are not yet clear because a system to perform transformation assays in differentiated type II pneumocytes does not exist. In this study we report culture of primary rat type II pneumocytes in conditions that favor prolonged expression of markers for type II pneumocytes. Env-expressing cultures formed more colonies that were larger in size and were viable for longer periods of time compared to vector control samples. The cells that remained in culture longer were confirmed to be derived from type II pneumocytes because they expressed surfactant protein C, cytokeratin, displayed alkaline phosphatase activity and were positive for Nile red. This system will be useful to study JSRV Env in the targets of transformation.

  7. Reproducible isolation of type II pneumocytes from fetal and adult rat lung using nycodenz density gradients.

    PubMed

    Viscardi, R M; Ullsperger, S; Resau, J H

    1992-01-01

    Isolating fresh, relatively pure type II pneumocytes from the lung, particularly of fetal origin, is a difficult process. Separation by buoyant density gradient centrifugation has been used successfully to isolate adult type II cells. There is concern, however, that Percoll, a gradient medium that is commonly used for type II cell isolation, may be toxic to cells. We evaluated a new gradient medium, Nycodenz, that is (1) a true solution, (2) transparent, (3) not metabolized by cells, and (4) nontoxic to cells. Type II pneumocytes were isolated from 19- and 21-day gestation fetal and adult rat lung by elastase digestion and separated on preformed isotonic Nycodenz gradients (2 mL each of 27.6, 20.7, 13.8, and 4.6 (w/v) solutions). Type II pneumocytes were recovered from the density range 1.057-1.061 and identified by binding of FITC-conjugated and gold-complexed Maclura pomifera lectin. Cells derived from 19-day fetal lung contained abundant glycogen and reacted with a monoclonal antibody to the cytokeratins 8 and 18, which are markers of the fetal type II cell. Adult type II cells reacted with antibodies to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. Type II cell purity was 79.7 +/- 2.4%, 83.8 +/- 2.8%, and 82.6 +/- 1.8% (means +/- SEM) for 19- and 21-day gestation fetal and adult lung preparations, respectively. Cell viability was greater than 95%. The final cell yield for adult preparations was 17.8 +/- 2.7 x 10(6)/rat (means +/- SEM). To determine if the freshly isolated type II pneumocytes were functionally active, the incorporation of [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine was measured. The percent saturation of phosphatidylcholine was high for both populations of freshly isolated cells. However, adult type II pneumocytes incorporated [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine more rapidly than 21-day gestation fetal cells (5.97 x 10(-3) dpm/10(6) cells/h vs. 0.32 x 10(-3) dpm/10(6) cells/h, P less than .005). We have demonstrated that, using the Nycodenz isolation method, it is

  8. Phenotypic characterization of type II collagen-induced arthritis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Hou-Pan; Li, Xin; Yu, Rong; Zeng, Guang; Yuan, Zhen-Yi; Wang, Wei; Huang, Hui-Yong; Cai, Xiong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a more specific, efficient and simple method for the induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. Different strains of rats were injected at the base of the tail with bovine type II collagen (CII) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). The onset and severity of arthritis were evaluated by clinical assessment. The established CIA model was analyzed using a comprehensive examination of clinical, hematological, histological and radiological parameters. The results demonstrated that Wistar rats were the most susceptible strain to CIA followed by Wistar Furth rats, with Sprague Dawley rats being the least susceptible. Following primary and booster immunization, female Wistar rats developed severe arthritis, with an incidence of >83% and low variability in clinical signs. The development of arthritis was accompanied by a significantly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate compared with that in the control rats. The radiographic examination revealed bone matrix resorption, considerable soft tissue swelling, periosteal new bone formation and bone erosion in the arthritic joints of the CIA rats. Histopathologically, the synovial joints of CIA rats were characterized by synovial hyperplasia, pannus formation, marked cellular infiltration, bone and cartilage erosion and narrowing of the joint space. The administration of an intradermal injection of only 200 µg bovine CII emulsified in IFA at the base of the tail therefore leads to the successful development of a CIA rat model. This well-characterized CIA rat model could be specifically used to study the pathophysiology of human rheumatoid arthritis as well as to test and develop anti-arthritic agents for humans.

  9. Paradoxical role of angiotensin II type 2 receptors in resistance arteries of old rats

    PubMed Central

    Pinaud, Frédéric; Bocquet, Arnaud; Dumont, Odile; Retailleau, Kevin; Baufreton, Christophe; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Loufrani, Laurent; Henrion, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The role of angiotensin II type 2 receptors (AT2R) remains a matter of controversy. Its vasodilatory and antitrophic properties are well accepted. Nevertheless, in hypertensive rats AT2R stimulation induces a vasoconstriction counteracting flow-mediated dilation (FMD). This contraction is reversed by hydralazine. As FMD is also decreased in aging, another risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, we hypothesized that AT2R function might be altered in old rats resistance arteries. Mesenteric resistance arteries (250 μm diameter) were isolated from old (24 months) and control (4 months) rats receiving hydralazine (16 mg/kg/day, 2 weeks) or water. FMD, NO-mediated dilation and eNOS expression were lower in old than in control rats. AT2R blockade improved FMD in old rats, suggesting that AT2R stimulation produced vasoconstriction. AT2R expression was higher in old rats and mainly located in the smooth muscle layer. In old rats AT2R stimulation induced endothelium-independent contraction, which was suppressed by the antioxydant Tempol. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was higher in old rats arteries than in controls. Hydralazine improved FMD and NO-dependent dilation in old rats without change in AT2R expression and location. In old rats treated with hydralazine ROS level was reduced in endothelial and smooth muscle cells and AT2R-dependent contraction was abolished. Thus, AT2R stimulation induced vasoconstriction through activation of ROS production, contributing to decrease FMD in old rats resistance arteries. Hydralazine suppressed AT2R-dependent ROS production and AT2R-dependent contraction, improving FMD. Importantly, endothelial alterations in aging were reversible. These findings are important to consider in the choice of vasoactive drugs in aging. PMID:17485601

  10. [Effect of melatonin on antioxidant state under type ii diabetes at rat].

    PubMed

    Agarkov, A A; Popova, T N; Matasova, L V

    2013-01-01

    The effect of melatonin on the intensity of free radical processes and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1.) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) has been investigated in liver and blood serum of rats with diabetes mellitus type II. The development of diabetes was accompanied by the increase in biochemiluminescence parameters and the enzyme activities studied. Melatonin administration changed the parameters studied towards control values.

  11. Centrally Mediated Erectile Dysfunction in Rats with Type 1 Diabetes: Role of Angiotensin II and Superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus. Apart from the peripheral actions, central mechanisms are also responsible for penile erection. Aim To determine the contribution of angiotensin (ANG) II in the dysfunction of central N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-nitric oxide (NO)-induced erectile responses in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic (T1D) rats. Methods Three weeks after streptozotocin injections, rats were randomly treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-enalapril, or the ANG II type 1 receptor blocker, losartan, or the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol or vehicle via chronic intracerebroventricular infusion by osmotic mini-pump for 2 weeks. Main Outcome Measure Central NMDA receptor stimulation or the administration of the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced penile erectile responses and concurrent behavioral responses were monitored in conscious rats. Results Two weeks of enalapril, losartan or tempol treatment significantly improved the erectile responses to central microinjection of both NMDA and SNP in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of conscious T1D rats (NMDA responses – T1D+enalapril: 1.7 ± 0.6, T1D+losartan: 2.0 ± 0.3, T1D+tempol: 2.0 ± 0.6 vs. T1D+vehicle: 0.6 ± 0.3 penile erections/rat in the first 20 min, P < 0.05; SNP responses – T1D+enalapril: 0.9 ± 0.3, T1D+losartan: 1.3 ± 0.3, T1D+tempol: 1.4 ± 0.4 vs. T1D+vehicle: 0.4 ± 0.2 penile erections/rat in the first 20 min, P < 0.05). Concurrent behavioral responses including yawning and stretching, induced by central NMDA and SNP microinjections were also significantly increased in T1D rats after enalapril, losartan or tempol treatments. Neuronal NO synthase expression within the PVN was also significantly increased and superoxide production was reduced in T1D rats after these treatments. Conclusions These data strongly support the contention that enhanced ANG II mechanism/s within the PVN of T1D rats contributes

  12. Bacopa monniera (L.) wettst inhibits type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Viji, V; Kavitha, S K; Helen, A

    2010-09-01

    Bacopa monniera (L.) Wettst is an Ayurvedic herb with antirheumatic potential. This study investigated the therapeutic efficacy of Bacopa monniera in treating rheumatoid arthritis using a type II collagen-induced arthritis rat model. Arthritis was induced in male Wistar rats by immunization with bovine type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was administered after the development of arthritis from day 14 onwards. The total duration of experiment was 60 days. Paw swelling, arthritic index, inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, myeloperoxidase and serum anti-collagen IgG and IgM levels were analysed in control and experimental rats. Arthritic induction significantly increased paw edema and other classical signs of arthritis coupled to upregulation of inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, neutrophil infiltration and increased anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels in serum. BME significantly inhibited the footpad swelling and arthritic symptoms. BME was effective in inhibiting cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase activities in arthritic rats. Decreased neutrophil infiltration was evident from decreased myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological data where an improvement in joint architecture was also observed. Serum anti-collagen IgM and IgG levels were consistently decreased. Thus the study demonstrates the potential antiarthritic effect of Bacopa monniera for treating arthritis which might confer its antirheumatic activity.

  13. Cardiac angiotensin II type I and type II receptors are increased in rats submitted to experimental hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro-Ramos, M S; Diniz, G P; Almeida, J; Vieira, R L P; Pinheiro, S V B; Santos, R A; Barreto-Chaves, M L M

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the behaviour of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors in an experimental hypothyroidism model in male Wistar rats. Animals were subjected to thyroidectomy and resting for 14 days. The alteration of cardiac mass was evaluated by total heart weight (HW), right ventricle weight (RVW), left ventricle weight (LVW), ratio of HW, RVW and LVW to body weight (BW) and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) expression. Cardiac and plasma Ang II levels and serum T3 and T4 were determined. The mRNA and protein levels of Ang II receptors were investigated by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Functional analyses were performed using binding assays. T3 and T4 levels and the haemodynamic parameters confirmed the hypothyroid state. HW/BW, RVW/BW and LVW/BW ratios and the ANF expression were lower than those of control animals. No change was observed in cardiac or plasma Ang II levels. Both AT1/AT2 mRNA and protein levels were increased in the heart of hypothyroid animals due to a significant increase of these receptors in the RV. Experiments performed in cardiomyocytes showed a direct effect promoted by low thyroid hormone levels upon AT1 and AT2 receptors, discarding possible influence of haemodynamic parameters. Functional assays showed that both receptors are able to bind Ang II. Herein, we have identified, for the first time, a close and direct relation of elevated Ang II receptor levels in hypothyroidism. Whether the increase in these receptors in hypothyroidism is an alternative mechanism to compensate the atrophic state of heart or whether it may represent a potential means to the progression of heart failure remains unknown. PMID:17540701

  14. Increased hepatic expression of nitric oxide synthase type II in cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Qiu, Fa-Zu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role and effect of nitric oxide synthase type II (NOS II) in cirrhotic rats. METHODS: Expression of NOS II mRNA was detected by real time RT-PCR. The activity of nitric oxide synthase and serum levels of NO, systemic and portal hemodynamics and degrees of cirrhosis were measured with high sensitive methods. Chinese traditional medicine tetrandrine was used to treat cirrhotic rats and to evaluate the function of NO. Double-blind method was applied during the experiment. RESULTS: The concentration of NO and the activity of NOS were increased markedly at all stages of cirrhosis, and iNOSmRNA was greatly expressed. Meanwhile the portal-venous-pressure (PVP), and portal-venous-flow (PVF) were significantly increased. NO, NOS and iNOSmRNA were positively correlated to the quantity of hepatic fibrosis. Tetrandrine significantly inhibited NO production and the expression of iNOSmRNA. CONCLUSION: Increased hepatic expression of NOS II is one of the important causes of hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension. PMID:15222038

  15. Glutamate-dependent ectodomain shedding of neuregulin-1 type II precursors in rat forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Yuriko; Wang, Ran; Inamura, Naoko; Araki, Kazuaki; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The neurotrophic factor neuregulin 1 (NRG1) regulates neuronal development, glial differentiation, and excitatory synapse maturation. NRG1 is synthesized as a membrane-anchored precursor and is then liberated by proteolytic processing or exocytosis. Mature NRG1 then binds to its receptors expressed by neighboring neurons or glial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern this process in the nervous system are not defined in detail. Here we prepared neuron-enriched and glia-enriched cultures from embryonic rat neocortex to investigate the role of neurotransmitters that regulate the liberation/release of NRG1 from the membrane of neurons or glial cells. Using a two-site enzyme immunoassay to detect soluble NRG1, we show that, of various neurotransmitters, glutamate was the most potent inducer of NRG1 release in neuron-enriched cultures. NRG1 release in glia-enriched cultures was relatively limited. Furthermore, among glutamate receptor agonists, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) and kainate (KA), but not AMPA or tACPD, mimicked the effects of glutamate. Similar findings were acquired from analysis of the hippocampus of rats with KA-induced seizures. To evaluate the contribution of members of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) families to NRG1 release, we transfected primary cultures of neurons with cDNA vectors encoding NRG1 types I, II, or III precursors, each tagged with the alkaline phosphatase reporter. Analysis of alkaline phosphatase activity revealed that the NRG1 type II precursor was subjected to tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE) / a Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) -dependent ectodomain shedding in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. These results suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission positively regulates the ectodomain shedding of NRG1 type II precursors and liberates the active NRG1 domain in an activity-dependent manner. PMID:28350885

  16. MCP-1 expression by rat type II alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Paine, R; Rolfe, M W; Standiford, T J; Burdick, M D; Rollins, B J; Strieter, R M

    1993-05-15

    Recruitment and activation of mononuclear phagocytes are potentially critical regulatory events for control of pulmonary inflammation. Located at the boundary between the alveolar airspace and the interstitium, alveolar epithelial cells are ideally situated to regulate the recruitment and activation of mononuclear phagocytes through the production of cytokines in response to inflammatory stimulation from the alveolar space. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the production of monocyte chemotactic polypeptide-1 (MCP-1), a protein that is chemotactic for and that activates monocytes, by rat type II alveolar epithelial cells in primary culture. Immunocytochemical staining using anti-murine JE, an antibody recognizing rat MCP-1, demonstrated cell-associated MCP-1 Ag throughout the monolayer. The intensity of staining was increased in response to IL-1 beta. When type II epithelial cells formed a tight monolayer on a filter support, there was polar secretion of MCP-1 Ag into the apical compartment by both control and IL-1-stimulated cells as measured by specific MCP-1 ELISA. Northern blot analysis revealed that IL-1 and TNF-alpha stimulated MCP-1 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, whereas dexamethasone blocked MCP-1 expression by cells stimulated with IL-1. In contrast to previous results using transformed epithelial cell lines, MCP-1 mRNA was induced in these primary cultures directly by stimulation with LPS. These data suggest that alveolar epithelial cells may have an important and previously unrecognized role in the initiation and maintenance of inflammatory processes in the lung by recruiting and activating circulating monocytes through the production of MCP-1.

  17. Stoichiometry and Na+ binding cooperativity of rat and flounder renal type II Na+-Pi cotransporters.

    PubMed

    Forster, I C; Loo, D D; Eskandari, S

    1999-04-01

    The stoichiometry of the rat and flounder isoforms of the renal type II sodium-phosphate (Na+-Pi) cotransporter was determined directly by simultaneous measurements of phosphate (Pi)-induced inward current and uptake of radiolabeled Pi and Na+ in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing the cotransporters. There was a direct correlation between the Pi-induced inward charge and Pi uptake into the oocytes; the slope indicated that one net inward charge was transported per Pi. There was also a direct correlation between the Pi-induced inward charge and Na+ influx; the slope indicated that the influx of three Na+ ions resulted in one net inward charge. This behavior was similar for both isoforms. We conclude that for both Na+-Pi cotransporter isoforms the Na+:Pi stoichiometry is 3:1 and that divalent Pi is the transported substrate. Steady-state activation of the currents showed that the Hill coefficients for Pi were unity for both isoforms, whereas for Na+, they were 1.8 (flounder) and 2.5 (rat). Therefore, despite significant differences in the apparent Na+ binding cooperativity, the estimated Na+:Pi stoichiometry was the same for both isoforms.

  18. Biochemical mechanisms involved in the endotoxin-induced type II cell hyperplasia in F344 rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Tesfaigzi, J.; Johnson, N.F.; Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Proliferative lesions and pulmonary epithelial neoplasms induced in the rat by plutonium inhalation have been shown to be of type II cell origin. Defining the gene changes responsible for the development of the type II proliferative lesions would help to elucidate the genetic events involved in the expansion of initiated type II cells into fully transformed tumor cells. One problem in identifying these gene alterations is dissociating changes in gene expression linked to cell replication or repair from those involved in tumor initiation and progression. The long-term goals of these investigations are to first develop and characterize a model of transient type II cell hyperplasia. Second, changes in gene expression associated with remodeling epithelium will be compared to gene changes exhibited by the {sup 239}Pu-induced hyperplastic lesions.

  19. In vivo creatine kinase reaction kinetics at rest and stress in type II diabetic rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Adil; Coggan, Andrew R.; Gropler, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of type II diabetes on cardiac creatine kinase (CK) enzyme activity and/or flux are unknown. We therefore measured steady‐state phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and forward CK reaction kinetic parameters in Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rat hearts, a type II diabetes research model. At baseline the PCr to ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) was significantly lower in diabetic heart when compared with matched controls (1.71 ± 0.21 vs. 2.26 ± 0.24, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the forward CK reaction rate constant (kf) was higher in diabetic animals (0.52 ± 0.09 s−1 vs. 0.35 ± 0.06 s−1, P < 0.01) and CK flux calculated as a product of PCr concentration ([PCr]) and kf was similar between two groups (4.32 ± 1.05 μmol/g/s vs. 4.94 ± 1.23 μmol/g/s, P = 0.20). Dobutamine administration resulted in similar increases in heart rate (~38%) and kf (~0.12 s−1) in both groups. No significant change in PCr and ATP content was observed with dobutamine. In summary, our data showed reduced PCr/ATP in diabetic myocardium as an indicator of cardiac energy deficit. The forward CK reaction rate constant is elevated at baseline which might reflect a compensatory mechanics to support energy flux through the CK shuttle and maintain constant ATP supply. When hearts were stimulated similar increase in kf was observed in both groups thus it seems that CK shuttle does not limit ATP supply for the range of workload studied. PMID:25626865

  20. Intrarenal aminopeptidase N inhibition restores defective angiontesin II type 2-mediated natriuresis in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Padia, Shetal H; Howell, Nancy L; Kemp, Brandon A; Fournie-Zaluski, Marie-Claude; Roques, Bernard P; Carey, Robert M

    2010-02-01

    The preferred ligand of angiotensin (Ang) II type 2 (AT(2)R)-mediated natriuresis is Ang III. The major enzyme responsible for the metabolism of Ang III is aminopeptidase N, which is selectively inhibited by compound PC-18. In this study, urine sodium excretion rates (U(Na)V), fractional excretion of sodium, fractional excretion of lithium, glomerular filtration rate, and mean arterial pressures were studied in prehypertensive and hypertensive spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and compared with age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs). Although renal interstitial infusion of Ang II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan increased U(Na)V in WKYs from a baseline of 0.05+/-0.01 to 0.17+/-0.04 micromol/min (P<0.01), identical infusions failed to increase U(Na)V in hypertensive SHRs. Coinfusion of AT(2)R antagonist PD-123319 abolished the natriuretic responses to candesartan in WKYs, indicating an AT(2)R-mediated effect. AT(2)R-mediated natriuresis was enabled in hypertensive SHRs by inhibiting the metabolism of Ang III with PC-18 (0.05+/-0.01 to 0.11+/-0.03 micromol/min; P<0.05). The defects in sodium excretion were present before the onset of hypertension in SHRs, because young WKYs demonstrated double the U(Na)V of SHRs (0.04+/-0.006 versus 0.02+/-0.003 micromol/min; P<0.01) at baseline. The increased U(Na)V of young WKYs was attributed to reduced renal proximal tubule sodium reabsorption, because increases in fractional excretion of sodium were paralleled by increases in fractional excretion of lithium. Renal interstitial PC-18 infusion ameliorated defective AT(2)R-mediated natriuresis in young SHRs by increasing fractional excretion of sodium and fractional excretion of lithium without changing the glomerular filtration rate. Thus, increased renal proximal tubule sodium retention is observed before the onset of hypertension in SHRs, and inhibition of the metabolism of Ang III ameliorates this pathophysiologic defect in sodium excretion.

  1. Pancreas transplantation using type I and type II spontaneously diabetic rats--our experimental experience.

    PubMed

    Ito, Toshinori; Shimada, Kazunori; Gang, Miao; Uchikoshi, Fumihiro; Tori, Masayuki; Komoda, Hiroshi; Fumimoto, Yuichi; Ohmori, Ken; Kawamoto, Koichi; Tanemura, Masahiro; Nozawa, Masumi

    2007-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation (PTx) is the only therapy that can cure type 1 diabetes mellitus. With the recent advance of surgical procedures and immunosuppression, the outcome of PTx has become better than it used to be before, but some problems still remain. It is rather difficult to induce tolerance and to reverse rejection once it occurred because pancreas graft itself has a strong immunogenicity. Another important issue is regarding the recurrence of autoimmune disease in the pancreatic graft, therefore, some animal models are necessary to delineate and regulate those immune responses specific for PTx. Recently, PTx is also clinically applicable for type 2 diabetic patients with end-stage renal disease. It has been shown that insulin resistance was improved by PTx in type 2 diabetic recipients. In the current study, we have introduced some useful type 1 and type 2 diabetic models mainly based on our experimental experiences.

  2. Compromised Neurotrophic and Angiogenic Regenerative Capability during Tendon Healing in a Rat Model of Type-II Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aisha S; Li, Jian; Abdul, Alim M D; Ahmed, Mahmood; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Salo, Paul T; Hewitt, Carolyn; Hart, David A; Ackermann, Paul W

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus type-II (DM-II) may increase the risk of suffering painful connective tissue disorders and tendon ruptures. The pathomechanisms, however, by which diabetes adversely affects connective tissue matrix metabolism and regeneration, still need better definition. Our aim was to study the effect of DM-II on expressional changes of neuro- and angiotrophic mediators and receptors in intact and healing Achilles tendon. The right Achilles tendon was transected in 5 male DM-II Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and 4 age-matched Wistar control rats. The left Achilles tendons were left intact. At week 2 post-injury, NGF, BDNF, TSP, and receptors TrkA, TrkB and Nk1 gene expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and their protein distribution by immunohistochemistry in intact and injured tendons. The expression of tendon-related markers, Scleraxis (SCX) and Tenomodulin (TNMD), was evaluated by qRT-PCR in intact and injured tendons. Injured tendons of diabetic GK rats exhibited significantly down-regulated Ngf and Tsp1 mRNA and corresponding protein levels, and down-regulated Trka gene expression compared to injured Wistar controls. Intact tendons of DM-II GK rats displayed reduced mRNA levels for Ngf, Tsp1 and Trkb compared to corresponding intact non-diabetic tendons. Up-regulated Scx and Tnmd gene expression was observed in injured tendons of normal and diabetic GK rats compared to intact Wistar controls. However, these molecules were not up-regulated in injured DM-II GK rats compared to their corresponding controls. Our results suggest that DM-II has detrimental effects on neuro- and angiotrophic pathways, and such effects may reflect the compromised repair seen in diabetic Achilles tendon. Thus, novel approaches for regeneration of injured, including tendinopathic, and surgically repaired diabetic tendons may include therapeutic molecular modulation of neurotrophic pathways such as NGF and its receptors.

  3. Compromised Neurotrophic and Angiogenic Regenerative Capability during Tendon Healing in a Rat Model of Type-II Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aisha S.; Li, Jian; Abdul, Alim M. D.; Ahmed, Mahmood; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Salo, Paul T.; Hewitt, Carolyn; Hart, David A.; Ackermann, Paul W.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus type-II (DM-II) may increase the risk of suffering painful connective tissue disorders and tendon ruptures. The pathomechanisms, however, by which diabetes adversely affects connective tissue matrix metabolism and regeneration, still need better definition. Our aim was to study the effect of DM-II on expressional changes of neuro- and angiotrophic mediators and receptors in intact and healing Achilles tendon. The right Achilles tendon was transected in 5 male DM-II Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and 4 age-matched Wistar control rats. The left Achilles tendons were left intact. At week 2 post-injury, NGF, BDNF, TSP, and receptors TrkA, TrkB and Nk1 gene expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and their protein distribution by immunohistochemistry in intact and injured tendons. The expression of tendon-related markers, Scleraxis (SCX) and Tenomodulin (TNMD), was evaluated by qRT-PCR in intact and injured tendons. Injured tendons of diabetic GK rats exhibited significantly down-regulated Ngf and Tsp1 mRNA and corresponding protein levels, and down-regulated Trka gene expression compared to injured Wistar controls. Intact tendons of DM-II GK rats displayed reduced mRNA levels for Ngf, Tsp1 and Trkb compared to corresponding intact non-diabetic tendons. Up-regulated Scx and Tnmd gene expression was observed in injured tendons of normal and diabetic GK rats compared to intact Wistar controls. However, these molecules were not up-regulated in injured DM-II GK rats compared to their corresponding controls. Our results suggest that DM-II has detrimental effects on neuro- and angiotrophic pathways, and such effects may reflect the compromised repair seen in diabetic Achilles tendon. Thus, novel approaches for regeneration of injured, including tendinopathic, and surgically repaired diabetic tendons may include therapeutic molecular modulation of neurotrophic pathways such as NGF and its receptors. PMID:28122008

  4. Effect of exogenous surfactants on viability and DNA synthesis in A549, immortalized mouse type II and isolated rat alveolar type II cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In mechanically ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), exogenous surfactant application has been demonstrated both to decrease DNA-synthesis but also and paradoxically to increase epithelial cell proliferation. However, the effect of exogenous surfactant has not been studied directly on alveolar type II cells (ATII cells), a key cell type responsible for alveolar function and repair. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two commercially available surfactant preparations on ATII cell viability and DNA synthesis. Methods Curosurf® and Alveofact® were applied to two ATII cell lines (human A549 and mouse iMATII cells) and to primary rat ATII cells for periods of up to 24 h. Cell viability was measured using the redox indicator resazurin and DNA synthesis was measured using BrdU incorporation. Results Curosurf® resulted in slightly decreased cell viability in all cell culture models. However, DNA synthesis was increased in A549 and rat ATII cells but decreased in iMATII cells. Alveofact® exhibited the opposite effects on A549 cells and had very mild effects on the other two cell models. Conclusion This study showed that commercially available exogenous surfactants used to treat preterm infants with RDS can have profound effects on cell viability and DNA synthesis. PMID:21324208

  5. The rate-limiting reaction in phosphatidylcholine synthesis by alveolar type II cells isolated from fetal rat lung.

    PubMed

    Post, M; Batenburg, J J; Van Golde, L M; Smith, B T

    1984-10-04

    The rate-limiting reaction in the formation of phosphatidylcholine by type II cells isolated from fetal rat lung was examined. Studies on the uptake of [Me-3H]choline and its incorporation into its metabolites indicated that in these cells the choline phosphate pool was much larger than both the choline and CDPcholine pools. Chemical measurements of the pool sizes showed that the choline phosphate pool was indeed much larger than the intracellular choline and CDPcholine pools. Pulse-chase studies with [Me-3H]choline revealed that labelled choline taken up by the cells was rapidly phosphorylated to choline phosphate and that the radioactivity lost from choline phosphate during the chase period appeared in phosphatidylcholine. Little change was observed in the labelling of CDPcholine during the chase period. These results indicate that cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase catalyzes a rate-limiting reaction in phosphatidylcholine formation by fetal rat lung type II cells.

  6. Hyperhomocysteinemia accelerates collagen accumulation in the adventitia of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries via angiotensin II type 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dan; Sun, Ning-Ling

    2014-10-27

    Recent studies suggest that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) increases collagen type I accumulation in rat vascular adventitia after balloon injury and that Angiotensin II (Ang II) induces collagen synthesis in vascular adventitial fibroblasts. Reports also indicate that Ang II type1 receptor (AT1R) activation, mediated by homocysteine (Hcy) may contribute to collagen type 1 expression in mouse aortic endothelial cells. However, little is known about the possible mechanisms behind the relationship between Hcy and AT1R in adventitial remodeling. Thus, we investigated whether HHcy induces collagen accumulation via activation of AT1R in the adventitia. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into a control group and a 1% l-methionine-induced HHcy group. Balloon injury was performed after 12 experimental weeks and animals were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 28 days after injury. Collagen deposition and AT1R expression was measured with Western blot. Serum Hcy, adventitial collagen, and AT1R levels were higher in the HHcy group compared with the control group. Hcy time-dependently induced collagen type 1 and AT1R expression, with the highest induction observed at 48 h. Also, we observed that the AT1R blocker, valsartan, attenuated collagen type 1 and AT1R expression. HHcy exacerbates adventitial remodeling after balloon injury, and the underling mechanisms may be related to AT1R activity.

  7. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor on aggrecan and type II collagen expression in rat articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuan-Yin; Hao, Ya-Rong; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jian-Lin; Jia, Qi-Xue; Qiu, Bo

    2012-11-01

    The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) directly correlates with the Mankin score and the degree of cartilage destruction. The biological activity of VEGF on articular cartilage remains unknown, so this study was performed to investigate the effect of VEGF on aggrecan and type II collagen expression in vitro. We carried out this study at the Center Laboratory of Renmin Hospital at Wuhan University. Rat articular chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer. Then, the experiment was divided into 4 groups: group A (control group), without any disposal; group B, treated with 10 ng/ml VEGF; group C, treated with 10 ng/ml IL-1β; and group D, treated with 10 ng/ml VEGF + 10 ng/ml IL-1β. After 48 h, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-Time PCR), and protein expression of aggrecan and type II collagen was detected by Western blotting. VEGF was found to significantly inhibit the expression of aggrecan and type II collagen at the gene and protein levels. These findings suggest that VEGF may result in degeneration of articular cartilage by inhibiting the synthesis and expression of aggrecan and type II collagen.

  8. CREB phosphorylation and melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal gland: involvement of cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase type II.

    PubMed

    Maronde, E; Wicht, H; Taskén, K; Genieser, H G; Dehghani, F; Olcese, J; Korf, H W

    1999-10-01

    Phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) at amino acid serine 133 appears as an important link between the norepinephrine (NE)-induced activation of second messenger systems and the stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis. Here we investigated in the rat pineal gland: 1) the type of protein kinase that mediates CREB phosphorylation: and 2) its impact on melatonin biosynthesis. Immunochemical or immunocytochemical demonstration of serine133-phosphorylated cyclic AMP regulated element binding protein (pCREB) and radioimmunological detection of melatonin revealed that only cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitors suppressed NE-induced CREB phosphorylation and stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis, whereas inhibitors of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, protein kinase C, or calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) were ineffective. Investigations with cyclic AMP-agonist pairs that selectively activate either PKA type I or II link NE-induced CREB phosphorylation and stimulation of melatonin biosynthesis to the activation of PKA type II. Our data suggest that PKA type II plays an important role in the transcriptional control of melatonin biosynthesis in the rat pineal organ.

  9. Telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, prevents the development of diabetes in male Spontaneously Diabetic Torii rats.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Goji; Fukui, Michiaki; Hosoda, Hiroko; Asano, Mai; Harusato, Ichiko; Tanaka, Muhei; Shiraishi, Emi; Senmaru, Takashi; Sakabe, Kazumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Kitawaki, Jo; Fujinami, Aya; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto

    2009-03-01

    To assess the beneficial effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker telmisartan on a non-obese animal model of reduced function and mass of islet beta-cells prior to the development of diabetes, Spontaneously Diabetic Torii (SDT) rats were treated with telmisartan at 8 weeks of age. At 24 weeks of age, the treatment with telmisartan dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, and high-dose (5 mg/kg/day) treated SDT rats did not developed diabetes. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that treatment with high-dose telmisartan reduced mRNA expression of local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components, components of NAD(P)H oxidase, transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor in the pancreas of male SDT rats. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses revealed that treatment with telmisartan also reduced expression of p47(phox). These results suggest that treatment with telmisartan reduces oxidative stress by local RAS activation and protects against islet beta-cell damage and dysfunction. These findings provide at least a partial explanation for the reduced incidence of new-onset diabetes that has been observed in several clinical trials involving angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers and ACE inhibitors.

  10. Renoprotective effects of benidipine in combination with angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker in hypertensive Dahl rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kozo; Sato, Hitoshi; Ina, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohno, Tetsuji; Shirakura, Shiro

    2003-08-01

    We examined the effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker candesartan, the calcium channel blockers benidipine and amlodipine, hydralazine, and the combination of candesartan and benidipine or amlodipine on blood pressure and renal function in Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) hypertensive rats. Male DS rats (5 weeks of age) were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet, resulting in hypertension accompanied by glomerular sclerosis and an increased urinary albumin excretion. Drugs were orally administered from 2 to 6 weeks after the start of the feeding. Although candesartan (1 or 10 mg/kg) had little effect on the blood pressure, benidipine (4 mg/kg), amlodipine (4 mg/kg) and hydralazine (5 mg/kg) had similar hypotensive effects. Benidipine, but not amlodipine, hydralazine, or candesartan, significantly inhibited the increase in the albuminuria and glomerular sclerosis. The combination of candesartan (1 mg/kg) and benidipine (4 mg/kg) lowered the levels of blood pressure and albuminuria more effectively than the combination of candesartan (1 mg/kg) and amlodipine (4 mg/kg). These results indicate that benidipine is effective in preventing the impairment of renal function in DS hypertensive rats, and suggest that additional benefits can be expected by combination therapy with benidipine and an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker.

  11. Angiotensin II type 2 receptors and nitric oxide sustain oxygenation in the clipped kidney of early Goldblatt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Connors, Stephanie G; Mendonca, Margarida; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2008-02-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) decrease the glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow in the clipped kidneys of early 2-kidney, 1-clip Goldblatt hypertensive rats, but the consequences for oxygenation are unclear. We investigated the hypothesis that angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptors or NO synthase mediate renal oxygenation responses to ACEI. Three weeks after left renal artery clipping, kidney function, oxygen (O(2)) use, renal blood flow, renal cortical blood flow, and renal cortical oxygen tension (Po(2)) were measured after acute administration of an ACEI (enalaprilat) and after acute administration of ACEI following acute administration of an angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptor blocker (candesartan or PD-123,319) or an NO synthase blocker (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester with control of renal perfusion pressure) and compared with mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure to the levels after ACEI. The basal renal cortical Po(2) of clipped kidneys was significantly lower than contralateral kidneys (35+/-1 versus 51+/-1 mm Hg; n=40 each). ACEI lowered renal venous Po(2), cortical Po(2), renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and cortical blood flow and increased the renal vascular resistance in the clipped kidney, whereas mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure was ineffective. PD-123,319 and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not candesartan, reduced the Po(2) of clipped kidneys and blocked the fall in Po(2) with acute ACEI administration. In conclusion, oxygen availability in the clipped kidney is maintained by angiotensin II generation, angiotensin II type 2 receptors, and NO synthase. This discloses a novel mechanism whereby angiotensin can prevent hypoxia in a kidney challenged with a reduced perfusion pressure.

  12. 3-D Reconstruction of Macular Type II Cell Innervation Patterns in Space-Flight and Control Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel Dorothy; Montgomery, K.; Linton, S.; Cheng, R.; Tomko, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A semiautomated method for reconstructing objects from serial thin sections has been developed in the Biocomputation Center. The method is being used to completely, for the first time, type II hair cells and their innervations. The purposes are to learn more about the fundamental circuitry of the macula on Earth and to determine whether changes in connectivities occur under space flight conditions. Data captured directly from a transmission electron microscope via a video camera are sent to a graphics workstation. There, the digitized micrographs are mosaicked into sections and contours are traced, registered and displayed by semiautomated methods. Current reconstructions are of type II cells from the medial part of rat maculas collected in-flight on the Space Life Sciences-2 mission, 4.5 hrs post-flight, and from a ground control. Results show that typical type II cells receive processes from tip to six nearby calyces or afferents. Nearly all processes are elongated and have bouton-like enlargements; some have numerous vesicles. Multiple (2 to 4) processes from a single calyx to a type II cell are common, and approximately 1/3 of the processes innervale 2 or 3 type II cells or a neighboring cluster. From 2% to 6% of the cells resemble type I cells morphologically but have demi-calyces. Thus far, increments in synaptic number in type II cells of flight rats are prominent along processes that supply two hair cells. It is clear that reconstruction methods provide insights into details of macular circuitry not obtainable by other techniques. The results demonstrate a morphological basis for interactions between adjacent receptive fields through feed back-feed forward connections, and for dynamic alterations in receptive field range and activity during preprocessing of linear acceleratory information by the maculas. The reconstruction method we have developed will find further applications in the study of the details of neuronal architecture of more complex systems, to

  13. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor correlates with therapeutic effects of losartan in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Hu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jie; Yuan, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Zhou, Aiwu; Wu, Yujing; Zhao, Wendi; Huang, Qiong; Chang, Yan; Wang, Qingtong; Sun, Wuyi; Wei, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in an experimental model. In RA, AT2R mainly opposes AT1R, but the mechanism by which this occurs still remains obscure. In the present study, we investigated the role of AT2R in the treatment of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) by losartan. Adjuvant-induced arthritis rats were treated with losartan (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) and methotrexate (MTX; 0.5 mg/kg) in vivo from day 14 to day 28. Arthritis was evaluated by the arthritis index and histological examination. Angiotensin II, tumour necrosis factor-α, and VEGF levels were examined by ELISA. The expression of AT1R and AT2R was detected by western blot and immunohistochemistry analysis. After stimulation with interleukin-1β in vitro, the effects of the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (10(-8) -10(-5)  M) on the chemotaxis of monocytes induced by 10% foetal calf serum (FCS) were analysed by using Transwell assay. Subsequently, the therapeutic effects of CGP42112 (5, 10 and 20 μg/kg) were evaluated in vivo by intra-articular injection in AIA rats. After treatment with losartan, the down-regulation of AT1R expression and up-regulation of AT2R expression in the spleen and synovium of AIA rats correlated positively with reduction in the polyarthritis index. Treatment with CGP42112 inhibited the chemotaxis of AIA monocytes in vitro, possibly because of the up-regulation of AT2R expression. Intra-articular injection with CGP42112 (10 and 20 μg/kg) ameliorated the arthritis index and histological signs of arthritis. In summary, the present study strongly suggests that the up-regulation of AT2R might be an additional mechanism by which losartan exerts its therapeutic effects in AIA rats.

  14. Cardiac and renal function are progressively impaired with aging in Zucker diabetic fatty type II diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Baynes, John; Murray, David B

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the temporal relationship between cardiomyopathy and renal pathology in the type II diabetic Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat. We hypothesized that changes in renal function will precede the development of cardiac dysfunction in the ZDF rat. Animals (10 weeks old) were divided into four experimental groups: Lean Control (fa/?) LC(n = 7), untreated ZDF rats (n = 7) sacrificed at 16 weeks of age, and LC (n = 7) untreated ZDF rats (n = 9) sacrificed at 36 weeks of age. LV structural/functional parameters were assessed via Millar conductance catheter. Renal function was evaluated via markers of proteinuria and evidence of hydronephrosis. LV mass was significantly less in the ZDF groups at both time points compared to age-matched LC. End diastolic volume was increased by 16% at 16 weeks and by 37% at 36 weeks of age (p < 0.05 vs. LC). End diastolic pressure and end systolic volume were significantly increased (42% and 27%respectively) at 36 weeks of age in the ZDF compared to LC. Kidney weights were significantly increased at both 16 and 36 week in ZDF animals (p < 0.05 vs. LC). Increased urinary albumin and decreased urinary creatinine were paralleled by a marked progression in the severity of hydronephrosis from 16 to 36 weeks of age in the ZDF group. In summary, there is evidence of progressive structural and functional changes in both the heart and kidney, starting as early as 16 weeks,without evidence that one pathology precedes or causes the other in the ZDF model of type II diabetes.

  15. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction in a Type II Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Qiu, Xuefeng; Shindel, Alan W.; Ning, Hongxiu; Ferretti, Ludovic; Jin, Xunbo; Lin, Guiting; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a broad constellation of voiding complaints that are often multifactorial and resistant to currently available therapies. The leading causes of diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) include alterations in the bladder smooth muscle, neuronal degeneration, and urothelial dysfunction. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), a type of mesenchymal stromal cells, have shown promise as a novel tissue regenerative technique that may have utility in DBD. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy and mechanism by which ADSCs may ameliorate DBD in rats fed a high-fat diet and treated with low-dose streptozotocin to induce type II diabetes. Improved voiding function was noted in ADSCs-treated rats as compared with phosphate-buffered saline-treated rats. Though some ADSCs differentiated into smooth muscle cells, paracrine pathway seems to play a main role in this process, thus resulting in reduction of apoptosis and preservation of “suburothelial capillaries network.” PMID:22008016

  16. Safety and immunogenicity of a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Juan, Long; Xiao, Zhao; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically available treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fail to cure the disease or unsatisfactorily halt disease progression. To overcome these limitations, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters may offer new promising strategies. Because type II collagen (CII) as a critical autoantigen in RA and native chicken type II collagen (nCCII) has been used to effectively treat RA, we previously developed a novel therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding CCII (pcDNA-CCOL2A1) with efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard", methotrexate(MTX). Here, we systemically evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal Wistar rats. Group 1 received only a single intramuscular injection into the hind leg with pcDNA-CCOL2A1 at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg on day 0; Group 2 was injected with normal saline (NS) as a negative control. All rats were monitored daily for any systemic adverse events, reactions at the injection site, and changes in body weights. Plasma and tissues from all experimental rats were collected on day 14 for routine examinations of hematology and biochemistry parameters, anti-CII IgG antibody reactivity, and histopathology. Our results indicated clearly that at the maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine was safe and well-tolerated. No abnormal clinical signs or deaths occurred in the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 group compared with the NS group. Furthermore, no major alterations were observed in hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology, even at the maximum dose. In particularly, no anti-CII IgG antibodies were detected in vaccinated normal rats at 14 d after vaccination; this was relevant because we previously demonstrated that the pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine, when administered at the therapeutic dosage of 300 μg/kg alone, did not induce anti-CII IgG antibody production and significantly reduced levels of anti-CII IgG antibodies in the plasma of rats with established collagen-induced arthritis

  17. The anabolic effects of insulin on type II collagen synthesis of Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bembenek, M.E.; Liberti, J.P.

    1984-08-15

    The anabolic effects of insulin on collagen production of freshly isolated Swarm rat chondrosarcoma chondrocytes were investigated. The specific radioactivity of newly synthesized collagen was not increased by insulin, indicating that the hormone has no effect on the specific radioactivity of the aminoacyl tRNA pool. Results of further studies obtained from collagen degradation experiments demonstrated that insulin did not alter the rate of (3H)collagen degradation. Together, these results clearly indicate that insulin stimulates collagen biosynthesis. Polyacrylamide gel analysis of the newly synthesized collagen of both control and insulin-stimulated cells revealed a large-molecular-weight component which migrated with authentic alpha 1(II) collagen and was collagenase-sensitive. Additional studies showed that, although insulin increased the processing and secretion of collagen, the hormone did not cause a shift in the distribution of the extracellular and intracellular collagen pools. Finally, results of studies conducted with the transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D, indicated that the anabolic effects of insulin on collagen and non-collagen proteins were mediated at a post-transcriptional site.

  18. Effect of sodium on vasoconstriction and angiotensin II type 1 receptor mRNA expression in cold-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiming; Zhu, Shanjun; Zhu, Jijun; van der Giet, Markus; Tepel, Martin

    2004-08-01

    Angiotensin II and sodium play an important pathogenetic role in several models of hypertension. Now, we investigated the effects of sodium on vasoconstriction and angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor mRNA expression in aortic vessels from cold-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats on low sodium and high sodium diet were exposed to cold-stress for 8 weeks. The effects of angiotensin II infusion on mean arterial blood pressure were investigated in these rats. In addition, angiotensin II induced contraction was measured using aortic rings. Expression of AT1 receptor mRNA and AT2 receptor mRNA was assessed in aortic vessels by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. After infusion of angiotensin II mean arterial blood pressure in cold-induced hypertensive rats on high sodium diet was significantly higher compared to cold-induced hypertensive rats on low sodium diet (p < 0.05). Angiotensin II-induced contraction of aortic rings was significantly higher in cold-induced hypertensive rats on high sodium diet compared to cold-induced hypertensive rats on low sodium diet (2.39 +/- 0.03 g vs. 2.21 +/- 0.04 g, n = 12, p < 0.01). Angiotensin AT1 receptor mRNA was significantly higher in cold-induced hypertensive rats on high sodium diet compared to cold-induced hypertensive rats on low sodium diet (p < 0.05). It is concluded that in this nongenetic, nonsurgical animal model of cold-induced hypertension increased vasoconstriction and increased AT1 receptor mRNA expression in aortic vessels are dependent on sodium intake.

  19. Regional distribution and subcellular associations of Type II calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Erondu, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies generated against the Type II CaM kinase have been characterized. Two of these antibodies were used to confirm that both alpha and beta subunits were part of the holoenzyme complex. I also developed liquid phase and solid phase radioimmunoassays for the kinase. With the solid phase radioimmunoassay, the distribution of the kinase in rat brain was examined. This study revealed that the concentration of the kinase varies markedly in different brain regions. It is most highly concentrated in the telencephalon where it comprises approximately 2% of total hippocampal protein, 1.3% of cortical protein and 0.7% of striatal protein. It is less concentrated in lower brain regions ranging from 0.3% of hypothalamic protein to 0.1% of protein in the pons/medulla.

  20. Carnitine supplementation to obese Zucker rats prevents obesity-induced type II to type I muscle fiber transition and favors an oxidative phenotype of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that carnitine supplementation counteracts obesity-induced muscle fiber transition from type I to type II. Methods 24 obese Zucker rats were randomly divided into two groups of 12 rats each (obese control, obese carnitine) and 12 lean Zucker rats were selected for lean control group. A control diet was given to both control groups and a carnitine supplemented diet (3 g/kg diet) was given to obese carnitine group for 4 wk. Components of the muscle fiber transformation in skeletal muscle were examined. Results The plasma level of carnitine were lower in the obese control group compared to the lean control group and higher in the obese carnitine group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids were increased in obese animals compared to lean animals and the obese carnitine group had lower level compared to the obese control group (P < 0.05). The obese carnitine group had an increased number of type I muscle fibers and higher mRNA levels of type I fiber-specific myosin heavy chain, regulators of muscle fiber transition and of genes involved in carnitine uptake, fatty acid transport, β-oxidation, angiogenesis, tricarboxylic acid cycle and thermo genesis in M. rectus femoris compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion The results demonstrate that carnitine supplementation to obese Zucker a rat counteracts the obesity-induced muscle fiber transition and restores the muscle oxidative metabolic phenotype. Carnitine supplementation is supposed to be beneficial for the treatment of elevated levels of plasma lipids during obesity or diabetes. PMID:23842456

  1. Chronic ethanol ingestion impairs alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function and predisposes to endotoxin-mediated acute edematous lung injury in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Holguin, F; Moss, I; Brown, L A; Guidot, D M

    1998-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases the incidence and mortality of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in septic patients. To examine a potential mechanism, we hypothesized that ethanol ingestion predisposes to sepsis-mediated acute lung injury by decreasing alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function. Lungs isolated from rats fed ethanol (20% in water for >/= 3 wk), compared with lungs from control-fed rats, had greater (P < 0. 05) edematous injury (reflected by nonhydrostatic weight gain) after endotoxin (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and subsequent perfusion ex vivo with n-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP, 10(-7) M). Ethanol ingestion decreased (P < 0.05) glutathione levels in the plasma, lung tissue, and lung lavage fluid, and increased (P < 0.05) oxidized glutathione levels in the lung lavage fluid. Furthermore, ethanol ingestion decreased type II cell glutathione content by 95% (P < 0.05), decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell surfactant synthesis and secretion, and decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell viability, in vitro. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursors S-adenosyl-L-methionine and N-acetylcysteine in the final week of ethanol ingestion significantly reduced lung edema during perfusion ex vivo. We conclude that ethanol ingestion in rats alters alveolar type II cell glutathione levels and function, thereby predisposing the lung to acute edematous injury after endotoxemia. We speculate that chronic alcohol abuse in humans predisposes to ARDS through similar mechanisms. PMID:9466970

  2. Acute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II Diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for Society of Toxicology, March 22-25, 2015, San Diego, CAAcute Ozone (O3) Exposure Accelerates Diet-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Metabolic Alterations in a Rat Model of Type II DiabetesS.J. Snow1,3, D. Miller2, V. Bass2, M. Schladweiler3, A. Ledbetter3, J. Richards3, C...

  3. Anti-rheumatoid arthritic effects of Saussurea involucrata on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meihong; Guo, Qianying; Wang, Shuangjia; Wang, Na; Wei, Liren; Wang, Junbo

    2016-02-01

    Saussurea involucrata (SI) has long been used under the herbal name "snow lotus" for treatment of inflammation and pain-related diseases in traditional Chinese medicine. The present study aimed to evaluate the pharmacological effects of SI on collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis in rats. Rats with collagen II (CII)-induced arthritis were orally administered SI (420 mg kg(-1)) for 40 consecutive days. Histopathological examination indicated that SI alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells and synovial hyperplasia and slows joint destruction. SI intervention reduced the serum levels of RF, COMP, CRP and anti-CII IgG. Results also showed that SI is a potential therapeutic agent for alleviating the severity of the disease based on the reduced arthritic index. It was concluded that SI can ameliorate inflammation and joint destruction in CIA rats.

  4. Angiotensin II stimulates expression of the chemokine RANTES in rat glomerular endothelial cells. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Ziyadeh, F N; Thaiss, F; Tomaszewski, J; Caron, R J; Wenzel, U; Zahner, G; Helmchen, U; Stahl, R A

    1997-01-01

    Glomerular influx of monocytes/macrophages (M/M) occurs in many immune- and non-immune-mediated renal diseases. The mechanisms targeting M/M into the glomerulus are incompletely understood, but may involve stimulated expression of chemokines. We investigated whether angiotensin II (ANG II) induces the chemokine RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells of the rat and in vivo. ANG II stimulated mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells. The ANG II-induced RANTES protein was chemotactic for human monocytes. Surprisingly, the ANG II-stimulated RANTES expression was transduced by AT2 receptors because the AT2 receptor antagonists PD 123177 and CGP-42112A, but not an AT1 receptor blocker, abolished the induced RANTES synthesis. Intraperitoneal infusion of ANG II (500 ng/h) into naive rats for 4 d significantly stimulated glomerular RANTES mRNA and protein expression compared with solvent-infused controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed induction of RANTES protein mainly in glomerular endothelial cells and small capillaries. Moreover, ANG II- infused animals exhibited an increase in glomerular ED-1- positive cells compared with controls. Oral treatment with PD 123177 (50 mg/liter drinking water) attenuated the glomerular M/M influx without normalizing the slightly elevated systolic blood pressure caused by ANG II infusion, suggesting that the effects on blood pressure and RANTES induction can be separated. We conclude that the vasoactive peptide ANG II may play an important role in glomerular chemotaxis of M/M through local induction of the chemokine RANTES. The observation that the ANG II- mediated induction of RANTES is transduced by AT2 receptors may influence the decision as to which substances might be used for the therapeutic interference with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:9276721

  5. Fetal rat lung type II cell differentiation in serum-free isolated cell culture: modulation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fraslon, C; Lacaze-Masmonteil, T; Zupan, V; Chailley-Heu, B; Bourbon, J R

    1993-05-01

    Undifferentiated fetal rat lung epithelial cells were isolated on gestational days 15 or 17 (term 22 days) and cultured in a defined medium. On plastic, most of the cells developed structurally abnormal lamellar bodies. On a basement membrane matrix (BMM), they sequentially accumulated glycogen and formed typical lamellar bodies. Biochemical analysis of the latter indicated that they had a phospholipid composition typical of surfactant for cells on BMM but not on plastic and that surfactant protein A appeared on BMM only. Progressing maturation from day 1 to day 6 in culture was demonstrated for 17-day cells on BMM by a sevenfold increase of labeled precursor incorporation into surfactant phospholipids. Exposure to medium conditioned by 21-day fetal fibroblasts enhanced incorporation already after a 1-day culture. The antisteroid RU 486 had no effect on differentiation, whereas transforming growth factor-beta, a factor produced by lung mesenchyme at early fetal stages, inhibited it markedly. Alveolar epithelial type II cells appear to be committed early, but their maturational process would be prevented until a definite gestational stage.

  6. The calcium channel antagonist benidipine reduces plasma and cardiac endothelin-1 levels in type II diabetic rat model.

    PubMed

    Jesmin, Subrina; Sakuma, Ichiro; Hattori, Yuichi; Kitabatake, Akira; Miyauchi, Takashi

    2004-11-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the central feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance is an early clinical manifestation of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Calcium channel blockers are widely used to treat cardiovascular diseases in diabetic patients; however, it remains unknown how endothelin-1 (ET-1) is altered and associated with cardiac lesions at the insulin-resistant early stage of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and, if so, whether calcium channel blockers can reverse such alterations. We examined plasma and cardiac expression of ET-1 in male Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a spontaneous model of human type 2 diabetes mellitus. At 8 weeks of age, OLETF rats were treated for 12 weeks with a long acting calcium channel blocker, benidipine (3 mg/kg per day p.o.) (BEN, n = 15), or with vehicle (OLETF, n = 15), and age-matched genetic control, male Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were also used (n = 15). Blood pressure was significantly higher in OLETF than LETO rats, and benidipine treatment of OLETF rats for 12 weeks did not reduce their blood pressure significantly. Plasma and cardiac levels of ET-1 were significantly higher in OLETF compared with LETO rats (both P < 0.01), and were reversed after benidipine treatment. Our results suggest that ET-1 plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of cardiac complications at the insulin-resistant stage of diabetes mellitus, and that benidipine treatment may have a beneficial effect on these complications.

  7. Renal angiotensin II type-2 receptors are upregulated and mediate the candesartan-induced natriuresis/diuresis in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Hakam, Amer C; Hussain, Tahir

    2005-02-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in studying the role of angiotensin II type-2 (AT(2)) receptor in renal/cardiovascular function in pathological conditions. The present study was designed to determine the functional role of the AT(2) receptors on natriuresis/diuresis and compare the level of the tubular AT(2) receptor expression in obese and lean Zucker rats (12 weeks old). Under anesthesia, candesartan (angiotensin II type 1 [AT(1)]-specific antagonist; 100 microg/kg bolus) produced natriuresis/diuresis to a greater degree in obese than in lean rats. The specific AT(2) antagonist PD123319 (50 microg/kg per minute) after candesartan administration abolished the natriuretic/diuretic effects of candesartan in obese rats but not in lean rats. Infusion of AT(2) receptor agonist, CGP-42112A (1 microg/kg per minute), produced greater increase in sodium and urine excretion over basal in obese than in lean rats. The presence of the AT(2) receptor expression in the brush-border and basolateral membranes was confirmed by Western blotting using specific antibody and antigen-blocking peptide. Densitometric analysis of the bands revealed approximately 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the AT(2) receptor proteins in both membranes of obese compared with lean rats. Our results suggest upregulation of the AT(2) receptors, which play a role in mediating the natriuretic/diuretic effects of AT(1) receptor blockers in obese Zucker rats. We speculate that AT(2) receptors, by promoting sodium excretion, may protect obese Zucker rats against blood pressure increase associated with sodium and water retention.

  8. Type I and Type II Pyrethroid alterations in Spontaneous Bursting Parameters in Rat Cortical Networks measured Using Multielectrode Array Recordings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are widely used in agricultural, industrial and residential settings to control insect pests. Pyrethroids prolong sodium channel inactivation, although their complete mode of action is not fully understood. We previously reported that permethrin (a Type I pyrethroid) ...

  9. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM)

    PubMed Central

    Bourassa, Erick A.; Stedenfeld, Kristen A.; Sved, Alan F.; Speth, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10%) reduction in AT1 receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia. PMID:26138553

  10. Immunohistochemical localization of angiotensin II receptor types 1 and 2 in the mesenteric artery from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Carmen; Leal, Sandra; Logan, Karen; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Soares, Ana Sofia; Rocha, Eduardo; Gonçalves, Jorge; Fresco, Paula

    2007-08-01

    Angiotensin II plays a crucial role in the control of blood pressure, acting at AT1 or AT2 receptors, and can act as a potent vasoconstrictor of the peripheral vasculature inducing hypertrophy, hyperplasia, or both, in resistance arteries. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the pattern of distribution of angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptors on mesenteric artery sections differs in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) versus their respective controls (Wistar-Kyoto [WKY] rats). Immunohistochemistry using anti-AT1 or anti-AT2 antibodies was performed on perfused-fixed/paraffin-embedded mesenteric arteries from SHR and WKY rats. 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB; activated by hydrogen peroxide) staining revealed distinct AT1 and AT2 labeling of all artery layers (adventitia, media and intima) from WKY rats, whereas in SHR an abundant AT1 labeling was found in both intima and adventitia and a sparser labeling in the media. There was a vast reduction of AT2 labeling throughout all layers. These results suggest a crucial role for AT2 receptors in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  11. Effect of amygdalin on the proliferation of hyperoxia-exposed type II alveolar epithelial cells isolated from premature rat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaping; Chang, Liwen; Li, Wenbin; Liu, Hanchu

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hyperoxia lung injury and the mechanism of amygdalin on type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) isolated from premature rat lungs in vitro were investigated. AEC2 were obtained by primary culture from 20-days fetal rat lung and hyperoxia-exposed cell model was established. Cell proliferating viability was examined by MTT assay after treatment of amygdalin at various concentrations. DNA content and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression of AEC2 were measured by using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry respectively after 24 h of hyperoxia exposure or amygdalin treatment. The results showed that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation and decreased PCNA protein expression in A-EC2 of premature rat in vitro. Amygdalin at the concentration range of 50-200 micromol/L stimulated the proliferation of AEC2 in a dose-dependent manner, however, 400 micromol/L amygdalin inhibited the proliferation of AEC2. Amygdalin at the concentration of 200 micromol/L played its best role in facilitating proliferation of AEC2s in vitro and could partially ameliorated the changes of proliferation in hyperoxia exposed AEC2 of premature rat. It has been suggested that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation of AEC2s of premature rat, which may contribute to hyperoxia lung injury. Amygdalin may play partial protective role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  12. Differences in type II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoform expression between rat preadipocytes and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Serazin-Leroy, V; Morot, M; de Mazancourt, P; Giudicelli, Y

    2001-11-26

    Adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity is low in preadipocyte membranes when compared to adipocytes. Under conditions promoting inhibition of adipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity by Gpp(NH)p, a stable GTP analog, a paradoxical increase in preadipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity was obtained. In order to explain this contradiction, expression of types II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoforms was compared in adipocytes and undifferentiated preadipocytes both by western blots and by a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Type II, IV, V and VI mRNAs and proteins were present in both adipocytes and preadipocytes. However, in undifferentiated preadipocytes, expression of type II mRNA and protein were significantly higher whereas expression of type IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase mRNAs and proteins were significantly weaker than in adipocytes. In late differentiated preadipocytes, the adenylyl cyclase subtype mRNA expression pattern was intermediary between the undifferentiated and the full differentiation states except for type IV which remained weakly expressed. Moreover, one of the representative regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS protein), RGS4, was less expressed in undifferentiated preadipocyte membranes and cytosol extracts, which contrasts with adipocytes where RGS4 is clearly expressed. Thus, the preferential expression of type II adenylyl cyclase (G(betagamma) subunit-stimulated) in preadipocytes might explain why Gpp(NH)p elicits stimulation of adenylyl cyclase under conditions designed to promote inhibition. Conversely, the preferential expression of type V and VI adenylyl cyclases and the slightly higher expression of type IV adenylyl cyclase in adipocytes could contribute to explain the elevated total catalytic activity observed in mature fat cells compared to their precursor cells.

  13. EFFECT OF GROWTH FACTOR-FIBRONECTIN MATRIX INTERACTION ON RAT TYPE II CELL ADHESION AND DNA SYTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Type II cells attach, migrate and proliferate on a provisional fibronectin-rich matrix during alveolar wall repair after lung injury. The combination of cell-substratum interactions via integrin receptors and exposure to local growth factors are likely to initiat...

  14. Intracerebroventricular losartan infusion modulates angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in the subfornical organ and drinking behaviour in bile-duct-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Walch, Joseph D; Carreño, Flávia Regina; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes congestive liver failure that initiates haemodynamic changes, including peripheral vasodilatation and generalized oedema. Peripheral vasodilatation is hypothesized to activate compensatory mechanisms, including increased drinking behaviour and neurohumoral activation. This study tested the hypothesis that changes in the expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) mRNA and protein in the lamina terminalis are associated with BDL-induced hyposmolality in the rat. All rats received either BDL or sham-ligation surgery. The rats were housed in metabolic chambers for measurement of fluid and food intake and urine output. Expression of AT(1)R in the lamina terminalis was assessed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Average baseline water intake increased significantly in BDL rats compared with sham-operated rats, and upregulation of AT(1)R protein and AT(1a)R mRNA were observed in the subfornical organ of BDL rats. Separate groups of BDL and sham-ligated rats were instrumented with minipumps filled with either losartan (2.0 μg μl(-1)) or 0.9% saline for chronic intracerebroventricular or chronic subcutaneous infusion. Chronic intracerebroventricular losartan infusion attenuated the increased drinking behaviour and prevented the increased abundance of AT(1)R protein in the subfornical organ in BDL rats. Chronic subcutaneous infusion did not affect water intake or AT(1)R abundance in the subfornical organ. The data presented here indicate a possible role of increased central AT(1)R expression in the regulation of drinking behaviour during congestive cirrhosis.

