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Sample records for rate intra-cavitary irradiation

  1. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Regine, William F.; Mutaf, Yildirim D.

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  2. Dosimetric comparison between intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques for accelerated partial breast irradiation and a novel stereotactic radiotherapy device for breast cancer: GammaPod™.

    PubMed

    Ödén, Jakob; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana; Yu, Cedric X; Feigenberg, Steven J; Regine, William F; Mutaf, Yildirim D

    2013-07-01

    The GammaPod™ device, manufactured by Xcision Medical Systems, is a novel stereotactic breast irradiation device. It consists of a hemispherical source carrier containing 36 Cobalt-60 sources, a tungsten collimator with two built-in collimation sizes, a dynamically controlled patient support table and a breast immobilization cup also functioning as the stereotactic frame for the patient. The dosimetric output of the GammaPod™ was modelled using a Monte Carlo based treatment planning system. For the comparison, three-dimensional (3D) models of commonly used intra-cavitary breast brachytherapy techniques utilizing single lumen and multi-lumen balloon as well as peripheral catheter multi-lumen implant devices were created and corresponding 3D dose calculations were performed using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group-43 formalism. Dose distributions for clinically relevant target volumes were optimized using dosimetric goals set forth in the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Protocol B-39. For clinical scenarios assuming similar target sizes and proximity to critical organs, dose coverage, dose fall-off profiles beyond the target and skin doses at given distances beyond the target were calculated for GammaPod™ and compared with the doses achievable by the brachytherapy techniques. The dosimetric goals within the protocol guidelines were fulfilled for all target sizes and irradiation techniques. For central targets, at small distances from the target edge (up to approximately 1 cm) the brachytherapy techniques generally have a steeper dose fall-off gradient compared to GammaPod™ and at longer distances (more than about 1 cm) the relation is generally observed to be opposite. For targets close to the skin, the relative skin doses were considerably lower for GammaPod™ than for any of the brachytherapy techniques. In conclusion, GammaPod™ allows adequate and more uniform dose coverage to centrally and peripherally

  3. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  4. Failures of CMOS Circuits Irradiated At Low Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goben, Charles A.; Price, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experiments on irradiation of SGS 4007 complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) integrated inverter circuits by 60Co and 137Cs radioactive sources. Purpose of experiments to supplement previous observations that minimum radiation doses at which failure occurred in more-complicated CMOS parts were lower at lower dose rates.

  5. Fission-gas-release rates from irradiated uranium nitride specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Fission-gas-release rates from two 93 percent dense UN specimens were measured using a sweep gas facility. Specimen burnup rates averaged .0045 and .0032 percent/hr, and the specimen temperatures ranged from 425 to 1323 K and from 552 to 1502 K, respectively. Burnups up to 7.8 percent were achieved. Fission-gas-release rates first decreased then increased with burnup. Extensive interconnected intergranular porosity formed in the specimen operated at over 1500 K. Release rate variation with both burnup and temperature agreed with previous irradiation test results.

  6. High Rate Proton Irradiation of 15mm Muon Drifttubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibell, A.; Biebel, O.; Hertenberger, R.; Ruschke, A.; Schmitt, Ch.; Kroha, H.; Bittner, B.; Schwegler, P.; Dubbert, J.; Ott, S.

    2012-08-01

    Future LHC luminosity upgrades will significantly increase the amount of background hits from photons, neutrons 11.11d protons in the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At the proposed LHC peak luminosity of 5\\cdot 1034(1)/(cm2s), background hit rates of more than 10(kHz)/(cm2) are expected in the innermost forward region, leading to a loss of performance of the current tracking chambers. Based on the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube chambers, a new high rate capable drift tube detecor using tubes with a reduced diameter of 15mm was developed. To test the response to highly ionizing particles, a prototype chamber of 46 15mm drift tubes was irradiated with a 20 MeV proton beam at the tandem accelerator at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Munich. Three tubes in a planar layer were irradiated while all other tubes were used for reconstruction of cosmic muon tracks through irradiated and nonirradiated parts of the chamber. To determine the rate capability of the 15mm drifttubes we investigated the effect of the proton hit rate on pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution of the cosmic muon signals.

  7. Modeling irradiation creep of graphite using rate theory

    DOE PAGES

    Sarkar, Apu; Eapen, Jacob; Raj, Anant; Murty, K. L.; Burchell, T. D.

    2016-02-20

    In this work we examined irradiation induced creep of graphite in the framework of transition state rate theory. Experimental data for two grades of nuclear graphite (H-337 and AGOT) were analyzed to determine the stress exponent (n) and activation energy (Q) for plastic flow under irradiation. Here we show that the mean activation energy lies between 0.14 and 0.32 eV with a mean stress-exponent of 1.0 ± 0.2. A stress exponent of unity and the unusually low activation energies strongly indicate a diffusive defect transport mechanism for neutron doses in the range of 3-4 x 1022 n/cm2.

  8. An algorithm to evaluate solar irradiance and effective dose rates using spectral UV irradiance at four selected wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Anav, A; Rafanelli, C; Di Menno, I; Di Menno, M

    2004-01-01

    The paper shows a semi-analytical method for environmental and dosimetric applications to evaluate, in clear sky conditions, the solar irradiance and the effective dose rates for some action spectra using only four spectral irradiance values at selected wavelengths in the UV-B and UV-A regions (305, 320, 340 and 380 nm). The method, named WL4UV, is based on the reconstruction of an approximated spectral irradiance that can be integrated, to obtain the solar irradiance, or convoluted with an action spectrum to obtain an effective dose rate. The parameters required in the algorithm are deduced from archived solar spectral irradiance data. This database contains measurements carried out by some Brewer spectrophotometers located in various geographical positions, at similar altitudes, with very different environmental characteristics: Rome (Italy), Ny Alesund (Svalbard Islands, Norway) and Ushuaia (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina). To evaluate the precision of the method, a double test was performed with data not used in developing the model. Archived Brewer measurement data, in clear sky conditions, from Rome and from the National Science Foundation UV data set in San Diego (CA, USA) and Ushuaia, where SUV 100 spectroradiometers operate, were drawn randomly. The comparison of measured and computed irradiance has a relative deviation of about +/-2%. The effective dose rates for action spectra of Erythema, DNA and non-Melanoma skin cancer have a relative deviation of less than approximately 20% for solar zenith angles <50 degrees . PMID:15266087

  9. Enhancement of cell growth rate by light irradiation in the cultivation of Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2011-10-01

    A yeast, Rhodotorula glutinis, is regarded as a potential microbial oil producer, due to its high lipid content. The flask results of this study indicated that irradiation could increase the growth of R. glutinis compared to that of a batch without irradiation. Further 5-l fermenter results confirmed that irradiation could greatly enhance the cells' growth rate and total lipid productivity. The maximum lipid productivity obtained in the fed-batch operation with 3 LED (light emitting diode) lamps was 0.39 g/l h as compared to 0.34 g/l h in the batch with 3 LED lamps and 0.19 g/l h in the batch without irradiation. Conclusively, the irradiation could significantly increase the cells' growth rate, which, in turn, could be applied to the commercialized production of biodiesel from single cell oils. PMID:21757336

  10. The independence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys of displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1997-04-01

    The majority of high fluence data on the void swelling and irradiation creep of austenitic steels were generated at relatively high displacement rates and relatively low helium/dpa levels that are not characteristic of the conditions anticipated in ITER and other anticipated fusion environments. After reanalyzing the available data, this paper shows that irradiation creep is not directly sensitive to either the helium/dpa ratio or the displacement rate, other than through their possible influence on void swelling, since one component of the irradiation creep rate varies with no correlation to the instantaneous swelling rate. Until recently, however, the non-swelling-related creep component was also thought to exhibit its own strong dependence on displacement rate, increasing at lower fluxes. This perception originally arose from the work of Lewthwaite and Mosedale at temperatures in the 270-350{degrees}C range. More recently this perception was thought to extend to higher irradiation temperatures. It now appears, however, that this interpretation is incorrect, and in fact the steady-state value of the non-swelling component of irradiation creep is actually insensitive to displacement rate. The perceived flux dependence appears to arise from a failure to properly interpret the impact of the transient regime of irradiation creep.

  11. Facility for gamma irradiations of cultured cells at low dose rates: design, physical characteristics and functioning.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Anello, Pasquale; Pecchia, Ilaria; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Campa, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    We describe a low dose/dose rate gamma irradiation facility (called LIBIS) for in vitro biological systems, for the exposure, inside a CO2 cell culture incubator, of cells at a dose rate ranging from few μGy/h to some tens of mGy/h. Three different (137)Cs sources are used, depending on the desired dose rate. The sample is irradiated with a gamma ray beam with a dose rate uniformity of at least 92% and a percentage of primary 662keV photons greater than 80%. LIBIS complies with high safety standards. PMID:27423023

  12. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, Manuel,

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential

  13. Dose Rate Calibration of a Commercial Beta-Particle Irradiator Used In Archeological and Geological Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, S.M.

    2004-10-31

    The 801E Multiple Sample Irradiator, manufactured by Daybreak Nuclear Systems, is capable of exposing up to 30 samples to beta radiation by placing each sample one by one directly beneath a heavily shielded ceramic Sr-90/Y-90 source and opening a specially designed shutter. Daybreak Nuclear Systems does not provide the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y dose rate to the sample because of variations of up to 20% in the nominal activity of the beta sources (separately manufactured by AEA Technology). Thus it is left to the end user to determine. Here aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), in the form of Landauer's Luxel{trademark}, was irradiated to different known doses using a calibrated {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particle irradiator, and the OSL signal monitored after each irradiation to generate a calibration curve. Comparison of the OSL Signal from the unknown 801E Irradiator dose with the calibration curve enabled the dose and therefore dose rate to be determined. The timing accuracy of the 801E Irradiator was also evaluated and found to be +/- 0.5 seconds. The dose rate of the beta source was found to be 0.147 +/- 0.007 Gy/s.

  14. The effects of low dose rate irradiation and thermal aging on reactor structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. R.; Trybus, C. L.; Cole, J. I.

    As part of the EBR-II reactor materials surveillance program, test samples of fifteen different alloys were placed into EBR-II in 1965. The surveillance (SURV) program was intended to determine property changes in reactor structural materials caused by irradiation and thermal aging. In this work, the effect of low dose rate (approximately 2 × 10 -8 dpa/s) irradiation at 380-410°C and long term thermal aging at 371°C on the properties of 20% cold worked 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel, Inconel X750, 304/308 stainless weld material, and 17-4 PH steel are evaluated. Doses of up to 6.8 dpa and thermal aging to 2994 days did not significantly affect the density of these alloys. The strength of 304 SS, X750, 17-4 PH, and 304/308 weld material increased with irradiation. In contrast, the strength of 420 stainless steel decreased with irradiation. Irradiation decreased the impact energy in both Inconel X750 and 17-4 PH steel. Thermal aging decreased the impact energy in 17-4 PH steel and increased the impact energy in Inconel X750. Tensile property comparisons of 304 SURV samples with 304 samples irradiated in EBR-II at a higher dose rate show that the higher dose rate samples had greater increases in strength and greater losses in ductility.

  15. Displacement rate and temperature equivalence in stochastic cluster dynamics simulations of irradiated pure α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Aaron; Muntifering, Brittany; Dingreville, Rémi; Hattar, Khalid; Capolungo, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Charged particle irradiation is a frequently used experimental tool to study damage accumulation in metals expected during neutron irradiation. Understanding the correspondence between displacement rate and temperature during such studies is one of several factors that must be taken into account in order to design experiments that produce equivalent damage accumulation to neutron damage conditions. In this study, spatially resolved stochastic cluster dynamics (SRSCD) is used to simulate damage evolution in α-Fe and find displacement rate/temperature pairs under 'target' and 'proxy' conditions for which the local distribution of vacancies and vacancy clusters is the same as a function of displacement damage. The SRSCD methodology is chosen for this study due to its computational efficiency and ability to simulate damage accumulation in spatially inhomogeneous materials such as thin films. Results are presented for Frenkel pair irradiation and displacement cascade damage in thin films and bulk α-Fe. Holding all other material and irradiation conditions constant, temperature adjustments are shown to successfully make up for changes in displacement rate such that defect concentrations and cluster sizes remain relatively constant. The methodology presented in this study allows for a first-order prediction of the temperature at which ion irradiation experiments ('proxy' conditions) should take place in order to approximate neutron irradiation ('target' conditions).

  16. Study of the mechanism by which localized preinoculation irradiation enhances the rate of lymphatic spread

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, D.S.; Brown, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    KHT sarcoma growing in the foot of C3H mice spontaneously metastasizes to the primary (popliteal) and secondary lymph nodes. Under appropriate conditions, localized preinoculation irradiation of the foot enhances lymphatic metastasis to the primary node. This enhancement could be a result of (1) a decrease in the latent period between inoculation and the initiation of lymphatic metastasis and/or (2) accelerated growth of the primary lymph node. Investigations were conducted to determine which of these factors contribute to the enhancement of lymphatic metastasis. The foot only of C3H mice was either irradiated (2400 rad) or sham-irradiated 1 or 8 days prior to tumor inoculation on Day 0. Each day after tumor inoculation a group of irradiated and sham-irradiated animals had their tumor-bearing foot amputated. The region behind the knee was palpated every 2 or 3 days for the presence of tumor. The period of time (ET/sub 50/) between inoculation and amputation necessary for 50% of the animals to present with lymphatic metastasis was used to determine the latent period between inoculation and initiation of lymphatic metastasis. The mean time to palpation was used to determine the relative growth rate of the primary lymph node. Localized preinoculation irradiation decreased the ET/sub 50/ from about 4.9 to 2.7 days. Irradiation also reduced the mean time to node palpation by about 0.9 day for each day amputation was delayed. The results indicated that irradiation both decreased the latent period between tumor inoculation and initiation of metastasis and increased the growth rate of the primary lymph node. The latter is thought to be a consequence of an increase in the rate at which tumor cells were shed into lymphatics.

  17. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  18. Degradation and annealing studies on gamma rays irradiated COTS PPD CISs at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Ma, Yingwu; Liu, Jing; Xue, Yuan; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Huang, Shaoyan; Liu, Minbo; Sheng, Jiangkun

    2016-06-01

    The degradation and annealing studies on Colbalt-60 gamma-rays irradiated commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) pinned photodiode (PPD) CMOS image sensors (CISs) at the various dose rates are presented. The irradiation experiments of COTS PPD CISs are carried out at 0.3, 3.0 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The COTS PPD CISs are manufactured using a standard 0.18-μm CMOS technology with four-transistor pixel PPD architecture. The behavior of the tested CISs shows a remarkable degradation after irradiation and differs in the dose rates. The dark current, dark signal non-uniformity (DSNU), random noise, saturation output, signal to noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range (DR) versus the total ionizing dose (TID) at the various dose rates are investigated. The tendency of dark current, DSNU, and random noise increase and saturation output, SNR, and DR to decrease at 3.0 rad(Si)/s are far greater than those at 0.3 and 30.0 rad(Si)/s. The damage mechanisms caused by TID irradiation at the various dose rates are also analyzed. The annealing tests are carried out at room temperature with unbiased conditions after irradiation.

  19. Thermal stability of PVC formulations gamma irradiated at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda-Facio, A.; Benavides, R.; Martínez-Pardo, M. E.

    2014-04-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) formulated with two different stabilizer systems (Ca/Zn stearates and dibasic lead phthalate) irradiated at 75 kGy at two different dose rates were studied in order to evaluate their effect in thermal stability. Samples were degraded in a TGA instrument at different heating rates and the activation energy (Ea) to dehydrochlorination was calculated using the Arrhenius method in accordance with ASTM E 1641-07. TGA evaluations show that temperature for HCl evolution is higher when increasing heating rate, as well as higher resistance to degradation, for irradiated lead formulations; however, after activation energies calculation the irradiated Ca/Zn formulations are more stable. The controversial results are due to the low initial stability of lead additives in PVC.

  20. Characterization of MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Manickam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2011-12-01

    In this study, MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces under ambient condition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The radiation fluence used was 0.5 J/cm2 at a pulse repetition rate of 25 MHz with 1 ms interaction time. SEM analysis of the irradiated surfaces showed self-assembled intermingled weblike nanofibrous structure in and around the laser-irradiated spots. Further TEM investigation on this nanostructure revealed that the nanofibrous structure is formed due to aggregation of Au-Si/Si nanoparticles. The XRD peaks at 32.2°, 39.7°, and 62.5° were identified as (200), (211), and (321) reflections, respectively, corresponding to gold silicide. In addition, the observed chemical shift of Au 4 f and Si 2 p lines in XPS spectrum of the irradiated surface illustrated the presence of gold silicide at the irradiated surface. The generation of Si/Au-Si alloy fibrous nanoparticles aggregate is explained by the nucleation and subsequent condensation of vapor in the plasma plume during irradiation and expulsion of molten material due to high plasma pressure.

  1. Characterization of MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this study, MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces under ambient condition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The radiation fluence used was 0.5 J/cm2 at a pulse repetition rate of 25 MHz with 1 ms interaction time. SEM analysis of the irradiated surfaces showed self-assembled intermingled weblike nanofibrous structure in and around the laser-irradiated spots. Further TEM investigation on this nanostructure revealed that the nanofibrous structure is formed due to aggregation of Au-Si/Si nanoparticles. The XRD peaks at 32.2°, 39.7°, and 62.5° were identified as (200), (211), and (321) reflections, respectively, corresponding to gold silicide. In addition, the observed chemical shift of Au 4f and Si 2p lines in XPS spectrum of the irradiated surface illustrated the presence of gold silicide at the irradiated surface. The generation of Si/Au-Si alloy fibrous nanoparticles aggregate is explained by the nucleation and subsequent condensation of vapor in the plasma plume during irradiation and expulsion of molten material due to high plasma pressure. PMID:21711595

  2. Effect of various irradiation treatments of plant protoplasts on the transformation rates after direct gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Köhler, F; Benediktsson, I; Cardon, G; Andreo, C S; Schieder, O

    1990-05-01

    In P. hybrida and B. nigra an enhancement of transformation rates (direct gene transfer) of about six to seven-fold was obtained after irradiation of protoplasts with 12.5 Gy (X-ray). The effect of protoplast irradiation was similar in experiments where protoplasts were irradiated 1h before transformation (X-ray/DNA) or 1h after completion of the transformation procedure (DNA/X-ray). Increased X-ray doses up to 62.5 Gy resulted in further enhancement of percentages of transformed colonies, indicating a correlation between relative transformation frequencies (RTF) and the doses applied. Estimation of degradation rates of plasmid sequences in plant protoplasts yielded a reduction of plasmid concentration to 50% 8-12 h after transformation. In 1-day-old protoplasts, the level of plasmid fragments dropped to 0%-10% compared to 1h after transformation. The results demonstrate that the integration rates of plasmid sequences into the plant genome may in part be governed by DNA repair mechanisms. This could be an explanation for the observed genotypic dependence of transformation rates in different plant species and plant genotypes. Gene copy number reconstructions revealed enhanced integration rates of plasmid sequences in transformed colonies derived from irradiated protoplasts.

  3. Altered turnover and synthesis rates of lung surfactant following thoracic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, P.G.; Ahier, R.G.; Anderson, R.L.

    1987-02-01

    Between 2-6 weeks after thoracic irradiation with 10 Gy X rays, when levels of surfactant in the alveoli show the greatest increase, there is a reduction in the rate of radioactivity loss from /sup 3/H-choline labeled disaturated phosphatidylcholine from the lung. This indicates a reduced turnover of surfactant. Discrepancies between the halving times for specific activity and for total radioactivity of the disaturated phospholipids suggest that at between 2 and 3 weeks post-irradiation, removal and degradation of surfactant almost ceases, but that synthesis continues normally. However, by 3 weeks post-irradiation, choline-/sup 3/H incorporation into disaturated phosphatidylcholine suggests that surfactant synthesis is increased about two-fold. The reduced number of macrophages recovered from alveolar lavage between about 2 and 6 weeks post-irradiation may indicate a reason for the lengthened turnover times of surfactant over this period. Nevertheless, the stimulated surfactant production that takes place from about 3 weeks onward suggests an additional active response to radiation or to radiation damage by the type II pneumonocytes. These studies confirm that the maximum levels of alveolar surfactant seen at 3 weeks post-irradiation result from a different lung response than that responsible for the increase in surfactant, which occurs within hours of irradiation.

  4. Allograft tissue irradiation and failure rate after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Dashe, Jesse; Parisien, Robert L; Cusano, Antonio; Curry, Emily J; Bedi, Asheesh; Li, Xinning

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft irradiation is effective for sterility without compromising graft integrity and increasing failure rate. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, and Google. The following search terms were used: “Gamma irradiation AND anterior cruciate ligament AND allograft” with a return of 30 items. Filters used included: English language, years 1990-2015. There were 6 hits that were not reviewed, as there were only abstracts available. Another 5 hits were discarded, as they did not pertain to the topic of interest. There were 9 more articles that were excluded: Three studies were performed on animals and 6 studies were meta-analyses. Therefore, a total of 10 articles were applicable to review. RESULTS: There is a delicate dosing crossover where gamma irradiation is both effective for sterility without catastrophically compromising the structural integrity of the graft. Of note, low dose irradiation is considered less than 2.0 Mrad, moderate dose is between 2.1-2.4 Mrad, and high dose is greater than or equal to 2.5 Mrad. Based upon the results of the literature search, the optimal threshold for sterilization was found to be sterilization at less than 2.2 Mrad of gamma irradiation with the important caveat of being performed at low temperatures. The graft selection process also must include thorough donor screening and testing as well as harvesting the tissue in a sterile fashion. Utilization of higher dose (≥ 2.5 Mrad) of irradiation causes greater allograft tissue laxity that results in greater graft failure rate clinically in patients after ACL reconstruction. CONCLUSION: Allograft ACL graft gamma irradiated with less than 2.2 Mrad appears to be a reasonable alternative to autograft for patients above 25 years of age. PMID:27335815

  5. Displacement rate dependence of irradiation creep as predicted by the production bias model

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, C.H.

    1996-04-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the non-swelling component of irradiation creep of austenitic stainless steels is relatively independent of temperature but is sensitive to the displacement rate. An earlier model of Lewthwaite and Mosedale anticipated the sensitivity of displacement rate and attributed it to the flux sensitivity of point defect recombination. The point-defect recombination process does not yield the observed temperature dependence, however, although it does predict an inverse dependence of the creep rate on the square root of the displacement rate that was experimentally observed at relatively low temperatures.

  6. Rate of F center formation in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar+ irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epie, E. N.; Wijesundera, D. N.; Tilakaratne, B. P.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-03-01

    Ionoluminescence, optical absorption spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channelling (RBS-C) have been used to study the rate of F center formation with fluence in 170 keV Ar+ irradiated single crystals of α-Al2O3 (sapphire) at room temperature. Implantation fluences range between 1013 cm-2 and 5 ×1014 cm-2. F center density (NF) has been found to display an initial rapid linear increase with Ar+ fluence followed by saturation to a maximum value of 1.74 ×1015 cm-2. Experimental results show a 1-1 correlation between radiation damage in the oxygen sublattice and F center density. This suggest F center kinetics in sapphire under low-energy low-fluence Ar irradiation is a direct consequence of dynamic competition between oxygen defect creation and recombination. An attempt has also been made to extend this discussion to F center kinetics in sapphire under swift heavy ion irradiation.

  7. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  8. GaAs detectors irradiated by electrons at different dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagatova, A.; Zatko, B.; Sedlackova, K.; Pavlovic, M.; Fulop, M.; Bohacek, P.; Necas, V.

    2014-12-01

    The radiation hardness of Semi-Insulating (SI) GaAs detectors against high-energy electrons was investigated. The detectors were irradiated by 5 MeV electrons. The influence of two irradiation parameters, the total absorbed dose (up to 24 kGy) and the applied dose rate (20, 40 and 80 kGy/h), on their spectrometric properties was studied. An 241Am gamma-ray source was used to evaluate the spectrometric properties. The applied dose has negatively affected the detector CCE (Charge Collection Efficiency) and has influenced also the energy resolution. Nevertheless, a global increase of detection efficiency with the dose was observed. Three different dose rates used during irradiation did not affect the CCE, but in the range of doses from 4 to 16 kGy an influence of the applied dose rate upon two other parameters was observed. With higher dose rates, a steeper increase in the detection efficiency and significant worsening of energy resolution were achieved.

  9. Strain-rate effects on microstructural deformation in irradiated 316 SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, James I.; Tsai, Hanchung; Allen, Todd R.; Yoshitake, Tsunemitsu; Akasaka, Naoaki; Yamagata, Ichiro; Nakamura, Yasuo

    2006-06-01

    A series of studies have been performed to investigate the post-irradiation deformation and failure behavior of 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel following irradiation to variety of doses and temperatures in the outer rows of the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II). In the current phase of these studies, three sets of samples with different radiation-induced microstructures have been characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following tensile testing to failure at a 'fast' strain-rate (1 × 10 -3 s -1) and a 'slow' strain-rate (1 × 10 -7 s -1). The samples were irradiated to doses between 9 and 41 dpa at temperatures between 383 and 443 °C. Tensile tests were conducted at a temperature of 430 °C and only regions outside of the necked region were examined. Over the parameters tested, strain-rate had a negligible effect on the deformation microstructure. In addition, there was no clear evidence of localized deformation behavior and the deformation appeared relatively homogeneous, characterized by unfaulting and incorporation of faulted dislocation loops into the general dislocation network structure. The influence of the defect microstructures and strain-rate on deformation behavior is discussed.

  10. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison study was conducted of the effects of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue (white pulp) of the mouse spleen with findings as they relate to the mouse thymus. Experimental techniques employed included autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine (TdR-(h-3)). The problem studied involved the mechanism of cell proliferation of lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen and thymus under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roentgens (R) per day for 105 days (15 weeks). The aim was to determine whether or not a steady state or near-steady state of cell population could be established for this period of time, and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population were involved.

  11. Dose rate dependence of the speciation of neptunium in irradiated solutions of nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Precek, M.; Paulenova, A.; Mincher, B.J.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of radiation on the redox speciation of neptunium are of interest due to their impact on the performance of separation of neptunium from highly radioactive solutions of dissolved used nuclear fuel. In this study, the influence of dose rate change from 0.4 kGy/h to 6 kGy/h was examined during irradiation of solutions of initially hexavalent 2.0-2.5 mM neptunium in nitric acid of two different concentrations (0.5 and 1 M). Results indicate that the immediate radiolytic steady-state concentration of neptunium(V) were depressed and its initial radiolytic yield was up to 2-times lower (in 1 M HNO{sub 3} solutions)during irradiations with the higher dose rate. The finding is explained on the basis of the enhancement of the role of oxidizing radicals during the radiolytic process. (authors)

  12. Effect of irradiation temperature and strain rate on the mechanical properties of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated to low doses in fission reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Gibson, L.T.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests performed on irradiated V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-6%)Ti alloys indicate that pronounced hardening and loss of strain hardening capacity occurs for doses of 0.1--20 dpa at irradiation temperatures below {approximately}330 C. The amount of radiation hardening decreases rapidly for irradiation temperatures above 400 C, with a concomitant increase in strain hardening capacity. Low-dose (0.1--0.5 dpa) irradiation shifts the dynamic strain aging regime to higher temperatures and lower strain rates compared to unirradiated specimens. Very low fracture toughness values were observed in miniature disk compact specimens irradiated at 200--320 C to {approximately}1.5--15 dpa and tested at 200 C.

  13. Biomass and lutein productivity of Scenedesmus almeriensis: influence of irradiance, dilution rate and temperature.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J F; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Acién, F G; Cerón, M C; Pérez-Parra, J; Molina-Grima, E

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the biomass and lutein productivity of the lutein-rich new strain Scenedesmus almeriensis is modelled versus irradiance and temperature. The results demonstrate that S. almeriensis is a mesophile microorganism with an optimal growth temperature of 35 degrees C, and capable of withstanding up to 48 degrees C, which caused culture death. This strain is also tolerant to high irradiances, showing no signs of photoinhibition even at the maximum irradiance essayed of 1625 microE m(-2) s(-1) accumulating up to 0.55% dry weight (d.wt.) of lutein. The optimal conditions that maximise the biomass productivity also favour the lutein productivity, lutein being a primary metabolite. Maximal biomass and lutein productivities of 0.87 g l(-1) day(-1) and 4.77 mg l(-1) day(-1), respectively, were measured. The analysis of light availability inside the cultures, quantified as average irradiance, demonstrates that the cultures were mainly photo-limited, although photosaturation also took place at high external irradiances. The effect of temperature was also investigated finding that the specific maximal growth rate is modified by the temperature according to the Arrhenius equation. The influence of both light availability and temperature was included in an overall growth model, which showed, as a result, capable of fitting the whole set of experimental data. An overall lutein accumulation rate model was also proposed and used in a regression analysis. Simulations performed using the proposed models show that under outdoor conditions a biomass productivity of 0.95 g l(-1) day(-1) can be expected, with a lutein productivity up to 5.31 mg l(-1) day(-1). These models may be useful to assist the design and operation optimisation of outdoor cultures of this strain. PMID:18491039

  14. Evolution of polarization dependent microstructures induced by high repetition rate femtosecond laser irradiation in glass.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangteng; Gecevičius, Mindaugas; Chen, Qiuqun; Zhang, Hang; Dai, Ye; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-09-19

    We report the observation of an anomalous polarization dependent process in an isotropic glass induced by long time stationary irradiation of a high repetition rate near-infrared femtosecond laser. Two distinctive types of polarization dependent microstructures were induced at different irradiation stages. At early stage (a few seconds), a dumbbell-shaped structure elongated perpendicularly to the laser polarization formed at the top of the modified region, which was later erased by further irradiation. At later stage (above 30 s), bubbles filled with O2 formed by the irradiation, which were distributed along the laser polarization at a distance far beyond the radius of the laser beam. Based on a simple modeling of light reflection on boundaries, a thermal accumulation process was proposed to explain the formation and evolution of the dumbbell-shaped microstructure. The possible factors responsible for polarization dependent distribution of bubbles are discussed, which needs further systematic investigations. The results may be helpful in the development of femtosecond laser microprocessing for various applications. PMID:27661877

  15. Effect of low-energy laser (He-Ne) irradiation on embryo implantation rate in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Anat; Kraicer, P. F.; Oron, Uri

    1997-12-01

    Attempts to date to increase the rate of embryo implantation, for example by assisting embryo hatching from the zona pellucida, have failed. Recently, several studies have suggested the biostimulating effect of low power laser irradiation. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the potential of low power laser irradiation of the uterus to enhance embryo implantation rate in the rat. Rat potential of low power laser irradiation of the uterus to enhance embryo implantation rate in the rat. Rat blastocysts were flushed from the uterus on day 5 of gestation. They were transferred to the uteri of pseudopregnant recipients on day 4 or 5 of pseudopregnancy. One cornu of the recipient uterus was irradiated; the other was used as control. On day 5 of pregnancy, irradiation did not change implantation rate after 10 or 30 sec of irradiation while 120 sec. of irradiation significantly decreased embryonic implantation. On the other hand, on day 4 of pregnancy, 120 sec. of radiation allowed embryonic implantation to a level similar to that seen after synchronized transfer. Conclusion: He-Ne laser irradiation of the exposed rat uterus can attenuate embryo implantation rate.

  16. Dose-rate and irradiation temperature dependence of BJT SPICE model rad-parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Montagner, X.; Briand, R.; Fouillat, P.; Touboul, A.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Galloway, K.F.; Calvet, M.C.; Calvel, P.

    1998-06-01

    A method to predict low dose rate degradation of bipolar transistors using high dose-rate, high temperature irradiation is evaluated, based on an analysis of four new rad-parameters that are introduced in the BJT SPICE model. This improved BJT model describes the radiation-induced excess base current with great accuracy. The low-level values of the rad-parameters are good tools for evaluating the proposed high-temperature test method because of their high sensitivity to radiation-induced degradation.

  17. Effect of damage rate on the kinetics of void nucleation and growth by phase field modeling for materials under irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xuejian; Zhao, Jiejiang; Huang, Hao; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong

    2016-11-01

    The void formation and growth in materials under irradiations is studied by a modified Cahn-Hilliard equation coupled with the explicit nucleation algorithm. Through the numerical simulations, the stages of incubation, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the irradiation induced voids are clearly observed with a faster kinetics for stronger damage rate. There seems to exist a critical damage rate g˙vc at which the kinetics speeds up significantly. For smaller damage rates, very few voids can be nucleated. But the nucleated voids can grow rather large with its average radius growing as Rv ∝t1/d. For stronger irradiations, much more voids could be nucleated, but they cannot grow very large before coarsening. The growth follows a much faster kinetics as Rv ∝t2/d. The critical damage rate g˙vc should be determined by the competition of the rate of diffusion and the rate of vacancy production due to irradiations.

  18. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  19. The dependence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys on displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    Before the parametric dependencies of irradiation creep can be confidently determined, analysis of creep data requires that the various creep and non-creep strains be separated, as well as separating the transient, steady-state, and swelling-driven components of creep. When such separation is attained, it appears that the steady-state creep compliance, B{sub o}, is not a function of displacement rate, as has been previously assumed. It also appears that the formation and growth of helium bubbles under high helium generation conditions can lead to a significant enhancement of the irradiation creep coefficient. This is a transient influence that disappears as void swelling begins to dominate the total strain, but this transient can increase the apparent creep compliance by 100--200% at relatively low ({le}20) dpa levels.