  15. P2Y2 receptor activation opens pannexin-1 channels in rat carotid body type II cells: potential role in amplifying the neurotransmitter ATP

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Piskuric, Nikol A; Vollmer, Cathy; Nurse, Colin A

    2012-01-01

    Signal processing in the carotid body (CB) is initiated at receptor glomus (or type I) cells which depolarize and release the excitatory neurotransmitter ATP during chemoexcitation by hypoxia and acid hypercapnia. Glomus cell clusters (GCs) occur in intimate association with glia-like type II cells which express purinergic P2Y2 receptors (P2Y2Rs) but their function is unclear. Here we immunolocalize the gap junction-like protein channel pannexin-1 (Panx-1) in type II cells and show Panx-1 mRNA expression in the rat CB. As expected, type II cell activation within or near isolated GCs by P2Y2R agonists, ATP and UTP (100 μm), induced a rise in intracellular [Ca2+]. Moreover in perforated-patch whole cell recordings from type II cells, these agonists caused a prolonged depolarization and a concentration-dependent, delayed opening of non-selective ion channels that was prevented by Panx-1 blockers, carbenoxolone (5 μm) and 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS; 10 μm). Because Panx-1 channels serve as conduits for ATP release, we hypothesized that paracrine, type II cell P2Y2R activation leads to ATP-induced ATP release. In proof-of-principle experiments we used co-cultured chemoafferent petrosal neurones (PNs), which express P2X2/3 purinoceptors, as sensitive biosensors of ATP released from type II cells. In several cases, UTP activation of type II cells within or near GCs led to depolarization or increased firing in nearby PNs, and the effect was reversibly abolished by the selective P2X2/3 receptor blocker, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS; 10 μm). We propose that CB type II cells may function as ATP amplifiers during chemotransduction via paracrine activation of P2Y2Rs and Panx-1 channels. PMID:22733659

  16. Heterogeneity of nuclear estrogen-binding sites in the rat uterus: a simple method for the quantitation of type I and type II sites by (3H)estradiol exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Markaverich, B.M.; Williams, M.; Upchurch, S.; Clark, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Estrogen administration to mature-ovariectomized rats causes the activation or stimulation of secondary nuclear estrogen-binding sites (type II) in the uterus which can interfere with estrogen receptor (type I) measurement. Earlier reports from our laboratory have shown that quantitation of type I sites in the presence of the type II site is very difficult and can only be achieved by graphic analysis of saturation curves which employ a wide range (0.4-40 NM) of (/sup 3/H)estradiol concentrations in nuclear exchange assay. The studies presented in this manuscript describe simple methods which can be used to separately quantitate both nuclear estrogen-binding sites using a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Since the nuclear type II site does not bind (/sup 3/H)estradiol in the presence of reducing agent, type I sites can be easily quantitated by incubating nuclei (37 C for 30 min) in Tris-EDTA buffer containing 0.1-1.00 mM dithiothreitol using a single saturating concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol. Conversely, a single concentration of (/sup 3/H)estradiol (40-80 nM) can be used to quantitate the nuclear type II site by incubating nuclei in Tris-EDTA buffer under conditions (4 C for 60 min) which do not measure occupied nuclear estrogen receptor. Therefore, by using the appropriate buffer system, type I and type II sites can be easily separated in mixed binding systems. In addition, we also demonstrate that Nafoxidine does not bind to the nuclear type II site. Therefore, it can be used as a competitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding to type I sites and permit the measurement of type II sites without interference from type I sites. These techniques should be applicable to autoradiographic or fluorescence studies which cannot discriminate between steroid binding to these two classes of nuclear estrogen-binding sites.

  17. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 allosteric potentiators prevent sodium lactate-induced panic-like response in panic-vulnerable rats

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L; Fitz, Stephanie D; Engleman, Eric A; Svensson, Kjell A; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M; Shekhar, Anantha

    2015-01-01

    Rats with chronic inhibition of GABA synthesis by infusion of l-allyglycine, a glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibitor, into their dorsomedial/perifornical hypothalamus are anxious and exhibit panic-like cardio-respiratory responses to treatment with intravenous (i.v.) sodium lactate (NaLac) infusions, in a manner similar to what occurs in patients with panic disorder. We previously showed that either NMDA receptor antagonists or metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2/3 receptor agonists can block such a NaLac response, suggesting that a glutamate mechanism is contributing to this panic-like state. Using this animal model of panic, we tested the efficacy of CBiPES and THIIC, which are selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators (at 10–30mg/kg i.p.), in preventing NaLac-induced panic-like behavioral and cardiovascular responses. The positive control was alprazolam (3mg/kg i.p.), a clinically effective anti-panic benzodiazepine. As predicted, panic-prone rats given a NaLac challenge displayed NaLac-induced panic-like cardiovascular (i.e. tachycardia and hypertensive) responses and “anxiety” (i.e. decreased social interaction time) and “flight” (i.e. increased locomotion) -associated behaviors; however, systemic injection of the panic-prone rats with CBiPES, THIIC or alprazolam prior to the NaLac dose blocked all NaLac-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses. These data suggested that in a rat animal model, selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators show an anti-panic efficacy similar to alprazolam. PMID:22914798

  18. Age determines the magnitudes of angiotensin II-induced contractions, mRNA, and protein expression of angiotensin type 1 receptors in rat carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Zoltan; Cseplo, Peter; Ivic, Ivan; Matics, Robert; Hamar, Janos; Koller, Akos

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that aging alters angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vasomotor responses and expression of vascular mRNA and protein angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R). Thus, carotid arteries were isolated from the following age groups of rats: 8 days, 2-9 months, 12-20 months, and 20-30 months, and their vasomotor responses were measured in a myograph after repeated administrations of Ang II. Vascular relative AT1R mRNA level was determined by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and the AT1R protein density was measured by Western blot. Contractions to the first administration of Ang II increased from 8 days to 6 months and then they decreased to 30 months. In general, second administration of Ang II elicited reduced contractions, but they also increased from 8 days until 2 months and then they decreased to 30 months. Similarly the AT1R mRNA level increased from 8 days to 12 months and then decreased to 30 months. Similarly the AT1R protein density increased from 8 days until 16 months and then they decreased to 30 months. The pattern of these changes correlated with functional vasomotor data. We conclude that aging (newborn to senescence) has substantial effects on Ang II-induced vasomotor responses and AT1R signaling suggesting the importance of genetic programs.

  19. Inhibitory effects of deer antler aqua-acupuncture, the pilose antler of Cervus Korean TEMMINCK var mantchuricus Swinhoe, on type II collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Kye; Kim, Kyung-Sook; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Kim, Kap-Sung; Lee, Young-Choon; Chang, Young-Chae; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2003-07-01

    Water extract of deer antler aqua-acupunture (DAA) prepared from the growing antler of Cervus korean TEMMINCK var. mantchuricus Swinhoe, was used to investigate the efficacy of a traditional immunosuppressive and immuno-activating Korean aqua-acupuncture, on the development of type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats. The onset of arthritis was observed at the 24th day after the CII-immunization in rats, and the severity of CIA was gradually developed. As compared with rats treated with saline, DAA i.p. injected at doses of more than 50 microg/kg once a day for 14 days inhibited the ability of inguinal lymph node cells to produce T cell cytokines interleukin 2 and interferon-gamma when the cells were obtained from rats 24 days after immunization and cultured in vitro with CII. Treatment with DAA also inhibited the production of macrophage cytokines interleukin-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in response to in vitro stimulation of lymph node and macrophage cells with CII. In addition, in order to evaluate the influence of DAA on the incidence and development of arthritis in rat CIA, rats were immunized twice at a 3-week interval with bovine CII, with DAA being given i.p. once a day for 14 days with four different regimens. A 14-day course of DAA treatment at a daily dose of 100 microg/kg, which began on the day of the first CII immunization, suppressed the development of arthritis, as well as antibody formation and delayed-type hypersensitivity to CII. Treatment with DAA, which started on the same day as the booster immunization, also resulted in inhibition of development of arthritis and of immune responses to CII. However, treatment with DAA, which was prophylactically started prior to a primary immunization, did not inhibit the development of arthritis and immune response to CII. Furthermore, DAA extract did not affect the established diseases.

  20. Endogenous expression of type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase mRNA and protein in rat intestine. Implications for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed Central

    Markert, T; Vaandrager, A B; Gambaryan, S; Pöhler, D; Häusler, C; Walter, U; De Jonge, H R; Jarchau, T; Lohmann, S M

    1995-01-01

    Certain pathogenic bacteria produce a family of heat stable enterotoxins (STa) which activate intestinal guanylyl cyclases, increase cGMP, and elicit life-threatening secretory diarrhea. The intracellular effector of cGMP actions has not been clarified. Recently we cloned the cDNA for a rat intestinal type II cGMP dependent protein kinase (cGK II) which is highly enriched in intestinal mucosa. Here we show that cGK II mRNA and protein are restricted to the intestinal segments from the duodenum to the proximal colon, with the highest amounts of cGK II protein in duodenum and jejunum. cGK II mRNA and protein decreased along the villus to crypt axis in the small intestine, whereas substantial amounts of both were found in the crypts of cecum. In intestinal epithelia, cGK II was specifically localized in the apical membrane, a major site of ion transport regulation. In contrast to cGK II, cGK I was localized in smooth muscle cells of the villus lamina propria. Short circuit current (ISC), a measure of Cl- secretion, was increased to a similar extent by STa and by 8-Br-cGMP, a selective activator of cGK, except in distal colon and in monolayers of T84 human colon carcinoma cells in which cGK II was not detected. In human and mouse intestine, the cyclic nucleotide-regulated Cl- conductance can be exclusively accounted for by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel. Viewed collectively, the data suggest that cGK II is the mediator of STa and cGMP effects on Cl- transport in intestinal-epithelia. Images PMID:7543493

  1. Untargeted serum metabolomics reveals Fu-Zhu-Jiang-Tang tablet and its optimal combination improve an impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in type II diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Chen, Xi; Cai, Hao; Li, Weidong; Cai, Baochang; Chai, Chuan; Di, Liuqing; Shi, Liyun; Hu, Lihong

    2017-01-01

    Fu-Zhu-Jiang-Tang tablet, a six-herb preparation, was proved to show beneficial effects on type II diabetes patients in clinical. This study aims to optimize the component proportion of the six-herb preparation and explore the serum metabolic signatures of type II diabetes rats after treatment with Fu-Zhu-Jiang-Tang tablet and its optimal combination. The component proportion of the preparation was optimized using uniform experimental design and machine learning techniques. Untargeted GC-MS metabolomic experiments were carried out with serum samples from model group and treatment groups. Data were normalized, multivariate and univariate statistical analysis performed and metabolites of interest putatively identified. 23 metabolites were significantly changed by Fu-Zhu-Jiang-Tang tablet treatment and the majority of these were decreased, including various carbohydrates (glucose, mannose, fructose, allose and gluconic acid), unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic acid, 9-octadecenoic acid, oleic acid, arachidonic acid), alanine, valine, propanoic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrate, along with pyrimidine and cholesterol. Increased concentrations of oxalic acid, leucine, glycine, serine, threonine, proline, lysine and citrate were observed. In the optimal combination-fed group, 21 metabolites were significantly affected and strikingly, the magnitudes of changes here were generally much greater than that of Fu-Zhu-Jiang-Tang tablet treated rats. 18 metabolites affected in both groups included various carbohydrates (mannose, glucose, allose, fructose and gluconic acid), unsaturated fatty acids (palmitic acid, 9-octadecenoic acid, oleic acid and arachidonic acid), short-chain fatty acids (oxalic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrate), and amino acids (alanine, valine, leucine, glycine, proline and lysine), as well as pyrimidine. Metabolites exclusively affected in optimal combination treated rat included succinic acid, cysteine and phenylalanine, whilst four metabolites (propanoic acid, citrate

  2. An improved method for the isolation of rat alveolar type II lung cells: Use in the Comet assay to determine DNA damage induced by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2015-06-01

    Smoking is a cause of serious diseases, including lung cancer, emphysema, chronic bronchitis and heart disease. DNA damage is thought to be one of the mechanisms by which cigarette smoke (CS) initiates disease in the lung. Indeed, CS induced DNA damage can be measured in vitro and in vivo. The potential of the Comet assay to measure DNA damage in isolated rat lung alveolar type II epithelial cells (AEC II) was explored as a means to include a genotoxicity end-point in rodent sub-chronic inhalation studies. In this study, published AEC II isolation methods were improved to yield viable cells suitable for use in the Comet assay. The improved method reduced the level of basal DNA damage and DNA repair in isolated AEC II. CS induced DNA damage could also be quantified in isolated cells following a single or 5 days CS exposure. In conclusion, the Comet assay has the potential to determine CS or other aerosol induced DNA damage in AEC II isolated from rodents used in sub-chronic inhalation studies.

  3. Leptin and Its Relation to Obesity and Insulin in the SHR/N-corpulent Rat, A Model of Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhathena, Sam J.; Hansen, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive/NIH-corpulent (SHR/N-cp) rat is a genetic animal model that exhibits obesity, metabolic features of hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia, which are characteristic of type II diabetes and mild hypertension. To determine the role of leptin, the protein product of the ob gene, in the development of obesity and diabetes in this model, we measured steady-state circulating levels of leptin in obese and lean SHR/N-cp rats and examined the relation between plasma leptin levels and metabolic variables at the stage of established obesity in these animals. Mean fasting plasma leptin concentration was 8-fold higher in obese than in lean rats (p<0.01). This was associated with a 6-fold elevation in plasma insulin in the obese group. Fasting levels of plasma glucose, cholesterol, and triglyceride were all significantly higher in obese rats than in lean controls. Spearman correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation between plasma leptin concentration and body weight among the animals (r=0.73, p<0.01). Similarly, plasma insulin concentration was significantly correlated with BW in all animals (r=0.54, p<0.05). There was also a significant positive.correlation between plasma leptin and plasma insulin in the entire group (r=0.70, p<0.01). However, this relationship was significant only for lean rats but not for obese rats (r=0.59, p<0.05 for lean rats, and r=0.23, p=NS, for obese rats). Plasma leptin also correlated positively with fasting plasma glucose (r=0.75, p<0.05), total cholesterol (r=0.63, p<0.05), and triglyceride (r=0.67, p <0.05). The marked elevation of plasma leptin in obese SHR/N-cp rats suggests that obesity in this animal model is related to up-regulation of the ob gene. Circulating leptin appears to be one of the best biological markers of obesity and that hyperleptinemia is closely associated with several metabolic risk factors related to insulin resistance in the diabesity syndrome. PMID:12369710

  4. Yohimbine hydrochloride ameliorates collagen type-II-induced arthritis targeting oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Neha; Ansari, Md Meraj; Khan, Haider A

    2017-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common type of chronic inflammatory disease which is triggered by dysfunction in the immune system which in turn affects synovial joints. Current treatment of RA with NSAIDs and DMRDs is limited by their side effect. As a result, the interest in alternative, well tolerated anti-inflammatory remedies has re-emerged. Our aim was to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities underlying the anti-RA effect of Yohimbine hydrochloride (YCL) in collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in Wistar rats. The YCL was administered at doses of 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) body weight once daily for 28 days. The effects of treatment in the rats were assessed by biochemical parameter (articular elastase, LPO, GSH, catalase, SOD), hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, C-reactive protein (CRP), immunohistochemical expression (COX2, TNF-α, and NF-κB), and histological changes in joints. YCL showed anti-RA efficacy as it significantly reduced articular elastase, LPO and catalase level and ameliorates histological changes. This is in addition to its antioxidant efficacy as YCL shown a significant increase in GSH and SOD level. Also, YCL showed effective anti-inflammatory activity as it significantly decreased the expression of COX-2, TNF-α, and NF-ĸB. The therapeutic effect of YCL against RA was also evident from lower arthritis scoring and reduced hematological parameter (ESR, WBC, and C-reactive protein level). The abilities to inhibit proinflammatory cytokines and modulation of antioxidant states that the protective effect of YCL on arthritis rats might be mediated via the modulation of the immune system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 619-629, 2017.

  5. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation decreases DNA damage in brain of rats subjected to a chemically induced chronic model of Tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Scaini, Giselli; Rebelo, Joyce; Damiani, Adriani P; Pereira, Maiara; Andrade, Vanessa M; Gava, Fernanda F; Valvassori, Samira S; Schuck, Patricia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2017-03-18

    Tyrosinemia type II is an inborn error of metabolism caused by a mutation in a gene encoding the enzyme tyrosine aminotransferase leading to an accumulation of tyrosine in the body, and is associated with neurologic and development difficulties in numerous patients. Because the accumulation of tyrosine promotes oxidative stress and DNA damage, the main aim of this study was to investigate the possible antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of omega-3 treatment in a chemically-induced model of Tyrosinemia type II in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex of rats. Our results showed chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased the frequency and the index of DNA damage, as well as the 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in the hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. Moreover, omega-3 fatty acid treatment totally prevented increased DNA damage in the striatum and hippocampus, and partially prevented in the cerebral cortex, whereas the increase in 8-OHdG levels was totally prevented by omega-3 fatty acid treatment in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the main accumulating metabolite in Tyrosinemia type II induce DNA damage in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex, possibly mediated by free radical production, and the supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids was able to prevent this damage, suggesting that could be involved in the prevention of oxidative damage to DNA in this disease. Thus, omega-3 fatty acids supplementation to Tyrosinemia type II patients may represent a new therapeutic approach and a possible adjuvant to the curren t treatment of this disease.

  6. Effects of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel agonists and antagonists on slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, Peter M B

    2009-12-01

    The possible functional role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels was investigated by testing various TRP agonists and antagonists in an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation. Extracellular recordings from slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptor units were made. The antagonist capsazepine depressed spontaneous and mechanically evoked activity, with an IC(50) of 82 microM. In one-third of units, capsazepine caused a selective depression of mechanically evoked firing, such that the existing spontaneous firing was interrupted by an absence of activity during the mechanical stimulus. The broad spectrum TRP blocker ruthenium red (30 microM) had inconsistent effects, although in some units a delayed onset (following wash) bursting and paroxysmal firing ensued. The agonist icilin (50-100 microM) had an excitatory effect on spontaneous firing, and (-)-menthol (200 microM) had inconsistent effects. Cinnamaldehyde (1-2 mM) depressed all types of activity equally, mechanically evoked and spontaneous. Camphor (0.5-2 mM) also depressed all types of activity, although it had a preferential effect on spontaneous activity. Capsaicin (1-10 microM) and allyl isothiocyanate (50-100 microM) had no clear effects. These results rule out any role for TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors.

  7. Solar Type II Radio Bursts and IP Type II Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined radio data from the WAVES experiment on the Wind spacecraft in conjunction with ground-based data in order to investigate the relationship between the shocks responsible for metric type II radio bursts and the shocks in front of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The bow shocks of fast, large CMEs are strong interplanetary (IP) shocks, and the associated radio emissions often consist of single broad bands starting below approx. 4 MHz; such emissions were previously called IP type II events. In contrast, metric type II bursts are usually narrowbanded and display two harmonically related bands. In addition to displaying complete dynamic spectra for a number of events, we also analyze the 135 WAVES 1 - 14 MHz slow-drift time periods in 2001-2003. We find that most of the periods contain multiple phenomena, which we divide into three groups: metric type II extensions, IP type II events, and blobs and bands. About half of the WAVES listings include probable extensions of metric type II radio bursts, but in more than half of these events, there were also other slow-drift features. In the 3 yr study period, there were 31 IP type II events; these were associated with the very fastest CMEs. The most common form of activity in the WAVES events, blobs and bands in the frequency range between 1 and 8 MHz, fall below an envelope consistent with the early signatures of an IP type II event. However, most of this activity lasts only a few tens of minutes, whereas IP type II events last for many hours. In this study we find many examples in the radio data of two shock-like phenomena with different characteristics that occur simultaneously in the metric and decametric/hectometric bands, and no clear example of a metric type II burst that extends continuously down in frequency to become an IP type II event. The simplest interpretation is that metric type II bursts, unlike IP type II events, are not caused by shocks driven in front of CMEs.

  8. Differential effect of severe and moderate social stress on blood immune and endocrine measures and susceptibility to collagen type II arthritis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Stefanski, Volker; Hemschemeier, Susanne K; Schunke, Kerstin; Hahnel, Anja; Wolff, Christine; Straub, Rainer H

    2013-03-01

    The effects of social stress on several blood immune measures and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were investigated in Wistar rats using the resident-intruder confrontation paradigm to induce stress of different intensity. Male intruders were exposed for one week to a dominant opponent either repeatedly for 4h daily (moderate stress) or continuously (severe stress). Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of collagen type II (CII) into the tail skin at the end of day 3 of confrontation. Only severe stress was associated with decreased CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the increase in granulocyte numbers and body mass loss was more pronounced under these conditions. Only severe stress reduced the susceptibility to arthritis by about 50%. Severity scores did not differ in the first five days after disease onset between all groups. Subsequent experiments focused on severely stressed rats indicated that disease progressed until day 10 only in control animals, but not in severely stressed males. Stressor exposure resulted in increased blood monocyte numbers, but these males failed to accumulate macrophages into the skin at the site of CII injection. High numbers of attacks experienced by intruders correlated with delayed disease onset in severely stressed rats. We hypothesize that severe stress persisting after disease induction exhibits beneficial effects on the susceptibility of CIA and propose that the specific endocrine and immunological profile associated with severe stress is an important factor for disease outcome--a factor which probably explains many of the conflicting data of previous stress studies on CIA.

  9. Toxicity studies on Agents GB and GD (Phase 2): 90-day subchronic study of GB (Sarin, Type II) in CD rats. Final report, Jul 85-Aug 91

    SciTech Connect

    Bucci, T.J.; Parker, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    A two-phase Dose Range findng study and a 90-Day Subchronic study were conducted in CD rats using the organophosphate ester Sarin (Agent GB, Type II, CAS Number 107-44-8). The highest dose level without lethality in the second phase of the range finding study was designated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The doses selected for the subchronic study were the MTD (300 micron GBII/Kg/day), MTD/2 (150micron GBII/Kg/day), MTD/4 (75micron GBII/Kg/day), and a vehicle control . Forty-eight male and forty-eight female CD rats were randomly allocated at 11 -1 2 weeks of age into four treatment groups (1 2 per sex per group). The animals were gavaged Monday through Friday for 13 weeks and euthanized with carbon dioxide at the beginning of the fourteenth week. Animals were observed daily for clinical signs of toxicity and were weighed weekly. The rats were bled (6 rat/sex/dose) during weeks -1, 1, 3, 7, and at necropsy. Necropsy examination was performed on all animals. Microscopic evaluation was performed on all high-dose and control animals and on those tissues of lower dose animals that were abnormal at necropsy. All gross lesions and all animals dying or removed early received histological examination. A cause of death or morbidity for animals removed before the end of the study, determined from histopathological examination, was established in four cases. There were several statistically significant effects in the clinical chemistry and hematology data. These effects were scattered among the treatment groups and were not numerous enough to develop a pattern of organ toxicity.

  10. Morphologic Damage of Rat Alveolar Epithelial Type II Cells Induced by Bile Acids Could Be Ameliorated by Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibitor Z-Guggulsterone In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yaowei; Hou, Xusheng; Wu, Wenyu; Nie, Lei; Tian, Yinghong; Lu, Yanmeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether bile acids (BAs) affect respiratory functions through the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) expressed in the lungs and to explore the possible mechanisms of BAs-induced respiratory disorder. Methods. Primary cultured alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECIIs) of rat were treated with different concentrations of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) in the presence or absence of FXR inhibitor Z-guggulsterone (GS). Then, expression of FXR in nuclei of AECIIs was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. And ultrastructural changes of the cells were observed under transmission electron microscope and analyzed by Image-Pro Plus software. Results. Morphologic damage of AECIIs was exhibited in high BAs group in vitro, with high-level expression of FXR, while FXR inhibitor GS could attenuate the cytotoxicity of BAs to AECIIs. Conclusions. FXR expression was related to the morphologic damage of AECIIs induced by BAs, thus influencing respiratory functions. PMID:27340672

  11. Stachybotrys chartarum alters surfactant-related phospholipid synthesis and CTP:cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase activity in isolated fetal rat type II cells.

    PubMed

    Hastings, C; Rand, T; Bergen, H T; Thliveris, J A; Shaw, A R; Lombaert, G A; Mantsch, H H; Giles, B L; Dakshinamurti, S; Scott, J E

    2005-03-01

    Stachybotry chartarum, a fungal contaminant of water-damaged buildings commonly grows on damp cellulose-containing materials. It produces a complex array of mycotoxins. Their mechanisms of action on the pulmonary system are not entirely clear. Previous studies suggest spore products may depress formation of disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), the major surface-active component of pulmonary surfactant (PS). If S. chartarum can indeed affect formation of this phospholipid, then mold exposure may be a significant issue for pulmonary function in both mature lung and developing fetal lung. To address this possibility, fetal rat type II cells, the principal source of DSPC, were used to assess effects of S. chartarum extract on formation of DSPC. Isolated fetal rat lung type II cells prelabeled with 3H-choline and incubated with spore extract showed decreased incorporation of 3H-choline into DSPC. The activity of CTP:cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase (CPCT), the rate-limiting enzyme in phosphatidylcholine synthesis was reduced by approximately 50% by a 1:10 dilution of spore extract. Two different S. chartarum extracts (isolates from S. chartarum (Cleveland) and S. chartarum (Hawaiian)) were used to compare activity of CPCT in the presence of phosphatidylglycerol (PG), a known activator. PG produced an approximate two-fold increase in CPCT activity. The spore isolate from Hawaii did not alter enzyme activity. S. chartarum (Cleveland) eliminated the PG-induced activation of CPCT. These results support previous observations that mold products alter PS metabolism and may pose a risk in developing lung, inhibiting surfactant synthesis. Different isolates of the same species of fungus are not equivalent in terms of potential exposure risks.

  12. Silencing of Wnt5a prevents interleukin-1β-induced collagen type II degradation in rat chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shiping; Man, Zhentao; Li, Wei; Sun, Shui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease, and few treatments to date have been able to delay OA progression. The degradation of collagen type II (COL2) in the cartilage matrix is an important initiating factor for OA progression; the upregulation of Wnt5a protein activates COL2 degradation. In the present study, small interfering RNA of Wnt-5a was delivered by a lentiviral vector (LV-Wnt5a-RNAi) to silence Wnt-5a mRNA and prevent COL2 degradation. To determine the function of LV-Wnt5a-RNAi, the OA chondrocyte model (OA-like chondrocytes) were constructed using interleukin (IL)-1β. Detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Wnt-5a mRNA in the OA-like chondrocytes were upregulated in a time-dependent manner, indicating that OA-like chondrocytes were successfully constructed. The bioactivity of OA-like chondrocytes was determined using Live-Dead staining, and the result illustrated that the OA-like chondrocytes stimulated with IL-1β for 6 h remained viable, and these were used in Wnt5a silencing. The OA-like chondrocytes were divided into three groups: Group I, cultivated with common medium; group II, cultivated with common medium supplemented with empty lentiviral vector; group III, cultivated with common medium supplemented with LV-Wnt5a-RNAi. The efficiency of LV-Wnt5a-RNAi transfection was determined using fluorescence microscopy, the result of which indicated that LV-Wnt5a-RNAi could efficiently be transfected into the OA-like chondrocytes. The LV-Wnt5a-RNAi efficiency for the Wnt5a mRNA silencing was determined using RT-qPCR. The result illustrated that the mRNA of Wnt5a in group III was significantly lower in group I compared with that in group II (P<0.05), indicating that the LV-Wnt5a-RNAi could successfully silence Wnt5a mRNA. To further verify whether the silencing of Wnt5a mRNA could prevent COL2 degradation, western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. The results demonstrated that COL2 in

  13. Curcumin modulates the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines by type II alveolar epithelial cells in a rat COPD model

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lixing; Li, Chengye; Wang, Jian; Guo, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have suggested that histone modification has a positive impact on various aspects associated with the progression of COPD. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) suppresses proinflammatory gene expression through deacetylation of core histones. Objective To investigate the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II) in a rat COPD model and regulation of HDAC2 expression by curcumin in comparison with corticosteroid. Materials and methods The rat COPD model was established by cigarette smoke exposure and confirmed by histology and pathophysioloy. AEC II were isolated and cultured in vitro from the COPD models and control animals. The cells were treated with curcumin, corticosteroid, or trichostatin A, and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α (MIP-2α) was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of HDAC2 was measured by Western blot. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect H3/H4 acetylation and H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of three kinds of chemokine genes (IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α). Results Compared to the control group, the mRNAs of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α were upregulated 4.48-fold, 3.14-fold, and 2.83-fold, respectively, in the AEC II from COPD model. The protein expression of HDAC2 in the AEC II from COPD model was significantly lower than from the control group (P<0.05). The decreased expression of HDAC2 was negatively correlated with the increased expression of IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α mRNAs (all P<0.05). The level of H3/H4 acetylation was higher but H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of chemokine genes was lower in the cells from COPD model than from the control group (all P<0.05). Curcumin downregulated the expression of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α, and the expression was further enhanced in the presence of

  14. Blood pressure, magnesium and other mineral balance in two rat models of salt-sensitive, induced hypertension: effects of a non-peptide angiotensin II receptor type 1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Rondón, Lusliany Josefina; Marcano, Eunice; Rodríguez, Fátima; del Castillo, Jesús Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is critically involved in regulating arterial blood pressure (BP). Inappropriate angiotensin type-1 receptor activation by angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is related to increased arterial BP. Mg has a role in BP; it can affect cardiac electrical activity, myocardial contractility, and vascular tone. To evaluate the relationship between high BP induced by a high sodium (Na) diet and Mg, and other mineral balances, two experimental rat models of salt-sensitive, induced-hypertension were used: Ang-II infused and Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We found that: 1) Ang-II infusion progressively increased BP, which was accompanied by hypomagnesuria and signs of secondary hyperaldosteronism; 2) an additive effect between Ang-II and a high Na load may have an effect on strontium (Sr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) balances; 3) Dahl SS rats fed a high Na diet had a slow pressor response, accompanied by altered Mg, Na, potassium (K), and phosphate (P) balances; and 4) losartan prevented BP increases induced by Ang II-NaCl, but did not modify mineral balances. In Dahl SS rats, losartan attenuated high BP and ameliorated magnesemia, Na and K balances. Mg metabolism maybe considered a possible defect in this strain of rat that may contribute to hypertension.

  15. Catalytic unit-independent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of type II regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Z; Luo, Y; Vereb, G

    1986-01-01

    Rat liver plasma membranes contain a 55 kDa protein which proved to be identical with type II regulatory subunit (RII) of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (kinase A) by several criteria (gel electrophoretic behaviour, peptide map, position of the autophosphorylated site). Analysis of phosphopeptide maps revealed that the membrane-bound RII was phosphorylated by a kinase which is unrelated to the catalytic unit (C) of kinase A. Dephosphorylation of the membrane-bound RII by an endogenous phosphatase was stimulated by both cyclic AMP and fluoride. Addition of C did not stimulate dephosphorylation even in the presence of ADP; moreover, protein inhibitor of C did not modify the effects of cyclic AMP or fluoride. The effects of both cyclic AMP and fluoride were, however, inhibited by C. Results indicate that rat liver plasma membranes contain a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation system for which RII is a relatively specific substrate. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3010951

  16. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor ligand PD123319 attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung and heart injury at a low dose in newborn rats

    PubMed Central

    Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Laghmani, El Houari; Chen, Xueyu; Lindeboom, Melissa P. H. A.; Roks, Anton J. M.; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J.

    2014-01-01

    Intervening in angiotensin (Ang)-II type 2 receptor (AT2) signaling may have therapeutic potential for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) by attenuating lung inflammation and preventing arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). We first investigated the role of AT2 inhibition with PD123319 (0.5 and 2 mg·kg−1·day−1) on the beneficial effect of AT2 agonist LP2–3 (5 μg/kg twice a day) on RVH in newborn rats with hyperoxia-induced BPD. Next we determined the cardiopulmonary effects of PD123319 (0.1 mg·kg−1·day−1) in two models: early treatment during continuous exposure to hyperoxia for 10 days and late treatment starting on day 6 in rat pups exposed postnatally to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by a 9-day recovery period in room air. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression. Ten days of coadministration of LP2–3 and PD123319 abolished the beneficial effects of LP2–3 on RVH in experimental BPD. In the early treatment model PD123319 attenuated cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septal thickness, pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, medial wall thickness of small arterioles, and extravascular collagen III deposition, and by preventing RVH. In the late treatment model PD123319 diminished PAH and RVH, demonstrating that PAH is reversible in the neonatal period. At high concentrations PD123319 blocks the beneficial effects of the AT2-agonist LP2–3 on RVH. At low concentrations PD123319 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in newborn rats with experimental BPD. PMID:24951776

  17. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor ligand PD123319 attenuates hyperoxia-induced lung and heart injury at a low dose in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Sengers, Rozemarijn M A; Laghmani, El Houari; Chen, Xueyu; Lindeboom, Melissa P H A; Roks, Anton J M; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J

    2014-08-01

    Intervening in angiotensin (Ang)-II type 2 receptor (AT2) signaling may have therapeutic potential for bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) by attenuating lung inflammation and preventing arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH). We first investigated the role of AT2 inhibition with PD123319 (0.5 and 2 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) on the beneficial effect of AT2 agonist LP2-3 (5 μg/kg twice a day) on RVH in newborn rats with hyperoxia-induced BPD. Next we determined the cardiopulmonary effects of PD123319 (0.1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) in two models: early treatment during continuous exposure to hyperoxia for 10 days and late treatment starting on day 6 in rat pups exposed postnatally to hyperoxia for 9 days, followed by a 9-day recovery period in room air. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression. Ten days of coadministration of LP2-3 and PD123319 abolished the beneficial effects of LP2-3 on RVH in experimental BPD. In the early treatment model PD123319 attenuated cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septal thickness, pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages and neutrophils, medial wall thickness of small arterioles, and extravascular collagen III deposition, and by preventing RVH. In the late treatment model PD123319 diminished PAH and RVH, demonstrating that PAH is reversible in the neonatal period. At high concentrations PD123319 blocks the beneficial effects of the AT2-agonist LP2-3 on RVH. At low concentrations PD123319 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in newborn rats with experimental BPD.

  18. Quercetin-Rich Guava (Psidium guajava) Juice in Combination with Trehalose Reduces Autophagy, Apoptosis and Pyroptosis Formation in the Kidney and Pancreas of Type II Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Fa; Kuo, Yen-Ting; Chen, Tsung-Ying; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2016-03-10

    We explored whether the combination of anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory guava (Psidium guajava) and trehalose treatment protects the kidney and pancreas against Type II diabetes (T2DM)-induced injury in rats. We measured the active component of guava juice by HPLC analysis. T2DM was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of nicotinamide and streptozotocin and combination with high fructose diets for 8 weeks. The rats fed with different dosages of guava juice in combination with or without trehalose for 4 weeks were evaluated the parameters including OGTT, plasma insulin, HbA1c, HOMA-IR (insulin resistance) and HOMA-β (β cell function and insulin secretion). We measured oxidative and inflammatory degrees by immunohistochemistry stain, fluorescent stain, and western blot and serum and kidney reactive oxygen species (ROS) by a chemiluminescence analyzer. High content of quercetin in the guava juice scavenged H2O2 and HOCl, whereas trehalose selectively reduced H2O2, not HOCl. T2DM affected the levels in OGTT, plasma insulin, HbA1c, HOMA-IR and HOMA-β, whereas these T2DM-altered parameters, except HbA1c, were significantly improved by guava and trehalose treatment. The levels of T2DM-enhanced renal ROS, 4-hydroxynonenal, caspase-3/apoptosis, LC3-B/autophagy and IL-1β/pyroptosis were significantly decreased by guava juice and trehalose. The combination with trehalose and guava juice protects the pancreas and kidney against T2DM-induced injury.

  19. Expression of cyclin D{sub 1} during endotoxin-induced aleveolar type II cell hyperplasia in rat lung and the detection of apoptotic cells during the remodeling process

    SciTech Connect

    Tesfaigzi, J.; Wood, M.B.; Johnson, N.F.

    1995-12-01

    Our studies have shown that endotoxin intratracheally instilled into the rat lung induces proliferation of alveolar type II cells. In that study, the alveolar type II cells. In that study, the alveolar type II cell hyperplasia occurred 2 d after instillation of endotoxin and persisted for a further 2 d. After hyperplasia, the lung remodeled and returned to a normal state within 24-48 h. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the remodeling process of this transient hyperplasia may be useful to identify molecular changes that are altered in neoplasia. The purpose of the present study was to corroborate induction of epithelial cell hyperplasia by endotoxin and to delineate mechanisms involved in tissue remodeling after endotoxin-induced alveolar type II cell hyperplasia. In conclusion, immonostaining with cyclin D1 and cytokeratin shows that endotoxin induced epithelial cell proliferation and resulted in hyperplasia in the lung which persisted through 4 d post-instillation.

  20. Agonists of MAS oncogene and angiotensin II type 2 receptors attenuate cardiopulmonary disease in rats with neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Gerry T M; Laghmani, El Houari; Fidder, Melissa; Sengers, Rozemarijn M A; de Visser, Yvonne P; de Vries, Louwe; Rink, Rick; Roks, Anton J M; Folkerts, Gert; Walther, Frans J

    2013-09-01

    Stimulation of MAS oncogene receptor (MAS) or angiotensin (Ang) receptor type 2 (AT2) may be novel therapeutic options for neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD) by counterbalancing the adverse effects of the potent vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, consisting of arterial hypertension (PAH)-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and pulmonary inflammation. We determined the cardiopulmonary effects in neonatal rats with CLD of daily treatment during continuous exposure to 100% oxygen for 10 days with specific ligands for MAS [cyclic Ang-(1-7); 10-50 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)] and AT2 [dKcAng-(1-7); 5-20 μg·kg(-1)·day(-1)]. Parameters investigated included lung and heart histopathology, fibrin deposition, vascular leakage, and differential mRNA expression in the lungs of key genes involved in the renin-angiotensin system, inflammation, coagulation, and alveolar development. We investigated the role of nitric oxide synthase inhibition with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (25 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) during AT2 agonist treatment. Prophylactic treatment with agonists for MAS or AT2 for 10 days diminished cardiopulmonary injury by reducing alveolar septum thickness and medial wall thickness of small arterioles and preventing RVH. Both agonists attenuated the pulmonary influx of inflammatory cells, including macrophages (via AT2) and neutrophils (via MAS) but did not reduce alveolar enlargement and vascular alveolar leakage. The AT2 agonist attenuated hyperoxia-induced fibrin deposition. In conclusion, stimulation of MAS or AT2 attenuates cardiopulmonary injury by reducing pulmonary inflammation and preventing PAH-induced RVH but does not affect alveolar and vascular development in neonatal rats with experimental CLD. The beneficial effects of AT2 activation on experimental CLD were mediated via a NOS-independent mechanism.

  1. Achondrogenesis type II with polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Rittler, M; Orioli, I M

    1995-11-06

    We report on a newborn male infant who presented the typical findings of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino), and who also showed postaxial polydactyly on both feet and bilateral microtia. Polydactyly is frequently part of the short-rib syndromes, but has not been reported in achondrogenesis. The hypothesis of polydactyly as part of a contiguous gene syndrome is discussed.

  2. Central Infusion of Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Agonist Compound 21 Attenuates DOCA/NaCl-Induced Hypertension in Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Peng, Wei; Shen, Ying; He, Jing-Jing

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated whether central activation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2-R) attenuates deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/NaCl-induced hypertension in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and whether female sex hormone status has influence on the effects of AT2-R activation. DOCA/NaCl elicited a greater increase in blood pressure in OVX females than that in intact females. Central infusion of compound 21, a specific AT2-R agonist, abolished DOCA/NaCl pressor effect in intact females, whereas same treatment in OVX females produced an inhibitory effect. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that DOCA/NaCl enhanced the mRNA expression of hypertensive components including AT1-R, ACE-1, and TNF-α in the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus in both intact and OVX females. However, the mRNA expressions of antihypertensive components such as AT2-R, ACE-2, and IL-10 were increased only in intact females. Central AT2-R agonist reversed the changes in the hypertensive components in all females, while this agonist further upregulated the expression of ACE2 and IL-10 in intact females, but only IL-10 in OVX females. These results indicate that brain AT2-R activation plays an inhibitory role in the development of DOCA/NaCl-induced hypertension in females. This beneficial effect of AT2-R activation involves regulation of renin-angiotensin system and proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26783414

  3. Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  4. Light echoes - Type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1987-01-01

    Type II supernovae (SNs) light curves show a remarkable range of shapes. Data have been collected for the 12 Type II SNs that have light curve information for more than four months past maximum. Contrary to previous reports, it is found that (1) the decay rate after 100 days past maximum varies by almost an order of magnitude and (2) the light curve shapes are not bimodally distributed, but actually form a continuum. In addition, it is found that the extinctions to the SNs are related to the light curve shapes. This implies that the absorbing dust is local to the SNs. The dust is likely to be part of a circumstellar shell emitted by the SN progenitor that Dwek (1983) has used to explain infrared echoes. The optical depth of the shell can get quite large. In such cases, it is found that the photons scattered and delayed by reflection off dust grains will dominate the light curve several months after peak brightness. This 'light echo' offers a straightforward explanation of the diversity of Type II SN light curves.

  5. Evaluation of humoral and cellular immune responses to a DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen for rheumatoid arthritis in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhao; Juan, Long; Song, Yun; Zhijian, Zhang; Jing, Jin; Kun, Yu; Yuna, Hao; Dongfa, Dai; Lili, Ding; Liuxin, Tan; Fei, Liang; Nan, Liu; Fang, Yuan; Yuying, Sun; Yongzhi, Xi

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of effective therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is finding a method for the specific inhibition of the inflammatory disease processes without the induction of generalized immunosuppression. Of note, the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines and boosters that may restore immunological tolerance remains a high priority. pcDNA-CCOL2A1 is a therapeutic DNA vaccine encoding chicken type II collagen(CCII). This vaccine was developed by our laboratory and has been shown to exhibit efficacy comparable to that of the current "gold standard" treatment, methotrexate (MTX). Here, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with anti-CII IgG antibodies, quantified the expression levels of Th1, Th2, and Th3 cytokines, and performed flow cytometric analyses of different T-cell subsets, including Th1, Th2, Th17, Tc, Ts, Treg, and CD4(+)CD29(+)T cells to systemically evaluate humoral and cellular immune responses to pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine in normal rats. Similar to our observations at maximum dosage of 3 mg/kg, vaccination of normal rats with 300 μg/kg pcDNA-CCOL2A1 vaccine did not induce the production of anti-CII IgG. Furthermore, no significant changes were observed in the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12(IL-23p40), monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, regulated on activation in normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in vaccinated normal rats relative to that in controls(P > 0.05). However, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β levels were significantly increased on days 10 and 14, while interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were significantly decreased on days 28 and 35 after vaccination(P < 0.05). Similarly, there were no significant differences in the

  6. Phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from lung, isolated alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Pool, G L; Bubacz, D G; Lumb, R H; Mason, R J

    1983-01-01

    We have examined phospholipid-transfer activities in cytosols from rat and mouse whole lung, isolated rat alveolar type II cells and alveolar type II cell-derived mouse pulmonary adenomas. We report an enrichment in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol (but not phosphatidylinositol) protein-catalysed transfer in the type II cell and adenoma cytosols compared with the whole-lung cytosols. The activities from these cytosols were resolved using column chromatofocusing, which clearly demonstrated the presence of a phosphatidylcholine-specific transfer protein in each of the four tissues. In addition, two proteins (rat) or three proteins (mouse) catalysing both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol transfer were resolved from whole lung, whereas in both the rat isolated alveolar type II cells and the mouse type II cell-derived adenomas one of these less specific proteins is not present. PMID:6661189

  7. Moderately luminous Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Pastorello, A.; Turatto, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Botticella, M. T.; Bufano, F.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Harutyunyan, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.; Zampieri, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Core-collapse Supernovae (CC-SNe) descend from progenitors more massive than about 8 M⊙. Because of the young age of the progenitors, the ejecta may eventually interact with the circumstellar medium (CSM) via highly energetic processes detectable in the radio, X-ray, ultraviolet (UV) and, sometimes, in the optical domains. Aims: In this paper we present ultraviolet, optical and near infrared observations of five Type II SNe, namely SNe 2009dd, 2007pk, 2010aj, 1995ad, and 1996W. Together with few other SNe they form a group of moderately luminous Type II events. We investigate the photometric similarities and differences among these bright objects. We also attempt to characterise them by analysing the spectral evolutions, in order to find some traces of CSM-ejecta interaction. Methods: We collected photometry and spectroscopy with several telescopes in order to construct well-sampled light curves and spectral evolutions from the photospheric to the nebular phases. Both photometry and spectroscopy indicate a degree of heterogeneity in this sample. Modelling the data of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad allows us to constrain the explosion parameters and the properties of the progenitor stars. Results: The light curves have luminous peak magnitudes (-16.95 < MB < -18.70). The ejected masses of 56Ni for three SNe span a wide range of values (2.8 × 10-2 M⊙ < M(56Ni)< 1.4 × 10-1 M⊙), while for a fourth (SN 2010aj) we could determine a stringent upper limit (7 × 10-3 M⊙). Clues of interaction, such as the presence of high velocity (HV) features of the Balmer lines, are visible in the photospheric spectra of SNe 2009dd and 1996W. For SN 2007pk we observe a spectral transition from a Type IIn to a standard Type II SN. Modelling the observations of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad with radiation hydrodynamics codes, we infer kinetic plus thermal energies of about 0.2-0.5 foe, initial radii of 2-5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of ~5.0-9.5 M⊙. Conclusions: These

  8. Crystal Structure of Rat Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao,Y.; Jogl, G.; Esser, V.; Tong, L.

    2006-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) has a crucial role in the {beta}-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in mitochondria. We report here the crystal structure of rat CPT-II at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The overall structure shares strong similarity to those of short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, although detailed structural differences in the active site region have a significant impact on the substrate selectivity of CPT-II. Three aliphatic chains, possibly from a detergent that is used for the crystallization, were found in the structure. Two of them are located in the carnitine and CoA binding sites, respectively. The third aliphatic chain may mimic the long-chain acyl group in the substrate of CPT-II. The binding site for this aliphatic chain does not exist in the short- and medium-chain carnitine acyltransferases, due to conformational differences among the enzymes. A unique insert in CPT-II is positioned on the surface of the enzyme, with a highly hydrophobic surface. It is likely that this surface patch mediates the association of CPT-II with the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

  9. Neurofibromatosis type II presenting as vertical diplopia.

    PubMed

    Sokwala, Ahmed; Knapp, Christopher; Gottlob, Irene

    2004-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type II (NF II) is rare and most commonly presents with hearing loss, tinnitus and/or vestibular disturbance in the third decade of life. The authors describe a rare case presenting with NF II with vertical diplopia due to IV(th) nerve palsy. The patient was otherwise asymptomatic despite multiple extensive lesions on MRI.

  10. Combination of MTX and LEF attenuates inflammatory bone erosion by down-regulation of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand and interleukin-17 in type II collagen-induced arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Ding, Cong-zhu; Fang, Yun

    2013-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of combination of methotrexate (MTX) and leflunomide (LEF) on type II collagen-induced arthritis rats and its mechanism. Curative effect was confirmed on CIA rats, which were randomized and divided into model, MTX, LEF and MTX + LEF group. Weights and joint swelling scores of rats were recorded. Interleukin (IL)-17, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) concentration in serum were determined by ELISA. H&E dyeing of joint was used to estimate the inflammation and osteoclasia extent. The mechanism was investigated through fibroblast-like synoviocytes isolated from RA patients. The effect of MTX and LEF on cell viability, and RANKL and OPG expression were indicated through MTT and RT-PCR analysis, respectively. Combination therapy would be effective in treating CIA rats. Joint swelling scores and IL-17 and RANKL level in serum were decreased obviously (P < 0.05), while OPG level was elevated (P < 0.05). Anti-inflammatory and anti-osteoclasia effect would be indicated by H&E dyeing results. Moreover, FLS cell viability was inhibited by combination treatment in vitro (P < 0.05), and expression of osteoclasia-related genes (RANKL and OPG) was modified (P < 0.05). Combination therapy would relive the synovium hypertrophy through depressing cell viability and osteoclasia through decreasing RANKL and increasing OPG expression. Otherwise, combination was superior to monotherapy.

  11. Alveolar type II cell-fibroblast interactions, synthesis and secretion of surfactant and type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M; Bhandari, R; Hamilton, G; Chan, Y C; Powell, J T

    1993-06-01

    During alveolar development and alveolar repair close contacts are established between fibroblasts and lung epithelial cells through gaps in the basement membrane. Using co-culture systems we have investigated whether these close contacts influence synthesis and secretion of the principal surfactant apoprotein (SP-A) by cultured rat lung alveolar type II cells and the synthesis and secretion of type I collagen by fibroblasts. The alveolar type II cells remained cuboidal and grew in colonies on fibroblast feeder layers and on Matrigel-coated cell culture inserts but were progressively more flattened on fixed fibroblast monolayers and plastic. Alveolar type II cells cultured on plastic released almost all their SP-A into the medium by 4 days. Alveolar type II cells cultured on viable fibroblasts or Matrigel-coated inserts above fibroblasts accumulated SP-A in the medium at a constant rate for the first 4 days, and probably recycle SP-A by endocytosis. The amount of mRNA for SP-A was very low after 4 days of culture of alveolar type II cells on plastic, Matrigel-coated inserts or fixed fibroblast monolayers: relatively, the amount of mRNA for SP-A was increased 4-fold after culture of alveolar type II cells on viable fibroblasts. Co-culture of alveolar type II cells with confluent human dermal fibroblasts stimulated by 2- to 3-fold the secretion of collagen type I into the culture medium, even after the fibroblasts' growth had been arrested with mitomycin C. Collagen secretion, by fibroblasts, also was stimulated 2-fold by conditioned medium from alveolar type II cells cultured on Matrigel. The amount of mRNA for type I collagen increased only modestly when fibroblasts were cultured in this conditioned medium. This stimulation of type I collagen secretion diminished as the conditioned medium was diluted out, but at high dilutions further stimulation occurred, indicating that a factor that inhibited collagen secretion also was being diluted out. The conditioned medium

  12. Online immunoaffinity liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry determination of a type II collagen peptide biomarker in rat urine: Investigation of the impact of collision-induced dissociation fluctuation on peptide quantitation.

    PubMed

    Berna, Michael; Schmalz, Chris; Duffin, Kevin; Mitchell, Peter; Chambers, Mark; Ackermann, Brad

    2006-09-15

    Proteolytic fragments of type II collagen, a major component of joint tissue, have recently been identified as biomarkers for osteoarthritis, a progressive disease associated with cartilage degeneration. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) assay that utilizes online immunoaffinity chromatography and column switching was developed in our laboratory for the neoepitope of type II collagen (NET2C). During method development, peptide collision-induced dissociation (CID) was found to be a significant source of assay variation, which exceeded 10% CV, despite the fact that a stable-isotope-labeled (SIL) internal standard was used to minimize imprecision. This phenomenon was studied in detail using peptides and associated SIL internal standards of varying lengths and amino acid compositions. Variability in peptide CID necessitated the monitoring of multiple MS/MS transitions to obtain acceptable assay precision. The assay was subsequently validated to measure NET2C concentrations in rat urine over the range of 0.1 to 10 ng/mL. The interday accuracy and precision ranged from 3.9 to 13.1 (%CV) and 10.7 to 5.3 (%RE), respectively, across the range of validated concentrations. A specific application of the assay is presented in which the role of estrogen deficiency in the development and progression of osteoarthritis was investigated. In this study, the effect of estrogen on lowering NET2C concentrations in urine in ovariectomized rats was demonstrated.

  13. Fits, pyridoxine, and hyperprolinaemia type II.

    PubMed

    Walker, V; Mills, G A; Peters, S A; Merton, W L

    2000-03-01

    The rare inherited disorder hyperprolinaemia type II presents with fits in childhood, usually precipitated by infection. A diagnosis of hyperprolinaemia type II and vitamin B(6) deficiency was made in a well nourished child with fits. It is thought that pyridoxine deficiency was implicated in her fits and was the result of inactivation of the vitamin by the proline metabolite, pyrroline-5-carboxylate.

  14. Hearing Restoration in Neurofibromatosis Type II Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeon Mi; Chang, Jin Woo; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type II will eventually succumb to bilateral deafness. For patients with hearing loss, modern medical science technology can provide efficient hearing restoration through a number of various methods. In this article, several hearing restoration methods for patients with neurofibromatosis type II are introduced. PMID:27189272

  15. A Type-II Positive Allosteric Modulator of α7 nAChRs Reduces Brain Injury and Improves Neurological Function after Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fen; Jin, Kunlin; Uteshev, Victor V.

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of clinically-efficacious therapies for ischemic stroke there is a critical need for development of new therapeutic concepts and approaches for prevention of brain injury secondary to cerebral ischemia. This study tests the hypothesis that administration of PNU-120596, a type-II positive allosteric modulator (PAM-II) of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), as long as 6 hours after the onset of focal cerebral ischemia significantly reduces brain injury and neurological deficits in an animal model of ischemic stroke. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by a transient (90 min) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Animals were then subdivided into two groups and injected intravenously (i.v.) 6 hours post-MCAO with either 1 mg/kg PNU-120596 (treated group) or vehicle only (untreated group). Measurements of cerebral infarct volumes and neurological behavioral tests were performed 24 hrs post-MCAO. PNU-120596 significantly reduced cerebral infarct volume and improved neurological function as evidenced by the results of Bederson, rolling cylinder and ladder rung walking tests. These results forecast a high therapeutic potential for PAMs-II as effective recruiters and activators of endogenous α7 nAChR-dependent cholinergic pathways to reduce brain injury and improve neurological function after cerebral ischemic stroke. PMID:23951360

  16. Uterine type II estrogen-binding sites are not of eosinophil origin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    A recent report suggested that nuclear type II sites in the rat uterus are of eosinophil origin and may represent (/sup 3/H)estradiol binding to eosinophil peroxidase. To further evaluate this hypothesis the authors examined the response of nuclear type II sites to estrogen under conditions where eosinophils are not present. Results of the experiments show that physiological levels of estradiol-17..beta.. (10 nM for 72 h) will stimulate nuclear type II sites in highly purified cultures of rat uterine stromal and myometrial cells. The magnitude of the response of type II sites to estradiol in these stromal (4-fold) and myometrial (80-fold) cell cultures was essentially identical to that observed in the uterine cell types following in vivo estrogen treatment. Since these highly purified cultures of uterine cells were prepared from the uterus of a 21-day ovariectomized rat which is devoid of eosinophils, it was concluded that estradiol stimulation of nuclear type II sites is a direct intracellular response to estrogen which occurs independent of eosinophil accumulation. Furthermore, it was found that type II sites in the rat uterus are not peroxidase. Stimulation of cytosol and nuclear type II sites by estrogen in the rat uterus is a direct intracellular response to the hormone unrelated to eosinophil accumulation and/or peroxidase activity.

  17. Cigarette smoke extract induces apoptosis of rat alveolar Type II cells via the PLTP/TGF-β1/Smad2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Liao, Ke; Cui-Zhao, Lv; Qiang-Wen, Fu; Feng-Zeng, Xue; Ping-Wu, Feng; Liang-Guo, Shu; Juan-Chen, Ya

    2015-09-01

    Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) may play a role in apoptosis. In the present study, the effect of the novel function of PLTP in cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells and the possible mechanism were examined. Male Wistar rats were exposed to air and cigarette smoke (n=10/exposure) for 6h/day on 3 consecutive days, then the lungs were sectioned and examined. To investigate effects on alveolar epithelial cells, rat alveolar epithelial cells (RLE-6TN) were treated with different concentrations of CSE for various times. siRNA for PLTP was transfected into cells and an inhibitor of the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) type I receptor was administered prior to CSE exposure. Apoptosis was measured, and mRNA expression of PLTP and TGF-β1 and protein levels of PLTP, TGF-β1, p-Smad2 and cleaved caspase-3 were analyzed. The results showed that apoptosis, as well as expression of PLTP, TGF-β1, p-Smad2 and cleaved caspase-3 were all significantly increased after CSE stimulation (P<0.05). Furthermore, the expression of TGF-β1, p-Smad2 and cleaved caspase-3 induced by CSE could be partly abrogated by knockdown of PLTP. The expression of PLTP showed no significant change as a result of TGF-β1 receptor inhibition, while cleaved caspase-3 showed a remarkable reduction. PLTP may act as an upstream signal molecule of the TGF-β1/Smad2 pathway and is likely to be involved in CSE-induced apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

  18. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II.

    PubMed Central

    Pieke Dahl, S; Kimberling, W J; Gorin, M B; Weston, M D; Furman, J M; Pikus, A; Möller, C

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. A gene for Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been localised to chromosome 1q32-q41. DNA from a family with four of seven sibs affected with clinical characteristics of Usher syndrome type II was genotyped using markers spanning the 1q32-1q41 region. These included D1S70 and D1S81, which are believed to flank USH2. Genotypic results and subsequent linkage analysis indicated non-linkage of this family to these markers. The A test analysis for heterogeneity with this family and 32 other Usher type II families was statistically significant at p < 0.05. Further clinical evaluation of this family was done in light of the linkage results to determine if any phenotypic characteristics would allow for clinical identification of the unlinked type. No clear phenotypic differences were observed; however, this unlinked family may represent a previously unreported subtype of Usher type II characterised by a milder form of retinitis pigmentosa and mild vestibular abnormalities. Heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II complicates efforts to isolate and clone Usher syndrome genes using linkage analysis and limits the use of DNA markers in early detection of Usher type II. Images PMID:7901420

  19. Resistance domain in type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.V.; Mints, R.G.

    1980-01-05

    We show that traveling domains with a finite resistance can exist in type II superconductors in the presence of a transport current. An experiment in which this effect generates an alternating electric field and current is proposed.

  20. Achondrogenesis type II, abnormalities of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Machado, M A; Chou, J W; Campbell, D

    1987-09-01

    Immune and lectin histochemical and microchemical methods were employed to study growth cartilage from seven cases of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino). The normal architecture of the epiphyseal and growth plate cartilage was replaced by a morphologically heterogeneous tissue. Some areas were comprised of vascular canals surrounded by extensive fibrous tissue and enlarged cells that had the appearance and histochemical characteristics of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Other areas contained a mixture of cells ranging from small to the enlarged chondrocytes. The extracellular matrix in the latter areas was more abundant and had characteristics of both precartilage mesenchymal matrix and typical cartilage matrix; it contained types I and II collagen, cartilage proteoglycan, fibronectin, and peanut agglutinin binding glycoconjugate(s). Peptide mapping of cyanogen bromide cartilage collagen peptides revealed the presence of types I and II collagen. These observations could be explained by a defect in the biosynthesis of type II collagen or in chondrocyte differentiation.

  1. Role of Mas receptor antagonist (A779) on pressure diuresis and natriuresis and renal blood flow in the absence of angiotensin II receptors type 1 and 2 in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, A; Oryan, S; Nematbakhsh, M

    2014-10-01

    Sexual differences in blood pressure are associated with angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) and its receptor and enzyme function targeting. Blockade of angiotensin II (AngII) receptors type 1 and 2 (AT1R and AT2R) inhibits some actions of Ang1-7. We described the role of Ang1-7 receptor (MasR) antagonist (A779) on kidney hemodynamics when AT1R and AT2R are blocked with losartan and PD123319. In anaesthetized male and female rats after blockade of both AT1R and AT2R, the renal perfusion pressure (RPP) was controlled in two levels of 80 and 100 mmHg via an adjustable clamp placed around the aorta above the level of the renal arteries. Then, the effects of saline vehicle and MasR blocker (A779) were tested on pressure natriuresis and diuresis, renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR). In the absence of AT1R and AT2R; RVR, RBF/wet kidney tissue weight, and serum level of renin did not alter in both genders either MasR was blocked or not. However, urine flow rate (UF) and sodium excretion (UNaV) increased significantly at the pressure level of 100 mmHg in the presence of MasR in male (P<0.05) but not in female rats. When AT1R and AT2R were blocked, the impact of MasR is gender-related in pressure natriuresis and diuresis, and pressure natriuresis and diuresis in male rats (not female) increases in the presence of MasR.

  2. Antenatal diagnosis of achondrogenesis type II.

    PubMed

    Kodandapani, S; Ramkumar, V

    2009-01-01

    Achondrogenesis is a lethal congenital chondrodystrophy characterized by extreme micromelia, small thorax and polyhydramnios. We describe a case of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis). Prenatal ultrasonography at 22-weeks gestation revealed a fetus with large head, short neck and chest, prominent abdomen and short limbs. Pregnancy was terminated. Radiologic examination of neonate revealed features of achondrogenesis type II. Routine ultrasound screening made early detection and timely management possible.

  3. Type II endometrial cancers: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Flora D.; Thomas, Eliz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Endometrial carcinoma ranks 3rd in India among gynecological malignancies. Endometrial cancer (EC) can be classified into two distinct groups – type I and type II, based on histology, which differs in molecular, clinical and histopathological profiles. Type II is nonestrogen dependent, nonendometrioid, more aggressive and carries poor prognosis. Although type II cancers contribute only about 10% of EC incidence, they present at advanced age and cause approximately 50% recurrence and deaths with a low 5-year, overall survival rate. Type II EC are also characterized by genetic alterations in p53, human epidermal growth factor-2/neu, p16 and E-cadherin. Materials and Methods: Endometrial carcinomas diagnosed from endometrial biopsies and hysterectomy specimens received in the Department of Pathology, Kasturba Medical College, Mangalore, from January 2007 to June 2012 were included in the study. Clinicopathological analysis of the 84 cases of EC was done with emphasis on morphology. p53 immunostaining was performed in two cases of serous carcinoma. Results: Out of a total of 84 cases of EC, ten cases were of type II (11.9%). Out of which, eight were serous carcinoma (9.5%) and two clear cell (2.4%). p53 immunostain was strongly positive in the serous papillary carcinomas. The age of the patients ranged from 45 to 75 years. Myometrial invasion was more than half. Treatment was hysterectomy followed by aggressive chemotherapy. Conclusion: Of the type II EC, serous carcinoma is the most common type. Clinical presentation and prognosis differs in comparison to type I EC, thus the recognition of this type of EC is pivotal. PMID:27499593

  4. An Extended Minimal Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model: Evaluation of Type II Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetic Nephropathy on Human IgG Pharmacokinetics in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Gurkishan S; Morris, Marilyn E

    2015-11-01

    Although many studies have evaluated the effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of low molecular weight molecules, there is limited information regarding effects on monoclonal antibodies. Our previous studies have reported significant increases in total (2-4 fold) and renal (100-300 fold) clearance of human IgG, an antibody isotype, in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. Pioglitazone treatment incompletely reversed the disease-related PK changes. The objective of this study was to construct a mechanistic model for simultaneous fitting plasma and urine data, to yield physiologically relevant PK parameters. We propose an extended minimal physiologically based PK (mPBPK) model specifically for IgG by classifying organs as either leaky or tight vascular tissues, and adding a kidney compartment. The model incorporates convection as the primary mechanism of IgG movement from plasma into tissues, interstitial fluid (ISF) in extravascular distribution space, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), sieving coefficient and fraction reabsorbed in the kidney. The model captured the plasma and urine PK profiles well, and simulated concentrations in ISF. The model estimated a 2-4 fold increase in nonrenal clearance from plasma and 30-120 fold increase in renal clearance with T2DM, consistent with the experimental findings, and these differences in renal clearance were related to changes in GFR, sieving coefficient, and proximal tubular reabsorption. In conclusion, the mPBPK model offers a more relevant approach for analyzing plasma and urine IgG concentration-time data than conventional models and provides insight regarding alterations in distributional and elimination parameters occurring with T2DM.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II Enable Javascript to view the ... PDF Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder that ...

  6. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: identification of abnormal type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    We have extended the study of a mild case of type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis to include biochemical analyses of cartilage, bone, and the collagens produced by dermal fibroblasts. Type I collagen extracted from bone and types I and III collagen produced by dermal fibroblasts were normal, as was the hexosamine ratio of cartilage proteoglycans. Hyaline cartilage, however, contained approximately equal amounts of types I and II collagen and decreased amounts of type XI collagen. Unlike the normal SDS-PAGE mobility. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed extensive overmodification of all type II cyanogen bromide peptides in a pattern consistent with heterozygosity for an abnormal pro alpha 1(II) chain which impaired the assembly and/or folding of type II collagen. This interpretation implies that dominant mutations of the COL2A1 gene may cause type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis. More generally, emerging data implicating defects of type II collagen in the type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis-spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita spectrum and in the Kniest-Stickler syndrome spectrum suggest that diverse mutations of this gene may be associated with widely differing phenotypic outcome.

  7. DO GIANT PLANETS SURVIVE TYPE II MIGRATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: ida@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-09-10

    Planetary migration is one of the most serious problems to systematically understand the observations of exoplanets. We clarify that the theoretically predicted type II, migration (like type I migration) is too fast, by developing detailed analytical arguments in which the timescale of type II migration is compared with the disk lifetime. In the disk-dominated regime, the type II migration timescale is characterized by a local viscous diffusion timescale, while the disk lifetime is characterized by a global diffusion timescale that is much longer than the local one. Even in the planet-dominated regime where the inertia of the planet mass reduces the migration speed, the timescale is still shorter than the disk lifetime except in the final disk evolution stage where the total disk mass decays below the planet mass. This suggests that most giant planets plunge into the central stars within the disk lifetime, and it contradicts the exoplanet observations that gas giants are piled up at r {approx}> 1 AU. We examine additional processes that may arise in protoplanetary disks: dead zones, photoevaporation of gas, and gas flow across a gap formed by a type II migrator. Although they make the type II migration timescale closer to the disk lifetime, we show that none of them can act as an effective barrier for rapid type II migration with the current knowledge of these processes. We point out that gas flow across a gap and the fraction of the flow accreted onto the planets are uncertain and they may have the potential to solve the problem. Much more detailed investigation for each process may be needed to explain the observed distribution of gas giants in extrasolar planetary systems.

  8. Organotypic culture of fetal lung type II alveolar epithelial cells: applications to pulmonary toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Shami, S G; Aghajanian, J D; Sanders, R L

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for isolation and culture of fetal Type II alveolar epithelial cells, as well as the morphologic and biochemical characteristics of these histotypic cultures, are described. Type II alveolar epithelial cells can be isolated from fetal rat lungs and grown in an organotypic culture system as described in this review. The fetal Type II cells resemble differentiated rat Type II cells in morphology, biochemistry, and karyotype as they grow in culture for up to 5 weeks. The cells of the mature organotypic cultures form alveolarlike structures while growing on a gelatin sponge matrix. The Type II cells also synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant similar in biochemical composition to that produced in vivo. This system has been used to study the effects of hormones on surfactant production and composition. The organotypic model has many potential applications to the study of pulmonary toxicology. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. PMID:6548184

  9. Type II seesaw dominance in SO(10)

    SciTech Connect

    Melfo, Alejandra; Ramirez, Alba; Senjanovic, Goran

    2010-10-01

    Grand unified theories where the neutrino mass is given by type II seesaw have the potential to provide interesting connections between the neutrino and charged fermion sectors. We explore the possibility of having a dominant type II seesaw contribution in supersymmetric SO(10). We show that this can be achieved in the model where symmetry breaking is triggered by 54 and 45 dimensional representations, without the need for additional fields other than those already required to have a realistic charged fermion mass spectrum. Physical consequences, such as the implementation of the Bajc, Senjanovic, and Vissani mechanism, the possibility of the fields responsible for type II seesaw dominance being messengers of supersymmetry breaking, and the realization of baryo and leptogenesis in these theories, are discussed.

  10. [A case of type II achondrogenesis].

    PubMed

    Micheli, E; Perrone, C; Quarta Colosso, L; Vetrugno, M; Zecca, G; Indirli, G C; Greco, F; Elia, G; Ciancio, S

    1996-01-01

    We describe a rare case of type II achondrogenesis (gestational age = thirty-two weeks) dead forty-five minutes after birth. This congenital skeletal dysplasia is classified among the lethal osteochondrodysplasias. Clinical features were enough for diagnosis and autopsy added nothing to our clinical knowledges.

  11. Type II Technology Applications in Teacher Education:

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen Wang, Lih-Ching; Beasley, William

    2005-01-01

    The use of the Instant Messenger (IM) environment to carry out structured online class discussions in graduate teacher education courses is described. Properties of IM are delineated, and specific procedures in using IM as a vehicle for class discussions are discussed. Attributes of Type II technology applications are addressed directly, and the…

  12. Competency Based Vocational Education Typing I and Typing II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, G. Lee; Mahan, Louise

    Materials are provided for two competency-based educational courses in Typing I and II for the community college level. The first course covers the touch method operation of the typewriter; the second covers the extension of the touch method and develops such skills as production of business letters, manuscripts, carbon copies, tabulation, tables,…

  13. Characterization of cloned cells from an immortalized fetal pulmonary type II cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.; Waide, J.J.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    A cultured cell line that maintained expression of pulmonary type II cell markers of differentiation would be advantageous to generate a large number of homogenous cells in which to study the biochemical functions of type II cells. Type II epithelial cells are the source of pulmonary surfactant and a cell of origin for pulmonary adenomas. Last year our laboratory reported the induction of expression of two phenotypic markers of pulmonary type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and surfactant lipid synthesis) in cultured fetal rat lung epithelial (FRLE) cells, a spontaneously immortalized cell line of fetal rat lung type II cell origin. Subsequently, the induction of the ability to synthesize surfactant lipid became difficult to repeat. We hypothesized that the cell line was heterogenuous and some cells were more like type II cells than others. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis and to obtain a cultured cell line with type II cell phenotypic markers by cloning several FRLE cells and characterizing them for phenotypic markers of type II cells (alkaline phosphatase activity and presence of surfactant lipids). Thirty cloned cell lines were analyzed for induced alkaline phosphatase activity (on x-axis) and for percent of phospholipids that were disaturated (i.e., surfactant).

  14. The effect of type II collagen on MSC osteogenic differentiation and bone defect repair.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Lai, Wen-Fu T; Chang, Shwu-Fen; Wong, Chin-Chean; Fan, Cheng-Yu; Fang, Chia-Lang; Tsai, Yu-Hui

    2014-03-01

    The function of type II collagen in cartilage is well documented and its importance for long bone development has been implicated. However, the involvement of type II collagen in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) osteogenesis has not been well investigated. This study elucidated the pivotal role of type II collagen in BMSC osteogenesis and its potential application to bone healing. Type II collagen-coated surface was found to accelerate calcium deposition, and the interaction of osteogenic medium-induced BMSCs with type II collagen-coated surface was mainly mediated through integrin α2β1. Exogenous type II collagen directly activated FAK-JNK signaling and resulted in the phosphorylation of RUNX2. In a segmental defect model in rats, type II collagen-HA/TCP-implanted rats showed significant callus formation at the reunion site, and a higher SFI (sciatic function index) scoring as comparing to other groups were also observed at 7, 14, and 21 day post-surgery. Collectively, type II collagen serves as a better modulator during early osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs by facilitating RUNX2 activation through integrin α2β1-FAK-JNK signaling axis, and enhance bone defect repair through an endochondral ossification-like process. These results advance our understanding about the cartilaginous ECM-BMSC interaction, and provide perspective for bone defect repair strategies.

  15. Magnetization of anisotropic Type II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.

    1989-04-10

    Peculiarities of magnetization of anisotropic type II superconductors are of considerable interest in view of the discovery of high-T/sub c/ superconductors characterized by strongly asymmetric layered structure. Specifics of the penetration of magnetic flux into an anisotropic type II superconductor were discussed in the literature. This analysis gave the distribution of induction in an isolated vortex, its energy, and critical magnetic field H/sub c1/. However, the magnetization curve of anisotropic superconductors was not considered. This paper deals with the magnetic moment of uniaxial London superconductor in the interval H/sub c1/ /le/ H/sub 0/ << H/sub c2/, where H/sub 0/ is the external magnetic field strength.

  16. Headache and Decompression Sickness: Type I or Type II?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    neurological exam was normal. Recompression with 100% oxygen produced relief within fifteen minutes. Follow up revealed no recurrence . Case 2 A twenty-seven...Follow up revealed no recurrence . Both cases pose an intriguing question. Should headache always be considered Type II DCS? DCS has a wide range of...with the supporting basis for this alternative view. The background for this paper is based on orthodontic and osteopathic medicine. For years

  17. UBIQUITOUS TORSIONAL MOTIONS IN TYPE II SPICULES

    SciTech Connect

    De Pontieu, B.; Hansteen, V. H.; Carlsson, M.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Rutten, R. J.; Watanabe, H.

    2012-06-10

    Spicules are long, thin, highly dynamic features that jut out ubiquitously from the solar limb. They dominate the interface between the chromosphere and corona and may provide significant mass and energy to the corona. We use high-quality observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope to establish that so-called type II spicules are characterized by the simultaneous action of three different types of motion: (1) field-aligned flows of order 50-100 km s{sup -1}, (2) swaying motions of order 15-20 km s{sup -1}, and (3) torsional motions of order 25-30 km s{sup -1}. The first two modes have been studied in detail before, but not the torsional motions. Our analysis of many near-limb and off-limb spectra and narrowband images using multiple spectral lines yields strong evidence that most, if not all, type II spicules undergo large torsional modulation and that these motions, like spicule swaying, represent Alfvenic waves propagating outward at several hundred km s{sup -1}. The combined action of the different motions explains the similar morphology of spicule bushes in the outer red and blue wings of chromospheric lines, and needs to be taken into account when interpreting Doppler motions to derive estimates for field-aligned flows in spicules and determining the Alfvenic wave energy in the solar atmosphere. Our results also suggest that large torsional motion is an ingredient in the production of type II spicules and that spicules play an important role in the transport of helicity through the solar atmosphere.

  18. Zn(II) transport and distribution in rat spermatids.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J G; Arrate, M P; Santander, M; Guzman, L; Benos, D J

    1993-10-01

    Zn(II) is an essential trace element. In spermatozoa, Zn(II) modulates metabolism and chromatin condensation. The mechanisms of uptake and distribution of this ion in sperm cells have not been explored. In rat spermatids, our results indicate that 1) 65Zn(II) binds with fast kinetics to a labile, presumably extracellular, compartment. This binding is temperature insensitive and not modified by metabolic inhibitors. 2) Entry of 65Zn(II) in the absence of externally added proteins occurs through a mediated transport system that allows exchange to reach steady state in approximately 15 min at 34 degrees C. 3) Upon entering the cells, 65Zn(II) binds tightly to cellular organelles. 4) Exchangeable Zn(II) bound to cytoplasmic proteins plus free intracellular Zn(II) appears to be < 20% of total exchangeable Zn(II). 5) The intracellular exchangeable Zn(II) compartment is decreased by metabolic inhibitors, showing a direct or indirect link between energy metabolism and cellular Zn(II) levels. 6) 65Zn(II) efflux from rat spermatids is a process with a rate constant of 0.16 +/- 0.13 min-1 at 34 degrees C. This exit rate of Zn(II) is likely to be affected by Zn(II) release from cytoplasmic binding sites or organelles.

  19. Bauhinia variegata (Caesalpiniaceae) leaf extract: An effective treatment option in type I and type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Garud, Mayuresh S

    2016-10-01

    Among various metabolic disorders, diabetes mellitus is one of the most common disorder. Present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extract of Bauhinia variegata leaves (AE) in animal models of type I and type II diabetes. Type I diabetes was induced by streptozotocin at the dose of 55mg/kg (i.p.) in male Sprague Dawley rats while type II diabetes was induced by high fat diet and streptozotocin at the dose of 35mg/kg (i.p.). Diabetic animals were treated with AE at the dose of 250, 500 and 1000mg/kg. Glipizide (5mg/kg) was used as standard treatment drug. Treatment was given for 28days. Parameters evaluated were body weight, plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, albumin, creatinine and bun urea nitrogen. In type II diabetes, high density lipoprotein levels in plasma and plasma insulin level were also evaluated. Histopathological study of pancreases were carried out in type I study. AE showed significant decrease in plasma glucose significantly. AE was also found to decrease cholesterol, triglyceride, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen level in both types of diabetes. AE did not show any significant effect on plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase. AE was found to increase the albumin and total protein levels. Histopathological study showed that AE decreases the necrotic changes in the pancreatic tissue. Aqueous extract of B. variegata leaves was found effective in treatment of both type I and type II diabetes.

  20. Spectral modeling of Type II SNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc

    2015-08-01

    The red supergiant phase represents the final stage of evolution in the life of moderate mass (8-25Msun) massive stars. Hidden from view, the core changes considerably its structure, progressing through the advanced stages of nuclear burning, and eventually becomes degenerate. Upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, this Fe or ONeMg core collapses, leading to the formation of a proto neutron star. A type II supernova results if the shock that forms at core bounce, eventually wins over the envelope accretion and reaches the progenitor surface.The electromagnetic display of such core-collapse SNe starts with this shock breakout, and persists for months as the ejecta releases the energy deposited initially by the shock or continuously through radioactive decay. Over a timescale of weeks to months, the originally optically-thick ejecta thins out and turns nebular. SN radiation contains a wealth of information about the explosion physics (energy, explosive nucleosynthesis), the progenitor properties (structure and composition). Polarised radiation also offers signatures that can help constrain the morphology of the ejecta.In this talk, I will review the current status of type II SN spectral modelling, and emphasise that a proper solution requires a time dependent treatment of the radiative transfer problem. I will discuss the wealth of information that can be gleaned from spectra as well as light curves, from both the early times (photospheric phase) and late times (nebular phase). I will discuss the diversity of Type SNe properties and how they are related to the diversity of red supergiant stars from which they originate.SN radiation offers an alternate means of constraining the properties of red-supergiant stars. To wrap up, I will illustrate how SNe II-P can also be used as probes, for example to constrain the metallicity of their environment.

  1. INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS LACKING TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Maekelae, P.; Akiyama, S.; Yashiro, S.; Howard, R. A.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the radio-emission characteristics of 222 interplanetary (IP) shocks detected by spacecraft at Sun-Earth L1 during solar cycle 23 (1996 to 2006, inclusive). A surprisingly large fraction of the IP shocks ({approx}34%) was radio quiet (RQ; i.e., the shocks lacked type II radio bursts). We examined the properties of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and soft X-ray flares associated with such RQ shocks and compared them with those of the radio-loud (RL) shocks. The CMEs associated with the RQ shocks were generally slow (average speed {approx}535 km s{sup -1}) and only {approx}40% of the CMEs were halos. The corresponding numbers for CMEs associated with RL shocks were 1237 km s{sup -1} and 72%, respectively. Thus, the CME kinetic energy seems to be the deciding factor in the radio-emission properties of shocks. The lower kinetic energy of CMEs associated with RQ shocks is also suggested by the lower peak soft X-ray flux of the associated flares (C3.4 versus M4.7 for RL shocks). CMEs associated with RQ CMEs were generally accelerating within the coronagraph field of view (average acceleration {approx}+6.8 m s{sup -2}), while those associated with RL shocks were decelerating (average acceleration {approx}-3.5 m s{sup -2}). This suggests that many of the RQ shocks formed at large distances from the Sun, typically beyond 10 Rs, consistent with the absence of metric and decameter-hectometric (DH) type II radio bursts. A small fraction of RL shocks had type II radio emission solely in the kilometric (km) wavelength domain. Interestingly, the kinematics of the CMEs associated with the km type II bursts is similar to those of RQ shocks, except that the former are slightly more energetic. Comparison of the shock Mach numbers at 1 AU shows that the RQ shocks are mostly subcritical, suggesting that they were not efficient in accelerating electrons. The Mach number values also indicate that most of these are quasi-perpendicular shocks. The radio-quietness is predominant

  2. Minkowski Flux Vacua of Type II Supergravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriot, David; Blâbäck, Johan; Van Riet, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We study flux compactifications of 10D type II supergravities to 4D Minkowski space-time, supported by parallel orientifold Op planes with 3 ≤p ≤8 . With some geometric restrictions, the 4D Ricci scalar can be written as a negative sum of squares involving Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield-like conditions. Setting all squares to zero provides automatically a solution to 10D equations of motion. This way we characterize a broad class, if not the complete set, of Minkowski flux vacua with parallel orientifolds. We conjecture an extension with nongeometric fluxes. None of our results rely on supersymmetry.

  3. Salvianolic Acid B Attenuates Rat Hepatic Fibrosis via Downregulating Angiotensin II Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Wang, Lina; Yan, Xiuchuan; Wang, Qinglan; Tao, Yanyan; Li, Junxia; Peng, Yuan; Liu, Ping; Liu, Chenghai

    2012-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in hepatic fibrosis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), one of the water-soluble components from Radix Salviae miltiorrhizae, has been used to treat hepatic fibrosis, but it is still not clear whether the effect of Sal B is related to angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling pathway. In the present study, we studied Sal B effect on rat liver fibrosis and Ang-II related signaling mediators in dimethylnitrosamine-(DMN-) induced rat fibrotic model in vivo and Ang-II stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in vitro, with perindopril or losartan as control drug, respectively. The results showed that Sal B and perindopril inhibited rat hepatic fibrosis and reduced expression of Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1R) and ERK activation in fibrotic liver. Sal B and losartan also inhibited Ang II-stimulated HSC activation including cell proliferation and expression of type I collagen I (Col-I) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) production in vitro, reduced the gene expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), and downregulated AT1R expression and ERK and c-Jun phosphorylation. In conclusion, our results indicate that Sal B may exert an antihepatic fibrosis effect via downregulating Ang II signaling in HSC activation. PMID:23243430

  4. Proteolysis of synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 in alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, U J; Malek, S K; Liu, L; Li, H L

    1999-10-01

    Synaptobrevin-2, syntaxin-1, and SNAP-25 were identified in rat alveolar epithelial type II cells by Western blot analysis. Synaptobrevin-2 was localized in the lamellar bodies, and syntaxin-1 and SNAP-25 were found in 0.4% Nonidet P40-soluble and -insoluble fractions, respectively, of the type II cells. When the isolated type II cells were stimulated for secretion with calcium ionophore A23187 or with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, these proteins were found to have been proteolyzed. Preincubation of cells with calpain inhibitor II (N-acetylleucylleucylmethionine), however, prevented the proteolysis. Treatment of the cell lysate with exogenous calpain resulted in a time-dependent decrease of these proteins. The data suggest that synaptobrevin, syntaxin, and SNAP-25 are subject to proteolytic modification by activated calpain in intact type II cells stimulated for secretion.

  5. Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease.

    PubMed

    Zheng, X Long; Kitamoto, Yasunori; Sadler, J Evan

    2009-06-01

    Enteropeptidase, a type II transmembrane serine protease, is localized to the brush border of the duodenal and jejunal mucosa. It is synthesized as a zymogen (proenteropeptidase) that requires activation by another protease, either trypsin or possibly duodenase. Active enteropeptidase then converts the pancreatic precursor, trypsinogen, to trypsin by cleavage of the specific trypsinogen activation peptide, Asp-Asp-Asp-Asp-Lys- Ile that is highly conserved in vertebrates. Trypsin, in turn, activates other digestive zymogens such as chymotrypsinogen, proelastase, procarboxypeptidase and prolipase in the lumen of the gut. The important biological function of enteropeptidase is highlighted by the manifestation of severe diarrhea, failure to thrive, hypoproteinemia and edema as a result of congenital deficiency of enteropeptidase activity in the gut. Conversely, duodenopancreatic reflux of proteolytically active enteropeptidase may cause acute and chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Blaumeiser, Bettina; Loquet, Philip; Wuyts, Wim; Nöthen, Markus M

    2004-08-01

    Pfeiffer syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by coronal craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia, broad thumbs and great toes. On the basis of clinical findings, three subtypes have been delineated. The clinical variability of Pfeiffer syndrome as well as other causes of craniosynostosis can make a prenatal diagnosis based on sonography alone difficult. We describe a fetus in whom sonographic findings (including 3D ultrasound) suggested a Pfeiffer syndrome type II and in which subsequent molecular analysis verified the diagnosis by identifying a de novo mutation in the FGFR2 gene. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prenatal molecular diagnosis of Pfeiffer syndrome in a patient without family history.

  7. Ordering dynamics in type-II superconductors.

    PubMed

    Guttenberg, Nicholas; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-12-01

    We use analytic and numerical methods to analyze the dynamics of vortices following the quench of a type-II superconductor under the application of an external magnetic field. In three dimensions, in the absence of a field, the spacing between vortices scales with time t with an exponent phi=0.414+/-0.01, in a thin sheet of a superconductor, the scaling exponent is phi=0.294+/-0.01. When an external magnetic field h is applied, the vortices are confined with respect to the length scale of the Abrikosov lattice, leading to a crossover between the power-law scaling length scale and the lattice length scale. From this we suggest a one-parameter scaling of r with h and r that is consistent with numerical data.

  8. Rat1p maintains RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation balance

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Schmid, Manfred; Malagon, Francisco; Haaning, Line Lindegaard; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2014-01-01

    In S. cerevisiae, the 5′-3′ exonuclease Rat1p partakes in transcription termination. Although Rat1p-mediated RNA degradation has been suggested to play a role for this activity, the exact mechanisms by which Rat1p helps release RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) from the DNA template are poorly understood. Here we describe a function of Rat1p in regulating phosphorylation levels of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest RNAPII subunit, Rpb1p, during transcription elongation. The rat1-1 mutant exhibits highly elevated levels of CTD phosphorylation as well as RNAPII distribution and transcription termination defects. These phenotypes are all rescued by overexpression of the CTD phosphatase Fcp1p, suggesting a functional relationship between the absence of Rat1p activity, elevated CTD phosphorylation, and transcription defects. We also demonstrate that rat1-1 cells display increased RNAPII transcription kinetics, a feature that may contribute to the cellular phenotypes of the mutant. Consistently, the rat1-1 allele is synthetic lethal with the rpb1-E1103G mutation, causing increased RNAPII speed, and is suppressed by the rpb2-10 mutation, causing slowed transcription. Thus, Rat1p plays more complex roles in controlling transcription than previously thought. PMID:24501251

  9. Waardenburg syndrome type II: phenotypic findings and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, X Z; Newton, V E; Read, A P

    1995-01-02

    The Waardenburg syndrome (WS) consists of at least two distinct autosomal dominant hereditary disorders. WS Type I has been mapped to the distal part of chromosome 2q and the gene identified as PAX3. Other gene(s) are responsible for WS Type II. Mapping WS Type II requires accurate diagnosis within affected families. To establish diagnostic criteria for WS Type II, 81 individuals from 21 families with Type II WS were personally studied, and compared with 60 personally studied patients from 8 families with Type I and 253 cases of WS (Type I or II) from the literature. Sensorineural hearing loss (77%) and heterochromia iridum (47%) were the two most important diagnostic indicators for WS Type II. Both were more common in Type II than in Type I. Other clinical manifestations, such as white forelock and skin patches, were more frequent in Type I. We estimate the frequency of phenotypic traits and propose diagnostic criteria for WS Type II. In practice, a diagnosis of WS Type II can be made with confidence given a family history of congenital hearing loss and pigmentary disorders, where individuals have been accurately measured for ocular distances to exclude dystopia canthorum.

  10. Angiotensin II-noradrenergic interactions in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J B; Robertson, D; Jackson, E K

    1987-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that interactions of endogenous angiotensin II (AII) with the noradrenergic neuroeffector junction are important in renin-dependent hypertension. In the in situ blood-perfused rat mesentery, in normal rats exogenous AII potentiated mesenteric vascular responses to periarterial (sympathetic) nerve stimulation (PNS) more than vascular responses to exogenous norepinephrine (NE). In 2-kidney-1-clip (2K-1C) rats with renovascular hypertension mesenteric vascular responses to PNS and NE were greater than in sham-operated rats, and renovascular hypertension mimicked the effects of exogenous AII with respect to enhancing responses to PNS more than responses to NE. In 2K-1C rats, but not in sham-operated rats, 1-Sar-8-Ile-AII markedly suppressed vascular responses to PNS, without influencing responses to NE. Finally, 1-Sar-8-Ile-AII attenuated sympathetic nerve stimulation-induced neuronal spillover of NE in 2K-1C rats, but not in sham-operated rats. These data indicate that renovascular hypertension enhances noradrenergic neurotransmission, and that this enhancement is mediated in part by AII-induced facilitation of NE release. PMID:3301900

  11. Type II Migration and Giant Planet Survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.

    2003-01-01

    Type II migration, in which a newly formed large planet opens a gap in its precursor circumstellar nebula and subsequently evolves with it, has been implicated as a delivery mechanism responsible for close stellar companions. Large scale migration is possible in a viscously spreading disk of surface density sigma (r,t) when most of it is sacrificed to the primary in order to promote a small portion of the disk to much higher angular momentum orbits. Embedded planets generally follow its evolution unless their own angular momentum is comparable to that of the disk. The fraction of the starting disk mass, M (sub d) = 2pi integral rsigma(r,0)dr, that is consumed by the star depends on the distance at which material escapes the disk's outer boundary. If the disk is allowed to expand indefinitely, virtually all of the disk will fall into the primary in order to send a vanishingly small portion to infinity. For such a case, it is difficult to explain the survival of any giant planets, including Jupiter and Saturn. Realistically, however, there are processes that could truncate a disk at a finite distance, r(sub d). Recent numerical modeling has illustrated that planets can survive in this case. We show here that much of these results can be understood by simple conservation arguments.

  12. Current Understanding of Usher Syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Wang, Le; Song, Hongman; Sokolov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common deafness-blindness caused by genetic mutations. To date, three genes have been identified underlying the most prevalent form of Usher syndrome, the type II form (USH2). The proteins encoded by these genes are demonstrated to form a complex in vivo. This complex is localized mainly at the periciliary membrane complex in photoreceptors and the ankle-link of the stereocilia in hair cells. Many proteins have been found to interact with USH2 proteins in vitro, suggesting that they are potential additional components of this USH2 complex and that the genes encoding these proteins may be the candidate USH2 genes. However, further investigations are critical to establish their existence in the USH2 complex in vivo. Based on the predicted functional domains in USH2 proteins, their cellular localizations in photoreceptors and hair cells, the observed phenotypes in USH2 mutant mice, and the known knowledge about diseases similar to USH2, putative biological functions of the USH2 complex have been proposed. Finally, therapeutic approaches for this group of diseases are now being actively explored. PMID:22201796

  13. Purification and partial characterization of myosin II from rat testis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Decivaldo dos Santos; Coelho, Milton Vieira

    2007-10-01

    The intent, in this work, was to isolate rat testis myosin II. Testis 40,000 x g x 40' supernatant was frozen at -20 degrees C for 48 h and, after it was thawed and centrifuged. The precipitate, after washed twice, was enriched in three polypeptides bands: p205, p43 and one that migrated together with the front of the gel. These polypeptides were solubilized in pH 10.8 at 27 degrees C and separated in Sephacryl S-400 column. Three low weight polypeptides co-eluted together with p205. The p205 was marked with anti-myosin II, possess actin-stimulated Mg-ATPase activity and co-sedimented with F-actin in the absence, but not in the presence, of ATP. In the present study, we have been developing a method for purification of myosin II from rat testis.

  14. [Achondrogenesis type I and II and hypochondrogenesis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bueno, M; Toledo, F; Toledo, J; Villegas, T; López, S; Remírez, J; García-Julián, G

    1980-10-01

    A study is made of achondrogenesis in relation to four observations of early fatal development. One case corresponds to type I (Parenti-Fraccaro); another to type II (Langer-Saldino); the final two, brothers, seem to come under the variation of hypochondrogenesis. In this study, authors stress the heterogenous nature of lethal, neonatal (short-limb) nanisms of which currently include: Type I and II achondrogenesis, hypochondrogenesis, homozygote achondroplasia, classical Torrance-type and San Diego-type thanatophoric dysplasia.

  15. Rescue of Isolated GH Deficiency Type II (IGHD II) via Pharmacologic Modulation of GH-1 Splicing.

    PubMed

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Petkovic, Vibor; Eblé, Andrée; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2016-10-01

    Isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) type II, the autosomal dominant form of GHD, is mainly caused by mutations that affect splicing of GH-1. When misspliced RNA is translated, it produces a toxic 17.5-kDa GH isoform that reduces the accumulation and secretion of wild-type-human GH (wt-hGH). Usually, isolated GHD type II patients are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH in order to maintain normal growth. However, this type of replacement therapy does not prevent toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa GH isoform on the pituitary gland, which can eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. Here, we tested the possibility to restore the constitutive splicing pattern of GH-1 by using butyrate, a drug that mainly acts as histone deacetylase inhibitor. To this aim, wt-hGH and/or different hGH-splice site mutants (GH-IVS3+2, GH-IVS3+6, and GH-ISE+28) were transfected in rat pituitary cells expressing human GHRH receptor (GHRHR) (GC-GHRHR). Upon butyrate treatment, GC-GHRHR cells coexpressing wt-hGH and each of the mutants displayed increased GH transcript level, intracellular GH content, and GH secretion when compared with the corresponding untreated condition. The effect of butyrate was most likely mediated by the alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2. Overexpression of alternative ASF/SF2 in the same experimental setting, indeed, promoted the amount of full-length transcripts thus increasing synthesis and secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that modulation of GH-1 splicing pattern to increase the 22-kDa GH isoform levels can be clinically beneficial and hence a crucial challenge in GHD research.

  16. Vitamin E alters alveolar type II cell phospholipid synthesis in oxygen and air

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, K.A.; Snyder, J.M.; Stenzel, W.; Saito, K.; Warshaw, J.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Newborn rats were injected with vitamin E or placebo daily until 6 days after birth. The effect of vitamin E pretreatment on in vitro surfactant phospholipid synthesis was examined in isolated type II cells exposed to oxygen or air form 24 h in vitro. Type II cells were also isolated from untreated 6-day-old rats and cultured for 24 h in oxygen or air with control medium or vitamin E supplemented medium. These cells were used to examine the effect of vitamin E exposure in vitro on type II cell phospholipid synthesis and ultrastructure. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis was reduced in cells cultured in oxygen as compared with air. This decrease was not prevented by in vivo pretreatment or in vitro supplementation with vitamin E. Vitamin E pretreatment increased the ratio of disaturated PC to total PC and increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis. The volume density of lamellar bodies in type II cells was increased in cells maintained in oxygen. Vitamin E did not affect the volume density of lamellar bodies. We conclude that in vitro hyperoxia inhibits alveolar type II cell phosphatidylcholine synthesis without decreasing lamellar body volume density and that supplemental vitamin E does not prevent hyperoxia-induced decrease in phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

  17. Type-II Dirac surface states in topological crystalline insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Kai; Chan, Y.-H.; Li, Xiao; Nohara, Y.; Schnyder, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, it has been realized that topological Weyl semimetals come in two different varieties: (i) with standard Weyl cones with pointlike Fermi surfaces (type I) and (ii) with tilted Weyl cones that appear at the contact of electron and hole pockets (type II). These two types of Weyl semimetals have very different physical properties, in particular, in their thermodynamics and magnetotransport. Here, we show that Dirac cone surface states of topological crystalline insulators can be distinguished in a similar way. We demonstrate this in terms of a general surface theory and then apply this knowledge to a family of antiperovskites of the form A3E O , where A denotes an alkaline earth metal, while E stands for Pb or Sn. Using ab initio DFT calculations, we investigate the bulk and surface topology of these antiperovskites and show that they exhibit type-I as well as type-II Dirac surface states protected by reflection symmetry. We find that the type-II Dirac states, as opposed to the type-I Dirac states, exhibit characteristic van Hove singularities in their dispersion, which lead to different thermodynamic properties, and which can serve as an experimental fingerprint of type-II surface states. The different magnetotransport characteristics between type-I and type-II surface states are discussed. In addition, we show that both type-I and type-II surface states exhibit an unusual helical spin polarization, which could lead to topological surface superconductivity.

  18. Surgical Treatment of Tubular Breast Type II

    PubMed Central

    Dabizha, Oleksii Y.; Kostenko, Alona A.; Gomolyako, Irina V.; Samko, Kristina A.; Borovyk, Denys V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubular breasts are caused by connective tissue malformation and occur in puberty. The main clinical characteristics of the tubular breast are breast asymmetry, dense fibrous ring around the areola, hernia bulging of the areola, megaareola, and hypoplasia of quadrants of the breast. Pathology causes great psychological discomfort to patients. Methods: This study included 17 patients, aged 18 to 34 years, with tubular breast type II who had bilateral pathology and were treated from 2013 to 2016. They had surgical treatment by method of the clinic. Correction technique consisted of mobilization of the central part of the gland and formation of a glandular flap with vertical and horizontal scorings, which looks like a “chessboard,” that was sufficient to cover the lower pole of the implant. The flap was fixed to the submammary folds with stitches that prevented its reduction and accented a new submammary fold. To underscore the importance of the method and to study the structural features of the vascular bed of tubular breast tissue, a morphological study was conducted. Results: Mean follow-up time was 25 months (range between 13 and 37 mo). The proposed technique achieved good results. Complications (hematoma, circumareolar scarring, and “double-bubble” deformity) were identified in 4 patients. Conclusions: Our morphological study confirmed that tubular breast tissue has increased vascularity due to the vessels with characteristic minor malformation and due to the high restorative potential of the vascular bed. Therefore, an extended glandular flap could be freely mobilized without damaging its blood supply; thus, the flap in most cases covered the implant completely and good aesthetic results were achieved. PMID:27826461

  19. Type II superlattice technology for LWIR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Avnon, E.; Azulai, D.; Benny, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Hojman, E.; Klin, O.; Krasovitsky, L.; Langof, L.; Lukomsky, I.; Nitzani, M.; Shtrichman, I.; Rappaport, N.; Snapi, N.; Weiss, E.; Tuito, A.

    2016-05-01

    SCD has developed a range of advanced infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductor heterostructures grown on GaSb. The XBn/XBp family of barrier detectors enables diffusion limited dark currents, comparable with MCT Rule-07, and high quantum efficiencies. This work describes some of the technical challenges that were overcome, and the ultimate performance that was finally achieved, for SCD's new 15 μm pitch "Pelican-D LW" type II superlattice (T2SL) XBp array detector. This detector is the first of SCD's line of high performance two dimensional arrays working in the LWIR spectral range, and was designed with a ~9.3 micron cut-off wavelength and a format of 640 x 512 pixels. It contains InAs/GaSb and InAs/AlSb T2SLs, engineered using k • p modeling of the energy bands and photo-response. The wafers are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and are fabricated into Focal Plane Array (FPA) detectors using standard FPA processes, including wet and dry etching, indium bump hybridization, under-fill, and back-side polishing. The FPA has a quantum efficiency of nearly 50%, and operates at 77 K and F/2.7 with background limited performance. The pixel operability of the FPA is above 99% and it exhibits a stable residual non uniformity (RNU) of better than 0.04% of the dynamic range. The FPA uses a new digital read-out integrated circuit (ROIC), and the complete detector closely follows the interfaces of SCD's MWIR Pelican-D detector. The Pelican- D LW detector is now in the final stages of qualification and transfer to production, with first prototypes already integrated into new electro-optical systems.

  20. Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1988-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

  1. Type II collagenopathies: Are there additional family members?

    SciTech Connect

    Freisinger, P.; Pontz, B.F.; Emmrich, P.; Stoess, H.; Bonaventure, J.

    1996-05-03

    The type II collagenopathies represent a group of chondrodysplasia sharing clinical and radiological manifestations which are expressed as a continuous spectrum of phenotypes, ranging from perinatally lethal to very mild conditions. Their common molecular bases are mutations in the type II collagen gene (COL2A1). We describe one case of lethal platyspondylic dysplasia, Torrance type, and a variant of lethal Kniest dysplasia, neither of which has been reported as a type II collagenopathy. Biochemical studies of cartilage collagens and morphological analysis of cartilage sections suggest that abnormalities of type II collagen structure and biosynthesis are the main pathogenetic factors in both cases. Thus, the phenotypic spectrum of type II collagenopathies might be greater than hitherto suspected. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Aberrant Activation of the Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System in the Developing Kidneys of Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Y.-Y.; Kobori, H.; Nakano, D.; Hitomi, H.; Mori, H.; Masaki, T.; Sun, Y.-X.; Zhi, N.; Zhang, L.; Huang, W.; Zhu, B.; Li, P.; Nishiyama, A.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that intrarenal angiotensin II (Ang II) levels are increased long before diabetes becomes apparent in obese Otsuka-Long-Evans-Tokushima-Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined the changes in intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity in the developing kidneys of OLETF rats. Ang II contents and mRNA levels of RAS components were measured in male OLETF and control Long-Evans Tokushima (LETO) rats at postnatal days (PND) 1, 5, and 15, and at 4–30 weeks of age. In both LETO and OLETF rats, kidney Ang II levels peaked at PND 1, then decreased during the pre- and post-weaning periods. However, Ang II levels and gene expression of RAS components, including angiotensinogen (AGT), renin, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), were not significantly different between LETO and OLETF rats. Intrarenal Ang II contents further decreased during puberty (from 7 to 11 weeks of age) in LETO rats, bur not in OLETF rats. At 11 weeks of age, kidney Ang II levels, urinary AGT excretion, and mRNA levels of AGT and renin were higher in OLETF rats than in LETO rats, while blood glucose levels were not significantly different between these groups of rats. These data indicate that continued intrarenal expression of Ang II during pubescence contributes to the increases in intrarenal Ang II levels in prediabetic OLETF rats, and is associated with increased intrarenal AGT and renin expression. Inappropriate activation of the intrarenal RAS in the prediabetic stage may facilitate the onset and development of diabetic nephropathy in later life. PMID:23322513

  3. Generating controllable type-II Weyl points via periodic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomantara, Raditya Weda; Gong, Jiangbin

    2016-12-01

    Type-II Weyl semimetals are a novel gapless topological phase of matter discovered recently in 2015. Similar to normal (type-I) Weyl semimetals, type-II Weyl semimetals consist of isolated band touching points. However, unlike type-I Weyl semimetals which have a linear energy dispersion around the band touching points forming a three-dimensional (3D) Dirac cone, type-II Weyl semimetals have a tilted conelike structure around the band touching points. This leads to various novel physical properties that are different from type-I Weyl semimetals. In order to study further the properties of type-II Weyl semimetals and perhaps realize them for future applications, generating controllable type-II Weyl semimetals is desirable. In this paper, we propose a way to generate a type-II Weyl semimetal via a generalized Harper model interacting with a harmonic driving field. When the field is treated classically, we find that only type-I Weyl points emerge. However, by treating the field quantum mechanically, some of these type-I Weyl points may turn into type-II Weyl points. Moreover, by tuning the coupling strength, it is possible to control the tilt of the Weyl points and the energy difference between two Weyl points, which makes it possible to generate a pair of mixed Weyl points of type-I and type-II. We also discuss how to physically distinguish these two types of Weyl points in the framework of our model via the Landau level structures in the presence of an artificial magnetic field. The results are of general interest to quantum optics as well as ongoing studies of Floquet topological phases.

  4. Degree of polarization of type-II unpolarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2007-05-15

    We address a quantitative determination of the degree of polarization of type-II unpolarized light via the computation of the distance between the polarization distribution and the uniform distribution associated with fully unpolarized light (i.e., type-I unpolarized light or natural light). We determine the maximum degree of polarization for type-II unpolarized light and the states reaching it. We show that the degree of polarization can be arbitrarily large, approaching complete polarization for increasing mean photon numbers.

  5. Prediction of Type II Burst Radiation for Large CME Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Schmidt, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Type IIs are associated with shocks in the corona and solar wind, either driven by CMEs or else blast waves. Recent quantitative theories for type II radiation show that the amount of radiation depends on the speed and spatial extent of the 3D shock, as well as on the background plasma, magnetic field configuration, and the number of superthermal electrons available for acceleration by the shock. In principle, then, Type II bursts may provide 1-3 day warnings of large and fast CMEs that might produce space weather at Earth. In this paper we couple the advanced 3D MHD BATS-R-US code of Toth, Gombosi, and colleagues with our new ``bolt-on'' theory for type II emission. The modeling includes initialization with coronal and active region magnetic fields reconstructed from solar magnetograms, coronal densities determined by 1 AU data, and CMEs modelled using STEREO coronagraph data. Two events with type IIs and strong CMEs are analyzed: 15 February 2011 and 7 March 2012. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for both type II bursts. This strongly supports the type II theory, implies real understanding of the physics involved, and supports the near-term development of a capability to predict and track these events for space weather prediction.

  6. Herringbone bursts associated with type II solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed observations of the herringbone (HB) fine structure on type II solar radio bursts are presented. Data from the Culgoora radiospectrograph, radiometer and radioheliograph are analyzed. The characteristic spectral profiles, frequency drift rates and exciter velocities, fluxes, source sizes, brightness temperatures, and polarizations of individual HB bursts are determined. Correlations between individual bursts within the characteristic groups of bursts and the properties of the associated type II bursts are examined. These data are compatible with HB bursts being radiation at multiples of the plasma frequency generated by electron streams accelerated by the type II shock. HB bursts are physically distinct phenomena from type II and type III bursts, differing significantly in emission processes and/or source conditions; this conclusion indicates that many of the presently available theoretical ideas for HB bursts are incorrect.

  7. [In vitro effect of total flavones of Fructus Chorspondiatis on expression of collagen type I and type III mRNA and protein of cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts].

    PubMed

    Bao, Jun-Ping; Jin, Ming; Yang, Yu-Min; Gao, Xiao-Hui; Shu, Liang; Xing, Hui-Hui; Jia, Lei

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of total flavones of Fructus Chorspondiatis (TFFC) on the mRNA and protein expression of collagen type I and III of rat cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II), and explore its anti-myocardial fibrosis molecular mechanism. Neonatal rat CFs were prepared from Sprague-Dawley rats (1-3 d after birth). The expression of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The study showed that stimulation of neonatal rat CFs with 100 nmol.L-1 of Ang II for 72 h resulted in a significant increase of the expression of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein. The changes on the expression level were blocked by TFFC. The results demonstrated that TFFC can inhibit myocardial fibrosis induced by Ang II in rats, which is probably associated with the collagen type I and III mRNA and protein levels up-regulated by Ang II, and TFFC was shown to decrease the expression levels of collagen type I and III mRNA and protein.

  8. Type II oestrogen binding sites in human colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Piantelli, M; Ricci, R; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Capelli, A; Rizzo, S; Scambia, G; Ranelletti, F O

    1990-01-01

    Seven cases of colorectal adenocarcinomas were investigated for the presence of oestrogen receptors and progesterone receptors. The tumours specifically bound oestradiol. This binding almost exclusively resulted from the presence of high numbers of type II oestrogen binding sites. Oestrogen receptors were absent or present at very low concentrations. Immunohistochemical investigation of nuclear oestrogen receptors gave negative results. This indicates that antioestrogen receptor antibodies recognise oestrogen receptors but not type II oestrogen binding sites. The presence of specific type II oestrogen binding sites and progesterone binding offers further evidence for a potential role for these steroids and their receptors in colorectal carcinoma. PMID:2266171

  9. Type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis: morphologic and immunohistopathologic studies.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M; Keene, D R; Blank, E; Hori, H; Sakai, L Y; Sherwin, L A; Hollister, D W

    1988-12-01

    A 32-wk-gestation female with type II achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis has been studied. The clinical features were typical, and radiographs revealed short ribs, hypoplastic ilia, absence of ossification of sacrum, pubis, ischia, tali, calcanei, and many vertebral bodies; the long bones were short with mild metaphyseal flaring. The femoral cylinder index was 6.3. Comparison with previous cases placed the patient toward the mild end of the achondrogenesis-hypochondrogenesis spectrum (Whitley-Gorlin prototype IV). Light microscopy revealed hypercellular cartilage with decreased matrix traversed by numerous fibrous vascular canals. The growth plate was markedly abnormal. Ultrastructural studies revealed prominently dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum containing a fine granular material with occasional fibrils in all chondrocytes. Immunohistologic studies indicated irregular large areas of cartilage matrix staining with monoclonal antibody to human type III collagen. The relative intensity of matrix staining for type II collagen appeared diminished. More striking, however, were intense focal accumulations of type II collagen within small rounded perinuclear structures of most chondrocytes but not other cell types. These results strongly suggest intracellular retention of type II collagen within vacuolar structures, probably within the dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum observed in all chondrocytes by electron microscopy (EM), and imply the presence of an abnormal, poorly secreted type II collagen molecule. Biochemical studies (see companion paper) suggest that this patient had a new dominant lethal disorder caused by a structural abnormality of type II collagen.

  10. Serum markers for type II diabetes mellitus

    DOEpatents

    Metz, Thomas O; Qian, Wei-Jun; Jacobs, Jon M; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Camp, II, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2014-03-18

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing selected biomarkers described hereafter either alone or in combination. The present invention allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases and provides other advantages, including the formulation of effective strategies for characterizing, archiving, and contrasting data from multiple sample types under varying conditions.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF II) receptor from rat brain is of lower apparent molecular weight than the IGF II receptor from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    McElduff, A.; Poronnik, P.; Baxter, R.C.

    1987-10-01

    The binding subunits of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF I) receptors from rat brain are of lower molecular weight than the corresponding receptor in rat liver, possibly due to variations in sialic acid content. We have compared the IGF II receptor from rat brain and rat liver. The brain receptor is of smaller apparent mol wt (about 10 K) on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This size difference is independent of ligand binding as it persists in iodinated and specifically immunoprecipitated receptors. From studies of wheat germ agglutinin binding and the effect of neuraminidase on receptor mobility, we conclude that this difference is not simply due to variations in sialic acid content. Treatment with endoglycosidase F results in reduction in the molecular size of both liver and brain receptors and after this treatment the aglycoreceptors are of similar size. We conclude that in rat brain tissue the IGF II receptor like the binding subunits of the insulin and IGF I receptors is of lower molecular size than the corresponding receptors in rat liver. This difference is due to differences in N-linked glycosylation.

  12. A COL2A1 mutation in achondrogenesis type II results in the replacement of type II collagen by type I and III collagens in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; Cole, W G; Chow, C W; Mundlos, S; Bateman, J F

    1995-01-27

    An autosomal dominant mutation in the COL2A1 gene was identified in a fetus with achondrogenesis type II. A transition of G2853 to A in exon 41 produced a substitution of Gly769 by Ser within the triple helical domain of the alpha 1(II) chain of type II collagen, interrupting the mandatory Gly-X-Y triplet sequence required for the normal formation of stable triple helical type II collagen molecules, resulting in the complete absence of type II collagen in the cartilage, which had a gelatinous composition. Type I and III collagens were the major species found in cartilage tissue and synthesized by cultured chondrocytes along with cartilage type XI collagen. However, cultured chondrocytes produced a trace amount of type II collagen, which was retained within the cells and not secreted. In situ hybridization of cartilage sections showed that the chondrocytes produced both type II and type I collagen mRNA. As a result, it is likely that the chondrocytes produced type II collagen molecules, which were then degraded. The close proximity of the Gly769 substitution by Ser to the mammalian collagenase cleavage site at Gly775-Leu776 may have produced an unstable domain that was highly susceptible to proteolysis. The type I and III collagens that replaced type II collagen were unable to maintain the normal structure of the hyaline cartilage but did support chondrocyte maturation, evidenced by the expression of type X collagen in the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate cartilage.

  13. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Munakata, M.; Hirata, A.; Akaike, N.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8395299

  14. Differential properties of type I and type II benzodiazepine receptors in mammalian CNS neurones.

    PubMed

    Yakushiji, T; Shirasaki, T; Munakata, M; Hirata, A; Akaike, N

    1993-07-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) partial agonists, Y-23684 and CL218,872, were compared with its full agonist, diazepam, on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced Cl- current (ICl) in acutely dissociated rat cerebral cortex (CTX), cerebellar Purkinje (CPJ) and spinal ventral horn (SVH) neurones, by the whole-cell mode patch-clamp technique. 2. The GABA-induced responses were essentially the same in both SVH and CPJ neurones, but the KD value of the GABA response in CTX neurone was lower than those in the other two brain regions. 3. Enhancement of the GABA response by the two partial agonists was about one-third of that by diazepam in the SVH neurones (where type II subtype of BZR, BZ2, is predominant), whereas these partial agonists potentiated the GABA response as much as diazepam in CPJ neurones (where the type I subtype of BZR, BZ1, is predominant). In CTX neurones where both type I and II variants are expressed, the augmentation ratio of the GABA response by diazepam was between the values in CPJ and SVH neurones. 4. In concentration-response relationships of BZR partial agonists, the threshold concentrations, KD values and maximal augmentation ratio of the GABA response were similar in all CTX, CPJ and SVH neurones. Also, in all preparations, the threshold concentration and KD values of diazepam action were 10 fold less than those induced by partial agonists. 5. All BZR agonists shifted the concentration-response relationship for GABA to the left without changing the maximum current amplitude, indicating that activation of both BZ1 and BZ2 increase the affinity of the GABAA receptor for GABA. 6. The results are important in clarifying the mechanism of anxiety and might explain the anxioselectivity of BZR partial agonists.

  15. Oxygen exchange profile in rat muscles of contrasting fibre types

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Brad J; McDonough, Paul; Padilla, Danielle J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether fibre type affects the O2 exchange characteristics of skeletal muscle at the microcirculatory level we tested the hypothesis that, following the onset of contractions, muscle comprising predominately type I fibres (soleus, Sol, 86 % type I) would, based on demonstrated blood flow responses, exhibit a blunted microvascular PO2 (PO2,m, which is determined by the O2 delivery () to O2 uptake () ratio) profile (assessed via phosphorescence quenching) compared to muscle of primarily type II fibres (peroneal, Per, 84 % type II). PO2,m was measured at rest, and following the rest-contractions (twitch, 1 Hz, 2–4 V for 120 s) transition in Sol (n = 6) and Per (n = 6) muscles of Sprague-Dawley rats. Both muscles exhibited a delay followed by a mono-exponential decrease in PO2,m to the steady state. However, compared with Sol, Per demonstrated (1) a larger change in baseline minus steady state contracting PO2,m (ΔPO2,m) (Per, 13.4 ± 1.7 mmHg; Sol, 8.6 ± 0.9 mmHg, P < 0.05); (2) a faster mean response time (i.e. time delay (TD) plus time constant (τ); Per, 23.8 ± 1.5 s; Sol, 39.6 ± 4.3 s, P < 0.05); and therefore (3) a greater rate of PO2,m decline (ΔPO2,m/τ; Per, 0.92 ± 0.08 mmHg s−1; Sol, 0.42 ± 0.05 mmHg s−1, P < 0.05). These data demonstrate an increased microvascular pressure head of O2 at any given point after the initial time delay for Sol versus Per following the onset of contractions that is probably due to faster dynamics relative to those of . PMID:12692174

  16. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Expression in Type II Cochlear Afferents in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Pankhuri; Wu, Jingjing Sherry; Zimmerman, Amanda; Fuchs, Paul; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase. The present study was designed to determine whether TH-driven Cre recombinase (TH-2A-CreER) provides a selective and reliable tool for identification and genetic manipulation of type II rather than type I cochlear afferents. The "TH-2A-CreER neurons" radiated from the spiral lamina, crossed the tunnel of Corti, turned towards the base of the cochlea, and traveled beneath the rows of outer hair cells. Neither the processes nor the somata of TH-2A-CreER neurons were labeled by antibodies that specifically labeled type I afferents and medial efferents. TH-2A-CreER-positive processes partially co-labeled with antibodies to peripherin, a known marker of type II afferents. Individual TH-2A-CreER neurons gave off short branches contacting 7-25 outer hair cells (OHCs). Only a fraction of TH-2A-CreER boutons were associated with CtBP2-immunopositive ribbons. These results show that TH-2A-CreER provides a selective marker for type II versus type I afferents and can be used to describe the morphology and arborization pattern of type II cochlear afferents in the mouse cochlea.

  17. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino)--a case report.

    PubMed

    Swar, M O; Srikrishna, B V

    1995-09-01

    Achondrogenesis is a lethal form of congenital chondrodystophy characterised by extreme micromelia. Definitive clinical and radiographic criteria have been established to differentiate Type II Achondrogenesis (Langer-Saldino) from type I Achondrogenesis (Parenti-Fraccaro). The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive for both types. We are presenting a case of Type II Achondrogenesis, a still born male to consanguinous parents. The clinical features included an enlarged head, protuberant abdomen and short stubby limbs. The mother had earlier delivered two still born males presumably with similar features. Radiographic characteristics of absence of rib fractures and well ossified iliac bones with concave medial margins and absent or deficient ossification of the sacrum, ischiae, and pubic bones differentiated Type II Achondrogenesis from Type I Achondrogenesis.

  18. Achondrogenesis type II with normally developed extremities: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kocakoc, Ercan; Kiris, Adem

    2002-07-01

    We present a case of achondrogenesis type II with normally developed extremities that was confirmed with postmortem ultrasonographic and radiographic examination. The length of the long bones may vary and the diagnosis of achondrogenesis should not be ruled out with normally developed extremities. Intrauterine sonographic examination of the vertebrae is very important and the absence of vertebral body ossification may be the unique finding of achondrogenesis type II. Axial ultrasonographic images and postmortem plain radiographs are useful to clarify the pathology.

  19. Unsupervised Clustering of Type II Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Adam; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2016-09-01

    As new facilities come online, the astronomical community will be provided with extremely large data sets of well-sampled light curves (LCs) of transients. This motivates systematic studies of the LCs of supernovae (SNe) of all types, including the early rising phase. We performed unsupervised k-means clustering on a sample of 59 R-band SN II LCs and find that the rise to peak plays an important role in classifying LCs. Our sample can be divided into three classes: slowly rising (II-S), fast rise/slow decline (II-FS), and fast rise/fast decline (II-FF). We also identify three outliers based on the algorithm. The II-FF and II-FS classes are disjoint in their decline rates, while the II-S class is intermediate and “bridges the gap.” This may explain recent conflicting results regarding II-P/II-L populations. The II-FS class is also significantly less luminous than the other two classes. Performing clustering on the first two principal component analysis components gives equivalent results to using the full LC morphologies. This indicates that Type II LCs could possibly be reduced to two parameters. We present several important caveats to the technique, and find that the division into these classes is not fully robust. Moreover, these classes have some overlap, and are defined in the R band only. It is currently unclear if they represent distinct physical classes, and more data is needed to study these issues. However, we show that the outliers are actually composed of slowly evolving SN IIb, demonstrating the potential of such methods. The slowly evolving SNe IIb may arise from single massive progenitors.

  20. Copper(II) complexes of rat amylin fragments.

    PubMed

    Kállay, Csilla; Dávid, Agnes; Timári, Sarolta; Nagy, Eszter Márta; Sanna, Daniele; Garribba, Eugenio; Micera, Giovanni; De Bona, Paolo; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2011-10-14

    The fragments of rat amylin rIAPP(17-29) (Ac-VRSSNNLGPVLPP-NH(2)), rIAPP(17-22) (Ac-VRSSNN-NH(2)), rIAPP(19-22) (Ac-SSNN-NH(2)) and rIAPP(17-20) (Ac-VRSS-NH(2)) together with the related mutant peptides (Ac-VASS-NH(2) and Ac-VRAA-NH(2)) have been synthesized and their copper(II) complexes studied by potentiometric, UV-Vis, CD and EPR spectroscopic methods. Despite the lack of any common strongly coordinating donor functions some of these fragments are able to bind copper(II) ions in the physiological pH range. The longest fragment rat amylin(17-29) keeps one equivalent copper(II) ion in solution in the whole pH range, while two other peptides Ac-VRSSNN-NH(2) and Ac-SSNN-NH(2) are also able to interact with copper(II) ions in the slightly alkaline pH range. According to the spectral parameters of the complexes, the peptides can be classified into two different categories: (i) the tetrapeptides Ac-VRSS-NH(2), Ac-VASS-NH(2) and Ac-VRAA-NH(2) can interact with copper(II) only under strongly alkaline conditions (pH > 10.0) and the formation of only one species with four amide nitrogen coordination can be detected; (ii) the peptides Ac-VRSSNNLGPVLPP-NH(2), Ac-VRSSNN-NH(2) and Ac-SSNN-NH(2) can form complexes above pH 6.0 with the major stoichiometries [CuH(-2)L], [CuH(-3)L](-) and [CuH(-4)L](2-). These data support that rIAPP(17-29) can interact with copper(II) ions under physiological conditions and the SSNN tetrapeptide fragment can be considered as the shortest sequence responsible for metal binding. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide some information on the possible coordination modes of Ac-SSNN-NH(2) towards the copper(II) ion and suggest that for [CuH(-2)L], [CuH(-3)L](-) and [CuH(-4)L](2-), the binding of two, three and four deprotonated amide nitrogens, with NH(-) of the side chain of asparagine as anchoring group, is probable. Moreover, these data reveal that peptides can be effective metal binding ligands even in the absence of anchoring

  1. Acoustic Type-II Weyl Nodes from Stacking Dimerized Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2016-11-01

    Lorentz-violating type-II Weyl fermions, which were missed in Weyl's prediction of nowadays classified type-I Weyl fermions in quantum field theory, have recently been proposed in condensed matter systems. The semimetals hosting type-II Weyl fermions offer a rare platform for realizing many exotic physical phenomena that are different from type-I Weyl systems. Here we construct the acoustic version of a type-II Weyl Hamiltonian by stacking one-dimensional dimerized chains of acoustic resonators. This acoustic type-II Weyl system exhibits distinct features in a finite density of states and unique transport properties of Fermi-arc-like surface states. In a certain momentum space direction, the velocity of these surface states is determined by the tilting direction of the type-II Weyl nodes rather than the chirality dictated by the Chern number. Our study also provides an approach of constructing acoustic topological phases at different dimensions with the same building blocks.

  2. Immunohistochemical analysis of lattice corneal dystrophies types I and II.

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, T; Tarkkanen, A; McLean, I; Ghiso, J; Frangione, B; Haltia, M

    1993-01-01

    Corneal buttons from four patients with lattice corneal dystrophy (LD) type I, thought to be an isolated corneal amyloidosis, and from six patients with LD type II, part of systemic familial amyloidosis, Finnish type (FAF; Meretoja's syndrome), were studied by immunohistochemistry to determine the differential distribution in the amyloid deposits of amyloid P component (AP), mutated gelsolin specific for FAF, and native gelsolin. In both types of LD, antibodies to AP labelled lattice lines and a discontinuous layer of amyloid deposits under Bowman's layer. In LD type II, particularly, they also reacted with streak-like amyloid deposits between corneal almellae, especially in the limbal region. While the anti-FAF antiserum strongly labelled all amyloid deposits in LD type II, it failed to react unequivocally with them in LD type I. Both in LD type I and in two control specimens representing granular dystrophy, the monoclonal antibody (MAb) GS-2C4 to gelsolin faintly labelled some deposits, while in LD type II it reacted non-homogeneously with most amyloid deposits. In all specimens, MAb GS-2C4 labelled corneal epithelial cells and occasional stromal keratocytes and endothelial cells. The results suggest that Meretoja's syndrome, a systemic disease, can be diagnosed even retrospectively from corneal buttons subjected to histopathological study. Images PMID:8110676

  3. Origin of wide-band IP type II bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjolainen, S.; Allawi, H.; Valtonen, E.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Different types of interplanetary (IP) type II bursts have been observed, where the more usual ones show narrow-band and patchy emissions, sometimes with harmonics, and which at intervals may disappear completely from the dynamic spectrum. The more unusual bursts are wide-band and diffuse, show no patches or breaks or harmonic emission, and often have long durations. Type II bursts are thought to be plasma emission, caused by propagating shock waves, but a synchrotron-emitting source has also been proposed as the origin for the wide-band type IIs. Aims: Our aim is to find out where the wide-band IP type II bursts originate and what is their connection to particle acceleration. Methods: We analyzed in detail 25 solar events that produced well-separated, wide-band IP type II bursts in 2001-2011. Their associations to flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and solar energetic particle events (SEPs) were investigated. Results: Of the 25 bursts, 18 were estimated to have heights corresponding to the CME leading fronts, suggesting that they were created by bow shocks ahead of the CMEs. However, seven events were found in which the burst heights were significantly lower and which showed a different type of height-time evolution. Almost all the analyzed wide-band type II bursts were associated with very high-speed CMEs, originating from different parts of the solar hemisphere. In terms of SEP associations, many of the SEP events were weak, had poor connectivity due to the eastern limb source location, or were masked by previous events. Some of the events had precursors in specific energy ranges. These properties and conditions affected the intensity-time profiles and made the injection-time-based associations with the type II bursts difficult to interpret. In several cases where the SEP injection times could be determined, the radio dynamic spectra showed other features (in addition to the wide-band type II bursts) that could be signatures of shock fronts

  4. A sample of Type II-L supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faran, T.; Poznanski, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Ganeshalingam, M.; Leonard, D. C.; Li, W.; Modjaz, M.; Serduke, F. J. D.; Silverman, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    What are Type II-Linear supernovae (SNe II-L)? This class, which has been ill defined for decades, now receives significant attention - both theoretically, in order to understand what happens to stars in the ˜15-25 M⊙ range, and observationally, with two independent studies suggesting that they cannot be cleanly separated photometrically from the regular hydrogen-rich SNe II-P characterized by a marked plateau in their light curve. Here, we analyse the multiband light curves and extensive spectroscopic coverage of a sample of 35 SNe II and find that 11 of them could be SNe II-L. The spectra of these SNe are hydrogen deficient, typically have shallow Hα absorption, may show indirect signs of helium via strong O I λ7774 absorption, and have faster line velocities consistent with a thin hydrogen shell. The light curves can be mostly differentiated from those of the regular, hydrogen-rich SNe II-P by their steeper decline rates and higher luminosity, and we propose to define them based on their decline in the V band: SNe II-L decline by more than 0.5 mag from peak brightness by day 50 after explosion. Using our sample we provide template light curves for SNe II-L and II-P in four photometric bands.

  5. Depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Akmal; Sultan, Sayed Mohammad; Nazli, Rubina; Akhtar, Tasleem; Khan, Mudasar Ahmad; Sher, Nabila; Aslam, Hina

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the frequency of depression among patients with type-II diabetes mellitus in Peshawar at Khyber Teaching Hospital, Peshawar, from March to September 2010. Depression was assessed by using Beck Depressive Inventory-II (BDI-II). Out of 140 patients with type-II diabetes, 85 (61%) were women and 55 (39%) were men. Mean age was 45±7.45 years. Eighty four (60%) patients presented with severe depression. Depression was higher in females than males and widows. Depression was high in diabetic patients, especially in females and widows. It is of essence that psychiatric attention may be necessary to be incorporated in diabetes care both for prevention and treatment.