  20. Irradiation swelling behavior and its dependence on temperature, dose rate and dislocation structure evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Surh, M P; Sturgeon, J B; Wolfer, W G

    2004-01-16

    The microstructural evolution of high purity steel under irradiation is modeled including a dislocation density that evolves simultaneously with void nucleation and growth. The predicted void swelling trends versus temperature, flux, and time are compared to experiment and to earlier calculations with a fixed dislocation density. The behavior is further analyzed within a simplified picture of segregation of irradiation defects to microstructural sinks. Agreement with experimental swelling behavior improves when dislocations co-evolve with the void content versus simulations with a fixed dislocation density. The time-dependent dislocation content dictates the rate of void nucleation and shapes the overall void size distribution so as to give steady swelling behavior over long times.

  1. Lymphoid cell kinetics under continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation: A comparison study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanism of cell proliferation is studied in the lymphoid tissue of the mouse spleen under the stress of continuous irradiation at a dose-rate of 10 roentgens per day for 105 days. Autoradiography and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine were utilized. It was found that at least four compensatory mechanisms maintained a near-steady state of cellular growth: (1) an increase in the proportion of PAS-positive cells which stimulate mitotic activity, (2) maturation arrest of proliferating and differentiating cells which tend to replenish the cells damaged or destroyed by irradiation, (3) an increase in the proportion of cells proliferating, and (4) an increase in the proportion of precursor cells. The results are compared to previous findings observed in the thymus.

  2. Continuous Low-dose-rate Irradiation of Iodine-125 Seeds Inhibiting Perineural Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng; Dong, Teng-Hui; Si, Pei-Ren; Shen, Wei; Bi, Yi-Liang; Min, Min; Chen, Xin; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perineural invasion (PNI) is a histopathological characteristic of pancreatic cancer (PanCa). The aim of this study was to observe the treatment effect of continuous low-dose-rate (CLDR) irradiation to PNI and assess the PNI-related pain relief caused by iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation. Methods: The in vitro PNI model established by co-culture with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and cancer cells was interfered under 2 and 4 Gy of 125I seeds CLDR irradiation. The orthotopic models of PNI were established, and 125I seeds were implanted in tumor. The PNI-related molecules were analyzed. In 30 patients with panCa, the pain relief was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Pain intensity was measured before and 1 week, 2 weeks, and 1, 3, and 6 months after 125I seed implantation. Results: The co-culture of DRG and PanCa cells could promote the growth of PanCa cells and DRG neurites. In co-culture groups, the increased number of DRG neurites and pancreatic cells in radiation group was significantly less. In orthotopic models, the PNI-positive rate in radiation and control group was 3/11 and 7/11; meanwhile, the degrees of PNI between radiation and control groups was significant difference (P < 0.05). At week 2, the mean VAS pain score in patients decreased by 50% and significantly improved than the score at baseline (P < 0.05). The pain scores were lower in all patients, and the pain-relieving effect was retained about 3 months. Conclusions: The CLDR irradiation could inhibit PNI of PanCa with the value of further study. The CLDR irradiation could do great favor in preventing local recurrence and alleviating pain. PMID:27748339

  3. Displacement damage rate dependence of defect cluster formation in α-Fe during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Hamaguchi, D.; Tanigawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Formation kinetics of defect clusters in pure iron during irradiation has been numerically investigated by reaction rate theory, with focusing on nucleation process of vacancy clusters (voids) and self-interstitial-atoms (SIA) clusters under a wide range of atomic displacement damage rate (dpa rate) and temperature conditions. In the rate theory model, the size dependence of thermal stability of a defect cluster is treated for a wide range of cluster size. The numerical analysis shows that the nucleation processes of voids and SIA-clusters are quite different from each other. As to the voids, the nucleation rate of voids depends much on temperature and dpa rate, and has the individual peak temperature for each dpa rate, during which the peak temperature increases with increasing dpa rate. This tendency for void nucleation is similar to that for void swelling observed in experiments. As to the SIA-clusters, the nucleation rate of SIA-clusters does not depend much on temperature and has no peak temperatures because of the relatively high thermal stability of an SIA-cluster, indicating that the conventional model (di-interstitial model) is applicable to describe the nucleation of SIA-clusters in a wide range of temperature.

  4. Evaluation of simulated photolysis rates and their response to solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodolov, Timofei; Rozanov, Eugene; Ball, William T.; Bais, Alkiviadis; Tourpali, Kleareti; Shapiro, Alexander I.; Telford, Paul; Smyshlyaev, Sergey; Fomin, Boris; Sander, Rolf; Bossay, Sébastien; Bekki, Slimane; Marchand, Marion; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Dhomse, Sandip; Haigh, Joanna D.; Peter, Thomas; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-05-01

    The state of the stratospheric ozone layer and the temperature structure of the atmosphere are largely controlled by the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) through its influence on heating and photolysis rates. This study focuses on the uncertainties in the photolysis rate response to solar irradiance variability related to the choice of SSI data set and to the performance of the photolysis codes used in global chemistry-climate models. To estimate the impact of SSI uncertainties, we compared several photolysis rates calculated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran, using SSI calculated with two models and observed during the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite mission. The importance of the calculated differences in the photolysis rate response for ozone and temperature changes has been estimated using 1-D a radiative-convective-photochemical model. We demonstrate that the main photolysis reactions, responsible for the solar signal in the stratosphere, are highly sensitive to the spectral distribution of SSI variations. Accordingly, the ozone changes and related ozone-temperature feedback are shown to depend substantially on the SSI data set being used, which highlights the necessity of obtaining accurate SSI variations. To evaluate the performance of photolysis codes, we compared the results of eight, widely used, photolysis codes against two reference schemes. We show that, in most cases, absolute values of the photolysis rates and their response to applied SSI changes agree within 30%. However, larger errors may appear in specific atmospheric regions because of differences, for instance, in the treatment of Rayleigh scattering, quantum yields, or absorption cross sections.

  5. Effect of dose rate of gamma irradiation on biochemical quality and browning of mushrooms Agaricus bisporus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, M.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    In order to enhance the shelf-life of edible mature mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, 2 kGy ionising treatments were applied at two different dose rates: 4.5 kGy/h ( I-) and 32 kGy/h ( I+). Both I+ and I- showed 2 and 4 days shelf-life enhancement compared to the control ( C). Before day 9, no significant difference ( p>0.05) in L* value was detected in irradiated mushrooms. However, after day 9, the highest observed L* value (whiteness) was obtained for the mushrooms irradiated in I-. Analyses of phenolic compounds revealed that mushrooms in I- contained more phenols than I+ and C, the latter containing the lower level of phenols. The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities of irradiated mushrooms, analysed via catechol oxidase and dopa oxidase substrates, resulted in being significantly lowered ( p⩽0.05) compared to C, with a further decrease in I+. Analyses of the enzymes indicated that PPO activity was lower in I+, contrasting with its lower phenol concentration. Ionising treatments also increased significantly ( p⩽0.05) the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity. The observation of mushrooms cellular membranes, by electronic microscopy, revealed a better preserved integrity in I- than in I+. It is thus assumed that the browning effect observed in I+ was caused by both the decompartimentation of vacuolar phenol and by the entry of molecular oxygen into the cell cytoplasm. The synergetic effect of the residual active PPO and the molecular oxygen, in contact with the phenols, allowed an increased oxidation rate and, therefore, a more pronounced browning in I+ than in I-.

  6. Energy related germination and survival rates of water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds irradiated with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H. L.; Xue, J. M.; Lai, J. N.; Wang, J. Y.; Zhang, W. M.; Miao, Q.; Yan, S.; Zhao, W. J.; He, F.; Gu, H. Y.; Wang, Y. G.

    2006-04-01

    In order to investigate the influence of ion energy on the germination and survival rates, water-imbibed Arabidopsis seeds were irradiated with protons in atmosphere. The ion fluence used in this experiment was in the range of 4 × 109-1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The ion energy is from 1.1 MeV to 6.5 MeV. According to the structure of the seed and TRIM simulation, the ions with the energy of 6.5 MeV can irradiate the shoot apical meristem directly whereas the ions with the energy of 1.1 MeV cannot. The results showed that both the germination and survival rates decrease while increasing the ion fluence, and the fluence-respond curve for each energy has different character. Besides the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which is generally considered as the main radiobiological target, the existence of a secondary target around SAM is proposed in this paper.

  7. Study of nanostructure growth with nanoscale apex induced by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz repetition rate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-like nanostructures with nanoscale apex are induced on dielectric target surfaces by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser irradiation in ambient conditions. We have recently developed this unique technique to grow leaf-like nanostructures with such interesting geometry without the use of any catalyst. It was found to be possible only in the presence of background nitrogen gas flow. In this synthesis method, the target serves as the source for building material as well as the substrate upon which these nanostructures can grow. In our investigation, it was found that there are three possible kinds of nanotips that can grow on target surfaces. In this report, we have presented the study of the growth mechanisms of such leaf-like nanostructures under various conditions such as different laser pulse widths, pulse repetition rates, dwell times, and laser polarizations. We observed a clear transformation in the kind of nanotips that grew for the given laser conditions. PMID:23607832

  8. Study of nanostructure growth with nanoscale apex induced by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nikunj B.; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-04-01

    Leaf-like nanostructures with nanoscale apex are induced on dielectric target surfaces by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser irradiation in ambient conditions. We have recently developed this unique technique to grow leaf-like nanostructures with such interesting geometry without the use of any catalyst. It was found to be possible only in the presence of background nitrogen gas flow. In this synthesis method, the target serves as the source for building material as well as the substrate upon which these nanostructures can grow. In our investigation, it was found that there are three possible kinds of nanotips that can grow on target surfaces. In this report, we have presented the study of the growth mechanisms of such leaf-like nanostructures under various conditions such as different laser pulse widths, pulse repetition rates, dwell times, and laser polarizations. We observed a clear transformation in the kind of nanotips that grew for the given laser conditions.

  9. Study of nanostructure growth with nanoscale apex induced by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nikunj B; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-like nanostructures with nanoscale apex are induced on dielectric target surfaces by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser irradiation in ambient conditions. We have recently developed this unique technique to grow leaf-like nanostructures with such interesting geometry without the use of any catalyst. It was found to be possible only in the presence of background nitrogen gas flow. In this synthesis method, the target serves as the source for building material as well as the substrate upon which these nanostructures can grow. In our investigation, it was found that there are three possible kinds of nanotips that can grow on target surfaces. In this report, we have presented the study of the growth mechanisms of such leaf-like nanostructures under various conditions such as different laser pulse widths, pulse repetition rates, dwell times, and laser polarizations. We observed a clear transformation in the kind of nanotips that grew for the given laser conditions. PMID:23607832

  10. Total-body irradiation and cataract incidence: A randomized comparison of two instantaneous dose rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ozsahin, M.; Belkacemi, Y.; Pene, F.; Dominique, C.; Schwartz, L.H.; Uzal, C.; Lefkopoulos, D.; Gindrey-Vie, B.; Vitu-Loas, L.; Touboul, E. )

    1994-01-15

    To assess the influence of instantaneous total-body irradiation dose rate in hematological malignancies, the authors randomized 157 patients according to different instantaneous dose rates. Patients have undergone a total-body irradiation before bone-marrow transplantation according to two different techniques: Either in one fraction (1000 cGy given to the midplane at the level of L4, and 800 cGy to the lungs) or in six fractions (1200 cGy over 3 consecutive days to the midplane at the level of L4, and 900 cGy to the lungs). Patients were randomized according to two instantaneous dose rates, called LOW and HIGH, in single-dose (6 vs. 15 cGy/min) and fractionated (3 vs. 6 cGy/min) TBI groups; there were 77 cases for the LOW and 80 for the HIGH groups, with 57 patients receiving single-dose (28 LOW, 29 HIGH) and 100 patients receiving fractionated total-body irradiation (49 LOW, 51 HIGH). As of July 1992, 16 of 157 patients developed cataracts after 17 to 46 months, with an estimated incidence of 23% at 5 years. Four of 77 patients in the LOW group, 12 of 80 patients in the HIGH group developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 12% and 34%, respectively. Ten of 57 patients in the single-dose group, and 6 of 100 patients in the fractionated group developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 39% and 13%, respectively. When the subgroups were considered, in the single-dose group, 3 of 28 LOW patients, and 7 of 29 HIGH patients developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 24% and 53%, respectively; in the fractionated group, 1 of 49 LOW patients, and 5 of 51 HIGH patients developed cataracts, with 5-year estimated incidences of 4% and 22%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in terms of 5-year estimated cataract incidence between the patients receiving steroids and those not. The instantaneous dose rate was the only independent factor influencing the cataractogenesis. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Synechococcus sp. (PTCC 6021) cultivation under different light irradiances-Modeling of growth rate-light response.

    PubMed

    Moosavi Zenooz, Alireza; Zokaee Ashtiani, Farzin; Ranjbar, Reza; Javadi, Najvan

    2016-08-17

    Synechococcus sp. (PTCC 6021), a cyanobacterium species, was cultivated in an internally illuminated photobioreactor. The reactor was designed to achieve a monoseptic cultivation of the species. The goal was to study the growth-irradiance behavior of Synechococcus sp. (PTCC 6021). To accomplish this, different initial light irradiances were implemented inside the photobioreactor and the growth of the cells was monitored. It was observed that cell growth increased with higher light intensity until the photoinhibition occurrence at light irradiance higher than 250 μE m(-2) s(-1). The maximum OD600, maximum growth rate, and biomass productivity increased, and hence the extinction coefficient decreased, with the increase in light irradiance before photoinhibition. The maximum optical density (OD600) of 5.91 was obtained with irradiance below 250 μE m(-2) s(-1) during a growth period of 80 days. The modified Monod function could model the growth-irradiance of cells with satisfactory agreement with the experimental data. The comparison of growth-irradiance of the studied species with other photosynthetic organisms showed the same trend as for cyanobacteria with photoinhibition.

  12. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body proton-irradiation on lymphocyte blastogenesis and hematological variables: part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, Michael J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Smith, Anna L.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate functional characteristics of leukocytes and circulating blood cell parameters after whole-body proton irradiation at varying doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR and HDR, respectively). C57BL/6 mice (n=51) were irradiated and euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for assay. Significant radiation dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in splenocyte responses to T and B cell mitogens when compared to sham-irradiated controls (P<0.001). Spontaneous blastogenesis, also significantly dose-dependent, was increased in both blood and spleen (P<0.001). Red blood cell counts, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit were decreased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05), whereas thrombocyte numbers were only slightly affected. Comparison of proton- and gamma-irradiated groups (both receiving 3 Gy at HDR) showed a higher level of spontaneous blastogenesis in blood leukocytes and a lower splenocyte response to concanavalin A following proton irradiation (P<0.05). There were no dose rate effects. Collectively, the data demonstrate that the measurements in blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of proton radiation and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor. A difference, however, was found between protons and gamma-rays in the degree of change induced in some of the measurements.

  13. Planetary quarantine in the solar system. Survival rates of some terrestrial organisms under simulated space conditions by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, J.; Oshima, T.

    We have been studying the survival rates of some species of terrestrial unicellular and multicellular organism (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions, in connection with planetary quarantine. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 K, 4 × 10 -8 torr), and proton irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, tobacco mosaic virus, Bacillus subtilis spores, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82, 45, 74, 13, 28, and 25%, respectively.

  14. Development and characterization of a novel variable low-dose rate irradiator for in vivo mouse studies

    PubMed Central

    Olipitz, Werner; Hembrador, Sheena; Davidson, Matthew; Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation exposure of humans generally results in low doses delivered at low dose-rate. Our limited knowledge of the biological effects of low dose radiation is mainly based on data from the atomic bomb long-term survivor study (LSS) cohort. However, the total doses and dose-rates in the LSS cohort are still higher than most environmental and occupational exposures in humans. Importantly, the dose-rate is a critical determinant of health risks stemming from radiation exposure. Understanding the shape of the dose-rate response curve for different biological outcomes is thus crucial for projecting the biological hazard from radiation in different environmental and man-made conditions. A significant barrier to performing low dose-rate studies is the difficulty in creating radiation source configurations compatible with long-term cellular or animal experiments. In this study the design and characterization of a large area, 125I-based irradiator is described. The irradiator allows continuous long-term exposure of mice at variable dose-rates and can be sited in standard animal care facilities. The dose-rate is determined by the level of 125I activity added to a large NaOH filled, rectangular phantom. The desired dose rate is maintained at essentially constant levels by weekly additions of 125I to compensate for decay. Dosimetry results for long-term animal irradiation at targeted dose rates of 0.00021 and 0.0021 cGy min−1 are presented. PMID:20386202

  15. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body proton irradiation on leukocyte populations and lymphoid organs: part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Dutta-Roy, Radha; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of part I of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole-body proton irradiation on lymphoid organs and specific leukocyte populations. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the entry region of the proton Bragg curve to total doses of 0.5 gray (Gy), 1.5 Gy, and 3.0 Gy, each delivered at a low dose rate (LDR) of 1 cGy/min and high dose rate (HDR) of 80 cGy/min. Non-irradiated and 3 Gy HDR gamma-irradiated groups were included as controls. At 4 days post-irradiation, highly significant radiation dose-dependent reductions were observed in the mass of both lymphoid organs and the numbers of leukocytes and T (CD3(+)), T helper (CD3(+)/CD4(+)), T cytotoxic (CD3(+)/CD8(+)), and B (CD19(+)) cells in both blood and spleen. A less pronounced dose effect was noted for natural killer (NK1.1(+) NK) cells in spleen. Monocyte, but not granulocyte, counts in blood were highly dose-dependent. The numbers for each population generally tended to be lower with HDR than with LDR radiation; a significant dose rate effect was found in the percentages of T and B cells, monocytes, and granulocytes and in CD4(+):CD8(+) ratios. These data indicate that mononuclear cell response to the entry region of the proton Bragg curve is highly dependent upon the total dose and that dose rate effects are evident with some cell types. Results from gamma- and proton-irradiated groups (both at 3 Gy HDR) were similar, although proton-irradiation gave consistently lower values in some measurements.

  16. Importance of amino acid composition to improve skin collagen protein synthesis rates in UV-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hitoshi; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Inoue, Yoshiko; Takino, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2012-06-01

    Skin collagen metabolism abnormalities induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation are the major causes of skin photoaging. It has been shown that the one-time exposure of UV irradiation decreases procollagen mRNA expression in dermis and that chronic UV irradiation decreases collagen amounts and induces wrinkle formation. Amino acids are generally known to regulate protein metabolism. Therefore, we investigated the effects of UV irradiation and various orally administered amino acids on skin collagen synthesis rates. Groups of 4-5 male, 8-week-old HR-1 hairless mice were irradiated with UVB (66 mJ/cm2) twice every other day, then fasted for 16 h. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR; %/h) of skin tropocollagen was evaluated by incorporating L-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine. We confirmed that the FSR of dermal tropocollagen decreased after UVB irradiation. The FSR of dermal tropocollagen was measured 30 min after a single oral administration of amino acids (1 g/kg) to groups of 5-16 UVB-irradiated mice. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, 1.34±0.32), arginine (Arg, 1.66±0.39), glutamine (Gln, 1.75±0.60), and proline (Pro, 1.48±0.26) did not increase the FSR of skin tropocollagen compared with distilled water, which was used as a control (1.56±0.30). However, essential amino acids mixtures (BCAA+Arg+Gln, BCAA+Gln, and BCAA+Pro) significantly increased the FSR (2.07±0.58, 2.04±0.54, 2.01±0.50 and 2.07±0.59, respectively). This result suggests that combinations of BCAA and glutamine or proline are important for restoring dermal collagen protein synthesis impaired by UV irradiation.

  17. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    The problem studied involved cell proliferation in mice thymus undergoing irradiation at a dose rate of 10 roetgens/day for 105 days. Specifically, the aim was to determine wheather or not a steady state of cell population can be established for the indicated period of time and what compensatory mechanisms of cell population are involved.

  18. Soluble carbohydrate allocation to roots, photosynthetic rate of leaves, and nitrate assimilation as affected by nitrogen stress and irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, L. T.; Raper, C. D. Jr

    1991-01-01

    Upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen to nitrogen-stressed plants, uptake rate of nitrogen is enhanced relative to nonstressed plants. Absorption of nitrogen presumably is dependent on availability of carbohydrates in the roots. A buildup in soluble carbohydrates thus should occur in roots of nitrogen-stressed plants, and upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen the increased uptake rate should be accompanied by a rapid decline in carbohydrates to prestress levels. To evaluate this relationship, three sets of tobacco plants growing in a complete hydroponic solution containing 1.0 mM NO3- were either continued in the complete solution for 21 d, transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 21 d, or transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 8-9 d and then returned to the 1.0 mM NO3- solution. These nitrogen treatments were imposed upon plants growing at photosynthetic photon flux densities of 700 and 350 micromoles m-2 s-1. Soluble carbohydrate levels in roots increased during onset of nitrogen stress to levels that were fourfold greater than in roots of non-stressed plants. Following resupply of external nitrogen, a rapid resumption of nitrogen uptake was accompanied by a decline in soluble carbohydrates in roots to levels characteristic of nonstressed plants. This pattern of soluble carbohydrate levels in roots during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress occurred at both irradiance levels. The response of net photosynthetic rate to nitrogen stress could be expressed as a nonlinear function of concentration of reduced nitrogen in leaves. The net photosynthetic rate at a given concentration of reduced nitrogen, however, averaged 10% less at the lower than at the higher irradiance. The decline in net photosynthetic rate per unit of reduced nitrogen in leaves at the lower irradiance was accompanied by an increase in the nitrate fraction of total nitrogen in leaves from 20% at the higher irradiance to 38% at the lower irradiance.

  19. Soluble carbohydrate allocation to roots, photosynthetic rate of leaves, and nitrate assimilation as affected by nitrogen stress and irradiance.

    PubMed

    Henry, L T; Raper, C D

    1991-03-01

    Upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen to nitrogen-stressed plants, uptake rate of nitrogen is enhanced relative to nonstressed plants. Absorption of nitrogen presumably is dependent on availability of carbohydrates in the roots. A buildup in soluble carbohydrates thus should occur in roots of nitrogen-stressed plants, and upon resupply of exogenous nitrogen the increased uptake rate should be accompanied by a rapid decline in carbohydrates to prestress levels. To evaluate this relationship, three sets of tobacco plants growing in a complete hydroponic solution containing 1.0 mM NO3- were either continued in the complete solution for 21 d, transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 21 d, or transferred to a minus-nitrogen solution for 8-9 d and then returned to the 1.0 mM NO3- solution. These nitrogen treatments were imposed upon plants growing at photosynthetic photon flux densities of 700 and 350 micromoles m-2 s-1. Soluble carbohydrate levels in roots increased during onset of nitrogen stress to levels that were fourfold greater than in roots of non-stressed plants. Following resupply of external nitrogen, a rapid resumption of nitrogen uptake was accompanied by a decline in soluble carbohydrates in roots to levels characteristic of nonstressed plants. This pattern of soluble carbohydrate levels in roots during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress occurred at both irradiance levels. The response of net photosynthetic rate to nitrogen stress could be expressed as a nonlinear function of concentration of reduced nitrogen in leaves. The net photosynthetic rate at a given concentration of reduced nitrogen, however, averaged 10% less at the lower than at the higher irradiance. The decline in net photosynthetic rate per unit of reduced nitrogen in leaves at the lower irradiance was accompanied by an increase in the nitrate fraction of total nitrogen in leaves from 20% at the higher irradiance to 38% at the lower irradiance.

  20. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and methods for monitoring the dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2006-03-28

    A scanned, pulsed, focused laser irradiation apparatus can measure and image the photocurrent collection resulting from a dose-rate equivalent exposure to infrared laser light across an entire silicon die. Comparisons of dose-rate response images or time-delay images from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems allows precise identification of those specific age-affected circuit structures within a device that merit further quantitative analysis with targeted materials or electrical testing techniques. Another embodiment of the invention comprises a broad-beam, dose rate-equivalent exposure apparatus. The broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. This embodiment can be combined with the synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into a device under test to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure.

  1. Low Cloud Cover-Adjusted Ultraviolet B Irradiance Is Associated with High Incidence Rates of Leukemia: Study of 172 Countries

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are 52,380 cases of leukemia and 24,090 deaths from it in the US annually. Its causes are unknown and no preventive strategies have been implemented. We hypothesized that leukemia is due mainly to vitamin D deficiency, which is due mainly to low solar ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance. To test this hypothesis, we estimated age-standardized cloud-cover-adjusted winter UVB irradiance using cloud cover data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, latitudes of population centroids, and standard astronomical calculations. Incidence rates for 172 countries, available from the International Agency for Cancer Research, were plotted according to cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance. We used multiple regression to account for national differences in elevation and average life expectancy. Leukemia incidence rates were inversely associated with cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance in males (p ≤ 0.01) and females (p ≤ 0.01) in both hemispheres. There were few departures from the trend line, which was parabolic when plotted with the equator at the center of the display, northern hemisphere countries on the right side and southern hemisphere countries on the left. The bivariate association displayed by the polynomial trend line indicated that populations at higher latitudes had at least two times the risk of leukemia compared to equatorial populations. The association persisted in males (p ≤ 0.05) and females (p ≤ 0.01) after controlling for elevation and life expectancy. Incidence rates of leukemia were inversely associated with solar UVB irradiance. It is plausible that the association is due to vitamin D deficiency. This would be consistent with laboratory studies and a previous epidemiological study. Consideration should be given to prudent use of vitamin D for prevention of leukemia. PMID:26637119

  2. Low Cloud Cover-Adjusted Ultraviolet B Irradiance Is Associated with High Incidence Rates of Leukemia: Study of 172 Countries.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Raphael E; Garland, Cedric F; Gorham, Edward D; Mohr, Sharif B

    2015-01-01

    There are 52,380 cases of leukemia and 24,090 deaths from it in the US annually. Its causes are unknown and no preventive strategies have been implemented. We hypothesized that leukemia is due mainly to vitamin D deficiency, which is due mainly to low solar ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiance. To test this hypothesis, we estimated age-standardized cloud-cover-adjusted winter UVB irradiance using cloud cover data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, latitudes of population centroids, and standard astronomical calculations. Incidence rates for 172 countries, available from the International Agency for Cancer Research, were plotted according to cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance. We used multiple regression to account for national differences in elevation and average life expectancy. Leukemia incidence rates were inversely associated with cloud-adjusted UVB irradiance in males (p ≤ 0.01) and females (p ≤ 0.01) in both hemispheres. There were few departures from the trend line, which was parabolic when plotted with the equator at the center of the display, northern hemisphere countries on the right side and southern hemisphere countries on the left. The bivariate association displayed by the polynomial trend line indicated that populations at higher latitudes had at least two times the risk of leukemia compared to equatorial populations. The association persisted in males (p ≤ 0.05) and females (p ≤ 0.01) after controlling for elevation and life expectancy. Incidence rates of leukemia were inversely associated with solar UVB irradiance. It is plausible that the association is due to vitamin D deficiency. This would be consistent with laboratory studies and a previous epidemiological study. Consideration should be given to prudent use of vitamin D for prevention of leukemia. PMID:26637119

  3. Preliminary experience on the implementation of computed tomography (CT)-based image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) of cervical cancer using high-dose-rate (HDR) Cobalt-60 source in University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalludin, Z.; Min, U. N.; Ishak, W. Z. Wan; Malik, R. Abdul

    2016-03-01

    This study presents our preliminary work of the computed tomography (CT) image guided brachytherapy (IGBT) implementation on cervical cancer patients. We developed a protocol in which patients undergo two Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations; a) prior to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and b) prior to intra-cavitary brachytherapy for tumour identification and delineation during IGBT planning and dosimetry. For each fraction, patients were simulated using CT simulator and images were transferred to the treatment planning system. The HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder and rectum were delineated on CT-based contouring for cervical cancer. Plans were optimised to achieve HR-CTV and IR-CTV dose (D90) of total EQD2 80Gy and 60Gy respectively, while limiting the minimum dose to the most irradiated 2cm3 volume (D2cc) of bladder and rectum to total EQD2 90Gy and 75Gy respectively. Data from seven insertions were analysed by comparing the volume-based with traditional point- based doses. Based on our data, there were differences between volume and point doses of HR- CTV, bladder and rectum organs. As the number of patients having the CT-based IGBT increases from day to day in our centre, it is expected that the treatment and dosimetry accuracy will be improved with the implementation.

  4. Intra-cavitary dosimetry for IMRT head and neck treatment using thermoluminescent dosimeters in a naso-oesophageal tube.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, F M; Roxby, K J; Engström, P E; Crosbie, J C

    2009-06-21

    Complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans require rigorous quality assurance tests. The aim of this study was to independently verify the delivered dose inside the patient in the region of the treatment site. A flexible naso-gastric tube containing thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) was inserted into the oesophagus via the sinus cavity before the patient's first treatment. Lead markers were also inserted into the tube in order that the TLD positions could be accurately determined from the lateral and anterior-posterior electronic portal images taken prior to treatment. The measured dose was corrected for both daily linac output variations and the estimated dose received from the portal images. The predicted dose for each TLD was determined from the treatment planning system and compared to the measured TLD doses. The results comprise 431 TLD measurements on 43 patients. The mean measured-to-predicted dose ratio was 0.988 +/- 0.011 (95% confidence interval) for measured doses above 0.2 Gy. There was a variation in this ratio when the measurements were separated into low dose (0.2-1.0 Gy), medium dose (1.0-1.8 Gy) and high dose (>1.8 Gy) measurements. The TLD-loaded, naso-oesophageal tube for in vivo dose verification is straightforward to implement, and well tolerated by patients. It provides independent reassurance of the delivered dose for head and neck IMRT.

  5. Void Swelling Of Aisi 321 Analog Stainless Steel Irradiated At Low Dpa Rates In The Bn-350 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimkin, O. P.; Tsai, K. V.; Turubarova, L. G.; Doronina, T. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2006-03-01

    In several recently published studies conducted on a Soviet analog of AISI 321 stainless steel irradiated in either fast reactors or light water reactors, it was shown that the void swelling phenomenon extended to temperatures as low as ~300ºC or less, when produced by neutron irradiation at dpa rates in the range 10-7 to 10-8 dpa/sec. Other studies yielded similar results for AISI 316 and the Russian analog of AISI 316. In the current study a blanket duct assembly from BN-350, constructed from the Soviet analog of AISI 321, also exhibits swelling at dpa rates on the order of 10-8 dpa/sec, with voids seen as low as 281oC and only 0.65 dpa. It appears that low-temperature swelling occurs at low dpa rates in 300 series stainless steels in general, and also occurs during irradiations conducted in either fast or mixed spectrum reactors. Therefore it is expected that a similar behavior will be observed in fusion devices as well.

  6. Void Swelling of AISI 321 Analog Stainless Steel Irradiated at Low DPA Rates in the BN-350 Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimkin, O. P.; Tsai, K. V.; Turubarova, L. G.; Doronina, T. A.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-08-01

    In several recently published studies conducted on a Soviet analog of AISI 321 stainless steel irradiated in either fast reactors or light water reactors, it was shown that the void swelling phenomenon extended to temperatures as low as ~300ºC or less, when produced by neutron irradiation at dpa rates in the range 10-7 to 10-8 dpa/sec. Other studies yielded similar results for AISI 316 and the Russian analog of AISI 316. In the current study a blanket duct assembly from BN-350, constructed from the Soviet analog of AISI 321, also exhibits swelling at dpa rates on the order of 10-8 dpa/sec, with voids seen as low as 281C and only 0.65 dpa. It appears that low-temperature swelling occurs at low dpa rates in 300 series stainless steels in general, and also occurs during irradiations conducted in either fast or in mixed spectrum reactors as shown in other studies.

  7. Void swelling of AISI 321 analog stainless steel irradiated at low dpa rates in the BN-350 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimkin, O. P.; Tsai, K. V.; Turubarova, L. G.; Doronina, T.; Garner, F. A.

    2007-08-01

    In several recently published studies conducted on a Soviet analog of AISI 321 stainless steel irradiated in either fast reactors or light water reactors, it was shown that the void swelling phenomenon extended to temperatures as low as ˜300 °C or less, when produced by neutron irradiation at dpa rates in the range 10 -7-10 -8 dpa/s. Other studies yielded similar results for AISI 316 and the Russian analog of AISI 316. In the current study a blanket assembly duct from BN-350, constructed from the Soviet analog of AISI 321, also exhibits swelling at dpa rates on the order of 10 -8 dpa/s, with voids seen as low as 281 °C and only 0.65 dpa. It appears that low-temperature swelling occurs at low dpa rates in 300 series stainless steels in general, and also occurs during irradiations conducted in either fast or in mixed spectrum reactors as shown in other studies.

  8. Strain rate dependence of the tensile properties of V-(4--5%)Cr-(4--5%)Ti irradiated in EBR-II and HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1998-03-01

    Elevated temperature tensile tests performed on V-(405)Cr-(4-5)Ti indicate that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 200 C, and decreases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 400 C. This observation is in qualitative agreement with the temperature-dependent strain rate effects observed on unirradiated specimens, and implies that some interstitial solute remains free to migrate in irradiated specimens. Additional strain rate data at different temperatures are needed.

  9. Repair rates of DNA double-strand breaks under different doses of proton and γ-ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jingwen; Fu, Qibin; Quan, Yi; Wang, Weikang; Mei, Tao; Li, Jia; Yang, Gen; Ren, Xiaotang; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Yugang

    2012-04-01

    It is known that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which can be induced by a variety of treatments including ionizing radiation (IR), can cause most deleterious consequences among all kinds of DNA lesions. However, it is still under debate about whether DSBs repair is equally efficient after low and high-LET radiation, especially the basic biological responses after exposure to high-LET particles. In present study, synchronous fibroblast normal Human lung fibroblast (NHLF) cells were irradiated with graded doses of proton and γ-ray. Then γ-H2AX foci assay was used to monitor DSBs induction and repair at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 18 h post irradiation. The results showed that the γ-ray irradiation could produce more γ-H2AX foci than proton irradiation at the same dose. However, compared to low LET radiation with γ-ray, the results also showed a much slower DSBs repair rate after high LET radiation with protons, suggesting that the cellular ability to eliminate DSBs after low and high-LET ionizing radiation is quite different.