  6. Type II supernovae as probes of environment metallicity: observations of host H II regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Dessart, L.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Morrell, N. I.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Phillips, M. M.; Folatelli, G.; Boffin, H. M. J.; de Jaeger, T.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Prieto, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Spectral modelling of type II supernova atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This dependence motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these supernovae can be used as environment metallicity indicators. Aims: To assess this accuracy we present a sample of type II supernova host H ii-region spectroscopy, from which environment oxygen abundances have been derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in supernova spectra. Methods: Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host H ii regions by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. These abundances are then compared to equivalent widths of Fe ii 5018 Å at various time and colour epochs. Results: Our distribution of inferred type II supernova host H ii-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of type II supernovae exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe ii 5018 Å at 50 days post-explosion shows a statistically significant correlation with host H ii-region oxygen abundance. The strength of this correlation increases if one excludes abundance measurements derived far from supernova explosion sites. The correlation significance also increases if we only analyse a "gold" IIP sample, and if a colour epoch is used in place of time. In addition, no evidence is found of a correlation between progenitor metallicity and supernova light-curve or spectral properties - except for that stated above with respect to Fe ii 5018 Å equivalent widths - suggesting progenitor metallicity is not a driving factor in producing the diversity that is observed in our sample. Conclusions: This study provides observational evidence of the usefulness of type II supernovae as metallicity indicators. We finish with a discussion of the

  7. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparison of type I and type II bovine viral diarrhea virus infection in swine.

    PubMed Central

    Walz, P H; Baker, J C; Mullaney, T P; Kaneene, J B; Maes, R K

    1999-01-01

    Some isolates of type II bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are capable of causing severe clinical disease in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infection has been reported in pigs, but the ability of these more virulent isolates of type II BVDV to induce severe clinical disease in pigs is unknown. It was our objective to compare clinical, virologic, and pathologic findings between type I and type II BVDV infection in pigs. Noninfected control and BVDV-infected 2-month-old pigs were used. A noncytopathic type I and a noncytopathic type II BVDV isolate were chosen for evaluation in feeder age swine based upon preliminary in vitro and in vivo experiments. A dose titration study was performed using 4 groups of 4 pigs for each viral isolate. The groups were inoculated intranasally with either sham (control), 10(3), 10(5), or 10(7) TCID50 of virus. The pigs were examined daily and clinical findings were recorded. Antemortem and postmortem samples were collected for virus isolation. Neither the type I nor type II BVDV isolates resulted in clinical signs of disease in pigs. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from antemortem and postmortem samples from groups of pigs receiving the 10(5) and the 10(7) TCID50 dose of the type I BVDV isolate. In contrast, BVDV was only isolated from postmortem samples in the group of pigs receiving the 10(7) TCID50 dose of the type II BVDV isolate. Type I BVDV was able to establish infection in pigs at lower doses by intranasal instillation than type II BVDV. Infection of pigs with a type II isolate of BVDV known to cause severe disease in calves did not result in clinically apparent disease in pigs. PMID:10369569

  9. Angiotensin II induces differential insulin action in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Surapongchai, Juthamard; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is reportedly involved in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of two ANGII doses on the phenotypic characteristics of insulin resistance syndrome and insulin action and signaling in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with either saline (SHAM) or ANGII at a commonly used pressor dose (100 ng/kg/min; ANGII-100) or a higher pressor dose (500 ng/kg/min; ANGII-500) via osmotic minipumps for 14 days. We demonstrated that ANGII-100-infused rats exhibited the phenotypic features of non-obese insulin resistance syndrome, including hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance of glucose uptake in the soleus muscle, whereas ANGII-500-treated rats exhibited diabetes-like symptoms, such as post-prandial hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion and hypertriglyceridemia. At the cellular level, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the soleus muscle of the ANGII-100 group was 33% lower (P < 0.05) than that in the SHAM group and was associated with increased insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Ser(307) and decreased Akt Ser(473) and AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation and GLUT-4 expression. However, ANGII-500 infusion did not induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance or impair insulin signaling elements as initially anticipated. Moreover, we found that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the ANGII-500 group was accompanied by the enhanced expression of ACE2 and MasR proteins, which are the key elements in the non-classical pathway of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic infusion with these two pressor doses of ANGII induced differential metabolic responses at both the systemic and skeletal muscle levels.

  10. Asymptomatic type II hyperprolinaemia associated with hyperglycinaemia in three sibs.

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, L; Mollica, F; Levy, H L

    1975-01-01

    Three clinically normal sibs were discovered to have type II hyperprolinaemia in a routine serum amino acid screening programme in Sicily. In addition to the basic biochemical features of type II hyperprolinaemia, all 3 children had marked hyperglycinaemia, whereas their parents had both normal blood proline and glycine concentrations. Clinical normality in individuals with hyperprolinaemia may suggest that these two metabolic disorders (types I and II) are benign entities. Furthermore, the absence of clinical abnormality in these sibs, despite the presence of marked hyperprolinaemia and hyperglycinaemia, may suggest that neither of these findings alone causes brain damage. The hyperglycinaemia in these sibs is unexplained and is an unusual if not unique finding in association with hyperprolinaemia. PMID:1200680

  11. Realizing type-II Weyl points in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastri, Kunal; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2017-01-01

    The recent discovery of the Lorentz symmetry-violating "type-II" Weyl semimetal phase has renewed interest in the study of Weyl physics in condensed-matter systems. However, tuning the exceptional properties of this novel state has remained a challenge. Optical lattices, created using standing laser beams, provide a convenient platform to tune tunneling parameters continuously in time. In this paper, we propose a generalized two level system exhibiting type-II Weyl points that can be realized using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. The system is engineered using a three-dimensional lattice with complex π phase tunneling amplitudes. Various unique properties of the type-II Weyl semimetal such as open Fermi surface, anomalous chirality, and topological Fermi arcs can be probed using the proposed optical lattice scheme.

  12. A TYPE II RADIO BURST WITHOUT A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Su, W.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Sun, J. Q. E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn

    2015-05-10

    Type II radio bursts are thought to be a signature of coronal shocks. In this paper, we analyze a short-lived type II burst that started at 07:40 UT on 2011 February 28. By carefully checking white-light images, we find that the type II radio burst is not accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, only by a C2.4 class flare and narrow jet. However, in the EUV images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we find a wave-like structure that propagated at a speed of ∼600 km s{sup −1} during the burst. The relationship between the type II radio burst and the wave-like structure is, in particular, explored. For this purpose, we first derive the density distribution under the wave by the differential emission measure method, which is used to restrict the empirical density model. We then use the restricted density model to invert the speed of the shock that produces the observed frequency drift rate in the dynamic spectrum. The inverted shock speed is similar to the speed of the wave-like structure. This implies that the wave-like structure is most likely a coronal shock that produces the type II radio burst. We also examine the evolution of the magnetic field in the flare-associated active region and find continuous flux emergence and cancellation taking place near the flare site. Based on these facts, we propose a new mechanism for the formation of the type II radio burst, i.e., the expansion of the strongly inclined magnetic loops after reconnecting with a nearby emerging flux acts as a piston to generate the shock wave.

  13. Vortex liquid crystals in anisotropic type II superconductors.

    PubMed

    Carlson, E W; Castro Neto, A H; Campbell, D K

    2003-02-28

    In an isotropic type II superconductor in a moderate magnetic field, the transition to the normal state occurs by vortex lattice melting. In certain anisotropic cases, the vortices acquire elongated cross sections and interactions. Systems of anisotropic, interacting constituents generally exhibit liquid crystalline phases. We examine the possibility of a two step melting in homogeneous type II superconductors with anisotropic superfluid stiffness from a vortex lattice into first a vortex smectic and then a vortex nematic at high temperature and magnetic field. We find that fluctuations of the ordered phase favor an instability to an intermediate smectic-A in the absence of intrinsic pinning.

  14. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis): a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Doh, J W; Kim, C J; Chi, J G

    2000-10-01

    Achondrogenesis is a lethal form of congenital chondrodystrophy characterized by extreme micromelia. We describe a case of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino achondrogenesis) detected by prenatal ultrasonography at 20-week gestation. A dwarfed fetus with large head, short neck and chest, prominent abdomen and short limbs was terminated transvaginally. Radiologic and histopathologic examination revealed features of mild form of achondrogenesis type II. Although the case had no known risk factor and the phenotypic abnormality was mild, modern development in prenatal screening made the early detection possible.

  15. Clinical and morphological features of Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, P B; Parsons, M A; Weatherhead, R G; Karcioglu, Z A

    1998-01-01

    Evaluation of 4-month-old girl who presented with congenital cataracts revealed heterochromia iridis, fundus hypopigmentation, residual white forelock and sensory neural hearing loss--findings consistent with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Bilateral peripheral iridectomies performed at lensectomy provided tissue for evaluation. Light microscopy revealed fewer melanocytes in the blue iris than in the brown. Electron microscopic examination showed a significant (p = 0.0001) reduction in melanosome size in the blue iris, and the nerve endings contained fewer vesicles. A defect in neural crest cell migration and melanin synthesis may be responsible for the heterochromia iridis seen in Waardenburg syndrome type II.

  16. Safety and toxicological evaluation of a novel, water-soluble undenatured type II collagen.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Marone, Palma Ann; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi; Bagchi, Manashi; Shiojima, Yoshiaki

    2013-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the broad-spectrum safety of a novel, water-soluble undenatured type II collagen (NEXT-II) derived from chicken sternum cartilage. The presence of epitope in NEXT-II was confirmed by using a commercial kit. The acute oral LD₅₀ of NEXT-II was found to be greater than 5000 mg/kg bw in rats, while the single-dose acute dermal LD₅₀ was greater than 2000 mg/kg bw. The primary dermal irritation index (PDII) of NEXT-II was found to be 1.8 and classified as slightly irritating to the skin. In primary eye irritation studies, the maximum mean total score (MMTS) of NEXT-II was observed to be 7.3 and classified as minimally irritating to the eye. Long-term safety studies were conducted in dogs over a period of 150 d, and no significant changes were observed in body weight, heart rate, respiration rate and blood chemistry. NEXT-II does not induce mutagenicity in the bacterial reverse mutation test in five Salmonella typhimurium strains either with or without metabolic activation. Furthermore, two experiments were conducted to assess the potential of NEXT-II to induce mutations with and without metabolic activation at the mouse lymphoma thymidine kinase locus using the cell line L5178Y. No biologically relevant increase of mutants was observed. Also, no dose-dependent toxicity was observed. Furthermore, colony sizing showed no clastogenic effects induced by NEXT-II under the experimental conditions. These studies demonstrated the broad spectrum of safety of NEXT-II.

  17. Adenosine-A1 receptor agonist induced hyperalgesic priming type II.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala, N-Me-Phe, Gly-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of transition to chronic pain that we have termed type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, type II hyperalgesic priming differs from type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that, as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study, we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms, as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor.

  18. Adenosine-A1 Receptor Agonist Induced Hyperalgesic Priming Type II

    PubMed Central

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that repeated exposure of the peripheral terminal of the primary afferent nociceptor to the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist DAMGO ([D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin acetate salt) induces a model of the transition to chronic pain that we have termed Type II hyperalgesic priming. Similar to Type I hyperalgesic priming, there is a markedly prolonged response to subsequent administration of proalgesic cytokines, prototypically prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, Type II hyperalgesic priming differs from Type I in being rapidly induced, protein kinase A (PKA), rather than PKCε dependent, not reversed by a protein translation inhibitor, occurring in female as well as in male rats, and isolectin B4-negative neuron dependent. We report that as with the repeated injection of a MOR agonist, the repeated administration of an agonist at the A1-adenosine receptor, also a Gi-protein coupled receptor, N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), also produces priming similar to DAMGO-induced Type II hyperalgesic priming. In this study we demonstrate that priming induced by repeated exposure to this A1-adenosine receptor agonist shares the same mechanisms as MOR-agonist induced priming. However, the prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by repeated administration of CPA depends on G-protein αi subunit activation, differently from DAMGO-induced Type II priming, in which it depends on the β/γ subunit. These data implicate a novel form of Gi-protein signaling pathway in the Type II hyperalgesic priming induced by repeated administration of an agonist at A1-adenosine receptor to the peripheral terminal of the nociceptor. PMID:26588695

  19. Biodistribution of a novel antiestrogen (Analog II) in the mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M T; Pento, J T; Magarian, R A; Mousissian, G K; Basmadjian, G P

    1990-01-01

    The biodistribution of a novel antiestrogen Analog II was determined in the mouse and rat. The tritiated product, [3H]-Analog II was prepared by New England Nuclear and was purified by preparative chromatography using silica gel and petroleum ether/methylene chloride (80:20). The fat tissue had the highest uptake due to the hydrophobic nature of Analog II. The second highest uptake was in the mouse uterine tissue which was greater than that observed in the rat. The differences in biodistribution between the mouse and rat may partially explain the differences in biological activity of Analog II previously observed in these two animal species.

  20. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Astier, Pierre; Carlberg, RaymondG.; Conley, Alex; Fabbro, Sebastien; Fouchez, Dominique; Neill, James D.; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas

    2006-03-20

    We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift upto z {approx}0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy&Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNeII-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, across-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We apply this revised method to our dataset of high-redshift SNe II-P and find that the resulting Hubble diagram has a scatter of only 0.26 magnitudes, thus demonstrating the feasibility of measuring the expansion history, with present facilities, using a method independent of that based upon supernovae of Type Ia.

  1. Subchronic toxicity study of Caramel Colour II in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, K M; Carter, J L; Petsel, S R; Chappel, C I; Emerson, J L; Stanley, J

    1992-05-01

    Caramel Colour II is a distinct type of colourant with a pronounced reddish hue. It is made with sulphite reactants but without ammonia. The red colour and a high alcohol solubility provide functional characteristics that are important in foods or beverages containing natural flavour extractives. Caramel Colour II is widely used in ice creams and liqueurs; however, it represents less than 1% of total caramel colour manufacture. The toxicity of Caramel Colour II was evaluated in a 13-wk study in Fischer-344 (F344) rats. The test material was mixed with demineralized water and the solutions were given to the animals ad lib. in the drinking fluid. The concentrations of caramel colour in the drinking fluid were adjusted periodically to achieve the desired caramel colour intake/kg body weight/day. Groups of 20 rats/sex were given Caramel Colour II at levels of 0, 4, 8, 12 or 16 g/kg for at least 13 wk. There were no deaths in any of the groups fed Caramel Colour II. All rats fed caramel colour had soft faeces. All treated groups also had lower fluid consumption that was attributed to poor palatability of the high concentrations of caramel colour that were fed. A number of changes observed (reduced food consumption in all treatment groups except males given 4 g/kg; significantly lower body weights for males given 12 g/kg or more and for females given 8 g/kg or more; lower urine volume and higher specific gravity) were attributed to the reduced water intake and not considered to be toxicologically significant. There were no consistent treatment-related alterations in haematology or blood chemistry variables, and random changes noted were not associated with macroscopic or microscopic pathological alterations. There were no toxicologically important pathological findings. Based on this study, Caramel Colour II was not toxic in F344 rats treated for 13 wk. The highest dose level tested in this study (16 g/kg) was considered to be the no-observed-adverse-effect level.

  2. Segmental fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Hrvoje; Bazdaric, Ksenija; Marijancic, Verner; Soic-Vranic, Tamara; Malnar, Daniela; Arbanas, Juraj

    2017-01-18

    The iliopsoas of the rat is composed of two muscles - the psoas major muscle and the iliacus muscle. The psoas major muscle arises from all the lumbar vertebrae and the iliacus muscle from the fifth and sixth lumbar vertebrae and ilium. Their common insertion point is the lesser trochanter of the femur, and their common action is the lateral rotation of the femur and flexion of the hip joint. Unlike humans, the rat is a quadruped and only occasionally rises up on its hind legs. Therefore, it is expected that the fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle will be different than that of humans. The iliopsoas muscle of the rat is generally considered to be a fast muscle. However, previous studies of the fibre type composition of the rat psoas muscle showed different results. Moreover, very little is known about the composition of the rat iliacus muscle. The aim of our study was to examine the fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle in order to better understand the complex function of the listed muscle. The psoas major muscle was examined segmentally at four different levels of its origin. Type I, IIA, IIB and IIX muscle fibres were typed using monoclonal antibodies for myosin heavy chain identification. The percentage of muscle fibre types and muscle fibre cross-sectional areas were calculated. In our study we showed that in the rat iliopsoas muscle both the iliacus and the psoas major muscles had a predominance of fast muscle fibre types, with the highest percentage of the fastest IIB muscle fibres. Also, the IIB muscle fibres showed the largest cross-sectional area (CSA) in both muscles. As well, the psoas major muscle showed segmental differences of fibre type composition. Our results showed changes in percentages, as well as the CSAs of muscle fibre types in cranio-caudal direction. The most significant changes were visible in type IIB muscle fibres, where there was a decrease of percentages and the CSAs from the cranial towards the caudal part

  3. Increased endocytotic and lysosomal activities in denervated type I and type II muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, G; Tågerud, S; Libelius, R

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that increased endocytotic and lysosomal activities occur in the endplate region of denervated skeletal muscle fibres. This, however, does not engage all fibres of a muscle at a given time after denervation. The present study was carried out in order to determine if both type I (slow) and type II (fast) muscle fibres can react to denervation by increased endocytotic and lysosomal activities. Uptake of horseradish peroxidase as a marker for endocytosis was studied in conjunction with acid phosphatase staining for lysosomal activity in type I and type II fibres of the denervated mouse hemidiaphragm. Fibre typing was performed using a monoclonal antibody against fast skeletal myosin and by adenosine triphosphatase staining. The results show that increased endocytosis and lysosomal activation occur in both type I and type II fibres after denervation.

  4. SHAPING OF ACTION POTENTIALS BY TYPE I AND TYPE II BK CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, David B.; Wang, Bin; Brenner, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The BK channel is a Ca2+ and voltage-gated conductance responsible for shaping action potential waveforms in many types of neurons. Type II BK channels are differentiated from type I channels by their pharmacology and slow gating kinetics. The β4 accessory subunit confers type II properties on BK α subunits. Empirically derived properties of BK channels, with and without the β4 accessory subunit, were obtained using a heterologous expression system under physiological ionic conditions. These data were then used to study how BK channels alone (type I) and with the accessory β4 subunit (type II) modulate action potential properties in biophysical neuron models. Overall, the models support the hypothesis that it is the slower kinetics provided by the β4 subunit that endows the BK channel with type II properties, which leads to broadening of action potentials and, secondarily, to greater recruitment of SK channels reducing neuronal excitability. Two regions of parameter space distinguished type II and type I effects; one where the range of BK-activating Ca2+ was high (>20 µM) and the other where BK-activating Ca2+ was low (~0.4–1.2 µM). The latter required an elevated BK channel density, possibly beyond a likely physiological range. BK-mediated sharpening of the spike waveform associated with the lack of the β4 subunit was sensitive to the properties of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels due to electrogenic effects on spike duration. We also found that depending on Ca2+ dynamics, type II BK channels may have the ability to contribute to the medium AHP, a property not generally ascribed to BK channels, influencing the frequency-current relationship. Finally, we show how the broadening of action potentials conferred by type II BK channels can also indirectly increase the recruitment of SK-type channels decreasing the excitability of the neuron. PMID:21723921

  5. Cytidine monophosphate-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol in permeabilized type II pneumonocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, J E; Thakur, N R; Rader, G R; Tesan, M

    1985-01-01

    Results of previous investigations support the proposition that, in type II pneumonocytes, CMP is involved in integration of the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol for lung surfactant. In the present investigation, the amount of CMP in rat type II pneumonocytes was altered directly and resultant changes in the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol were examined. Type II pneumonocytes were made permeable to CMP by treatment with Ca2+-free medium, and phosphatidylglycerol synthesis was then assessed by measurement of the incorporation of a radiolabelled precursor, [14C]glycerol 3-phosphate, that was not effectively utilized by cells that resisted permeabilization. Incorporation of [14C]glycerol 3-phosphate into phosphatidylglycerol (but not into other lipids) was stimulated greatly by CMP (half-maximal stimulation at approx. 0.1 mM). CMP stimulated the incorporation of [14C]glycerol 3-phosphate into both the phosphatidyl moiety and the head group of phosphatidylglycerol. Incorporation of [14C]palmitate into phosphatidylglycerol was also stimulated by CMP. myo-Inositol, at concentrations found in foetal-rat serum (0.2-2.0 mM), inhibited CMP-dependent incorporation of [14C]glycerol 3-phosphate into phosphatidylglycerol and promoted, instead, CMP-dependent incorporation into phosphatidylinositol. These data, when extrapolated to foetal type II pneumonocytes, are consistent with the view that the developmental increase in the synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol for surfactant by foetal lungs is promoted by the increase in intracellular CMP and the declining availability of myo-inositol that were found previously to be associated with this period of development. PMID:3004409

  6. Glycogen storage disease types I and II: Treatment updates

    PubMed Central

    Kishnani, P. S.; Chen, Y. T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Prior to 2006 therapy for glycogen storage diseases consisted primarily of dietary interventions, which in the case of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II (GSD II; Pompe disease) remained essentially palliative. Despite improved survival and growth, long-term complications of GSD type I (GSD I) have not responded to dietary therapy with uncooked cornstarch or continuous gastric feeding. The recognized significant risk of renal disease and liver malignancy in GSD I has prompted efforts towards curative therapy, including organ transplantation, in those deemed at risk. Results of clinical trials in infantile Pompe disease with alglucosidase alfa (Myozyme) showed prolonged survival reversal of cardiomyopathy, and motor gains. This resulted in broad label approval of Myozyme for Pompe disease in 2006. Furthermore, the development of experimental therapies, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy, holds promise for the availability of curative therapy in GSD I and GSD II/Pompe disease in the future. PMID:17308886

  7. Glycogen storage disease types I and II: treatment updates.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, D D; Kishnani, P S; Chen, Y T

    2007-04-01

    Prior to 2006 therapy for glycogen storage diseases consisted primarily of dietary interventions, which in the case of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II (GSD II; Pompe disease) remained essentially palliative. Despite improved survival and growth, long-term complications of GSD type I (GSD I) have not responded to dietary therapy with uncooked cornstarch or continuous gastric feeding. The recognized significant risk of renal disease and liver malignancy in GSD I has prompted efforts towards curative therapy, including organ transplantation, in those deemed at risk. Results of clinical trials in infantile Pompe disease with alglucosidase alfa (Myozyme) showed prolonged survival reversal of cardiomyopathy, and motor gains. This resulted in broad label approval of Myozyme for Pompe disease in 2006. Furthermore, the development of experimental therapies, such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene therapy, holds promise for the availability of curative therapy in GSD I and GSD II/Pompe disease in the future.

  8. Antidepressants in type II versus type I bipolar depression: A randomized discontinuation trial

    PubMed Central

    Vöhringer, Paul A.; Ostacher, Michael J.; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Holtzman, Niki S.; Thommi, Sairah B.; Whitham, Elizabeth A.; Sullivan, Matthew C.; Baldassano, Claudia F.; Goodwin, Fredrick K.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to test the hypothesis that antidepressants (ADs) may show preferential efficacy and safety among type-II over type-I bipolar disorder (BD) patients. Methods DSM-IV BD-I (n=21) and -II patients (n=49) in acute major depressive episodes were treated with ADs plus mood-stabilizers to euthymia sustained for two months, and then randomized openly to continue or discontinue ADs for up to three years. Outcomes were episode-recurrences and changes in standardized symptom-ratings. Results In follow-up averaging 1.64±0.98 years, both subgroups showed improvement in depressive episode frequency with AD continuation, but contrary to the hypothesis, more improvement was seen in type I than in type II bipolar depression (for type II, mean decrease in depressive episodes per year 0.21 ± 0.26 [CI:0.05, 0.37]; for type I: mean decrease 0.35 ± 0.15 [CI:0.30, 0.41]). Type II subjects continued on ADs had slightly more depressive, but fewer manic/hypomanic, episodes than BD-I subjects. No notable differences were seen in either group in time to a recurrence of mood episodes or total time-in-remission. Conclusions The findings do not confirm the hypothesis that long-term AD treatment in BP-II has better outcomes than in BD-I patients, except somewhat lower risk of manic/hypomanic episodes. PMID:26267418

  9. Oro-facial-digital syndrome type II with otolaryngological manifestations.

    PubMed

    Havle, A; Shedge, S; Malashetti, S; Jain, V

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of oro-facial-digital syndrome type II (Mohr's syndrome) which is characterized by malformations of the oral cavity, face and digits. The facial and oral features include tongue nodules, cleft or high-arched palate, missing teeth, broad nose; cleft lip. The digital features include clinodactyly, polydactyly, syndactyly, brachydactyly and duplication of the hallux.

  10. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  11. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  12. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  13. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II devices. 159.126 Section 159.126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.126 Coliform...

  14. Subcellular localization of mammalian type II membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Aturaliya, Rajith N; Fink, J Lynn; Davis, Melissa J; Teasdale, Melvena S; Hanson, Kelly A; Miranda, Kevin C; Forrest, Alistair R R; Grimmond, Sean M; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kanamori, Mutsumi; Kai, Chikatoshi; Kawai, Jun; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Teasdale, Rohan D

    2006-05-01

    Application of a computational membrane organization prediction pipeline, MemO, identified putative type II membrane proteins as proteins predicted to encode a single alpha-helical transmembrane domain (TMD) and no signal peptides. MemO was applied to RIKEN's mouse isoform protein set to identify 1436 non-overlapping genomic regions or transcriptional units (TUs), which encode exclusively type II membrane proteins. Proteins with overlapping predicted InterPro and TMDs were reviewed to discard false positive predictions resulting in a dataset comprised of 1831 transcripts in 1408 TUs. This dataset was used to develop a systematic protocol to document subcellular localization of type II membrane proteins. This approach combines mining of published literature to identify subcellular localization data and a high-throughput, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach to experimentally characterize subcellular localization. These approaches have provided localization data for 244 and 169 proteins. Type II membrane proteins are localized to all major organelle compartments; however, some biases were observed towards the early secretory pathway and punctate structures. Collectively, this study reports the subcellular localization of 26% of the defined dataset. All reported localization data are presented in the LOCATE database (http://www.locate.imb.uq.edu.au).

  15. Free flap transfer for complex regional pain syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ken; Kikuchi, Mamoru; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A patient with complex regional pain syndrome type II was successfully treated using free anterolateral thigh flap transfer with digital nerve coaptation to the cutaneous nerve of the flap. Release of the scarred tissue and soft tissue coverage with targeted sensory nerve coaptation were useful in relieving severe pain. PMID:27252946

  16. 33 CFR 159.126 - Coliform test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... follows: During each of the 10 test days, one sample must be taken at the beginning, middle and end of an 8-consecutive hour period with one additional sample taken immediately following the peak capacity... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coliform test: Type II...

  17. Carbon and Silicate Dust Condensation in Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneault, Ethan A.-N.; Morales, B.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the chemistry of formation and destruction processes of molecules in the expanding and cooling ejecta of Type II Supernovae. In this work, we use a kinetic chemistry network to explore the parameters and conditions of the ejecta which are required for the condensation of graphite and silicon carbide grains.

  18. Type II (noninsulin-dependent) diabetes: new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, B J

    1997-01-01

    Type II diabetes (noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [NIDDM]) is a common primary and secondary diagnosis in home care patients. This article describes the pathophysiology of NIDDM, the new drugs that have been released for treatment, and the nursing implications inherent in using these new medications.

  19. Knowledge Is Power: Teaching Children about Type II Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feild-Berner, Natalie; Balgopal, Meena

    2011-01-01

    World Diabetes Day (November 14) offers a wonderful opportunity to educate elementary children about the power they have to control their health. First lady Michelle Obama has urged Americans to educate themselves about childhood obesity, which is often associated with the onset of type II diabetes (Rabin 2010). The authors developed activities to…

  20. Type II alveolar epithelial cell in vitro culture in aerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Aerts, C; Voisin, C; Wallaert, B

    1988-08-01

    A method of Type II alveolar epithelial cell culture in aerobiosis has been developed. Isolation of Type II cells was performed by digesting guinea-pig lung tissue with crude trypsin and elastase and using discontinuous Percoll density gradients. The Type II cells, as identified by light and electron microscopy, were cultured in aerobiosis for up to six days, in direct contact with the atmosphere in conditions mimicking those present in the lower respiratory tract. Significant activities of cellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), manganese dependent superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were found at the time of isolation. In contrast, cell glutathione content varied widely from one experiment to another. Changes of antioxidant enzymes were evaluated during cell culture in aerobiosis. SOD, Mn-SOD and catalase were significantly decreased after three days but were not significantly different between a three day and six day culture. Antioxidant changes did not influence the cell culture. In marked contrast, decrease in cell glutathione was associated with rapid cell death, whereas good cell survival was obtained at high levels of cell glutathione. Cell culture in aerobiosis will permit a precise evaluation of the effects of gases, particularly oxidant gases, on a primary culture of Type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  1. Type II restriction endonucleases--a historical perspective and more.

    PubMed

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss 'Type II' REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  3. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  4. Endogenous ANG II supports lumbar sympathetic activity in conscious sodium-deprived rats: role of area postrema.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Collister, J P; Osborn, J W; Brooks, V L

    1998-07-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that the area postrema (AP) is necessary for endogenous ANG II to chronically maintain lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) and heart rate (HR) in conscious sodium-deprived rats. The effect of the ANG II type 1-receptor antagonist, losartan, on LSNA and HR was determined in rats that were either AP lesioned (APX) or sham lesioned. The sham rats were divided into groups, with (SFR) or without (SAL) food restriction, to control for the decreased food intake of APX rats. Before losartan, basal mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, and baroreflex control of LSNA and HR were similar between groups, with the exception of lower maximal reflex LSNA and higher maximal gain of the HR-MAP curve in APX rats. In all groups, losartan similarly shifted (P < 0.01) the LSNA-MAP curve to the left without altering maximal gain. Losartan also decreased (P < 0.05) minimal LSNA in all groups, and suppressed (P < 0.01) maximal LSNA (% of control) in SFR (240 +/- 13 to 205 +/- 15) and SAL (231 +/- 21 to 197 +/- 26) but not APX (193 +/- 10 to 185 +/- 8) rats. In general, losartan similarly shifted the HR-MAP curve to a lower MAP in all groups. The results suggest that the AP is not necessary for endogenous ANG II to chronically support LSNA and HR at basal and elevated MAP levels in sodium-deprived rats. However, the AP is required for endogenous ANG II to increase maximal reflex LSNA at low MAP levels.

  5. Comparing the host galaxies of type Ia, type II, and type Ibc supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, X.; Liang, Y. C.; Chen, X. Y.; Zhong, G. H.; Deng, L. C.; Zhang, B.; Shi, W. B.; Zhou, L.; Dennefeld, M.; Hammer, F.; Flores, H. E-mail: ycliang@bao.ac.cn

    2014-08-10

    We compare the host galaxies of 902 supernovae (SNe), including SNe Ia, SNe II, and SNe Ibc, which are selected by cross-matching the Asiago Supernova Catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7. We selected an additional 213 galaxies by requiring the light fraction of spectral observations to be >15%, which could represent well the global properties of the galaxies. Among these 213 galaxies, 135 appear on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, which allows us to compare the hosts in terms of whether they are star-forming (SF) galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs; including composites, LINERs, and Seyfert 2s) or absorption-line galaxies (Absorps; i.e., their related emission lines are weak or non-existent). The diagrams related to the parameters D{sub n}(4000), Hδ{sub A}, stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and specific SFRs for the SNe hosts show that almost all SNe II and most of the SNe Ibc occur in SF galaxies, which have a wide range of stellar masses and low D{sub n}(4000). The SNe Ia hosts as SF galaxies following similar trends. A significant fraction of SNe Ia occurs in AGNs and absorption-line galaxies, which are massive and have high D{sub n}(4000). The stellar population analysis from spectral synthesis fitting shows that the hosts of SNe II have a younger stellar population than hosts of SNe Ia. These results are compared with those of the 689 comparison galaxies where the SDSS fiber captures less than 15% of the total light. These comparison galaxies appear biased toward higher 12+log(O/H) (∼0.1 dex) at a given stellar mass. Therefore, we believe the aperture effect should be kept in mind when the properties of the hosts for different types of SNe are discussed.

  6. A universal characteristic of type II radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gopalswamy, N.; MacDowall, R.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    We present a study on the spectral properties of interplanetary type II radio bursts observed by the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We investigated the relative bandwidth of the type II radio bursts observed by WAVES from 1997 up to 2003. We obtained three sets of events, based on the frequency domain of occurrence: 109 events in the low-frequency domain (30 KHz to 1000 kHz, detected by the RAD1 receiver), 216 events in the high-frequency domain (1-14 MHz, observed by the RAD2 receiver), and 73 events that spanned both domains (RAD1 and RAD2). Statistical results show that the average bandwidth-to-frequency ratio (BFR) was 0.28 ± 0.15, 0.26 ± 0.16, and 0.32 ± 0.15 for RAD1, RAD2, and RAD1 + RAD2, respectively. We compared our results with those obtained for ISEE-3 type II bursts and found a difference in the average BFR, which seems to be due to a selection effect. The BFR of the WAVES type II bursts is similar to that of metric type II bursts reported in published works. This suggests that the BFR is a universal characteristic, irrespective of the spectral domain. Finally, we also studied the BFR evolution with heliocentric distance using white-light observation of the associated coronal mass ejections. We found that the BFR remains roughly constant in the SOHO/LASCO field of view (i.e., from 2.1 to 32 solar radii), while the bandwidth itself decreases.

  7. Localization of the ANG II type 2 receptor in the microcirculation of skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nora, E. H.; Munzenmaier, D. H.; Hansen-Smith, F. M.; Lombard, J. H.; Greene, A. S.; Cowley, A. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Only functional studies have suggested the presence of the ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptor in the microcirculation. To determine the distribution of this receptor in the rat skeletal muscle microcirculation, a polyclonal rabbit anti-rat antiserum was developed and used for immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The antiserum was prepared against a highly specific and antigenic AT2-receptor synthetic peptide and was validated by competition and sensitivity assays. Western blot analysis demonstrated a prominent, single band at approximately 40 kDa in cremaster and soleus muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a wide distribution of AT2 receptors throughout the skeletal muscle microcirculation in large and small microvessels. Microanatomic studies displayed an endothelial localization of the AT2 receptor, whereas dual labeling with smooth muscle alpha-actin also showed colocalization of the AT2 receptor with vascular smooth muscle cells. Other cells associated with the microvessels also stained positive for AT2 receptors. Briefly, this study confirms previous functional data and localizes the AT2 receptor to the microcirculation. These studies demonstrate that the AT2 receptor is present on a variety of vascular cell types and that it is situated in a fashion that would allow it to directly oppose ANG II type 1 receptor actions.

  8. Gain spectroscopy of a type-II VECSEL chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, C.; Stein, M.; Berger, C.; Möller, C.; Fuchs, C.; Ruiz Perez, A.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Stolz, W.; Koch, S. W.; Koch, M.

    2016-12-01

    Using optical pump-white light probe spectroscopy, the gain dynamics is investigated for a vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser chip, which is based on a type-II heterostructure. The active region of the chip consists of a GaAs/(GaIn)As/Ga(AsSb)/(GaIn)As/GaAs multiple quantum well. For this structure, a fully microscopic theory predicts a modal room temperature gain at a wavelength of 1170 nm, which is confirmed by the experimental spectra. The results show a gain buildup on the type-II chip that is delayed relative to that of a type-I chip. This slower gain dynamics is attributed to a diminished cooling rate arising from the reduced electron-hole scattering.

  9. SPECTRA OF TYPE II CEPHEID CANDIDATES AND RELATED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E. G.; Rogalla, Danielle; Thacker-Lynn, Lauren E-mail: drogall1@bigred.unl.edu

    2011-02-15

    We present low-resolution spectra for variable stars in the Cepheid period range from the ROTSE-I Demonstration Project and the All Sky Automated Survey, some of which were previously identified as type II Cepheid candidates. We have derived effective temperatures, gravities, and metallicities from the spectra. Based on this, three types of variables were identified: Cepheid strip stars, cool stars that lie along the red subgiant and giant branch, and cool main-sequence stars. Many fewer type II Cepheids were found than expected and most have amplitudes less than 0.4 mag. The cool variables include many likely binaries as well as intrinsic variables. Variation among the main-sequence stars is likely to be mostly due to binarity or stellar activity.

  10. Intrafibrillar Mineral May be Absent in Dentinogenesis Imperfecta Type II (DI-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A.

    2001-03-29

    High-resolution synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SRCT) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were performed on normal and dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DI-II) teeth. Three normal and three DI-II human third molars were used in this study. The normal molars were unerupted and had intact enamel; donors were female and ranged in age from 18-21y. The DI-II specimens, which were also unerupted with intact enamel, came from a single female donor age 20y. SRCT showed that the mineral concentration was 33% lower on average in the DI-II dentin with respect to normal dentin. The SAXS spectra from normal dentin exhibited low-angle diffraction peaks at harmonics of 67.6 nm, consistent with nucleation and growth of the apatite phase within gaps in the collagen fibrils (intrafibrillar mineralization). In contrast, the low-angle peaks were almost nonexistent in the DI-II dentin. Crystallite thickness was independent of location in both DI-II and normal dentin, although the crystallites were significantly thicker in DI-II dentin (6.8 nm (s.d. = 0.5) vs 5.1 nm (s.d. = 0.6)). The shape factor of the crystallites, as determined by SAXS, showed a continuous progression in normal dentin from roughly one-dimensional (needle-like) near the pulp to two-dimensional (plate-like) near the dentin-enamel junction. The crystallites in DI-II dentin, on the other hand, remained needle-like throughout. The above observations are consistent with an absence of intrafibrillar mineral in DI-II dentin.

  11. Pavlovian Conditioning of Rat Mucosal Mast Cells to Secrete Rat Mast Cell Protease II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Marshall, Jean; Perdue, Mary; Siegel, Shepard; Bienenstock, John

    1989-01-01

    Antigen (egg albumin) injections, which stimulate mucosal mast cells to secrete mediators, were paired with an audiovisual cue. After reexposure to the audiovisual cue, a mediator (rat mast cell protease II) was measured with a sensitive and specific assay. Animals reexposed to only the audiovisual cue released a quantity of protease not significantly different from animals reexposed to both the cue and the antigen; these groups released significantly more protease than animals that had received the cue and antigen in a noncontingent manner. The results support a role for the central nervous system as a functional effector of mast cell function in the allergic state.

  12. Type 2 diabetic rats are sensitive to thioacetamide hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Dnyanmote, Ankur V.; Warbritton, Alan; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-03-15

    Previously, we reported high hepatotoxic sensitivity of type 2 diabetic (DB) rats to three dissimilar hepatotoxicants. Additional work revealed that a normally nonlethal dose of CCl{sub 4} was lethal in DB rats due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair. The present study was conducted to investigate the importance of compensatory tissue repair in determining the final outcome of hepatotoxicity in diabetes, using another structurally and mechanistically dissimilar hepatotoxicant, thioacetamide (TA), to initiate liver injury. A normally nonlethal dose of TA (300 mg/kg, ip), caused 100% mortality in DB rats. Time course studies (0 to 96 h) showed that in the non-DB rats, liver injury initiated by TA as assessed by plasma alanine or aspartate aminotransferase and hepatic necrosis progressed up to 48 h and regressed to normal at 96 h resulting in 100% survival. In the DB rats, liver injury rapidly progressed resulting in progressively deteriorating liver due to rapidly expanding injury, hepatic failure, and 100% mortality between 24 and 48 h post-TA treatment. Covalent binding of {sup 14}C-TA-derived radiolabel to liver tissue did not differ from that observed in the non-DB rats, indicating similar bioactivation-based initiation of hepatotoxicity. S-phase DNA synthesis measured by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation, and advancement of cells through the cell division cycle measured by PCNA immunohistochemistry, were substantially inhibited in the DB rats compared to the non-DB rats challenged with TA. Thus, inhibited cell division and compromised tissue repair in the DB rats resulted in progressive expansion of liver injury culminating in mortality. In conclusion, it appears that similar to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes also increases sensitivity to dissimilar hepatotoxicants due to inhibited compensatory tissue repair, suggesting that sensitivity to hepatotoxicity in diabetes occurs in the absence as well as presence of insulin.

  13. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  14. Refined genetic and physical mapping of BPES type II.

    PubMed

    Messiaen, L; Leroy, B P; De Bie, S; De Pauw, K; Van Roy, N; Speleman, F; Van Camp, G; De Paepe, A

    1996-01-01

    BPES is a genetic disorder including blepharophimosis, ptosis of the eyelids, epicanthus inversus and telecanthus. Type I is associated with female infertility, whereas type II presents without other symptoms. Both types I and II occur sporadically or are inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We present a molecular genetic and cytogenetic study in a large four-generation Belgian family with BPES type II. Karyotype analysis on high-resolution banded chromosomes yielded normal results. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmid probes spanning 3q22-q24 revealed normal hybridization patterns. Sixteen polymorphic CA repeats encompassing region 3q13-q25 were analysed. Linkage analysis in this large four-generation family provides conclusive evidence for the presence of a BPES gene in this region. Two-point lod scores greater than 3.0 between the disease and the following markers were seen: D3S1589 (4.67), D3S1292 (3.52), D3S1290 (3.59) and D3S1549 (3.65). By FISH, D3S1290, D3S1292 and D3S1549 were assigned to chromosome 3q23 using YACs positive for these markers.

  15. Type II restriction endonucleases—a historical perspective and more

    PubMed Central

    Pingoud, Alfred; Wilson, Geoffrey G.; Wende, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    This article continues the series of Surveys and Summaries on restriction endonucleases (REases) begun this year in Nucleic Acids Research. Here we discuss ‘Type II’ REases, the kind used for DNA analysis and cloning. We focus on their biochemistry: what they are, what they do, and how they do it. Type II REases are produced by prokaryotes to combat bacteriophages. With extreme accuracy, each recognizes a particular sequence in double-stranded DNA and cleaves at a fixed position within or nearby. The discoveries of these enzymes in the 1970s, and of the uses to which they could be put, have since impacted every corner of the life sciences. They became the enabling tools of molecular biology, genetics and biotechnology, and made analysis at the most fundamental levels routine. Hundreds of different REases have been discovered and are available commercially. Their genes have been cloned, sequenced and overexpressed. Most have been characterized to some extent, but few have been studied in depth. Here, we describe the original discoveries in this field, and the properties of the first Type II REases investigated. We discuss the mechanisms of sequence recognition and catalysis, and the varied oligomeric modes in which Type II REases act. We describe the surprising heterogeneity revealed by comparisons of their sequences and structures. PMID:24878924

  16. On the nature of rapidly fading Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Pruzhinskaya, Maria V.; Ergon, Mattias; Blinnikov, Sergei I.

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that Type II supernovae with rapidly fading light curves (a.k.a. Type IIL supernovae) are explosions of progenitors with low-mass hydrogen-rich envelopes which are of the order of 1 M⊙. We investigate light-curve properties of supernovae from such progenitors. We confirm that such progenitors lead to rapidly fading Type II supernovae. We find that the luminosity of supernovae from such progenitors with the canonical explosion energy of 1051 erg and 56Ni mass of 0.05 M⊙ can increase temporarily shortly before all the hydrogen in the envelope recombines. As a result, a bump appears in their light curves. The bump appears because the heating from the nuclear decay of 56Ni can keep the bottom of hydrogen-rich layers in the ejecta ionized, and thus the photosphere can stay there for a while. We find that the light-curve bump becomes less significant when we make explosion energy larger (≳2 × 1051 erg), 56Ni mass smaller (≲0.01 M⊙), 56Ni mixed in the ejecta, or the progenitor radius larger. Helium mixing in hydrogen-rich layers makes the light-curve decline rates large but does not help reducing the light-curve bump. Because the light-curve bump we found in our light-curve models has not been observed in rapidly fading Type II supernovae, they may be characterized by not only low-mass hydrogen-rich envelopes but also higher explosion energy, larger degrees of 56Ni mixing, and/or larger progenitor radii than slowly fading Type II supernovae, so that the light-curve bump does not become significant.

  17. The transforming growth factor beta type II receptor can replace the activin type II receptor in inducing mesoderm.

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, A; Lin, H Y; Lodish, H F; Kintner, C R

    1994-01-01

    The type II receptors for the polypeptide growth factors transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and activin belong to a new family of predicted serine/threonine protein kinases. In Xenopus embryos, the biological effects of activin and TGF-beta 1 are strikingly different; activin induces a full range of mesodermal cell types in the animal cap assay, while TGF-beta 1 has no effects, presumably because of the lack of functional TGF-beta receptors. In order to assess the biological activities of exogenously added TGF-beta 1, RNA encoding the TGF-beta type II receptor was introduced into Xenopus embryos. In animal caps from these embryos, TGF-beta 1 and activin show similar potencies for induction of mesoderm-specific mRNAs, and both elicit the same types of mesodermal tissues. In addition, the response of animal caps to TGF-beta 1, as well as to activin, is blocked by a dominant inhibitory ras mutant, p21(Asn-17)Ha-ras. These results indicate that the activin and TGF-beta type II receptors can couple to similar signalling pathways and that the biological specificities of these growth factors lie in their different ligand-binding domains and in different competences of the responding cells. Images PMID:8196664

  18. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 and fetal lung maturation: immunogold detection of VDR expression in pneumocytes type II cells and effect on fructose 1,6 bisphosphatase.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, M; Trubert, C L; Rizk-Rabin, M; Rehan, V K; Besançon, F; Cayre, Y E; Garabédian, M

    2004-05-01

    Lung maturation before birth includes type II pneumocyte differentiation with progressive disappearance of glycogen content and onset of surfactant synthesis. We have shown previously that 1,25-(OH)2D3 increases surfactant synthesis and secretion by type II cells and decreases their glycogen content in fetal rat lung explants. Recently, the gene coding fructose 1,6 bisphosphatase (F1,6BP), a regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis, has been identified in type II cells and its promoter bears a Vitamin D response element. Present results show:The coexistence of type II cells at different stages of maturation. in rat fetal lung on day 21 of gestation (electron microscopy), and the association between maturation of type II cells and disappearance of their glycogen content. The immunogold labeling of all type II cells when using the 9A7g VDR-antibody, with significantly more abundant gold particles in cells exhibiting an intermediate glycogen content. The expression of F1,6BP mRNA in a human type II cell line (NCI-H441) and the increase of this expression after 18h incubation with 1,25-(OH)2D3 (10(-8)M). These results bring further evidence for a physiological role of 1,25-(OH)2D3 during type II pneumocyte maturation. Activation of F1,6BP may participate to the 1,25-(OH)2D3 action on surfactant synthesis via the gluconeogenesis pathway.

  19. Characteristics of Type-II Radio Bursts Associated with Flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth, V.; Umapathy, S.; Vršnak, Bojan; Anna Lakshmi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a statistical study of the characteristics of type-II radio bursts observed in the metric (m) and deca-hectometer (DH) wavelength range during 1997-2008. The collected events are divided into two groups: Group I contains the events of m-type-II bursts with starting frequency ≥ 100 MHz, and group II contains the events with starting frequency of m-type-II radio bursts < 100 MHz. We have analyzed both samples considering three different aspects: i) statistical properties of type-II bursts, ii) statistical properties of flares and CMEs associated with type-II bursts, and iii) time delays between type-II bursts, flares, and CMEs. We find significant differences in the properties of m-type-II bursts in duration, bandwidth, drift rate, shock speed and delay between m- and DH-type-II bursts. From the timing analysis we found that the majority of m-type-II bursts in both groups occur during the flare impulsive phase. On the other hand, the DH-type-II bursts in both groups occur during the decaying phase of the associated flares. Almost all m-DH-type-II bursts are found to be associated with CMEs. Our results indicate that there are two kinds of shock in which group I (high frequency) m-type-II bursts seem to be ignited by flares whereas group II (low frequency) m-type-II bursts are CME-driven.

  20. Long-term effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rhythm in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Frank C; Jacobson, Michael; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Adeghate, Ernest

    2008-03-01

    In vivo biotelemetry studies have demonstrated a variety of heart rhythm disturbances in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat, these disturbances have included reductions in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) and an electrocardiogram that displays prolonged QRS duration and Q-T interval. The aim of this study was to investigate the chronic effects of type 2 diabetes mellitus on heart rhythm in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat. Transmitter devices were surgically implanted in the peritoneal cavity of young male GK and age-matched Wistar control rats. Electrodes from the transmitter were arranged in Einthoven bipolar lead II configuration. Electrocardiogram, physical activity and body temperature data were recorded in rats from age 2 to 15 months. Data were acquired for 2 weeks each month. Non-fasting blood glucose, glucose tolerance and body weight were measured periodically. In GK rats, growth rate and maximal attained body weight were significantly reduced and non-fasting blood glucose was progressively increased compared with age-matched Wistar control animals. Heart rate was significantly lower in GK compared with control rats at 2, 7 and 15 months of age. At 2 months of age, HR was 316 +/- 6 beats min(-1) in GK rats compared with 370 +/- 7 beats min(-1) in Wistar control animals. There was a progressive age-dependent decline in HRV in Wistar control rats; however, HRV in GK rats did not alter significantly with age. Heart rate variability was significantly reduced in GK compared with Wistar control rats at 2 and 7 months. At 2 months of age, HRV was 28 +/- 2 beats min(-1) in GK rats compared with 38 +/- 3 beats min(-1) in Wistar control rats. Reduced HR in GK rats may be an inherited characteristic. The absence of age-dependent reductions in HRV in GK rats may be a consequence of an underlying impairment of autonomic control which manifests at early age.

  1. Drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to ANG II in young and old rats.

    PubMed

    Thunhorst, Robert L; Beltz, Terry G; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2010-11-01

    We investigated water drinking and arterial blood pressure responses to intravenous infusions of ANG II in young (4 mo), middle-aged adult (12 mo), and old (29 mo) male Brown Norway rats. Infusions of ANG II began with arterial blood pressure either at control levels or at reduced levels following injection of the vasodilator minoxidil. Under control conditions, mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to ANG II rose to the same level for all groups, and middle-aged and old rats drank as much or more water in response to ANG II compared with young rats, depending on whether intakes were analyzed using absolute or body weight-adjusted values. When arterial blood pressure first was reduced with minoxidil, MAP in response to ANG II stabilized at significantly lower levels compared with control conditions for all groups. Young rats drank significantly more water under reduced pressure conditions compared with control conditions, while middle-aged and old rats did not. Urine volume in response to ANG II was lower, while water balance was higher, under conditions of reduced pressure compared with control conditions. Baroreflex control of heart rate was substantially reduced in old rats compared with young and middle-aged animals. In summary, young rats appear to be more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of increased arterial blood pressure on water drinking than are older animals.

  2. Exploring Type I and Type II Errors Using Rhizopus Sporangia Diameter Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert A.; Burns, Gerard; Freud, Brian; Fenning, Stacy; Hoffman, Rosemary; Sabapathi, Durai

    2000-01-01

    Presents exercises in which students can explore Type I and Type II errors using sporangia diameter measurements as a means of differentiating between two species. Examines the influence of sample size and significance level on the outcome of the analysis. (SAH)

  3. Multicolor Oservations of the Type II Cepheid Prototype W Virginis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.; Henden, A. A.; Crawford, T.; James, R.; Bonnardeau, M.; Wells, D.

    2006-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the AAVSO's six-month photometric campaign on the bright, pulsating variable star W Virginis, class prototype of the Type II Cepheid variables. This campaign was organized in support of separate spectroscopic observations (Wallerstein et al., in preparation), but these photometric data also stand alone as a valuable, recent, multicolor light curve of this object. Observations were obtained by several amateur and professional observers using a variety of equipment; data are primarily in the V filter, but include two complete pulsation cycles in the BVRcIc filters. We present lightand color-curves of this star, and compare our results to previous observational and theoretical results on W Vir and the Type II Cepheids.

  4. THE CONNECTION OF TYPE II SPICULES TO THE CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Judge, Philip G.; McIntosh, Scott W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Olluri, Kosovare

    2012-02-20

    We examine the hypothesis that plasma associated with 'Type II' spicules is heated to coronal temperatures, and that the upward moving hot plasma constitutes a significant mass supply to the solar corona. One-dimensional hydrodynamical models including time-dependent ionization are brought to bear on the problem. These calculations indicate that heating of field-aligned spicule flows should produce significant differential Doppler shifts between emission lines formed in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona. At present, observational evidence for the computed 60-90 km s{sup -1} differential shifts is weak, but the data are limited by difficulties in comparing the proper motion of Type II spicules with spectral and kinematic properties of an associated transition region and coronal emission lines. Future observations with the upcoming infrared interferometer spectrometer instrument should clarify if Doppler shifts are consistent with the dynamics modeled here.

  5. UBVRIz Light Curves of 51 Type II Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, Lluís; Hamuy, Mario; Phillips, Mark M.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; de Jaeger, Thomas; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Krisciunas, Kevin; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Krzeminski, Wojtek; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; Anguita, Claudio; Galaz, Gaspar; Green, Elisabeth M.; Impey, Chris; Kim, Yong-Cheol; Kirhakos, Sofia; Malkan, Mathew A.; Mulchaey, John S.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Pizzella, Alessandro; Prosser, Charles F.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Schommer, Robert A.; Sherry, William; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Wells, Lisa A.; Williger, Gerard M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986-2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  6. New insights into bacterial type II polyketide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuan; Pan, Hai-Xue; Tang, Gong-Li

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial aromatic polyketides, exemplified by anthracyclines, angucyclines, tetracyclines, and pentangular polyphenols, are a large family of natural products with diverse structures and biological activities and are usually biosynthesized by type II polyketide synthases (PKSs). Since the starting point of biosynthesis and combinatorial biosynthesis in 1984–1985, there has been a continuous effort to investigate the biosynthetic logic of aromatic polyketides owing to the urgent need of developing promising therapeutic candidates from these compounds. Recently, significant advances in the structural and mechanistic identification of enzymes involved in aromatic polyketide biosynthesis have been made on the basis of novel genetic, biochemical, and chemical technologies. This review highlights the progress in bacterial type II PKSs in the past three years (2013–2016). Moreover, novel compounds discovered or created by genome mining and biosynthetic engineering are also included. PMID:28299197

  7. Progression of Jackhammer Esophagus to Type II Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Jason; Fass, Ronnie

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that patients with certain motility disorders may progress overtime to develop achalasia. We describe a 66 year-old woman who presented with dysphagia for solids and liquids for a period of 18 months. Her initial workup showed normal endoscopy and non-specific esophageal motility disorder on conventional manometry. Six months later, due to persistence of symptoms, the patient underwent a high resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) demonstrating jackhammer esophagus. The patient was treated with a high dose proton pump inhibitor but without resolution of her symptoms. During the last year, the patient reported repeated episodes of food regurgitation and a significant weight loss. A repeat HREM revealed type II achalasia. Multiple case reports, and only a few prospective studies have demonstrated progression from certain esophageal motility disorders to achalasia. However, this report is the first to describe a case of jackhammer esophagus progressing to type II achalasia. PMID:26717932

  8. On the Covariant Quantization of Type II Superstrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttenberg, Sebastian; Knapp, Johanna; Kreuzer, Maximilian

    2004-06-01

    In a series of papers Grassi, Policastro, Porrati and van Nieuwenhuizen have introduced a new method to covariantly quantize the GS-superstring by constructing a resolution of the pure spinor constraint of Berkovits' approach. Their latest version is based on a gauged WZNW model and a definition of physical states in terms of relative cohomology groups. We first put the off-shell formulation of the type-II version of their ideas into a chirally split form and directly construct the free action of the gauged WZNW model, thus circumventing some complications of the super group manifold approach to type-II. Then we discuss the BRST charges that define the relative cohomology and the N=2 superconformal algebra. A surprising result is that nilpotency of the BRST charge requires the introduction of another quartet of ghosts.

  9. UBVRIz LIGHT CURVES OF 51 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Galbany, Lluis; Hamuy, Mario; Jaeger, Thomas de; Moraga, Tania; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrell, Nidia I.; Thomas-Osip, Joanna; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Maza, José; González, Luis; Antezana, Roberto; Wishnjewski, Marina; Krisciunas, Kevin; Krzeminski, Wojtek; McCarthy, Patrick; Anderson, Joseph P.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; and others

    2016-02-15

    We present a compilation of UBVRIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986–2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calán/Tololo Supernova Program (C and T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.

  10. Contractile responses to rat urotensin II in resting and depolarized basilar arteries.

    PubMed

    Porras-González, Cristina; Ureña, Juan; Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Gordillo-Escobar, Elena; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco; González-Montelongo, María del Carmen; Muñoz-Sánchez, María Angeles

    2014-03-01

    The effects of human urotensin II (hUII) on the vascular tone of different animal species has been studied extensively. However, little has been reported on the vasoactive effects of rat urotensin (rUII) in murine models. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of rUII on vasoreactivity in rat basilar arteries. Basilar arteries from adult male Wistar rats (300-350 g) were isolated, cut in rings, and mounted on a small vessel myograph to measure isometric tension. rUII concentrations were studied in both resting and depolarized state. To remove endothelial nitric oxide effects from the rUII response, we treated selected arterial rings with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). 10 μM rUII produced a potent vasoconstrictor response in rat basilar arteries with intact endothelium, while isometric forces remained unaffected in arterial rings treated with lower rUII concentrations. Although L-NAME did not have a significant effect on 10 μM rUII-evoked contraction, it slightly increased arterial ring contraction elicited by 1 μM rUII. In depolarized arteries, dose-dependent rUII increased depolarization-induced contractions. This effect was suppressed by L-NAME. Our results show that the rat basilar artery has a vasoconstrictor response to rUII. The most potent vasoconstrictor effect was produced by lower doses of rUII (0.1 and 1 μM) in depolarized arteries with intact endothelium. This effect could facilitate arterial vasospasm in vascular pathophysiological processes such as subarachnoid hemorrhage and hypertension, when sustained depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation are present.

  11. Microarray analysis of thioacetamide-treated type 1 diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, Sachin S.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-04-01

    It is well known that diabetes imparts high sensitivity to numerous hepatotoxicants. Previously, we have shown that a normally non-lethal dose of thioacetamide (TA, 300 mg/kg) causes 90% mortality in type 1 diabetic (DB) rats due to inhibited tissue repair allowing progression of liver injury. On the other hand, DB rats exposed to 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed tissue repair and delayed recovery from injury. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of impaired tissue repair and progression of liver injury in TA-treated DB rats by using cDNA microarray. Gene expression pattern was examined at 0, 6, and 12 h after TA challenge, and selected mechanistic leads from microarray experiments were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and further investigated at protein level over the time course of 0 to 36 h after TA treatment. Diabetic condition itself increased gene expression of proteases and decreased gene expression of protease inhibitors. Administration of 300 mg TA/kg to DB rats further elevated gene expression of proteases and suppressed gene expression of protease inhibitors, explaining progression of liver injury in DB rats after TA treatment. Inhibited expression of genes involved in cell division cycle (cyclin D1, IGFBP-1, ras, E2F) was observed after exposure of DB rats to 300 mg TA/kg, explaining inhibited tissue repair in these rats. On the other hand, DB rats receiving 30 mg TA/kg exhibit delayed expression of genes involved in cell division cycle, explaining delayed tissue repair in these rats. In conclusion, impaired cyclin D1 signaling along with increased proteases and decreased protease inhibitors may explain impaired tissue repair that leads to progression of liver injury initiated by TA in DB rats.

  12. Shock waves and nucleosynthesis in type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aufderheide, M. B.; Baron, E.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of nucleosynthesis in type II SN, shock waves are initiated artificially, since collapse calculations do not, as yet, give self-consistent shock waves strong enough to produce the SN explosion. The two initiation methods currently used by light-curve modelers are studied, with a focus on the peak temperatures and the nucleosynthetic yields in each method. The various parameters involved in artificially initiating a shock wave and the effects of varying these parameters are discussed.

  13. Study of interacting CMEs and DH type II radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Subramanian, S.; Shanmugaraju, A.

    2013-04-01

    The subject of interaction between the Corona Mass Ejections (CMEs) is important in the concept of space-weather studies. In this paper, we analyzed a set of 15 interacting events taken from the list compiled by Manoharan et al. (in J. Geophys. Res. 109:A06109, 2004) and their associated DH type II radio bursts. The pre and primary CMEs, and their associated DH type II bursts are identified using the SOHO/LASCO catalog and Wind/WAVES catalog, respectively. All the primary CMEs are associated with shocks and interplanetary CMEs. These CMEs are found to be preceded by secondary slow CMEs. Most of primary CMEs are halo type CME and much faster (Mean speed = 1205 km s-1) than the pre CME (Mean speed = 450 km s-1). The average delay between the pre and primary CMEs, drift rate of DH type IIs and interaction height are found to be 211 min, 0.878 kHz/s and 17.87 Ro, respectively. The final observed distance (FOD) of all pre CMEs are found to be less than 15 Ro and it is seen that many of the pre CMEs got merged with the primary CMEs, and, they were not traced as separate CMEs in the LASCO field of view. Some radio signatures are identified for these events in the DH spectrum around the time of interaction. The interaction height obtained from the height-time plots of pre and primary CMEs is found to have correlations with (i) the time delay between the two CMEs and (ii) the central frequency of emission in the radio signatures in the DH spectrum around the time of interaction. The centre frequency of emission in the DH spectrum around the time of interaction seems to decrease when the interaction height increases. This result is compared with an interplanetary density model of Saito et al. (in Solar Phys. 55:121, 1977).

  14. Closed Timelike Curves in Type II Non-Vacuum Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Faizuddin

    2017-02-01

    Here we present a cyclicly symmetric non-vacuum spacetime, admitting closed timelike curves (CTCs) which appear after a certain instant of time, i.e., a time-machine spacetime. The spacetime is asymptotically flat, free-from curvature singularities and a four-dimensional extension of the Misner space in curved spacetime. The spacetime is of type II in the Petrov classification scheme and the matter field pure radiation satisfy the energy condition.

  15. Classification of SN2005dj, a Type II Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, N.; Bongard, S.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; Sauge, L.; Smadja, G.; Antilogus, P.; Garavini, G.; Gilles, S.; Pain, R.; Aldering, G.; Bailey, S.; Lee, B. C.; Loken, S.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Scalzo, R.; Thomas, R. C.; Wang, L.; Weaver, B. A.; Bonnaud, C.; Pecontal, E.; Kessler, R.; Baltay, C.; Rabinowitz, D.; Bauer, A.

    2005-08-01

    The Nearby Supernova Factory reports that a spectrum (range 320-1000 nm) of SN 2005dj (IAUC#8585), obtained August 19.6 UT with the Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph on the University of Hawaii 2.2-meter telescope, reveals P-Cygni H-alpha and H-beta, indicative of a Type II supernova. The observed redshift is consistent with that of the host UGC 3545 (z = 0.011508, Huchtmeier & Skillman 1998 via NED).

  16. Evaluation of nanoarchitectured collagen type II molecules on cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shyh Ming; Chiang, Ming Yu; Lan, Cheng Wen; Niu, Gregory Cheng-Chie; Chang, Shwu Jen

    2013-02-01

    Scaffold architecture, including the geometry and dimension of scaffolds, is an important parameter in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Following the characterization of collagen type II nanoarchitectured molecules, collagen fibrils (CNFs) and collagen spheres (CNPs) prepared using a high-voltage electric field in our laboratory, we proposed to use these nanoarchitectured molecules to assess their influence on the culturing of chondrocytes in stirred bioreactors. The results demonstrate that chondrocytes rapidly formed more and larger chondrocyte pellets (spheroids) after the addition of nanoarchitectured molecules into the culture medium. The maintenance of chondrocytes with round morphology and increased glycosaminoglycan secretion indicated that these spheroids contained viable and un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. No significant increases in DNA content were detected. These results show that the introduction of these molecules did not affect chondrocyte proliferation during a 3-day culture period. After the addition of CNPs and CNFs into the culture medium, the expression levels of collagen type II and aggrecan genes in chondrocytes increased significantly as demonstrated by real-time PCR analysis. Interestingly, chondrocytes exhibited distinct collagen type II and aggrecan gene expression profiles in culture with CNPs and CNFs. The aggrecan gene expression level of the chondrocytes was 2.5-fold greater following CFN addition than following the addition of CNPs. In contrast, the collagen type II expression level of the chondrocytes was 2.2-fold greater following the addition of CNPs than following the addition of CNFs. The chondrocyte pellets rapidly restored defects in articular cartilage during a 1-month implantation period in a rabbit model.

  17. ACCELERATION OF TYPE II SPICULES IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Michael L.

    2012-10-01

    A 2.5D, time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic model is used to test the proposition that observed type II spicule velocities can be generated by a Lorentz force under chromospheric conditions. It is found that current densities localized on observed space and time scales of type II spicules and that generate maximum magnetic field strengths {<=}50 G can generate a Lorentz force that accelerates plasma to terminal velocities similar to those of type II spicules. Maximum vertical flow speeds are {approx}150-460 km s{sup -1}, horizontally localized within {approx}2.5-10 km from the vertical axis of the spicule, and comparable to slow solar wind speeds, suggesting that significant solar wind acceleration occurs in type II spicules. Horizontal speeds are {approx}20 times smaller than vertical speeds. Terminal velocity is reached {approx}100 s after acceleration begins. The increase in the mechanical and thermal energy of the plasma during acceleration is (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} ergs. The radial component of the Lorentz force compresses the plasma during the acceleration process by factors as large as {approx}100. The Joule heating flux generated during this process is essentially due to proton Pedersen current dissipation and can be {approx}0.1-3.7 times the heating flux of {approx}10{sup 6} ergs cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} associated with middle-upper chromospheric emission. About 84%-94% of the magnetic energy that accelerates and heats the spicules is converted into bulk flow kinetic energy.

  18. Type III intermediate filament peripherin inhibits neuritogenesis in type II spiral ganglion neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Meagan; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Ryan, Allen F.; Housley, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Peripherin, a type III intermediate filament protein, forms part of the cytoskeleton in a subset of neurons, most of which have peripheral fibre projections. Studies suggest a role for peripherin in axon outgrowth and regeneration, but evidence for this in sensory and brain tissues is limited. The exclusive expression of peripherin in a sub-population of primary auditory neurons, the type II spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) prompted our investigation of the effect of peripherin gene deletion (pphKO) on these neurons. We used confocal immunofluorescence to examine the establishment of the innervation of the cochlear outer hair cells by the type II SGN neurites in vivo and in vitro, in wildtype (WT) and pphKO mice, in the first postnatal week. The distribution of the type II SGN nerve fibres was normal in pphKO cochleae. However, using P1 spiral ganglion explants under culture conditions where the majority of neurites were derived from type II SGN, pphKO resulted in increased numbers of neurites/explant compared WT controls. Type II SGN neurites from pphKO explants extended ~ double the distance of WT neurites, and had reduced complexity based on greater distance between turning points. Addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to the culture media increased neurite number in WT and KO explants ~30-fold, but did not affect neurite length or distance between turning. These results indicate that peripherin may interact with other cytoskeletal elements to regulate outgrowth of the peripheral neurites of type II SGN, distinguishing these neurons from the type I SGN innervating the inner hair cells. PMID:20132868

  19. Type-II superlattice infrared detector technology at Fraunhofer IAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehm, Robert; Daumer, Volker; Hugger, Tsvetelina; Kohn, Norbert; Luppold, Wolfgang; Müller, Raphael; Niemasz, Jasmin; Schmidt, Johannes; Rutz, Frank; Stadelmann, Tim; Wauro, Matthias; Wörl, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    For more than two decades, Antimony-based type-II superlattice photodetectors for the infrared spectral range between 3-15 μm are under development at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics (IAF). Today, Fraunhofer IAF is Germany's only national foundry for InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice detectors and we cover a wide range of aspects from basic materials research to small series production in this field. We develop single-element photodetectors for sensing systems as well as two-dimensional detector arrays for high-performance imaging and threat warning systems in the mid-wavelength and long-wavelength region of the thermal infrared. We continuously enhance our production capabilities by extending our in-line process control facilities. As a recent example, we present a semiautomatic wafer probe station that has developed into an important tool for electrooptical characterization. A large amount of the basic materials research focuses on the reduction of the dark current by the development of bandgap engineered device designs on the basis of heterojunction concepts. Recently, we have successfully demonstrated Europe's first LWIR InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice imager with 640x512 pixels with 15 μm pitch. The demonstrator camera already delivers a good image quality and achieves a thermal resolution better than 30 mK.

  20. Subcellular dynamics of type II PKA in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Haining; Sia, Gek-Ming; Sato, Takashi R.; Gray, Noah W.; Mao, Tianyi; Khuchua, Zaza; Huganir, Richard L.; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Protein kinase A (PKA) plays multiple roles in neurons. The localization and specificity of PKA are largely controlled by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). However, the dynamics of PKA in neurons, and the roles of specific AKAPs, are poorly understood. We imaged the distribution of type II PKA in hippocampal and cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in vitro and in vivo. PKA was concentrated in dendritic shafts compared to the soma, axons and dendritic spines. This spatial distribution was imposed by the microtubule-binding protein MAP2, indicating that MAP2 is the dominant AKAP in neurons. Following cAMP elevation, catalytic subunits dissociated from the MAP2-tethered regulatory subunits and rapidly moved to become enriched in nearby spines. The spatial gradient of type II PKA between dendritic shafts and spines was critical for the regulation of synaptic strength and long-term potentiation. The localization and activity-dependent translocation of type II PKA are therefore important determinants of PKA function. PMID:19447092

  1. Coronas Mass Ejections, Shocks, and Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2010-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most energetic phenomena in the interplanetary medium. Type II radio bursts are the earliest indicators of particle acceleration by CME-driven shocks. There is one-to-one correspondence between large solar energetic particle (SEP) events and long wavelength type II bursts because the same CME-driven shock is supposed to accelerate electrons and ions. However, there are some significant deviations: some CMEs lacking type II bursts (radio-quiet or RQ CMEs) are associated with small SEP events while some radioloud (RL) CMEs are not associated with SEP events, suggesting subtle differences in the acceleration of electrons and protons. Not all CME-driven shocks are radio loud: more than one third of the interplanetary shocks during solar cycle 23 were radio quiet. Some RQ shocks were associated with energetic storm particle (ESP) events, which are detected when the shocks arrive at the observing spacecraft. This paper attempts to explain these contradictory results in terms of the properties of CMEs, shocks, and the ambient medium.

  2. Perinatal lethal type II osteogenesis imperfecta: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ayadi, Imene Dahmane; Hamida, Emira Ben; Rebeh, Rania Ben; Chaouachi, Sihem; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type II which is a perinatal lethal form. First trimester ultrasound didn't identified abnormalities. Second trimester ultrasound showed incurved limbs, narrow chest, with hypomineralization and multiple fractures of ribs and long bones. Parents refused pregnancy termination; they felt that the diagnosis was late. At birth, the newborn presented immediate respiratory distress. Postnatal examination and bone radiography confirmed the diagnosis of OI type IIA. Death occurred on day 25 of life related to respiratory failure.

  3. Comparative modeling of the three-dimensional structure of type II antifreeze protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sönnichsen, F. D.; Sykes, B. D.; Davies, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Type II antifreeze proteins (AFP), which inhibit the growth of seed ice crystals in the blood of certain fishes (sea raven, herring, and smelt), are the largest known fish AFPs and the only class for which detailed structural information is not yet available. However, a sequence homology has been recognized between these proteins and the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectins. The structure of this domain from rat mannose-binding protein (MBP-A) has been solved by X-ray crystallography (Weis WI, Drickamer K, Hendrickson WA, 1992, Nature 360:127-134) and provided the coordinates for constructing the three-dimensional model of the 129-amino acid Type II AFP from sea raven, to which it shows 19% sequence identity. Multiple sequence alignments between Type II AFPs, pancreatic stone protein, MBP-A, and as many as 50 carbohydrate-recognition domain sequences from various lectins were performed to determine reliably aligned sequence regions. Successive molecular dynamics and energy minimization calculations were used to relax bond lengths and angles and to identify flexible regions. The derived structure contains two alpha-helices, two beta-sheets, and a high proportion of amino acids in loops and turns. The model is in good agreement with preliminary NMR spectroscopic analyses. It explains the observed differences in calcium binding between sea raven Type II AFP and MBP-A. Furthermore, the model proposes the formation of five disulfide bridges between Cys 7 and Cys 18, Cys 35 and Cys 125, Cys 69 and Cys 100, Cys 89 and Cys 111, and Cys 101 and Cys 117.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7540906

  4. THE IMMUNOLOGICAL SPECIFICITY OF TYPE II PNEUMOCOCCUS AND ITS SEPARATION INTO PARTIAL SPECIFICITIES. II

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberger, Michael

    1960-01-01

    Quantitative data are given on the cross reactions in Type II antipneumococcal horse sera of plant gums and hemicelluloses containing multiple terminal groupings of glucuronic acid and/or 4-O-methylglucuronic acid. Great variability is shown both in the reactivities of the polysaccharides and in the antibodies in the sera of different animals immunized with the same antigen. The 4-O-methyl substituent on the glucuronic acid residues in a gum often appears to diminish cross-precipitation with antibodies to S II. PMID:13852209

  5. Muscle fiber types composition and type identified endplate morphology of forepaw intrinsic muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Mi, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Rui, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The failure to accept reinnervation is considered to be one of the reasons for the poor motor functional recovery of intrinsic hand muscles (IHMs) after nerve injury. Rat could be a suitable model to be used in simulating motor function recovery of the IHMs after nerve injury as to the similarities in function and anatomy of the muscles between human and rat. However, few studies have reported the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphologic characteristics of intrinsic forepaw muscles (IFMs) in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain isoforms and acetylcholine receptors were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and endplates on type-identified fibers of the lumbrical muscles (LMs), interosseus muscles (IMs), abductor digiti minimi (AM) and flexor pollicis brevis (FM) in rat forepaw. The majority of IFMs fibers were labeled positively for fast-switch fiber. However, the IMs were composed of only slow-switch fiber. With the exception of the IMs, the other IFMs had a part of hybrid fibers. Two-dimensional morphological characteristics of endplates on I and IIa muscle fiber had no significant differences among the IFMs. The LMs is the most suitable IFMs of rat to stimulate reinnervation of the IHMs after nerve injury. Gaining greater insight into the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphology in the IFMs of rat may help understand the pathological and functional changes of IFMs in rat model stimulating reinnervation of IHMs after peripheral nerve injury.

  6. A study of low-energy type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisakov, Sergey M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2015-08-01

    All stars with an initial mass greater than 8Msun, but not massive enough to encounter the pair-production instability, eventually form a degenerate core and collapse to form a compact object, either a neutron star or a black hole.At the lower mass end, these massive stars die as red-supergiant stars and give rise to Type II supernovae (SNe). The diversity of observed properties of SNe II suggests a range of progenitor mass, radii, but also explosion energy.We have performed a large grid simulations designed to cover this range of progenitor and explosion properties. Using MESA STAR, we compute a set of massive star models (12-30Msun) from the main sequence until core collapse. We then generate explosions with V1D to produce ejecta with a range of explosion energies and yields. Finally, all ejecta are evolved with CMFGEN to generate multi-band light curves and spectra.In this poster, we focus our attention on the properties of low-energy explosions that give rise to low-luminosity Type II Plateau (II-P) SNe. In particular, we present a detailed study of SN 2008bk, but also include other notorious low-energy SNe II-P like 2005cs, emphasising their non-standard properties by comparing to models that match well events like SN 1999em. Such low-energy explosions, characterised by low ejecta expansion rates, are more suitable for reliable spectral line identifications.Based on our models, we discuss the distinct signatures of low-energy explosions in lower and higher mass models. One important goal is to identify whether there is a progenitor-mass bias leading to such events.

  7. Effect of a misspecification of response rates on type I and type II errors, in a phase II Simon design.

    PubMed

    Baey, Charlotte; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile

    2011-07-01

    Phase-II trials are a key stage in the clinical development of a new treatment. Their main objective is to provide the required information for a go/no-go decision regarding a subsequent phase-III trial. In single arm phase-II trials, widely used in oncology, this decision relies on the comparison of efficacy outcomes observed in the trial to historical controls. The false positive rate generally accepted in phase-II trials, around 10%, contrasts with the very high attrition rate of new compounds tested in phase-III trials, estimated at about 60%. We assumed that this gap could partly be explained by the misspecification of the response rate expected with standard treatment, leading to erroneous hypotheses tested in the phase-II trial. We computed the false positive probability of a defined design under various hypotheses of expected efficacy probability. Similarly we calculated the power of the trial to detect the efficacy of a new compound for different expected efficacy rates. Calculations were done considering a binary outcome, such as the response rate, with a decision rule based on a Simon two-stage design. When analysing a single-arm phase-II trial, based on a design with a pre-specified null hypothesis, a 5% absolute error in the expected response rate leads to a false positive rate of about 30% when it is supposed to be 10%. This inflation of type-I error varies only slightly according to the hypotheses of the initial design. Single-arm phase-II trials poorly control for the false positive rate. Randomised phase-II trials should, therefore, be more often considered.

  8. Increase of cardiac M2-muscarinic receptor gene expression in type-1 but not in type-2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Liang-Ming; Chang, Cheng Kuei; Cheng, Kai-Chun; Kou, Dai-Huang; Liu, I-Min; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2008-08-22

    Changes of cardiac M2-muscarinic receptor (M2-mAChR) gene expression was investigated in type-1 like diabetic rats induced by intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ) and type-2 like diabetic rats induced by fed with fructose-rich chow. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) in STZ-diabetic rats was significantly lower than that in age-matched non-diabetic rats, while the SBP in type-2 like diabetic rats was higher than in non-diabetic rats. Also, the mRNA or protein level of cardiac M2-mAChR in STZ-diabetic rats was markedly higher than non-diabetic rats, but it was not observed in type-2 like diabetic rats as compared to age-matched non-diabetic rats. Arecaidine propargyl ester (APE), the agonist of M2-mAChR, produced a marked reduction of heart rate in STZ-diabetic rats but made less influence on heart rate in fructose-fed rats or non-diabetic rats. The results suggest that cardiac M2-mAChR gene expression is raised in type-1 like diabetic rats but not in type-2 like diabetic rats, this difference mainly due to hyperglycemia, for the production of hypotension in diabetic disorders.

  9. Exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II decrease renal cortical oxygen tension in conscious rats by limiting renal blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Emans, Tonja W.; Janssen, Ben J.; Pinkham, Maximilian I.; Ow, Connie P. C.; Evans, Roger G.; Joles, Jaap A.; Malpas, Simon C.; Krediet, C. T. Paul

    2016-01-01

    Key points Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the role of hypoxia in the initiation and progression of renal disease remains rudimentary.We have developed a method that allows wireless measurement of renal tissue oxygen tension in unrestrained rats.This method provides stable and continuous measurements of cortical tissue oxygen tension (PO2) for more than 2 weeks and can reproducibly detect acute changes in cortical oxygenation.Exogenous angiotensin‐II reduced renal cortical tissue PO2 more than equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine, probably because it reduced renal oxygen delivery more than did phenylephrine.Activation of the endogenous renin–angiotensin system in transgenic Cyp1a1Ren2 rats reduced cortical tissue PO2; in this model renal hypoxia precedes the development of structural pathology and can be reversed acutely by an angiotensin‐II receptor type 1 antagonist.Angiotensin‐II promotes renal hypoxia, which may in turn contribute to its pathological effects during development of chronic kidney disease. Abstract We hypothesised that both exogenous and endogenous angiotensin‐II (AngII) can decrease the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in the renal cortex of unrestrained rats, which might in turn contribute to the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rats were instrumented with telemeters equipped with a carbon paste electrode for continuous measurement of renal cortical tissue PO2. The method reproducibly detected acute changes in cortical oxygenation induced by systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia. In conscious rats, renal cortical PO2 was dose‐dependently reduced by intravenous AngII. Reductions in PO2 were significantly greater than those induced by equi‐pressor doses of phenylephrine. In anaesthetised rats, renal oxygen consumption was not affected, and filtration fraction was increased only in the AngII infused animals. Oxygen delivery decreased by 50% after infusion of AngII and renal blood flow (RBF) fell by 3.3 ml min−1

  10. EARLY-TYPE HOST GALAXIES OF TYPE II AND Ib SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Hyewon; Jeong, Hyunjin; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Yoon, Sung-chul

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies find that some early-type galaxies host Type II or Ibc supernovae (SNe II, Ibc). This may imply recent star formation activities in these SNe host galaxies, but a massive star origin of the SNe Ib so far observed in early-type galaxies has been questioned because of their intrinsic faintness and unusually strong Ca lines shown in the nebular phase. To address the issue, we investigate the properties of early-type SNe host galaxies using the data with Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet photometry and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical data. Our sample includes eight SNe II and one peculiar SN Ib (SN 2000ds) host galaxies as well as 32 SN Ia host galaxies. The host galaxy of SN 2005cz, another peculiar SN Ib, is also analyzed using the GALEX data and the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database optical data. We find that the NUV-optical colors of SN II/Ib host galaxies are systematically bluer than those of SN Ia host galaxies, and some SN II/Ib host galaxies with NUV - r colors markedly bluer than the others exhibit strong radio emission. We perform a stellar population synthesis analysis and find a clear signature of recent star formation activities in most of the SN II/Ib host galaxies. Our results generally support the association of the SNe II/Ib hosted in early-type galaxies with core collapse of massive stars. We briefly discuss implications for the progenitors of the peculiar SNe Ib 2000ds and 2005cz.

  11. Pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II in female mice is enhanced with age: role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pressor response to angiotensin II (AngII) is attenuated in adult females as compared to males via an angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R)-dependent pathway. We hypothesized that adult female mice are protected against AngII-induced hypertension via an enhanced AT2R-mediated pathway and that in reproductively senescent females this pathway is no longer operative. Methods Mean arterial pressure was measured via telemetry in 4-month-old (adult) and 16-month-old (aged) and aged ovariectomized (aged-OVX) wild-type and AT2R knockout (AT2R-KO) female mice during baseline and 14-day infusion of vehicle (saline) or AngII (600 ng/kg/min s.c.). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine renal gene expression of angiotensin receptors and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in response to 14-day treatment with vehicle or AngII. Results Basal mean arterial pressure was similar between the groups. The pressor response to AngII was augmented in adult AT2R-KO compared to adult wild-type mice (29 ± 3 mmHg versus 10 ± 4 mmHg, respectively, on day 14 as compared to basal mean arterial pressure, P = 0.002). In wild-type mice, pressor responsiveness to AngII was augmented with age, such that the pressor response to AngII was similar between aged AT2R-KO and wild-type female mice (31 ± 4 mmHg versus 34 ± 3 mmHg, respectively, on day 14, P = 0.9). There were no significant differences in pressor responsiveness to AngII between aged and aged-OVX mice. Vehicle-treated aged wild-type mice had a lower renal AT2R/AT1R balance as compared to adult counterparts. In response to AngII, the renal AT2R/AT1R balance in aged wild-type females was greater than that observed in vehicle-treated aged wild-type females and adult wild-type females, yet the protective effects of AT2R activation were not restored. Conclusions The protective role of the AT2R depressor pathway is lost with age in female mice. Therefore

  12. Deciphering the role of the type II glyoxalase isoenzyme YcbL (GlxII-2) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reiger, Matthias; Lassak, Jürgen; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG) requires glyoxalases I and II. Glyoxalase I (gloA/GlxI) isomerizes the hemithioacetal, formed spontaneously from MG and glutathione (GSH) to S-lactoylglutathione (SLG), which is hydrolyzed by glyoxalase II (gloB/GlxII) to lactate and GSH. YcbL from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an unusual type II glyoxalase whose role in MG detoxification has remained enigmatic. Here we show that YcbL (gloC/GlxII-2) acts as an accessory type II glyoxylase in E. coli. The two isoenzymes have additive effects and ensure maximal MG degradation.

  13. Glomerular angiotensin II receptors in gentamicin-induced renal failure in the rat.

    PubMed

    Esquerro, E; Rivas-Cabãnero, L; López-Novoa, J M

    1995-11-01

    We evaluated the properties of glomerular angiotensin II receptors in renal glomeruli isolated from control rats and from rats with gentamicin-induced renal failure. There were no differences in the affinity of angiotensin II for its receptor between glomeruli from control and those from rats treated with gentamicin. Angiotensin II receptor density was lower in glomeruli from rats with renal failure than in those from control rats (985 +/- 71 in gentamicin treated rats vs. 1602 +/- 213 fmol/mg prot in controls). No significant differences were observed in renin activity in the supernatant from glomeruli isolated from control rats (3.74 +/- 0.29 ng angiotensin l/mL h) and those isolated from rats with gentamicin-induced renal failure (2.99 +/- 0.29 ng angiotensin l/mL h, p > 0.1). These findings do not support the contention of a role of angiotensin II in the development and maintenance of gentamicin-induced ARF.

  14. Physiological regulation of extracellular matrix collagen and elastin in the arterial wall of rats by noradrenergic tone and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Dab, Houcine; Kacem, Kamel; Hachani, Rafik; Dhaouadi, Nadra; Hodroj, Wassim; Sakly, Mohsen; Randon, Jacques; Bricca, Giampiero

    2012-03-01

    The interactions between the effects of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and angiotensin II (ANG II) on vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis were determined in rats. The mRNA and protein content of collagen I, collagen III and elastin in the abdominal aorta (AA) and femoral artery (FA) was investigated in Wistar-Kyoto rats treated for 5 weeks with guanethidine, a sympathoplegic, losartan, an ANG II AT1 receptor (AT1R) blocker, or both. The effects of noradrenaline (NE) and ANG II on collagen III and elastin mRNA, and the receptor involved, were tested in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Guanethidine increased collagen types I and III and decreased elastin, while losartan had an opposite effect, although without effect on collagen III. The combination of treatments abrogated changes induced by simple treatment with collagen I and elastin, but increased collagen III mRNA in AA and not in FA. NE stimulated collagen III mRNA via β receptors and elastin via α1 and α2 receptors. ANG II stimulated collagen III but inhibited elastin mRNA via AT1R. Overall, SNS and ANG II exert opposite and antagonistic effects on major components of ECM in the vascular wall. This may be of relevance for the choice of a therapeutic strategy in vascular diseases.

  15. Preferential Type II Muscle Fiber Damage From Plyometric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Filippo; Isaacs, Ashwin W.; Myburgh, Kathryn H.

    2012-01-01

    Context Plyometric training has been successfully used in different sporting contexts. Studies that investigated the effect of plyometric training on muscle morphology are limited, and results are controversial with regard to which muscle fiber type is mainly affected. Objective To analyze the skeletal muscle structural and ultrastructural change induced by an acute bout of plyometric exercise to determine which type of muscle fibers is predominantly damaged. Design Descriptive laboratory study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Eight healthy, untrained individuals (age = 22 ± 1 years, height = 179.2 ± 6.4 cm, weight = 78.9 ± 5.9 kg). Intervention(s) Participants completed an acute bout of plyometric exercise (10 sets of 10 squat-jumps with a 1-minute rest between sets). Main Outcome Measure(s) Blood samples were collected 9 days and immediately before and 6 hours and 1, 2, and 3 days after the acute intervention. Muscle samples were collected 9 days before and 3 days after the exercise intervention. Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase activity. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for damage using fluorescent and electron transmission microscopy. Results Creatine kinase activity peaked 1 day after the exercise bout (529.0 ± 317.8 U/L). Immunofluorescence revealed sarcolemmal damage in 155 of 1616 fibers analyzed. Mainly fast-twitch fibers were damaged. Within subgroups, 7.6% of type I fibers, 10.3% of type IIa fibers, and 14.3% of type IIx fibers were damaged as assessed by losses in dystrophin staining. Similar damage was prevalent in IIx and IIa fibers. Electron microscopy revealed clearly distinguishable moderate and severe sarcomere damage, with damage quantifiably predominant in type II muscle fibers of both the glycolytic and oxidative subtypes (86% and 84%, respectively, versus only 27% of slow-twitch fibers). Conclusions We provide direct evidence that a single bout of plyometric exercise affected mainly type II muscle

  16. Dynamics of keratin assembly: exogenous type I keratin rapidly associates with type II keratin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IF) are obligate heteropolymers containing equal amounts of type I and type II keratin. We have previously shown that microinjected biotinylated type I keratin is rapidly incorporated into endogenous bundles of keratin IF (tonofilaments) of PtK2 cells. In this study we show that the earliest steps in the assembly of keratin subunits into tonofilaments involve the extremely rapid formation of discrete aggregates of microinjected keratin. These are seen as fluorescent spots containing both type I and type II keratins within 1 min post-injection as determined by double label immunofluorescence. These observations suggest that endogenous type II keratin subunits can be rapidly mobilized from their endogenous state to form complexes with the injected type I protein. Furthermore, confocal microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy suggest that the type I-type II keratin spots from in close association with the endogenous keratin IF network. When the biotinylated protein is injected at concentrations of 0.3-0.5 mg/ml, the organization of the endogenous network of tonofilaments remains undisturbed during incorporation into tonofilaments. However, microinjection of 1.5-2.0 mg/ml of biotinylated type I results in significant alterations in the organization and assembly state of the endogenous keratin IF network soon after microinjection. The results of this study are consistent with the existence of a state of equilibrium between keratin subunits and polymerized keratin IF in epithelial cells, and provide further proof that IF are dynamic elements of the cytoskeleton of mammalian cells. PMID:7686161

  17. Geochemistry of the alginite and amorphous organic matter from type II-S kerogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stankiewicz, B.A.; Kruge, M.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Salmon, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Maceral fractions of the Type II-S kerogens from the Monterey Formation (Miocene. California. U.S.A.) and Duwi Formation (Campanian/Maastrichtian, Egypt) were separated by density gradient centrifugation. The Monterey Fm. kerogen sample was comprised chiefly of light red-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM), the flash pyrolyzate of which was characterized by a predominance of alkylbenzenes, alkylthiophenes and alkylpyrroles. In contrast, the pyrolyzates of its alginite concentrate showed a highly aliphatic character, typical of this maceral, with the series of n-alkenes and n-alkanes (C6- C26) predominating. The pyrolyzate of the dominant light brown-fluorescing AOM of the Duwi Fm. kerogen had a relatively high concentration of alkylbenzenes and alkylthiophenes, while its elginite concentrate showed a more aliphatic character upon pyrolysis. There was a marked enrichment of thiophenic sulfur in the light-colored AOM of both samples (and also pyrrolic nitrogen in the case of the Monterey) relative to the alginite. The results support a bacterially-mediated, degradative origin for Type II-S amorphous organic matter, with algal remains as the primary source of the kerogen.

  18. Early photocoagulation in patients with either type I or type II diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the benefits of early photocoagulation in patients with type I versus type II diabetes. DESIGN: One eye of each of 3,711 patients was randomly assigned to early photocoagulation; the other was assigned to deferral of photocoagulation, with follow-up visits scheduled every 4 months and photocoagulation to be carried out promptly if high-risk proliferative retinopathy developed. Patients were categorized by age and type of diabetes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Best corrected visual acuity was measured at each study visit scheduled at 4-month intervals. Stereoscopic fundus photographs were taken and evaluated at baseline, 4 months, and yearly thereafter. Retinopathy severity was assessed from fundus photographs. Severe visual loss was defined as visual acuity of worse than 5/200 for at least two consecutive study visits. RESULTS: Previously published results of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) demonstrated a statistically significant benefit of early photocoagulation in preventing severe vision loss. Further analyses demonstrate that this benefit of early photocoagulation is greater in patients with type II diabetes than in those with type I. The relative benefit of early photocoagulation in patients with type II diabetes is also seen for other outcomes (development of high-risk proliferative retinopathy, development of the combined end point [severe visual loss or vitrectomy], development of moderate visual loss, or development of legal blindness). The patients most likely to benefit from early photocoagulation had severe nonproliferative retinopathy or early proliferative retinopathy. Analyses from the Diabetic Retinopathy Study confirm the relative benefit of scatter photocoagulation for type II patients. Because of the high correlation between age and type of diabetes, analyses sub-grouped by age show similar results. CONCLUSION: These analyses suggest that patients with type II diabetes, or older patients with diabetes

  19. Contribution of renal purinergic receptors to renal vasoconstriction in angiotensin II-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Franco, Martha; Bautista, Rocio; Tapia, Edilia; Soto, Virgilia; Santamaría, José; Osorio, Horacio; Pacheco, Ursino; Sánchez-Lozada, L Gabriela; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L Gabriel

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the participation of purinergic P2 receptors in the regulation of renal function in ANG II-dependent hypertension, renal and glomerular hemodynamics were evaluated in chronic ANG II-infused (14 days) and Sham rats during acute blockade of P2 receptors with PPADS. In addition, P2X1 and P2Y1 protein and mRNA expression were compared in ANG II-infused and Sham rats. Chronic ANG II-infused rats exhibited increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reductions in glomerular blood flow, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), single-nephron GFR (SNGFR), and glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient. PPADS restored afferent and efferent resistances as well as glomerular blood flow and SNGFR, but did not ameliorate the elevated arterial blood pressure. In Sham rats, PPADS increased afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances and reduced GFR and SNGFR. Since purinergic blockade may influence nitric oxide (NO) release, we evaluated the role of NO in the response to PPADS. Acute blockade with N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) reversed the vasodilatory effects of PPADS and reduced urinary nitrate excretion (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)) in ANG II-infused rats, indicating a NO-mediated vasodilation during PPADS treatment. In Sham rats, PPADS induced renal vasoconstriction which was not modified by l-NAME, suggesting blockade of a P2X receptor subtype linked to the NO pathway; the response was similar to that obtained with l-NAME alone. P2X1 receptor expression in the renal cortex was increased by chronic ANG II infusion, but there were no changes in P2Y1 receptor abundance. These findings indicate that there is an enhanced P2 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of afferent and efferent arterioles in chronic ANG II-infused rats, which contributes to the increased renal vascular resistance observed in ANG II-dependent hypertension.

  20. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  1. Angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan attenuates aortic stiffening and remodelling in STZ-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevention or attenuation of diabetic vascular complications includes anti-hypertensive treatment with renin-angiotensin system inhibitors on account of their protective effects beyond blood pressure reduction. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of telmisartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), on blood pressure, aortic stiffening, and aortic remodelling in experimental type 1 diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ) (65 mg/kg) in male Wistar rats. One diabetic group was treated for 10 weeks with telmisartan (10 mg/kg/day p/o). Pressure-independent aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured under anaesthesia after intravenous infusion of phenylephrine and nitroglycerine. Aortic wall samples were collected for histomorphometrical analysis. Results Untreated diabetes imposed differential effects on aortic stiffening, as demonstrated by increased isobaric PWV over a range of high blood pressures, but not at lower blood pressures. This was associated with loss and disruption of elastin fibres and an increase in collagen fibres in the aortic media. Treatment with telmisartan decreased resting blood pressure, reduced aortic stiffness, and partially prevented the degradation of elastin network within the aortic wall. Conclusions Telmisartan improved the structural and functional indices of aortic stiffening induced by untreated STZ-diabetes, demonstrating the importance of ARBs in the therapeutic approach to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:24920962

  2. On the Intrinsic Diversity of Type II-Plateau Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen-rich Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe) exhibit correlations between the plateau luminosity {L}{pl}, the nickel mass {M}{Ni}, the explosion energy {E}{exp}, and the ejecta mass {M}{ej}. Using our global, self-consistent, multi-band model of nearby well-observed SNe, we find that the covariances of these quantities are strong and that the confidence ellipsoids are oriented in the direction of the correlations, which reduces their significance. By proper treatment of the covariance matrix of the model, we discover a significant intrinsic width to the correlations between {L}{pl}, {E}{exp} and {M}{Ni}, where the uncertainties due to the distance and the extinction dominate. For fixed {E}{exp}, the spread in {M}{Ni} is about 0.25 dex, which we attribute to the differences in the progenitor internal structure. We argue that the effects of incomplete γ-ray trapping are not important in our sample. Similarly, the physics of the Type II-Plateau SN light curves leads to inherently degenerate estimates of {E}{exp} and {M}{ej}, which makes their observed correlation weak. Ignoring the covariances of SN parameters or the intrinsic width of the correlations causes significant biases in the slopes of the fitted relations. Our results imply that Type II-Plateau SN explosions are not described by a single physical parameter or a simple one-dimensional trajectory through the parameter space, but instead reflect the diversity of the core and surface properties of their progenitors. We discuss the implications for the physics of the explosion mechanism and possible future observational constraints.

  3. Effect of the type-I to type-II Weyl semimetal topological transition on superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dingping; Rosenstein, Baruch; Shapiro, B. Ya.; Shapiro, I.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of recently discovered topological transition between type-I and type-II Weyl semimetals on superconductivity is considered. A set of Gorkov equations for weak superconductivity in Weyl semimetal under topological phase transition is derived and solved. The critical temperature and superconducting gap both have spikes in the transition point as functions of the tilt parameter of the Dirac cone determined, in turn, by the material parameters like pressure. The spectrum of superconducting excitations is different in two phases: The sharp cone pinnacle is characteristic for type I, while two parallel almost flat bands, are formed in type II. Spectral density is calculated on both sides of transition to demonstrate the different weights of the bands. The superconductivity thus can be used as a clear indicator for the topological transformation. Results are discussed in the light of recent experiments.

  4. Predicted continuum spectra of type II supernovae - LTE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaviv, G.; Wehrse, R.; Wagoner, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The continuum spectral energy distribution of the flux emerging from type II supernovae is calculated from quasi-static radiative transfer through a power-law density gradient, assuming radiative equilibrium and LTE. It is found that the Balmer jump disappears at high effective temperatures and low densities, while the spectrum resembles that of a dilute blackbody but is flatter with a sharper cutoff at the short-wavelength end. A significant UV excess is found in all models calculated. The calculation should be considered exploratory because of significant effects which are anticipated to arise from departure from LTE.

  5. Predictive data modeling of human type II diabetes related statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Kristina L.; Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Albritton, Nathaniel G.

    2009-04-01

    During the course of routine Type II treatment of one of the authors, it was decided to derive predictive analytical Data Models of the daily sampled vital statistics: namely weight, blood pressure, and blood sugar, to determine if the covariance among the observed variables could yield a descriptive equation based model, or better still, a predictive analytical model that could forecast the expected future trend of the variables and possibly eliminate the number of finger stickings required to montior blood sugar levels. The personal history and analysis with resulting models are presented.

  6. Interaction of ultrasound with vortices in type-II superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sonin, E.B.

    1996-04-01

    The theory of ultrasound in the mixed state of type-II superconductors is suggested which takes into account the Magnus force on vortices, the anti-Magnus force on ions, and diamagnetism of the mixed state. The acoustic Faraday effect (rotation of polarization of the transverse ultrasonic wave propagating along vortices) is linear in the Magnus force in any regime of the flux flow for wavelengths now used in the ultrasound experiments. Therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, the Faraday effect should be looked for only in clean superconductors with a strong Magnus force. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Type II strained layer superlattice: A potential future IR solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidrow, Meimei Z.

    2009-11-01

    Type II strained layer superlattice (SLS) has been making tremendous progress in the past few years funded by the Missile Defense Agency Advanced Technology Directorate (MDA/DV) under the Passive EO/IR Program. SLS has shown great potential as a future solution for infrared military systems. In this presentation, the most recent progress in SLS development will be presented. The presentation will also discuss the comparison of SLS with mercury-cadmium-telluride (HgCdTe) using Rule 07, SLS minority carrier lifetime issues, and future directions.

  8. Combination of Vildagliptin and Pioglitazone in Experimental Type 2 Diabetes in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Rowaida; Sakr, Ahmed; Salama, Mona; El Sarha, Ashgan

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical Research The majority of studies on vildagliptin and pioglitazone have focused on their combination in glycemic control. The aim of the present study was to investigate their effects in combination on (i) hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and inflammation and (ii) on organs involved in the pathophysiology of diabetes, pancreas, kidney and liver. Type 2 diabetes was induced using low-dose streptozotocin in male Wistar rats. Diabetic rats were treated for 4 weeks, with vildagliptin (10 mg/kg/day), pioglitazone (10 mg/kg/day) and their combination. Diabetic rats showed elevated fasting serum glucose, fasting serum insulin, serum transaminases together with a deleterious lipid profile and elevated serum creatinine and urea concentrations. Serum levels of the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitrite/nitrate were also elevated compared to normal rats. Oxidative stress was manifested by lowered hepatic reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Pancreatic sections from diabetic rats showed degenerated islets with poorly maintained architecture that was prevented by drug treatment. Pioglitazone was generally more effective than vildagliptin in the studied parameters except for the lipid profile where the effect of both drugs was comparable and for the liver enzymes and renal parameters where vildagliptin was more effective. The combination of vildagliptin and pioglitazone produced superior effects than either drug alone. Drug Dev Res 77 : 251-257, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Biologic Activity of Type I and Type II Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates from Clinically Characterized Sites,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-26

    journal of choice is the Journal of Periodontology . 1 ncl JACK W. VINCENT as COL, DC Microbiology Branch SGRD-UDZ (19 Jul 84) TO COL Jack W. Vincent...Activitity of Type I and Type II Manuscript for Publication Fusobacterium nucleatum Isolates From Clinically Chatacterized Sites. 6. PERFORMING ONG...120) were obtained from subgingival plaque samples taken from 27 clinically characterized sites utilizing a selec- tive culture medium. All isolates

  10. Cognitive Dysfunction Is Worse among Pediatric Patients with Bipolar Disorder Type I than Type II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; West, Amy E.; Jacobs, Rachel; Sweeney, John A.; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Impaired profiles of neurocognitive function have been consistently demonstrated among pediatric patients with bipolar disorder (BD), and may aid in the identification of endophenotypes across subtypes of the disorder. This study aims to determine phenotypic cognitive profiles of patients with BD Type I and II. Methods: Subjects (N =…

  11. 77 FR 60124 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Initial Completeness Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... Assessments for Type II Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Drug Master Files Under the Generic Drug User Fee... Amendments of 2012 (GDUFA), holders of certain drug master files, namely, Type II active...

  12. Imbalance of angiotensin type 1 receptor and angiotensin II type 2 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla: potential mechanism for sympathetic overactivity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lie; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Wei; Zucker, Irving H

    2008-10-01

    Upregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors (AT(1)R) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) contributes to the sympathoexcitation in the chronic heart failure (CHF). However, the role of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)R) is not clear. In this study, we measured AT(1)R and AT(2)R protein expression in the RVLM and determined their effects on renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate in anesthetized sham and CHF rats. We found that (1) although AT(1)R expression in the RVLM was upregulated, the AT(2)R was significantly downregulated (CHF: 0.06+/-0.02 versus sham: 0.15+/-0.02, P<0.05); (2) simultaneously stimulating RVLM AT(1)R and AT(2)R by angiotensin II evoked sympathoexcitation, hypertension, and tachycardia in both sham and CHF rats with greater responses in CHF; (3) stimulating RVLM AT1R with angiotensin II plus the specific AT(2)R antagonist PD123319 induced a larger sympathoexcitatory response than simultaneously stimulating AT(1)R and AT(2)R in sham rats, but not in CHF; (4) activating RVLM AT(2)R with CGP42112 induced a sympathoinhibition, hypotension, and bradycardia only in sham rats (renal sympathetic nerve activity: 36.4+/-5.1% of baseline versus 102+/-3.9% of baseline in artificial cerebrospinal fluid, P<0.05); (5) pretreatment with 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, a general inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism, into the RVLM attenuates the CGP42112-induced sympathoinhibition. These results suggest that AT(2)R in the RVLM exhibits an inhibitory effect on sympathetic outflow, which is, at least partially, mediated by an arachidonic acid metabolic pathway. These data implicate a downregulation in the AT(2)R as a contributory factor in the sympathoexcitation in CHF.

  13. Effect of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockade on kidney ischemia/reperfusion; a gender-related difference

    PubMed Central

    Moslemi, Fatemeh; Taheri, Pegah; Azimipoor, Mahdis; Ramtin, Sina; Hashemianfar, Mostafa; Momeni- Ashjerdi, Ali; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir; Nasri, Hamid; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury may be related to activity of reninangiotensin system (RAS), which is gender-related. In this study, it was attempted to compare the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor type 1 (AT1R) blockade; losartan in I/R injury in male and female rats. Materials and Methods: Male and female Wistar rats were assigned as sham surgery, control I/R groups treated with vehicle, and case I/R groups treated with losartan (30 mg/kg). Vehicle and losartan were given 2 hours before bilateral kidney ischemia induced by clamping renal arteries for 45 minutes followed by 24 hours of renal reperfusion. Results: The I/R injury significantly increased the serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr), and kidney tissue damage score in both genders. However, losartan decreased these values in female rats significantly (P < 0.05). This was not observed in male rats. Conclusion: Losartan protects the kidney from I/R injury in female but not in male rats possibly because of gender-related difference of RAS. PMID:27689110

  14. [Achondrogenesis type II-hypochondrogenesis: radiological features.Case report].

    PubMed

    Delgado Carrasco, J; Casanova Morcillo, A; Zabalza Alvillos, M; Ayala Garcés, A

    2001-12-01

    We present a case of lethal dysplasia in the neonatal period. The abnormality was suspected after ultrasonography of a pregnant woman presenting weak fetal movements revealed shortening of the extremities, voluminous cranium and polyhydramnios. Clinical and radiological findings showed platyspondylic dwarfism with short extremities, narrow thorax and hydropic appearance. The infant died on the third day of life from progressive respiratory distress. In the absence of histological, chondro-osseus and molecular studies, detailed clinical and radiological studies, as well as the lethal evolution during the neonatal period, guided the diagnosis of hypochondrogenesis. This entity, together with achondrogenesis II (and other dysplasias), forms part of the same spectrum of collagen type II abnormalities produced by a defect in the gene (COL2A1) that codifies collagen II, located in chromosome 12 I(12q13.1-13.2). When a heterozygote is produced, transmission is dominant autosomal. The phenotype shows wide variation and severity depends on the mechanism and location of the mutation. The definitive diagnosis is given by cytomolecular studies, while individualization of the different entities is based on histological data from the cartilage; clinical findings and skeletal radiology serve as a guide.

  15. Type II pneumocytes modulate surfactant production in response to cigarette smoke constituents: restoration by vitamins A and E.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuan; Williams, Tracy L; Li, Ting; Umbehr, Joshua; Fang, Liang; Wang, Weiqun; Baybutt, Richard C

    2005-12-01

    This study was to evaluate the effects of cigarette smoke constituents upon type II pneumocyte surfactant production in vitro, and how vitamins A and E may alter the response. Freshly isolated type II pneumocytes from Sprague-Dawley rats were incubated 20 h in medium with fetal bovine serum that was or was not treated with cigarette smoke. The number of adherent cells was inversely related to the dose of smoke or benzo(a)pyrene. Despite the decreased number of treated cells, the total amount of surfactant per culture well was unchanged, whereas surfactant production per cell was significantly increased (P<0.05). Vitamin A concentration was significantly (P<0.05) lower in the smoke-treated serum compared with untreated serum. When vitamin A or E was added to the cigarette smoke-treated serum, cell adherence and surfactant production returned to control values. In conclusion, cigarette smoke constituents or benzo(a)pyrene alone decreased the number of adherent type II pneumocytes, but did not alter surfactant amounts because of an increased production of surfactant per cell. Type II pneumocytes seem to adjust surfactant production dependent upon the number of type II pneumocytes to produce it and vitamin A or E enhance cell attachment in the presence of the smoke toxins.

  16. Type-II Bursts in Meter and Deca - Hectometer Wavelengths and Their Relation to Flares and CMEs: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, O.; Umapathy, S.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Pappa Kalaivani, P.; Vršnak, Bojan

    2010-09-01

    A study of the relationship between 38 type-II bursts recorded in meter and deca-hectometer (hereinafter m and DH) wavelength range and the associated flares and CMEs observed during the years 2000 - 2005 was carried out by Prakash et al. (2009). These events were divided into two classes: i) Class I, representing events where DH-type-II bursts are not a continuation of m-type-II bursts and ii) Class II, where DH-type-II bursts are a continuation of m-type-II bursts. In the present work, we extend the analysis of this sample of 38 events in three different steps: i) statistical properties of m- and DH-type-II bursts; ii) analysis of time lags between onsets of flares and CMEs associated with type-II bursts; and iii) statistical properties and relation between flares and CMEs of Class I and Class II events. We found a significant difference between the properties of m- and DH-type-II bursts of Class I and Class II events. For example, there are significant differences in starting and ending frequencies, bandwidth and speed. From the time delay analysis, we found the following. i) In 64% of Class I events, flares start after the onset of CMEs and the remaining 36% of flares start before the onset of CMEs. On the other hand, in the case of Class II events, the values are 83% and 17%, respectively. ii) The difference between the mean values of delay between flare start and DH start has high statistical significance (probability P of null hypothesis <1%). The time delays between the start of m-type-II burst and the CME onset are considerably larger for Class I events ( P=7%) than Class II events. iii) There are notable differences in: (a) delay between the flare and CME onset times ( P<1%); (b) flare rise time of Class I and Class II events ( P<5%). iv) While the flare rise time is well correlated with the lag between the flare start and the CME onset in Class I events, there is no such correlation for Class II events.

  17. A-current and type I/type II transition determine collective spiking from common input.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Andrea K; Thilo, Evan L; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2012-09-01

    The mechanisms and impact of correlated, or synchronous, firing among pairs and groups of neurons are under intense investigation throughout the nervous system. A ubiquitous circuit feature that can give rise to such correlations consists of overlapping, or common, inputs to pairs and populations of cells, leading to common spike train responses. Here, we use computational tools to study how the transfer of common input currents into common spike outputs is modulated by the physiology of the recipient cells. We focus on a key conductance, g(A), for the A-type potassium current, which drives neurons between "type II" excitability (low g(A)), and "type I" excitability (high g(A)). Regardless of g(A), cells transform common input fluctuations into a tendency to spike nearly simultaneously. However, this process is more pronounced at low g(A) values. Thus, for a given level of common input, type II neurons produce spikes that are relatively more correlated over short time scales. Over long time scales, the trend reverses, with type II neurons producing relatively less correlated spike trains. This is because these cells' increased tendency for simultaneous spiking is balanced by an anticorrelation of spikes at larger time lags. These findings extend and interpret prior findings for phase oscillators to conductance-based neuron models that cover both oscillatory (superthreshold) and subthreshold firing regimes. We demonstrate a novel implication for neural signal processing: downstream cells with long time constants are selectively driven by type I cell populations upstream and those with short time constants by type II cell populations. Our results are established via high-throughput numerical simulations and explained via the cells' filtering properties and nonlinear dynamics.

  18. Type-II Weyl cone transitions in driven semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Oh, Yun-Tak; Han, Jung Hoon; Lee, Patrick A.

    2016-09-01

    Periodically driven systems provide tunable platforms to realize interesting Floquet topological phases and phase transitions. In electronic systems with Weyl dispersions, the band crossings are topologically protected even in the presence of time-periodic perturbations. This robustness permits various routes to shift and tilt the Weyl spectra in the momentum and energy space using circularly polarized light of sufficient intensity. We show that type-II Weyl fermions, in which the Weyl dispersions are tilted with the appearance of pocketlike Fermi surfaces, can be induced in driven Dirac semimetals and line node semimetals. Under a circularly polarized drive, both semimetal systems immediately generate Weyl node pairs whose types can be further controlled by the driving amplitude and direction. The resultant phase diagrams demonstrate experimental feasibilities.

  19. Exotic dual of type II double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Riccioni, Fabio

    2017-04-01

    We perform an exotic dualization of the Ramond-Ramond fields in type II double field theory, in which they are encoded in a Majorana-Weyl spinor of O (D , D). Starting from a first-order master action, the dual theory in terms of a tensor-spinor of O (D , D) is determined. This tensor-spinor is subject to an exotic version of the (self-)duality constraint needed for a democratic formulation. We show that in components, reducing O (D , D) to GL (D), one obtains the expected exotically dual theory in terms of mixed Young tableaux fields. To this end, we generalize exotic dualizations to self-dual fields, such as the 4-form in type IIB string theory.

  20. The role of insulin-like growth factor II in the malignant transformation of rat liver oval cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Siegel, K; Odenthal, M; Becker, R; Oesch, F; Dienes, H P; Schirmacher, P; Steinberg, P

    1997-04-01

    Oval cells are small nonparenchymal epithelial cells that first appear in the periportal areas of the liver and thereafter invade the whole parenchyma when mice or rats are exposed to a variety of chemical carcinogens. In the present study we have analyzed the expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II) in the recently established oval cell line OC/CDE 22 and its malignantly transformed counterpart (the M22 cells) and the biological consequences of the constitutive expression of IGF II in oval cells. OC/CDE 22 cells do not express the above-mentioned growth factor, whereas the M22 cells do and addition of a neutralizing anti-IGF II antibody to M22 cells resulted in an almost complete proliferation stop. The presence of type 1 as well as type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptors in OC/CDE 22 and M22 cells was revealed by Northern blotting; however, only neutralizing antibodies directed against the type 1 IGF receptor were able to inhibit the proliferation of the cultured oval cells. Finally, transfection of an IGF II complementary DNA (cDNA) into OC/CDE 22 cells resulted in the release of active IGF II into the extracellular medium but not in the concomitant malignant transformation of the cells. Taken together these results show that: 1) upon transformation oval cells start producing IGF II and 2) IGF II acts on oval cells as a pure mitogen (without being per se oncogenic) via an autocrine loop involving the activation of the type 1 IGF receptor.

  1. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  2. A monoclonal rat anti-mouse EMAP II antibody that functionally neutralizes pro- and mature-EMAP II in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Mitnacht-Kraus, Rita; Ispe, Ute; Garrison, Jana; Hou, Yonghao; Taylor, Brian; Petrache, Irina; Vestweber, Dietmar; Clauss, Matthias

    2009-10-31

    EMAP II is an endothelial cell and monocyte activating proinflammatory cytokine, which has been demonstrated to induce endothelial cell apoptosis. In order to analyze its role in disease models linked to inflammation and endothelial cell death, we aimed to develop a neutralizing antibody against mouse EMAP II. Therefore, we generated rat monoclonal anti-mouse EMAP II antibodies by immunization with recombinant full length, mouse pro-EMAP II protein. We could identify by ELISA, hybridoma clones from fusion with mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells which produced antibodies recognizing both full length and mature EMAP II. We further characterized one antibody, M7/1 and demonstrated its ability to detect both EMAP II forms in Western blotting and to neutralize EMAP II directed migration of human peripheral blood monocytes as well as EMAP II induced apoptosis of tumor and endothelial cells. We conclude that this antibody can be useful to both target and analyze murine disease models, in which EMAP II may be involved.

  3. Feeding problems and malnutrition in spinal muscular atrophy type II.

    PubMed

    Messina, Sonia; Pane, Marika; De Rose, Paola; Vasta, Isabella; Sorleti, Domenica; Aloysius, Annie; Sciarra, Federico; Mangiola, Fortunato; Kinali, Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the study was to conduct a survey using a dedicated questionnaire to assess feeding difficulties and weight gain in a population of 122 Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) type II patients, aged between 1 and 47 years. All the answers were entered in a database and were analysed subdividing the cohort into age groups (1-5, 6-10, 11-14, 15-19, 20-29, and 30-50 years). Six out of our 122 patients (5%), all younger than 11 years, had weights more than 2SD above the median for age matched controls, whilst 45 (37%) had weights less than 2SD below the median. Chewing difficulties were reported in 34 of the 122 patients (28%) and limitation in the ability to open the mouth in 36 (30%) and both were increasingly more frequent with age. Swallowing difficulties were reported in 30 patients (25%). The results of our survey suggest that a number of patients with SMA type II have limited jaw opening, and chewing and swallowing difficulties. Our findings raise a few issues concerning standards of care that should be implemented in the monitoring and management of feeding difficulties and weight gain.

  4. Model light curves of linear Type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, D.A.; Wheeler, J.C.; Harkness, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    Light curves computed from hydrodynamic models of supernova are compared graphically with the average observed B and V-band light curves of linear Type II supernovae. Models are based on the following explosion scenarios: carbon deflagration within a C + O core near the Chandrasekhar mass, electron-capture-induced core collapse of an O-Ne-Mg core of the Chandrasekhar mass, and collapse of an Fe core in a massive star. A range of envelope mass, initial radius, and composition is investigated. Only a narrow range of values of these parameters are consistent with observations. Within this narrow range, most of the observed light curve properties can be obtained in part, but none of the models can reproduce the entire light curve shape and absolute magnitude over the full 200 day comparison period. The observed lack of a plateau phase is explained in terms of a combination of small envelope mass and envelope helium enhancement. The final cobalt tail phase of the light curve can be reproduced only if the mass of explosively synthesized radioactive Ni-56 is small. The results presented here, in conjunction with the observed homogeneity among individual members of the supernova subclass, argue favorably for the O-Ne-Mg core collapse mechanism as an explanation for linear Type II supernovae. The Crab Nebula may arisen from such an explosion. Carbon deflagrations may lead to brighter events like SN 1979C. 62 refs.

  5. Type II intermediate-luminosity optical transients (ILOTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam

    2017-01-01

    We propose that in a small fraction of intermediate luminosity optical transients (ILOTs) powered by a strongly interacting binary system, the ejected mass in the equatorial plane can block the central source from our line of sight. We can therefore observe only radiation that is reprocessed by polar outflow, much as in type II active galactic nuclei (AGN). An ejection of M_ej,e=10^{-4} M_⊙ (1 M_⊙) at 30 degrees from the equatorial plane and at a velocity of v_e = 100 {km} {s}^{-1} will block the central source in the NIR for about 5 years (500 years). During that period of time the object might disappear in the visible band, and be detected only in the IR band due to polar dust. We raise the possibility that the recently observed disappearance of a red giant in the visible, designated N6946-BH1, is a type II ILOT rather than a failed supernova. For this case we estimate that the ejected mass in the polar direction was M_ej,p≈ 10^{-3} M_⊙. Our scenario predicts that this event should reinstate its visible emission in several decades.

  6. Isolation and molecular characterization of type I and type II feline coronavirus in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) and feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) are two important coronaviruses of domestic cat worldwide. Although FCoV is prevalent among cats; the fastidious nature of type I FCoV to grow on cell culture has limited further studies on tissue tropism and pathogenesis of FCoV. While several studies reported serological evidence for FCoV in Malaysia, neither the circulating FCoV isolated nor its biotypes determined. This study for the first time, describes the isolation and biotypes determination of type I and type II FCoV from naturally infected cats in Malaysia. Findings Of the total number of cats sampled, 95% (40/42) were RT-PCR positive for FCoV. Inoculation of clinical samples into Crandell feline kidney cells (CrFK), and Feline catus whole fetus-4 cells (Fcwf-4), show cytopathic effect (CPE) characterized by syncytial cells formation and later cell detachment. Differentiation of FCoV biotypes using RT-PCR assay revealed that, 97.5% and 2.5% of local isolates were type I and type II FCoV, respectively. These isolates had high sequence homology and phylogenetic similarity with several FCoV isolates from Europe, South East Asia and USA. Conclusions This study reported the successful isolation of local type I and type II FCoV evident with formation of cytopathic effects in two types of cell cultures namely the CrFK and Fcwf-4 , where the later cells being more permissive. However, the RT-PCR assay is more sensitive in detecting the antigen in suspected samples as compared to virus isolation in cell culture. The present study indicated that type I FCoV is more prevalent among cats in Malaysia. PMID:23171743

  7. Supernova 1993J as a spectroscopic link between type II and type Ib supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, D. A.; Clocchiatti, A.; Benjamin, R.; Lester, D. F.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Supernova 1993J in the nearby galaxy M81 is one of the closest - and hence brightest - supernovae to be witnessed this century. The early spectrum of SN1993J showed the characteristic hydrogen signature of type II supernovae, but its subsequent evolution is atypical for this class of supernova. Here we present optical and infrared spectra of SN1993J up to 43 days after outburst, which reveal the onset of the helium absorption and emission features more commonly associated with hydrogen-free type Ib supernovae. Corresponding model spectra show that the progenitor star must have possessed an unusually thin (for type II supernovae) hydrogen-rich envelope overlying a helium-rich mantle. Moreover, the supernova ejecta must have remained compositionally stratified, with little transport of the hydrogen-rich material down into the underlying helium layer or mixing of heavier elements outwards. SN1993J therefore represents a transition object between hydrogen-dominated type II supernovae, and hydrogen-free, helium-dominated type Ib supernovae.

  8. Magnetic description of the Fermi arc in type-I and type-II Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchoumakov, Serguei; Civelli, Marcello; Goerbig, Mark O.

    2017-03-01

    We consider finite-sized interfaces of a Weyl semimetal and show that the corresponding confinement potential is similar to the application of a magnetic field. Among the numerous states, which can be labeled by indices n like in Landau levels, the n =0 surface state describes the Weyl semimetal Fermi arc at a given chemical potential. Moreover, the analogy with a magnetic field shows that an external in-plane magnetic field can be used to distort the Fermi arc and would explain some features of magnetotransport in Weyl semimetals. We derive the Fermi arc for type-I and type-II Weyl semimetals where we deal with the tilt anisotropy by the use of Lorentz boosts. In the case of type-II Weyl semimetals, this leads to many additional topologically trivial surface states at low energy. Finally, we extend the Aharonov-Casher argument and demonstrate the stability of the Fermi arc over fluctuations of the surface potential.

  9. Piezoelectricity in collagen type II fibrils measured by scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, D.; Kilpatrick, J. I.; Hsu, T.; Habelitz, S.; Fertala, A.; Rodriguez, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    The converse piezoelectric effect in collagen type II fibrils, the main collagen constituent in cartilage, was investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy. The fibrils exhibited shear piezoelectric behavior similar to that previously reported in collagen type I fibrils and followed the same cantilever-fibril angle dependence present for type I. A uniform polarization directed from the amine to carboxyl termini, as seen for collagen type I, was observed in all type II fibrils studied. The shear piezoelectric coefficient, d15, however, for type II was roughly 28-32% of the value measured for type I fibrils. Possible explanations for the reduced piezoelectric coefficient of type II collagen are provided.

  10. Dietary avocado oil supplementation attenuates the alterations induced by type I diabetes and oxidative stress in electron transfer at the complex II-complex III segment of the electron transport chain in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Sámano-García, Carlos Alberto; Calderón-Cortés, Elizabeth; Pérez-Hernández, Ismael H; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Orozco, Alain R; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Impaired complex III activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondria have been identified as key events leading to renal damage during diabetes. Due to its high content of oleic acid and antioxidants, we aimed to test whether avocado oil may attenuate the alterations in electron transfer at complex III induced by diabetes by a mechanism related with increased resistance to lipid peroxidation. 90 days of avocado oil administration prevented the impairment in succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity caused by streptozotocin-induced diabetes in kidney mitochondria. This was associated with a protection against decreased electron transfer through high potential chain in complex III related to cytochromes c + c1 loss. During Fe(2+)-induced oxidative stress, avocado oil improved the activities of complexes II and III and enhanced the protection conferred by a lipophilic antioxidant against damage by Fe(2+). Avocado oil also decreased ROS generation in Fe(2+)-damaged mitochondria. Alterations in the ratio of C20:4/C18:2 fatty acids were observed in mitochondria from diabetic animals that not were corrected by avocado oil treatment, which yielded lower peroxidizability indexes only in diabetic mitochondria although avocado oil caused an augment in the total content of monounsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, a protective effect of avocado oil against lipid peroxidation was observed consistently only in control mitochondria. Since the beneficial effects of avocado oil in diabetic mitochondria were not related to increased resistance to lipid peroxidation, these effects were discussed in terms of the antioxidant activity of both C18:1 and the carotenoids reported to be contained in avocado oil.

  11. Neutrinos from type II supernovae - The first 100 milliseconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myra, Eric S.; Burrows, Adam

    1990-01-01

    The collapse of a 1.17 solar mass iron core is numerically followed through infall to 100 ms past core bounce, and the emergent neutrino spectra during each phase are highlighted. It is found that, even with fairly optimistic conditions for producing a strong, sustained core-bounce shock wave, the prompt shock stalls within 9 ms of core bounce at a radius of less than 250 km. It appears that a radical change in the character of the progenitor core or in our understanding of the relevant physics of stellar collapse is needed before the direct mechanism for type II supernovae can become viable. Expanding the number of neutrino types from one to six magnifies the debilitating effect of neutrino loss on shock propagation. At shock breakout, prompt bursts of all neutrino types are observed. The luminosities of the nonelectron types show a sudden turn-on in luminosity while that of the electron neutrinos steadily increases throughout infall as a result of accelerating electron capture.