  10. Enhancement of transformation rates in higher plants by low-dose irradiation: Are DNA repair systems involved in the incorporation of exogenous DNA into the plant genome?

    PubMed

    Köhler, F; Cardon, G; Pöhlman, M; Gill, R; Schieder, O

    1989-02-01

    Irradiation (X-ray; 5-15 Gy) of protoplasts treated with plasmid-DNA and PEG yielded higher transformation rates in comparison to non-irradiated protoplasts transformed by the same method. This could be demonstrated for four plant species. The irradiation doses used did not affect the total number of colonies regenerated without selection pressure, but resulted in 3-6-fold enhancement of hygromycin- or kanamycin-resistant colonies. Plant regeneration frequencies of transformed colonies derived from irradiated and non-irradiated protoplasts were similar in tobacco as well as in Petunia. Higher integration rates of foreign DNA as a consequence of an increased recombination machinery in irradiated cells may be responsible for the enhancement of the number of stably transformed colonies.

  11. Study of variations in structural, optical parameters and bulk etch rate of CR-39 polymer due to electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, G. S.; Tripathy, S. P.; Joshi, D. S.; Bandyopadhyay, T.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, electron induced modifications on the bulk etch rate, structural and optical parameters of CR-39 polymer were studied using gravimetric, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV-vis (Ultraviolet-Visible) techniques, respectively. CR-39 samples were irradiated with 10 MeV electron beam for different durations to have the absorbed doses of 1, 10, 550, 5500, 16 500, and 55 000 kGy. From the FTIR analysis, the peak intensities at different bands were found to be changing with electron dose. A few peaks were observed to shift at high electron doses. From the UV-vis analysis, the optical band gaps for both direct and indirect transitions were found to be decreasing with the increase in electron dose whereas the opacity, number of carbon atoms in conjugation length, and the number of carbon atoms per cluster were found to be increasing. The bulk etch rate was observed to be increasing with the electron dose. The primary objective of this investigation was to study the response of CR-39 to high electron doses and to determine a suitable pre-irradiation condition. The results indicated that, the CR-39 pre-irradiated with electrons can have better sensitivity and thus can be potentially applied for neutron dosimetry.

  12. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: II. Hematological variables and cytokines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, D. S.; Pecaut, M. J.; Miller, G. M.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma-radiation on circulating blood cells, functional characteristics of splenocytes, and cytokine expression after whole-body irradiation at varying total doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR, HDR). Young adult C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were irradiated with either 1 cGy/min or 80 cGy/min photons from a 60Co source to cumulative doses of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy. The animals were euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for in vitro assays. Significant dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in erythrocyte and blood leukocyte counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced 3H-thymidine incorporation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion by activated spleen cells when compared to sham-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Basal proliferation of leukocytes in the blood and spleen increased significantly with increasing dose (p < 0.05). Significant dose rate effects were observed only in thrombocyte counts. Plasma levels of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and splenocyte secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were not affected by either the dose or dose rate of radiation. The data demonstrate that the responses of blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of radiation employed and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor in the great majority of measurements.

  13. The effect of heating rate on thermoluminescence of anion-defective alumina after high-dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, S. V.; Kortov, V. S.; Makkambaev, B. A.; Aminov, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    The dependences of the light sum of peaks of thermoluminescence (TL) at 180 and 300°C on the rate of heating of single crystals of anion-defective alumina after high-dose irradiation are investigated. It is found that these dependences for the peak at 180°C are the same for all studied samples and match the known dependence measured after low-dose irradiation. The curves for the TL peak at 300°C vary significantly from one sample to another. The parameters of thermal TL quenching are calculated for both peaks using the Monte Carlo method. Practical suggestions regarding the use of the obtained results in high-dose dosimetry are provided.

  14. The effect of continuous low dose-rate gamma irradiation on cell population kinetics of lymphoid tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. R.

    1974-01-01

    Cellular response and cell population kinetics were studied during lymphopoiesis in the thymus of the mouse under continuous gamma irradiation using autoradiographic techniques and specific labeling with tritiated thymidine. On the basis of tissue weights, it is concluded that the response of both the thymus and spleen to continuous low dose-rate irradiation is multiphasic. That is, alternating periods of steady state growth, followed by collapse, which in turn is followed by another period of homeostasis. Since there are two populations of lymphocytes - short lived and long-lived, it may be that different phases of steady state growth are mediated by different lymphocytes. The spleen is affected to a greater extent with shorter periods of steady-state growth than exhibited by the thymus.

  15. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2008-05-20

    A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

  16. The effect of ultrasound irradiation on the convective heat transfer rate during immersion cooling of a stationary sphere.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-11-01

    It has been proven that ultrasound irradiation can enhance the rate of heat transfer processes. The objective of this work was to study the heat transfer phenomenon, mainly the heat exchange at the surface, as affected by ultrasound irradiation around a stationary copper sphere (k=386W m(-1)K(-1), C(p)=384J kg(-1)K(-1), ρ=8660kg m(-3)) during cooling. The sphere (0.01m in diameter) was immersed in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-10°C) in an ultrasonic cooling system that included a refrigerated circulator, a flow meter, an ultrasound generator and an ultrasonic bath. The temperature of the sphere was recorded using a data logger equipped with a T-type thermocouple in the center of the sphere. The temperature of the cooling medium was also monitored by four thermocouples situated at different places in the bath. The sphere was located at different positions (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06m) above the transducer surface of the bath calculated considering the center of the sphere as the center of the reference system and was exposed to different intensities of ultrasound (0, 120, 190, 450, 890, 1800, 2800, 3400 and 4100W m(-2)) during cooling. The frequency of the ultrasound was 25kHz. It was demonstrated that ultrasound irradiation can increase the rate of heat transfer significantly, resulting in considerably shorter cooling times. Higher intensities caused higher cooling rates, and Nu values were increased from about 23-27 to 25-108 depending on the intensity of ultrasound and the position of the sphere. However, high intensities of ultrasound led to the generation of heat at the surface of the sphere, thus limiting the lowest final temperature achieved. An analytical solution was developed considering the heat generation and was fitted to the experimental data with R(2) values in the range of 0.910-0.998. Visual observations revealed that both cavitation and acoustic streaming were important for heat transfer phenomenon. Cavitation clouds at the surface of the sphere

  17. The effect of ultrasound irradiation on the convective heat transfer rate during immersion cooling of a stationary sphere.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-11-01

    It has been proven that ultrasound irradiation can enhance the rate of heat transfer processes. The objective of this work was to study the heat transfer phenomenon, mainly the heat exchange at the surface, as affected by ultrasound irradiation around a stationary copper sphere (k=386W m(-1)K(-1), C(p)=384J kg(-1)K(-1), ρ=8660kg m(-3)) during cooling. The sphere (0.01m in diameter) was immersed in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-10°C) in an ultrasonic cooling system that included a refrigerated circulator, a flow meter, an ultrasound generator and an ultrasonic bath. The temperature of the sphere was recorded using a data logger equipped with a T-type thermocouple in the center of the sphere. The temperature of the cooling medium was also monitored by four thermocouples situated at different places in the bath. The sphere was located at different positions (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06m) above the transducer surface of the bath calculated considering the center of the sphere as the center of the reference system and was exposed to different intensities of ultrasound (0, 120, 190, 450, 890, 1800, 2800, 3400 and 4100W m(-2)) during cooling. The frequency of the ultrasound was 25kHz. It was demonstrated that ultrasound irradiation can increase the rate of heat transfer significantly, resulting in considerably shorter cooling times. Higher intensities caused higher cooling rates, and Nu values were increased from about 23-27 to 25-108 depending on the intensity of ultrasound and the position of the sphere. However, high intensities of ultrasound led to the generation of heat at the surface of the sphere, thus limiting the lowest final temperature achieved. An analytical solution was developed considering the heat generation and was fitted to the experimental data with R(2) values in the range of 0.910-0.998. Visual observations revealed that both cavitation and acoustic streaming were important for heat transfer phenomenon. Cavitation clouds at the surface of the sphere

  18. Recovery capacity of glial progenitors after in vivo fission-neutron or X irradiation: age dependence, fractionation and low-dose-rate irradiations.

    PubMed

    Philippo, H; Winter, E A M; van der Kogel, A J; Huiskamp, R

    2005-06-01

    Previous experiments on the radiosensitivity of O-2A glial progenitors determined for single-dose fission-neutron and X irradiation showed log-linear survival curves, suggesting a lack of accumulation of recovery of sublethal damage. In the present study, we addressed this question and further characterized the radiobiological properties of these glial stem cells by investigating the recovery capacity of glial stem cells using either fractionated or protracted whole-body irradiation. Irradiations were performed on newborn, 2-week-old or 12-week-old rats. Fractionated irradiations (four fractions) were performed with 24-h intervals, followed by cell isolations 16- 24 h after the last irradiation. Single-dose irradiations were followed by cell isolation 16-24 h after irradiation or delayed cell isolation (4 days after irradiation) of the O-2A progenitor cells from either spinal cord (newborns) or optic nerve (2- and 12-week-old rats). Results for neonatal progenitor cell survival show effect ratios for both fractionated fission-neutron and X irradiation of the order of 1.8 when compared with single-dose irradiation. A similar ratio was found after single-dose irradiation combined with delayed plating. Comparable results were observed for juvenile and adult optic nerve progenitors, with effect ratios of the order of 1.2. The present investigation clearly shows that fractionated irradiation regimens using X rays or fission neutrons and CNS tissue from rats of various ages results in an increase in O-2A progenitor cell survival while repair is virtually absent. This recovery of the progenitor pool after irradiation can be observed at all ages but is greatest in the neonatal spinal cord and can probably be attributed to repopulation. PMID:15913395

  19. Rate constant for reaction of vitamin C with protein radicals in γ-irradiated aqueous albumin solution at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Toru; Mita, Kazuya; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1995-02-01

    When an aqueous solution of albumin (0.1 kg dm -3) is irradiated by γ-rays at 295 K, albumin radicals with a long lifetime are observed by ESR. The reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals has been studied at 295 K in the albumin solution, which is considered as a model of cells. The rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals was measured as 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, which is much smaller than the reported rate constants (10 6-10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1) for the reaction of vitamin C with radicals in a dilute aqueous solution. The small rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C is ascribed to the reaction in polymer coils in the albumin solution, since vitamin C and albumin radicals diffuse very slowly in the coils.

  20. Enhancing the growth rate and astaxanthin yield of Haematococcus pluvialis by nuclear irradiation and high concentration of carbon dioxide stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Ke; Yang, Zongbo; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-03-01

    Unicellular green microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis was mutated with (60)Co-γ irradiation to promote growth rate and increase astaxanthin yield under high concentration of CO2 stress. The average specific growth rate of H. pluvialis mutated with 4000 Gy γ-ray irradiation was increased by 15% compared with the original strain with air aeration. The mutant grew best with 6% CO2 (the maximum specific growth rate was 0.60/d) when it was cultured with high concentrations of CO2 (2-10%). The peak biomass productivity (0.16 g/L/d) of the mutant cultured with 6% CO2 was 82% higher than that of the mutant with air. The astaxanthin yield and lipid content of the mutant induced with 6% CO2 and high light (108 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)) increased to 46.0mg/L and 45.9%, which were 2.4 and 1.3 times higher than those of the wild-type strain, respectively.

  1. Dose rate effect of gamma irradiation on phenolic compounds, polyphenol oxidase, and browning of mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus).

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, M; D'Aprano, M B; Lacroix, M

    1999-07-01

    To enhance the shelf life of edible mature mushrooms, Agaricus bisporus, 2 kGy ionizing treatments were applied at two different dose rates: 4.5 kGy/h (I(-)) and 32 kGy/h (I(+)). Both I(+) and I(-) showed a 2 and 4 day shelf-life enhancement compared to the control (C). Before day 9, no significant difference (p>0.05) in L value was detected in irradiated mushrooms. However, after day 9, the highest observed L value (whiteness) was obtained for the mushrooms irradiated in I(-). Analyses of phenolic compounds revealed that mushrooms in I(-) contained more phenols than I(+) and C, the latter containing the lower level of phenols. The fluctuation of the precursors of glutaminyl-4-hydroxyaniline (GHB) was less in I(-) than in I(+). The polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities of irradiated mushrooms, analyzed via catechol oxidase, dopa oxidase, and tyrosine hydroxylase substrates, were found to be significantly lowered (p = 0.05) compared to C, with a further decrease in I(+). Analyses of the enzymes indicated that PPO activity was lower in I(+), contrasting with its lower phenols concentration. The observation of mushrooms' cellular membranes, by electronic microscopy, revealed a better preserved integrity in I(-) than in I(+). It is thus assumed that the browning effect observed in I(+) was caused by both the decompartmentation of vacuolar phenol and the entry of molecular oxygen into the cell cytoplasm. The synergetic effect of the residual active PPO and the molecular oxygen, in contact with the phenols, allowed an increased oxidation rate and, therefore, a more pronounced browning I(+) than in I(-).

  2. Mesoscale distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance, actinic flux, and photolysis rates derived from multispectral satellite data and radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Melanie A.; Slusser, James R.

    2005-04-01

    Global atmospheric trends in ozone column amount have focused attention on the environmental risk of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Monitoring UV irradiance in diverse and remote locations is necessary to understand the variability of exposure, dose rates, and resultant vulnerability of ecological systems. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring Program maintains a wide network for ground-based continuous measurement of solar radiation in several wavelengths of interest for photosynthesis, plant growth, UV exposure to humans, and photochemistry. This network provides data for analysis of UV climatology and trends at those sites. A satellite-based method to produce mesoscale-resolution mapped distributions of UV spectral irradiance has been developed that utilizes this network data for verification. The methodology combines radiative transfer modeling, multispectral image pixel classification, cloud optical depth retrievals, and auxiliary remote sensing data. Retrieved parameters are compared with ground-based measurements from the USDA network instrumentation at two sites [Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; 65.12 deg N, 147.43 deg W, 550 m mean sea level (MSL); and Storm Peak Laboratory, Colorado, 40.45 deg N, 106.73 deg W, 3220 m MSL]. The results are used to evaluate the effects of cloud distribution and surface albedo in determining mesoscale variability of UV exposure and photolysis rates in high-latitude and high-altitude environments.

  3. Dose rate dependence of radiation-induced lattice defects and performance degradation in npn Si bipolar transistors by 2-MeV electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayama, K.; Takakura, K.; Ohyama, H.; Kuboyama, S.; Simoen, E.; Mercha, A.; Claeys, C.

    2007-12-01

    Total-dose response of npn Si transistors by 2-MeV electrons is presented for different dose rates. The base current increases after irradiation, whereas the collector current decreases. Therefore, the current gain ( β) decreases by irradiation. The degradation of electrical properties by 2-MeV electrons for low dose rate is higher than that for high dose rate. Similar dose rate dependence of the radiation-induced electron trap densities is observed by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements.

  4. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  5. Kinetics of the current response in TlBr detectors under a high dose rate of {gamma}-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gazizov, I. M.; Zaletin, V. M.; Kukushkin, V. M.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Lisitsky, I. S.

    2012-03-15

    The kinetics of the photocurrent response in doped and undoped TlBr samples subjected to irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons from a {sup 137}Cs source with the dose rate 0.033 to 3.84 Gy/min are studied. The crystals were grown by the directional crystallization of the melt method using the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The Pb impurity mass fraction introduced into the doped TlBr crystals was 1-10 ppm and amounted to 150 ppm for the Ca impurity. The crystals were grown in a vacuum, in bromine vapors, in a hydrogen atmosphere, and in air. Decay of the photocurrent is observed for extrinsic semiconductor crystals doped with bivalent cations (irrespective of the growth atmosphere), and also for crystals grown in hydrogen and crystals grown in an excess of thallium. The time constant of photocurrent decay {tau} amounted to 30-1400 s and was proportional to resistivity. It is shown that the current response can be related to photolysis in the TlBr crystals during irradiation with {gamma}-ray photons. The energy of hole traps responsible for a slow increase in the photo-current has been estimated and found to be equal to 0.6-0.85 eV.

  6. Differential expression of cancer pathway-related genes in low-versus high-dose-rate-irradiated AKR/J mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong Bong, Jin; Kang, Yu Mi; Shin, Suk Chul; Choi, Moo Hyun; Choi, Seung Jin; Kim, Hee Sun

    2012-11-01

    To understand the biological effects of ionizing radiation on lymphomagenesis, we reared AKR/J mice for 130 days with exposure to either high-dose-rate (HDR, 0.8 Gy/min, a single dose of 4.5 Gy) or low-dose-rate (LDR, 0.7 mGy/h, a cumulative dose of 2.1 Gy) irradiation. After 130 days, we compared the mean thymus weight, analyzed the histological changes, and measured apoptotic cell numbers using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. We also used microarrays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis (qPCR) to analyze the expression profiles of cancer pathway-related genes in the thymuses of the mice. The mean thymus weight of the LDR-irradiated mice decreased relative to Sham- and HDR-irradiated mice. Histopathological examination revealed that the neoplastic cells in the thymuses of the Sham- and HDR-irradiated mice were pleomorphic, with marked anisocytosis and anisokaryosis, whereas the cells and their nuclei were relatively small and uniform in size in the LDR-irradiated mice. Furthermore, TUNEL assays showed that the number of apoptotic cells was higher in the LDR-irradiated mice than in the Sham- and HDR-irradiated mice. Microarray analysis showed differentially expressed genes according to carcinogenic stage (DNA repair/genomic instability, DNA damage signaling pathway, cell cycle, cancer pathway, p53 signaling pathway, apoptosis, and T- and B-cell activation). qPCR data for cancer pathway-related genes showed that Cds1 gene expression was upregulated in the LDR-irradiated mice, whereas expression of the Itga4, Myc, and Itgb1 genes was upregulated in the irradiated mice. However, the functions of cancer pathway-related genes require further study and validation.

  7. Theory of absorption rate of carriers in fused silica under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Wu, SY; Jiang, XD; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Sun, Kai

    2010-11-15

    A quantum non-perturbation theory for phonon-assisted photon absorption of conduction band electron in intense laser was developed. By carrying out the calculation in fused silica at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared in terawatt intensity laser, we show that the Non-perturbation approach can make a uniform description of energy absorption rate at both short wavelengths and long wavelengths on TW / cm2 intensity laser.

  8. Determining the americium transmutation rate and fission rate by post-irradiation examination within the scope of the ECRIX-H experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, J.; Pontillon, Y.; Esbelin, E.; Béjaoui, S.; Pasquet, B.; Bourdot, P.; Bonnerot, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    The ECRIX-H experiment aims to assess the feasibility of transmuting americium micro-dispersed in an inert magnesia matrix under a locally moderated neutron flux in the Phénix reactor. A first set of examinations demonstrated that pellet behaviour was satisfactory with moderate swelling at the end of the irradiation. Additional post-irradiation examinations needed to be conducted to confirm the high transmutation rate so as to definitively conclude on the success of the ECRIX-H experiment. This article presents and discusses the results of these new examinations. They confirm the satisfactory behaviour of the MgO matrix not only during the basic irradiation but also during post-irradiation thermal transients. These examinations also provide additional information on the behaviour of fission products both in the americium-based particles and in the MgO matrix. These results particularly validate the transmutation rate predicted by the calculation codes using several different analytical techniques. The fission rate is also determined. Moderate pellet swelling under irradiation (6.7 vol.%), while only 23% of the produced He and 4% of the fission gases were released from the fuel. No interaction between the pellets and the cladding. Formation of bubbles due to the precipitation of fission gases and He mainly in bubbles located inside the americium-based particles. These bubbles are the main cause of macroscopic swelling in the pellets. Well-crystallised structure of the MgO matrix which shows no amorphisation after irradiation despite the presence of fission products. The absence of any reaction of MgO with the americium-based phase, Formation of a PuO2-type crystalline phase from AmO1.62 particles following the Am transmutation process. A shielded electron probe micro-analyser (EPMA) 'CAMECA' Camebax equipped to collect and exploit the measurements using the 'SAMx' system. A Philips XL30 scanning electron microscope (SEM). Field acquisitions were performed thanks to

  9. TGF-B3 Dependent Modification of Radiosensitivity in Reporter Cells Exposed to Serum From Whole-Body Low Dose-Rate Irradiated Mice.

    PubMed

    Edin, Nina Jeppesen; Altaner, Čestmír; Altanerova, Veronica; Ebbesen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Prior findings in vitro of a TGF-β3 dependent mechanism induced by low dose-rate irradiation and resulting in increased radioresistance and removal of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) was tested in an in vivo model. DBA/2 mice were given whole-body irradiation for 1 h at low dose-rates (LDR) of 0.3 or 0.03 Gy/h. Serum was harvested and added to RPMI (4% mouse serum and 6% bovine serum).This medium was transferred to reporter cells (T-47D breast cancer cells or T98G glioblastoma cells). The response to subsequent challenge irradiation of the reporter cells was measured by the colony assay. While serum from unirradiated control mice had no effect on the radiosensitivity in the reporter cells, serum from mice given 0.3 Gy/h or 0.03 Gy/h for 1 h removed HRS and also increased survival in response to doses up to 5 Gy. The effect lasted for at least 15 months after irradiation. TGF-β3 neutralizer added to the medium containing mouse serum inhibited the effect. Serum from mice given irradiation of 0.3 Gy/h for 1 h and subsequently treated with iNOS inhibitor 1400W did not affect radiosensitivity in reporter cells; neither did serum from the unirradiated progeny of mice given 1h LDR whole-body irradiation. PMID:26673923

  10. TGF-B3 Dependent Modification of Radiosensitivity in Reporter Cells Exposed to Serum From Whole-Body Low Dose-Rate Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Altaner, Čestmír; Altanerova, Veronica; Ebbesen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Prior findings in vitro of a TGF-β3 dependent mechanism induced by low dose-rate irradiation and resulting in increased radioresistance and removal of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) was tested in an in vivo model. DBA/2 mice were given whole-body irradiation for 1 h at low dose-rates (LDR) of 0.3 or 0.03 Gy/h. Serum was harvested and added to RPMI (4% mouse serum and 6% bovine serum).This medium was transferred to reporter cells (T-47D breast cancer cells or T98G glioblastoma cells). The response to subsequent challenge irradiation of the reporter cells was measured by the colony assay. While serum from unirradiated control mice had no effect on the radiosensitivity in the reporter cells, serum from mice given 0.3 Gy/h or 0.03 Gy/h for 1 h removed HRS and also increased survival in response to doses up to 5 Gy. The effect lasted for at least 15 months after irradiation. TGF-β3 neutralizer added to the medium containing mouse serum inhibited the effect. Serum from mice given irradiation of 0.3 Gy/h for 1 h and subsequently treated with iNOS inhibitor 1400W did not affect radiosensitivity in reporter cells; neither did serum from the unirradiated progeny of mice given 1h LDR whole-body irradiation. PMID:26673923

  11. [Genetic changes in yeast cells Saccharomyces irradiated by fast neutrons with different dose rate].

    PubMed

    Malinova, I V; Tsyb, T S; Komarova, E V

    2009-01-01

    No neutron dose rate effects in the wide range of 10(-3) Gy/s to 10(6) Gy/s were observed in yeast diploid cells for induction of mitotic segregation and crossing-over. The RBE values for these effects were determined as doses ratio (Dgamma/D(n)) at maximum effects. The RBE were 2.2-1.9 for neutrons of the reactor BR-10 (E = = 0.85 MeV) and the pulse reactor BARS-6 (E = 1.44 MeV). The RBE values for genetic effects were 1.0 at the equal survival level for neutrons and gamma-rays 60Co.

  12. Analysis of Chromosomal Aberrations after Low and High Dose Rate Gamma Irradiation in ATM or NBS Suppressed Human Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Huff, J. L.; Patel, Z.; Pluth, J. M.; George, K. A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    condensation (PCC) technique at the first mitosis post-irradiation. Chromosomes were analyzed using a multicolor fluorescence in-situ hybridization (mFISH) chromosome painting method. Preliminary analysis showed that chromosomal exchanges were increased in the cells treated with the specific ATM inhibitor. Possible cytogenetic signatures of acute and low dose-rate gamma irradiation in ATM or Nibrin deficient and suppressed cells will be discussed.

  13. Determining the americium transmutation rate and fission rate by post-irradiation examination within the scope of the ECRIX-H experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, J.; Pontillon, Y.; Esbelin, E.; Béjaoui, S.; Pasquet, B.; Bourdot, P.; Bonnerot, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    The ECRIX-H experiment aims to assess the feasibility of transmuting americium micro-dispersed in an inert magnesia matrix under a locally moderated neutron flux in the Phénix reactor. A first set of examinations demonstrated that pellet behaviour was satisfactory with moderate swelling at the end of the irradiation. Additional post-irradiation examinations needed to be conducted to confirm the high transmutation rate so as to definitively conclude on the success of the ECRIX-H experiment. This article presents and discusses the results of these new examinations. They confirm the satisfactory behaviour of the MgO matrix not only during the basic irradiation but also during post-irradiation thermal transients. These examinations also provide additional information on the behaviour of fission products both in the americium-based particles and in the MgO matrix. These results particularly validate the transmutation rate predicted by the calculation codes using several different analytical techniques. The fission rate is also determined. Moderate pellet swelling under irradiation (6.7 vol.%), while only 23% of the produced He and 4% of the fission gases were released from the fuel. No interaction between the pellets and the cladding. Formation of bubbles due to the precipitation of fission gases and He mainly in bubbles located inside the americium-based particles. These bubbles are the main cause of macroscopic swelling in the pellets. Well-crystallised structure of the MgO matrix which shows no amorphisation after irradiation despite the presence of fission products. The absence of any reaction of MgO with the americium-based phase, Formation of a PuO2-type crystalline phase from AmO1.62 particles following the Am transmutation process. A shielded electron probe micro-analyser (EPMA) 'CAMECA' Camebax equipped to collect and exploit the measurements using the 'SAMx' system. A Philips XL30 scanning electron microscope (SEM). Field acquisitions were performed thanks to

  14. High dose rate /sup 60/Co remote afterloading irradiation in cancer of the cervix in Haiti, 1977-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, O.E. Jr.; Goldson, A.L.; Chevallier, C.; Nibhanupudy, J.R.

    1988-06-01

    From 1977 through 1984, 293 previously untreated patients with biopsy proven carcinoma of the uterine cervix were treated by whole pelvis irradiation and high intensity 60Co remote afterloading (RAL) intrauterine tandem techniques in Haiti. The treatment results were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the therapeutic results and prognostic factors of a strict protocol involving 40 Gy to the whole pelvis (2 Gy/day, 5 days/week). In addition, on the 5th day of the 3rd week, the first outpatient 60Co remote afterloading intracavitary insertion, delivering 7.5 Gy to point A with each insertion, repeated 3 times by a week separation for a total of 4 times. The total TDF for external beam plus RAL was 158 and 175 for early and late effects respectively. One hundred-four patients were evaluable after 1 year or more follow-up, with a median of 26.5 months. No evidence of disease (NED) by Stage at 1 year was: Stage I of 100% (3/3), Stage II of 82% (9/11), Stage III of 80% (47/59), and Stage IV of 58% (18/31). The post-therapeutic complication rate was 7.7%, with no fistulas or requirement of surgical intervention. Those with documented follow-up of at least 2 years (74 patients) had comparable survival to other high dose rate and low dose rate studies. This study shows that outpatient brachytherapy can be carried out without sophisticated and expensive equipment with minimal staff trained in radiation therapy. A detailed description of this outpatient RAL technique and results are described so that this method can be adapted to other developing and industrialized nations where cost containment is becoming a key issue.

  15. Effects of irradiation temperature and dose rate on the mechanical properties of self-ion implanted Fe and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Christopher D.; Williams, Ceri A.; Xu, Shuo; Roberts, Steve G.

    2013-08-01

    Pure Fe and model Fe-Cr alloys containing 5, 10 and 14%Cr were irradiated with Fe+ ions at a maximum energy of 2 MeV to the same dose of 0.6 dpa at temperatures of 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C, and at dose rates corresponding to 6 × 10-4 dpa/s and 3 × 10-5 dpa/s. All materials exhibited an increase in hardness after irradiation at 300 °C. After irradiation at 400 °C, hardening was observed only in Fe-Cr alloys, and not in the pure Fe. After irradiation at 500 °C, no hardening was observed in any of the materials tested. For irradiations at both 300 °C and 400 °C, greater hardening was found in the Fe-Cr alloys irradiated at the lower dose rate. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of Fe 5%Cr identified larger dislocation loop densities and sizes in the alloy irradiated with the high dose rate and Cr precipitation in the alloy irradiated with the low dose rate. Loss of defects at extended sinks such as dislocations and grain boundaries. Growth or shrinkage of defect clusters by the capture of point defects. Mutual annihilation by the recombination of a vacancy and interstitial. At low dose rates and/or high irradiation temperatures, reaction path (i) (sinks) dominates and at a high dose rates and/or low irradiation temperature reaction path (iii) (recombination) dominates [2]. The evolution of radiation damage such as dislocation loops and voids and phenomena such as radiation induced segregation, swelling and creep, depend on the fraction of point defects which migrate to sinks, recombine or cluster within the lattice and will be influenced by the reaction path that dominates the microstructural evolution of the material under irradiation.The relative proportions of these reaction types are directly dependent on the density and mobility of the defects, and hence dependent on dose rate and temperature. In iron, vacancy type defects are generally found to have significantly higher activation energy for migration compared to interstitial

  16. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate {sup 125}I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.H. Jia, R.F.; Yu, L.; Zhao, M.J.; Shao, C.L.; Cheng, W.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) {sup 125}I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR {sup 125}I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), {gamma}H2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with {sup 125}I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of {gamma}H2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p <0.05), although they did not increase with irradiation dose. However, the proportion of bystander NCI-H446 cells with MN numbers {>=}3 and {gamma}H2AX foci numbers 15-19 and 20-24 was higher than that of bystander A549 cells. In addition, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) treatment could completely suppress the bystander MN of NCI-H446 cells, but it suppressed only partly the bystander MN of A549 cells, indicating that reactive oxygen species are involved in the bystander response to NCI-H446 cells, but other signaling factors may contribute to the bystander response of A549 cells. Conclusions: Continuous LDR irradiation of {sup 125}I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes.

  17. Effects of irradiation temperature and dose rate on the mechanical properties of self-ion implanted Fe and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Christopher D.; Williams, Ceri A.; Xu, Shuo; Roberts, Steve G.

    2013-08-01

    Pure Fe and model Fe-Cr alloys containing 5, 10 and 14%Cr were irradiated with Fe+ ions at a maximum energy of 2 MeV to the same dose of 0.6 dpa at temperatures of 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C, and at dose rates corresponding to 6 × 10-4 dpa/s and 3 × 10-5 dpa/s. All materials exhibited an increase in hardness after irradiation at 300 °C. After irradiation at 400 °C, hardening was observed only in Fe-Cr alloys, and not in the pure Fe. After irradiation at 500 °C, no hardening was observed in any of the materials tested. For irradiations at both 300 °C and 400 °C, greater hardening was found in the Fe-Cr alloys irradiated at the lower dose rate. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography of Fe 5%Cr identified larger dislocation loop densities and sizes in the alloy irradiated with the high dose rate and Cr precipitation in the alloy irradiated with the low dose rate. Loss of defects at extended sinks such as dislocations and grain boundaries. Growth or shrinkage of defect clusters by the capture of point defects. Mutual annihilation by the recombination of a vacancy and interstitial. At low dose rates and/or high irradiation temperatures, reaction path (i) (sinks) dominates and at a high dose rates and/or low irradiation temperature reaction path (iii) (recombination) dominates [2]. The evolution of radiation damage such as dislocation loops and voids and phenomena such as radiation induced segregation, swelling and creep, depend on the fraction of point defects which migrate to sinks, recombine or cluster within the lattice and will be influenced by the reaction path that dominates the microstructural evolution of the material under irradiation.The relative proportions of these reaction types are directly dependent on the density and mobility of the defects, and hence dependent on dose rate and temperature. In iron, vacancy type defects are generally found to have significantly higher activation energy for migration compared to interstitial

  18. Preliminary Comparison of Reaction Rate theory and Object Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Defect Cluster Dynamics under Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E; Golubov, Stanislav I; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2006-09-01

    The multiscale modeling scheme encompasses models from the atomistic to the continuum scale. Phenomena at the mesoscale are typically simulated using reaction rate theory (RT), Monte Carlo (MC), or phase field models. These mesoscale models are appropriate for application to problems that involve intermediate length scales ( m to >mm), and timescales from diffusion (~ s) to long-term microstructural evolution (~years). Phenomena at this scale have the most direct impact on mechanical properties in structural materials of interest to nuclear energy systems, and are also the most accessible to direct comparison between the results of simulations and experiments. Recent advances in computational power have substantially expanded the range of application for MC models. Although the RT and MC models can be used simulate the same phenomena, many of the details are handled quite differently in the two approaches. A direct comparison of the RT and MC descriptions has been made in the domain of point defect cluster dynamics modeling, which is relevant to both the nucleation and evolution of radiation-induced defect structures. The relative merits and limitations of the two approaches are discussed, and the predictions of the two approaches are compared for specific irradiation conditions.