  12. Evidence for extracellular, but not intracellular, generation of angiotensin II in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, H.; Khosla, M.C.; Bumpus, M.; Husain, A. )

    1988-11-01

    Based on the observation that high levels of renin and angiotensin II (Ang II) are found in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), it has been postulated that Ang II is formed intracellularly by the renin-converting enzyme cascade in this tissue. To test this hypothesis, the authors examined renin-angiotensin system components in subcellular fractions of the rat adrenal ZG. Renin activity and immunoreactive-Ang II (IR-Ang II) were observed in vesicular fractions but were not colocalized. In addition, angiotensinogen, angiotensin I, and converting enzyme were not observed in the renin or IR-Ang II-containing vesicular fractions. These data do not support the hypothesis that Ang II is formed intracellularly within the renin-containing vesicles of the ZG. Rather, since modulatable renin release from adrenal ZG slices was observed and renin activity was found in dense vesicular fractions (33-39% sucrose), it is likely that Ang II formation in the ZG is extracellular and initiated by the release of vesicular renin. In ZG lysomal fractions {sup 125}I-labeled Ang II was degraded to {sup 125}I-labeled des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II. Since Ang II antibodies do not recognize des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II, these finding explain why IR-Ang II in the ZG is due predominantly to Ang II and not to its C-terminal immunoreactive fragments.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of angiotensin II type 2 receptor during cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun-ye; Yin, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) activation has been shown to protect against stroke, but its precise mechanism remains poorly understood. We investigated whether the protective effect of AT2R against ischemia/reperfusion injury is mediated by the suppression of immune and inflammatory responses. Rat models of middle cerebral artery occlusion were intraperitoneally injected with physiological saline, the AT2R agonist CGP42112 (1 mg/kg per day) or antagonist PD123319 (1 mg/kg per day). In the CGP42112 group, AT2R expression increased, the infarct area decreased, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α expression decreased, and interleukin-10 expression increased compared with the saline group. Antagonisin AT2R using PD123319 produced the opposite effects. These results indicate that AT2R activation suppresses immune and inflammatory responses, and protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27630693

  14. Role of Mas receptor antagonist (A779) in renal hemodynamics in condition of blocked angiotensin II receptors in rats.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, A; Oryan, S; Nematbakhsh, M

    2016-03-01

    The vasodilatory effect of angiotensin 1-7 (Ang 1-7) is exerted in the vascular bed via Mas receptor (MasR) gender dependently. However, the crosstalk between MasR and angiotensin II (Ang II) types 1 and 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) may change some actions of Ang 1-7 in renal circulation. In this study by blocking AT1R and AT2R, the role of MasR in kidney hemodynamics was described. In anaesthetized male and female Wistar rats, the effects of saline as vehicle and MasR blockade (A779) were tested on mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal perfusion pressure (RPP), renal blood flow (RBF), and renal vascular resistance (RVR) when both AT1R and AT2R were blocked by losartan and PD123319, respectively. In male rats, when AT1R and AT2R were blocked, there was a tendency for the increase in RBF/wet kidney tissue weight (RBF/KW) to be elevated by A779 as compared with the vehicle (P=0.08), and this was not the case in female rats. The impact of MasR on renal hemodynamics appears not to be sexual dimorphism either when Ang II receptors were blocked. It seems that co-blockade of all AT1R, AT2R, and MasR may alter RBF/ KW in male more than in female rats. These findings support a crosstalk between MasR and Ang II receptors in renal circulation.

  15. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of nuclear urotensin-II binding sites in rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Doan, ND; Nguyen, TTM; Létourneau, M; Turcotte, K; Fournier, A; Chatenet, D

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE During the past decade, a few GPCRs have been characterized at the nuclear membrane where they exert complementary physiological functions. In this study, we investigated (1) the presence of a functional urotensin-II (U-II) receptor (UT) in rat heart nuclear extracts and (2) the propensity of U-II and U-II-related peptide (URP) to cross the plasma membrane in a receptor-independent manner. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Biochemical and pharmacological methods including competitive binding assays, photoaffinity labelling, immunoblotting as well as de novo RNA synthesis were used to characterize the presence of functional UT receptors in rat heart nuclei. In addition, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to investigate the cellular uptake of fluorescent U-II and URP derivatives. KEY RESULTS The presence of specific U-II binding sites was demonstrated in rat heart nuclear extracts. Moreover, such subcellular localization was also observed in monkey heart extracts. In vitro transcription initiation assays on rat, freshly isolated, heart nuclei suggested that nuclear UT receptors are functional, and that U-II, but not URP, participates in nuclear UT-associated gene expression. Surprisingly, hU-II and URP efficiently crossed the plasma membrane in a receptor-independent mechanism involving endocytosis through caveolin-coated pits; this uptake of hU-II, but not that of URP, was dependent on extracellular pH. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that (1) U-II and URP can differentially modulate nuclear UT functions such as gene expression, and (2) both ligands can reach the internal cellular space through a receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:22044114

  16. HTLV type I and HTLV type II infection among Indians and natives from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, M B; Zapiola, I; Quiruelas, S; Gorvein, D; Panzita, A; Rey, J; Carnese, F P; Corral, R; Perez, C; Zala, C

    1994-11-01

    Endemic foci for HTLV-II infection have been identified in several Amerindian populations. To determine HTLV-I and/or HTLV-II infection among Amerindians living in Argentina we studied 454 sera or plasmas from Indians and natives from different areas of our country. All samples were tested by the particle agglutination technique, and positive reactions were confirmed by the immunofluorescence assay (IFA). IFA titration was used to differentiate HTLV-I and HTLV-II antibodies. Twenty-three of 222 samples (10.4%) were found positive among the Tobas Indians; 22 samples were typed as HTLV-II and 1 as HTLV-I. Antibodies for HTLV-I were found in the serum and CSF of three natives from Salta with a TSP diagnosis. No positive samples were found among 96 Mapuche Indians and 133 natives from San Luis. Our results indicate that HTLV-II is endemic among the Tobas Indians. In this study, infection by these retroviruses in Argentinian Amerindians seems to have a marked geographic distribution.

  17. Effects of ANG II type 1 and 2 receptors on oxidative stress, renal NADPH oxidase, and SOD expression.

    PubMed

    Chabrashvili, Tina; Kitiyakara, Chagriya; Blau, Jonathan; Karber, Alex; Aslam, Shakil; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2003-07-01

    Oxidative stress accompanies angiotensin (ANG) II infusion, but the role of ANG type 1 vs. type 2 receptors (AT1-R and AT2-R, respectively) is unknown. We infused ANG II subcutaneously in rats for 1 wk. Excretion of 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha (8-Iso) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) were related to renal cortical mRNA abundance for subunits of NADPH oxidase and superoxide dismutases (SODs) using real-time PCR. Subsets of ANG II-infused rats were given the AT1-R antagonist candesartan cilexetil (Cand) or the AT2-R antagonist PD-123,319 (PD). Compared to vehicle (Veh), ANG II increased 8-Iso excretion by 41% (Veh, 5.4 +/- 0.8 vs. ANG II, 7.6 +/- 0.5 pg/24 h; P < 0.05). This was prevented by Cand (5.6 +/- 0.5 pg/24 h; P < 0.05) and increased by PD (15.8 +/- 2.0 pg/24 h; P < 0.005). There were similar changes in MDA excretion. Compared to Veh, ANG II significantly (P < 0.005) increased the renal cortical mRNA expression of p22phox (twofold), Nox-1 (2.6-fold), and Mn-SOD (1.5-fold) and decreased expression of Nox-4 (2.1-fold) and extracellular (EC)-SOD (2.1-fold). Cand prevented all of these changes except for the increase in Mn-SOD. PD accentuated changes in p22phox and Nox-1 and increased p67phox. We conclude that ANG II infusion stimulates oxidative stress via AT1-R, which increases the renal cortical mRNA expression of p22phox and Nox-1 and reduces abundance of Nox-4 and EC-SOD. This is offset by strong protective effects of AT2-R, which are accompanied by decreased expression of p22phox, Nox-1, and p67phox.

  18. Postjunctional regulation by angiotensin II of alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated pressor responses in the rat.

    PubMed

    Marano, G; Argiolas, L

    1994-08-11

    The effects of angiotensin II on the vasopressor responses to the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, in intact and sympathectomized rats were investigated. Infusion of angiotensin II at subpressor doses significantly enhanced the pressor effects of phenylephrine in intact rats. We also found that in the chemically sympathectomized rat, where prejunctional sympathetic function is impaired, the effects of angiotensin II infusion on the pressor effects of phenylephrine were similar to those obtained in intact rats. Furthermore, pretreatment with valsartan ((S)-N-valeryl-N-([2'-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)biphenyl-4-yl]-methyl)-val ine), a new selective angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist, antagonized the effects of angiotensin II on phenylephrine-mediated pressor responses, whereas the administration of the selective angiotensin AT2 receptor antagonist, PD 123319 (1-[[4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]-methyl]-5-(diphenylacetyl)- 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]-pyridine-6-carboxylic acid, ditriflouroacetate, monohydrate), injected in bolus doses of 100 micrograms/kg, did not antagonize the enhancing effect of angiotensin II. Collectively, these data suggest that angiotensin II modulates the response to phenylephrine primarily at a postjunctional level through the activation of angiotensin AT1 receptors and that the suggested prejunctional facilitation mediated by angiotensin receptors is quantitatively much less important in the intact animal.

  19. The importance of type II error and falsifiability.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    Before intergovernmental consensus under the Rio Declaration in 1992, ignorance of type I errors had been disfavored in science. However, the Precautionary Principle (PP) counsels the avoidance of type II errors, rather than of type I errors. We need a new academic code for the PP. The risk of extinction has usually been evaluated based on conservative estimates of the present population size. I define the weight of evidence as the extinction risk of Japanese vascular plants based on unbiased estimates. Catch quotas in the fisheries are usually decided by precautionary approach. I calculate the long-term yield and risk of stock collapse under a simple stock dynamics model. The weight of evidence depends on the frequency of grids with size unknown. In a few plant species, rankings based on conservative estimates have differed from rankings based on unbiased estimates. In fishery management, a catch quota based on a precautionary approach proved neither sufficient nor necessary to avoid stock collapse. The precautionary approach is one of the reasons that prevent us from maximizing a sustainable yield. We need to clarify the end-point of risks, and check whether it is necessary to adopt a PP. We can obtain the weight of evidence that is measured under unbiased estimates, while the risk based on a PP is measured under conservative estimates.

  20. Keratocytes are induced to produce collagen type II: A new strategy for in vivo corneal matrix regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greene, Carol Ann; Green, Colin R; Dickinson, Michelle E; Johnson, Virginia; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-09-10

    The stroma, the middle layer of the cornea, is a connective tissue making up most of the corneal thickness. The stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of highly organised lamellae which are made up of tightly packed fibrils primarily composed of collagens type I and V. This layer is interspersed with keratocytes, mesenchymal cells of neural crest origin. We have previously shown that adult corneal keratocytes exhibit phenotypic plasticity and can be induced into a neuronal phenotype. In the current study we evaluated the potential of keratocytes to produce collagen type II via phenotypic reprogramming with exogenous chondrogenic factors. The cornea presents a challenge to tissue engineers owing to its high level of organisation and the phenotypic instability of keratocytes. Traditional approaches based on a scar model do not support the engineering of functional stromal tissue. Type II collagen is not found in the adult cornea but is reported to be expressed during corneal development, raising the possibility of using such an approach to regenerate the corneal ECM. Keratocytes in culture and within intact normal and diseased tissue were induced to produce collagen type II upon treatment with transforming growth factor Beta3 (TGFβ3) and dexamethasone. In vivo treatment of rat corneas also resulted in collagen type II deposition and a threefold increase in corneal hardness and elasticity. Furthermore, the treatment of corneas and subsequent deposition of collagen type II did not cause opacity, fibrosis or scarring. The induction of keratocytes with specific exogenous factors and resulting deposition of type II collagen in the stroma can potentially be controlled by withdrawal of the factors. This might be a promising new approach for in vivo corneal regeneration strategies aimed at increasing corneal integrity in diseases associated with weakened ectatic corneal tissue such as keratoconus.

  1. Increased activity and expression of Ca2+-dependent NOS in renal cortex of ANG II-infused hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    CHIN, SO YEON; PANDEY, KAILASH N.; SHI, SHANG-JIN; KOBORI, HIROYUKI; MORENO, CAROL; NAVAR, L. GABRIEL

    2008-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) exerts a greater modulatory influence on renal cortical blood flow in ANG II-infused hypertensive rats compared with normotensive rats. In the present study, we determined nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities and protein levels in the renal cortex and medulla of normotensive and ANG II-infused hypertensive rats. Enzyme activity was determined by measuring the rate of formation of l-[14C]citrulline from l-[14C]arginine. Western blot analysis was performed to determine the regional expression of endothelial (eNOS), neuronal (nNOS), and inducible (iNOS) isoforms in the renal cortex and medulla of control and ANG II-infused rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared by the infusion of ANG II at a rate of 65 ng/min via osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously for 13 days and compared with sham-operated rats. Systolic arterial pressures were 127 ± 2 and 182 ± 3 mmHg in control (n = 13) and ANG II-infused rats (n = 13), respectively. The Ca2+-dependent NOS activity, expressed as picomoles of citrulline formed per minute per gram wet weight, was higher in the renal cortex of ANG II-infused rats (91 ± 11) than in control rats (42 ± 12). Likewise, both eNOS and nNOS were markedly elevated in the renal cortex of the ANG II-treated rats. In both groups of rats, Ca2+-dependent NOS activity was higher in the renal medulla than in the cortex; however, no differences in medullary NOS activity were observed between the groups. Also, no differences in medullary eNOS levels were observed between the groups; however, medullary nNOS was decreased by 45% in the ANG II-infused rats. For the Ca2+-independent NOS activities, the renal cortex exhibited a greater activity in the control rats (174 ± 23) than in ANG II-infused rats (101 ± 10). Similarly, cortical iNOS was greater by 47% in the control rats than in ANG II-treated rats. No differences in the activity were found for the renal medulla between the groups. There was

  2. Jamming dynamics of stretch-induced surfactant release by alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arnab; Arold, Stephen P; Bartolák-Suki, Erzsébet; Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Suki, Béla

    2012-03-01

    Secretion of pulmonary surfactant by alveolar epithelial type II cells is vital for the reduction of interfacial surface tension, thus preventing lung collapse. To study secretion dynamics, rat alveolar epithelial type II cells were cultured on elastic membranes and cyclically stretched. The amounts of phosphatidylcholine, the primary lipid component of surfactant, inside and outside the cells, were measured using radiolabeled choline. During and immediately after stretch, cells secreted less surfactant than unstretched cells; however, stretched cells secreted significantly more surfactant than unstretched cells after an extended lag period. We developed a model based on the hypothesis that stretching leads to jamming of surfactant traffic escaping the cell, similar to vehicular traffic jams. In the model, stretch increases surfactant transport from the interior to the exterior of the cell. This transport is mediated by a surface layer with a finite capacity due to the limited number of fusion pores through which secretion occurs. When the amount of surfactant in the surface layer approaches this capacity, interference among lamellar bodies carrying surfactant reduces the rate of secretion, effectively creating a jam. When the stretch stops, the jam takes an extended time to clear, and subsequently the amount of secreted surfactant increases. We solved the model analytically and show that its dynamics are consistent with experimental observations, implying that surfactant secretion is a fundamentally nonlinear process with memory representing collective behavior at the level of single cells. Our results thus highlight the importance of a jamming dynamics in stretch-induced cellular secretory processes.

  3. Proposal for strained type II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. L.; Mailhiot, C.

    1987-09-01

    It is shown that strained type II superlattices made of InAs-Ga(1-x)In(x)Sb(x) about 0.4 have favorable optical properties for infrared detection. By adjusting the layer thicknesses and the alloy composition, a wide range of wavelengths can be reached. Optical absorption calculations for a case where the cutoff wavelength is about 10 microns show that, near threshold, the absorption is as good as for the HgCdTe alloy with the same band gap. The electron effective mass is nearly isotropic and equal to 0.04 m. This effective mass should give favorable electrical properties, such as small diode tunneling currents and good mobilities, and diffusion lengths.

  4. Type II seesaw model and multilepton signatures at hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Manimala; Niyogi, Saurabh; Spannowsky, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We investigate multilepton signatures, arising from the decays of doubly charged and singly charged Higgs bosons in the Type II seesaw model. Depending on the vacuum expectation value of the triplet vΔ , the doubly and singly charged Higgs bosons can decay into a large variety of multilepton final states. We explore all possible decay modes corresponding to different regimes of vΔ that generate distinguishing four and five leptonic signatures. We focus on the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and further extend the study to a very high energy proton-proton collider (VLHC) with a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. We find that a doubly charged Higgs boson of masses around 375 GeV can be discovered at immediate LHC runs. A heavier mass of 630 GeV can instead be discovered at the high-luminosity run of the LHC or at the VLHC with 30 fb-1 .

  5. Sweet taste and diet in type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tepper, B J; Hartfiel, L M; Schneider, S H

    1996-07-01

    The relationship between sweet taste function and dietary intake was studied in 21 patients with type II diabetes mellitus and 16 age-, weight-, and sex-matched controls. Subjects rated the sweetness intensity and pleasantness of a series of beverage samples sweetened with sucrose: 1.5-24%, fructose: 1-18%, or aspartame: 0.25-4%. They also kept 7-day food records. No group differences were found in sweet taste perception, pleasantness ratings, daily energy intakes, or macronutrient composition of the diets. However, subjects with diabetes consumed less sucrose but 3.5 times more alternative sweeteners than did controls. Peak pleasantness ratings for the beverage samples were positively correlated with dietary sweetness content in the subjects with diabetes but not the controls. These findings suggest that in diabetes, hedonic ratings for a sweetened beverage were related to dietary sweetness intake rather than changes in sweet taste perception.

  6. Type II congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an esophageal lung

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Blanca Estela; Furuya, María Elena Yuriko; Martínez-Muñiz, Irma; Vargas, Mario H; Flores-Salgado, Rosalinda

    2013-01-01

    A seven-month-old girl, born prematurely (birth weight 1000 g) from a twin pregnancy, was admitted to hospital due to recurrent pneumonia and atelectasis. She experienced cough and respiratory distress during feeding. The right hemithorax was smaller than the left, with diminished breath sounds and dullness. Chest x-rays revealed decreased lung volume and multiple radiolucent images in the right lung, as well as overdistention of the left lung. An esophagogram revealed three bronchial branches arising from the lower one-third of the esophagus, corresponding to the right lung and ending in a cul-de-sac. A diagnosis of esophageal lung was established. On bronchography, the right lung was absent and the trachea only continued into the left main bronchus. Echocardiography and angiotomography revealed agenesis of the pulmonary artery right branch. The surgical finding was an esophageal right lung, which was removed; the histopathological diagnosis was type II congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an esophageal lung. PMID:23762890

  7. Vorticity and magnetic shielding in a type-II superconductor.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marco; Bicudo, Pedro; Sacramento, Pedro D

    2006-09-20

    We study in detail, solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, the magnetic field, supercurrent and order parameter profiles originated by a solenoid or magnetic whisker inserted in a type-II superconductor. We consider solutions of different vorticities, n, in the various cases. The results confirm the connection between the vorticity, the internal currents and the boundstates in a self-consistent way. The number of boundstates is given by the vorticity of the phase of the gap function as in the case with no external solenoid. In the limiting case of an infinitely thin solenoid, like a Dirac string, the solution is qualitatively different. The quasiparticle spectrum and wavefunctions are a function of n-n(ext), where n(ext) is the vorticity of the solenoid. The flux is in all cases determined by the vorticity of the gap function.

  8. Unusual approach for the treatment of a type II endoleak.

    PubMed

    Ciampi Dopazo, J J; Gastaldo, F; Lanciego Pérez, C

    2016-01-01

    This case presentation is about an 88 years-old male patient with previous endovascular aortic aneurysm repairment history and aortic endoleak type II (EL2). The direct lumbar artery catheterization was considered an alternative to solve EL2, associated with aortic endovascular prosthesis and due to an incomplete sealing or exclusion of the aneurysmal sac or a vascular segment demonstrated by imaging studies, when other treatment alternative failed (transarterial embolization) to control the aneurysm growing. Performing translumbar approach was decided by puncturing the artery lumbar (L4) left, previously the lumbar arteries (L4) were evaluated in the abdominal CT arterial phase to guide a puncture/access under flouroscopy control. Diagnostic angiogram clearly demonstrated the median sacral and right lumbar arteries inflow into the aneurysm sac. Transcatheter embolization with fibered platinum microcoils was performed of the median sacral artery and lumbar left and right arteries (L4), showing satisfactory endoleak devascularization.

  9. Type II Diabetes Mellitus in Arabic-Speaking Countries

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemic of diabetes has not spared the Arabic-speaking countries, which have some of the highest prevalence of type II diabetes. This is particularly true of the Arab Gulf, a conglomerate of high income, oil-producing countries where prevalence rates are the highest. The prevalence rates among adults of the Arabic speaking countries as a whole range between 4%–21%, with the lowest being in Somalia and the highest in Kuwait. As economic growth has accelerated, so has the movement of the populations to urban centers where people are more likely to adopt lifestyles that embrace increased high-calorie food consumption and sedentary lifestyles. These factors likely contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the Arabic speaking countries. PMID:22851968

  10. Type II congenital cystic pulmonary malformation in an esophageal lung.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Blanca E; Furuya, María Elena Yuriko; Martínez-Muñiz, Irma; Vargas, Mario H; Flores-Salgado, Rosalinda

    2013-01-01

    A seven-month-old girl, born prematurely (birth weight 1000 g) from a twin pregnancy, was admitted to hospital due to recurrent pneumonia and atelectasis. She experienced cough and respiratory distress during feeding. The right hemithorax was smaller than the left, with diminished breath sounds and dullness. Chest x-rays revealed decreased lung volume and multiple radiolucent images in the right lung, as well as overdistention of the left lung. An esophagogram revealed three bronchial branches arising from the lower one-third of the esophagus, corresponding to the right lung and ending in a cul-de-sac. A diagnosis of esophageal lung was established. On bronchography, the right lung was absent and the trachea only continued into the left main bronchus. Echocardiography and angiotomography revealed agenesis of the pulmonary artery right branch. The surgical finding was an esophageal right lung, which was removed; the histopathological diagnosis was type II congenital pulmonary airway malformation in an esophageal lung.

  11. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II): expanding the vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bober, Michael B; Khan, Nadia; Kaplan, Jennifer; Lewis, Kristi; Feinstein, Jeffrey A; Scott, Charles I; Steinberg, Gary K

    2010-04-01

    Majewski Osteodysplastic Primordial Dwarfism, Type II (MOPD II) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder. Features include severe intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), poor postnatal growth (adult stature approximately 100 cm), severe microcephaly, skeletal dysplasia, characteristic facial features, and normal or near normal intelligence. An Institutional Review Board (IRB) approved registry was created and currently follows 25 patients with a diagnosis of MOPD II. Based on previous studies, a neurovascular screening program was implemented and 13 (52%) of these patients have been found to have cerebral neurovascular abnormalities including moyamoya angiopathy and/or intracranial aneurysms. The typical moyamoya pathogenesis begins with vessel narrowing in the supraclinoid internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral (A1) or middle cerebral (M1) artery segments. The narrowing may predominate initially on one side, progresses to bilateral stenosis, with subsequent occlusion of the vessels and collateral formation. We present four patients who, on neurovascular screening, were found to have cerebrovascular changes. Two were asymptomatic, one presented with a severe headache and projectile vomiting related to a ruptured aneurysm, and one presented after an apparent decline in cognitive functioning. Analysis of the registry suggests screening for moyamoya disease be performed at the time of MOPD II diagnosis and at least every 12-18 months using MRA or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). We believe this is imperative. If diagnosed early enough, re-vascularization and aneurysm treatment in skilled hands can be performed safely and prevent or minimize long-term sequelae in this population. Emergent evaluation is also needed when other neurologic or cardiac symptoms are present.

  12. Type-II superlattice materials for mid-infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gail J.; Haugan, Heather; Szmulowicz, Frank; Mahalingam, Krishnamur; Grazulis, L.; Houston, Shanee

    2005-03-01

    Type-II superlattices composed of alternating thin layers of InAs and GaSb, have been shown to be a highly flexible infrared materials system in which the energy band gap can be adjusted anywhere between 360 meV and 40 meV. These superlattices (SLs) are the III-V equivalent to the well established HgxCd1-xTe alloys used for infrared detection in the short, mid and long wavelength bands of the infrared spectrum. There are many possible designs for these superlattices that will produce the same narrow band gap by adjusting individual layer thicknesses and interface composition. Systematic growth and characterization studies were performed to determine optimum superlattice designs suitable for infrared detection in the 3 to 5 μm wavelength band. For these studies the individual layer thicknesses were less than 35Å. The effects of adding different thickness InSb-like interfaces were also studied. Through precision molecular beam epitaxy, design changes as small as 3Å to the SL layers could be studied. Significant changes were observed in the infrared photoresponse spectra of the various SL samples. The infrared properties of the various designs of these type-II superlattices were modeled using an 8-band Envelope Function Approximation. The infrared photoresponse spectra, combined with quantum mechanical modeling of predicted absorption spectra, were a key factor in the design optimization of the InAs/GaSb superlattices with band gaps in the range of 200 to 360 meV.

  13. Bilateral internal auditory canal gangliogliomas mimicking neurofibromatosis Type II

    PubMed Central

    Hooten, Kristopher G.; Oliveria, Seth F.; Sadrameli, Saeed S.; Gandhi, Shashank; Yachnis, Anthony T.; Lewis, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gangliogliomas are rare low grade, typically well-differentiated, tumors that are composed of mature ganglion cells and neoplastic glial cells. These tumors can appear at virtually any location along the neuroaxis but classically occur in the temporal lobe of young patients. In a small number of cases, gangliogliomas have presented as masses in the brainstem or involving cranial nerves. With the exception of vestibular schwannomas, bilateral tumors in the region of the internal auditory canal (IAC) or cerebellopontine angle (CPA) are exceedingly rare. Case Description: We report a case of a 58-year-old male who presented with hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Initial magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral nonenhancing IAC/CPA tumors. Based on this finding, a presumptive diagnosis of neurofibromatosis Type II was made, which was initially managed conservatively with close observation. He returned for follow-up with worsening vertigo and tinnitus, thus prompting the decision to proceed with surgical resection of the symptomatic mass. Intriguingly, pathological study demonstrated a WHO Grade I ganglioglioma. Description: We report a case of a 58-year-old male who presented with hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Initial magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral nonenhancing IAC/CPA tumors. Based on this finding, a presumptive diagnosis of neurofibromatosis Type II was made, which was initially managed conservatively with close observation. He returned for follow-up with worsening vertigo and tinnitus, thus prompting the decision to proceed with surgical resection of the symptomatic mass. Intriguingly, pathological study demonstrated a WHO Grade I ganglioglioma. Conclusion: This is the first reported case of bilateral IAC/CPA gangliogliomas. When evaluating bilateral IAC/CPA lesions with unusual imaging characteristics, ganglioglioma should be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:27127704

  14. Type II collagen defects in the chondrodysplasias. I. Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasias.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, L W; Bautista, J; James, P L; Rimoin, D L

    1989-01-01

    The spondyloepiphyseal dysplasias (SEDs) and spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasias (SEMDs) are a heterogeneous group of skeletal dysplasias (dwarfing disorders) characterized by abnormal epiphyses, with and without varying degrees of metaphyseal irregularities, flattened vertebral bodies, and myopia. To better define the underlying cause of these disorders, we have analyzed the collagens from costal cartilage from several of these patients, using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of intact chains and cyanogen bromide (CNBr) peptides and amino acid analysis. In almost all of the patients in this study group, the type II collagen exhibited a slower electrophoretic mobility when compared with that in normal controls. The mobility of many, but not all, of the CNBr peptides was also retarded. Peptides near the amino terminus were almost always altered, while the mobility of peptides close to the carboxyl terminus were normal in all but the severely affected cases. Analysis of the CNBr peptides on an HPLC sieving column confirmed that the electrophoretically abnormal peptides were of a higher molecular weight than were control peptides. Amino acid analysis indicated that the abnormal collagens have a higher ratio of hydroxylysine to lysine than does control collagen, suggesting that overmodification may be involved in the altered mobility. Our results are consistent with a defect in the collagen helix that results in overmodification of the molecule from that point toward the amino terminus. We propose that some forms of SED and SEMD are associated with abnormalities in type II collagen that results in delayed helix formation and consequent overmodification of the collagen. Cases of SED fit onto a continuous spectrum of clinical severity that correlates positively with both the extent of alteration and the proximity of the defect to the carboxyl terminus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2741952

  15. Angiotensin II upregulates K(Ca)3.1 channels and stimulates cell proliferation in rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2013-05-15

    The proliferation of cardiac fibroblasts is implicated in the pathogenesis of myocardial remodeling and fibrosis. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K⁺ channels (K(Ca)3.1 channels) have important roles in cell proliferation. However, it is unknown whether angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent profibrotic molecule, would regulate K(Ca)3.1 channels in cardiac fibroblasts and participate in cell proliferation. In the present study, we investigated whether K(Ca)3.1 channels were regulated by Ang II, and how the channel activity mediated cell proliferation in cultured adult rat cardiac fibroblasts using electrophysiology and biochemical approaches. It was found that mRNA, protein, and current density of K(Ca)3.1 channels were greatly enhanced in cultured cardiac fibroblasts treated with 1 μM Ang II, and the effects were countered by the angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT₁R) blocker losartan, the p38-MAPK inhibitor SB203580, the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, and the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002. Ang II stimulated cell proliferation and the effect was antagonized by the K(Ca)3.1 blocker TRAM-34 and siRNA targeting K(Ca)3.1. In addition, Ang II-induced increase of K(Ca)3.1 expression was attenuated by transfection of activator protein-1 (AP-1) decoy oligodeoxynucleotides. These results demonstrate for the first time that Ang II stimulates cell proliferation mediated by upregulating K(Ca)3.1 channels via interacting with the AT₁R and activating AP-1 complex through ERK1/2, p38-MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in cultured adult rat cardiac fibroblasts.

  16. Prenylation of Rab8 GTPase by type I and type II geranylgeranyl transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A L; Erdman, R A; Castellano, F; Maltese, W A

    1998-01-01

    Rab GTPases are post-translationally modified by addition of geranylgeranyl moieties to carboxyl-terminal cysteine residues. For Rab proteins ending with xxCC xCxC and CCxx motifs this modification is catalysed by geranylgeranyltransferase type II (GGTaseII), and is entirely dependent on the Rab substrate being bound to Rab escort protein (REP). Several Rab proteins contain carboxyl-terminal CaaL prenylation motifs typical of members of the Rho family, which are modified in a REP-independent manner by geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTaseI). The present studies show that one such Rab protein (Rab8), which ends with a CVLL motif, is uniquely able to serve as a substrate for either REP/GGTaseII or GGTaseI in cell-free assays. The modification of Rab8 by GGTaseI did not require REP, indicating that a REP-induced conformational change is not essential for exposure of the Rab carboxyl-terminal cysteine prenylation site. To determine whether one enzyme plays a predominant role in Rab8 prenylation in vivo, the incorporation of [3H]mevalonate into Rab8 was measured in human embryonal kidney 293 cells under conditions where the activity of GGTaseI, but not GGTaseII, was blocked by the peptidomimetic inhibitor GGTI-298. The GGTaseI inhibitor did not prevent prenylation of either overexpressed Myc-tagged Rab8 or endogenous Rab8, whereas prenylation of a known GGTaseI substrate with the same carboxyl-terminal motif, Cdc42Hs, was completely blocked. To rule out the possibility that the apparent prenylation of Rab8 by GGTaseII occurs only when GGTaseI activity is eliminated, metabolic labelling studies were carried out in the absence of the GGTaseI inhibitor, using a REP-binding-deficient Rab8 construct (Y78D) that cannot serve as a substrate for GGTaseII, but is indistinguishable from wild-type Rab8 as a substrate for GGTaseI. Prenylation of the Y78D mutant was reduced by 60-70% in intact cells, consistent with the conclusion that the majority of Rab8 is prenylated by the

  17. Magnetization studies of II-VI semiconductor columnar quantum dots with type-II band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eginligil, M.; Sellers, I. R.; McCombe, B. D.; Chou, W.-C.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2009-03-01

    We report SQUID magnetization measurements of MBE-grown type-II, II-VI semiconductor quantum dot (QD) samples, with and without Mn incorporation. In all samples, the easy axis is out-of-plane, possibly due to columnar QD formation that arises from strain interaction between adjacent thin dot-containing layers. In addition, both types of QDs display a non-zero spontaneous magnetic ordering at 300 K. One set of samples consists of five-layers of (Zn,Mn)Te/ZnSe with a nominal (Zn,Mn)Te thickness of 3 nm, and ZnSe spacer thickness of 5 nm and 20 nm. These magnetic QD samples show magnetization vs. temperature behavior that can be interpreted in terms of two independent FM phases characterized by transition temperatures TC1 < TC2. A sample containing no Mn consists of 130 ZnTe/ZnSe layers, which forms Zn(Se,Te) QD layers separated by ZnSe spacers. Evidence of ferromagnetism is also seen in this structure, but the spontaneous magnetization is much weaker. For this sample only one phase is seen with TC above 300 K. Results will be discussed in terms of magneto-polaronic effects and defect-level induced ferromagnetism.

  18. Magnetic-Field-Induced Relativistic Properties in Type-I and Type-II Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchoumakov, Serguei; Civelli, Marcello; Goerbig, Mark O.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Weyl semimetals with tilted conical bands in a magnetic field. Even when the cones are overtilted (type-II Weyl semimetal), Landau-level quantization can be possible as long as the magnetic field is oriented close to the tilt direction. Most saliently, the tilt can be described within the relativistic framework of Lorentz transformations that give rise to a rich spectrum, displaying new transitions beyond the usual dipolar ones in the optical conductivity. We identify particular features in the latter that allow one to distinguish between semimetals of different types.

  19. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  20. XIAP acts as a switch between type I and type II FAS-induced apoptosis signalling

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Philipp J.; Grabow, Stephanie; Gray, Daniel; McKenzie, Mark D.; Nachbur, Ueli; Huang, David C.S.; Bouillet, Philippe; Thomas, Helen E.; Borner, Christoph; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Kaufmann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    FAS (APO-1/CD95) and its physiological ligand, FASL, regulate apoptotic death of unwanted or dangerous cells in many tissues, functioning as a guardian against autoimmunity and cancer development1-4. Distinct cell types differ in the mechanisms by which the ‘death receptor’ FAS triggers their apoptosis1-4. In type I cells, such as lymphocytes, activation of ‘effector caspases’ by FAS-induced activation of caspase-8 suffices for cell killing whereas in type II cells, including hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, amplification of the caspase cascade through caspase-8 mediated activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BID5 is essential6-8. Here we show, that loss of X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)9,10 function by gene-targeting or treatment with a second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC11, also called DIABLO12: direct IAP binding protein with low pI) mimetic drug rendered hepatocytes independent of BID for FAS-induced apoptosis signalling. These results show that XIAP is the critical discriminator between type I versus type II apoptosis signalling and suggest that IAP inhibitors should be used with caution in cancer patients with underlying liver conditions. PMID:19626005

  1. XIAP discriminates between type I and type II FAS-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jost, Philipp J; Grabow, Stephanie; Gray, Daniel; McKenzie, Mark D; Nachbur, Ueli; Huang, David C S; Bouillet, Philippe; Thomas, Helen E; Borner, Christoph; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Kaufmann, Thomas

    2009-08-20

    FAS (also called APO-1 and CD95) and its physiological ligand, FASL, regulate apoptosis of unwanted or dangerous cells, functioning as a guardian against autoimmunity and cancer development. Distinct cell types differ in the mechanisms by which the 'death receptor' FAS triggers their apoptosis. In type I cells, such as lymphocytes, activation of 'effector caspases' by FAS-induced activation of caspase-8 suffices for cell killing, whereas in type II cells, including hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, caspase cascade amplification through caspase-8-mediated activation of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BID (BH3 interacting domain death agonist) is essential. Here we show that loss of XIAP (X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) function by gene targeting or treatment with a second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (SMAC, also called DIABLO; direct IAP-binding protein with low pI) mimetic drug in mice rendered hepatocytes and beta-cells independent of BID for FAS-induced apoptosis. These results show that XIAP is the critical discriminator between type I and type II apoptosis signalling and suggest that IAP inhibitors should be used with caution in cancer patients with underlying liver conditions.

  2. Access conditions affect binge-type shortening consumption in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wojnicki, F.H.E.; Johnson, D.S.; Corwin, R.L.W.

    2009-01-01

    When non-food-deprived rats are given intermittent access to certain substances, consumption of those substances is greater than when more frequent access is provided. The present study examined the effects of three different shortening access conditions on subsequent shortening intake in rats. Each of the three different shortening conditions lasted five weeks and was followed by a five-week period in which shortening access was limited by time (1 hr of availability) on either an Intermittent (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) or Daily schedule of access. In Part 1, limiting the quantity of shortening provided during the 1-hour period of availability attenuated subsequent 1-hr shortening intake in the Intermittent access group, but had no statistically significant effect in the Daily access group. In Part 2, unrestricted availability of shortening (24-hr/day-7days/week) attenuated subsequent 1-hr shortening intake in all groups. In Part 3, shortening non-availability for five weeks enhanced subsequent 1-hr shortening intake in all groups. It was also shown that rats under an Intermittent, but not a Daily, schedule of access consumed as much shortening during a 1 hr period of availability, as was consumed in 24-hr when shortening availability was unrestricted. These results demonstrate that while intermittent access is necessary and sufficient to stimulate binge-type eating in rats, the behavioral history can modulate binge size. PMID:18851983

  3. Autoradiographic visualization of insulin-like growth factor-II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, L.G.; Kerchner, G.A.; Clemens, J.A.; Smith, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    The documented presence of IGF-II in brain and CSF prompted us to investigate the distribution of receptors for IGF-II in rat brain slices. Human /sup 125/-I-IGF-II (10 pM) was incubated for 16 hrs at 4/sup 0/C with slide-mounted rat brain slices in the absence and presence of unlabeled human IGF-II (67 nM) or human insulin (86 nM). Slides were washed, dried, and exposed to X-ray film for 4-7 days. The results showed dense labeling in the granular layers of the olfactory bulbs, deep layers of the cerebral cortex, pineal gland, anterior pituitary, hippocampus (pyramidal cells CA/sub 1/-CA/sub 2/ and dentate gyrus), and the granule cell layers of the cerebellum. Unlabeled IGF-II eliminated most of the binding of these brain regions while insulin produced only a minimal reduction in the amount of /sup 125/I-IGF-II bound. These results indicate that a specific neural receptor for IGS-II is uniquely distributed in rat brain tissue and supports the notion that this peptide might play an important role in normal neuronal functioning.

  4. Effect of chronic intracerebroventricular angiotensin II infusion on vasopressin release in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, G. H.; Chee, O.; Riggs, R. V.; Keil, L. C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of the chronic infusion of angiotensin II into the lateral cerebral ventricle on the release of arginine vasopressin in rats are investigated. Rats were subjected to a continuous infusion of angiotensin at a rate of 1 microgram/h for five days, during which they were offered water, isotonic saline or hypertonic saline ad libitum or 40 ml water/day, and fluid intake, changes in body weight, plasma sodium ion concentrations and plasma and pituitary arginine vasopressin levels were measured. Angiotensin II is found to increase the fluid intake of rats given isotonic saline and decrease plasma sodium ion levels with no changes in plasma or pituitary arginine vasopressin in those given water or isotonic saline. However, in rats given hypertonic saline, plasma sodium concentrations remained at control levels while plasma vasopressin increased, and in water-restricted rats the effects of angiotensin II were intermediate. Results thus demonstrate that angiotensin II-stimulated arginine vasopressin release is reduced under conditions in which plasma sodium ion concentration becomes dilute, compatible with a central role of angiotensin in the regulation of salt and water balance.

  5. Muscle fibre types in the suprahyoid muscles of the rat

    PubMed Central

    COBOS, A. R.; SEGADE, L. A. G.; FUENTES, I.

    2001-01-01

    Five muscle fibre types (I, IIc, IIa, IIx and IIb) were found in the suprahyoid muscles (mylohyoid, geniohyoid, and the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric) of the rat using immuno and enzyme histochemical techniques. More than 90% of fibres in the muscles examined were fast contracting fibres (types IIa, IIx and IIb). The geniohyoid and the anterior belly of the digastric had the greatest number of IIb fibres, whilst the mylohyoid was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres. The posterior belly of the digastric contained a greater percentage of aerobic fibres (83.4%) than the anterior belly (67.8%). With the exception of the geniohyoid, the percentage of type I and IIc fibres, which have slow myosin heavy chain (MHCβ), was relatively high and greater than has been previously reported in the jaw-closing muscles of the rat, such as the superficial masseter. The geniohyoid and mylohyoid exhibited a mosaic fibre type distribution, without any apparent regionalisation, although in the later MHCβ-containing fibres (types I and IIc) were primarily located in the rostral 2/3 region. In contrast, the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric revealed a clear regionalisation. In the anterior belly of the digastric 2 regions were observed: both a central region, which was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres and where all of the type I and IIc fibres were located, and a peripheral region, where type IIb fibres predominated. The posterior belly of the digastric showed a deep aerobic region which was greater in size and where type I and IIc fibres were confined, and a superficial region, where primarily type IIx and IIb fibres were observed. PMID:11322721

  6. Mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyl transferase-II inactivity aggravates lipid accumulation in rat hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Juan-Juan; Yao, Min; Yang, Jie; Cai, Yin; Zheng, Wen-Jie; Wang, Li; Yao, Deng-Bing; Yao, Deng-Fu

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the dynamic alteration of mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyl transferase II (CPT-II) expression during malignant transformation of rat hepatocytes. METHODS Sprague-Dawley male rats were fed with normal, high fat (HF), and HF containing 2-fluorenylacetamide (2-FAA) diet, respectively. According to the Hematoxylin and Eosin staining of livers, rats were divided into control, fatty liver, degeneration, precancerous, and cancerous groups. Liver lipids were dyed with Oil Red O, CPT-II alterations were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and compared with CPT-II specific concentration (μg/mg protein). Levels of total cholesterol (Tch), triglyceride (TG), and amino-transferases [alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST)] were determined by the routine methods. RESULTS After intake of HF and/or HF+2-FAA diets, the rat livers showed mass lipid accumulation. The lipid level in the control group was significantly lower than that in other groups. The changes of serum TG and Tch levels were abnormally increasing, 2-3 times more than those in the controls (P < 0.05). During the rat liver morphological changes from normal to cancer development process with hepatocyte injury, serum AST and ALT levels were significantly higher (4-8 times, P < 0.05) than those in the control group. The specific concentration of CPT-II in liver tissues progressively decreased during hepatocyte malignant transformation, with the lowest CPT-II levels in the cancer group than in any of the other groups (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Low CPT-II expression might lead to abnormal hepatic lipid accumulation, which should promote the malignant transformation of hepatocytes. PMID:28127199

  7. Complex Type-II Interband Cascade MQW Photodetectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui

    2007-01-01

    Multiple-quantum-well (MQW) photodetectors of a proposed type would contain active regions comprising multiple superlattice subregions. These devices would have complex structures: The superlattice of each subregion would be designed for enhanced absorption of photons in a desired wavelength band (typically in the infrared) and multiple subregions of different design would be cascaded for multicolor operation. The designs of these photodetectors would take advantage of the characteristic alignment of the edges of the electron-energy bands in type-II quantum-well structures: Within each finite superlattice, interband transitions would be used for detecting photons, and between finite superlattices, intraband relaxation and interband tunneling would be used for transport of charge carriers, all such as to enable detection of normally incident photons. Absorption of photons in the active region of a photodetector according to the proposal could be significantly enhanced by designing the superlattice/MQW structures to contain closely spaced energy states. The photodetector could be operated with a small bias to facilitate transport of charge carriers. The superlattices could be somewhat chirped, with a preferred transport direction.

  8. Adjuvant arthritis pretreatment with type II collagen and Mycobacterium butyricum.

    PubMed

    Franch, A; Cassany, S; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1992-11-01

    A treatment previous to adjuvant arthritis induction has been performed with type II collagen (CII) or Mycobacterium butyricum (Mb), which is the inducer of the pathology. Pretreatment was administered in two different ways: a) subcutaneously or intradermally 14 days before arthritis induction, and b) intravenously 3 days before induction. In order to relate the change in inflammation to the corresponding antigen immune response, serum antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) against CII or Mb were studied. Pretreatment with s.c. CII 14 days before induction produced slight protection against arthritis and significantly delayed its onset; systemic inflammation showed good positive correlation with anti-CII antibodies. The CII administered i.v. 3 days before arthritic challenge did not significantly modify the inflammatory process. The use of i.d. subarthritogenic doses of Mb 14 days before induction protected a high percentage of the animals from the posterior arthritic challenge; this protection was accompanied by high anti-Mb antibody titers and DTH reaction. When Mb was given i.v. 3 days before induction, a partial protection of inflammation was observed; arthritis was milder and its onset was delayed. These changes were accompanied by reduced humoral and cellular response to Mb.

  9. Angiotensin II-independent upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by activation of the (Pro)renin receptor in rat renal inner medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alexis A; Luffman, Christina; Bourgeois, Camille R T; Vio, Carlos P; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2013-02-01

    During renin-angiotensin system activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandins attenuate the pressor and antinatriuretic effects of angiotensin II (AngII) in the renal medulla. The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is abundantly expressed in the collecting ducts (CD) and its expression is augmented by AngII. PRR overexpression upregulates COX-2 via mitogen-activated kinases/extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 in renal tissues; however, it is not clear whether this effect occurs independently or in concert with AngII type 1 receptor (AT1R) activation. We hypothesized that PRR activation stimulates COX-2 expression independently of AT(1)R in primary cultures of rat renal inner medullary cells. The use of different cell-specific immunomarkers (aquaporin-2 for principal cells, anion exchanger type 1 for intercalated type-A cells, and tenascin C for interstitial cells) and costaining for AT(1)R, COX-2, and PRR revealed that PRR and COX-2 were colocalized in intercalated and interstitial cells whereas principal cells did not express PRR or COX-2. In normal rat kidney sections, PRR and COX-2 were colocalized in intercalated and interstitial cells. In rat renal inner medullary cultured cells, treatment with AngII (100 nmol/L) increased COX-2 expression via AT(1)R. In addition, AngII and rat recombinant prorenin (100 nmol/L) treatments increased extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 phosphorylation, independently. Importantly, rat recombinant prorenin upregulated COX-2 expression in the presence of AT(1)R blockade. Inhibition of mitogen-activated kinases/extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 suppressed COX-2 upregulation mediated by either AngII or rat recombinant prorenin. Furthermore, PRR knockdown using PRR-short hairpin RNA blunted the rat recombinant prorenin-mediated upregulation of COX-2. These results indicate that COX-2 expression is upregulated by activation of either PRR or AT(1)R via mitogen-activated kinases/extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 in rat renal

  10. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  11. Relative potencies of Type I and Type II pyrethroids for inhibition of spontaneous firing in neuronal networks.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids insecticides commonly used in pest control disrupt the normal function of voltage-sensitive sodium channels. We have previously demonstrated that permethrin (a Type I pyrethroid) and deltamethrin (a Type II pyrethroid) inhibit sodium channel-dependent spontaneous netw...

  12. Effect of chronic blockade of angiotensin II-receptor subtypes on aortic compliance in rats with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ceiler, D L; Nelissen-Vrancken, H J; De Mey, J G; Smits, J F

    1998-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate changes in aortic geometry and compliance after long-term blockade of angiotensin receptors type 1 (AT1) and AT2 receptors under basal conditions and after myocardial infarction (MI). Sham-operated (sham) or MI rats received either no treatment, AT1 antagonist GR138950C (GR; 2 mg/kg/day i.v.), or AT2 antagonist PD123319 (PD; 3 mg/kg/day s.c.). After 3 weeks, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured. Thoracic aorta diastolic diameter (D[dia]), compliance coefficient (CC), and distensibility coefficient (DC) were determined noninvasively in anesthetized rats by using ultrasound and wall tracking. After the rats were killed, histologic measurements were made on aortic cross sections. In sham rats, MAP was reduced by GR treatment (76 +/- 6 vs. 106 +/- 5 mm Hg), but not by PD. D(dia) was reduced in both GR-treated (1.74 +/- 0.08 vs. 2.09 +/- 0.05 mm) and PD-treated (1.83 +/- 0.05 vs. 2.09 +/- 0.05 mm) sham rats. CC and DC were not modified by either treatment. Although media cross-sectional area was not affected by either GR or PD treatment in sham rats, media thickness and media/lumen ratio were increased in both cases. Induction of MI had no effect on aortic structure, geometry, or mechanics; however, treatment with either GR or PD improved DC versus untreated MI rats. We conclude that AT1 and AT2 receptors are involved in angiotensin II-mediated effects on aortic geometry and mechanics under both basal conditions and after MI. Whereas blockade of AT1 receptors most likely influences vascular properties through a depressor mechanism, AT2 receptors induce pressure-independent remodeling.

  13. Quantification of fibre type regionalisation: an analysis of lower hindlimb muscles in the rat

    PubMed Central

    WANG, L. C.; KERNELL, D.

    2001-01-01

    Newly developed concepts and methods for the quantification of fibre type regionalisation were used for comparison between all muscles traversing the ankle of the rat lower hindlimb (n = 12). For each muscle, cross-sections from the proximodistal midlevel were stained for myofibrillar ATPase and classified as type I (‘slow’) or II (‘fast’). For the 11 ‘fast’ muscles (i.e. all except soleus), the muscle outline and the position of each type I fibre were digitised for further computer processing. Two potentially independent aspects of type I fibre regionalisation were evaluated quantitatively: (1) the degree to which type I fibres were restricted to a limited portion of the total cross-sectional area (‘area-regionalisation’) ; (2) the extent and direction of the difference (if any) between the centre of the muscle cross-section and the calculated centre for the type I fibre cluster (‘vector regionalisation’). Statistical analysis showed that type I fibres were vector regionalised in practically all investigated muscles and area regionalised within most of them, the only consistent exceptions being peroneus brevis and peroneus digitorum 4, 5. In muscles with a high degree of area regionalisation the population of type I fibres also had a markedly eccentric intramuscular position (i.e. high vector regionalisation). A significant relationship was observed between the relative position of a muscle within the hindlimb (transverse plane) and the direction and degree of its type I fibre eccentricity. On average, the degree of type I fibre eccentricity was greater for muscles remote from the limb centre than for those situated more centrally. In addition, the intramuscular concentration of type I fibres was typically greatest towards the centre of the limb, the most striking exception being tibialis posterior. For the slow soleus muscle, which is centrally placed within the limb, our analysis concerned the type II fibres, which were found to be weakly

  14. DNA synthesis in pulmonary alveolar macrophages and type II cells: effects of ozone exposure and treatment with alpha-difluoromethylornithine

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, E.S.; White, D.M.; Brady, A.N.; Li, L.C.; D'Arcy, J.B.; Smiler, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in the number of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (AM) can be induced by a number of toxic insults to the lung, including ozone, an important photochemical oxidant air pollutant. This increase could arise from an influx of monocytes from the vascular or interstitial compartments, or from proliferation of AM in situ. While proliferation of alveolar type II cells after oxidant exposure has been well documented, it is not clear whether AM are also capable of this response. Rats were exposed to air or to 0.12, 0.25, or 0.50 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 3, 7, or 14 d, 20 h/d. The labeling index in both AM and type II cells increased about 10-fold after 2 d of exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ppm of ozone, but returned to control levels by the end of 1 wk of exposure. These changes closely paralleled the temporal and dose-response characteristics of changes in total lung DNA synthesis. alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) administered to rats during a 2-d exposure to 0.50 ppm ozone did not inhibit the ozone-induced increase in labeling index in AM or type II cells, although evidence of inhibition of lung ornithine decarboxylase activity was obtained, and the ozone-induced increase in total lung DNA synthesis was inhibited by 23%. These results suggest that, like type II cells, AM are capable of entering the cell cycle and synthesizing new DNA in situ in response to short-term exposure to environmentally relevant doses of ozone, and that the ozone-induced stimulation of DNA synthesis in these cell types was refractory to inhibition by DFMO.

  15. Evaporation and recondensation of sodium in Semarkona Type II chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewins, Roger H.; Zanda, Brigitte; Bendersky, Claire

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the Na distributions in Semarkona Type II chondrules by electron microprobe, analyzing olivine and melt inclusions in it, mesostasis and bulk chondrule, to see whether they indicate interactions with an ambient gas during chondrule formation. Sodium concentrations of bulk chondrule liquids, melt inclusions and mesostases can be explained to a first approximation by fractional crystallization of olivine ± pyroxene. The most primitive olivine cores in each chondrule are mostly between Fa 8 and Fa 13, with 0.0022-0.0069 ± 0.0013 wt.% Na 2O. Type IIA chondrule olivines have consistently higher Na contents than olivines in Type IIAB chondrules. We used the dependence of olivine-liquid Na partitioning on FeO in olivine as a measure of equilibration. Extreme olivine rim compositions are ˜Fa 35 and 0.03 wt.% Na 2O and are close to being in equilibrium with the mesostasis glass. Olivine cores compared with the bulk chondrule compositions, particularly in IIA chondrules, show very high apparent D Na, indicating disequilibrium and suggesting that chondrule initial melts were more Na-rich than present chondrule bulk compositions. The apparent D Na values correlate with the Na concentrations of the olivine, but not with concentrations in the bulk melt. We use equilibrium D Na to find the Na content of the true parent liquid and estimate that Type IIA chondrules lost more than half their Na and recondensation was incomplete, whereas Type IIAB chondrules recovered most of theirs in their mesostases . Glass inclusions in olivine have lower Na than expected from fractionation of bulk composition liquids, and mesostases have higher Na than expected in calculated daughter liquids formed by fractional crystallization alone. These observations also require open system behavior of chondrules, specifically evaporation of Na before formation of melt inclusions followed by recondensation of Na in mesostases. Within this record of evaporation followed by

  16. Solar flares associated coronal mass ejections in case of type II radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Beena; Prasad, Lalan; Chandra, Harish; Garia, Suman

    2016-08-01

    We have statistically studied 220 events from 1996 to 2008 (i.e. solar cycle 23). Two set of flare-CME is examined one with Deca-hectometric (DH) type II and other without DH type II radio burst. Out of 220 events 135 (flare-halo CME) are accompanied with DH type II radio burst and 85 are without DH type II radio burst. Statistical analysis is performed to examine the distribution of solar flare-halo CME around the solar disk and to investigate the relationship between solar flare and halo CME parameters in case of with and without DH type II radio burst. In our analysis we have observed that: (i) 10-20° latitudinal belt is more effective than the other belts for DH type II and without DH type II radio burst. In this belt, the southern region is more effective in case of DH type II radio burst, whereas in case of without DH type II radio burst dominance exits in the northern region. (ii) 0-10° longitudinal belt is more effective than the other belts for DH type II radio burst and without DH type II radio burst. In this belt, the western region is more effective in case of DH type II radio burst, while in case of without DH type II radio burst dominance exits in the eastern region. (iii) Mean speed of halo CMEs (1382 km/s) with DH type II radio burst is more than the mean speed of halo CMEs (775 km/s) without DH type II radio burst. (iv) Maximum number of M-class flares is found in both the cases. (v) Average speed of halo CMEs in each class accompanied with DH type II radio burst is higher than the average speed of halo CMEs in each class without DH type II radio burst. (vi) Average speed of halo CMEs, associated with X-class flares, is greater than the other class of solar flares in both the cases.

  17. Evidence for selective expression of angiotensin II receptors on atretic follicles in the rat ovary: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daud, A.I.; Bumpus, F.M.; Husain, A.

    1988-06-01

    Ovarian angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors display a cyclical pattern of variation during the rat estrous cycle. Ang II receptors, estimated by the specific binding of the Ang II receptor antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodo-(Sar1,Ile8) Ang II to ovarian membranes, were lowest at estrus (binding site density (Bmax) = 35 +/- 2 fmol/mg; binding site affinity (KD) = 2.0 +/- 0.2 nM) and highest at diestrus I (Bmax = 59 +/- 3 fmol/mg; KD = 1.6 +/- 0.1 nM). We have previously shown that Ang II receptors in the rat ovary predominantly exist on the granulosa cell layer of a subpopulation of follicles. Our present studies show that the Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary are mainly atretic (approximately 80%) or show signs of early atresia (approximately 15%) during all stages of the estrous cycle. A small number of Ang II receptor-containing follicles were healthy (approximately 5%). In contrast to the Ang II receptor-containing follicles, the FSH receptor-containing follicles were predominantly healthy (greater than 90%). Follicles which contained both Ang II receptors and FSH receptors were mainly early atretic. Since Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary were mainly atretic these studies suggest that in the rat Ang II may be a major factor in regulating the function of atretic ovarian follicles.

  18. Dietary sodium intake regulates angiotensin II type 1, mineralocorticoid receptor, and associated signaling proteins in heart.

    PubMed

    Ricchiuti, Vincent; Lapointe, Nathalie; Pojoga, Luminita; Yao, Tham; Tran, Loc; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2011-10-01

    Liberal or high-sodium (HS) intake, in conjunction with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increases cardiovascular (CV) damage. We tested the hypothesis that sodium intake regulates the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and associated signaling pathways in heart tissue from healthy rodents. HS (1.6% Na(+)) and low-sodium (LS; 0.02% Na(+)) rat chow was fed to male healthy Wistar rats (n=7 animals per group). Protein levels were assessed by western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. Fractionation studies showed that MR, AT(1)R, caveolin-3 (CAV-3), and CAV-1 were located in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. In healthy rats, consumption of an LS versus a HS diet led to decreased cardiac levels of AT(1)R and MR. Decreased sodium intake was also associated with decreased cardiac levels of CAV-1 and CAV-3, decreased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R-CAV-3 and MR-CAV-3 complexes, but increased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R/MR complexes. Furthermore, decreased sodium intake was associated with decreased cardiac extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated ERK (pERK), and pERK/ERK ratio; increased cardiac striatin; decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (peNOS), but increased peNOS/eNOS ratio; and decreased cardiac plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Dietary sodium restriction has beneficial effects on the cardiac expression of factors associated with CV injury. These changes may play a role in the cardioprotective effects of dietary sodium restriction.

  19. Jingzhaotoxin-II, a novel tarantula toxin preferentially targets rat cardiac sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meichi; Liu, Qingping; Luo, Haiyong; Li, Jiang; Tang, Jianzhou; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2008-12-15

    Naturally occurring toxins are invaluable tools for exploration of the structure and function relationships of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). In this study, we isolated and characterized a novel VGSC toxin named jingzhaotoxin-II (JZTX-II) from the tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao venom. JZTX-II consists of 32 amino acid residues including two acidic and two basic residues. Cloned and sequenced using 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of the cDNA ends, the full-length cDNA for JZTX-II was found to encode a 63-residue precursor which contained a signal peptide of 21 residues, a propeptide of 10 residues and a mature peptide of 32 residues. Under whole-cell voltage-clamp conditions, JZTX-II significantly slowed rapid inactivation of TTX-resistant (TTX-R) VGSC on cardiac myocytes with the IC50=0.26+/-0.09 microM. In addition, JZTX-II had no effect on TTX-R VGSCs on rat dorsal root ganglion neurons but exerted a concentration-dependent reduction in tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) VGSCs accompanied by a slowing of sodium current inactivation similar to delta-ACTXs. It is notable that TTX-S VGSCs on cultured rat hippocampal neurons were resistant to JZTX-II at high dose. Based on its high selectivity for mammalian VGSC subtypes, JZTX-II might be an important ligand for discrimination of VGSC subtypes and for exploration of the distribution and modulation mechanisms of VGSCs.

  20. Candesartan cilexetil protects against loss of autoregulatory efficiency in angiotensin II-infused rats.

    PubMed

    Inscho, E W; Imig, J D; Deichmann, P C; Cook, A K

    1999-01-01

    Renal autoregulatory efficiency is compromised in angiotensin-II (AngII)-dependent Goldblatt hypertension. The current studies were performed to assess renal autoregulatory capability in AngII-infused hypertensive rats and to determine the effect of chronic candesartan cilexetil treatment on autoregulatory behavior. Rats received chronic infusion of AngII (60 ng/min) or vehicle via an osmotic minipump implanted subcutaneously in the dorsum of the neck. Selected rats received the novel AT1 receptor blocker candesartan cilexetil (1.0 mg/kg per d) in the drinking water. Systolic BP averaged 118+/-1 mmHg (n=34) before pump implantation. Chronic AngII infusion for 6 d increased arterial pressure to 151+/-4 mmHg. Candesartan cilexetil administration prevented the AngII-dependent increase in systolic BP. Microvascular autoregulation experiments were performed in vitro using the blood-perfused juxtamedullary nephron technique combined with videomicroscopy. Renal perfusion pressure was set at 100 mmHg during the control period before being decreased to 65 mmHg. Afferent arteriolar diameter was measured continuously as the perfusion pressure was increased from 65 mmHg to 170 mmHg in 15-mmHg increments. Afferent arteriolar diameter in sham-treated rats was 120% of control at a perfusion pressure of 65 mmHg and decreased to 76% of the control diameter at 170 mmHg (n=6). This behavior is consistent with normal autoregulatory behavior. Arterioles from rats receiving chronic infusion of AngII exhibited compromised renal microvascular autoregulatory efficiency. Afferent arteriolar diameter in AngII-treated kidneys varied from 103 to 100% (n=6) of the control diameter over the same pressure range of 65 to 170 mmHg. This blunting of autoregulatory behavior was prevented by AT1 receptor blockade. In animals receiving AngII + candesartan cilexetil, stepwise changes in perfusion pressure elicited changes in afferent arteriolar diameter between 120 and 84% after 6 d of treatment (n=6

  1. Mechanical strain and collagen potentiate mitogenic activity of angiotensin II in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sudhir, K; Wilson, E; Chatterjee, K; Ives, H E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of extracellular matrix proteins and mechanical strain on the mitogenic activity of angiotensins I and II (AI and AII) were examined in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. VSM cells on various extracellular matrices were exposed to AII (1 microM) for 48 h. On plastic, AII induced only a 1.6-fold increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation, but on fibronectin- or type I collagen-coated plastic, the response to AII was enhanced from two- to fourfold. On a type I collagen-coated silicone elastomer, to which mechanical strain was applied, [3H]thymidine incorporation dramatically increased to a maximum of 53-fold. Dup 753 (10(-5) M) blocked the AII-induced increase in DNA synthesis. AI also increased DNA synthesis in VSM cells, and this response was also enhanced by mechanical strain. Mitogenic activity of AI was blocked by ramiprilat (10(-5) M), indicating that its mitogenic activity was via conversion to AII. The synergy between AII and strain was completely eliminated by neutralizing antibodies to PDGF AB (3 micrograms/ml). Furthermore, the mitogenic effect of AII in unstrained cells was also synergistic with submaximal concentrations of PDGF AB (1 ng/ml). Thus, the synergy between AII and mechanical strain probably results from synergism between AII and PDGF secreted in response to strain. PMID:8254054

  2. Characteristics of DH type II bursts, CMEs and flares with respect to the acceleration of CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, O.; Umapathy, S.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Pappa Kalaivani, P.; Vršnak, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    A detailed investigation on DH-type-II radio bursts recorded in Deca-Hectometer (hereinafter DH-type-II) wavelength range and their associated CMEs observed during the year 1997-2008 is presented. The sample of 212 DH-type-II associated with CMEs are classified into three populations: (i) Group I (43 events): DH-type-II associated CMEs are accelerating in the LASCO field view ( a>15 m s-2); (ii) Group II (99 events): approximately constant velocity CMEs (-15< a<15 m s-2) and (iii) Group III (70 events): represents decelerating CMEs ( a<-15 m s-2). Our study consists of three steps: (i) statistical properties of DH-type-II bursts of Group I, II and III events; (ii) analysis of time lags between onsets of flares and CMEs associated with DH-type-II bursts and (iii) statistical properties of flares and CMEs of Group I, II and III events. We found statistically significant differences between the properties of DH-type-II bursts of Group I, II and III events. The significance ( P a ) is found using the one-way ANOVA-test to examine the differences between means of groups. For example, there is significant difference in the duration ( P a =5%), ending frequency ( P a =4%) and bandwidth ( P a =4%). The accelerating and decelerating CMEs have more kinetic energy than the constant speed CMEs. There is a significant difference between the nose height of CMEs at the end time of DH-type-IIs ( P a ≪1%). From the time delay analysis, we found: (i) there is no significant difference in the delay (flare start—DH-type-II start and flare peak—DH-type-II start); (ii) small differences in the time delay between the CME onset and DH-type-II start, delay between the flare start and CME onset times. However, there are high significant differences in: flare duration ( P a =1%), flare rise time ( P a =0.5%), flare decay time ( P a =5%) and CMEs speed ( P a ≪1%) of Group I, II and III events. The general LASCO CMEs have lower width and speeds when compared to the DH CMEs. It seems

  3. FACS purification of immunolabeled cell types from adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Guez-Barber, Danielle; Fanous, Sanya; Harvey, Brandon K; Zhang, Yongqing; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G; Picciotto, Marina R; Hope, Bruce T

    2012-01-15

    Molecular analysis of brain tissue is greatly complicated by having many different classes of neurons and glia interspersed throughout the brain. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) has been used to purify selected cell types from brain tissue. However, its use has been limited to brain tissue from embryos or transgenic mice with promoter-driven reporter genes. To overcome these limitations, we developed a FACS procedure for dissociating intact cell bodies from adult wild-type rat brains and sorting them using commercially available antibodies against intracellular and extracellular proteins. As an example, we isolated neurons using a NeuN antibody and confirmed their identity using microarray and real time PCR of mRNA from the sorted cells. Our FACS procedure allows rapid, high-throughput, quantitative assays of molecular alterations in identified cell types with widespread applications in neuroscience.