  19. Dependence of the rate of steady-state swelling of fuel-element claddings made of ChS68 steel on the characteristics of neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Rate of steady-state swelling of fuel-element sheaths made of the 06Kh16N15M2G2TFR steel in the course of their operation in a BN-600 reactor has been calculated. In the calculations, the diffusion characteristics of point defects and the results of the determination of the characteristics of the irradiation-induced porosity have been used. The dependence of the dose rate of steady-state swelling on neutron-irradiation characteristics has been analyzed. It has been established that the dose rate of swelling at the steady-state stage is independent of the energy of migration of vacancies and the rate of generation of atomic displacements.

  20. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Sharon M.; Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn

    2012-04-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6-1 and 8-1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10-1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3-1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura appear

  1. Evaluation of two intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices for irradiating additional and irregularly shaped volumes of breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sharon M; Scanderbeg, Daniel J; Barna, Patrick; Yashar, William; Yashar, Catheryn

    2012-01-01

    The SAVI and Contura breast brachytherapy applicators represent 2 recent advancements in brachytherapy technology that have expanded the number of women eligible for accelerated partial breast irradiation in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer. Early clinical experience with these 2 single-entry, multichannel high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices confirms their ease of use and dosimetric versatility. However, current clinical guidelines for SAVI and Contura brachytherapy may result in a smaller or less optimal volume of treated tissue compared with traditional interstitial brachytherapy. This study evaluates the feasibility of using the SAVI and Contura to irradiate larger and irregularly shaped target volumes, approaching what is treatable with the interstitial technique. To investigate whether additional tissue can be treated, 17 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected. For each patient, the planning target volume (PTV) was modified to extend 1.1 cm, 1.3 cm, and 1.5 cm beyond the tumor bed cavity. To evaluate dose conformance to an irregularly shaped target volume, 9 patients treated with the SAVI and 3 with the Contura were selected from the original 20 patients. The following asymmetric PTV margin combinations were assessed for each patient: 1.5/0.3, 1.3/0.3, and 1.1/0.3 cm. For all patients, treatment planning was performed, adopting the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project guidelines, and dosimetric comparisons were made. The 6-1 and 8-1 SAVI devices can theoretically treat a maximal tissue margin of 1.5 cm and an asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3 to 1.5 cm. The 10-1 SAVI and Contura can treat a maximal margin of 1.3 cm and 1.1 cm, respectively, and asymmetric PTV with margins ranging from 0.3-1.3 cm. Compared with the Contura, the SAVI demonstrated greater dosimetric flexibility. Risk of developing excessive hot spots increased with the size of the SAVI device. Both the SAVI and Contura appear

  2. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to monitor high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora).

    PubMed

    Janka, Eshetu; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-05-01

    Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting. The control regime may be optimised by monitoring plant responses, and may be promptly adjusted when plant performance is affected by extreme microclimatic conditions, such as high irradiance or temperature. To determine the stress indicators of plants based on their physiological responses, net photosynthesis (Pn) and four chlorophyll-a fluorescence parameters: maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII [Fv/Fm], electron transport rate [ETR], PSII operating efficiency [F'q/F'm], and non-photochemical quenching [NPQ] were assessed for potted chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora Tzvelev) 'Coral Charm' under different temperature (20, 24, 28, 32, 36 °C) and daily light integrals (DLI; 11, 20, 31, and 43 mol m(-2) created by a PAR of 171, 311, 485 and 667 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 16 h). High irradiance (667 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) combined with high temperature (>32 °C) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased Fv/Fm. Under high irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes in the NPQ determined the PSII operating efficiency, with no major change in the fraction of open PSII centres (qL) (indicating a QA redox state). We conclude that 1) chrysanthemum plants cope with excess irradiance by non-radiative dissipation or a reversible stress response, with the effect on the Pn and quantum yield of PSII remaining low until the temperature reaches 28 °C and 2) the integration of online measurements to monitor photosynthesis and PSII

  3. Materials corrosion and mitigation strategies for APT, end of FY `97 report: Inconel 718 in-beam corrosion rates from the `97 A6 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Pile, D.L.; Butt, D.P.

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes the results from the 1997 irradiation of the corrosion insert at the LANSCE A6 Target Station. It addresses the corrosion measurements made on the in-beam Inconel 718 probe only. To simulate the environment that materials may be exposed to in a spallation neutron target/blanket cooling loops, samples were irradiated by the proton beam at the A6 Target Station of the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). EIS measurements have demonstrated that the polarization resistance of IN718 decreases from approximately 3 x 10{sup 5} ohms prior to irradiation to approximately 1,000 ohms during irradiation at a proton beam current of 400 {micro}A. From the polarization resistance measurements, corrosion rate as a function of beam current was calculated for several different scenarios of beam/sample interaction. As the beam spot was small relative to the size of the IN718 corrosion probe (2{sigma} = 3 cm vs. 1.3 cm diam. x 15.9 cm length respectively), The first method for calculating corrosion rate used beam profile as a criterion for the area of highest damage. The beam spot intensity profile at LANSCE has been characterized and found to be a Gaussian distribution rotated about a central axis. From this relationship, and R{sub p} as a function of beam current, corrosion rate as a function of radial distance from the center of the beam was calculated for each beam current. Physical evidence from change in thickness measurements made on tungsten rods irradiated at 1 mA during the FY 96 irradiation period suggest that this Gaussian damage profile is an accurate depiction of beam/sample interaction. From this method the corrosion rate of IN718 during irradiation at a beam current of 1.0 mA is calculated to be approximately 0.002 inches per yr (2 mpy). The second method assumed that the predominant contributor to the corrosion current comes from an area defined by 2{sigma}. Further, the method assumed that the corrosion rate was uniform over this area

  4. Microbial survival rates of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under low temperature, low pressure, and UV-Irradiation conditions, and their relevance to possible Martian life.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Benjamin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Viability rates were determined for microbial populations of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under the environmental stresses of low temperature (-35 degrees C), low-pressure conditions (83.3 kPa), and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (37 W/m(2)). During the stress tests the organisms were suspended in saltwater soil and freshwater soil media, at variable burial depths, and in seawater. Microbial populations of both organisms were most susceptible to dehydration stress associated with low-pressure conditions, and to UV irradiation. However, suspension in a liquid water medium and burial at larger depths (5 cm) improved survival rates markedly. Our results indicate that planetary surfaces that possess little to no atmosphere and have low water availability do not constitute a favorable environment for terrestrial microorganisms.

  5. Microbial Survival Rates of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans Under Low Temperature, Low Pressure, and UV-Irradiation Conditions, and Their Relevance to Possible Martian Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Benjamin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Viability rates were determined for microbial populations of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under the environmental stresses of low temperature (-35°C), low-pressure conditions (83.3 kPa), and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (37 W/m2). During the stress tests the organisms were suspended in saltwater soil and freshwater soil media, at variable burial depths, and in seawater. Microbial populations of both organisms were most susceptible to dehydration stress associated with low-pressure conditions, and to UV irradiation. However, suspension in a liquid water medium and burial at larger depths (5 cm) improved survival rates markedly. Our results indicate that planetary surfaces that possess little to no atmosphere and have low water availability do not constitute a favorable environment for terrestrial microorganisms.

  6. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  7. The dependence of helium generation rate on nickel content of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated at high dpa levels in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, F.A.; Oliver, B.M.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1997-04-01

    With a few exceptions in the literature, it is generally accepted that it is nickel in Fe-Cr-Ni alloys that produces most of the transmutant helium and that the helium generation rate should scale linearly with the nickel content. Surprisingly, this assumption is based only on irradiations of pure nickel and has never been tested in an alloy series. There have also been no extensive tests of the predictions for helium production in alloys in various fast reactors spectra.

  8. The effects of pre-irradiation heat treatment and heating rate on the thermoluminescence glow peaks of natural CaF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa; Necmeddin Yazici, A.; Yeǧingil, Zehra; Doǧan, Tamer

    2010-05-01

    In this article, we have investigated the effects of pre-irradiation heat treatments on the thermoluminescence (TL) glow peaks of natural fluorite (CaF2) collected from the central Anatolia region of Turkey. A typical TL glow curve of phosphor consists of four clear glow peaks with maximum intensities occurring at temperatures around 100 °C, 120 °C, 190 °C and 290 °C for a sample irradiated to a dose of 48 Gy and readout at a heating rate of 1 °C/s. It was observed that the intensities of all the TL glow peaks are strongly sensitive to annealing temperatures and durations. Annealing at 450 °C for 15 min was found to be the best for reproducibility of experimental results. The dose-responses of individual TL peaks of this material were also examined after annealing at 450 °C for 15 min by β-irradiation to doses between 0.04 Gy and ≈10.4 kGy. It was observed that the total area and peak heights of all glow peaks showed similar trends with increasing radiation dose; first, they increased linearly up to ≈50 Gy and then saturation effects began above this dose value. The effect of heating rate on the TL glow peaks of the mineral was also studied and it was observed that the intensities of glow peaks are differently affected with variation in heating rate.

  9. The genetic basis of cellular recovery from radiation damage: Response of the radiosensitive irs lines to low-dose-rate irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, J.; Wilkinson, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Recovery from the lethal effects of irradiation is commonly found when cultured mammalian cells are irradiated at low dose rates when compared to the same cells irradiated at higher dose rates. However, this cellular recovery process is severely reduced or absent in a number of radiosensitive cell lines, including those derived from the human disorder ataxia telangiectasia (AT). The genetic and molecular basis of such recovery processes is not understood, despite their importance. The responses of cells of three further radiosensitive lines, irs1, irs2 and irs3, shown previously to be mutated in different genes, to low-dose-rate radiation are now presented. Plateau-phase cultures of cells of the irs2 line were found to have little or no cellular recovery, while irs1 and irs3 had considerable recovery potential. In comparing the known properties of the radiosensitive lines. lacking cellular recovery, including xrs, XR-1 and scid as well as AT and irs2, it is argued that the gene products lacking in these lines normally act coordinately in a specific damage-recognition pathway. The recovery pathway is likely to be associated with the rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, since several of these recovery-defective lines have a measurable deficiency in break repair. 67 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Analysis of dose rates received around the storage pool for irradiated control rods in a BWR nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, J; Abarca, A; Gallardo, S

    2011-08-01

    BWR control rods are activated by neutron reactions in the reactor. The dose produced by this activity can affect workers in the area surrounding the storage pool, where activated rods are stored. Monte Carlo (MC) models for neutron activation and dose assessment around the storage pool have been developed and validated. In this work, the MC models are applied to verify the expected reduction of dose when the irradiated control rod is hanged in an inverted position into the pool.

  11. Factors Associated With Chest Wall Toxicity After Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sheree; Vicini, Frank; Vanapalli, Jyotsna R.; Whitaker, Thomas J.; Pope, D. Keith; Lyden, Maureen; Bruggeman, Lisa; Haile, Kenneth L.; McLaughlin, Mark P.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate dose-volume relationships associated with a higher probability for developing chest wall toxicity (pain) after accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by using both single-lumen and multilumen brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Rib dose data were available for 89 patients treated with APBI and were correlated with the development of chest wall/rib pain at any point after treatment. Ribs were contoured on computed tomography planning scans, and rib dose-volume histograms (DVH) along with histograms for other structures were constructed. Rib DVH data for all patients were sampled at all volumes {>=}0.008 cubic centimeter (cc) (for maximum dose related to pain) and at volumes of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc for analysis. Rib pain was evaluated at each follow-up visit. Patient responses were marked as yes or no. No attempt was made to grade responses. Eighty-nine responses were available for this analysis. Results: Nineteen patients (21.3%) complained of transient chest wall/rib pain at any point in follow-up. Analysis showed a direct correlation between total dose received and volume of rib irradiated with the probability of developing rib/chest wall pain at any point after follow-up. The median maximum dose at volumes {>=}0.008 cc of rib in patients who experienced chest wall pain was 132% of the prescribed dose versus 95% of the prescribed dose in those patients who did not experience pain (p = 0.0035). Conclusions: Although the incidence of chest wall/rib pain is quite low with APBI brachytherapy, attempts should be made to keep the volume of rib irradiated at a minimum and the maximum dose received by the chest wall as low as reasonably achievable.

  12. Intravenous Laser Blood Irradiation, Interstitial Laser Acupuncture, and Electroacupuncture in an Animal Experimental Setting: Preliminary Results from Heart Rate Variability and Electrocorticographic Recordings

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Jing, Xianghong; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Zhu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study to investigate intravenous (i.v.) laser blood irradiation, interstitial (i.st.) laser acupuncture, and electroacupuncture (EA) in combination with heart rate variability (HRV) and electrocorticogram. We investigated 10 male anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats under the three conditions mentioned previously in Beijing, China, and data analysis was performed in Graz, Europe. For i.v. laser stimulation in the femoral vein and i.st. laser acupuncture at Neiguan (PC6), we used a European system (Modulas needle, Schwa-Medico, Germany; 658 nm, 50 mW, continuous wave mode), and for EA at Neiguan, a Chinese system (Hanshi-100A; Nanjing Jisheng Medical Technology Company, China; 15 Hz, 1 mA). HR, HRV, and electrocorticogram were recorded using a biophysical amplifier AVB-10 (Nihon-Kohden, Japan). HR changed significantly during i.st. laser acupuncture stimulation of Neiguan in anesthetized rats. Total HRV increased insignificantly during i.v. and i.st. laser stimulation. The LF/HF ratio showed significant changes only during i.v. laser blood irradiation. Integrated cortical EEG (electrocorticogram) decreased insignificantly during EA and i.v. laser blood irradiation. Further studies concerning dosage-dependent alterations are in progress. PMID:23476681

  13. Scoring Systems to Estimate Intracerebral Control and Survival Rates of Patients Irradiated for Brain Metastases;Brain metastases; Radiation therapy; Local control; Survival; Prognostic scores

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Dziggel, Liesa; Haatanen, Tiina; Veninga, Theo; Lohynska, Radka; Dunst, Juergen; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To create and validate scoring systems for intracerebral control (IC) and overall survival (OS) of patients irradiated for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: In this study, 1,797 patients were randomly assigned to the test (n = 1,198) or the validation group (n = 599). Two scoring systems were developed, one for IC and another for OS. The scores included prognostic factors found significant on multivariate analyses. Age, performance status, extracerebral metastases, interval tumor diagnosis to RT, and number of brain metastases were associated with OS. Tumor type, performance status, interval, and number of brain metastases were associated with IC. The score for each factor was determined by dividing the 6-month IC or OS rate (given in percent) by 10. The total score represented the sum of the scores for each factor. The score groups of the test group were compared with the corresponding score groups of the validation group. Results: In the test group, 6-month IC rates were 17% for 14-18 points, 49% for 19-23 points, and 77% for 24-27 points (p < 0.0001). IC rates in the validation group were 19%, 52%, and 77%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In the test group, 6-month OS rates were 9% for 15-19 points, 41% for 20-25 points, and 78% for 26-30 points (p < 0.0001). OS rates in the validation group were 7%, 39%, and 79%, respectively (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Patients irradiated for brain metastases can be given scores to estimate OS and IC. IC and OS rates of the validation group were similar to the test group demonstrating the validity and reproducibility of both scores.

  14. Mechanism of heat-modification inside a glass after irradiation with high-repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Nakaya, Takayuki

    2010-10-15

    Accumulation of thermal energies by highly repeated irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses inside a glass induces the heat-modification whose volume is much larger than that of the photoexcited region. It has been proposed that the heat-modification occurs in the region in which the temperature had overcome a threshold temperature during exposure of laser pulses. In order to understand the mechanism of the heat-modification, we investigated the temperature distribution during laser exposure and the threshold temperature by analyzing the volume of the modification based on a thermal diffusion model. We found that the threshold temperature becomes lower with increasing laser exposure time. The dependence of the threshold temperature on the laser exposure time was explained by the deformation mechanism based on the temperature-dependent viscosity and viscoelastic behavior of a glass under a stress loading by thermal expansion. The deformation mechanism also could simulate a tear-drop shape of a heat-modification by simultaneous double-beams' irradiation and the distribution of birefringence in a heat-modification. The mechanism proposed in this study means that the temperature-dependence of the viscosity of a glass should be essential for predicting and controlling the heat-modification.

  15. Role of solar UVB irradiance and smoking in cancer as inferred from cancer incidence rates by occupation in Nordic countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiance and vitamin D reduce the risk of incidence and death for many types of cancer. However, most of that evidence comes from midlatitude regions, where solar UVB doses are generally high in summer. Data on cancer standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) by sex and 54 occupation categories based on 1.4 million male and 1.36 million female cancer cases for 1961–2005 in the five Nordic countries provide the basis for an ecological study of the role of solar UVB in the risk of many types of cancer at high latitudes. Lip cancer SIRs less lung cancer SIRs for men was the best index of solar UVB dose, which was weakly inversely correlated with both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) SIRs. Lung cancer SIRs were used as the index of the effects of smoking. For men, the UVB index was significantly inversely correlated with 14 types of internal cancer—bladder, breast, colon, gallbladder, kidney, laryngeal, liver, lung, oral, pancreatic, pharyngeal, prostate, rectal and small intestine cancer. For women, the same UVB index was inversely correlated with bladder, breast and colon cancer. These results generally agree with findings from other studies. These results provide more support for the UVB-vitamin D-cancer hypothesis and suggest that widespread fear of chronic solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance may be misplaced. PMID:22928078

  16. Photoionization of isooctane and n-octane in intense laser fields. I. Effect of irradiance on ionization rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Andrew T.; Lipsky, Sanford; Blank, David A.

    2007-12-01

    The population of ejected electrons following multiphoton ionization of neat liquids isooctane and n-octane is investigated over a large range of ionizing irradiance Iex. Transient absorption (TA) at 1200nm in both neat liquids is measured in a 60μm path at time delays of 0.7 and 2.5ps following an intense 400nm (3.1eV) ionizing pulse. As the irradiance of this pulse is varied over the range from 4to410TW/cm2, the dependence of TA on Iex exhibits the periodic structure theoretically predicted for multiphoton channel openings and closings. At low Iex (<9TW/cm2), TA in isooctane is proportional to Iexn where n =3, consistent with nonresonant, near threshold ionization (liquid phase ionization potential=8.6eV). At Iex>9TW/cm2, n declines with increasing Iex up to Iex=13TW/cm2, at which point n abruptly increases to 4. The pattern is repeated at Iex>13TW/cm2, albeit with n declining from 4 and then abruptly increasing to 5 as Iex becomes greater than 100TW/cm2. A similar trend is observed in n-octane. The dependence of the TA on Iex in the regions of channel openings and closings is compared to the nonperturbative, strong field approximation developed by Reiss [Phys. Rev. A 22, 1786 (1980)].

  17. Washout rate in rat brain irradiated by a 11C beam after acetazolamide loading using a small single-ring OpenPET prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Nakajima, Yasunori; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-03-01

    In dose verification techniques of particle therapies based on in-beam positron emission tomography (PET), the causes of washout of positron emitters by physiological effects should be clarified to correct washout for accurate verification. As well, the quantitative washout rate has a potential usefulness as a diagnostic index which should be explored. Therefore, we measured washout rates of rat brain after vasodilator acetazolamide loading to investigate the possible effects of blood flow on washout. Six rat brains were irradiated by a radioisotope 11C beam and time activity curves on the whole brains were obtained with a small single-ring OpenPET prototype. Then, washout rates were calculated with the Mizuno model, where two washout rates (k 2m and k 2s ) were assumed, and a two-compartment model including efflux from tissue to blood (k 2) and influx (k 3) and efflux (k 4) between the two tissue compartments. Before the irradiations, we used laser-Doppler flowmetry to confirm that acetazolamide increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) of a rat. We compared means of k 2m , k 2s and k 2, k 3 and k 4 without acetazolamide loading (Rest) and with acetazolamide loading (ACZ). For all k values, ACZ values were lower than Rest values. In other words, though CBF increased, washout rates were decreased. This may be attributed to the implanted 11C reacting to form 11CO2. Because acetazolamide increased the concentration of CO2 in brain, suppressed diffusion of 11CO2 and decomposition of 11CO2 into ions were prevented.

  18. Enhancing growth rate and lipid yield of Chlorella with nuclear irradiation under high salt and CO2 stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Lu, Hongxiang; Huang, Yun; Li, Ke; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-03-01

    In order to produce biodiesel from microalgae cultured with abundant seawater, Chlorella sp. was mutated with (137)Se-γ ray irradiation and domesticated with f/2 seawater culture medium (salinity=3 wt.%) under 15 vol.% CO2 stress. Biomass yield of the mutant increased by 25% compared with wild species and lipid content increased to 54.9%. When nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations in the initial substrate increased, the increased propagation speed of the mutant resulted in decreased cell diameter by 26.6% and decreased cell wall thickness by 69.7%. The dramatically increased biomass yield of the mutant with sufficient initial substrate and relative nitrogen starvation in the later growth period with continuous 15 vol.% CO2 led to an increased lipid yield of 1.0 g/L. The long-chain unsaturated fatty acids increased, whereas short-chain saturated fatty acids decreased.

  19. Photoionization of isooctane and n-octane in intense laser fields. I. Effect of irradiance on ionization rates

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, Andrew T.; Lipsky, Sanford; Blank, David A.

    2007-12-07

    The population of ejected electrons following multiphoton ionization of neat liquids isooctane and n-octane is investigated over a large range of ionizing irradiance I{sub ex}. Transient absorption (TA) at 1200 nm in both neat liquids is measured in a 60 {mu}m path at time delays of 0.7 and 2.5 ps following an intense 400 nm (3.1 eV) ionizing pulse. As the irradiance of this pulse is varied over the range from 4 to 410 TW/cm{sup 2}, the dependence of TA on I{sub ex} exhibits the periodic structure theoretically predicted for multiphoton channel openings and closings. At low I{sub ex} (<9 TW/cm{sup 2}), TA in isooctane is proportional to I{sub ex}{sup n} where n=3, consistent with nonresonant, near threshold ionization (liquid phase ionization potential=8.6 eV). At I{sub ex}>9 TW/cm{sup 2}, n declines with increasing I{sub ex} up to I{sub ex}=13 TW/cm{sup 2}, at which point n abruptly increases to 4. The pattern is repeated at I{sub ex}>13 TW/cm{sup 2}, albeit with n declining from 4 and then abruptly increasing to 5 as I{sub ex} becomes greater than 100 TW/cm{sup 2}. A similar trend is observed in n-octane. The dependence of the TA on I{sub ex} in the regions of channel openings and closings is compared to the nonperturbative, strong field approximation developed by Reiss [Phys. Rev. A 22, 1786 (1980)].

  20. Chromosome Damage and Cell Proliferation Rates in In Vitro Irradiated Whole Blood as Markers of Late Radiation Toxicity After Radiation Therapy to the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Beaton, Lindsay A.; Ferrarotto, Catherine; Marro, Leonora; Samiee, Sara; Malone, Shawn; Grimes, Scott; Malone, Kyle; Wilkins, Ruth C.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients showing late normal tissue damage were examined for lymphocyte response by measuring chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rate. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from a randomized trial evaluating the optimal timing of dose-escalated radiation and short-course androgen deprivation therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% experienced grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood samples were taken from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated at 6 Gy and, along with control samples, were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes and excess fragments per cell. Cells in first and second metaphase were also enumerated to determine the lymphocyte proliferation rate. Results: At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for 3 endpoints: the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell (3.26 ± 0.31, 2.91 ± 0.32; P=.0258), the mean number of excess fragments per cell (2.27 ± 0.23, 1.43 ± 0.37; P<.0001), and the proportion of cells in second metaphase (0.27 ± 0.10, 0.46 ± 0.09; P=.0007). Conclusions: These results may be a valuable indicator for identifying radiosensitive patients and for tailoring radiation therapy.

  1. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Powell, Simon N.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Freer, Phoebe; Lawenda, Brian; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I–II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall’s tau (τβ) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4–14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome (τβ 0.6, p < .0001), lower patient satisfaction (τβ 0.5, p < .001), and worse fibrosis (τβ 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias ≥1 cm2. Grade 3–4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose (τβ 0.3–0.5, p ≤ .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rate was 85% (95% confidence interval, 70–97

  2. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation With Low-Dose-Rate Interstitial Implant Brachytherapy After Wide Local Excision: 12-Year Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Powell, Simon N.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Mauceri, Thomas; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Freer, Phoebe; Lawenda, Brian; Alm El-Din, Mohamed A.; Gadd, Michele A.; Smith, Barbara L.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term toxicity, cosmesis, and local control of accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision for Stage T1N0 breast cancer (BCa). Materials and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 50 patients with Stage T1N0M0 BCa were treated in a Phase I-II protocol using low-dose-rate accelerated partial breast irradiation with implant brachytherapy after wide local excision and lymph node surgery. The total dose was escalated in three groups: 50 Gy (n = 20), 55 Gy (n = 17), and 60 Gy (n = 13). Patient- and physician-assessed breast cosmesis, patient satisfaction, toxicity, mammographic abnormalities, repeat biopsies, and disease status were prospectively evaluated at each visit. Kendall's tau ({tau}{sub {beta}}) and logistic regression analyses were used to correlate outcomes with dose, implant volume, patient age, and systemic therapy. Results: The median follow-up period was 11.2 years (range, 4-14). The patient satisfaction rate was 67%, 67% reported good-excellent cosmesis, and 54% had moderate-severe fibrosis. Higher dose was correlated with worse cosmetic outcome ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.6, p < .0001), lower patient satisfaction ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.5, p < .001), and worse fibrosis ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.4, p = .0024). Of the 50 patients, 35% had fat necrosis and 34% developed telangiectasias {>=}1 cm{sup 2}. Grade 3-4 late skin and subcutaneous toxicities were seen in 4 patients (9%) and 6 patients (13%), respectively, and both correlated with higher dose ({tau}{sub {beta}} 0.3-0.5, p {<=} .01). One patient had Grade 4 skin ulceration and fat necrosis requiring surgery. Mammographic abnormalities were seen in 32% of the patients, and 30% underwent repeat biopsy, of which 73% were benign. Six patients had ipsilateral breast recurrence: five elsewhere in the breast, and one at the implant site. One patient died of metastatic BCa after recurrence. The 12-year actuarial local control, recurrence-free survival

  3. DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES EFFECT OF INCREASED PURGE RATE AND CATALYST CONCENTRATION ON THE BATCH SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.

    2010-07-22

    Flowsheets for the dissolution of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel have been proposed using 0.002 M mercuric nitrate catalyst in 5 to 6 M nitric acid. Previous calculations for flammable gas control during the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel have been extended to cover a range of dissolver purge rates from 40 to 55 scfm. A range of dissolver solution volumes from 12000 to 15000 liters were considered for the large H-Canyon dissolver (6.4D). Depending on the purge rate, anywhere from four to six bundles of MURR fuel can be initially charged to the dissolver (6.4D). For successive charges where the dissolver solution already contains 0.002 M mercury catalyst and the dissolved aluminum from five bundles of MURR fuel, five to nine bundles of additional fuel can be charged depending on the purge rate and the dissolver solution volume. Similar calculations have been performed for the small H-Canyon dissolver (6.1D) for solution volumes that ranged from 6000 to 7500 liters and purge rates from 40 to 55 scfm. The limitations on the initial charge are four to six bundles depending on the purge rate. The aluminum from four bundles of fuel in an initial charge will allow nine to ten bundles in the second charge to 6.1D depending on the purge rate and dissolver solution volume. Solubility or criticality limitations will restrict the second charge on the small dissolver. The concentration of aluminum from previous charges will slow the dissolution rate to extend the cycle time of repeated charges of fuel. Calculations have been performed to allow a second catalyst addition (up to 0.004 M total catalyst) to reduce the cycle time (as necessary) based on the aluminum concentration and the purge rate.

  4. Degradation rates of benzotriazoles and benzothiazoles under UV-C irradiation and the advanced oxidation process UV/H2O2.

    PubMed

    Bahnmüller, Sabrina; Loi, Clara H; Linge, Kathryn L; Gunten, Urs von; Canonica, Silvio

    2015-05-01

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) and benzothiazoles (BTHs) are extensively used chemicals found in a wide range of household and industrial products. They are chemically stable and are therefore ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. The present study focuses on the potential of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, alone or in combination with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to remove BTs and BTHs from contaminated waters. Six compounds, three out of each chemical class, were investigated using a low-pressure mercury lamp (main emission at 254 nm) as the radiation source. Initially, the direct phototransformation kinetics and quantum yield in dilute aqueous solution was studied over the pH range of 4-12. All BTs and BTHs, except for benzothiazole, exhibited pH-dependent direct phototransformation rate constants and quantum yields in accordance to their acid-base speciation (7.1 < pKa < 8.9). The direct phototransformation quantum yields (9.0 × 10(-4)-3.0 × 10(-2) mol einstein(-1)), as well as the photon fluence-based rate constants (1.2-48 m(2) einstein(-1)) were quite low. This suggests that UV irradiation alone is not an efficient method to remove BTs and BTHs from impacted waters. The second-order rate constants for the reaction of selected BTs and BTHs with the hydroxyl radical were also determined, and found to fall in the range of 5.1-10.8 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which is typical for aromatic contaminants. Finally, the removal of BTs and BTHs was measured in wastewater and river water during application of UV irradiation or the advanced oxidation process UV/H2O2. The latter process provided an efficient removal, mostly due to the effect of the hydroxyl radical, that was comparable to other aromatic aquatic contaminants, in terms of energy requirement or treatment costs.

  5. Degradation rates of benzotriazoles and benzothiazoles under UV-C irradiation and the advanced oxidation process UV/H2O2.

    PubMed

    Bahnmüller, Sabrina; Loi, Clara H; Linge, Kathryn L; Gunten, Urs von; Canonica, Silvio

    2015-05-01

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) and benzothiazoles (BTHs) are extensively used chemicals found in a wide range of household and industrial products. They are chemically stable and are therefore ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. The present study focuses on the potential of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, alone or in combination with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), to remove BTs and BTHs from contaminated waters. Six compounds, three out of each chemical class, were investigated using a low-pressure mercury lamp (main emission at 254 nm) as the radiation source. Initially, the direct phototransformation kinetics and quantum yield in dilute aqueous solution was studied over the pH range of 4-12. All BTs and BTHs, except for benzothiazole, exhibited pH-dependent direct phototransformation rate constants and quantum yields in accordance to their acid-base speciation (7.1 < pKa < 8.9). The direct phototransformation quantum yields (9.0 × 10(-4)-3.0 × 10(-2) mol einstein(-1)), as well as the photon fluence-based rate constants (1.2-48 m(2) einstein(-1)) were quite low. This suggests that UV irradiation alone is not an efficient method to remove BTs and BTHs from impacted waters. The second-order rate constants for the reaction of selected BTs and BTHs with the hydroxyl radical were also determined, and found to fall in the range of 5.1-10.8 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which is typical for aromatic contaminants. Finally, the removal of BTs and BTHs was measured in wastewater and river water during application of UV irradiation or the advanced oxidation process UV/H2O2. The latter process provided an efficient removal, mostly due to the effect of the hydroxyl radical, that was comparable to other aromatic aquatic contaminants, in terms of energy requirement or treatment costs. PMID:25725202

  6. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors.

  7. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  8. Effects of different doses of gamma irradiation on oxygen and water vapour transmission rate of preserved human amniotic membrane.

    PubMed

    Zahari, Nor Kamalia; Sheikh Ab Hamid, Suzina; Yusof, Norimah

    2015-03-01

    Preserved human amniotic membrane either air dried or glycerol preserved has been used effectively to treat superficial and partial thickness wounds without leaving any obvious hypertrophic scar. The preserved amnion, sterilised by ionising radiation, is known as an effective barrier for heat, fluid and protein loss while adheres nicely on wound. Air drying slightly reduced the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of the amnion and the value significantly dropped after 15 kGy (p < 0.05). Glycerol preservation significantly reduced (p < 0.05) the OTR indicating less oxygen transmitted through the well structured cells of the amnion. Increase in the OTR with the increasing radiation doses up to 35 kGy possibly due to direct effects of radiation that resulted in large intercellular gaps. Both preservation methods significantly increased (p < 0.05) the water vapour transmission rate (WVTR). However, the low WVTR in the air dried amnion at 15 and 25 kGy was postulated due to cross-linking of collagen. Changes in the biophysical properties can be linked to direct and indirect effects of radiation on collagen bundles. The radiation dose of 25 kGy caused no adverse effect on biophysical properties hence it is still acceptable to sterilize both the air dried and the glycerol preserved amnions.

  9. Proteomic analysis of Spirogyra varians mutant with high starch content and growth rate induced by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Gwang Hoon; Kim, Dong-Ho; Park, Don-Hee

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a high-efficiency strain of Spirogyra varians for the production of biomass by radiation breeding. The characteristics of wild-type and mutant S. varians were analyzed through phenomenological and proteomic observations. The results of our phenomenological observations of the S. varians mutant demonstrated increases in growth rate and content of chlorophyll a, b, and a + b; in particular, a significant threefold increase was observed in starch accumulation. Proteomic analysis to investigate the differences in expression between wild-type and mutant proteins identified 18 proteins with significantly different expressions. From the literature review, it was confirmed that the up-regulated proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate biosynthesis, and energy metabolism. These results suggest the possibility of algae development by radiation breeding for the production of biofuel. PMID:23370702

  10. Proteomic analysis of Spirogyra varians mutant with high starch content and growth rate induced by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Gwang Hoon; Kim, Dong-Ho; Park, Don-Hee

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a high-efficiency strain of Spirogyra varians for the production of biomass by radiation breeding. The characteristics of wild-type and mutant S. varians were analyzed through phenomenological and proteomic observations. The results of our phenomenological observations of the S. varians mutant demonstrated increases in growth rate and content of chlorophyll a, b, and a + b; in particular, a significant threefold increase was observed in starch accumulation. Proteomic analysis to investigate the differences in expression between wild-type and mutant proteins identified 18 proteins with significantly different expressions. From the literature review, it was confirmed that the up-regulated proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate biosynthesis, and energy metabolism. These results suggest the possibility of algae development by radiation breeding for the production of biofuel.