  4. Type I and type II fatty acid biosynthesis in Eimeria tenella: enoyl reductase activity and structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, J Z; Muench, S P; Allary, M; Campbell, S; Roberts, C W; Mui, E; McLeod, R L; Rice, D W; Prigge, S T

    2007-12-01

    Apicomplexan parasites of the genus Eimeria are the major causative agent of avian coccidiosis, leading to high economic losses in the poultry industry. Recent results show that Eimeria tenella harbours an apicoplast organelle, and that a key biosynthetic enzyme, enoyl reductase, is located in this organelle. In related parasites, enoyl reductase is one component of a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS) and has proven to be an attractive target for antimicrobial compounds. We cloned and expressed the mature form of E. tenella enoyl reductase (EtENR) for biochemical and structural studies. Recombinant EtENR exhibits NADH-dependent enoyl reductase activity and is inhibited by triclosan with an IC50 value of 60 nm. The crystal structure of EtENR reveals overall similarity with other ENR enzymes; however, the active site of EtENR is unoccupied, a state rarely observed in other ENR structures. Furthermore, the position of the central beta-sheet appears to block NADH binding and would require significant movement to allow NADH binding, a feature not previously seen in the ENR family. We analysed the E. tenella genomic database for orthologues of well-characterized bacterial and apicomplexan FAS enzymes and identified 6 additional genes, suggesting that E. tenella contains a type II FAS capable of synthesizing saturated, but not unsaturated, fatty acids. Interestingly, we also identified sequences that appear to encode multifunctional type I FAS enzymes, a feature also observed in Toxoplasma gondii, highlighting the similarity between these apicomplexan parasites.

  5. Transgenic mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-II in β cells develop type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; George, Monica; Casellas, Alba; Pujol, Anna; Visa, Joana; Pelegrín, Mireia; Gros, Laurent; Bosch, Fatima

    2000-01-01

    During embryonic development, insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) participates in the regulation of islet growth and differentiation. We generated transgenic mice (C57BL6/SJL) expressing IGF-II in β cells under control of the rat Insulin I promoter in order to study the role of islet hyperplasia and hyperinsulinemia in the development of type 2 diabetes. In contrast to islets from control mice, islets from transgenic mice displayed high levels of IGF-II mRNA and protein. Pancreases from transgenic mice showed an increase in β-cell mass (about 3-fold) and in insulin mRNA levels. However, the organization of cells within transgenic islets was disrupted, with glucagon-producing cells randomly distributed throughout the core. We also observed enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and glucose utilization in islets from transgenic mice. These mice displayed hyperinsulinemia, mild hyperglycemia, and altered glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and about 30% of these animals developed overt diabetes when fed a high-fat diet. Furthermore, transgenic mice obtained from the N1 backcross to C57KsJ mice showed high islet hyperplasia and insulin resistance, but they also developed fatty liver and obesity. These results indicate that local overexpression of IGF-II in islets might lead to type 2 diabetes and that islet hyperplasia and hypersecretion of insulin might occur early in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:10727441

  6. ZK91587: a novel synthetic antimineralocorticoid displays high affinity for corticosterone (type I) receptors in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Sutanto, W.; de Kloet, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro cytosol binding assays have shown the properties of binding of a novel steroid, ZK91587 (15..beta.., 16..beta..b-methylene-mexrenone) in the brain of rats. Scatchard and Woolf analyses of the binding data reveal the binding of (/sup 3/H) ZK91587 to the total hippocampal coritcosteroid receptor sites with high affinity, and low capacity. When 100-fold excess RU28362 was included simultaneously with (/sup 3/H) ZK91587, the labelled steroid binds with the same affinity and capacity. Relative binding affinities (RBA) of various steroids for the Type I or Type II corticosteroid receptor in these animals are: Type I: ZK91587 = corticosterone (B) > cortisol (F); Type II: B > F >>> ZK91587. In the binding kinetic study, ZK91587 has a high association rate of binding in the rat. The steroid dissociates following a one slope pattern, indicating, the present data demonstrate that in the rat hippocampus, ZK91587 binds specifically to the Type I (corticosterone-preferring/mineralocorticoid-like receptor.

  7. Type II topoisomerases--inhibitors, repair mechanisms and mutations.

    PubMed

    Heisig, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases are ubiquitous enzymes that play an essential role in the control of replicative DNA synthesis and share structural and functional homology among different prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Antibacterial fluoroquinolones target prokaryotic topoisomerases at concentrations 100- to 1000-fold lower than mammalian enzymes, the preferred targets of anticancer drugs such as etoposide. The mechanisms of action of both of these types of inhibitors involve the fixation of an intermediate reaction step, where the enzyme is covalently bound to an enzyme-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB). The resulting ternary drug-enzyme-DNA complexes can then be converted to cleavage complexes that block further movement of the DNA replication fork, subsequently inducing stress responses. In haploid prokaryotic cells, stress responses include error-free and error-prone DNA damage repair pathways, such as homologous recombination and translesion synthesis, respectively. The latter can result in the acquisition of point mutations. Diploid mammalian cells are assumed to preferentially use recombination mechanisms for the repair of DSBs, an example of which, non-homologous end joining, is a major error-prone repair mechanism associated with an increased frequency of detectable small deletions, insertions and translocations. However, results obtained from safety testing of novel fluoroquinolones at high concentrations indicate that point mutations may also occur in mammalian cells. Recent data provide evidence for translesion synthesis catalysed by error-prone repair polymerases as a damage-tolerance repair mechanism of DSBs in eukaryotic cells. This paper discusses possible roles of different mechanisms for the repair of DSBs operating in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells that result in recombinational rearrangements, deletions/insertions as well as point mutations.

  8. Bolometric Lightcurves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the bolometric lightcurves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au and 2009E) which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe lightcurves using three different techniques common in the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the lightcurves calculated by SuperBoL along with previously published lightcurves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction lightcurves largely agree with previously published lightcurves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2 ≤ δL/L ≤ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ˜5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric lightcurves from observed sets of broad-band light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  9. Bolometric Light Curves of Peculiar Type II-P Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusk, Jeremy A.; Baron, E.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the bolometric light curves of five Type II-P supernovae (SNe 1998A, 2000cb, 2006V, 2006au, and 2009E), which are thought to originate from blue supergiant progenitors like that of SN 1987A, using a new python package named SuperBoL. With this code, we calculate SNe light curves using three different common techniques common from the literature: the quasi-bolometric method, which integrates the observed photometry, the direct integration method, which additionally corrects for unobserved flux in the UV and IR, and the bolometric correction method, which uses correlations between observed colors and V-band bolometric corrections. We present here the light curves calculated by SuperBoL, along with previously published light curves, as well as peak luminosities and 56Ni yields. We find that the direct integration and bolometric correction light curves largely agree with previously published light curves, but with what we believe to be more robust error calculations, with 0.2≲ δ {L}{bol}/{L}{bol}≲ 0.5. Peak luminosities and 56Ni masses are similarly comparable to previous work. SN 2000cb remains an unusual member of this sub-group, owing to the faster rise and flatter plateau than the other supernovae in the sample. Initial comparisons with the NLTE atmosphere code PHOENIX show that the direct integration technique reproduces the luminosity of a model supernova spectrum to ∼5% when given synthetic photometry of the spectrum as input. Our code is publicly available. The ability to produce bolometric light curves from observed sets of broadband light curves should be helpful in the interpretation of other types of supernovae, particularly those that are not well characterized, such as extremely luminous supernovae and faint fast objects.

  10. Isolation of cDNA and genomic DNA clones encoding type II collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Young, M F; Vogeli, G; Nunez, A M; Fernandez, M P; Sullivan, M; Sobel, M E

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA library constructed from total chick embryo RNA was screened with an enriched fraction of type II collagen mRNA. Two overlapping cDNA clones were characterized and shown to encode the COOH propeptide of type II collagen. In addition, a type II collagen clone was isolated from a Charon 4A library of chick genomic fragments. Definitive identification of the clones was based on DNA sequence analysis. The 3' end of the type II collagen gene appears to be similar to that of other interstitial collagen genes. Northern hybridization data indicates that there is a marked decrease in type II collagen mRNA levels in chondrocytes treated with the dedifferentiating agent 5-bromodeoxyuridine. The major type II collagen mRNA species is 5300 bases long, similar to that of other interstitial collagen RNAs. Images PMID:6203098

  11. Alternative Splicing of Type II Procollagen: IIB or not IIB?

    PubMed Central

    McAlinden, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Over two decades ago, two isoforms of the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) were discovered. These isoforms, named IIA and IIB, are generated in a developmentally-regulated manner by alternative splicing of exon 2. Chondroprogenitor cells synthesize predominantly IIA isoforms (containing exon 2) while differentiated chondrocytes produce mainly IIB transcripts (devoid of exon 2). Importantly, this IIA-to-IIB alternative splicing switch occurs only during chondrogenesis. More recently, two other isoforms have been reported (IIC and IID) that also involve splicing of exon 2; these findings highlight the complexities involving regulation of COL2A1 expression. The biological significance of why different isoforms of COL2A1 exist within the context of skeletal development and maintenance is still not completely understood. This review will provide current knowledge on COL2A1 isoform expression during chondrocyte differentiation and what is known about some of the mechanisms that control exon 2 alternative splicing. Utilization of mouse models to address the biological significance of Col2a1 alternative splicing in vivo will also be discussed. From the knowledge acquired to date, some new questions and concepts are now being proposed on the importance of Col2a1 alternative splicing in regulating extracellular matrix assembly and how this may subsequently affect cartilage and endochondral bone quality and function. PMID:24669942

  12. Type II supernovae as a significant source of interstellar dust.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Loretta; Eales, Stephen; Ivison, Rob; Morgan, Haley; Edmunds, Mike

    2003-07-17

    Large amounts of dust (>10(8)M(o)) have recently been discovered in high-redshift quasars and galaxies corresponding to a time when the Universe was less than one-tenth of its present age. The stellar winds produced by stars in the late stages of their evolution (on the asymptotic giant branch of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram) are thought to be the main source of dust in galaxies, but they cannot produce that dust on a short enough timescale (&<1 Gyr) to explain the results in the high-redshift galaxies. Supernova explosions of massive stars (type II) are also a potential source, with models predicting 0.2-4M(o) of dust. As massive stars evolve rapidly, on timescales of a few Myr, these supernovae could be responsible for the high-redshift dust. Observations of supernova remnants in the Milky Way, however, have hitherto revealed only 10(-7)-10(-3)M(o) each, which is insufficient to explain the high-redshift data. Here we report the detection of approximately 2-4M(o) of cold dust in the youngest known Galactic supernova remnant, Cassiopeia A. This observation implies that supernovae are at least as important as stellar winds in producing dust in our Galaxy and would have been the dominant source of dust at high redshifts.

  13. Inert dark matter in type-II seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2014-09-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) as a dark matter (DM) candidate is further inspired by recent AMS-02 data, which confirm the excess of positron fraction observed earlier by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments. Additionally, the excess of positron+electron flux is still significant in the measurement of Fermi-LAT. For solving the problems of massive neutrinos and observed excess of cosmic-ray, we study the model with an inert Higgs doublet (IHD) in the framework of type-II seesaw model by imposing a Z 2 symmetry on the IHD, where the lightest particle of IHD is the DM candidate and the neutrino masses originate from the Yukawa couplings of Higgs triplet and leptons. We calculate the cosmic-ray production in our model by using three kinds of neutrino mass spectra, which are classified by normal ordering, inverted ordering and quasi-degeneracy. We find that when the constraints of DM relic density and comic-ray antiproton spectrum are taken into account, the observed excess of positron/electron flux could be explained well in normal ordered neutrino mass spectrum. Moreover, excess of comic-ray neutrinos is implied in our model. We find that our results on < σv> are satisfied with and close to the upper limit of IceCube analysis. More data from comic-ray neutrinos could test our model.

  14. Identification of type II and III DDR2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Richters, André; Nguyen, Hoang D; Phan, Trang; Simard, Jeffrey R; Grütter, Christian; Engel, Julian; Rauh, Daniel

    2014-05-22

    Discoidin domain-containing receptors (DDRs) exhibit a unique mechanism of action among the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) because their catalytic activity is induced by extracellular collagen binding. Moreover, they are essential components in the assimilation of extracellular signals. Recently, DDRs were reported to be significantly linked to tumor progression in breast cancer by facilitating the processes of invasion, migration, and metastasis. Here, we report the successful development of a fluorescence-based, direct binding assay for the detection of type II and III DFG-out binders for DDR2. Using sequence alignments and homology modeling, we designed a DDR2 construct appropriate for fluorescent labeling. Successful assay development was validated by sensitive detection of a reference DFG-out binder. Subsequent downscaling led to convenient application to high-throughput screening formats. Screening of a representative compound library identified high-affinity DDR2 ligands validated by orthogonal activity-based assays, and a subset of identified compounds was further investigated with respect to DDR1 inhibition.

  15. Type II dehydroquinase: molecular replacement with many copies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kirsty Anne; Robinson, David Alexander; Lapthorn, Adrian Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Type II dehydroquinase is a small (150-amino-acid) protein which in solution packs together to form a dodecamer with 23 cubic symmetry. In crystals of this protein the symmetry of the biological unit can be coincident with the crystallographic symmetry, giving rise to cubic crystal forms with a single monomer in the asymmetric unit. In crystals where this is not the case, multiple copies of the monomer are present, giving rise to significant and often confusing noncrystallographic symmetry in low-symmetry crystal systems. These different crystal forms pose a variety of challenges for solution by molecular replacement. Three examples of structure solutions, including a highly unusual triclinic crystal form with 16 dodecamers (192 monomers) in the unit cell, are described. Four commonly used molecular-replacement packages are assessed against two of these examples, one of high symmetry and the other of low symmetry; this study highlights how program performance can vary significantly depending on the given problem. In addition, the final refined structure of the 16-dodecamer triclinic crystal form is analysed and shown not to be a superlattice structure, but rather an F-centred cubic crystal with frustrated crystallographic symmetry. PMID:18094474

  16. Health perceptions among urban American Indians with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sachin; Davila, Javier; Patel, Sonam; Norman, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s, American Indians (AIs) have increasingly urbanized, moving off of reservations in large part due to federal policies of tribal termination and relocation. Though previous AI research has largely focused on reservation-associated challenges, many of these same challenges persist among urban AI populations. One mutual concern is the growing prevalence and incidence of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). While behavioral, genetic, and socioeconomic determinants of T2DM have been explored, much less is known about the influence of cultural and psychosocial factors. Recent studies suggest that the way AIs perceive diabetes may affect their health trajectory and explain their poor prognosis. Through the use of the Illness Perception Questionnaire, we explored this hypothesis in a pilot study of urban AI with T2DM living in Los Angeles County. We found that the majority of participants have a neutral perception about their diabetes: They view their condition to be long lasting yet treatable and indicate reasonable understanding of its symptoms and progression. We also identified "personal control," the level of perceived control one has over his or her disease, as a strong correlate of overall illness perception and, thus, a potentially useful psychological metric.

  17. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  18. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  19. ``N'' structure for type-II superlattice photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Muti, Abdullah; Kutluer, Kutlu; Tansel, Tunay; Turan, Rasit; Ergun, Yuksel; Aydinli, Atilla

    2012-08-01

    In the quest to raise the operating temperature and improve the detectivity of type II superlattice (T2SL) photodetectors, we introduce a design approach that we call the "N structure." N structure aims to improve absorption by manipulating electron and hole wavefunctions that are spatially separated in T2SLs, increasing the absorption while decreasing the dark current. In order to engineer the wavefunctions, we introduce a thin AlSb layer between InAs and GaSb layers in the growth direction which also acts as a unipolar electron barrier. Unlike the symmetrical insertion of AlSb into GaSb layers, N design aims to exploit the shifting of the electron and hole wavefunctions under reverse bias. With cutoff wavelength of 4.3 μm at 77 K, temperature dependent dark current and detectivity measurements show that the dark current density is 3.6 × 10-9 A/cm2, under zero bias. Photodetector reaches background limited infrared photodetection (BLIP) condition at 125 K with the BLIP detectivity (D*BLIP) of 2.6 × 1010 Jones under 300 K background and -0.3 V bias voltage.

  20. Type II Radio Bursts as an Indicator of CME Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirk, C. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; Henning, C.; Xie, H.; Gilbert, H. R.; Orlove, M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Odstrcil, D.

    2011-12-01

    We examined a subset of nine low-frequency radio events with type II radio bursts that drifted below 2 megahertz and were detected by the WAVES investigation on the WIND spacecraft. For each event, we identified the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) and derived the electron density using a model of solar wind plasma frequency (fp ≈ 9 * ne1/2, where fp is plasma frequency in kHz and ne is electron density in cm-3) . We also used the pb_inverter program in SolarSoft developed by Howard and Hayes to examine the electron density structure. Expanding on the Van De Hulst process of inverting polarized brightness measurements, the program inverts total brightness measurements from SOHO LASCO images to extract electron density information. From the electron density inferred from radio spectra, we derived the location of the CME using five standard electron density to height models (Leblanc, 1996; Saito, 1977; Bougeret, 1984; Alvarez, 1973; and Fainberg, 1971). Using images from the LASCO instrument on SOHO and the SECCHI instrument on STEREO, we extracted locations of the leading edge of the CME and compared the heights and velocities to those found using the frequency data. For the lowest frequency events, we also compared our results to the outputs of ENLIL, a time-dependent, three-dimensional, MHD model of the heliosphere hosted by the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  1. Localized accumulation of angiotensin II and production of angiotensin-(1-7) in rat luteal cells and effects on steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, John R; Nemeth, Gabor; Yamada, Yuji; Naftolin, Frederick; Merino, Maricruz

    2006-08-01

    These studies aim to investigate subcellular distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) in rat luteal cells, identify other bioactive angiotensin peptides, and investigate a role for angiotensin peptides in luteal steroidogenesis. Confocal microscopy showed ANG II distributed within the cytoplasm and nuclei of luteal cells. HPLC analysis showed peaks that eluted with the same retention times as ANG-(1-7), ANG II, and ANG III. Their relative concentrations were ANG II >or= ANG-(1-7) > ANG III, and accumulation was modulated by quinapril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), Z-proprolinal (ZPP), an inhibitor of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP), and parachloromercurylsulfonic acid (PCMS), an inhibitor of sulfhydryl protease. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, did not affect peptide accumulation. Quinapril, ZPP, PCMS, and PMSF, as well as losartan and PD-123319, the angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonists, were used in progesterone production studies. ZPP significantly reduced luteinizing hormone (LH)-dependent progesterone production (P < 0.05). Quinapril plus ZPP had a greater inhibitory effect on LH-stimulated progesterone than either inhibitor alone, but this was not reversed by exogenous ANG II or ANG-(1-7). Both PCMS and PMSF acutely blocked LH-stimulated progesterone, and PCMS blocked LH-sensitive cAMP accumulation. Losartan inhibited progesterone production in permeabilized but not intact luteal cells and was reversed by ANG II. PD-123319 had no significant effect on luteal progesterone production in either intact or permeabilized cells. These data suggest that steroidogenesis may be modulated by angiotensin peptides that act in part through intracellular AT1 receptors.

  2. Garlic Attenuates Plasma and Kidney ACE-1 and AngII Modulations in Early Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: Renal Clearance and Blood Pressure Implications

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qattan, Khaled K.; Jayasree, Divya; Ali, Muslim

    2016-01-01

    Raw garlic aqueous extract (GE) has ameliorative actions on the renin-angiotensin system in type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM); however its effects on plasma and kidney angiotensin I converting enzyme type-1 (ACE-1) and angiotensin II (AngII) require further elucidation. This study investigated the effect of GE on plasma and kidney ACE-1 and AngII concentrations and in relation to systemic and renal clearance indicators significant to blood pressure (BP) homeostasis in early streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced type-1 DM. Normal rats (n = 10) received 0.5 mL normal saline (NR/NS), diabetic rats (n = 10) received 0.5 mL NS (DR/NS), and treated diabetic rats (n = 10) received 50 mg/0.1 mL/100 g body weight GE (DR/GE) as daily intraperitoneal injections for 8 weeks. Compared to NR/NS, DR/NS showed a significant increase in plasma ACE-1 and AngII and conversely a decrease in kidney ACE-1 and AngII. These changes were associated with an increase in BP and clearance functions. Alternatively and compared to DR/NS, DR/GE showed normalization or attenuation in plasma and kidney ACE-1 and AngII. These GE induced rectifications were associated with moderation in BP elevation and renal clearance functions. Garlic attenuates modulations in plasma and kidney ACE-1 and AngII, in addition to BP and renal clearance function in type-1 DM. PMID:27293465

  3. Hypoxic increase in nitric oxide generation of rat sensory neurons requires activation of mitochondrial complex II and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Henrich, M; Paddenberg, R; Haberberger, R V; Scholz, A; Gruss, M; Hempelmann, G; Kummer, W

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that sensory neurons of rat lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) respond to hypoxia with an activation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) resulting in enhanced NO production associated with mitochondria which contributes to resistance against hypoxia. Extracellular calcium is essential to this effect. In the present study on rat DRG slices, we set out to determine what types of calcium channels operate under hypoxia, and which upstream events contribute to their activation, thereby focusing upon mitochondrial complex II. Both the metallic ions Cd2+ and Ni2+, known to inhibit voltage-gated calcium channels and T-type channels, respectively, and verapamil and nifedipine, typical blocker of L-type calcium channels completely prevented the hypoxic neuronal NO generation. Inhibition of complex II by thenoyltrifluoroacetone at the ubiquinon binding site or by 3-nitropropionic acid at the substrate binding site largely diminished hypoxic-induced NO production while having an opposite effect under normoxia. An additional blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels entirely abolished the hypoxic response. The complex II inhibitor malonate inhibited both normoxic and hypoxic NO generation. These data show that complex II activity is required for increased hypoxic NO production. Since succinate dehydrogenase activity of complex II decreased at hypoxia, as measured by histochemistry and densitometry, we propose a hypoxia-induced functional switch of complex II from succinate dehydrogenase to fumarate reductase, which subsequently leads to activation of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in increased NO production by eNOS.

  4. Phosphorylation of rat kidney Na-K pump at Ser938 is required for rapid angiotensin II-dependent stimulation of activity and trafficking in proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Massey, Katherine J; Li, Quanwen; Rossi, Noreen F; Keezer, Susan M; Mattingly, Raymond R; Yingst, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    How angiotensin (ANG) II acutely stimulates the Na-K pump in proximal tubules is only partially understood, limiting insight into how ANG II increases blood pressure. First, we tested whether ANG II increases the number of pumps in plasma membranes of native rat proximal tubules under conditions of rapid activation. We found that exposure to 100 pM ANG II for 2 min, which was previously shown to increase affinity of the Na-K pump for Na and stimulate activity threefold, increased the amount of the Na-K pump in plasma membranes of native tubules by 33%. Second, we tested whether previously observed increases in phosphorylation of the Na-K pump at Ser(938) were part of the stimulatory mechanism. These experiments were carried out in opossum kidney cells, cultured proximal tubules stably coexpressing the ANG type 1 (AT1) receptor, and either wild-type or a S938A mutant of rat kidney Na-K pump under conditions found by others to stimulate activity. We found that 10 min of incubation in 10 pM ANG II stimulated activity of wild-type pumps from 2.3 to 3.5 nmol K · mg protein(-1) · min(-1) and increased the amount of the pump in the plasma membrane by 80% but had no effect on cells expressing the S938A mutant. We conclude that acute stimulation of Na-K pump activity in native rat proximal tubules includes increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and that phosphorylation at Ser(938) is part of the mechanism by which ANG II directly stimulates activity and trafficking of the rat kidney Na-K pump in opossum kidney cells.

  5. Redesigning the type II' β-turn in green fluorescent protein to type I': implications for folding kinetics and stability.

    PubMed

    Madan, Bharat; Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2014-10-01

    Both Type I' and Type II' β-turns have the same sense of the β-turn twist that is compatible with the β-sheet twist. They occur predominantly in two residue β-hairpins, but the occurrence of Type I' β-turns is two times higher than Type II' β-turns. This suggests that Type I' β-turns may be more stable than Type II' β-turns, and Type I' β-turn sequence and structure can be more favorable for protein folding than Type II' β-turns. Here, we redesigned the native Type II' β-turn in GFP to Type I' β-turn, and investigated its effect on protein folding and stability. The Type I' β-turns were designed based on the statistical analysis of residues in natural Type I' β-turns. The substitution of the native "GD" sequence of i+1 and i+2 residues with Type I' preferred "(N/D)G" sequence motif increased the folding rate by 50% and slightly improved the thermodynamic stability. Despite the enhancement of in vitro refolding kinetics and stability of the redesigned mutants, they showed poor soluble expression level compared to wild type. To overcome this problem, i and i + 3 residues of the designed Type I' β-turn were further engineered. The mutation of Thr to Lys at i + 3 could restore the in vivo soluble expression of the Type I' mutant. This study indicates that Type II' β-turns in natural β-hairpins can be further optimized by converting the sequence to Type I'.

  6. Higgs potential in the type II seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, A.; Benbrik, R.; Chabab, M.; Rahili, L.; Ramadan, J.; Moultaka, G.; Peyranere, M. C.

    2011-11-01

    The standard model Higgs sector, extended by one weak gauge triplet of scalar fields with a very small vacuum expectation value, is a very promising setting to account for neutrino masses through the so-called type II seesaw mechanism. In this paper we consider the general renormalizable doublet/triplet Higgs potential of this model. We perform a detailed study of its main dynamical features that depend on five dimensionless couplings and two mass parameters after spontaneous symmetry breaking, and highlight the implications for the Higgs phenomenology. In particular, we determine (i) the complete set of tree-level unitarity constraints on the couplings of the potential and (ii) the exact tree-level boundedness from below constraints on these couplings, valid for all directions. When combined, these constraints delineate precisely the theoretically allowed parameter space domain within our perturbative approximation. Among the seven physical Higgs states of this model, the mass of the lighter (heavier) CP{sub even} state h{sup 0} (H{sup 0}) will always satisfy a theoretical upper (lower) bound that is reached for a critical value {mu}{sub c} of {mu} (the mass parameter controlling triple couplings among the doublet/triplet Higgses). Saturating the unitarity bounds, we find an upper bound m{sub h}{sup 0} or approx. {mu}{sub c} and {mu} < or approx. {mu}{sub c}. In the first regime the Higgs sector is typically very heavy, and only h{sup 0} that becomes SM-like could be accessible to the LHC. In contrast, in the second regime, somewhat overlooked in the literature, most of the Higgs sector is light. In particular, the heaviest state H{sup 0} becomes SM-like, the lighter states being the CP{sub odd} Higgs, the (doubly) charged Higgses, and a decoupled h{sup 0}, possibly

  7. Effect of hepatocyte growth factor and angiotensin II on rat cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ai-Lan; Ou, Cai-Wen; He, Zhao-Chu; Liu, Qi-Cai; Dong, Qi; Chen, Min-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays an important role in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. The combined effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and Ang II on cardiomyocytes is unknown. The present study was designed to determine the effect of HGF on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and to explore the combined effect of HGF and Ang II on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Primary cardiomyocytes were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and cultured in vitro. Cells were treated with Ang II (1 µM) alone, HGF (10 ng/mL) alone, and Ang II (1 µM) plus HGF (10 ng/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. The amount of [3H]-leucine incorporation was then measured to evaluate protein synthesis. The mRNA levels of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic factor were determined by real-time PCR to evaluate the presence of fetal phenotypes of gene expression. The cell size of cardiomyocytes was also studied. Ang II (1 µM) increased cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Similar to Ang II, treatment with 1 µM HGF promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Moreover, the combination of 1 µM Ang II and 10 ng/mL HGF clearly induced a combined pro-hypertrophy effect on cardiomyocytes. The present study demonstrates for the first time a novel, combined effect of HGF and Ang II in promoting cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:23044624

  8. 46 CFR 171.070 - Subdivision requirements--Type II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... have a collision bulkhead. (d) Paragraph (c) of this section applies to a ferry vessel that— (1) Is 150... other main transverse watertight bulkhead; (ii) The collision bulkhead; and (iii) The aftermost point on... transverse watertight bulkhead; (ii) The collision bulkhead; and (iii) The aftermost point on the...

  9. 46 CFR 171.070 - Subdivision requirements--Type II.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... have a collision bulkhead. (d) Paragraph (c) of this section applies to a ferry vessel that— (1) Is 150... other main transverse watertight bulkhead; (ii) The collision bulkhead; and (iii) The aftermost point on... transverse watertight bulkhead; (ii) The collision bulkhead; and (iii) The aftermost point on the...

  10. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION OF MICE WITH THE POLYSACCHARIDES OF PNEUMOCOCCI TYPES I, II AND III

    PubMed Central

    Zozaya, José; Clark, Janet

    1933-01-01

    1. Pneumococcus polysaccharides Types I, II and III adsorbed on collodion particles, and Types I and III adsorbed on carbon (norit) are antigenic in mice. 2. Unadsorbed pneumococcus polysaccharide of Type I is antigenic in mice in proper dilution. One preparation of Type II polysaccharide was not antigenic, while another one immunized against Types I and II. Type III polysaccharide was only slightly antigenic against Type III but immunized against Type I. 3. The antigenicity of pneumococcus polysaccharide in optimal dosage is tentatively explained by an adsorption phenomenon taking place in the body in instances in which the polysaccharides had not been adsorbed before injection. 4. The aggressin-like action of large doses of pneumococcus polysaccharides Types I, II and III is further established. PMID:19870119

  11. Matrix composition of cartilaginous anlagen in achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino).

    PubMed

    Dertinger, Susanne; Söeder, Stephan; Bösch, Hubert; Aigner, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal dysplasias represent in vivo models of genetic defects. Achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino), caused by a genetic defect in the major cartilage matrix protein, collagen type II, is a rare and severe skeletal dysplasia. It comprises a severe derangement of the fetal growth plate cartilage with subsequent ossification defects. In this study, we analyzed the matrix composition and cell differentiation pattern in 3 relatives with achondrogenesis type II. Most strikingly we found a strongly reduced collagen type II and moderately reduced aggrecan proteoglycan content in the dysplastic cartilage matrix. Type II collagen is, at least to some extent, replaced by collagens type I III, and VI. Ultrastructural analysis of the dysplastic cartilage matrix demonstrated a distended rER (rough endoplasmic reticulum), which is typical for this condition and most likely related to improper processing and retention of genetically altered type II collagen. Immunostaining for type IIA and X collagens suggest a severe delay in chondrocyte maturation. Thus, the genetic defect in the present cases leads most likely to a severe retention of collagen type II in the rER and, therefore, a strongly reduced collagen deposition and replacement by other interstitial collagens. However, the latter are less efficient in binding aggrecan proteoglycans in the dysplastic cartilage matrix. Additionally, a delay in chondrocyte maturation appears to be important in achondrogenesis type II.

  12. Investigation of resistive losses in type II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benapfl, Brendan W.

    For low-TC materials, the superconducting transition temperature (TC) is depressed by the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, one of the remarkable features of cuprate high-TC materials is that the superconducting transition is broadened by the application of a magnetic field. Tinkham presented a model for the field-dependent resistive transition of high-T C materials, arising from "phase slippage at a complicated network of channels." Coffey & Clem did not include this field-broadening effect in their sophisticated model for the field and temperature dependence of the surface resistance in type-II superconductors. From the model by Lee & Stroud, treating Josephson Junction-coupled superconducting segments, it is concluded that doped, layered superconductors are certain to have a field-broadened superconducting transition. This effect can be identified by measurements of the resistivity as a function of temperature, magnetic field strength, angle of field with respect to the crystal axis as well as with respect to an induced current density. The iron pnictide materials such as Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 (BaK122) have chemical layers with different compositions, differentiating them from elemental type-II superconductors such as niobium, and also from cuprates, by the absence of copper. Experimental data on BaK122 indicate a field-broadened transition in conjunction with a field-depressed superconducting transition temperature. In this work, techniques associated with Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy were used to measure the temperature and field-induced changes in the surface resistance of single-crystal BaK122 samples. In addition, polycrystalline foils of niobium and a NbTi (70/30) alloy were measured using the same techniques to provide comparison. Measurements were taken as a function of applied magnetic field, temperature, rf field intensity, and angle of the applied field with respect to the rf-induced current. BaK122 sample field-dependent surface

  13. Effect of chromium on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus: the fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated rat.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Onderci, Muhittin; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Ustundag, Bilal; Cikim, Gurkan; Ozercan, Ibrahim H; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Juturu, Vijaya; Komorowski, James R

    2007-09-01

    Chromium supplements are widely used as an alternative remedy for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In vitro study findings show that chromium picolinate (CrPic) may improve insulin sensitivity by enhancing intracellular insulin receptor. In this study, we evaluated the metabolic effects of CrPic in a rat model of T2DM. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 45, 8 weeks old) were divided into 3 groups. The controls (group I) received a standard diet (12% of calories as fat); group II received a high-fat diet (HFD; 40% of calories as fat) for 2 weeks and then were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin (STZ, 40 mg/kg; HFD/STZ) on day 14; group III rats were given group II diets with the addition of 80 microg CrPic per kilogram body weight per day. The addition of CrPic in the group III treatment lowered glucose by an average of 63% (P < .001), total cholesterol by 9.7% (P < .001), and triglycerides by 6.6% (P < .001) compared with group II treatment. Compared with group II, CrPic treatment also lowered free fatty acid levels by 24% (P < .001), blood urea by 33% (P < .05), and creatinine level by 25% (P < .01), and reduced the severity of glomerular sclerosis (P < .0001). Histopathologic findings suggest that the CrPic-treated group had normal renal tubular appearance compared with the HFD/STZ-treated group. Normal appearance of hepatocytes was observed in the CrPic-treated group. These results showed that CrPic has marked beneficial effects against microvascular complications. In conclusion, HFD/STZ rats provide a novel animal model for T2DM. Further treatment with CrPic for 10 weeks significantly ameliorated changes in metabolic risk factors including favorable changes in histopathology of the liver, kidney, and pancreas, suggesting its potential role in the management of diabetes.

  14. Unusual compactness of a polyproline type II structure

    PubMed Central

    Zagrovic, Bojan; Lipfert, Jan; Sorin, Eric J.; Millett, Ian S.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.; Doniach, Sebastian; Pande, Vijay S.

    2005-01-01

    Polyproline type II (PPII) helix has emerged recently as the dominant paradigm for describing the conformation of unfolded polypeptides. However, most experimental observables used to characterize unfolded proteins typically provide only short-range, sequence-local structural information that is both time- and ensemble-averaged, giving limited detail about the long-range structure of the chain. Here, we report a study of a long-range property: the radius of gyration of an alanine-based peptide, Ace-(diaminobutyric acid)2-(Ala)7-(ornithine)2-NH2. This molecule has previously been studied as a model for the unfolded state of proteins under folding conditions and is believed to adopt a PPII fold based on short-range techniques such as NMR and CD. By using synchrotron radiation and small-angle x-ray scattering, we have determined the radius of gyration of this peptide to be 7.4 ± 0.5 Å, which is significantly less than the value expected from an ideal PPII helix in solution (13.1 Å). To further study this contradiction, we have used molecular dynamics simulations using six variants of the AMBER force field and the GROMOS 53A6 force field. However, in all cases, the simulated ensembles underestimate the PPII content while overestimating the experimental radius of gyration. The conformational model that we propose, based on our small angle x-ray scattering results and what is known about this molecule from before, is that of a very flexible, fluctuating structure that on the level of individual residues explores a wide basin around the ideal PPII geometry but is never, or only rarely, in the ideal extended PPII helical conformation. PMID:16085707

  15. Non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Rodger, W

    1991-01-01

    Non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia with resistance to ketosis. The onset is usually after age 40 years. Patients are variably symptomatic and frequently obese, hyperlipidemic and hypertensive. Clinical, pathological and biochemical evidence suggests that the disease is caused by a combined defect of insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Goals in the treatment of hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension should be appropriate to the patient's age, the status of diabetic complications and the safety of the regimen. Nonpharmacologic management includes meal planning to achieve a suitable weight, such that carbohydrates supply 50% to 60% of the daily energy intake, with limitation of saturated fats, cholesterol and salt when indicated, and physical activity appropriate to the patient's age and cardiovascular status. Follow-up should include regular visits with the physician, access to diabetes education, self-monitoring of the blood or urine glucose level and laboratory-based measurement of the plasma levels of glucose and glycated hemoglobin. If unacceptably high plasma glucose levels (e.g., 8 mmol/L or more before meals) persist the use of orally given hypoglycemic agents (a sulfonylurea agent or metformin or both) is indicated. Temporary insulin therapy may be needed during intercurrent illness, surgery or pregnancy. Long-term insulin therapy is recommended in patients with continuing symptoms or hyperglycemia despite treatment with diet modification and orally given hypoglycemic agents. The risk of pancreatitis may be reduced by treating severe hypertriglyceridemia (fasting serum level greater than 10 mmol/L) and atherosclerotic disease through dietary and, if necessary, pharmacologic management of dyslipidemia. Antihypertensive agents are available that have fewer adverse metabolic effects than thiazides and beta-adrenergic receptor blockers. New drugs are being developed that

  16. Screening of three Usher syndrome type II candidate genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bloemker, B.K.; Swaroop, A.; Kimberling, W.J.

    1994-09-01

    Usher syndrome type II (US2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital hearing loss. The disease affects approximately 1 in 20,000 individuals in the general population and is responsible for over 50% of all cases of deafness with blindness. The underlying US2 defect is unknown. The US2 gene has been localized to the 1q41 region of chromosome 1 by linkage studies. Three genes previously localized to 1q were analyzed to assess their candidacy as the US2 gene. These were evaluated by PCR assays using DNA from a YAC contig spanning the US2 region on chromosome 1. The first gene evaluated was the human choroideremia-like gene (hCHML), which had been mapped to chromosome 1q. The sequence on 1q is a homologue of the human choroideremia gene on chromosome X. Choroideremia is a degenerative disorder causing ocular pathology similar to that observed in US2 patients. Therefore, hCHML is a candidate for the US2 gene. Two cDNAs (A and B) from an enriched human retinal pigment epithelium library have been mapped to 1q41 by in situ hybridization. Both cDNAs are considered good candidates. The hCHML and cDNA A were ruled out as candidates for the US2 gene based on negative results from PCR assays performed on YACs spanning the US2 region. cDNA B could not be ruled out as a candidate for the US2 gene by these assays. Answers to many clinical questions regarding US2 will only be resolved after the gene is identified and characterized. Eventually, understanding the function and expression of the US2 gene will provide a basis for the development of therapy.

  17. Radiation-hydrodynamical modelling of underluminous Type II plateau supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumo, M. L.; Zampieri, L.; Spiro, S.; Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Manicò, G.; Turatto, M.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving our knowledge about the nature of the progenitors of low-luminosity Type II plateau supernovae (LL SNe IIP), we made radiation-hydrodynamical models of the well-sampled LL SNe IIP 2003Z, 2008bk and 2009md. For these three SNe, we infer explosion energies of 0.16-0.18 foe, radii at explosion of 1.8-3.5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of 10-11.3 M⊙. The estimated progenitor mass on the main sequence is in the range ˜13.2-15.1 M⊙ for SN 2003Z and ˜11.4-12.9 M⊙ for SNe 2008bk and 2009md, in agreement with estimates from observations of the progenitors. These results together with those for other LL SNe IIP modelled in the same way enable us also to conduct a comparative study on this SN sub-group. The results suggest that (a) the progenitors of faint SNe IIP are slightly less massive and have less energetic explosions than those of intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP; (b) both faint and intermediate-luminosity SNe IIP originate from low-energy explosions of red (or yellow) supergiant stars of low to intermediate mass; (c) some faint objects may also be explained as electron-capture SNe from massive super-asymptotic giant branch stars; and (d) LL SNe IIP form the underluminous tail of the SNe IIP family, where the main parameter `guiding' the distribution seems to be the ratio of the total explosion energy to the ejected mass. Further hydrodynamical studies should be performed and compared to a more extended sample of LL SNe IIP before drawing any conclusion on the relevance of fall-back to this class of events.

  18. Macrovascular complications in Mexican Americans with type II diabetes.

    PubMed

    Haffner, S M; Mitchell, B D; Stern, M P; Hazuda, H P

    1991-07-01

    Mexican Americans have a threefold greater prevalence of non-insulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus than non-Hispanic whites in the San Antonio Heart Study, a population-based study of diabetes. In addition, Mexican-American diabetic subjects (n = 365) have greater fasting glycemia than non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects (P less than 0.001). Despite these findings, and despite a higher prevalence of microvascular complications among Mexican Americans, there does not appear to be a marked difference in prevalence of macrovascular complications between Mexican-American and non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects. Mexican-American diabetic subjects have only a moderate excess of peripheral vascular disease (as judged by ankle-arm blood pressure ratios) relative to non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects (sex-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio 1.84, 95% confidence interval 0.75-4.49). Mexican-American diabetic subjects actually reported fewer myocardial infarctions than non-Hispanic white diabetic subjects (sex-adjusted Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.31-1.71). Duration was not associated with either peripheral vascular disease or myocardial infarction. Severity of glycemia was only mildly associated with presence of peripheral vascular disease and negatively associated with self-reported myocardial infarction. This latter finding may represent a survival bias in that more severe diabetic subjects have already died and are not ascertained in a prevalence study. The absence of an ethnic difference in the prevalence of macrovascular disease contrasts with our previous reports from the San Antonio Heart Study, in which the prevalence of both retinopathy and proteinuria was observed to be higher in Mexican-American diabetic subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Analytic Approximation of Carbon Condensation Issues in Type ii Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    I present analytic approximations for some issues related to condensation of graphite, TiC, and silicon carbide in oxygen-rich cores of supernovae of Type II. Increased understanding, which mathematical analysis can support, renders researchers more receptive to condensation in O-rich supernova gases. Taking SN 1987A as typical, my first analysis shows why the abundance of CO molecules reaches an early maximum in which free carbon remains more abundant than CO. This analysis clarifies why O-rich gas cannot oxidize C if 56Co radioactivity is as strong as in SN 1987A. My next analysis shows that the CO abundance could be regarded as being in chemical equilibrium if the CO molecule is given an effective binding energy rather than its laboratory dissociation energy. The effective binding energy makes the thermal dissociation rate of CO equal to its radioactive dissociation rate. This preserves possible relevance for the concept of chemical equilibrium. My next analysis shows that the observed abundances of CO and SiO molecules in SN 1987A rule out frequent suggestions that equilibrium condensation of SUNOCONs has occurred following atomic mixing of the He-burning shell with more central zones in such a way as to reproduce roughly the observed spectrum of isotopes in SUNOCONs while preserving C/O > 1. He atoms admixed along with the excess carbon would destroy CO and SiO molecules, leaving their observed abundances unexplained. The final analysis argues that a chemical quasiequilibrium among grains (but not gas) may exist approximately during condensation, so that its computational use is partially justified as a guide to which mineral phases would be stable against reactions with gas. I illustrate this point with quasiequilibrium calculations by Ebel & Grossman that have shown that graphite is stable even when O/C >1 if prominent molecules are justifiably excluded from the calculation of chemical equilibrium.

  20. Identification of Unique Type II Polyketide Synthase Genes in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wawrik, Boris; Kerkhof, Lee; Zylstra, Gerben J.; Kukor, Jerome J.

    2005-01-01

    Many bacteria, particularly actinomycetes, are known to produce secondary metabolites synthesized by polyketide synthases (PKS). Bacterial polyketides are a particularly rich source of bioactive molecules, many of which are of potential pharmaceutical relevance. To directly access PKS gene diversity from soil, we developed degenerate PCR primers for actinomycete type II KSα (ketosynthase) genes. Twenty-one soil samples were collected from diverse sources in New Jersey, and their bacterial communities were compared by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analysis of PCR products generated using bacterial 16S rRNA gene primers (27F and 1525R) as well as an actinomycete-specific forward primer. The distribution of actinomycetes was highly variable but correlated with the overall bacterial species composition as determined by TRFLP. Two samples were identified to contain a particularly rich and unique actinomycete community based on their TRFLP patterns. The same samples also contained the greatest diversity of KSα genes as determined by TRFLP analysis of KSα PCR products. KSα PCR products from these and three additional samples with interesting TRFLP pattern were cloned, and seven novel clades of KSα genes were identified. Greatest sequence diversity was observed in a sample containing a moderate number of peaks in its KSα TRFLP. The nucleotide sequences were between 74 and 81% identical to known sequences in GenBank. One cluster of sequences was most similar to the KSα involved in ardacin (glycopeptide antibiotic) production by Kibdelosporangium aridum. The remaining sequences showed greatest similarity to the KSα genes in pathways producing the angucycline-derived antibiotics simocyclinone, pradimicin, and jasomycin. PMID:15870305

  1. The Three-Dimensional Structural Basis of Type II Hyperprolinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Dhiraj; Singh, Ranjan K.; Moxley, Michael A.; Henzl, Michael T.; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J.

    2012-08-31

    Type II hyperprolinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in {Delta}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH; also known as ALDH4A1), the aldehyde dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate. Here, we report the first structure of human P5CDH (HsP5CDH) and investigate the impact of the hyperprolinemia-associated mutation of Ser352 to Leu on the structure and catalytic properties of the enzyme. The 2. 5-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of HsP5CDH was determined using experimental phasing. Structures of the mutant enzymes S352A (2.4 {angstrom}) and S352L (2.85 {angstrom}) were determined to elucidate the structural consequences of altering Ser352. Structures of the 93% identical mouse P5CDH complexed with sulfate ion (1.3 {angstrom} resolution), glutamate (1.5 {angstrom}), and NAD{sup +} (1.5 {angstrom}) were determined to obtain high-resolution views of the active site. Together, the structures show that Ser352 occupies a hydrophilic pocket and is connected via water-mediated hydrogen bonds to catalytic Cys348. Mutation of Ser352 to Leu is shown to abolish catalytic activity and eliminate NAD{sup +} binding. Analysis of the S352A mutant shows that these functional defects are caused by the introduction of the nonpolar Leu352 side chain rather than the removal of the Ser352 hydroxyl. The S352L structure shows that the mutation induces a dramatic 8-{angstrom} rearrangement of the catalytic loop. Because of this conformational change, Ser349 is not positioned to interact with the aldehyde substrate, conserved Glu447 is no longer poised to bind NAD{sup +}, and Cys348 faces the wrong direction for nucleophilic attack. These structural alterations render the enzyme inactive.

  2. The three-dimensional structural basis of type II hyperprolinemia.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Dhiraj; Singh, Ranjan K; Moxley, Michael A; Henzl, Michael T; Becker, Donald F; Tanner, John J

    2012-07-13

    Type II hyperprolinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH; also known as ALDH4A1), the aldehyde dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate. Here, we report the first structure of human P5CDH (HsP5CDH) and investigate the impact of the hyperprolinemia-associated mutation of Ser352 to Leu on the structure and catalytic properties of the enzyme. The 2. 5-Å-resolution crystal structure of HsP5CDH was determined using experimental phasing. Structures of the mutant enzymes S352A (2.4 Å) and S352L (2.85 Å) were determined to elucidate the structural consequences of altering Ser352. Structures of the 93% identical mouse P5CDH complexed with sulfate ion (1.3 Å resolution), glutamate (1.5 Å), and NAD(+) (1.5 Å) were determined to obtain high-resolution views of the active site. Together, the structures show that Ser352 occupies a hydrophilic pocket and is connected via water-mediated hydrogen bonds to catalytic Cys348. Mutation of Ser352 to Leu is shown to abolish catalytic activity and eliminate NAD(+) binding. Analysis of the S352A mutant shows that these functional defects are caused by the introduction of the nonpolar Leu352 side chain rather than the removal of the Ser352 hydroxyl. The S352L structure shows that the mutation induces a dramatic 8-Å rearrangement of the catalytic loop. Because of this conformational change, Ser349 is not positioned to interact with the aldehyde substrate, conserved Glu447 is no longer poised to bind NAD(+), and Cys348 faces the wrong direction for nucleophilic attack. These structural alterations render the enzyme inactive.

  3. Ring A of nukacin ISK-1: a lipid II-binding motif for type-A(II) lantibiotic.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad R; Nishie, Mami; Nagao, Jun-ichi; Zendo, Takeshi; Keller, Sandro; Nakayama, Jiro; Kohda, Daisuke; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2012-02-29

    Ring A of nukacin ISK-1, which is also present in different type-A(II) lantibiotics, resembles a lipid II-binding motif (TxS/TxD/EC, x denotes undefined residues) similar to that present in mersacidin (type-B lantibiotics), which suggests that nukacin ISK-1 binds to lipid II as a docking molecule. Results from our experiments on peptidoglycan precursor (UDP-MurNAc-pp) accumulation and peptide antagonism assays clearly indicated that nukacin ISK-1 inhibits cell-wall biosynthesis, accumulating lipid II precursor inside the cell, and the peptide activity can be repressed by lipid I and lipid II. Interaction analysis of nukacin ISK-1 and different ring A variants with lipid II revealed that nukacin ISK-1 and nukacin D13E (a more active variant) have a high affinity (K(D) = 0.17 and 0.19 μM, respectively) for lipid II, whereas nukacin D13A (a less active variant) showed a lower affinity, and nukacin C14S (a negative variant lacking the ring A structure) exhibited no interaction. Therefore, on the basis of the structural similarity and positional significance of the amino acids in this region, we concluded that nukacin ISK-1 binds lipid II via its ring A region and may lead to the inhibition of cell-wall biosynthesis.

  4. Dietary sodium deprivation evokes activation of brain regional neurons and down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and angiotensin-convertion enzyme mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, B; Yang, X J; Chen, K; Yang, D J; Yan, J Q

    2009-12-15

    Previous studies have indicated that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is implicated in the induction of sodium appetite in rats and that different dietary sodium intakes influence the mRNA expression of central and peripheral RAAS components. To determine whether dietary sodium deprivation activates regional brain neurons related to sodium appetite, and changes their gene expression of RAAS components of rats, the present study examined the c-Fos expression after chronic exposure to low sodium diet, and determined the relationship between plasma and brain angiotensin I (ANG I), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone (ALD) levels and the sodium ingestive behavior variations, as well as the effects of prolonged dietary sodium deprivation on ANG II type 1 (AT1) and ANG II type 2 (AT2) receptors and angiotensin-convertion enzyme (ACE) mRNA levels in the involved brain regions using the method of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results showed that the Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) expression in forebrain areas such as subfornical organ (SFO), paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei (PVN), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) all increased significantly and that the levels of ANG I, ANG II and ALD also increased in plasma and forebrain in rats fed with low sodium diet. In contrast, AT1, ACE mRNA in PVN, SON and OVLT decreased significantly in dietary sodium depleted rats, while AT2 mRNA expression did not change in the examined areas. These results suggest that many brain areas are activated by increased levels of plasma and/or brain ANG II and ALD, which underlies the elevated preference for hypertonic salt solution after prolonged exposure to low sodium diet, and that the regional AT1 and ACE mRNA are down-regulated after dietary sodium deprivation, which may be mediated by increased ANG II in plasma and/or brain tissue.

  5. Type II pyrethroid deltamethrin produces antidepressant-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Ichiro; Oose, Kyohei; Otaki, Yuki; Ihara, Daisuke; Fukuchi, Mamoru; Tabuchi, Akiko; Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Tsuda, Masaaki

    2013-11-15

    Pyrethroids, which are widely used insecticides with low acute toxicity in mammals, affect sodium channels in neurons. In primary culture of rat cortical neurons, the type II pyrethroid deltamethrin (DM) markedly enhances the expression of the mRNA of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and exerts neurotrophic effects. In this study, we investigated the antidepressant-like effect of DM in mice. The effects of DM were assessed using the forced swimming test (FST) and were compared with those of type I pyrethroid permethrin (PM). Intraperitoneal administration of DM (5 and 10mg/kg), but not of PM (10mg/kg), increased the expression of BDNF mRNA in the hippocampus. DM, but not PM, significantly decreased the immobility time in the FST, and did not affect locomotor activity and motor coordination, suggesting that DM has an antidepressant-like effect. This effect of DM was inhibited by intracerebroventricular injection of K252a, which is an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, indicating that the antidepressant-like effects of DM are mediated by BDNF/TrkB signaling pathways. Repeated administration of DM, but not of PM, also exerted antidepressant-like effects, which were long lasting. The results of the present study suggest that DM possesses antidepressant-like properties, and may be a possible source for the development of drugs to treat neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders including depression.

  6. Use of Enterally Delivered Angiotensin II Type Ia Receptor Antagonists to Reduce the Severity of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Koga, Hiroyuki; Larsen, Scott D.; Showalter, Hollis D.; Turbiak, Anjanette J.; Jin, Xiaohong; Lucas, Peter C.; Lipka, Elke; Hillfinger, John; Kim, Jae Seung

    2011-01-01

    Background Renin-angiotensin system blockade reduces inflammation in several organ systems. Having found a fourfold increase in angiotensin II type Ia receptor expression in a dextran sodium sulfate colitis model, we targeted blockade with angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists to prevent colitis development. Because hypotension is a major complication of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists use, we hypothesized that use of angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists compounds which lack cell membrane permeability, and thus enteric absorption, would allow for direct enteral delivery at far higher concentrations than would be tolerated systemically, yet retain efficacy. Methods Based on the structure of the angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist losartan, deschloro-losartan was synthesized, which has extremely poor cell membrane permeability. Angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy was evaluated by determining the ability to block NF-κB activation in vitro. Dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in mice and angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist efficacy delivered transanally was assessed. Results In vitro, deschloro-losartan demonstrated near equal angiotensin II type Ia receptor blockade compared to losartan as well as another angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist, candesartan. In the dextran sodium sulfate model, each compound significantly improved clinical and histologic scores and epithelial cell apoptosis. Abundance of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL6 mRNA were significantly decreased with each compound. In vitro and in vivo intestinal drug absorption, as well as measures of blood pressure and mucosal and colonic blood flow, showed significantly lower uptake of deschloro-losartan compared to losartan and candesartan. Conclusions This study demonstrated efficacy of high-dose angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonists in this colitis model. We postulate that a specially designed angiotensin II type Ia receptor antagonist with

  7. [Extraction, purification and identification of type II collagen from Agkistrodon acutus].

    PubMed

    Gu, Heng-Cun; Hu, Jin-Bo; Ding, Zhi-Shan; Fan, Yong-Sheng; Ding, Xing-Hong

    2013-11-01

    The object of the research was to extract, purify and identify the type II collagen of Agkistrodon acutus. Type II collagen of A. acutus was extracted by enzyme decomposition method, and purified by ion exchange column chromatography. It was characterized by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis, ultraviolet spectrophotometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy. The results showed that the size of C II was about 130 kDa. It absorbed at 223 nm. IR spectrum obtained showed that the triple helical domains of amino-acid sequences were characterized by the repetition of triplets Gly-X-Y. The MS spectrum graphically stated that C II extracted from cow and A. acutus have the similar peptides. The C II of A. acutus was obtained by extraction and purification. Appraisal analysis by SDS-PAGE, UV, IR and MS, C II of A. acutus was consistent with the standard C II of cow. It was proved that the extracted protein was C II.

  8. Increased activity of group II phospholipase A2 in plasma in rat sodium deoxycholate induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Furue, S; Hori, Y; Kuwabara, K; Ikeuchi, J; Onoyama, H; Yamamoto, M; Tanaka, K

    1997-01-01

    Background—Two different types of secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2), pancreatic group I (PLA2-I) and non-pancreatic group II (PLA2-II), have been identified and postulated to be associated with the pathogenesis of various diseases, such as acute pancreatitis, septic shock, and multiple organ failure. 
Aims—To investigate the type of secretory PLA2 responsible for its catalytic activity found in plasma and ascites of experimental acute pancreatitis. 
Methods—Acute pancreatitis of differing severity was induced by the injection of different concentrations (1% or 10%) of sodium deoxycholate (DCA) into the common biliopancreatic duct in rats, and catalytic PLA2 activity in plasma and ascites were differentiated by anti-PLA2-I antibody and specific inhibitor of PLA2-II. Survival rate and plasma amylase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were also measured.
Results—In 1% and 10% DCA induced acute pancreatitis, plasma amylase values as well as PLA2 activity in ascites were greatly increased. PLA2 activity in plasma was also notably increased in 10% DCA induced acute pancreatitis, but not in 1% DCA induced acute pancreatitis. PLA2-I specific polyclonal antibody significantly inhibited PLA2 activity in ascites but not that in plasma. In contrast, plasma PLA2 activity was completely suppressed by PLA2-II specific inhibitor. In addition, a high mortality (93% at five hours) and a significant increase in plasma AST and ALT were noted in 10% DCA induced pancreatitis. 
Conclusion—Ascites PLA2 activity is mainly derived from PLA2-I, whereas plasma PLA2 activity is mostly derived from PLA2-II in severe acute pancreatitis, suggesting that increased plasma PLA2-II activity might be implicated in hepatic failure arising after severe acute pancreatitis. 

 Keywords: acute pancreatitis; phospholipase A2; sodium deoxycholate pancreatitis; hepatic failure PMID:9462218

  9. Shaping of action potentials by type I and type II large-conductance Ca²+-activated K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, D B; Wang, B; Brenner, R

    2011-09-29

    The BK channel is a Ca(2+) and voltage-gated conductance responsible for shaping action potential waveforms in many types of neurons. Type II BK channels are differentiated from type I channels by their pharmacology and slow gating kinetics. The β4 accessory subunit confers type II properties on BK α subunits. Empirically derived properties of BK channels, with and without the β4 accessory subunit, were obtained using a heterologous expression system under physiological ionic conditions. These data were then used to study how BK channels alone (type I) and with the accessory β4 subunit (type II) modulate action potential properties in biophysical neuron models. Overall, the models support the hypothesis that it is the slower kinetics provided by the β4 subunit that endows the BK channel with type II properties, which leads to broadening of action potentials and, secondarily, to greater recruitment of SK channels reducing neuronal excitability. Two regions of parameter space distinguished type II and type I effects; one where the range of BK-activating Ca(2+) was high (>20 μM) and the other where BK-activating Ca(2+) was low (∼0.4-1.2 μM). The latter required an elevated BK channel density, possibly beyond a likely physiological range. BK-mediated sharpening of the spike waveform associated with the lack of the β4 subunit was sensitive to the properties of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels due to electrogenic effects on spike duration. We also found that depending on Ca(2+) dynamics, type II BK channels may have the ability to contribute to the medium AHP, a property not generally ascribed to BK channels, influencing the frequency-current relationship. Finally, we show how the broadening of action potentials conferred by type II BK channels can also indirectly increase the recruitment of SK-type channels decreasing the excitability of the neuron.

  10. Attenuation of angiotensin type 2 receptor function in the rostral ventrolateral medullary pressor area of the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    PubMed Central

    Kawabe, Tetsuya; Iwasa, Masamitsu; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that blockade of angiotensin II type 2 receptors (AT2Rs) in the rostral ventrolateral medullary pressor area (RVLM) may elicit sympathoexcitatory responses which are smaller in hypertensive rats compared to normotensive rats. This hypothesis was tested in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated male 14-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Age-matched male Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) and Wistar rats were used as controls. PD123319 (AT2R antagonist) was microinjected into the RVLM and mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and greater splanchnic nerve activity (GSNA) were recorded. Increases in MAP, HR and GSNA elicited by unilateral microinjections of PD123319 into the RVLM were significantly smaller in SHR when compared to those in WKY and Wistar rats. Unilateral microinjections of L-glutamate (L-Glu) into the RVLM elicited greater increases in MAP and GSNA in SHR compared to those in WKY. AT2R immunoreactivity was demonstrated in the RVLM neurons which were retrogradely labeled from the intermediolateral cell column (IML) of the spinal cord. These results indicate that AT2Rs are present on the RVLM neurons projecting to the IML and their blockade results in sympathoexcitatory responses. Activation of AT2Rs has an inhibitory influence in the RVLM and these receptors are tonically active. Attenuation of the function of AT2Rs in the RVLM may play a role in genesis and/or maintenance of hypertension in SHR. PMID:26818039

  11. Noradrenaline upregulates T-type calcium channels in rat pinealocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Seo, Jong Bae; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2015-01-01

    Our basic hypothesis is that mammalian pinealocytes have cycling electrical excitability and Ca2+ signalling that may contribute to the circadian rhythm of pineal melatonin secretion. This study asked whether the functional expression of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (CaV channels) in rat pinealocytes is changed by culturing them in noradrenaline (NA) as a surrogate for the night signal. Channel activity was assayed as ionic currents under patch clamp and as optical signals from a Ca2+-sensitive dye. Channel mRNAs were assayed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cultured without NA, pinealocytes showed only non-inactivating L-type dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca2+ current. After 24 h in NA, additional low-voltage activated transient Ca2+ current developed whose pharmacology and kinetics corresponded to a T-type CaV3.1 channel. This change was initiated by β-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A as revealed by pharmacological experiments. mRNA for CaV3.1 T-type channels became significantly elevated, but mRNA for another T-type channel and for the major L-type channel did not change. After only 8 h of NA treatment, the CaV3.1 mRNA was already elevated, but the transient Ca2+ current was not. Even a 16 h wait without NA following the 8 h NA treatment induced little additional transient current. However, these cells were somehow primed to make transient current as a second NA exposure for only 60 min sufficed to induce large T-type currents. The NA-induced T-type channel mediated an increased Ca2+ entry during short depolarizations and supported modest transient electrical responses to depolarizing stimuli. Such experiments reveal the potential for circadian regulation of excitability. PMID:25504572

  12. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent samples... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR Part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in...