  11. Butylated hydroxytoluene does not protect Chinese hamster ovary cells from chromosomal damage induced by high-dose rate 192Ir irradiation.

    PubMed

    Grillo, C A; Dulout, F N

    2006-11-01

    Previous reports showed the protective effect of the synthetic antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) against the chromosomal damage induced by bleomycin (BLM), cadmium chloride and potassium dichromate. To test the hypothesis that this effect was exerted by inhibition and/or scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the effect of BHT on the chromosomal damage induced by a high dose-rate gamma rays (HDR (192)Ir). Experiments were carried out by irradiating G(1) CHO cells with nominal doses of 1, 2 or 3 Gy. BHT (doses of 1.0, 2.5 or 5.0 microg/ml) was added to the culture immediately before or immediately after irradiation. Cells were then incubated in the presence of BHT for 13 h until harvesting and fixation. Results obtained showed that BHT did not decrease the chromosomal damage induced by radiation in any consistent fashion. On the contrary, in cells post-treated with 5.0 microg/ml of BHT the yield of chromosomal aberrations increased in several experimental points. These results with ionizing radiation suggest that the previous observed protective effects of BHT on the chromosomal damage induced by chemical genotoxicants may not be mediated solely through the scavenging or inactivating reactive oxidative species. The decrease of the yield of chromosomal damage induced by BLM could be due to the union of BHT with a metallic ion, in this case Fe (II), required for the activation of BLM. In the same way, the protective effect of BHT on the chromosomal damage induced by cadmium chloride and potassium dichromate could be due to the decrease of the effective dose of both salts in the cell through the chelation of the cations by BHT.

  12. Efficient rotational echo double resonance recoupling of a spin-1/2 and a quadrupolar spin at high spinning rates and weak irradiation fields.

    PubMed

    Nimerovsky, Evgeny; Goldbourt, Amir

    2010-09-01

    A modification of the rotational echo (adiabatic passage) double resonance experiments, which allows recoupling of the dipolar interaction between a spin-1/2 and a half integer quadrupolar spin is proposed. We demonstrate efficient and uniform recoupling at high spinning rates (nu(r)), low radio-frequency (RF) irradiation fields (nu(1)), and high values of the quadrupolar interaction (nu(q)) that correspond to values of alpha=nu(1)(2)/nu(q)nu(r), the adiabaticity parameter, which are down to less than 10% of the traditional adiabaticity limit for a spin-5/2 (alpha=0.55). The low-alpha rotational echo double resonance curve is obtained when the pulse on the quadrupolar nucleus is extended to full two rotor periods and beyond. For protons (spin-1/2) and aluminum (spin-5/2) species in the zeolite SAPO-42, a dephasing curve, which is significantly better than the regular REAPDOR experiment (pulse length of one-third of the rotor period) is obtained for a spinning rate of 13 kHz and RF fields down to 10 and even 6 kHz. Under these conditions, alpha is estimated to be approximately 0.05 based on an average quadrupolar coupling in zeolites. Extensive simulations support our observations suggesting the method to be robust under a large range of experimental values.

  13. One-step argon/nitrogen binary plasma jet irradiation of Li4Ti5O12 for stable high-rate lithium ion battery anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chun-Kai; Chuang, Shang-I.; Bao, Qi; Liao, Yen-Ting; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure Ar/N2 binary plasma jet irradiation has been introduced into the manufacturing process of lithium ions batteries as a facile, green and scalable post-fabrication treatment approach, which enhanced significantly the high-rate anode performance of lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12). Main emission lines in Ar/N2 plasma measured by optical emission spectroscopy reveal that the dominant excited high-energy species in Ar/N2 plasma are N2*, N2+, N∗ and Ar∗. Sufficient oxygen vacancies have been evidenced by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and Raman spectra. Nitrogen doping has been achieved simultaneously by the surface reaction between pristine Li4Ti5O12 particles and chemically reactive plasma species such as N∗ and N2+. The variety of Li4Ti5O12 particles on the surface of electrodes after different plasma processing time has been examined by grazing incident X-Ray diffraction. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) confirm that the Ar/N2 atmospheric plasma treatment facilitates Li+ ions diffusion and reduces the internal charge-transfer resistance. The as-prepared Li4Ti5O12 anodes exhibit a superior capacity (132 mAh g-1) and excellent stability with almost no capacity decay over 100 cycles under a high C rate (10C).

  14. A quantitative study of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) production by Nannochloropsis gaditana for aquaculture as a function of dilution rate, temperature and average irradiance.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Rodríguez, J; González-Céspedes, A M; Cerón-García, M C; Fernández-Sevilla, J M; Acién-Fernández, F G; Molina-Grima, E

    2014-03-01

    Different pilot-scale outdoor photobioreactors using medium recycling were operated in a greenhouse under different environmental conditions and the growth rates (0.1 to 0.5 day(-1)) obtained evaluated in order to compare them with traditional systems used in aquaculture. The annualized volumetric growth rate for Nannochloropsis gaditana was 0.26 g l(-1) day(-1) (peak 0.4 g l(-1) day(-1)) at 0.4 day(-1) in a 5-cm wide flat-panel bioreactor (FP-PBR). The biomass productivity achieved in this reactor was 10-fold higher than in traditional reactors, reaching values of 28 % and 45 % dry weight (d.w.) of lipids and proteins, respectively, with a 4.3 % (d.w.) content of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). A model for predicting EPA productivity from N. gaditana cultures that takes into account the existence of photolimitation and photoinhibition of growth under outdoor conditions is presented. The effect of temperature and average irradiance on EPA content is also studied. The maximum EPA productivity attained is 30 mg l(-1) day(-1).

  15. Accelerated partial breast irradiation: An analysis of variables associated with late toxicity and long-term cosmetic outcome after high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wazer, David E. . E-mail: dwazer@tufts-nemc.org; Kaufman, Seth; Cuttino, Laurie; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To perform a detailed analysis of variables associated with late tissue effects of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a large cohort of patients with prolonged follow-up. Methods and Materials: Beginning in 1995, 75 women with Stage I/II breast cancer were enrolled in identical institutional trials evaluating APBI as monotherapy after lumpectomy. Patients eligible included those with T1-2, N0-1 ({<=}3 nodes positive), M0 tumors of nonlobular histology with negative surgical margins, no extracapsular nodal extension, and negative results on postexcision mammogram. All patients underwent surgical excision and postoperative irradiation with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the excision cavity plus a 2-cm margin. Treatment was delivered with a high-activity Ir-192 source at 3.4 Gy per fraction twice daily for 5 days to a total dose of 34 Gy. Dosimetric analyses were performed with three-dimensional postimplant dose and volume reconstructions. All patients were evaluated at 3-6-month intervals and assessed with a standardized cosmetic rating scale and according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late normal tissue toxicity scoring criteria. Clinical and therapy-related features were analyzed for their relationship to cosmetic outcome and toxicity rating. Clinical features analyzed included age, volume of resection, history of diabetes or hypertension, extent of axillary surgery, and systemic therapies. Therapy-related features analyzed included volume of tissue encompassed by the 100%, 150%, and 200% isodose lines (V100, V150, and V200, respectively), the dose homogeneity index (DHI), number of source dwell positions, and planar separation. Results: The median follow-up of all patients was 73 months (range, 43-118 months). The cosmetic outcome at last follow-up was rated as excellent, good, and fair/poor in 67%, 24%, and 9% of patients, respectively

  16. [Searching Radiation Countermeasures using the Model of Prolonged Irradiation of Mice with Low Dose Rate and Evaluation of Their Influence on Heat Shock Protein Genes Expression].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvensky, L M; Mikhailov, V F; Schlyakova, T G; Shagirova, J M; Shchegoleva, R A; Raeva, N F; Lisina, N I; Shulenina, L V; Zorin, V V; Pchelka, A V; Trubitsina, K Y

    2015-01-01

    Different radiomodificators (cytokine betaleukine, antioxidant phenoxan, antigipoksant limontar and nucleoside riboxin) were investigated on mice for evaluating their radiation protective capacity against prolonged (21 h) exposure at a dose of 12.6 Gy at a low dose rate of 10 mGy/min. Bone marrow cellularity and endogenic CFUs were used as evaluation criteria 9 days after exposure. Simultaneously, expression of the heat shock proteins of 25, 70 and 90 kDa in unexposed mice bone marrow was studied 2, 24 and 48 h after injections. Betaleukine only had a positive significant effect in both tests in the variants of 50 mcg/kg and 3 mcg/kg when administered 2 h and 22 h before exposure, correspondingly. Effects of betaleukine HSPs on expression were both stimulating and inhibiting, that was in contradiction with a constant positive effect in 5 experiments on exposed mice for each betaleukine variant. It argues against the vital role of HSPs in the betaleukine antiradiation effect. In 2 experiments with high temperatures betaleukine administered at a dose of 50 mcg/kg evoked a very high HSP-70 gene expression after 24 h, and mice exposed to irradiation at that time in a parallel experiment showed an increased radiation effect. It corresponds to the idea that HSPs serve a stress indicator.

  17. [The influence of consecutive application of B-190 preparation and interleukin-1beta on survival rate and bone marrow hematopoiesis of irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Grebeniuk, A N; Zatsepin, V V; Aksenova, N V; Nazarov, V B; Vlasenko, T N

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of research was the experimental estimation of efficiency of consecutive application of a radioprotector B-190 and means of emergency therapy of radiating injury interleukin-1beta at acute irradiation. An estimation of treatment-and-prophylactic action of the given circuit of introduction of preparations carried out by studying 30 day-survival and average life expectancy of the lost animals, research of bone marrow hemopoiesis. It is established, that consecutive application of a radioprotector B-190 in a doze of 50 mg/kg for 15 mines up to an irradiation and interleukin-1beta in a doze of 50 mkg/kg through 15 mines after irradiating increases survival and prevents decrease in quantity of CFU-S9 at the irradiated mice in the greater degree, than their isolated introduction. PMID:20968059

  18. Factors for Predicting Rectal Dose of High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy After Pelvic Irradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: A Retrospective Study With Radiography-Based Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Engyen; Wang Chongjong; Lan Jenhong; Chen Huichun; Fang Fumin; Hsu, H.-C.; Huang Yujie; Wang Changyu; Wang Yuming

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive factors for rectal dose of the first fraction of high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1993 through February 2008, 946 patients undergoing pelvic irradiation and HDR-ICBT were analyzed. Examination under anesthesia (EUA) at the first implantation of the applicator was usually performed in the early period. Rectal point was determined radiographically according to the 38th Report of the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU). The ICRU rectal dose (PRD) as a percentage of point A dose was calculated; multiple linear regression models were used to predict PRD. Results: Factors influencing successful rectal dose calculation were EUA (p < 0.001) and absence of diabetes (p = 0.047). Age (p < 0.001), body weight (p = 0.002), diabetes (p = 0.020), and EUA (p < 0.001) were independent factors for the PRD. The predictive equation derived from the regression model was PRD (%) = 57.002 + 0.443 x age (years) - 0.257 x body weight (kg) + 6.028 x diabetes (no: 0; yes: 1) - 8.325 x EUA (no: 0; yes: 1) Conclusion: Rectal dose at the first fraction of HDR-ICBT is positively influenced by age and diabetes, and negatively correlated with EUA and body weight. A small fraction size at point A may be considered in patients with a potentially high rectal dose to reduce the biologically effective dose if the ICRU rectal dose has not been immediately obtained in the first fraction of HDR-ICBT.

  19. A master curve-mechanism based approach to modeling the effects of constraint, loading rate and irradiation on the toughness-temperature behavior of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Donahue, E.; Lucas, G.E.; Sheckherd, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    The influence of loading rate and constraint on the effective fracture toughness as a function of temperature [K{sub e}(T)] of the fusion program heat of V-4Cr-4Ti was measured using subsized, three point bend specimens. The constitutive behavior was characterized as a function of temperature and strain rate using small tensile specimens. Data in the literature on this alloy was also analysed to determine the effect of irradiation on K{sub e}(T) and the energy temperature (E-T) curves measured in subsized Charpy V-notch tests. It was found that V-4Cr-4Ti undergoes {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} stress-controlled cleavage fracture below a temperature marking a sharp ductile-to-brittle transition. The transition temperature is increased by higher loading rates, irradiation hardening and triaxial constraint. Shifts in a reference transition temperature due to higher loading rates and irradiation can be reasonably predicted by a simple equivalent yield stress model. These results also suggest that size and geometry effects, which mediate constraint, can be modeled by combining local critical stressed area {sigma}*/A* fracture criteria with finite element method simulations of crack tip stress fields. The fundamental understanding reflected in these models will be needed to develop K{sub e}(T) curves for a range of loading rates, irradiation conditions, structural size scales and geometries relying (in large part) on small specimen tests. Indeed, it may be possible to develop a master K{sub e}(T) curve-shift method to account for these variables. Such reliable and flexible failure assessment methods are critical to the design and safe operation of defect tolerant vanadium structures.

  20. Far-UV Spectroscopy of the Planet-hosting Star WASP-13: High-energy Irradiance, Distance, Age, Planetary Mass-loss Rate, and Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; France, K.; Koskinen, T.; Juvan, I. G.; Haswell, C. A.; Lendl, M.

    2015-12-01

    Several transiting hot Jupiters orbit relatively inactive main-sequence stars. For some of those, the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime activity parameter lies below the basal level (-5.1). Two explanations have been proposed so far: (i) the planet affects the stellar dynamo, (ii) the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime measurements are biased by extrinsic absorption, either by the interstellar medium (ISM) or by material local to the system. We present here Hubble Space Telescope/COS far-UV spectra of WASP-13, which hosts an inflated hot Jupiter and has a measured {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value (-5.26), well below the basal level. From the star’s spectral energy distribution we obtain an extinction E(B - V) = 0.045 ± 0.025 mag and a distance d = 232 ± 8 pc. We detect at ≳4σ lines belonging to three different ionization states of carbon (C i, C ii, and C iv) and the Si iv doublet at ˜3σ. Using far-UV spectra of nearby early G-type stars of known age, we derive a C iv/C i flux ratio-age relation, from which we estimate WASP-13's age to be 5.1 ± 2.0 Gyr. We rescale the solar irradiance reference spectrum to match the flux of the C iv 1548 doublet. By integrating the rescaled solar spectrum, we obtain an XUV flux at 1 AU of 5.4 erg s-1 cm-2. We use a detailed model of the planet’s upper atmosphere, deriving a mass-loss rate of 1.5 × 1011 g s-1. Despite the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value, the star shows a far-UV spectrum typical of middle-aged solar-type stars, pointing toward the presence of significant extrinsic absorption. The analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the Ca ii H&K lines indicates that the ISM absorption could be the origin of the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value. Nevertheless, the large uncertainty in the Ca ii ISM abundance does not allow us to firmly exclude the presence of circumstellar gas. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from MAST at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities

  1. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws) ) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA): normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-04-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and radiofrequency (RF) irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (k(ws) ), with little dependence on bulk water T(1) , T(2) , RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments.

  2. Simplified quantification of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with RF saturation time dependent ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) - Normalization of relaxation and RF irradiation spillover effects for improved quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is an emerging imaging technique capable of detecting dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, with promising in vivo applications. However, CEST MRI contrast is complex, varying not only with the labile proton concentration and exchange rate, but also with experimental conditions such as field strength and RF irradiation scheme. Furthermore, the optimal RF irradiation power depends on the exchange rate, which must be estimated in order to optimize the CEST MRI experiments. Although methods including numerical fitting with modified Bloch-McConnell equations, quantification of exchange rate with RF saturation time and power (QUEST and QUESP), have been proposed to address this relationship, they require multiple-parameter non-linear fitting and accurate relaxation measurement. Our work here extended the QUEST algorithm with ratiometric analysis (QUESTRA) that normalizes the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) at labile and reference frequencies, which effectively eliminates the confounding relaxation and RF spillover effects. Specifically, the QUESTRA contrast approaches its steady state mono-exponentially at a rate determined by the reverse exchange rate (kws), with little dependence on bulk water T1, T2, RF power and chemical shift. The proposed algorithm was confirmed numerically, and validated experimentally using a tissue-like phantom of serially titrated pH compartments. PMID:21842497

  3. Photoionization of isooctane and n-octane in intense laser fields: The effect of irradiance on ionization rates and electron dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Andrew T.

    Thin path length jets (60 mum) of liquid isooctane and n-octane have been photoionized with 36-70 fs pulses of 3.1 eV photons. The population of electrons ejected post ionization is investigated over a large range of ionizing irradiance, Iex, though transient absorption (TA) measurements at wavelengths in the range 570 nm (2.17 eV) to 1315 nm (0.94 eV). As Iex is varied over a range from 3 TW/cm2 to 410 TW/cm2, the dependence of the TA intensity on Iex at time delays 0.7 ps and 2.5 ps exhibits the periodic structure theoretically predicted to develop as a result of multiphoton channel closings. At low Iex (< 9 TW/cm2), TA intensity in isooctane is proportional to Inex where n = 3, consistent with non-resonant, near threshold ionization (liquid phase ionization potential = 8.6 eV). At I ex > 9 TW/cm2, n declines with increasing Iex up to Iex = 13 TW/cm2, at which point n abruptly increases to 4. The pattern is repeated at Iex > 13 TW/cm 2, albeit with n declining from 4 and then abruptly increasing to 5 as Iex becomes greater than 100 TW/cm2. A similar trend is observed in n-octane. The decay of the TA intensity in both liquids has been measured from 0.50 ps to 180 ps over the same range of irradiance. Via comparison of the two liquids, and electron quenching studies, the TA at wavelengths longer than 800 nm has been assigned to be predominantly due to absorption by the electron. At the lowest irradiances, where n = 3 photons are required for photoionization, the TA decay in isooctane is characteristic of a geminate ion pair decaying via diffusive recombination in a Coulomb field. As the irradiance is increased, an early time, rapid, exponential decay of the TA begins to develop until an irradiance is reached (≅ 13 TW/cm2) at which our studies indicate that the n = 3 channel closes. At this irradiance, the TA decay returns to purely diffusive-like. As the irradiance is further increased, there is a reappearance of the early time exponential decay until the n = 4

  4. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  5. Total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, D.E.; Ferguson, R.M.; Simmons, R.L.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation by itself can produce sufficient immunosuppression to prolong the survival of a variety of organ allografts in experimental animals. The degree of prolongation is dose-dependent and is limited by the toxicity that occurs with higher doses. Total lymphoid irradiation is more effective before transplantation than after, but when used after transplantation can be combined with pharmacologic immunosuppression to achieve a positive effect. In some animal models, total lymphoid irradiation induces an environment in which fully allogeneic bone marrow will engraft and induce permanent chimerism in the recipients who are then tolerant to organ allografts from the donor strain. If total lymphoid irradiation is ever to have clinical applicability on a large scale, it would seem that it would have to be under circumstances in which tolerance can be induced. However, in some animal models graft-versus-host disease occurs following bone marrow transplantation, and methods to obviate its occurrence probably will be needed if this approach is to be applied clinically. In recent years, patient and graft survival rates in renal allograft recipients treated with conventional immunosuppression have improved considerably, and thus the impetus to utilize total lymphoid irradiation for its immunosuppressive effect alone is less compelling. The future of total lymphoid irradiation probably lies in devising protocols in which maintenance immunosuppression can be eliminated, or nearly eliminated, altogether. Such protocols are effective in rodents. Whether they can be applied to clinical transplantation remains to be seen.

  6. REPLY: Reply to Comments on 'Effect of heating rate on kinetic parameters of β-irradiated Li2B4O7:Cu,Ag,P in TSL measurements'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ege, A. Turkler; Tekin, E. Ekdal; Karali, T.; Can, N.; Prokić, M.

    2009-05-01

    We appreciate the opportunity to respond to comments regarding the paper published by Ege et al (2007 Effect of heating rate on kinetic parameters of β-irradiated Li2B4O7:Cu,Ag,P in TSL measurements Meas. Sci. Technol. 18 889). We would like to thank the authors for taking the time to tell us about their opinion, but unfortunately we do not agree with them completely. In the article presented by Kumar and Chourasiya some comment is advanced to the analysis of the glow curves measured with different heating rates, presented in our recent study. According to our study, the area under the glow curve decreases with increasing heating rate in TL-temperature plots due to the quenching effects. Contrary to this, Kumar and Chourasiya suggest that this decrease is due to the normalization process. Here we hope to clarify any confusion regarding our published study.

  7. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation. PMID:26272165

  8. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation.

  9. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  10. LASERS: Laser stand for irradiation of targets by laser pulses from the Iskra-5 facility at a repetition rate of 100 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annenkov, V. I.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Eroshenko, V. A.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Zubkov, A. V.; Kalipanov, S. V.; Kalmykov, N. A.; Kovalenko, V. P.; Krotov, V. A.; Lapin, S. G.; Martynenko, S. P.; Pankratov, V. I.; Faizullin, V. S.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Khudikov, N. M.; Chebotar, V. S.

    2009-08-01

    A train of a few tens of high-power subnanosecond laser pulses with a repetition period of 10 ns is generated in the Iskra-5 facility. The laser pulse train has an energy of up to 300 J and contains up to 40 pulses (by the 0.15 intensity level), the single pulse duration in the train being ~0.5 ns. The results of experiments on conversion of a train of laser pulses to a train of X-ray pulses are presented. Upon irradiation of a tungsten target, a train of X-ray pulses is generated with the shape of an envelope in the spectral band from 0.18 to 0.28 keV similar to that of the envelope of the laser pulse train. The duration of a single X-ray pulse in the train is equal to that of a single laser pulse.

  11. Irradiation and food processing.

    PubMed

    Sigurbjörnsson, B; Loaharanu, P

    1989-01-01

    After more than four decades of research and development, food irradiation has been demonstrated to be safe, effective and versatile as a process of food preservation, decontamination or disinfection. Its various applications cover: inhibition of sprouting of root crops; insect disinfestation of stored products, fresh and dried food; shelf-life extension of fresh fruits, vegetables, meat and fish; destruction of parasites and pathogenic micro-organisms in food of animal origin; decontamination of spices and food ingredients, etc. Such applications provide consumers with the increase in variety, volume and value of food. Although regulations on food irradiation in different countries are largely unharmonized, national authorities have shown increasing recognition and acceptance of this technology based on the Codex Standard for Irradiated Foods and its associated Code of Practice. Harmonization of national legislations represents an important prerequisite to international trade in irradiated food. Consumers at large are still not aware of the safety and benefits that food irradiation has to offer. Thus, national and international organizations, food industry, trade associations and consumer unions have important roles to play in introducing this technology based on its scientific values. Public acceptance of food irradiation may be slow at the beginning, but should increase at a faster rate in the foreseeable future when consumers are well informed of the safety and benefits of this technology in comparison with existing ones. Commercial applications of food irradiation has already started in 18 countries at present. The volume of food or ingredients treated on a commercial scale varies from country to country ranging from several tons of spices to hundreds of thousands of tons of grains per annum. With the increasing interest of national authorities and the food industry in applying the process, it is anticipated that some 25 countries will use some 55 commercial

  12. The non-contact monitoring of heart and respiratory rates using laser irradiation: an experimental simultaneous monitoring with and without clothes during biochemical hazards.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Ishizuka, T; Ishihara, M; Ishihara, M; Matsumura, K; Kikuchi, M; Kurita, A

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contact method to evaluate the heart and respiratory rates simultaneously using a single optical sensor which can be used without the removal of clothes before a decontamination procedure in biochemical hazards. We measured the heart and respiratory rates with and without clothes to assess the vital sign monitoring before decontamination. In order to monitor the heart and respiratory rates of rabbits simultaneously, the respiratory and cardiac peaks were separated using fast Fourier transform from a 5 mW helium-neon laser (wavelength 632.8 nm) reflected off the chest walls of rabbits. A cloth (50 mm x 50 mm, 2 mm thick) was placed on the chest of the rabbits to simulate the vital sign monitoring with clothes. The heart rate measured using this method agreed with the rate derived from an electrocardiogram (r = 0.82, p<0.05). The respiratory rate correlated with the manually measured respirator rate (r = 0.93, p<0.05). This method appears promising as a non-contact method for monitoring the heart and respiratory rates of patients under biochemically hazardous conditions.

  13. The non-contact monitoring of heart and respiratory rates using laser irradiation: an experimental simultaneous monitoring with and without clothes during biochemical hazards.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Ishizuka, T; Ishihara, M; Ishihara, M; Matsumura, K; Kikuchi, M; Kurita, A

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a non-contact method to evaluate the heart and respiratory rates simultaneously using a single optical sensor which can be used without the removal of clothes before a decontamination procedure in biochemical hazards. We measured the heart and respiratory rates with and without clothes to assess the vital sign monitoring before decontamination. In order to monitor the heart and respiratory rates of rabbits simultaneously, the respiratory and cardiac peaks were separated using fast Fourier transform from a 5 mW helium-neon laser (wavelength 632.8 nm) reflected off the chest walls of rabbits. A cloth (50 mm x 50 mm, 2 mm thick) was placed on the chest of the rabbits to simulate the vital sign monitoring with clothes. The heart rate measured using this method agreed with the rate derived from an electrocardiogram (r = 0.82, p<0.05). The respiratory rate correlated with the manually measured respirator rate (r = 0.93, p<0.05). This method appears promising as a non-contact method for monitoring the heart and respiratory rates of patients under biochemically hazardous conditions. PMID:12775459

  14. Effects of far infrared rays irradiated from ceramic material (BIOCERAMIC) on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure, and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ting-Kai; Chen, Chien-Ho; Tsai, Shih-Ying; Hsiao, George; Lee, Chi-Ming

    2012-10-31

    The present study examined the effects of BIOCERAMIC on psychological stress-conditioned elevated heart rate, blood pressure and oxidative stress-suppressed cardiac contractility using in vivo and in vitro animal models. We investigated the effects of BIOCERAMIC on the in vivo cardiovascular hemodynamic parameters of rats by monitoring their heart rates, systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. Thereafter, we assayed its effects on the heart rate in an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation, and on cardiac contractility under oxidative stress. BIOCERAMIC caused significant decreases in heart rates and systolic and mean blood pressure in the stress-conditioned heart rate rat models (P < 0.05), as well as in the experimental models of an isolated frog heart with and without adrenaline stimulation (P < 0.05), and normalized cardiac contractility under oxidative stress (P < 0.05). BIOCERAMIC may, therefore, normalize the effects of psychological stress and oxidative stress conditions.

  15. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  16. Microwave irradiation as a versatile tool for increasing reaction rates and yields in synthesis of optically active polyamides containing flexible L-leucine amino acid.

    PubMed

    Mallakpour, Shadpour; Zadehnazari, Amin

    2010-05-01

    In this investigation, a series of thermally stable and optically active polyamides (PA)s containing bulky pendant chiral functionality from polymerization of a diacid monomer containing rigid phthalimide and flexible L-leucine groups, (2S)-5-[4-(4-methyl-2-phthalimidylpentanoylamino)benzoylamino]isophthalic acid with several aromatic and aliphatic diisocyanates such as 4,4'-methylenebis(phenyl isocyanate), toluylene-2,4-diisocyanate, isophorone diisocyanate, and hexamethylene diisocyanate under gradual heating method were prepared and compared with microwave-assisted polycondensation method. The polymerization reactions occurred rapidly under microwave irradiation and produced a series of PAs with good yields and moderate inherent viscosities of 0.26-0.68 dL/g. All of the new PAs showed good solubility and were readily dissolved in aprotic organic solvents. The resulting polymers were characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis technique. Thermal stability and thermal properties of PAs were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The interpretation of kinetic parameters (E, Delta H, Delta S, and Delta G) of thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern equations. PMID:19756941

  17. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk of food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  18. Simultaneous experimental determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency power-dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2013-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents owing to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis.

  19. Simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate with irradiation radio frequency (RF) power dependent quantitative CEST MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging is sensitive to dilute proteins/peptides and microenvironmental properties, and has been increasingly evaluated for molecular imaging and in vivo applications. However, the experimentally measured CEST effect depends on the CEST agent concentration, exchange rate and relaxation time. In addition, there may be non-negligible direct radio-frequency (RF) saturation effects, particularly severe for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) agents due to their relatively small chemical shift difference from that of the bulk water resonance. As such, the commonly used asymmetry analysis only provides CEST-weighted information. Recently, it has been shown with numerical simulation that both labile proton concentration and exchange rate can be determined by evaluating the RF power dependence of DIACEST effect. To validate the simulation results, we prepared and imaged two CEST phantoms: a pH phantom of serially titrated pH at a fixed creatine concentration and a concentration phantom of serially varied creatine concentration titrated to the same pH, and solved the labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate per-pixel. For the concentration phantom, we showed that the labile proton fraction ratio is proportional to the CEST agent concentration with negligible change in the exchange rate. Additionally, we found the exchange rate of the pH phantom is dominantly base-catalyzed with little difference in the labile proton fraction ratio. In summary, our study demonstrated quantitative DIACEST MRI, which remains promising to augment the conventional CEST-weighted MRI analysis. PMID:23606428

  20. COMMENT: Comments on 'Effect of heating rate on kinetic parameters of β-irradiated Li2B4O7:Cu,Ag,P in TSL measurements'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Munish; Chourasiya, G.

    2009-05-01

    The area under the glow curve (no thermal quenching and constant dose) is conserved only in TL-time plots and is not conserved in TL-temperature plots, but for a given heating rate, the glow peak height is same in time as well as in temperature plots and the glow peak height increases with increasing heating rate. However, to conserve area in TL-temperature plots, the TL intensity should be divided by the respective heating rate; this will lead to a decrease of glow peak height in I/β-temperature plots, which is an artifact of the normalization process, and this decrease should not be used to measure thermal quenching.

  1. High-dose Extended-Field Irradiation and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Cervical Cancer With Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Young-Tak; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of extended-field radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with uterine cervical carcinoma and positive para-aortic nodes. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the results for 33 women with Stage IB-IVB cervical cancer. Each patient had received 59.4 Gy, including a three-dimensional conformal boost to the para-aortic lymph nodes and 41.4-50.4 Gy of external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis. Each patient also underwent six or seven applications of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (median, 5 Gy to point A at each session). Results: The median follow-up period of surviving patients was 39 months. The most common acute toxicity was hematologic, observed in 23 women. Severe acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 3 and 4 patients, respectively. More than three-quarters of patients showed a complete response, encompassing the primary mass, metastatic pelvic, and para-aortic lymph nodes. Of the 33 women, 15 had no evidence of disease, 6 had persistent disease, 4 developed in-field failures, and 6 developed distant failures. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 42%, respectively. Conclusion: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with extended-field radiotherapy is feasible in women with uterine cervical carcinoma and positive para-aortic lymph nodes, with acceptable late morbidity and a high survival rate, although it was accompanied by substantial acute toxicity.

  2. Design of YCF-1 mobile γ irradiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehu, Zhang; Chuanzhen, Wang

    1993-07-01

    YCF-1 Mobile irradiator is designed by BINE of China. It has been put into running in YanJi city of Jilin province. It is able to be moved to border and distance places and area lumped and spreading out of agricultural products to service. It can play a important role in demonstration and extending irradiation technology in food irradiation, disinfestation, sterilization and quarantine, etc. This paper describes the features and design considerations of mobile irradiator. This irradiator adopted Cesium-137 source. The design capacity of loading source is 9.25PBq (250kCi), A half-time of Cs- 137 is 30.2 years long, exchanging source is not needed utilization rate of energy is higher, and the shielding is thinner, The Weight is lighter, The dose rate on the surface of it is 0.0025mSv/h in accordance with national standard. The internal size of irradiation room is 1800×1800×900mm (L×W×H), The sheilding of irradiation room is a steel shell filled with lead. The thickness of lead is 18cm. The irradiator is installed on a special flat truck. The size of the truck is 7000×3400×4200mm (L×W×H). The weight of irradiator is more than 80 150kw. The main components and parts of irradiator are: source, source racks and hoist, irradiation chamber, storage source chamber, the product's transport system, dose monitoring system, ventilation system and safety interlock system, etc.

  3. Simultaneous Integrated Boost Irradiation After Breast-Conserving Surgery: Physician-Rated Toxicity and Cosmetic Outcome at 30 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bantema-Joppe, Enja J.; Schilstra, Cornelis; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Dolsma, Wil V.; Busz, Dianne M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Maduro, John H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity and cosmetic outcome (CO) in breast cancer survivors treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy with a hypofractionated, simultaneous integrated boost (3D-CRT-SIB) and to identify risk factors for toxicity, with special focus on the impact of age. Methods and Materials: Included were 940 consecutive disease-free patients treated for breast cancer (Stage 0-III) with 3D-CRT-SIB, after breast-conserving surgery, from 2005 to 2010. Physician-rated toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0) and CO were prospectively assessed during yearly follow-up, up to 5 years after radiotherapy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses using a bootstrapping method were performed. Results: At 3 years, toxicity scores of 436 patients were available. Grade {>=}2 fibrosis in the boost area was observed in 8.5%, non-boost fibrosis in 49.4%, pain to the chest wall in 6.7%, and fair/poor CO in 39.7% of cases. Radiotherapy before chemotherapy was significantly associated with grade {>=}2 boost fibrosis at 3 years (odds ratio [OR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-6.0). Non-boost fibrosis was associated with re-resection (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.0) and larger tumors (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.1). At 1 year, chest wall pain was significantly associated with high boost dosage (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.7) and younger age (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7). A fair/poor CO was observed more often after re-resection (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.4-8.5), after regional radiotherapy (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.2-7.1), and in larger tumors (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.1). Conclusions: Toxicity and CO are not impaired after 3D-CRT-SIB. Fibrosis was not significantly associated with radiotherapy parameters. Independent risk factors for fibrosis were chemotherapy after radiotherapy, re-resection, and larger tumor size. Re-resection was most predictive for worse CO. Age had an impact on chest wall pain occurrence.

  4. Damage nucleation in Si during ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, O.W.; Fathy, D.; Narayan, J.

    1984-01-01

    Damage nucleation in single crystals of silicon during ion irradiation is investigated. Experimental results and mechanisms for damage nucleation during both room and liquid nitrogen temperature irradiation with different mass ions are discussed. It is shown that the accumulation of damage during room temperature irradiation depends on the rate of implantation. These dose rate effects are found to decrease in magnitude as the mass of the ions is increased. The significance of dose rate effects and their mass dependence on nucleation mechanisms is discussed.

  5. Objective and Longitudinal Assessment of Dermatitis After Postoperative Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in Patients With Breast Cancer Treated With Breast Conserving Therapy: Reduction of Moisture Deterioration by APBI

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamazaki, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Takenaka, Tadashi; Masuda, Norikazu; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Inoue, Takehiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To objectively evaluate the radiation dermatitis caused by accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: The skin color and moisture changes were examined using a newly installed spectrophotometer and corneometer in 22 patients who had undergone APBI using open cavity implant high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (36 Gy in six fractions) and compared with the corresponding values for 44 patients in an external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) control group (50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions within 5-6 weeks) after breast conserving surgery. Results: All values changed significantly as a result of APBI. The extent of elevation in a Asterisk-Operator (reddish) and reduction in L Asterisk-Operator (black) values caused by APBI were similar to those for EBRT, with slightly delayed recovery for 6-12 months after treatment owing to the surgical procedure. In contrast, only APBI caused a change in the b Asterisk-Operator values, and EBRT did not, demonstrating that the reduction in b Asterisk-Operator values (yellowish) depends largely on the surgical procedure. The changes in moisture were less severe after APBI than after EBRT, and the recovery was more rapid. The toxicity assessment using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3, showed that all dermatitis caused by APBI was Grade 2 or less. Conclusion: An objective analysis can quantify the effects of APBI procedures on color and moisture cosmesis. The radiation dermatitis caused by APBI using the present schedule showed an equivalent effect on skin color and a less severe effect on moisture than the effects caused by standard EBRT.

  6. Free radical kinetics on irradiated fennel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2008-09-01

    Herein, an electron spin resonance study on the behavior of organic radicals in fennel before and after irradiation is reported. The spectrum of irradiated fennel composed of the spectrum component derived from the un-irradiated sample (near g=2.005) and the spectra components derived from carbohydrates. The time decay of intensity spectral components was well explained by first-order kinetics with a variety of rate constants. Especially, the signal at near g=2.02 ascribed to stable cellulose-derivative components is expected to be a good indicator in the identification of irradiated plant samples.

  7. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  8. Detection of irradiated liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengchu, Qi; Jilan, Wu; Rongyao, Yuan

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl≈1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation.

  9. Prone Whole-Breast Irradiation Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Early Disease Yields High Rates of Excellent to Good Cosmetic Outcomes in Patients With Large and/or Pendulous Breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergom, Carmen; Kelly, Tracy; Morrow, Natalya; Wilson, J. Frank; Walker, Alonzo; Xiang Qun; Ahn, Kwang Woo; White, Julia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report our institution's experience using prone positioning for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to deliver post-lumpectomy whole breast irradiation (WBI) in a cohort of women with large and/or pendulous breasts, to determine the rate of acute and late toxicities and, more specifically, cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that using 3D-CRT for WBI in the prone position would reduce or eliminate patient and breast size as negative prognostic indicators for toxicities associated with WBI. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2006, 110 cases were treated with prone WBI using 3D-CRT. The lumpectomy, breast target volumes, heart, and lung were contoured on all computed tomography scans. A dose of 45-50 Gy was prescribed to the breast volume using standard fractionation schemes. The planning goals were {>=}95% of prescription to 95% of the breast volume, and 100% of boost dose to 95% of lumpectomy planning target volume. Toxicities and cosmesis were prospectively scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Effects Version 3.0 and the Harvard Scale. The median follow-up was 40 months. Results: The median body mass index (BMI) was 33.6 kg/m{sup 2}, and median breast volume was 1396 cm{sup 3}. The worst toxicity encountered during radiation was Grade 3 dermatitis in 5% of our patient population. Moist desquamation occurred in 16% of patients, with only 2% of patients with moist desquamation outside the inframammary/axillary folds. Eleven percent of patients had Grade {>=}2 late toxicities, including Grade 3 induration/fibrosis in 2%. Excellent to good cosmesis was achieved in 89%. Higher BMI was associated with moist desquamation and breast pain, but BMI and breast volume did not impact fibrosis or excellent to good cosmesis. Conclusion: In patients with higher BMI and/or large-pendulous breasts, delivering prone WBI using 3D-CRT results in favorable toxicity profiles and high excellent to good cosmesis rates. Higher BMI was

  10. Commercial food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, E.F.; Libby, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Food irradiation is discussed. Irradiation exposes food to gamma rays from a cobalt-60 or a cesium-137 source, or to high-energy electrons emitted by an electron accelerator. A major advantage is that food can be packaged either before or after treatment. FDA regulations with regard to irradiation are discussed. Comments on an 'Advance Notice' on irradiation, published by the FDA in 1981 are summarized.

  11. Irradiated mandibular autografts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.; Singer, M.I.; Shockley, W.W.; Pugh, N.; Shidnia, H.

    1983-09-15

    The cosmetic and functional disability associated with mandibular resection has been a major problem to the patient with direct invasion of the mandible by oral cancer. Marginal resections with combined postoperative radiation therapy have frequently been substituted for the more preferred segmental resections and resultant deformities. Presented are 15 cases of oral cavity cancer involving resection of the mandible, immediate radiation to 10,000 rad, and primary reconstruction as irradiated mandibular autografts. The longest following is 4 years and 3 months, with a success rate of 66%. Morbidity is minimal as compared to autogenous bone grafting. Tumor size, previous radiation, or use of regional flaps have not been a factor in the success of this method in reconstruction of the mandible primarily.

  12. Modeling precipitate evolution in zirconium alloys during irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, J. D.

    2016-08-01

    The second phase precipitates (SPPs) in zirconium alloys are critical in controlling their performance. During service, SPPs are subject to both thermal and irradiation effects that influence volume fraction, number, and size. In this paper, a model has been developed to capture the combined effect of thermal and irradiation exposure on the Zr(Fe,Cr)2 precipitates in Zircaloy. The model includes irradiation induced precipitate destabilization integrated into a classical size class model for nucleation, growth and coarsening. The model has been applied to predict the effect of temperature and irradiation on SPP evolution. Increasing irradiation displacement rate is predicted to strongly enhance the loss of particles that arises from coarsening alone. The effect of temperature is complex due to competition between coarsening and irradiation damage. As temperature increases, coarsening is predicted to become increasingly important compared to irradiation induced dissolution and may increase resistance to irradiation induced dissolution by increasing particle size.

  13. Radical Irradiation of Extracranial Oligometastases

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Joseph K.; Milano, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in radiotherapy planning and delivery have been used to treat patients with limited metastatic disease. With these techniques, high rates of treated metastasis control and low toxicity have been reported. Some patients have long disease-free intervals after radiotherapy similar to those seen after surgical resection. Ongoing studies will determine the benefit of these irradiation techniques to treat limited metastases, identify appropriate candidates, and assist in integrating these treatments into management strategies for specific diseases. PMID:25113765

  14. Dental Implants Installed in Irradiated Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Chambrone, L.; Mandia, J.; Shibli, J.A.; Romito, G.A.; Abrahao, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the survival rate of titanium implants placed in irradiated jaws. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched for studies assessing implants that had been placed in nongrafted sites of irradiated patients. Random effects meta-analyses assessed implant loss in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients and in irradiated patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Of 1,051 potentially eligible publications, 15 were included. A total of 10,150 implants were assessed in the included studies, and of these, 1,689 (14.3%) had been placed in irradiated jaws. The mean survival rate in the studies ranged from 46.3% to 98.0%. The pooled estimates indicated a significant increase in the risk of implant failure in irradiated patients (risk ratio: 2.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.86, 4.05; p < .00001) and in maxillary sites (risk ratio: 5.96; 95% confidence interval: 2.71, 13.12; p < .00001). Conversely, HBO therapy did not reduce the risk of implant failure (risk ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 8.82; p = .80). Radiotherapy was linked to higher implant failure in the maxilla, and HBO therapy did not improve implant survival. Most included publications reported data on machined implants, and only 3 studies on HBO therapy were included. Overall, implant therapy appears to be a viable treatment option for reestablishing adequate occlusion and masticatory conditions in irradiated patients. PMID:24158336

  15. Influence of microwave irradiation on enzyme kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelkić, V. M.; Stanisavljev, D. R.; Gopčević, K. R.; Beljanski, M. V.

    2009-09-01

    The in vitro effect of 2.45 GHz microwave irradiation on porcine pepsin activity under controlled temperature and absorbed microwave power via kinetic parameters was evaluated. Kinetic study with respect of time of irradiation demonstrated the existence of an inactivation effect of microwaves at pH 2 on pepsin molecule. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-bromphenol blue (BPB) complex was used as substrate for the assay of pepsin by kinetic method. Depending on absorbed microwave dose, the degree of caused inactivation varies from 39.11 to 45.91% for 5 and 20 min of pepsin MW irradiation, respectively. The V maxapp and K mapp were calculated for low (5 min of MW irradiation) and higher specific absorbed dose (20 min of MW irradiation), as well as for untreated enzyme, from double reciprocal Lineweaver-Burk plot. The effect of microwaves on substrate (BSA-BPB complex) was also investigated. For reaction performed with MW irradiated substrate for 5 min the reaction rate was decreased for 15.15%, while for 20 min of substrate irradiation reaction rate was decreased for 25.52% compared to the control reaction.

  16. Total body calcium analysis. [neutron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewellen, T. K.; Nelp, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    A technique to quantitate total body calcium in humans is developed. Total body neutron irradiation is utilized to produce argon 37. The radio argon, which diffuses into the blood stream and is excreted through the lungs, is recovered from the exhaled breath and counted inside a proportional detector. Emphasis is placed on: (1) measurement of the rate of excretion of radio argon following total body neutron irradiation; (2) the development of the radio argon collection, purification, and counting systems; and (3) development of a patient irradiation facility using a 14 MeV neutron generator. Results and applications are discussed in detail.

  17. Irradiation autogenous mandibular grafts in primary reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.

    1981-07-01

    The procedure, irradiated mandibular autografts, for primary reconstruction, is presented with an immediate success rate of 88%. Eight cases have undergone primary mandibular reconstruction with the tumorous mandible irradiated to 10,000 rads in a single dose. The longest follow-up is 2 3/4 years. The autograft has proven to be an ideal implant. Major resections of the mandible in conjunction with large myocutaneous flaps have been reconstructed utilizing this implant.

  18. Vanadium irradiation at ATR - neutronics aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate damage and transmutation rates in vanadium irradiated in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) located in Idaho. The main focuses of the study are to evaluate the transmutation of vanadium to chromium and to explore ways to design the irradiation experiment to avoid excessive transmutation. It was found that the A-hole of ATR produces damage rate of {approximately} 0.2%/dpa of vanadium to chromium. A thermal neutron filter can be incorporated into the design to reduce the vanadium-to-chromium transmutation rate to low levels. A filter 1-2 mm thick of gadolinium or hafnium can be used.

  19. Influences of Microwave Irradiation on Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Abe, Y.; Iwata, T.; Kudo, I.; Saito, K.; Okuda, T.

    2004-12-01

    An experimental facility to evaluate the long-duration influence of microwave to environment, a so-called long duration microwave exposure facility (LDMEF), was constructed in Tsukuba in 1994, and so far irradiation tests on plants accumulated over 40,000 hours have been conducted with the aid of 2.45 GHz magnetron. The LDMEF consists of a pair of outdoor electromagnetically isolated areas, one under the influence of microwave irradiation with a 500 W magnetron and one without microwave irradiation. The growth rates of plants in both areas were compared and evaluated with the experimental data for the temperature distribution in the soil and power distribution of microwave. Although any appreciable influence of microwave was not noticed in the power density less than 10 mW/cm2 , the experimental results showed a significant growth rate enhancement when the power density became over 10 mW/cm2 . However, the growth was rather depressed when the power density increased over 15 mW/cm2 . These effects are well explained by the temperature and moisture in the soil which are also under an appreciable influence of microwave irradiation [1,2]. In this context, we newly constructed an indoor irradiation facility, in which the growth conditions of plants under a constant soil temperature can be maintained. In addition, irradiation with a 5.8 GHz magnetron will be conducted in the new facility. In parallel to a series of indoor and outdoor irradiation tests on plants, the influence of microwave irradiation on the growth pattern of albino mouse will be conducted. This experiment will be the first experimental evaluation for the influence of microwave irradiation on animals.

  20. Irradiation creep of dispersion strengthened copper alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pokrovsky, A.S.; Barabash, V.R.; Fabritsiev, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    Dispersion strengthened copper alloys are under consideration as reference materials for the ITER plasma facing components. Irradiation creep is one of the parameters which must be assessed because of its importance for the lifetime prediction of these components. In this study the irradiation creep of a dispersion strengthened copper (DS) alloy has been investigated. The alloy selected for evaluation, MAGT-0.2, which contains 0.2 wt.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, is very similar to the GlidCop{trademark} alloy referred to as Al20. Irradiation creep was investigated using HE pressurized tubes. The tubes were machined from rod stock, then stainless steel caps were brazed onto the end of each tube. The creep specimens were pressurized by use of ultra-pure He and the stainless steel caps subsequently sealed by laser welding. These specimens were irradiated in reactor water in the core position of the SM-2 reactors to a fluence level of 4.5-7.1 x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV), which corresponds to {approx}3-5 dpa. The irradiation temperature ranged from 60-90{degrees}C, which yielded calculated hoop stresses from 39-117 MPa. A mechanical micrometer system was used to measure the outer diameter of the specimens before and after irradiation, with an accuracy of {+-}0.001 mm. The irradiation creep was calculated based on the change in the diameter. Comparison of pre- and post-irradiation diameter measurements indicates that irradiation induced creep is indeed observed in this alloy at low temperatures, with a creep rate as high as {approx}2 x 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1}. These results are compared with available data for irradiation creep for stainless steels, pure copper, and for thermal creep of copper alloys.

  1. Applicability of the Sunna dosimeter for food irradiation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, A.; Baranyai, M.; Wojnárovits, L.; Miller, S.; Murphy, M.; McLaughlin, W. L.; Slezsák, I.; Kovács, A. I.

    2002-03-01

    The quick development concerning the commercial application of food irradiation in the USA recently resulted in growing marketing of irradiated red meat as well as irradiated fresh and dried fruits. These gamma and electron irradiation technologies require specific dosimetry systems for process control. The new version of the Sunna dosimeter has been characterized in gamma, electron and bremsstrahlung radiation fields by measuring the optically stimulated luminescence (osl) at 530 nm both below and above 1 kGy, i.e. for disinfestation and for meat irradiation purposes. No humidity and no significant dose rate effect on the green osl signal was observed. The temperature coefficient was determined from 0°C up to about 40°C and to stabilize the osl signal after irradiation a heat treatment method was introduced. Based on these investigations the Sunna 'gamma' film is a suitable candidate for dose control below and above 1 kGy for food irradiation technologies.

  2. Mobile gamma-irradiation robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teply, J.; Franek, C.; Vocilka, J.; Stetka, R.; Vins, J.; Krotil, J.; Garba, A.

    1993-07-01

    The source container with 98 TBq of 137Cs and shielding made from depleted uranium has the total weight of 264 kg, height of 0.370 and diameter 0.272 m. The container is joined to accessories allowing movment of the radiation beam. The dose rate at a distance of 0.4 m in the beam axis is 50 Gy/h. Various technical means are available for manipulation and transport. The irradiation process proceeds according to a precalculated program. The safety measures have been taken to secure the possible application in historical buildings and similar objects. The licence from health physics authorities has been obtained. The first irradiation process performed is described.

  3. Irradiation creep of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1998-03-01

    A study of irradiation creep in vanadium-base alloys is underway with experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States. Test specimens are thin-wall sealed tubes with internal pressure loading. The results from the initial ATR irradiation at low temperature (200--300 C) to a neutron damage level of 4.7 dpa show creep rates ranging from {approx}0 to 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}/dpa/MPa for a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. These rates were generally lower than reported from a previous experiment in BR-10. Because both the attained neutron damage levels and the creep strains were low in the present study, however, these creep rates should be regarded as only preliminary. Substantially more testing is required before a data base on irradiation creep of vanadium alloys can be developed and used with confidence.

  4. IRRADIATION METHOD OF CONVERTING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Allen, A.O.; Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

    1960-10-11

    A method is given for changing the distribution of organic compounds from that produced by the irradiation of bulk alkane hydrocarbons. This method consists of depositing an alkane hydrocarbon on the surface of a substrate material and irradiating with gamma radiation at a dose rate of more than 100,000 rads. The substrate material may be a metal, metal salts, metal oxides, or carbons having a surface area in excess of 1 m/sup 2//g. The hydrocarbons are deposited in layers of from 0.1 to 10 monolayers on the surfaces of these substrates and irradiated. The product yields are found to vary from those which result from the irradiation of bulk hydrocarbons in that there is an increase in the quantity of branched hydrocarbons.

  5. Hardness Evolution of Gamma-Irradiated Polyoxymethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chuan-Hao; Harmon, Julie P.; Lee, Sanboh

    2016-04-01

    This study focuses on analyzing hardness evolution in gamma-irradiated polyoxymethylene (POM) exposed to elevated temperatures after irradiation. Hardness increases with increasing annealing temperature and time, but decreases with increasing gamma ray dose. Hardness changes are attributed to defects generated in the microstructure and molecular structure. Gamma irradiation causes a decrease in the glass transition temperature, melting point, and extent of crystallinity. The kinetics of defects resulting in hardness changes follow a first-order structure relaxation. The rate constant adheres to an Arrhenius equation, and the corresponding activation energy decreases with increasing dose due to chain scission during gamma irradiation. The structure relaxation of POM has a lower energy barrier in crystalline regions than in amorphous ones. The hardness evolution in POM is an endothermic process due to the semi-crystalline nature of this polymer.

  6. Stability of γ-Irradiated Carmine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Hélio M.; Fontenele, Rinaldo S.; DelMastro, Nélida L.

    2005-01-01

    Carmine is a dye used mainly for coloring food products and galenicals but also in inks. As food irradiation is becoming a regular treatment for food preservation, it is desirable to have a proper knowledge about the radiation sensitivity of additives that can be included in the food formula. The aim of this work was to establish the radiation stability of carmine against Co-60 gamma radiation. Samples of 50% pure carmine powder as well as 50%, 10% and 5% aqueous solutions were irradiated in a Gammacell 220, dose rate of about 5.2 kGy/h, with doses of 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 kGy. Spectrophotometric readings at 494 nm show a slight decrease of the absorbance as a function of dose: Samples irradiated with 4 and 32 kGy retained 95% and 90% of absorbance of the unirradiated samples respectively. These results indicate a rather good stability of carmine against γ-irradiation.

  7. Comparison of Deuterium Retention for Ion-irradiated and Neutron-irradiated Tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuhisa Oya; Masashi Shimada; Makoto Kobayashi; Takuji Oda; Masanori Hara; Hideo Watanabe; Yuji Hatano; Pattrick Calderoni; Kenji Okuno

    2011-12-01

    The behavior of D retention for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten with a damage of 0.025-3 dpa was compared with that for neutron-irradiated tungsten with 0.025 dpa. The D{sub 2} thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten consisted of two desorption stages at 450 and 550 K, while that for neutron-irradiated tungsten was composed of three stages and an addition desorption stage was found at 750 K. The desorption rate of the major desorption stage at 550K increased as the displacement damage increased due to Fe{sup 2+} irradiation increasing. In addition, the first desorption stage at 450K was found only for damaged samples. Therefore, the second stage would be based on intrinsic defects or vacancy produced by Fe{sup 2+} irradiation, and the first stage should be the accumulation of D in mono-vacancy and the activation energy would be relatively reduced, where the dislocation loop and vacancy is produced. The third one was found only for neutron irradiation, showing the D trapping by a void or vacancy cluster, and the diffusion effect is also contributed to by the high full-width at half-maximum of the TDS spectrum. Therefore, it can be said that the D{sub 2} TDS spectra for Fe{sup 2+}-irradiated tungsten cannot represent that for the neutron-irradiated one, indicating that the deuterium trapping and desorption mechanism for neutron-irradiated tungsten is different from that for the ion-irradiated one.

  8. Interstitial irradiation of brain tumors: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Gutin, P.H.

    1981-12-01

    As an adjuvant to surgery, radiation therapy has consistently proven to be the most successful form of treatment for primary and secondary malignant brain tumors and possibly for inoperable benign tumors. Because the risk of radiation necrosis of normal brain limits the amount of radiation that can be given by external beam therapy at conventional dose rates, interstitial radiation of brain tumors is a logical alternative treatment approach. We discuss the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate irradiation and intratumoral placement of sources that make interstitial irradiation an attractive treatment for brain tumors and review the history of clinical brachytherapy for intracranial neoplasia.

  9. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  10. MASSIVE LEAKAGE IRRADIATOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Szilard, L.; Christy, R.F.; Friedman, F.L.

    1961-05-30

    An irradiator designed to utilize the neutrons that leak out of a reactor around its periphery is described. It avoids wasting neutron energy and reduces interference with the core flux to a minimum. This is done by surrounding all or most of the core with removable segments of the material to be irradiated within a matrix of reflecting material.

  11. Perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-01

    Recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of irradiation treatment for fruit, vegetables and pork has stimulated considerable discussion in the popular press on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of food. This perspective is designed to summarize the current scientific information available on this issue.

  12. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

    In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

  13. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  14. Modeling of microstructure evolution in austenitic stainless steels irradiated under light water reactor condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.; Stoller, R. E.

    2001-10-01

    A model for microstructure development in austenitic alloys under light water reactor irradiation conditions is described. The model is derived from the model developed by Stoller and Odette to describe microstructural evolution under fast neutron or fusion reactor irradiation conditions. The model is benchmarked against microstructure measurements in 304 and 316 SS irradiated in a boiling water reactor core using one material-dependent and three irradiation-based parameters. The model is also adapted for proton irradiation at higher dose rate and higher temperature and is calibrated against microstructure measurements for proton irradiation. The model calculations show that for both neutron and proton irradiations, in-cascade interstitial clustering is the driving mechanism for loop nucleation. The loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by interstitial cluster diffusion was found to be an important factor in determining the loop density. The model also explains how proton irradiation can produce an irradiated dislocation microstructure similar to that in neutron irradiation.

  15. Irradiation performance of nitride fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The properties and advantages of nitride fuels are well documented in the literature. Basically the high thermal conductivity and uranium density of nitride fuels permit high power density, good breeding ratios, low reactivity swings, and large diameter pins compared to oxides. Nitrides are compatible with cladding alloys and liquid metal coolants, thereby reducing fuel/cladding chemical interactions and permitting the use of sodium-bonded pins and the operation of breached pins. Recent analyses done under similar operating conditions show that - compared to metal - fuels mixed nitrides operate at lower temperatures, produce less cladding strain, have greater margins to failure, result in lower transient temperatures, and have lower sodium void reactivity. Uranium nitride fuel pellet fabrication processes were demonstrated during the SP-100 program, and irradiated nitride fuels can be reprocessed by the PUREX process. Irradiation performance data suggest that nitrides have low fission gas release and swelling rates thereby permitting favorable pin designs and long lifetime. The objective of this report is to summarize the available nitride irradiation performance data base and to recommend optimum nitride characteristics for use in advanced liquid metal reactors.

  16. Effects of irradiation on Planococcus minor (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    PubMed

    Ravuiwasa, Kaliova Tavou; Lu, Kuang-Hui; Shen, Tse-Chi; Hwang, Shaw-Yhi

    2009-10-01

    Irradiation has been recognized and endorsed as a potential phytosanitary measure that could be an alternative to current quarantine treatments. Dosages of 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 Gy were used to irradiate three different life stages (eggs, immatures, and adults) of Planococcus minor (Maskell) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), focusing on females due to its parthenogenesis ability, with an aim to find the most tolerant stage and the most optimal dose to control P. minor. Cobalt 60 was the source of irradiation used. Irradiation of 150-250 Gy has a significant effect on all life stages of P. minor, decreasing its survival rate, percentage of adult reproduction, oviposition, and fertility rate. The adult was the most tolerant life stage in both mortality and fertility rate. All the different irradiated target life stage groups oviposited eggs, but none of the F2 eggs hatched at the most optimal dosage of 150-250 Gy.

  17. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  18. Irradiated homologous costal cartilage for augmentation rhinoplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkovits, G. )

    1990-10-01

    Although the ideal reconstructive material for augmentation rhinoplasty continues to challenge plastic surgeons, there exists no report in the literature that confines the use of irradiated homologous costal cartilage, first reported by Dingman and Grabb in 1961, to dorsal nasal augmentation. The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective analysis of the author's experience using irradiated homologous costal cartilage in augmentation rhinoplasty. Twenty-seven dorsal nasal augmentations were performed in 24 patients between 16 and 49 years of age with a follow-up ranging from 1 to 27 months. Good-to-excellent results were achieved in 83.3% (20 of 24). Poor results requiring revision were found in 16.7% (4 of 24). Complication rates included 7.4% infection (2 of 27) and 14.8% warping (4 of 27). The resorption rate was zero. These results compare favorably with other forms of nasal augmentation. Advantages and disadvantages of irradiated homologous costal cartilage are discussed.

  19. Test reactor irradiation coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Heartherly, D.W.; Siman Tov, I.I.; Sparks, D.W.

    1995-10-01

    This task was established to supply and coordinate irradiation services needed by NRC contractors other than ORNL. These services include the design and assembly of irradiation capsules as well as arranging for their exposure, disassembly, and return of specimens. During this period, the final design of the facility and specimen baskets was determined through an iterative process involving the designers and thermal analysts. The resulting design should permit the irradiation of all test specimens to within 5{degrees}C of their desired temperature. Detailing of all parts is ongoing and should be completed during the next reporting period. Procurement of the facility will also be initiated during the next review period.

  20. Alaskan Commodities Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, J.P.; Swanson, R.B.; Logan, R.R.; Das, D.K.; Lewis, C.E.; Workman, W.G.; Tumeo, M.A.; Hok, C.I.; Birklid, C.A.; Bennett, F.L.

    1988-12-01

    The ninety-ninth US Congress commissioned a six-state food irradiation research and development program to evaluate the commercial potential of this technology. Hawaii, Washington, Iowa, Oklahoma and Florida as well as Alaska have participated in the national program; various food products including fishery products, red meats, tropical and citrus fruits and vegetables have been studied. The purpose of the Alaskan study was to review and evaluate those factors related to the technical and economic feasibility of an irradiator in Alaska. This options analysis study will serve as a basis for determining the state's further involvement in the development of food irradiation technology. 40 refs., 50 figs., 53 tabs.

  1. Control of fouling formation in membrane ultrafiltration by ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Naddeo, Vincenzo; Belgiorno, Vincenzo; Borea, Laura; Secondes, Mona Freda N; Ballesteros, Florencio

    2015-01-01

    The increasing application of membrane filtration in water and wastewater treatment necessitates techniques to improve performance, especially in fouling control. Ultrasound is one promising technology for this purpose as cavitational effects facilitate continuous cleaning of the membrane. This research studied the ultrafiltration of lake water in systems with constant permeate flux under medium frequency (45 kHz) ultrasound irradiation. Fouling was investigated by monitoring transmembrane pressure (TMP) using continuous or intermittent ultrasound irradiation and dead-end or crossflow operation. Best performance was observed with continuous ultrasound irradiation in crossflow mode. Intermittent irradiation reduced the rate of TMP build-up but nevertheless allowed irreversible fouling to develop.

  2. Economics of food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deitch, J.

    1982-01-01

    This article examines the cost competitiveness of the food irradiation process. An analysis of the principal factors--the product, physical plant, irradiation source, and financing--that impact on cost is made. Equations are developed and used to calculate the size of the source for planned product throughput, efficiency factors, power requirements, and operating costs of sources, radionuclides, and accelerators. Methods of financing and capital investment are discussed. A series of tables show cost breakdowns of sources, buildings, equipment, and essential support facilities for both a cobalt-60 and a 10-MeV electron accelerator facility. Additional tables present irradiation costs as functions of a number of parameters--power input, source size, dose, and hours of annual operation. The use of the numbers in the tables are explained by examples of calculations of the irradiation costs for disinfestation of grains and radicidation of feed.

  3. [The influence of irradiation into the wear behaviour of polyethylene (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ungethüm, M; Hinterberger, J

    1979-10-01

    Irradiated specimens of UHMW-PE have been tested by a "Pin-on-disc"-method against a metal pin. Increasing irradiation doses are leading to obviously increasing wear-rates. Irradiation in presence of nitrogen gives no advantage in comparison to normal air as an crosslinking agents, concerning tribological properties. PMID:549337

  4. Improvement of colour strength and colourfastness properties of gamma irradiated cotton using reactive black-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad Bhatti, Ijaz; Adeel, Shahid; Nadeem, Raziya; Asghar, Toheed

    2012-03-01

    The dyeing behaviour of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Reactive Black-5 dye powder has been investigated. The mercerized, bleached and plain weaved cotton fabric was irradiated to different absorbed doses of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy using Co-60 gamma irradiator. Dyeing was performed using irradiated and un-irradiated cotton with dye solutions. The dyeing parameters such as temperature of dyeing, time of dyeing and pH of dyeing solutions were optimised. The colour strength values of dyed fabrics were evaluated by comparing irradiated and un-irradiated cotton in CIE Lab system using Spectra flash SF650. Methods suggested by International Standard Organisation (ISO) were employed to study the effect of gamma irradiation on the colourfastness properties of dyed fabric. It is found that gamma irradiated cotton dyed with Reactive Black-5 has not only improved the colour strength but also enhanced the rating of fastness properties.

  5. Recent decreasing trend in the total solar irradiance - 1981-1992 spacecraft measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Gibson, M. A.; Wilson, Robert S.; Thomas, Susan

    1993-01-01

    During 1990-1992, pyrheliometric measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) indicate that the total solar irradiance is decreasing at an annual rate of -0.2 Wm exp -2 with declining solar magnetic activity. Regression analyses of spacecraft irradiance measurements and of solar magnetic activity indices (10.7-cm solar radio flux and photometric sunspot index) verified the ERBS decreasing trend. The decreasing rate suggests that the irradiance should decrease 0.1 percent by 1997 when minimum solar magnetic activity is forecasted. If the forecasted 1990-1997 irradiance decrease is equal in magnitude to the magnitude of the 1986-1989 irradiance rise, one could conclude that solar irradiance variability has a strong 11-year component and no significant 22-year component. The ERBS measurements yielded 1365.4 +/- 0.7 Wm exp -2 as the mean irradiance value. In this paper, 1981-1992 spacecraft irradiance measurements are presented and compared with solar indices.

  6. Physiologic consequences of local heart irradiation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, B.J.; Lauk, S.; Bornhausen, M.; Trott, K.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Noninvasive methods have been used to study the long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary functional changes at rest and after exercise in adult rats following local heart irradiation with single x-ray doses of 15, 17.5 or 20 Gy, and in non-irradiated control animals. Rats that had undergone a chronic exercise program were compared with untrained cohorts. The earliest dysfunction detected was an increased respiratory rate (f) at 10 weeks after irradiation in the highest dose group. In contrast, both telemetric heart-rate (HR) and rhythm and indirect systolic blood pressure measurements performed at rest only revealed changes starting at 43 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy, up to which point the rats showed no clinical signs of heart failure. However, the number of minutes required for the recovery of the HR to pre-exercise levels following the implementation of a standardized exercise challenge was elevated in untrained rats compared with their trained cohorts at 18 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy. Increases in recovery times were required in the two lowest dose groups, starting at 26 weeks after irradiation. It was concluded that the reserve capacity of the cardiopulmonary system masks functional decrements at rest for many months following local heart irradiation, necessitating the use of techniques which reveal reductions in reserve capacities. Further, the influence of local irradiation to the heart and lungs deserves closer scrutiny due to mutual interactions.

  7. FOOD IRRADIATION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, C.F.; Putnam, G.E.

    1961-05-01

    An irradiation apparatus is described. It comprises a pressure vessel, a neutronic reactor active portion having a substantially greater height than diameter in the pressure vessel, an annular tank surrounding and spaced from the pressure vessel containing an aqueous indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution of approximately 600 grams per liter concentration, means for circulating separate coolants through the active portion and the space between the annular tank and the pressure vessel, radiator means adapted to receive the materials to be irradiated, and means for flowing the indium/sup 1//sup 1//sup 5/ sulfate solution through the radiator means.

  8. Economics of food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Eng, P.; Steeves, Colyn; Beaulieu, Daniel; Eng, P.

    1993-07-01

    The number of products being radiation processed worldwide is constantly increasing and today includes such diverse items as medical disposables, fruits and vegetables, spices, meats, seafoods and waste products. This range of products to be processed has resulted in a wide range of irradiator designs and capital and operating cost requirements. This paper discusses the economics of low dose food irradiation applications and the effects of various parameters on unit processing costs. It provides a model for calculating specific unit processing costs by correlating known capital costs with annual operating costs and annual throughputs. It is intended to provide the reader with a general knowledge of how unit processing costs are derived.