  13. 33 CFR 159.126a - Suspended solids test: Type II devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suspended solids test: Type II... Suspended solids test: Type II devices. During the sewage processing test (§ 159.121) 40 effluent samples... suspended solids in accordance with 40 CFR part 136. The arithmetic mean of the total suspended solids in...

  14. Interband cascade light emitting devices based on type-II quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lin, C.H.; Murry, S.J.

    1997-06-01

    The authors discuss physical processes in the newly developed type-II interband cascade light emitting devices, and review their recent progress in the demonstration of the first type-II interband cascade lasers and the observation of interband cascade electroluminescence up to room temperature in a broad mid-infrared wavelength region (extended to 9 {mu}m).

  15. Characteristics of coronal mass ejections associated with solar frontside and backside metric Type II bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.; Sheeley, N. R.; Howard, R. A.; Michels, D. J.; Koomen, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Fast velocities of 500 km/s or greater coronal mass ejections (CME's) are compared with reported metric type II bursts to study the properties of CME's associated with coronal shocks. An earlier report of fast frontside CME's with no associated metric type II bursts is confirmed, and it is calculated that 33 + or - 15 percent of all fast frontside CME's are not associated with such bursts. Faster CME's are more likely to be associated with type II bursts, as expected from the hypothesis of piston-driven shocks. However, CME brightness and associated peak 3-cm burst intensity are also important factors, as might be inferred from the Wagner and MacQueen (1983) view of type II shocks decoupled from associated CME's. The equal visibility of solar frontside and backside CME's is used to deduce the observability of backside type II bursts. It is calculated that 23 + or - 7 percent of all backside type II bursts associated with fast CME's can be observed at the earth and that 13 + or - 4 percent of all type II bursts originate in backside flares. CME speed again is the most important factor in the obervability of backside type II bursts.

  16. 46 CFR 171.072 - Calculation of permeability for Type II subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of permeability for Type II subdivision. 171... permeability for Type II subdivision. When doing calcualtions to show compliance with § 171.070, the following uniform average permeabilities must be assumed: (a) 85 percent in the machinery space. (b) 60 percent...

  17. 46 CFR 171.072 - Calculation of permeability for Type II subdivision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of permeability for Type II subdivision. 171... Calculation of permeability for Type II subdivision. When doing calcualtions to show compliance with § 171.070, the following uniform average permeabilities must be assumed: (a) 85 percent in the machinery...

  18. Rules for distinguishing toxicants that cause type I and type II narcosis syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, G.D.; Broderius, S.J. )

    1990-07-01

    Narcosis is a nonspecific reversible state of arrested activity of protoplasmic structures caused by a wide variety of organic chemicals. The vast majority of industrial organic chemicals can be characterized by a baseline structure-toxicity relationship as developed for diverse aquatic organisms, using only the n-octanol/water partition coefficient as a descriptor. There are, however, many apparent narcotic chemicals that are more toxic than baseline narcosis predicts. Some of these chemicals have been distinguished as polar narcotics. Joint toxic theory and isobole diagrams were used to show that chemicals strictly additive with phenol were generally more toxic than predicted by narcosis I models and characterized by a different mode of action called narcosis II syndrome. This type of toxicity is exemplified by certain amides, amines, phenols, and nitrogen heterocycles. Evidence is provided that suggests that narcosis II syndrome may result from the presence of a strong hydrogen bonding group on the molecule, and narcosis I syndrome results from hydrophobic bonding of the chemical to enzymes and/or membranes. This shift in toxic action is apparently indistinguishable for narcotic chemicals with log P greater than about 2.7. General rules for selecting the appropriate models are proposed.

  19. Nucleosynthesis in the accretion disks of Type II collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2013-09-01

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside the gamma-ray burst (GRB) accretion disks formed by the Type II collapsars. In these collapsars, the core collapse of massive stars first leads to the formation of a proto-neutron star. After that, an outward moving shock triggers a successful supernova. However, the supernova ejecta lacks momentum and within a few seconds the newly formed neutron star gets transformed to a stellar mass black hole via massive fallback. The hydrodynamics of such an accretion disk formed from the fallback material of the supernova ejecta has been studied extensively in the past. We use these well-established hydrodynamic models for our accretion disk in order to understand nucleosynthesis, which is mainly advection dominated in the outer regions. Neutrino cooling becomes important in the inner disk where the temperature and density are higher. The higher the accretion rate (dot M) is, the higher the density and temperature are in the disks. We deal with accretion disks with relatively low accretion rates: 0.001 Msolar s-1 ≲ dot M ≲ 0.01 Msolar s-1 and hence these disks are predominantly advection dominated. We use He-rich and Sirich abundances as the initial condition of nucleosynthesis at the outer disk, and being equipped with the disk hydrodynamics and the nuclear network code, we study the abundance evolution as matter inflows and falls into the central object. We investigate the variation in the nucleosynthesis products in the disk with the change in the initial abundance at the outer disk and also with the change in the mass accretion rate. We report the synthesis of several unusual nuclei like 31P, 39K, 43Sc, 35Cl and various isotopes of titanium, vanadium, chromium, manganese and copper. We also confirm that isotopes of iron, cobalt, nickel, argon, calcium, sulphur and silicon get synthesized in the disk, as shown by previous authors. Much of these heavy elements thus synthesized are ejected from the disk via outflows and hence they

  20. Investigation of the Geoeffectiveness of CMEs Associated with IP Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth, V.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Wang, B.

    2015-06-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of the geoeffectiveness of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are associated with interplanetary (IP) type II bursts in Solar Cycle 23 during the period 1997 - 2008. About 47 % (109 out of 232) of IP type II bursts are found to be associated with geomagnetic storms. Of these 47 %, 27 % are associated with moderate, 14 % with intense, and 6 % with severe geomagnetic storms. We find that the IP type II bursts and their corresponding end frequencies can be used as indicators of CME geoeffectiveness: the lower the type II burst end frequency, the higher the possibility of having a stronger storm. In addition, we show that various combinations of CME remote-sensing and IP type II parameters can be used to improve geomagnetic storm forecasting.

  1. Treatment of Type II Endoleaks After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Transcaval Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mansueto, Giancarlo Cenzi, Daniela; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Petrella, Enrico; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of the note is to describe a new technique for type II endoleak treatment, using an alternative approach through femoral venous access. Three patients who developed type II endoleak after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm were treated with direct transcaval puncture and embolization inside the aneurysm sac. The detailed technique is described. All patients were treated without any complications and discharged 48 hours after the treatment. At 1 month follow-up the computed tomograph scan did not show a recurrence of a type II endoleak. The management of patients with type II endoleak is a controversial issue and different techniques have been proposed. We suggest an alternative technique for type II endoleak treatment. The feasibility and the advantages of this approach can offer new possibilities for the diagnosis as well as for the treatment of this complication.

  2. Surgery-Induced Hippocampal Angiotensin II Elevation Causes Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption via MMP/TIMP in Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengqian; Mo, Na; Li, Lunxu; Cao, Yiyun; Wang, Wenming; Liang, Yaoxian; Deng, Hui; Xing, Rui; Yang, Lin; Ni, Cheng; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    Reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been uniformly reported in several animal models of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Nevertheless, the precise mechanism underlying this occurrence remains unclear. Using an aged rat model of POCD, we investigated the dynamic changes in expression of molecules involved in BBB disintegration, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9), as well as three of their endogenous tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP-1, -2, -3), and tried to establish the correlation between MMP/TIMP balance and surgery-induced hippocampal BBB disruption. We validated the increased hippocampal expression of angiotensin II (Ang II) and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1) after surgery. We also found MMP/TIMP imbalance as early as 6 h after surgery, together with increased BBB permeability and decreased expression of Occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), as well as increased basal lamina protein laminin at 24 h postsurgery. The AT1 antagonist candesartan restored MMP/TIMP equilibrium and modulated expression of Occludin and laminin, but not ZO-1, thereby improving BBB permeability. These events were accompanied by suppression of the surgery-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation cascade. Nevertheless, AT1 antagonism did not affect nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that surgery-induced Ang II release impairs BBB integrity by activating NF-κB signaling and disrupting downstream MMP/TIMP balance via AT1 receptor. PMID:27199659

  3. Notch maintains Drosophila type II neuroblasts by suppressing expression of the Fez transcription factor Earmuff.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaosu; Xie, Yonggang; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-07-15

    Notch signaling is crucial for maintaining neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and heterogeneity; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In Drosophila, loss of Notch prematurely terminates the self-renewal of larval type II neuroblasts (NBs, the Drosophila NSCs) and transforms type II NBs into type I NBs. Here, we demonstrate that Notch maintains type II NBs by suppressing the activation of earmuff (erm) by Pointed P1 (PntP1). We show that loss of Notch or components of its canonical pathway leads to PntP1-dependent ectopic Erm expression in type II NBs. Knockdown of Erm significantly rescues the loss-of-Notch phenotypes, and misexpression of Erm phenocopies the loss of Notch. Ectopically expressed Erm promotes the transformation of type II NBs into type I NBs by inhibiting PntP1 function and expression in type II NBs. Our work not only elucidates a key mechanism of Notch-mediated maintenance of type II NB self-renewal and identity, but also reveals a novel function of Erm.

  4. Pharmacodynamics of Glucose Regulation by Methylprednisolone. II. Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jin Y.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A physiologic pharmacodynamic model was developed to jointly describe the effects of methylprednisolone (MPL) on adrenal suppression and glycemic control in normal rats. Six groups of animals were given MPL intravenously at 0, 10 and 50 mg/kg, or by subcutaneous 7 day infusion at rates of 0, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg/h. Plasma concentrations of MPL, corticosterone (CST), glucose and insulin were determined at various times up to 72 h after injection and 336 h after infusion. The pharmacokinetics of MPL was described by a two-compartment model. A circadian rhythm for CST was found in untreated rats with a stress-altered baseline caused by handling, which was captured by a circadian harmonic secretion rate with an increasing mesor. All drug treatments caused CST suppression. Injection of MPL caused temporary increases in glucose over 4 h. Insulin secretion was thereby stimulated yielding a later peak around 6 h. In turn, insulin can normalize glucose. However, long-term dosing caused continuous hyperglycemia during and after infusion. Hyperinsulinemia was achieved during infusion, but diminished immediately after dosing despite the high glucose concentration. The effects of CST and MPL on glucose production were described with a competitive stimulation function. A disease progression model incorporating reduced endogenous glucose uptake/utilization was used to describe glucose metabolism under different treatments. The results exemplify the roles of endogenous and exogenous hormones in mediating glucose dynamics. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model is valuable for quantitating diabetogenic effects of corticosteroid treatments and provides mechanistic insights into the hormonal control of the metabolic system. PMID:19156669

  5. Diverse effects of type II collagen on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Li-Hsuan; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Huang, Huei-Mei; Leu, Sy-Jye; Yang, Charng-Bin; Tsai, Yu-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Type II collagen is known to modulate chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In this study, MSCs from human bone marrow aspirates were used to study the modulating effects of type II collagen on MSC differentiation during the early stages of osteogenesis and adipogenesis. With osteogenic induction, MSCs cultured on the type II collagen-coated surface showed an enhanced calcium deposition level with increasing mRNA expressions of RUNX2, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. A synthetic integrin binding peptide, which specifically interacts with the I-domain of α(1)β(1)/α(2)β(1) integrins significantly blocks the mineralization-enhancing effect of type II collagen. MSCs attached on the type II collagen-coated plates exhibited expanded cell morphology with increasing spreading area, and the pretreatment of cells with integrin α(1)β(1) or α(2)β(1)-blocking antibody reduced the effect. The phosphorylation levels of FAK, ERK, and JNK significantly increased in the MSCs that attached on the type II collagen-coated plates. On the contrary, the mineralization-enhancing effect of type II collagen was diminished by JNK and MEK inhibitors. Furthermore, type II collagen blocked the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs, and this effect is rescued by JNK and MEK inhibitors. In conclusion, type II collagen facilitates osteogenesis and suppresses adipogenesis during early stage MSC differentiation. Such effects are integrin binding-mediated and conducted through FAK-JNK and/or FAK-ERK signaling cascades. These results inspire a novel strategy encompassing type II collagen in bone tissue engineering.

  6. Cardiovascular effects of native and non-native urotensin II and urotensin II-related peptide on rat and salmon hearts.

    PubMed

    Prosser, H C G; Leprince, J; Vaudry, H; Richards, A M; Forster, M E; Pemberton, C J

    2006-12-01

    Urotensin II (UII) was first discovered in the urophyses of goby fish and later identified in mammals, while urotensin II-related peptide (URP) was recently isolated from rat brain. We studied the effects of UII on isolated heart preparations of Chinook salmon and Sprague-Dawley rats. Native rat UII caused potent and sustained, dose-dependent dilation of the coronary arteries in the rat, whereas non-native UII (human and trout UII) showed attenuated vasodilation. Rat URP dilated rat coronary arteries, with 10-fold less potency compared with rUII. In salmon, native trout UII caused sustained dilation of the coronary arteries, while rat UII and URP caused significant constriction. Nomega-nitro-(l)-arginine methyl (l-NAME) and indomethacin significantly attenuated the URP and rat UII-induced vasodilation in the rat heart. We conclude that UII is a coronary vasodilator, an action that is species form specific. We also provide the first evidence for cardiac actions of URP, possibly via mechanisms common with UII.

  7. Swimming training prevents fat deposition and decreases angiotensin II-induced coronary vasoconstriction in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Endlich, Patrick Wander; Claudio, Erick Roberto Gonçalves; da Silva Gonçalves, Washington Luiz; Gouvêa, Sonia Alves; Moysés, Margareth Ribeiro; de Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic swimming training (ST) on the deposition of abdominal fat and vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II (ANG II) in the coronary arterial bed of estrogen deficient rats. Twenty-eight 3-month old Wistar female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary sham (SS), sedentary-ovariectomized (SO), swimming-trained sham (STS) and swimming-trained ovariectomized (STO). ST protocol consisted of a continuous 60-min session, with a 5% BW load attached to the tail, completed 5 days/week for 8-weeks. The retroperitoneal, parametrial, perirenal and inguinal fat pads were measured. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR), coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and a concentration-response curve to ANG II in the coronary bed was constructed using the Langendorff preparation. Ovariectomy (OVX) significantly reduced 17-β-estradiol plasma levels in SO and STO groups (p<0.05). The STO group had a significantly reduced retroperitoneal and parametrial fat pad compared with the SO group (p<0.05). IHR values were similar in all groups; however, baseline CPP was significantly reduced in the SO, STS and STO groups compared with the SS group (p<0.05). ANG II caused vasoconstriction in the coronary bed in a concentration-dependent manner. The SO group had an increased response to ANG II when compared with all other experimental groups (p<0.05), which was prevented by 8-weeks of ST in the STO group (p<0.05). OVX increased ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in the coronary vascular bed and abdominal fat pad deposition. Eight weeks of swimming training improved these vasoconstrictor effects and decreased abdominal fat deposition in ovariectomized rats.

  8. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-12-16

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. RESULTS Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. CONCLUSIONS SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis.

  9. Substance P Inhibits the Collagen Synthesis of Rat Myocardial Fibroblasts Induced by Ang II

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xinzhong; Guo, Naipeng; Li, Bin; Zhao, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the regulating effects of Substance P (SP) on the collagen synthesis of rat myocardial fibroblasts (CFBs) induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and its potential mechanism. Material/Methods The CFBs of a neonatal SD rat were separately cultured and divided into the control group, Ang II treatment group, and treatment groups with different concentrations of SP, Ang II +; each group was given corresponding treatment respectively. Results Ang II successfully induced the collagen synthesis of CFBs. Compared with the control group, the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β, erk, and smad2/3 were higher (p<0.05). Different concentrations of SP had an effect on Ang II-induced CFBs, reduced the collagen synthesis of CFBs, and increased the expressions of SP receptors, accompanied by lowering TGF-β protein, erk protein phosphorylation level, and smad2/3 protein phosphorylation level (p<0.05). Moreover, the higher the concentrations of SP, the more obvious of an effect it exerted. Treating the Ang II + SP group with aprepitant reduced the inhibiting effects of SP on collagen synthesis. The expression changes of collagen I and collagen III detected by immunocytochemistry were exactly in accordance with the results of qPCR and Western blotting. Conclusions SP can inhibit collagen synthesis of CFBs after Ang II inducing which may adjust the downstream signaling pathways associated protein including TGF-β, erk and smad2/3. SP can block the progress of myocardial fibrosis and is dose dependent, which is expected to be a promising target for the treatment of myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27980320

  10. Regional differences of type II collagen synthesis in the human temporomandibular joint disc: immunolocalization study of carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (chondrocalcin).

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Toshirou; Hamada, Yoshiki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kikuchi, Toshiyuki; Fujikawa, Kyousuke; Seto, Kannichi

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the regional differences of distribution of the carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL-II-C; chondrocalcin) as markers of cartilaginous expression in the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc. Twelve human TMJ discs without morphologic abnormalities were obtained from 12 fresh cadavers. All specimens were analysed for pCOL-II-C expression using polyclonal rabbit anti-human pCOL-II-C antibody in avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining. The results were demonstrated that the percentage of pCOL-II-C immunoreactive disc cells was significantly higher in the outer part (the articular surfaces) than in the inner part (the deep central areas) of the disc. These findings suggest that the tissue heterogeneity of cartilaginous expression reflects the functional demands of the remodelling process in the human TMJ disc.

  11. Angiotensin-II mediates ACE2 Internalization and Degradation through an Angiotensin-II type I receptor-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lazartigues, Eric; Filipeanu, Catalin M.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) is a pivotal component of the renin-angiotensin system, promoting the conversion of Angiotensin (Ang)-II to Ang-(1-7). We previously reported that decreased ACE2 expression and activity contribute to the development of Ang-II-mediated hypertension in mice. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in ACE2 down-regulation during neurogenic hypertension. In ACE2-transfected Neuro-2A cells, Ang-II treatment resulted in a significant attenuation of ACE2 enzymatic activity. Examination of the subcellular localization of ACE2 revealed that Ang-II treatment leads to ACE2 internalization and degradation into lysosomes. These effects were prevented by both the Ang-II type 1 receptor (AT1R) blocker losartan and the lysosomal inhibitor leupeptin. In contrast, in HEK293T cells, which lack endogenous AT1R, Ang-II failed to promote ACE2 internalization. Moreover, this effect could be induced after AT1R transfection. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that AT1R and ACE2 form complexes and these interactions were decreased by Ang-II treatment, which also enhanced ACE2 ubiquitination. In contrast, ACE2 activity was not changed by transfection of AT2 or Mas receptors. In vivo, Ang-II-mediated hypertension was blunted by chronic infusion of leupeptin in wildtype C57Bl/6, but not in ACE2 knockout mice. Overall, this is the first demonstration that elevated Ang-II levels reduce ACE2 expression and activity by stimulation of lysosomal degradation through an AT1R-dependent mechanism. PMID:25225202

  12. Valsartan ameliorates ageing-induced aorta degeneration via angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated ERK activity.

    PubMed

    Shan, HaiYan; Zhang, Siyang; Li, Xuelian; Yu, Kai; Zhao, Xin; Chen, Xinyue; Jin, Bo; Bai, XiaoJuan

    2014-06-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays important roles in ageing-related disorders through its type 1 receptor (AT1 R). However, the role and underlying mechanisms of AT1R in ageing-related vascular degeneration are not well understood. In this study, 40 ageing rats were randomly divided into two groups: ageing group which received no treatment (ageing control), and valsartan group which took valsartan (selective AT1R blocker) daily for 6 months. 20 young rats were used as adult control. The aorta structure were analysed by histological staining and electron microscopy. Bcl-2/Bax expression in aorta was analysed by immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The expressions of AT1 R, AT2 R and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were detected. Significant structural degeneration of aorta in the ageing rats was observed, and the degeneration was remarkably ameliorated by long-term administration of valsartan. With ageing, the expression of AT1R was elevated, the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax was decreased and meanwhile, an important subgroup of MAPKs, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity was elevated. However, these changes in ageing rats could be reversed to some extent by valsartan. In vitro experiments observed consistent results as in vivo study. Furthermore, ERK inhibitor could also acquire partial effects as valsartan without affecting AT1R expression. The results indicated that AT1R involved in the ageing-related degeneration of aorta and AT1R-mediated ERK activity was an important mechanism underlying the process.

  13. Relaxin Treatment in an Ang-II-Based Transgenic Preeclamptic-Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nadine; Golic, Michaela; Herse, Florian; Rugor, Julianna; Linz, Dominik; Solano, Maria Emilia; Müller, Dominik N.; Dechend, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Relaxin is a peptide related to pregnancy that induces nitric oxide-related and gelatinase-related effects, allowing vasodilation and pregnancy-related adjustments permitting parturition to occur. Relaxin controls the hemodynamic and renovascular adaptive changes that occur during pregnancy. Interest has evolved regarding relaxin and a therapeutic principle in preeclampsia and heart failure. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder, featuring hypertension, proteinuria and placental anomalies. We investigated relaxin in an established transgenic rat model of preeclampsia, where the phenotype is induced by angiotensin (Ang)-II production in mid pregnancy. We gave recombinant relaxin to preeclamtic rats at day 9 of gestation. Hypertension and proteinuria was not ameliorated after relaxin administration. Intrauterine growth retardation of the fetus was unaltered by relaxin. Heart-rate responses and relaxin levels documented drug effects. In this Ang-II-based model of preeclampsia, we could not show a salubrious effect on preeclampsia. PMID:26963382

  14. BMP type I receptor ALK2 is required for angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Mohd; Spagnolli, Ester; Ernande, Laura; Thoonen, Robrecht; Kolodziej, Starsha A; Leyton, Patricio A; Cheng, Juan; Tainsh, Robert E T; Mayeur, Claire; Rhee, David K; Wu, Mei X; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Buys, Emmanuel S; Zapol, Warren M; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B

    2016-04-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling contributes to the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the identity of the BMP type I receptor involved in cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. By using quantitative PCR and immunoblotting, we demonstrated that BMP signaling increased during phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs), as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of Smads 1 and 5 and induction of Id1 gene expression. Inhibition of BMP signaling with LDN193189 or noggin, and silencing of Smad 1 or 4 using small interfering RNA diminished the ability of phenylephrine to induce hypertrophy in NRCs. Conversely, activation of BMP signaling with BMP2 or BMP4 induced hypertrophy in NRCs. Luciferase reporter assay further showed that BMP2 or BMP4 treatment of NRCs repressed atrogin-1 gene expression concomitant with an increase in calcineurin protein levels and enhanced activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells, providing a mechanism by which BMP signaling contributes to cardiac hypertrophy. In a model of cardiac hypertrophy, C57BL/6 mice treated with angiotensin II (A2) had increased BMP signaling in the left ventricle. Treatment with LDN193189 attenuated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and collagen deposition in left ventricles. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of BMP type I receptor ALK2 (activin-like kinase 2), but not ALK1 or ALK3, inhibited BMP signaling and mitigated A2-induced cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular fibrosis in mice. The results suggest that BMP signaling upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cell pathway via BMP type I receptor ALK2, contributing to cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis.

  15. Interfacial strain effect on type-I and type-II core/shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheshlaghi, Negar; Pisheh, Hadi Sedaghat; Karim, M. Rezaul; Malkoc, Derya; Ünlü, Hilmi

    2016-09-01

    A comparative experimental and theoretical study on the calculation of capped core diameter in ZnSe/ZnS, CdSe/Cd(Zn)S type-I and ZnSe/CdS type-II core/shell nanocrystals is presented. The lattice mismatch induced interface strain between core and shell was calculated from continuum elastic theory and applied in effective mass approximation method to obtain the corresponding capped core diameter. The calculated results were compared with diameter of bare cores (CdSe and ZnSe) from transmission electron microscopy images to obtain the amount of the stretched or squeezed core after deposition of tensile or compressive shells. The result of the study showed that the core is squeezed in ZnSe/ZnS and CdSe/Cd(Zn)S after compressive shell and stretched in ZnSe/CdS after tensile shell deposition. The stretched and squeezed amount of the capped core found to be in proportion with lattice mismatch amount in the core/shell structure.

  16. The biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan enhances the oral tolerance to type II collagen

    PubMed Central

    Porporatto, C; Canali, M M; Bianco, I D; Correa, S G

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan is a mucoadhesive polysaccharide that promotes the transmucosal absorption of peptides and proteins. At mucosal sites chitosan exhibits immunomodulatory activities and stimulates the release of regulatory cytokines. Herein we evaluated the effect of the co-administration of chitosan in the tolerance to type II collagen (CII) using an experimental model of arthritis. Rats were fed diluent (acetic acid), 1 mg CII, 1 mg chitosan or 1 mg CII + 1 mg chitosan during 5 days before immunization with CII in Freund's complete adjuvant. Systemic effects were evaluated in draining lymph nodes after antigenic challenge or during the clinical evolution of arthritis. Specific antibodies, proliferation against CII and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin-10 were assessed. Clinical signs were observed 13–15 days after primary immunization. The CII : chitosan group presented the lowest incidence and developed moderate arthritis, with reduced levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a anti-CII, a limited proliferation in draining lymph nodes and a lower release of IFN-γ after restimulation with CII. Our results demonstrate that chitosan enhances the tolerance to an articular antigen with a decrease in the inflammatory responses and, as a consequence, an improvement in clinical signs. PMID:19076832

  17. Studies on the topology of the renal type II NaPi-cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Lambert, G; Traebert, M; Hernando, N; Biber, J; Murer, H

    1999-05-01

    The rat type II sodium/phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-2) is a 85- to 90-kDa glycosylated protein located at the proximal tubular brush border membrane. Hydropathy predictions suggest eight transmembrane domains (sTM) with a large glycosylated loop between sTM 3 and sTM 4. We have studied the membrane topology of NaPi-2 expressed in oocytes. A 33-amino-acid fragment containing the FLAG epitope was inserted into seven loops connecting the sTMs and into the NH2- and COOH-ends of the protein. FLAG-antibody binding suggested that the loops connecting sTM 1 and sTM 2 as well as sTM 3 and sTM 4 are located extracellularly. Based on the lack of FLAG-antibody binding we suggest intracellular locations for the NH2- and COOH-termini and the region connecting sTM 4 and sTM 5. Immunoprecipitation studies of in vitro translated protein also suggest that the NH2-terminus is sited extracellularly. In immunohistochemical studies with NaPi-2-transfected MDCK cells, an interaction with NH2- and COOH- terminal antipeptide antibodies could only be obtained after membrane permeabilization. The presented data are an experimental documentation of the intracellular location of the NH2- and COOH-termini, and of the extracellular location of extracellular loops 1 and 2.

  18. Developmental Toxicity (Segment II) Study of WR238605 Succinate in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-04

    vehicle control or WR238605 Succinate treated groups. The use of Vitamin A (Retinol Palmitate) as a positive control agent was effective in producing a...ACCESSION NO. 073 [11. TITLE ( Include Security Classification) Developmental Toxicity (Segment II) Study of WR238605 Succinate in Rats ]\\2...ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Unclassified i 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL Barrv S. IPvinP 22b. TELEPHONE ( Include Area Code) (312

  19. Developmental Toxicity of OTTO Fuel II in the Rat and Rabbit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    metabolism in the evaluated by Smith in 1953.’ In this study , 20 male blood, in vitro studies indicate that this metabolism and female rats were...48 torpedoes. - I Owing to the possibility of human exposure during fueling and defueling operations, studies were initiated - to determine if OFII...Additional studies by Clark indicated that ca. 10% of topically applied PGDN is absorbed through the skin of this OTTO Fuel II (OFII) is composed of 76

  20. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes are coupled with distinct signal-transduction mechanisms in neurons and astrocytes from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Wei Tang; Zelezna, B.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Both neurons and astrocytes contain specific receptors for angiotensin II (AII). The authors used selective ligands for the AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} types of AII receptors to investigate the expression of functional receptor subtypes in astrocyte cultures and neuron cultures from 1-day-old (neonatal) rat brain. In astrocyte cultures, competition of {sup 125}I-labeled AII ({sup 125}I-AII) specific binding with AT{sub 1} (DuP753) or AT{sub 2} {l brace}PD123177, CGP42112A, (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII{r brace} selective receptor ligands revealed a potency series of AII > DuP753 > > > CGP42112A > (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII > PD123177. These results suggest a predominance of the AT{sub 1} receptor subtype in neonatal astrocytes. {sup 125}I-AII specific binding to neonate neuronal cultures was reduced 73-84% by 1 {mu} MPD123177, and the residual {sup 125}I-AII specific binding was eliminated by DuP753. The results suggest that astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brains contain predominantly AT{sub 1} receptors that are coupled to a stimulation of inositophospholipid hydrolysis. In contrast, neuron cultures from neonatal rat brain contain mostly AT{sub 2} receptors that are coupled to a reduction in basal cGMP levels, but a smaller population of AT{sub 1} receptors is also present in these neurons.

  1. Receptor for detection of a Type II sex pheromone in the winter moth Operophtera brumata

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Hong-Lei; Schultze, Anna; Froß, Heidrun; Francke, Wittko; Krieger, Jürgen; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-01-01

    How signal diversity evolves under stabilizing selection in a pheromone-based mate recognition system is a conundrum. Female moths produce two major types of sex pheromones, i.e., long-chain acetates, alcohols and aldehydes (Type I) and polyenic hydrocarbons and epoxides (Type II), along different biosynthetic pathways. Little is known on how male pheromone receptor (PR) genes evolved to perceive the different pheromones. We report the identification of the first PR tuned to Type II pheromones, namely ObruOR1 from the winter moth, Operophtera brumata (Geometridae). ObruOR1 clusters together with previously ligand-unknown orthologues in the PR subfamily for the ancestral Type I pheromones, suggesting that O. brumata did not evolve a new type of PR to match the novel Type II signal but recruited receptors within an existing PR subfamily. AsegOR3, the ObruOR1 orthologue previously cloned from the noctuid Agrotis segetum that has Type I acetate pheromone components, responded significantly to another Type II hydrocarbon, suggesting that a common ancestor with Type I pheromones had receptors for both types of pheromones, a preadaptation for detection of Type II sex pheromone. PMID:26729427

  2. Receptor for detection of a Type II sex pheromone in the winter moth Operophtera brumata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Hong-Lei; Schultze, Anna; Froß, Heidrun; Francke, Wittko; Krieger, Jürgen; Löfstedt, Christer

    2016-01-05

    How signal diversity evolves under stabilizing selection in a pheromone-based mate recognition system is a conundrum. Female moths produce two major types of sex pheromones, i.e., long-chain acetates, alcohols and aldehydes (Type I) and polyenic hydrocarbons and epoxides (Type II), along different biosynthetic pathways. Little is known on how male pheromone receptor (PR) genes evolved to perceive the different pheromones. We report the identification of the first PR tuned to Type II pheromones, namely ObruOR1 from the winter moth, Operophtera brumata (Geometridae). ObruOR1 clusters together with previously ligand-unknown orthologues in the PR subfamily for the ancestral Type I pheromones, suggesting that O. brumata did not evolve a new type of PR to match the novel Type II signal but recruited receptors within an existing PR subfamily. AsegOR3, the ObruOR1 orthologue previously cloned from the noctuid Agrotis segetum that has Type I acetate pheromone components, responded significantly to another Type II hydrocarbon, suggesting that a common ancestor with Type I pheromones had receptors for both types of pheromones, a preadaptation for detection of Type II sex pheromone.

  3. Achondrogenesis: a review with special consideration of achondrogenesis type II (Langer-Saldino).

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Liu, C T; Yang, S S

    1981-01-01

    We describe two dwarfed infants with large head, short neck and chest, prominent abdomen, and short limbs. Both died neonatally. Radiographic and morphologic characteristics identified the Langer-Saldino form of achondrogenesis (type II). Review of type II achondrogenesis documented distinctive clinical and anthropometric manifestations (fewer stillbirths, longer survival time and gestation period, larger size of the baby, longer limbs, and characteristic craniofacial features) as compared with type I achondrogenesis (Parenti-Fraccaro).

  4. Alteration of sequence specificity of the type II restriction endonuclease HincII through an indirect readout mechanism.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hemant K; Etzkorn, Christopher; Chatwell, Lorentz; Bitinaite, Jurate; Horton, Nancy C

    2006-08-18

    The functional and structural consequences of a mutation of the DNA intercalating residue of HincII, Q138F, are presented. Modeling has suggested that the DNA intercalation by Gln-138 results in DNA distortions potentially used by HincII in indirect readout of its cognate DNA, GTYRAC (Y = C or T, R = A or G) (Horton, N. C., Dorner, L. F., and Perona, J. J. (2002) Nat. Struct. Biol. 9, 42-47). Kinetic data presented here indicate that the mutation of glutamine 138 to phenylalanine (Q138F) results in a change in sequence specificity at the center two base pairs of the cognate recognition site. We show that the preference of HincII for cutting, but not binding, the three cognate sites differing in the center two base pairs has been altered by the mutation Q138F. Five new crystal structures are presented including Q138F HincII bound to GTTAAC and GTCGAC both with and without Ca2+ as well as the structure of wild type HincII bound to GTTAAC. The Q138F HincII/DNA structures show conformational changes in the protein, bound DNA, and at the protein-DNA interface, consistent with the formation of adaptive complexes. Analysis of these structures and the effect of Ca2+ binding on the protein-DNA interface illuminates the origin of the altered specificity by the mutation Q138F in the HincII enzyme.

  5. Development of type-I/type-II hybrid dye sensitizer with both pyridyl group and catechol unit as anchoring group for type-I/type-II dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Ooyama, Yousuke; Furue, Kensuke; Enoki, Toshiaki; Kanda, Masahiro; Adachi, Yohei; Ohshita, Joji

    2016-11-09

    A type-I/type-II hybrid dye sensitizer with a pyridyl group and a catechol unit as the anchoring group has been developed and its photovoltaic performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is investigated. The sensitizer has the ability to adsorb on a TiO2 electrode through both the coordination bond at Lewis acid sites and the bidentate binuclear bridging linkage at Brønsted acid sites on the TiO2 surface, which makes it possible to inject an electron into the conduction band of the TiO2 electrode by the intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) excitation (type-I pathway) and by the photoexcitation of the dye-to-TiO2 charge transfer (DTCT) band (type-II pathway). It was found that the type-I/type-II hybrid dye sensitizer adsorbed on TiO2 film exhibits a broad photoabsorption band originating from ICT and DTCT characteristics. Here we reveal the photophysical and electrochemical properties of the type-I/type-II hybrid dye sensitizer bearing a pyridyl group and a catechol unit, along with its adsorption modes onto TiO2 film, and its photovoltaic performance in type-I/type-II DSSC, based on optical (photoabsorption and fluorescence spectroscopy) and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry), density functional theory (DFT) calculation, FT-IR spectroscopy of the dyes adsorbed on TiO2 film, photocurrent-voltage (I-V) curves, incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) spectra, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for DSSC.

  6. Functionalized fullerenes mediate photodynamic killing of cancer cells: Type I versus Type II photochemical mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mroz, Pawel; Pawlak, Anna; Satti, Minahil; Lee, Haeryeon; Wharton, Tim; Gali, Hariprasad; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) and harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and kill cells. Most clinically studied PS are based on the tetrapyrrole structure of porphyrins, chlorins and related molecules, but new non-tetrapyrrole PS are being sought. Fullerenes are soccer-ball shaped molecules composed of sixty or seventy carbon atoms and have attracted interest in connection with the search for biomedical applications of nanotechnology. Fullerenes are biologically inert unless derivatized with functional groups, whereupon they become soluble and can act as PS. We have compared the photodynamic activity of six functionalized fullerenes with 1, 2, or 3 hydrophilic or 1, 2, or 3 cationic groups. The octanol-water partition coefficients were determined and the relative contributions of Type I photochemistry (photogeneration of superoxide in the presence of NADH) and Type II photochemistry (photogeneration of singlet oxygen) were studied by measurement of oxygen consumption, 1270-nm luminescence and EPR spin-trapping of the superoxide product. We studied three mouse cancer cell lines: (J774, LLC and CT26) incubated for 24 h with fullerenes and illuminated with white light. The order of effectiveness as PS was inversely proportional to the degree of substitution of the fullerene nucleus for both the neutral and cationic series. The mono-pyrrolidinium fullerene was the most active PS against all cell lines and induced apoptosis 4–6 hours after illumination. It produced diffuse intracellular fluorescence when dichlorodihydrofluorescein was added as an ROS probe suggesting a Type I mechanism for phototoxicity. We conclude that certain functionalized fullerenes have potential as novel PDT agents and phototoxicity may be mediated both by superoxide and by singlet oxygen. PMID:17664135

  7. Characteristics of flares producing metric type II bursts and coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Howard, R. A.; Michels, D. J.; Koomen, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to study the origin of coronal shocks by comparing several flare characteristics for two groups of flares: those with associated metric type II bursts and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and those with associated metric type II bursts but no CMEs. CMEs accompany about 60 percent of all flares with type II bursts for solar longitudes greater than 30 deg, where CMEs are well observed with the NRL Solwind coronagraph. H-alpha flare areas, 1-8 A X-ray fluxes, and impulsive 3-cm fluxes are all statistically smaller for events with no CMEs than for events with CMEs. It appears that both compact and large mass ejection flares are associated with type II bursts. The events with no CMEs imply that at least many type II shocks are not piston-driven, but the large number of events of both groups with small 3 cm bursts does not support the usual assumption that type II shocks are produced by large energy releases in flare impulsive phases. The poor correlation between 3 cm burst fluxes and the occurrence of type II bursts may be due to large variations in the coronal Alfven velocity.

  8. Mechanism of adrenal angiotensin II receptor changes after nephrectomy in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J G

    1981-01-01

    At 48 h after bilateral nephrectomy in rats there is a two- to threefold increase in the number of adrenal angiotensin II receptors and a decrease in Kd of smooth muscle angiotensin II receptors. These changes have been attributed to the absence of circulating angiotensin II. Serum K+, which increases after nephrectomy may be an important and overlooked modulator. Therefore, the present experiments were designed to assess the role of K+ as a regulator of angiotensin II receptors after nephrectomy. Serum K+ was controlled with Na polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate), a resin designed to exchange Na+ for K+ in the gastrointestinal tract. Acutely nephrectomized rats were divided into two groups: experimental animals received Kayexalate resin every 12 h for four doses, and controls received Kayexalate exchanged with KCl in vitro before gavage. There was a significant positive correlation serum K+ and aldosterone (r = 0.78, P less than 0.001). Kayexalate maintained a normal serum K+ of 5.9 +/- 0.2 meq/liter (n = 27), aldosterone 25 +/- 3 ng/dl (n = 27) and adrenal receptor concentration of 934 +/- 156 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). Control animals had significantly higher serum K+ of 10.5 +/- 0.4 meq/liter (n = 23), aldosterone 435 +/- 32 (n = 23), and adrenal receptors of 2726 +/- 235 fmol/mg protein (n = 4). There was a linear relationship between serum K+ and number of adrenal receptors (r = 0.87). No such relationship was present in uterine smooth muscle. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that K+ modulates the number of adrenal but not smooth muscle angiotensin II receptors after nephrectomy. This is the first evidence that potassium modulates angiotensin II receptors independently of changes in angiotensin II blood levels. PMID:6259213

  9. THE CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE UV AND OPTICAL Fe ii EMISSION LINES IN TYPE 1 AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacević-Dojcinović, Jelena; Popović, Luka Č. E-mail: lpopovic@aob.bg.ac.rs

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the spectral properties of the UV (λλ2650–3050 Å) and optical (λλ4000–5500 Å) Fe ii emission features in a sample of 293 Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database. We explore different correlations between their emission line properties, as well as the correlations with other emission lines from the spectral range. We find several interesting correlations and outline the most interesting results as follows. (i) There is a kinematical connection between the UV and optical Fe ii lines, indicating that the UV and optical Fe ii lines originate from the outer part of the broad line region, the so-called intermediate line region. (ii) The unexplained anticorrelations of the optical Fe ii equivalent width (EW Fe ii{sub opt}) versus EW [O iii] 5007 Å and EW Fe ii{sub opt} versus FWHM Hβ have not been detected for the UV Fe ii lines. (iii) The significant averaged redshift in the UV Fe ii lines, which is not present in optical Fe ii, indicates an inflow in the UV Fe ii emitting clouds, and probably their asymmetric distribution. (iv) Also, we confirm the anticorrelation between the intensity ratio of the optical and UV Fe ii lines and the FWHM of Hβ, and we find the anticorrelations of this ratio with the widths of Mg ii 2800 Å, optical Fe ii, and UV Fe ii. This indicates a very important role for the column density and microturbulence in the emitting gas. We discuss the starburst activity in high-density regions of young AGNs as a possible explanation of the detected optical Fe ii correlations and intensity line ratios of the UV and optical Fe ii lines.

  10. Effectiveness of cervical hemilaminectomy in canine Hansen Type I and Type II disc disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Oliver; Golini, Lorenzo; Steffen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Medical records of 41 dogs, including 15 small breed dogs (<15 kg) and 26 large breed dogs (>15 kg), with cervical intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) that underwent a hemilaminectomy were reviewed. Dogs were diagnosed using myelography, computed tomography/myelography, or MRI, and dogs were classified as having either Hansen Type I disc extrusion or Hansen Type II disc protrusion located ventrally, ventrolaterally, or laterally within the cervical spinal canal. The most common clinical presentation was ambulatory tetraparesis and/or lameness (44%). The most affected sites for cervical IVDD were between the sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae (C6-C7; 78% of Hansen Type II discs) and C2-C3 (86% of Hansen Type I discs). Treatment was effective in 88% of dogs. Five large breed dogs (12%) did not improve. In dogs with a Hansen Type I disc extrusion, clinical signs improved in 96% of the cases. In dogs with a Hansen Type II disc protrusion, an excellent and good outcome was seen in 47% and 32% of cases, respectively. Outcome was significantly better for small breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type I disc disease compared with large breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type II disc disease.

  11. Computer simulation of vortex pinning in type II superconductors. II. Random point pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, E. H.

    1983-10-01

    Pinning of vortices in a type II superconductor by randomly positioned identical point pins is simulated using the two-dimensional method described in a previous paper (Part I). The system is characterized by the vortex and pin numbers ( N v , N p ), the vortex and pin interaction ranges ( R v , R p ), and the amplitude of the pin potential A p . The computation is performed for many cases: dilute or dense, sharp or soft, attractive or repulsive, weak or strong pins, and ideal or amorphous vortex lattice. The total pinning force F as a function of the mean vortex displacement X increases first linearly (over a distance usually much smaller than the vortex spacing and than R p ) and then saturates, fluctuating about its averagebar F. We interpretbar F as the maximum pinning force j c B of a large specimen. For weak pins the prediction of Larkin and Ovchinnikov for two-dimensional collective pinning is confirmed:bar F=const·bar W/ R p c 66, wherebar W is the mean square pinning force and c 66 is the shear modulus of the vortex lattice. If the initial vortex lattice is chosen highly defective (“amorphous”) the constant is 1.3 3 times larger than for the ideal triangular lattice. This finding may explain the often observed “history effect”. The functionbar F( A p ) exhibits a jump, which for dilute, sharp, attractive pins occurs close to the “threshold value” predicted for isolated pins by Labusch. This jump reflects the onset of plastic deformation of the vortex lattice, and in some cases of vortex trapping, but is not a genuine threshold. For strong pinsbar F˜( N p bar W)1/2 approaches the direct summation limit. For both weak and strong pinning j c B is related to the mean square actual (not maximum) force of each pin. This mean square in general is not proportional to A {/p 2} but, due to relaxation of the vortex lattice, may be smaller or larger than its rigid-lattice limit. Therefore, simple power laws j c ˜ n p A {/p 2} or j c ˜ n p A p in

  12. Shock-associated kilometric radio emission and solar metric type II bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.

    1989-01-01

    New criteria are used here to select and study the properties of shock-associated (SA) kilometric bursts. Nearly half of all intense metric type II bursts were temporally associated with 1980 kHz emission which was not attributable to metric type III bursts. A quarter of all intense type II bursts are not associated with any significant 1980 kHz emission and another quarter are accompanied by 1980 kHz emission presumed due to type II bursts. The SA bursts are generally not well correlated with microwave flux-density profiles but compare more closely with the most intense and structured parts of the profiles of metric type II bursts. These results imply that the SA emission is due primarily to energetic electrons accelerated at the associated shock.

  13. Quantum cascade light emitting diodes based on type-II quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.H.; Yang, R.Q.; Zhang, D.; Murry, S.J.; Pei, S.S.; Allerman, A.A.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1997-01-21

    The authors have demonstrated room-temperature CW operation of type-II quantum cascade (QC) light emitting diodes at 4.2 {micro}m using InAs/InGaSb/InAlSb type-II quantum wells. The type-II QC configuration utilizes sequential multiple photon emissions in a staircase of coupled type-II quantum wells. The device was grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a p-type GaSb substrate and was compared of 20 periods of active regions separated by digitally graded quantum well injection regions. The maximum average output power is about 250 {micro}W at 80 K, and 140 {micro}W at 300 K at a repetition rate of 1 kHz with a duty cycle of 50%.

  14. Type-II AGN population from the zCOSMOS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorno, A.; Mignoli, M.; Zamorani, G.; Zcosmos Team

    2008-10-01

    I'll present the first results on the type-II AGN population isolated from the zCOSMOS bright sample which consists of 10k sources, purely magnitude selected at I=22.5. The selected type-II AGN sample consists of about 200 AGN, selected using the diagnostic diagrams up to redshift ~1.0. I'll present the properties of this sample (i.e. SED and morphology) and some preliminary results on the evolution of type-II AGN, as well as on the evolution of their fraction with respect to the total AGN population (Type-I + Type-II), as a function of both luminosity and redshift.

  15. Femtosecond Dynamics of Norrish Type-II Reactions: Nonconcerted Hydrogen-Transfer and Diradical Intermediacy.

    PubMed

    De Feyter S; Diau; Zewail

    2000-01-01

    Norrish type-II and McLafferty rearrangements, which both involve an intramolecular transfer of a gamma H atom, can be differentiated on the femtosecond time scale. The McLafferty rearrangement results in ion fragmentation of the parent ketone, whereas the Norrish type-II reaction leads to a diradical species, which then either cyclizes or fragments (see scheme). For Norrish type-II reactions, the reaction time for the transfer of the hydrogen atom is within 70 - 90 fs, and the lifetime of the diradical intermediate is in the range of 400 - 700 ps at the total energy studied.

  16. High Na intake increases renal angiotensin II levels and reduces expression of the ACE2-AT2R-MasR axis in obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Preethi; Ali, Quaisar; Sabuhi, Rifat; Wu, Yonnie

    2012-01-01

    High sodium intake is known to regulate the renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and is a risk factor for the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. The complex nature of the RAS reveals that its various components may have opposing effects on natriuresis and blood pressure regulation. We hypothesized that high sodium intake differentially regulates and shifts a balance between opposing components of the renal RAS, namely, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-ANG II-type 1 ANG II receptor (AT1R) vs. AT2-ACE2-angiotensinogen (Ang) (1–7)-Mas receptor (MasR), in obesity. In the present study, we evaluated protein and/or mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, renin, AT1A/BR, ACE, AT2R, ACE2, and MasR in the kidney cortex following 2 wk of a 8% high-sodium (HS) diet in lean and obese Zucker rats. The expression data showed that the relative expression pattern of ACE and AT1BR increased, renin decreased, and ACE2, AT2R, and MasR remained unaltered in HS-fed lean rats. On the other hand, HS intake in obese rats caused an increase in the cortical expression of ACE, a decrease in ACE2, AT2R, and MasR, and no changes in renin and AT1R. The cortical levels of ANG II increased by threefold in obese rats on HS compared with obese rats on normal salt (NS), which was not different than in lean rats. The HS intake elevated mean arterial pressure in obese rats (27 mmHg) more than in lean rats (16 mmHg). This study suggests that HS intake causes a pronounced increase in ANG II levels and a reduction in the expression of the ACE2-AT2R-MasR axis in the kidney cortex of obese rats. We conclude that such changes may lead to the potentially unopposed function of AT1R, with its various cellular and physiological roles, including the contribution to the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. PMID:22592638

  17. High Na intake increases renal angiotensin II levels and reduces expression of the ACE2-AT(2)R-MasR axis in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Preethi; Ali, Quaisar; Sabuhi, Rifat; Wu, Yonnie; Hussain, Tahir

    2012-08-01

    High sodium intake is known to regulate the renal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and is a risk factor for the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. The complex nature of the RAS reveals that its various components may have opposing effects on natriuresis and blood pressure regulation. We hypothesized that high sodium intake differentially regulates and shifts a balance between opposing components of the renal RAS, namely, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-ANG II-type 1 ANG II receptor (AT(1)R) vs. AT(2)-ACE2-angiotensinogen (Ang) (1-7)-Mas receptor (MasR), in obesity. In the present study, we evaluated protein and/or mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, renin, AT(1A/B)R, ACE, AT(2)R, ACE2, and MasR in the kidney cortex following 2 wk of a 8% high-sodium (HS) diet in lean and obese Zucker rats. The expression data showed that the relative expression pattern of ACE and AT(1B)R increased, renin decreased, and ACE2, AT(2)R, and MasR remained unaltered in HS-fed lean rats. On the other hand, HS intake in obese rats caused an increase in the cortical expression of ACE, a decrease in ACE2, AT(2)R, and MasR, and no changes in renin and AT(1)R. The cortical levels of ANG II increased by threefold in obese rats on HS compared with obese rats on normal salt (NS), which was not different than in lean rats. The HS intake elevated mean arterial pressure in obese rats (27 mmHg) more than in lean rats (16 mmHg). This study suggests that HS intake causes a pronounced increase in ANG II levels and a reduction in the expression of the ACE2-AT(2)R-MasR axis in the kidney cortex of obese rats. We conclude that such changes may lead to the potentially unopposed function of AT(1)R, with its various cellular and physiological roles, including the contribution to the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension.

  18. The medial preoptic nucleus as a site of the thermogenic and metabolic actions of melanotan II in male rats.

    PubMed

    Monge-Roffarello, Boris; Labbe, Sebastien M; Lenglos, Christophe; Caron, Alexandre; Lanfray, Damien; Samson, Pierre; Richard, Denis

    2014-07-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of the medial preoptic nucleus (MPO) as a site of the thermogenic and metabolic effects of the α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog melanotan II (MTII). We also assessed the involvement of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) by investigating the effects of the MPO infusion of MTII in rats with DMH lesions produced by kainic acid. Infusion of MTII in the MPO led to increases in interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) temperature and iBAT uptake of 14C-bromopalmitate. Both increases were blocked by DMH lesions. iBAT temperature increase (area under curve) and 14C-bromopalmitate uptake emerged as two correlated variables (r = 0.63, P < 0.001). DMH lesions also blocked MTII-induced expression of mRNAs coding for proteins involved in 1) thermogenesis [type II iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (Pgc1α)], 2) lipolysis [hormone-sensitive lipase (Hsl)], and 3) lipogenesis [diacylglycerol-O-acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2), fatty acid synthase (Fas)], in iBAT of rats killed 1 h after MPO infusion of MTII. MTII also stimulated expression of genes in iWAT but only in rats with DMH lesions. These genes included glucose transporter member 4 (Glut4), glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 3 (Gpat3), Dgat1, Dgat2, triglyceride lipase (Atgl), Hsl, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1β (Cpt1β). Altogether, the present results reveal the MPO as a site of the thermogenic and metabolic actions of MTII. They also contribute to establish the MPO-DMH duet as a significant target for melanocortins to modulate energy homeostasis.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-I stimulates H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation: Dominant role of PI-3'K/Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Alexia, Catherine; Fourmatgeat, Pascal; Delautier, Daniele; Groyer, Andre . E-mail: groyer@bichat.inserm.fr

    2006-04-15

    Although hepatocytes are the primary source of endocrine IGF-I and -II in mammals, their autocrine/paracrine role in the dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis during hepatocarcinogenesis and in hepatocarcinomas (HCC) remains to be elucidated. Indeed, IGF-II and type-I IGF receptors are overexpressed in HCC cells, and IGF-I is synthesized in adjacent non-tumoral liver tissue. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of type-I IGF receptor signaling on H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation, as estimated by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation into DNA. IGF-I stimulated the rate of DNA synthesis of serum-deprived H{sub 4}II cells, stimulation being maximal 3 h after the onset of IGF-I treatment and remaining elevated until at least 6 h. The IGF-I-induced increase in DNA replication was abolished by LY294002 and only partially inhibited by PD98059, suggesting that phosphoinositol-3' kinase (PI-3'K) and to a lesser extent MEK/Erk signaling were involved. Furthermore, the 3- to 19-fold activation of the Erks in the presence of LY294002 suggested a down-regulation of the MEK/Erk cascade by PI-3'K signaling. Finally, the effect of IGF-I on DNA replication was almost completely abolished in clones of H{sub 4}II cells expressing a dominant-negative form of Akt but was unaltered by rapamycin treatment of wild-type H{sub 4}II cells. Altogether, these data support the notion that the stimulation of H{sub 4}II rat hepatoma cell proliferation by IGF-I is especially dependent on Akt activation but independent on the Akt/mTOR signal0009i.

  20. Effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and smooth muscle contraction in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Al-Shboul, Othman; Mustafa, Ayman

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that both Rho kinase signaling and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. However, very little is known about the effect of oxidative stress on the gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle Rho kinase pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on Rho kinase II and muscle contraction in rat stomach. The peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and peroxynitrite were used to induce oxidative stress. Rho kinase II expression and ACh-induced activity were measured in control and oxidant-treated cells via specifically designed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and activity assay kits, respectively. Single smooth muscle cell contraction was measured via scanning micrometry in the presence or absence of the Rho kinase blocker, Y-27632 dihydrochloride. All oxidant agents significantly increased ACh-induced Rho kinase II activity without affecting its expression level. Most important, oxidative stress induced by all three agents augmented ACh-stimulated muscle cell contraction, which was significantly inhibited by Y-27632. In conclusion, oxidative stress activates Rho kinase II and enhances contraction in rat gastric muscle, suggesting an important role in GI motility disorders associated with oxidative stress.

  1. Oligomeric State Regulated Trafficking of Human Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase Type-II

    PubMed Central

    Monillas, Elizabeth S.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Thévenin, Anastasia F.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response. PMID:25707358

  2. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    PubMed

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  3. Type II collagen is transiently expressed during avian cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Swiderski, R E; Daniels, K J; Jensen, K L; Solursh, M

    1994-08-01

    We present new evidence of the temporal and spatial expression of type II collagen in the embryonic chick heart during the very early stages of its development. In particular, we emphasize the distribution of its mRNA and protein during valve formation. Type II collagen as well as several other fibrillar collagens (types I, III, and V) are present in stage 18 endocardial cushion mesenchymal cells. At stage 23, alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts and the cognate polypeptide colocalize in the atrioventricular valves. As development proceeds, the relative abundance of alpha 1 (II) collagen transcripts decreases during the stages studied (stages 22 to 45; day 3.5 to day 19) as assayed by RNA blotting of extracts of whole hearts. Type II collagen protein was immunologically undetectable in stage 38 (day 12) hearts, although collagens I, III, and V persisted and localize in the valve regions, in the endothelial lining of the heart, and in the epicardium. In keeping with other observations of type II collagen expression in non-chondrogenic regions of a variety of vertebrate embryos, the avian heart also exhibits transient type II collagen expression.

  4. Dietary nitrate improves age-related hypertension and metabolic abnormalities in rats via modulation of angiotensin II receptor signaling and inhibition of superoxide generation.

    PubMed

    Hezel, Michael; Peleli, Maria; Liu, Ming; Zollbrecht, Christa; Jensen, Boye L; Checa, Antonio; Giulietti, Alessia; Wheelock, Craig E; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie; Carlström, Mattias

    2016-10-01

    Advanced age is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. A proposed central event is diminished amounts of nitric oxide (NO) due to reduced generation by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and increased oxidative stress. In addition, it is widely accepted that increased angiotensin II (ANG II) signaling is also implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by accelerating formation of reactive oxygen species. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dietary nitrate supplementation could reduce blood pressure and improve glucose tolerance in aged rats, via attenuation of NADPH oxidase activity and ANG II receptor signaling. Dietary nitrate supplementation for two weeks reduced blood pressure (10-15mmHg) and improved glucose clearance in old, but not in young rats. These favorable effects were associated with increased insulin responses, reduced plasma creatinine as well as improved endothelial relaxation to acetylcholine and attenuated contractility to ANG II in resistance arteries. Mechanistically, nitrate reduced NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and increased cGMP signaling. Finally, nitrate treatment in aged rats normalized the gene expression profile of ANG II receptors (AT1A, AT2, AT1A/AT2 ratio) in the renal and cardiovascular systems without altering plasma levels of renin or ANG II. Our results show that boosting the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway can partly compensate for age-related disturbances in endogenous NO generation via inhibition of NADPH oxidase and modulation of ANG II receptor expression. These novel findings may have implications for nutrition-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  5. Halo Coronal Mass Ejections and Their Relation to DH Type-II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugaraju, A.; Bendict Lawrance, M.

    2015-10-01

    A set of 88 halo CMEs observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/ Large Angle Solar Coronagraph (SOHO/LASCO) during the period 2005 to 2010 is considered to study the relationship of these halo CMEs with Type-II radio bursts in the deca-hectametric (DH) wavelength range observed by Wind/(Plasma and Radio Waves: WAVES). Among the 88 events, 39 halo CMEs are found to be associated with DH Type-II radio bursts and their characteristics are analyzed with the following results: i) The heights of the CME leading edge at the time of the starting frequencies of many of the selected DH Type-II events (74 %) are in the range (2 - 10 R_{⊙}) where the shocks are formed. ii) The mean speed of DH-associated halo CMEs (1610 km s-1) is nearly twice the mean speed (853 km s-1) of halo CMEs without DH Type-II radio bursts, implying that the peak of the Alfvén speed profile in the outer corona where DH Type-II radio bursts start might be around 800 km s-1. iii) The shock speed of DH Type-II radio bursts calculated using the heights of shock signatures of the corresponding CME events is found to be slightly higher than the CME speed. iv) The CME speed plays a major role in the determination of the ending frequency of DH Type-II radio bursts but not the starting frequency. v) The relationship between the characteristics of DH Type-II radio bursts and CMEs is explained in the context of the universal drift-rate spectrum.

  6. Impaired endothelial function and microvascular asymmetrical dimethylarginine in angiotensin II-infused rats: effects of tempol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Luo, Zaiming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Jose, Pedro A; Falck, John R; Welch, William J; Aslam, Shakil; Teerlink, Tom; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2010-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II causes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular risk. We investigated the hypothesis that Ang II increases microvascular reactive oxygen species and asymmetrical dimethylarginine and switches endothelial function from vasodilator to vasoconstrictor pathways. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent responses of mesenteric resistance arterioles were assessed in a myograph and vascular NO and reactive oxygen species by fluorescent probes in groups (n=6) of male rats infused for 14 days with Ang II (200 ng/kg per minute) or given a sham infusion. Additional groups of Ang or sham-infused rats were given oral Tempol (2 mmol · L(-1)). Ang II infusion increased mean blood pressure (119±5 versus 89±7 mm Hg; P<0.005) and plasma malondialdehyde (0.57±0.02 versus 0.37±0.05 μmol · L(-1); P<0.035) and decreased maximal endothelium-dependent relaxation (18±5% versus 54±6%; P<0.005) and hyperpolarizing (19±3% versus 29±3%; P<0.05) responses and NO activity (0.9±0.1 versus 1.6±0.2 U; P<0.01) yet enhanced endothelium-dependent contraction responses (23±5% versus 5±5%; P<0.05) and reactive oxygen species production (0.82±0.05 versus 0.15±0.03 U; P<0.01). Ang II decreased the expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine in vessels (450±50 versus 260±35 pmol/mg of protein; P<0.01) but not plasma. Tempol prevented any significant changes with Ang II. In conclusion, Ang redirected endothelial responses from relaxation to contraction, reduced vascular NO, and increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine. These effects were dependent on reactive oxygen species and could, therefore, be targeted with effective antioxidant therapy.

  7. Regional expression and androgen regulation of carbonic anhydrase IV and II in the adult rat epididymis.

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, K; Fleming, R E; Kneer, J; Sly, W S; Rajaniemi, H

    1999-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is implicated in the acidification of epididymal fluid and thereby in the regulation of sperm maturation and motility. Among the CA isoenzymes, CA IV and II have been shown to be present in the rat epididymal duct epithelium. In the present study, we examined the expression and androgen regulation of CA IV and II mRNAs along the epididymal duct. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of CA II mRNA in all regions of the epididymis with the strongest signal in the corpus region, while CA IV mRNA was expressed predominantly in the corpus epididymidis. Three days after bilateral castration, CA IV and II mRNAs were decreased by 80-90% in the corpus epididymidis. Testosterone (T) replacement maintained the expression of CA mRNAs at 50-60% of the control levels, indicating that circulating androgens alone are not sufficient to recover the CA expression in the corpus region. However, unilateral castration did not affect the mRNA levels of CA IV and II, suggesting that factors in testicular fluid do not play a major role in the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis. Immunoblot analysis showed that CA IV protein levels decreased 3 days after castration, while T administration maintained the protein expression virtually at the precastration levels. These data demonstrate that mRNAs for CA IV and II are predominantly expressed in the corpus region of the rat epididymis and can be regulated by androgens in that region. The present data suggest that the regulation of CA expression in the corpus epididymidis by androgens contributes to the known androgen effects on epididymal acidification.

  8. Sirtuin 1 Activator SRT1720 Protects Against Lung Injury via Reduction of Type II Alveolar Epithelial Cells Apoptosis in Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chao; Li, Yaqing; Xu, Wu-Lin; Yan, Jian-Ping; Xia, Ying-jie; Ma, Ying-Yu; Chen, Chun; Wang, Hui-Ju; Tao, Hou-quan

    2015-08-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), two major pathological changes that occur are the loss of alveolar structure and airspace enlargement. Type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECII) play a vital role in maintaining alveolar homeostasis and lung tissue repair. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase, regulates many pathophysiological processes including inflammation, apoptosis, cellular senescence and stress resistance. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether SRT1720, a pharmacological SIRT1 activator, could protect against AECII apoptosis in