  9. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-12-23

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins.

  10. Microstructure evolution in austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys irradiated with rotons: comparison with neutron-irradiated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, J.; Was, G. S.

    2001-08-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructures of high purity and commercial purity austenitic stainless steels were investigated using proton-irradiation. For high purity alloys, Fe-20Cr-9Ni (HP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons between 300°C and 600°C at a dose rate of 7×10 -6 dpa/ s to doses up to 3.0 dpa. The commercial purity alloys, CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 5.0 dpa. The dose, temperature and composition dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were characterized. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier-hardening (DBH) model. The dose and temperature dependence of proton-irradiated microstructure (loops, voids) and the irradiation hardening are consistent with the neutron-data trend. Results indicate that proton-irradiation can accurately reproduce the microstructure of austenitic alloys irradiated in LWR cores.

  11. Advances in the Hopkinson bar testing of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and large specimens.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Carlo; Cadoni, Ezio; Solomos, George

    2014-05-13

    A brief review of the technological advances of the Hopkinson bar technique in tension for the study of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and the development of this technology for large specimens is presented. Comparisons are made of the dynamic behaviour of non-irradiated and irradiated materials previously subjected to creep, low cycle fatigue and irradiation (2, 10 and 30 displacements per atom). In particular, complete results of the effect of irradiation on the dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304L steel, tested at 20, 400 and 550°C are presented. These high strain rate tests have been performed with a modified Hopkinson bar (MHB), installed inside a hot cell. Examples of testing large nuclear steel specimens with a very large Hopkinson bar are also shown. The results overall demonstrate the capability of the MHB to efficiently reproduce the material stress conditions in case of accidental internal and external dynamic loadings in nuclear reactors, thus contributing to the important process of their structural assessment.

  12. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  13. Electron Irradiation Damage in Quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayensu, Akwasi; Ocran, John

    2002-03-01

    Transmission electron microscopy for observing highly beam sensitive materials had been used to study the microstructure of deformed quartz crystals. At 100 kV accelerating voltage and electron flux of 3 x 10^8 e/cm2/s, beam spots damage appeared within five minutes of exposure to the electron beam. The rate of damage was found to depend on the crystal type; in particular, on the OH content and initial defect density, since these factors controlled the plasticity of quartz. The electron irradiation damage was manifested as black spots, prismatic dislocation loops, defect clusters, hairpin shaped images of dislocations and long segements of dislocation loops. The observed microstructure indicate that during electron beam irradiation, the primary defects in quartz attained sufficiently high mobilities permitting large-scale recombination and clustering leading to rapid creation of secondary defects from the clustering processes. The number of electrons that are lost by the recombination process is determined by the density of the recombination centres and the probability that an electron will interact with the centre.

  14. Deformation in metals after low temperature irradiation: Part II - Irradiation hardening, strain hardening, and stress ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei

    2008-03-01

    Effects of irradiation at temperatures 200oC on tensile stress parameters are analyzed for dozens of bcc, fcc, and hcp pure metals and alloys, focusing on irradiation hardening, strain hardening, and relationships between the true stress parameters. Similar irradiation-hardening rates are observed for all the metals irrespective of crystal type; typically, the irradiation-hardening rates are large, in the range 100 - 1000 GPa/dpa, at the lowest dose of <0.0001 dpa and decrease with dose to a few tens of MPa/dpa or less at about 10 dpa. However, average irradiation-hardening rates over the dose range of 0 dpa − (the dose to plastic instability at yield) are considerably lower for stainless steels due to their high uniform ductility. It is shown that whereas low temperature irradiation increases the yield stress, it does not significantly change the strain-hardening rate of metallic materials; it decreases the fracture stress only when non-ductile failure occurs. Such dose independence in strain hardening behavior results in strong linear relationships between the true stress parameters. Average ratios of plastic instability stress to unirradiated yield stress are about 1.4, 3.9, and 1.3 for bcc metals (and precipitation hardened IN718 alloy), annealed fcc metals (and pure Zr), and Zr-4 alloy, respectively. Ratios of fracture stress to plastic instability stress are calculated to be 2.2, 1.7, and 2.1, respectively. Comparison of these values confirms that the annealed fcc metals and other soft metals have larger uniform ductility but smaller necking ductility when compared to other materials.

  15. The single-process biochemical reaction of Rubisco: a unified theory and model with the effects of irradiance, CO₂ and rate-limiting step on the kinetics of C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis from gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Farazdaghi, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the origin of oxygenic life on the planet, and its models are the core of all models of plant biology, agriculture, environmental quality and global climate change. A theory is presented here, based on single process biochemical reactions of Rubisco, recognizing that: In the light, Rubisco activase helps separate Rubisco from the stored ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), activates Rubisco with carbamylation and addition of Mg²(+), and then produces two products, in two steps: (Step 1) Reaction of Rubisco with RuBP produces a Rubisco-enediol complex, which is the carboxylase-oxygenase enzyme (Enco) and (Step 2) Enco captures CO₂ and/or O₂ and produces intermediate products leading to production and release of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) and Rubisco. PGA interactively controls (1) the carboxylation-oxygenation, (2) electron transport, and (3) triosephosphate pathway of the Calvin-Benson cycle that leads to the release of glucose and regeneration of RuBP. Initially, the total enzyme participates in the two steps of the reaction transitionally and its rate follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. But, for a continuous steady state, Rubisco must be divided into two concurrently active segments for the two steps. This causes a deviation of the steady state from the transitional rate. Kinetic models are developed that integrate the transitional and the steady state reactions. They are tested and successfully validated with verifiable experimental data. The single-process theory is compared to the widely used two-process theory of Farquhar et al. (1980. Planta 149, 78-90), which assumes that the carboxylation rate is either Rubisco-limited at low CO₂ levels such as CO₂ compensation point, or RuBP regeneration-limited at high CO₂. Since the photosynthesis rate cannot increase beyond the two-process theory's Rubisco limit at the CO₂ compensation point, net photosynthesis cannot increase above zero in daylight, and since there is always respiration at

  16. Processing of diamond by laser beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Masanori; Hirata, Atsushi

    1998-10-01

    YAG and ArF excimer laser beams, of which wavelengths are 1.06 micrometers and 193 nm respectively, have been applied to processing of a variety of diamonds. Cutting and smoothing of natural, CVD and sintered diamonds have been performed. CVD diamond films were prepared by arc discharge plasma jet CVD and microwave plasma CVD, and sintered diamonds contain metallic or ceramic binder have been used. Fundamental removal processes of diamond with YAG and ArF excimer laser have been investigated using natural single crystal and CVD diamonds in various atmospheres changing laser irradiation conditions such as average power, energy density and pulse repetition rates. Cutting of natural and CVD diamonds with YAG laser proceeds at higher peal power that occurs at lower pulse repetition rates. Smooth surfaces are obtained by excimer laser irradiation at the incident angle of 80 percent. In the cases of the processing with YAG laser, the effect of local heating by laser beam irradiation mainly assists the diamond processing, and diamond appears to be removed after graphitization and oxidization following vaporization in the atmosphere contains oxygen. The temperature measurement was carried out at backside of irradiation surface, and increase of temperature when YAG laser beam was irradiated was larger than that when excimer laser was irradiated. On the contrary, the detection of C, C2, C+, O2 and CO from the emission at the irradiation area with ArF excimer laser beam suggest that processing partly proceeds by the separation of carbon atoms from the surface of diamond after braking bonds between carbon atoms caused by laser beam. Cutting of sintered diamond with metallic binder was difficult because metallic binder remains in the groove while ceramic binder was easily removed. Processing technique using laser beams has been applied to surface planing, chip preparation and edge formation of CVD diamond and curved surface formation on sintered diamond. Surface planing was

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with BPTB autograft, irradiated versus non-irradiated allograft: a prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shaoqi; Zhang, Jihua; Xia, Changsuo; Zhang, Cailong; Yu, Tengbo

    2009-05-01

    The effect of using gamma irradiation to sterilize bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft on the clinical outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated allograft remains controversial. Our study was aimed to analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction with irradiated BPTB allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 Mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 102 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into three groups. The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months follow-up (range 24-47 months) patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Of these patients, 99 (autograft 33, non-irradiated allograft 34, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When compared the irradiated allograft group to non-irradiated allograft group or autograft group at 31 months follow-up by the Lachman test, ADT, pivot shift test and KT-2000 arthrometer testing, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the Auto group, 85.3% in the Non-Ir-Auto group and just only 31.3% in the Ir-Allo group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%) and non-irradiated allograft (8.8%). The anterior and rotational stability decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall IKDC, functional, subjective evaluations and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the three groups. However, there was a trend that the functional and

  18. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, James Irvin

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  19. Update on meat irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.

    1997-12-01

    The irradiation of meat and poultry in the United States is intended to eliminate pathogenic bacteria from raw product, preferably after packaging to prevent recontamination. Irradiation will also increase the shelf life of raw meat and poultry products approximately two to three times the normal shelf life. Current clearances in the United States are for poultry (fresh or frozen) at doses from 1.5 to 3.0 kGy and for fresh pork at doses from 0.3 to 1.0 kGy. A petition for the clearance of all red meat was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 1994. The petition is for clearances of fresh meat at doses from 1.5 to 4.5 kGy and for frozen meat at {approximately}2.5 to 7.5 kGy. Clearance for red meat is expected before the end of 1997. There are 28 countries that have food irradiation clearances, of which 18 countries have clearances for meat or poultry. However, there are no uniform categories or approved doses for meat and poultry among the countries that could hamper international trade of irradiated meat and poultry.

  20. Irradiating insect pests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a non-technical article focusing on phytosanitary uses of irradiation. In a series of interview questions, I present information on the scope of the invasive species problem and the contribution of international trade in agricultural products to the movement of invasive insects. This is foll...

  1. AGC-2 Specimen Post Irradiation Data Package Report

    SciTech Connect

    Windes, William Enoch; Swank, W. David; Rohrbaugh, David T.; Cottle, David L.

    2015-08-01

    This report documents results of the post-irradiation examination material property testing of the creep, control, and piggyback specimens from the irradiation creep capsule Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC)-2 are reported. This is the second of a series of six irradiation test trains planned as part of the AGC experiment to fully characterize the neutron irradiation effects and radiation creep behavior of current nuclear graphite grades. The AGC-2 capsule was irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor at a nominal temperature of 600°C and to a peak dose of 5 dpa (displacements per atom). One-half of the creep specimens were subjected to mechanical stresses (an applied stress of either 13.8, 17.2, or 20.7 MPa) to induce irradiation creep. All post-irradiation testing and measurement results are reported with the exception of the irradiation mechanical strength testing, which is the last destructive testing stage of the irradiation testing program. Material property tests were conducted on specimens from 15 nuclear graphite grades using a similar loading configuration as the first AGC capsule (AGC-1) to provide easy comparison between the two capsules. However, AGC-2 contained an increased number of specimens (i.e., 487 total specimens irradiated) and replaced specimens of the minor grade 2020 with the newer grade 2114. The data reported include specimen dimensions for both stressed and unstressed specimens to establish the irradiation creep rates, mass and volume data necessary to derive density, elastic constants (Young’s modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson’s ratio) from ultrasonic time-of-flight velocity measurements, Young’s modulus from the fundamental frequency of vibration, electrical resistivity, and thermal diffusivity and thermal expansion data from 100–500°C. No data outliers were determined after all measurements were completed. A brief statistical analysis was performed on the irradiated data and a limited comparison between

  2. Irradiation creep in austenitic and ferritic steels irradiated in a tailored neutron spectrum to induce fusion reactor levels of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Jitsukawa, S.

    1996-04-01

    Six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys were irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor where an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa was achieved and was then transferred to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the irradiation to a total displacement level of 19 dpa. Temperatures of 60 and 330{degree}C are reported on. At 330{degree}C irradiation creep was found to be linear in stress and fluence with rates in the range of 1.7 - 5.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. Annealed and cold-worked materials exhibited similar creep rates. There is some indication that austenitic alloys with TiC or TiO precipitates had a slightly higher irradiation creep rate than those without. The ferritic alloys HT-9 and Fe-16Cr had irradiatoin creep rates about 0.5 x 10{sup -4}% MPa{sup -1} dpa{sup -1}. No meaningful data could be obtained from the tubes irradiated at 60{degree}C because of damage to the tubes.

  3. Proton irradiation of germanium isotope multilayer structures at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.; Bracht, H.; Petersen, M. C.; Hansen, J. Lundsgaard; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2008-02-01

    Irradiation of germanium (Ge) isotope heterostructures with 2.5 MeV protons have been performed at 550 °C. The applied proton flux was varied between 1.0 and 1.5 μA leading to various rates of Frenkel pair production. After irradiation, concentration profiles of the Ge isotopes were recorded by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). An inhomogeneous broadening of the isotope structure was observed. In addition to the effect of irradiation enhanced self-diffusion, an influence of the formation of microscopic defects on the detected broadening was ascertained. Atomic force and scanning electron microscopy show that the microscopic defects are most probably resulting from an aggregation of vacancies formed during irradiation. Numerical analysis of Ge profiles not disturbed by microdefect formation indicates a significant contribution of self-interstitials to self-diffusion under irradiation.

  4. Role of Sucrose in Gamma-irradiated Chrysanthemum Cut Flowers.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, K; Kikuchi, O K; Todoriki, S; Hosoda, H; Hayashi, T

    1998-01-01

    Vase solution containing 2% sucrose prevented the deterioration of chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum Kitamura) cut flowers induced by gamma-rays at 750 Gy. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose in florets and leaves of irradiated chrysanthemums decreased more rapidly than those of unirradiated ones, when the cut chrysanthemums were held in a vase solution without sucrose. The sugar contents of florets and leaves and the respiratory rate of irradiated chrysanthemums held with sucrose remained at higher levels than those of unirradiated ones. Incorporation of (14)C from [(14)C]sucrose into CO2 was increased by irradiation. Incorporation of [α-(32)P]dTTP into trichloroacetic acid (TCA) insoluble substances in florets was increased by irradiation and by exogenous sucrose supply. These results suggest that sucrose in a vase solution was used as a respiratory substrate and facilitated the repair of radiation-induced damage, resulting in the extension of longevity of irradiated chrysanthemums.

  5. Photorecovery of gamma irradiated cultures of blue-green alga, Anacystis nidulans.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asato, Y.

    1971-01-01

    Evidence is given for photorecovery of Anacystis nidulans after exposures to Co 60 gamma radiation. After irradiation the levels of viable cells were higher in cultures kept in white light than in cultures kept dark for 24 hr. The post-irradiation survival rate increase after 30-min exposures to visible light is demonstrated in cultures irradiated with 35 krad. An increase in survival rates was not observed after exposures to ?red' light.

  6. Luminescence properties after X-ray irradiation for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the luminescence characteristics after exposure to X-ray radiation, we developed an independent, small X-ray irradiation system comprising a Varian VF-50J mini X-ray generator, a Pb collimator, a delay shutter, and an Al absorber. With this system, the apparent dose rate increased linearly to 0.8 Gy/s against the emission current for a 50 kV anode potential when the shutter was delayed for an initial 4 s and the Al absorber was 300 µm thick. In addition, an approximately 20 mm diameter sample area was irradiated homogeneously with X rays. Based on three-dimensional (3D) thermoluminescence (TL) spectra, the small X-ray irradiator was considered comparable to the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source even though the TL intensity from beta irradiation was higher than that from X-ray irradiation. The single aliquot regenerative (SAR) growth curve for the small X-ray irradiator was identical to that for the beta source. Therefore, we concluded that the characteristics of the small X-ray irradiator and the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source were similar and that X ray irradiation had the potential for being suitable for use in luminescence dosimetry.

  7. Marrow toxicity of fractionated vs. single dose total body irradiation is identical in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Graham, T.; Appelbaum, F.R.; Deeg, H.J.; Schuening, F.G.; Shulman, H.; Pepe, M. )

    1993-03-20

    The authors explored in dogs the marrow toxicity of single dose total body irradiation delivered from two opposing [sup 60]Co sources at a rate of 10 cGy/min and compared results to those seen with total body irradiation administered in 100 cGy fractions with minimum interfraction intervals of 6 hr. Dogs were not given marrow transplants. They found that 200 cGy single dose total body irradiation was sublethal, with 12 of 13 dogs showing hematopoietic recovery and survival. Seven of 21 dogs given 300 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to 6 of 10 dogs given 300 cGy fractionated total body irradiation. One of 28 dogs given 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to none of six given fractionated radiation. With granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) administered from day 0-21 after 400 cGy total body irradiation, most dogs survived with hematological recovery. Because of the almost uniform success with GCSF after 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation, a study of GCSF after 400 cGy fractionated total body irradiation was deemed not to be informative and, thus, not carried out. Additional comparisons between single dose and fractionated total body irradiation were carried out with GCSF administered after 500 and 600 cGy of total body irradiation. As with lower doses of total body irradiation, no significant survival differences were seen between the two modes of total body irradiation, and only 3 of 26 dogs studied survived with complete hematological recovery. Overall, therefore, survival among dogs given single dose total body irradiation was not different from that of dogs given fractionated total body irradiation (p = .67). Similarly, the slopes of the postirradiation declines of granulocyte and platelet counts and the rates of their recovery in surviving dogs given equal total doses of single versus fractionated total body irradiation were indistinguishable. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Bystander Effects Induced by Medium From Irradiated Cells: Similar Transcriptome Responses in Irradiated and Bystander K562 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Herok, Robert; Konopacka, Maria; Polanska, Joanna; Swierniak, Andrzej; Rogolinski, Jacek; Jaksik, Roman; Hancock, Ronald; Rzeszowska-Wolny, Joanna

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Cells exposed to ionizing radiation release factors that induce deoxyribonucleic acid damage, chromosomal instability, apoptosis, and changes in the proliferation rate of neighboring unexposed cells, phenomena known as bystander effects. This work analyzes and compares changes in global transcript levels induced by direct irradiation and by bystander effects in K562 (human erythroleukemia) cells. Methods and Materials: Cells were X-irradiated with 4 Gy or transferred into culture medium collected from cells 1 h after irradiation (irradiation-conditioned medium). Global transcript profiles were assessed after 36 h of growth by use of Affymetrix microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA) and the kinetics of change of selected transcripts by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The level of the majority (72%) of transcripts changed similarly (increase, decrease, or no change) in cells grown in irradiation-conditioned medium or irradiated, whereas only 0.6% showed an opposite response. Transcript level changes in bystander and irradiated cells were significantly different from those in untreated cells grown for the same amount of time and were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for selected genes. Signaling pathways in which the highest number of transcripts changed in both conditions were found in the following groups: neuroactive ligand-receptor, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Janus Kinase-Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (JAK-STAT) and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) In control cells more transcripts were downregulated than in irradiated and bystander cells with transcription factors YBX1 and STAT5B, heat shock protein HSPA1A, and ribonucleic acid helicase DDX3X as examples. Conclusions: The transcriptomes of cells grown in medium from X-irradiated cells or directly irradiated show very similar changes. Signals released by irradiated cells may cause

  9. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    SciTech Connect

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto Z.

    2008-12-15

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 {mu}m has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

  10. A nanotube based electron microbeam cellular irradiator for radiobiology research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordelon, David E.; Zhang, Jian; Graboski, Sarah; Cox, Adrienne; Schreiber, Eric; Zhou, Otto Z.; Chang, Sha

    2008-12-01

    A prototype cellular irradiator utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission electron source has been developed for microscopic image-guided cellular region irradiation. The CNT cellular irradiation system has shown great potential to be a high temporal and spatial resolution research tool to enable researchers to gain a better understanding of the intricate cellular and intercellular microprocesses occurring following radiation deposition, which is essential to improving radiotherapy cancer treatment outcomes. In this paper, initial results of the system development are reported. The relationship between field emission current, the dose rate, and the dose distribution has been investigated. A beam size of 23 μm has been achieved with variable dose rates of 1-100 Gy/s, and the system dosimetry has been measured using a radiochromic film. Cell irradiation has been demonstrated by the visualization of H2AX phosphorylation at DNA double-strand break sites following irradiation in a rat fibroblast cell monolayer. The prototype single beam cellular irradiator is a preliminary step to a multipixel cell irradiator that is under development.

  11. Dental implants installed in irradiated jaws: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chambrone, L; Mandia, J; Shibli, J A; Romito, G A; Abrahao, M

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the survival rate of titanium implants placed in irradiated jaws. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched for studies assessing implants that had been placed in nongrafted sites of irradiated patients. Random effects meta-analyses assessed implant loss in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients and in irradiated patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Of 1,051 potentially eligible publications, 15 were included. A total of 10,150 implants were assessed in the included studies, and of these, 1,689 (14.3%) had been placed in irradiated jaws. The mean survival rate in the studies ranged from 46.3% to 98.0%. The pooled estimates indicated a significant increase in the risk of implant failure in irradiated patients (risk ratio: 2.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.86, 4.05; p < .00001) and in maxillary sites (risk ratio: 5.96; 95% confidence interval: 2.71, 13.12; p < .00001). Conversely, HBO therapy did not reduce the risk of implant failure (risk ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 8.82; p = .80). Radiotherapy was linked to higher implant failure in the maxilla, and HBO therapy did not improve implant survival. Most included publications reported data on machined implants, and only 3 studies on HBO therapy were included. Overall, implant therapy appears to be a viable treatment option for reestablishing adequate occlusion and masticatory conditions in irradiated patients.

  12. Light ion irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Linstadt, D.; Castro, J.R.; Phillips, T.L.; Petti, P.L.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.; Schoethaler, R.; Rayner, A.

    1990-09-01

    Between 1978 and 1989, 32 patients with unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma underwent light ion (helium, neon) irradiation with curative intent at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The tumors were located in the trunk in 22 patients and head and neck in 10. Macroscopic tumor was present in 22 at the time of irradiation. Two patients had tumors apparently induced by previous therapeutic irradiation. Follow-up times for surviving patients ranged from 4 to 121 months (median 27 months). The overall 3-year actuarial local control rate was 62%; the corresponding survival rate was 50%. The 3-year actuarial control rate for patients irradiated with macroscopic tumors was 48%, while none of the patients with microscopic disease developed local recurrence (100%). The corresponding 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40% (macroscopic) and 78% (microscopic). Patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma did notably well; the local control rate and survival rate were 64% and 62%, respectively. Complications were acceptable; there were no radiation related deaths, while two patients (6%) required operations to correct significant radiation-related injuries. These results appear promising compared to those achieved by low -LET irradiation, and suggest that this technique merits further investigation.

  13. [Normofractionated breast irradiation in breast cancer. Indications and benefits].

    PubMed

    Fourquet, A; Krhili, S-L; Campana, F; Chilles, A; Kirova, Y-M

    2016-10-01

    Whole-breast normofractionated irradiation following breast-conserving surgery is the reference treatment. It delivers a dose of 50Gy in 25 fractions of 2Gy to the reference point, and, in some patients, an additional dose of 16Gy in 8 fractions of 2Gy in the tumor bed. Long-term results and toxicity of this irradiation scheme was prospectively evaluated in several randomised trials and meta-analyses, in invasive cancers as well as in ductal carcinoma in situ. The average 10-year rate of in breast recurrences was 6 % in these trials, with limited cardiac and pulmonary toxicity and limited rate of severe fibrosis. Identification of risk factors of recurrences may help to design new irradiation schemes adapted to tumor biology. The new irradiation schemes must be rigorously evaluated in the long-term in the frame of prospective clinical trials, in order to validate them as new standards of treatment. PMID:27592268

  14. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF SOLIDS

    DOEpatents

    Damask, A.C.

    1959-11-01

    A method is presented for altering physical properties of certain solids, such as enhancing the usefulness of solids, in which atomic interchange occurs through a vacancy mechanism, electron irradiation, and temperature control. In a centain class of metals, alloys, and semiconductors, diffusion or displacement of atoms occurs through a vacancy mechanism, i.e., an atom can only move when there exists a vacant atomic or lattice site in an adjacent position. In the process of the invention highenergy electron irradiation produces additional vacancies in a solid over those normally occurring at a given temperature and allows diffusion of the component atoms of the solid to proceed at temperatures at which it would not occur under thermal means alone in any reasonable length of time. The invention offers a precise way to increase the number of vacancies and thereby, to a controlled degree, change the physical properties of some materials, such as resistivity or hardness.

  15. Gynogenesis caused by ultraviolet irradiation of salmonid sperm.

    PubMed

    Chourrout, D

    1982-10-10

    Gynogenetic rainbow trout lines can be produced easily with the simple UV sperm irradiation technique detailed in this study. The dose effect on embryonic survival rate is called a pseudo "Hertwig effect" because of major differences with results of gamma irradiation: Some mixing of various karyotypes (from diploid to haploid number) were obtained with mean doses, probably because of the weak penetrating power of the ultraviolet rays. Irradiations lasting 4 minutes of more are required to produce homogeneous haploid progeny; heat shock applied to such fertilized eggs results in diploid fry of the maternal phenotype. PMID:7142944

  16. The methodology study of time accelerated irradiation of elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Masayuki

    2005-07-01

    The article studied the methods how to shorten the irradiation time by increasing dose rate without changing the relationship between dose versus properties of degraded samples. The samples used were nine kinds of EPDM which have different compounding formula. The different dose of Co-γ ray was exposed to the samples. The maximum dose was 2 MGy. The reference condition to be compared with two short time test conditions is irradiation of 0.33 kGy/h at room temperature. Two methods shown below were studied as the time-accelerate irradiation conditions.

  17. Dynamic Void Growth and Shrinkage in Mg under Electron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W. Z.; Zhang, Y. F.; Cheng, G. M.; Jian, W. W.; Millett, P. C.; Koch, C. C.; Mathaudhu, S. N.; Zhu, Y. T.

    2014-04-30

    We report in-situ atomic-scale investigation of void evolution, including growth, coalescence and shrinkage, under electron irradiation. With increasing irradiation dose, the total volume of voids increased linearly, while nucleation rate of new voids decreased slightly, and the total number of voids decreased. Some voids continued to grow while others shrank to disappear, depending on the nature of their interactions with nearby self-interstitial loops. For the first time, surface diffusion of adatoms was observed largely responsible for the void coalescence and thickening. These findings provide fundamental understanding to help with the design and modeling of irradiation-resistant materials.

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on deteriorated paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicchieri, Marina; Monti, Michela; Piantanida, Giovanna; Sodo, Armida

    2016-08-01

    Even though gamma radiation application, also at the minimum dosage required for disinfection, causes depolymerization and degradation of the paper substrate, recently published papers seemed, instead, to suggest that γ-rays application could be envisaged in some conditions for Cultural Heritage original documents and books. In some of the published papers, the possible application of γ-rays was evaluated mainly by using mechanical tests that scarcely reflect the chemical modifications induced in the cellulosic support. In the present article the effect of low dosage γ-irradiation on cellulosic substrates was studied and monitored applying different techniques: colorimetry, spectroscopic measurements, carbonyl content and average viscometric degree of polymerization. Two different papers were investigated, a non-sized, non-filled cotton paper, and a commercial permanent paper. To simulate a real deteriorated document, which could need γ-rays irradiation, some samples were submitted to a hydrolysis treatment. We developed a treatment based on the exposition of paper to hydrochloric acid vapors, avoiding any contact of the samples with water. This method induces a degradation similar to that observed on original documents. The samples were then irradiated with 3 kGy γ-rays at a 5258 Gy/h rate. The aforementioned analyses were performed on the samples just irradiated and after artificial ageing. All tests showed negative effects of gamma irradiation on paper. Non-irradiated paper preserves better its appearance and chemical properties both in the short term and after ageing, while the irradiated samples show appreciable color change and higher oxidation extent. Since the Istituto centrale restauro e conservazione patrimonio archivistico e librario is responsible for the choice of all restoration treatments that could be applied on library and archival materials under the protection of the Italian State (http://www.icpal.beniculturali.it/allegati/DM-7

  19. BIOLOGICAL IRRADIATION FACILITY

    DOEpatents

    McCorkle, W.H.; Cern, H.S.

    1962-04-24

    A facility for irradiating biological specimens with neutrons is described. It includes a reactor wherein the core is off center in a reflector. A high-exposure room is located outside the reactor on the side nearest the core while a low-exposure room is located on the opposite side. Means for converting thermal neutrons to fast neutrons are movably disposed between the reactor core and the high and low-exposure rooms. (AEC)

  20. Characteristics of irradiation creep in the first wall of a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    A number of significant differences in the irradiation environment of a fusion reactor are expected with respect to the fission reactor irradiation environment. These differences are expected to affect the characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor. Special conditions of importance are identified as the (1) large number of defects produced per pka, (2) high helium production rate, (3) cyclic operation, (4) unique stress histories, and (5) low temperature operations. Existing experimental data from the fission reactor environment is analyzed to shed light on irradiation creep under fusion conditions. Theoretical considerations are used to deduce additional characteristics of irradiation creep in the fusion reactor environment for which no experimental data are available.

  1. Sample Heat, Activity, Reactivity, and Dose Analysis for Safety Analysis of Irradiations in a Research Reactor.

    1987-12-01

    SHARDA is a program for assessing sample heating rates, activities produced and reactivity load caused while irradiating a small sample in a well thermalized research reactor like CIRUS. It estimates the sample cooling or lead shielding requirements to limit the gamma-ray dose rates due to the irradiated sample within permissible levels.

  2. Hyperparathyroidism after neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Chapple, C R; Noble, J G; Milroy, E J; Cowie, A G

    1988-09-01

    A retrospective review of 1550 cases of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) treated surgically over a 30-year period reveals a past history of exposure to neck irradiation in 10 cases (0.7 per cent). The indication for radiotherapy was benign disease in nine and papillary thyroid carcinoma in one case. The mean interval between radiation exposure and the detection of HPT was 32 years (range 3-63 years). Patients treated with radioactive iodine alone developed HPT after a mean of 5 years while the interval for those treated with external beam therapy alone was a mean of 44 years. The parathyroid histology was adenoma in six cases, carcinoma in three cases and nodular hyperplasia in one case. All patients had coincident benign thyroid disease apart from one that had previously had papillary carcinoma and another with follicular carcinoma. Neck irradiation has been shown to confer an increased risk of HPT due to parathyroid adenoma and carcinoma. Radiotherapy for benign disease has generally been abandoned and these cases demonstrate a further contra-indication for the use of neck irradiation.

  3. Influence of 12C6+ ion irradiation on mutant avermitilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Yang; Chen, Ji-Hong; Li, Wen-Jian; Liang, Jian-Ping; Bo, Yong-Heng; Ma, Xiao-Qi; Liu, Jing

    2012-11-01

    The effects of 12C+6 ion irradiation on colony morphology and mycelia morphology, as well as on mutation rate have been studied in the B1a high-product strains (ZJAV-Y1-203) mutated by heavy ion irradiation and compared with that in the original strain (ZJAV-A-1). After irradiating the rate of a straw hat colony type having a high ability of producing B1a in ZJAV-Y1-203 strains was higher than that found in ZJAV-A-1 strains. When strains were cultured in a liquid medium for 24 hours, the mycelium becoming thinner could be observed in all of the irradiated ZJAV- Y1-203 groups, but only in the ZJAV-A-1 groups irradiated at the dose of 50 Gy or more. The early growth of mycelium was inhibited in the ZJAV- Y1-203 group irradiated with a high dose. The highest positive mutation rate (23.5%) of ZJAV - Y1 - 203 was reached at the lower dose of 30 Gy while the highest positive mutation rate of 34.2% in ZJAV-A-1 appeared at 50 Gy. These results indicate that the effects of heavy ion irradiation still exist even in the mutated Streptomyces avermitilis, and only the dose is lower and the effects not so strong compared with the one that is first irradiated with optimized heavy ion doses. This is evidence of the one directional mutation being controlled by many more factors in a organism.

  4. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  5. Liquid-xenon detector under the intensive pulse irradiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsanov, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of intense pulsed irradiation on the operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer was studied. The ionization chamber filled with liquid xenon was irradiated by bremsstrahlung pulses of the microtron. The pulse repetition rate was 400 Hz. The absorbed dose ranged from 10-7 to 0.1 Gy per pulse. Stable operation of the liquid xenon spectrometer in the intervals between the pulses of the accelerator was shown for a long time.

  6. Nanoscale Morphology Evolution Under Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Michael J.

    2014-11-10

    We showed that the half-century-old paradigm of morphological instability under irradiation due to the curvature-dependence of the sputter yield, can account neither for the phase diagram nor the amplification or decay rates that we measure in the simplest possible experimental system -- an elemental semiconductor with an amorphous surface under noble-gas ion irradiation; We showed that a model of pattern formation based on the impact-induced redistribution of atoms that do not get sputtered away explains our experimental observations; We developed a first-principles, parameter-free approach for predicting morphology evolution, starting with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts, lasting picoseconds, and upscaling through a rigorous crater-function formalism to develop a partial differential equation that predicts morphology evolution on time scales more than twelve orders of magnitude longer than can be covered by the molecular dynamics; We performed the first quantitative comparison of the contributions to morphological instability from sputter removal and from impact-induced redistribution of atoms that are removed, and showed that the former is negligible compared to the latter; We established a new paradigm for impact-induced morphology evolution based on crater functions that incorporate both redistribution and sputter effects; and We developed a model of nanopore closure by irradiation-induced stress and irradiationenhanced fluidity, for the near-surface irradiation regime in which nuclear stopping predominates, and showed that it explains many aspects of pore closure kinetics that we measure experimentally.

  7. FDA perspective on food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, G.H.

    1994-12-31

    The Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) monitors the safety of food irradiation. A few limited uses are regulated, and occasionally CFSAN receives a petition for a new use. Despite extensive studies (more than 400) showing the safety of food irradiation, a cloud of suspicion continues to hang over this issue in the mind of the public. People perceive food irradiation and direct body irradiation as having similar implications. Food irradiation is banned in two states in the United States. Food is irradiated for the following purposes: delay of ripening, prevention of sprouting, eradication of pests and sterilization, and allowing commodities to be stored unrefrigerated for long periods of time. The dosage depends on the purpose of the irradiation. Radiolytic products are formed during irradiation and during storage afterward. Most of these products are also formed during conventional preservation. In 1980, CFSAN, then the Bureau of Foods, introduced the term unique radiolytic products for compounds not identified in foods after conventional processing. Although the existence of URPs was never proven chemically, the term has caused anxiety. Irradiation of foods in the commercially useful range does not generate radioactivity above natural background. Because radiolytic products formed from beef, chicken, and pork are primarily the same, irradiated foods of similar food groups may be evaluated generically.

  8. Effects Of Dose Rates On Radiation Damage In CMOS Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goben, Charles A.; Coss, James R.; Price, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes measurements of effects of ionizing-radiation dose rate on consequent damage to complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic devices. Depending on irradiation time and degree of annealing, survivability of devices in outer space, or after explosion of nuclear weapons, enhanced. Annealing involving recovery beyond pre-irradiation conditions (rebound) detrimental. Damage more severe at lower dose rates.

  9. Post-irradiation effects in polyethylenes irradiated under various atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suljovrujic, E.

    2013-08-01

    If a large amount of polymer free radicals remain trapped after irradiation of polymers, the post-irradiation effects may result in a significant alteration of physical properties during long-term shelf storage and use. In the case of polyethylenes (PEs) some failures are attributed to the post-irradiation oxidative degradation initiated by the reaction of residual free radicals (mainly trapped in crystal phase) with oxygen. Oxidation products such as carbonyl groups act as deep traps and introduce changes in carrier mobility and significant deterioration in the PEs electrical insulating properties. The post-irradiation behaviour of three different PEs, low density polyethylene (LDPE), linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and high density polyethylene (HDPE) was studied; previously, the post-irradiation behaviour of the PEs was investigated after the irradiation in air (Suljovrujic, 2010). In this paper, in order to investigate the influence of different irradiation media on the post-irradiation behaviour, the samples were irradiated in air and nitrogen gas, to an absorbed dose of 300 kGy. The annealing treatment of irradiated PEs, which can substantially reduce the concentration of free radicals, is used in this study, too. Dielectric relaxation behaviour is related to the difference in the initial structure of PEs (such as branching, crystallinity etc.), to the changes induced by irradiation in different media and to the post-irradiation changes induced by storage of the samples in air. Electron spin resonance (ESR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infra-red (IR) spectroscopy and gel measurements were used to determine the changes in the free radical concentration, crystal fraction, oxidation and degree of network formation, respectively.

  10. Effect of mercerization and gamma irradiation on the dyeing behaviour of cotton using stilbene based direct dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Ijaz Ahmad; Adeel, Shahid; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Irshad, Misbah; Abbas, Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    The dyeing behaviour of mercerized and gamma irradiated cotton fabric using stilbene based direct dye has been investigated. The fabric was treated with different concentrations of alkali to optimize the mercerization. The optimum mercerized cotton fabric was irradiated to absorbed doses of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy using Cs-137 gamma irradiator. Dyeing was performed using irradiated and un-irradiated cotton with dye solutions. The dyeing parameters such as temperature, time of dyeing, pH of dyeing solutions and salt concentration were optimized. The colour strength values of dyed fabrics were evaluated by comparing irradiated and un-irradiated cotton in CIE Lab system using Spectra flash SF650. Methods suggested by International Standard Organization (ISO) were employed to study the effect of gamma irradiation on the colourfastness properties of dyed fabric. It was found that mercerized and irradiated cotton have not only improved the colour strength but enhanced the rating of fastness properties also.

  11. Physiological activity of irradiated green tea polyphenol on the human skin.

    PubMed

    An, Bong-Jeun; Kwak, Jae-Hoon; Son, Jun-Ho; Park, Jung-Mi; Lee, Jin-Young; Park, Tae Soon; Kim, So-Yeun; Kim, Yeoung-Sun; Jo, Cheorun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2005-01-01

    Physiological activity of irradiated green tea polyphenol on the human skin was investigated for further industrial application. The green tea polyphenol was separated and irradiated at 40 kGy by y-ray. For an anti-wrinkle effect, the collagenase inhibition effect was higher in the irradiated sample (65.3%) than that of the non-irradiated control (56.8%) at 200 ppm of the concentration (p < 0.05). Collagen biosynthesis rates using a human fibroblast were 19.4% and 16.3% in the irradiated and the non-irradiated polyphenols, respectively. The tyrosinase inhibition effect, which is related to the skin-whitening effect, showed a 45.2% and 42.9% in the irradiated and the non-irradiated polyphenols, respectively, at a 100 ppm level. A higher than 90% growth inhibition on skin cancer cells (SK-MEL-2 and G361) was demonstrated in both the irradiated and the non-irradiated polyphenols. Thus, the irradiation of green tea polyphenol did not change and even increased its anti-wrinkle, skin-whitening and anticancer effects on the human skin. The results indicated that irradiated green tea polyphenol can be used as a natural ingredient with excellent physiological functions for the human skin through cosmetic or food composition.

  12. Microstructure evolution in proton-irradiated austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys under LWR core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian

    1999-11-01

    Irradiation-induced microstructure of austenitic stainless steel was investigated using proton irradiation. High-purity alloys of Fe-20Cr-9Ni (UHP 304 SS), Fe-20Cr-24Ni and Ni-18Cr-9Fe were irradiated using 3.2 MeV protons at a dose rate of 7 × 10-6 dpa/s between 300°C and 600°C. The irradiation produced a microstructure consisting of dislocation loops and voids. The dose and temperature dependence of the number density and size of dislocation loops and voids were investigated. The changes in yield strength due to irradiation were estimated from Vickers hardness measurements and compared to calculations using a dispersed-barrier hardening model. The dose and temperature dependence of microstructure and hardness change for proton irradiation follows the same trend as that for neutron irradiation at comparable irradiation conditions. Commercial purity alloys of CP 304 SS and CP 316 SS were irradiated at 360°C to doses between 0.3 and 3.0 dpa. The irradiated microstructure consists of dislocation loops. No voids were detected at doses up to 3.0 dpa. Loop size distributions are in close agreement with that in the same alloys neutron-irradiated in a LWR core. The loop density also agrees with neutron irradiation data. The yield strength as a function of dose in proton irradiated commercial purity alloys is consistent with the neutron- data trend. A fast-reactor microstructure model was adapted for light water reactor (LWR) irradiation conditions (275°C, 7 × 10 -8 dpa/s) and then applied to proton irradiation under conditions (360°C, 7 × 10-6 dpa/s) relevant to LWRs. The original model was modified by including in-cascade interstitial clustering and the loss of interstitial clusters to sinks by cluster diffusion. It was demonstrated that loop nucleation for both LWR irradiation condition and proton irradiation are driven by in-cascade interstitial clustering. One important result from this modeling work is that the difference in displacement cascade between

  13. Characteristics of the KUR Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility as a neutron irradiation field with variable energy spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2000-10-01

    The Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility (HWNIF) of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) was updated in March 1996, mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy (NCT). A striking feature of the updated facility is that the energy spectrum of the neutron beam can be controlled from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal, within 5 min by remote control under a continuous reactor operation. This feature is advantageous not only to medical science such as NCT, but also to the other research fields such as physics, engineering, biology, etc. The performance of the updated facility as a neutron irradiation field with variable energy spectra, was characterized. Thermal neutron flux, cadmium ratio, gamma-ray dose rate, etc., at the normal irradiation position for various irradiation modes were determined, mainly on the basis of the measurement using gold activation foils and thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The emphasis was on the performance of the new neutron energy spectrum shifter and cadmium thermal neutron filter, that control the mixing ratio of thermal and epi-thermal neutrons, through the change in the heavy water thickness of the spectrum shifter and the aperture size of the cadmium filter. The evaluation of neutron energy spectra at the normal irradiation position was also performed for three representative irradiation modes, in which the neutron intensities are largest of all the irradiation modes. In addition, the irradiation characteristics of two irradiation devices, namely the Irradiation Rail Device and the Remote Patient Carrier, which were updated concurrently with the facility update, were evaluated.

  14. Comparison of chromatographic band profiles obtained under microwave irradiated and non-irradiated reversed-phase liquid chromatography column

    SciTech Connect

    Galinada, Wilmer; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-08-01

    The possible influence of the application of microwave energy to a reversed-phase liquid chromatography column on the mass transfer kinetics and the thermodynamics of equilibrium between mobile and stationary phases was examined. Chromatograms of propylbenzene and phenol were recorded under the same experimental conditions, on the same column, successively irradiated and not. The effect of microwave irradiation on the mass transfer kinetics was determined by measuring the second moment of small pulses of propylbenzene in a 70:30 (v/v) solution of methanol in water and microwave outputs of 15 and 30 W. The effect of microwave irradiation on the equilibrium thermodynamics was determined by measuring the elution time of breakthrough curves of phenol at high concentrations in a 20:80 (v/v) solution of methanol and water and microwave outputs of 15, 50, and 150 W. A qualitative comparison of the profiles of the propylbenzene peaks obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation affects significantly the peak shapes. However, a qualitative comparison of the profiles of the breakthrough curves of phenol obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation has no significant effect on their shapes. The peak sharpening observed may be due to an increase in the diffusivity, resulting from the dielectric polarization under microwave irradiation. This effect is directly related to an increase of the rate of mass transfers in the column. In contrast, the similarity of the overloaded band profiles at high concentrations suggests that the equilibrium thermodynamics is unaffected by microwave irradiation. This may be explained by the transparence of the stationary phase to microwaves at 2.45 GHz. The column temperature was measured at the column outlet under irradiation powers of 15, 30, 50, and 150 W. It increases with increasing power, the corresponding effluent temperatures being 25 {+-} 1, 30 {+-} 1, 35 {+-} 1, and 45 {+-} 1 C, respectively.

  15. Comparison of chromatographic band profiles obtained under microwave irradiated and non-irradiated reversed-phase liquid chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Galinada, Wilmer A; Guiochon, Georges

    2005-10-28

    The possible influence of the application of microwave energy to a reversed-phase liquid chromatography column on the mass transfer kinetics and the thermodynamics of equilibrium between mobile and stationary phases was examined. Chromatograms of propylbenzene and phenol were recorded under the same experimental conditions, on the same column, successively irradiated and not. The effect of microwave irradiation on the mass transfer kinetics was determined by measuring the second moment of small pulses of propylbenzene in a 70:30 (v/v) solution of methanol in water and microwave outputs of 15 and 30 W. The effect of microwave irradiation on the equilibrium thermodynamics was determined by measuring the elution time of breakthrough curves of phenol at high concentrations in a 20:80 (v/v) solution of methanol and water and microwave outputs of 15, 50, and 150 W. A qualitative comparison of the profiles of the propylbenzene peaks obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation affects significantly the peak shapes. However, a qualitative comparison of the profiles of the breakthrough curves of phenol obtained with and without irradiation suggests that this irradiation has no significant effect on their shapes. The peak sharpening observed may be due to an increase in the diffusivity, resulting from the dielectric polarization under microwave irradiation. This effect is directly related to an increase of the rate of mass transfers in the column. In contrast, the similarity of the overloaded band profiles at high concentrations suggests that the equilibrium thermodynamics is unaffected by microwave irradiation. This may be explained by the transparence of the stationary phase to microwaves at 2.45 GHz. The column temperature was measured at the column outlet under irradiation powers of 15, 30, 50, and 150 W. It increases with increasing power, the corresponding effluent temperatures being 25+/-1, 30+/-1, 35+/-1, and 45+/-1 degrees C, respectively.

  16. Magnetic phase formation in irradiated austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T; Tan, Lizhen; Garner, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Austenitic alloys are often observed to develop magnetic properties during irradiation, possibly associated with radiation-induced acceleration of the ferrite phase. Some of the parametric sensitivities of this phenomenon have been addressed using a series of alloys irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor at 593K. The rate of development of magnetic phase appears to be sensitive to alloy composition. To the first order, the largest sensitivities to accelerate ferrite formation, as explored in this experiment, are associated with silicon, carbon and manganese and chromium. Si, C, and Mn are thought to influence diffusion rates of point defects while Cr plays a prominent role in defining the chromium equivalent and therefore the amount of ferrite at equilibrium. Pre-irradiation cold working was found to accelerate ferrite formation, but it can play many roles including an effect on diffusion, but on the basis of these results the dominant role or roles of cold-work cannot be identified. Based on the data available, ferrite formation is most probably associated with diffusion.

  17. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Scarlatescu, Ioana Avram, Calin N.; Virag, Vasile

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  18. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarlatescu, Ioana; Virag, Vasile; Avram, Calin N.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  19. Dislocation loop evolution under ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, A.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Genevois, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2010-05-01

    A solution annealed 304 and a cold worked 316 austenitic stainless steels were irradiated from 0.36 to 5 dpa at 350 °C using 160 keV Fe ions. Irradiated microstructures were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Observations after irradiation revealed the presence of a high number density of Frank loops. Size and number density of Frank loops have been measured. Results are in good agreement with those observed in the literature and show that ion irradiation is able to simulate dislocation loop microstructure obtained after neutron irradiation. Experimental results and data from literature were compared with predictions from the cluster dynamic model, MFVIC (Mean Field Vacancy and Interstitial Clustering). It is able to reproduce dislocation loop population for neutron irradiation. Effects of dose rate and temperature on the loop number density are simulated by the model. Calculations for ion irradiations show that simulation results are consistent with experimental observations. However, results also show the model limitations due to the lack of accurate parameters.

  20. Irradiation of northwest agricultural products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, D. E.; Tingey, G. I.

    1985-02-01

    Irradiation of food for disinfestation and preservation is increasing in importance because of increasing restrictions on various chemical treatments. Irradiation treatment is of particular interest in the Northwest because of a growing supply of agricultural products and the need to develop new export markets. Several products have, or could potentially have, significant export markets if stringent insect ocntrol procedures are developed and followed. Due to the recognized potential benefits of irradiation, this program was conducted to evaluate the benefits of using irradiation on Northwest agricultural products. Commodities currently included in the program are cherries, apples, asparagus, spices, hay, and hides.

  1. Precipitation during irradiation: an experimental example

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron damage can significantly alter the process of precipitation from supersaturated solid solution. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments using a precipitation strengthened superalloy, Nimonic PE16 irradiated with fast neutrons over the temperature 400 to 650/sup 0/C. In disagreement with earlier predictions, precipitate development is found to be controlled by the competing processes of Ostwald coarsening and solute segregation due to drag by point defects to point defect sinks. Analysis of the kinetics of Ostwald coarsening reveals significant enhancement of diffusion rates due to irradiation in agreement with predictions and involving an activation energy on the order of one quarter that of thermal diffusion. Unusual precipitate morphologies were observed such as void shells, linear precipitate arrays and Archimedes' screw configurations. However, predicted temperature dependencies for solute segregation are not obeyed. An explanation is presented involving the coupling of the Ostwald coarsening mechanism with the solute segregation process.

  2. Precipitation during irradiation: an experimental example

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Neutron damage can significantly alter the process of precipitation from supersaturated solid solution. This is demonstrated by a series of experiments using a precipitation strengthened superalloy, Nimonic PE16 irradiated with fast neutrons over the temperature 400 to 650/sup 0/C. In disagreement with earlier predictions, precipitate development is found to be controlled by the competing processes of Ostwald coarsening and solute segregation due to drag by point defects to point defect sinks. Analysis of the kinetics of Ostwald coarsening reveals significant enhancement of diffusion rates due to irradiation in agreement with predictions and involving an activation energy on the order of one quarter that of thermal diffusion. Unusual precipitate morphologies were observed such as void shells, linear precipitate arrays and Archimedes' screw configurations. However, predicted temperature dependencies for solute segregation are not obeyed.

  3. Food irradiation and sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  4. Irradiation creep of candidate materials for advanced nuclear plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Hoffelner, W.

    2013-10-01

    In the present paper, irradiation creep results of an intermetallic TiAl alloy and two ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are summarized. In situ irradiation creep measurements were performed using homogeneous implantation with α- and p-particles to maximum doses of 0.8 dpa at displacement damage rates of 2-8 × 10-6 dpa/s. The strains of miniaturized flat dog-bone specimens were monitored under uniaxial tensile stresses ranging from 20 to 400 MPa at temperatures of 573, 673 and 773 K, respectively. The effects of material composition, ODS particle size, and bombarding particle on the irradiation creep compliance was studied and results are compared to literature data. Evolution of microstructure during helium implantation was investigated in detail by TEM and is discussed with respect to irradiation creep models.

  5. Creep behavior of epoxy resin during irradiation at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, Tetsuya; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Okada, Toichi

    1999-11-01

    Creep tests of an epoxy resin during bending and irradiation have been carried out to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation and stress on mechanical properties of the resin. Simultaneous application of stress and irradiation on the epoxy resin enhanced creep rates in comparison with the application of stress on an irradiated sample. In order to clarify the mechanism of the radiation-induced creep, measurements of solvent swelling of specimens have been performed. The swelling increased with the dose and the increase of the swelling corresponds to the increase of the chain scission. The mechanism of increased deformation of the resin during irradiation is proposed to be caused by increased chain scission following the release of the local strain energy.

  6. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (<0.3 dpa), while the formation of intermetallic second phase precipitation, resulting from transmutation, dominates the radiation-induced strengthening beginning with a relatively modest dose (>0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  7. The pros and cons of polyethylene sterilization with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Robert H; Engh, C Anderson; Fowlkes, LaTonya B; Engh, Charles A

    2004-12-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the implant, patient and surgical factors associated with polyethylene wear for one type of porous-coated hemispheric total hip arthroplasty cup. Radiographic wear measurements among 567 Duraloc cups (512 patients) revealed that liners sterilized by gamma-irradiation wore 0.085 mm/year less than those that were sterilized by gas-plasma, a noncross-linking chemical surface treatment. The substantially decreased wear rate associated with gamma-irradiation was attributed to sterilization-induced polyethylene cross-linking. Shelf-aging adversely affected liners that were gamma irradiated in air. On average, highly crystalline Hylamer liners showed a 0.064 mm/year increase in wear rates for each year of shelf storage after terminal sterilization with gamma-irradiation in air. Among conventional Enduron liners, the effect of shelf aging after gamma-irradiation in air was more modest, increasing wear rates by 0.014 mm/year for each year of shelf storage. Because Hylamer's wear performance degraded at about five times the rate of Enduron's, the improved wear resistance associated with gamma-irradiation in air would be lost after 1.3 years of shelf aging for Hylamer compared with 6.1 years for Enduron. For every additional year of age at the time of surgery, the wear rate decreased by 0.003 mm/year. Increased body mass index, a preoperative diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis, and a ceramic femoral head also were associated with decreased wear rates. PMID:15577466

  8. Low dose irradiation creep of pure nickel. [17 or 15 MeV deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, C.H. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    A detailed climb-controlled glide model of low dose irradiation creep has been developed to rationalize irradiation creep data of pure nickel irradiated in a light ion irradiation creep apparatus. Experimental irradiation creep data were obtained to study the effects of initial microstructure and stress on low dose irradiation creep in pure nickel. Pure nickel specimens (99.992% Ni), with three different microstructures, were irradiated with 17 or 15 MeV deuterons at 473 K and stresses ranging from 0.35 to 0.9 of the unirradiated yield stress. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the microstructure following irradiation to 0.05 dpa consisted of a high density of small dislocation loops, some small voids and network dislocations. The creep model predicted creep rates proportional to the mobile dislocation density and a comparison of experimental irradiation creep rates as a function of homologous stress revealed a dependence on initial microstructure of the magnitude predicted by the measured dislocation densities. The three microstructures that were irradiated consisted of 85% and 25% cold-worked Ni specimens and well-annealed Ni specimens. A weak stress dependence of irradiation creep was observed in 85% cold-worked Ni in agreement with experimental determinations of the stress dependence of irradiation creep by others. The weak stress dependence was shown to be a consequence of the stress independence of the dislocation climb velocity and the weak stress dependence of the barrier removal process. The irradiation creep rate was observed to be proportional to the applied stress. This linear stress dependence was suggested to be due to the stress dependence of the mobile dislocation density. 101 references, 27 figures, 11 tables.

  9. Swelling under irradiation of MgO pellets containing americium oxide: The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, J.; Béjaoui, S.; Hanifi, K.; Valot, Ch.; Loubet, L.

    2011-06-01

    The ECRIX-H irradiation experiment studied the behaviour of pellets containing americium dispersed in MgO. The purpose of the irradiation was to demonstrate the capacity of magnesia to provide an efficient support matrix. After fabrication, the sintered pellets contained 16.65 wt.% of Am microdispersed in the inert matrix. The ECRIX-H pellets were irradiated under a locally moderated neutron flux in the Phénix sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) for 318 Effective Full Power Days (EFPD). Post-test calculations indicated that the fission and transmutation rates of americium at the maximum flux plane reached 33.9% and 92.6% respectively at the end of the irradiation phase. The results of the post-irradiation examinations - both non-destructive and destructive - are discussed in this paper. These results indicate a satisfactory behaviour of the MgO matrix. Particularly, a moderate swelling occurs in the pellets under irradiation even with significant quantities of helium generated and at high transmutation rate.

  10. Phytosanitary irradiation in south Asia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irradiation has the potential to solve phytosanitary problems related to trade in south Asia. In general, it is the phytosanitary treatment most tolerated by fresh agricultural commodities. Irradiation technology is available in some countries of the region but is only used for phytosanitary purpos...

  11. Commercial implementation of food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welt, M. A.

    In July 1981, the first specifically designed multi-purpose irradiation facility for food irradiation was put into service by the Radiation Technology, Inc. subsidiary Process Technology, Inc. in West Memphis, Arkansas. The operational experience gained, resulted in an enhanced design which was put into commercial service in Haw River, North Carolina, by another subsidiary, Process Technology (N.C.), Inc. in October 1983. These facilities have enabled the food industry to assess the commercial viability of food irradiation. Further impetus towards commercialization of food irradiation was gained in March 1981 with the filing in the Federal Register, by the FDA, of an Advanced Proposed Notice of Rulemaking for Food Irradiation. Two years later in July 1983, the FDA approved the first food additive regulation involving food irradiation in nineteen years, when they approved the Radiation Technology, Inc. petition calling for the sanitization of spices, onion powder and garlic powder at a maximum dosage of 10 kGy. Since obtaining the spice irradiation approval, the FDA has accepted four additional petitions for filing in the Federal Register. One of the petitions which extended spice irradiation to include insect disinfestation has issued into a regulation while the remaining petitions covering the sanitization of herbs, spice blends, vegetable seasonings and dry powdery enzymes as well as the petition to irradiate hog carcasses and pork products for trichinae control at 1 kGy, are expected to issue either before the end of 1984 or early in 1985. More recently, food irradiation advocates in the United States received another vote of confidence by the announcement that a joint venture food irradiation facility to be constructed in Hawaii by Radiation Technology, is backed by a contractual committment for the processing of 40 million pounds of produce per year. Another step was taken when the Port of Salem, New Jersey announced that the Radiation Technology Model RT-4104

  12. Platelet-Rich Fibrin Lysate Can Ameliorate Dysfunction of Chronically UVA-Irradiated Human Dermal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wirohadidjojo, Yohanes Widodo; Budiyanto, Arief; Soebono, Hardyanto

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether platelet-rich fibrin lysate (PRF-L) could restore the function of chronically ultraviolet-A (UVA)-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), we isolated and sub-cultured HDFs from six different human foreskins. HDFs were divided into two groups: those that received chronic UVA irradiation (total dosages of 10 J cm⁻²) and those that were not irradiated. We compared the proliferation rates, collagen deposition, and migration rates between the groups and between chronically UVA-irradiated HDFs in control and PRF-L-treated media. Our experiment showed that chronic UVA irradiation significantly decreased (p<0.05) the proliferation rates, migration rates, and collagen deposition of HDFs, compared to controls. Compared to control media, chronically UVA-irradiated HDFs in 50% PRF-L had significantly increased proliferation rates, migration rates, and collagen deposition (p<0.05), and the migration rates and collagen deposition of chronically UVA-irradiated HDFs in 50% PRF-L were equal to those of normal fibroblasts. Based on this experiment, we concluded that PRF-L is a good candidate material for treating UVA-induced photoaging of skin, although the best method for its clinical application remains to be determined. PMID:27401663

  13. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  14. Hydrogen retention in ion irradiated steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, J.D.; Lewis, M.B.; Lee, E.H.

    1998-11-01

    In the future 1--5 MW Spallation Neutron Source, target radiation damage will be accompanied by high levels of hydrogen and helium transmutation products. The authors have recently carried out investigations using simultaneous Fe/He,H multiple-ion implantations into 316 LN stainless steel between 50 and 350 C to simulate the type of radiation damage expected in spallation neutron sources. Hydrogen and helium were injected at appropriate energy and rate, while displacement damage was introduced by nuclear stopping of 3.5 MeV Fe{sup +}, 1 {micro}m below the surface. Nanoindentation measurements showed a cumulative increase in hardness as a result of hydrogen and helium injection over and above the hardness increase due to the displacement damage alone. TEM investigation indicated the presence of small bubbles of the injected gases in the irradiated area. In the current experiment, the retention of hydrogen in irradiated steel was studied in order to better understand its contribution to the observed hardening. To achieve this, the deuterium isotope ({sup 2}H) was injected in place of natural hydrogen ({sup 1}H) during the implantation. Trapped deuterium was then profiled, at room temperature, using the high cross-section nuclear resonance reaction with {sup 3}He. Results showed a surprisingly high concentration of deuterium to be retained in the irradiated steel at low temperature, especially in the presence of helium. There is indication that hydrogen retention at spallation neutron source relevant target temperatures may reach as high as 10%.

  15. Recycling of irradiated high-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navratil, J.; Manas, M.; Mizera, A.; Bednarik, M.; Stanek, M.; Danek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation crosslinking of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) is a well-recognized modification of improving basic material characteristics. This research paper deals with the utilization of electron beam irradiated HDPE (HDPEx) after the end of its lifetime. Powder of recycled HDPEx (irradiation dose 165 kGy) was used as a filler into powder of virgin low-density polyethylene (LDPE) in concentrations ranging from 10% to 60%. The effect of the filler on processability and mechanical behavior of the resulting mixtures was investigated. The results indicate that the processability, as well as mechanical behavior, highly depends on the amount of the filler. Melt flow index dropped from 13.7 to 0.8 g/10 min comparing the lowest and the highest concentration; however, the higher shear rate the lower difference between each concentration. Toughness and hardness, on the other hand, grew with increasing addition of the recycled HDPEx. Elastic modulus increased from 254 to 450 MPa and material hardness increased from 53 to 59 ShD. These results indicate resolving the problem of further recycling of irradiated polymer materials while taking advantage of the improved mechanical properties.

  16. Irradiation Environment of the Materials Test Station

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2012-06-21

    Conceptual design of the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is now complete. The principal mission is the irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials for fast-spectrum nuclear reactor applications. The neutron spectrum in the fuel irradiation region of MTS is sufficiently close to that of fast reactor that MTS can match the fast reactor fuel centerline temperature and temperature profile across a fuel pellet. This is an important characteristic since temperature and temperature gradients drive many phenomena related to fuel performance, such as phase stability, stoichiometry, and fission product transport. The MTS irradiation environment is also suitable in many respects for fusion materials testing. In particular, the rate of helium production relative to atomic displacements at the peak flux position in MTS matches well that of fusion reactor first wall. Nuclear transmutation of the elemental composition of the fusion alloy EUROFER97 in MTS is similar to that expected in the first wall of a fusion reactor.

  17. Sequential half-body irradiation in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkin, R.D.T.; Berry, M.P.

    1983-12-01

    Single-dose half-body irradiation (HBI), introduced for the palliation of pain from widespread bone metastases in adults, has proved to be successful. The dose-limiting toxicity has proved to be acute radiation pneumonitis, with bone marrow tolerance of lesser importance, in spite of the fact that many patients received previous local irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Palliative HBI has not become a valuable treatment in pediatric malignancies, because of a shorter metastatic phase. Results are described in selected institutions, where HBI has been used in the treatment of pediatric malignancies. A single institution plot study was undertaken at the Princess Margaret Hospital involving 17 patients with Ewing's sarcoma of bone, without overt metastases at diagnosis. Results to date have not been obviously different from overall survival in the first intergroup Ewing's sarcoma study. Overall, the treatment has been shown to be well tolerated and can be given entirely on an out-patient basis. When compared on a historical basis with a previous single dose total body irradiation study, the one year survival rate was increased. HBI appears to be tolerable treatment, when given concurrently with or sequential to local and systemic treatment.

  18. Commercial scale irradiation for insect disinfestation preserves peach quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Heather; McCulloch, Mary; Caporaso, Fred; Winborne, Ian; Oubichon, Michon; Rakovski, Cyril; Prakash, Anuradha

    2012-06-01

    Irradiation is approved as a generic quarantine treatment by the US Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Due to the effectiveness of irradiation in controlling insects on commodities, there is a growing need to understand the effects of low dose irradiation on fruit quality. The goal of this study was to determine the sensitivity of peaches (Prunus persica) to irradiation, and secondly, to determine the effect of commercial scale treatment on shelf-life, overall quality and consumer liking. Six varieties of peaches were irradiated in small batches at 0.29, 0.49, 0.69 and 0.90 kGy to observe the sensitivity of peaches at different dose levels. Changes in quality were evaluated by 8 trained panelists using descriptive analysis. Sensory characteristics (color, smoothness, aroma, touch firmness, mouth firmness, graininess, overall flavor and off-flavor) were evaluated at 2-4 day intervals and untreated samples served as control. To simulate commercial treatment, peaches were irradiated in pallet quantities at a target dose level of 0.4 kGy. The average absorbed dose was 0.66 kGy with an average dose uniformity ratio of 1.57. Commercially treated peaches were evaluated by 40-80 untrained consumers for acceptability routinely throughout the shelf life. Titratable acidity, Brix, texture and weight loss were also monitored for both commercial and small scale irradiated peaches. There was no dose effect on TA, Brix and weight loss due to irradiation. Peaches irradiated at 0.69 and 0.90 kGy were darker in flesh color, more juicy and less firm as determined by the trained panel and analytical pressure tests. Commercial scale irradiation did not adversely affect shelf life but was seen to enhance ripening. This, however, was perceived as a positive change by consumers. Overall, consumers rated the acceptability of irradiated peaches higher than untreated peaches. Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed models to find determinates

  19. Hydrolytic degradation of electron beam irradiated high molecular weight and non-irradiated moderate molecular weight PLLA.

    PubMed

    Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Tan, Hui Tong; Ooi, Chui Ping; Boey, Yin Chiang Freddy

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the hydrolytic degradation of electron beam irradiated ring-opening polymerized (ROP) poly(l-lactide) (PLLA-ir) and non-irradiated melt polycondensation polymerized poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA-pc). It was observed that irradiation increases the hydrolytic degradation rate constant for ROP PLLA. This was due to a more hydrophilic PLLA-ir, as a result of irradiation. The degradation rate constants (k) of PLLA-ir samples were also found to be similar, regardless of the radiation dose, and an empirically formulated equation relating hydrolytic degradation time span to radiation dose was derived. The k value for PLLA-pc was observed to be lower than that for PLLA-ir, though the latter had a higher molecular weight. This was due to the difference in degradation mechanism, in which PLLA-ir undergoes end group scission, through a back- biting mechanism, during hydrolysis and thus a faster hydrolysis rate. Electron beam irradiation, though accelerates the degradation of PLLA, has been shown to be useful in accurately controlling the hydrolytic time span of PLLA. This method of controlling the hydrolytic degradation time was by far an easier task than through melt polycondensation polymerization. This would allow PLLA to be used for drug delivery purposes or as a temporary implant that requires a moderate time span (3-6 months). PMID:16701888

  20. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres containing bupivacaine: comparison between gamma and beta irradiation effects.

    PubMed

    Montanari, L; Cilurzo, F; Selmin, F; Conti, B; Genta, I; Poletti, G; Orsini, F; Valvo, L

    2003-07-31

    The beta- and gamma-irradiation effects on stability of microspheres made of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) 50:50 copolymer (PLGA) containing bupivacaine (BU) were studied. Microspheres containing 10, 25, and 40% w/w, respectively, of BU were prepared by spray drying and irradiated in air with beta- and gamma-irradiation at a dose of 25 kGy. Morphology (atomic force microscopy, particle-size analysis), physico-chemical characteristics (DSC and FT-IR spectroscopy), drug content and in vitro dissolution profile of microspheres were all determined; the stability of irradiated microspheres was evaluated over a 9-month period. The decrease of BU content in gamma-irradiated microspheres was almost always constant independent of the amount of BU per sample, therefore it was in inverse proportion to drug loading (range between 5 and 15%). BU release rate increased immediately after irradiation and increased slightly until 90 days of storage. As far as beta-irradiated microspheres are concerned, BU content decreased in a significant way (approximately 3%) only in microspheres containing 10% w/w of BU. Immediately after irradiation, drug release rate in beta-irradiated microspheres increased less than in the corresponding gamma-irradiated microspheres, and it did not change further over the following storage period. BU-loaded microspheres have been shown to be more stable against beta- than gamma-irradiation. AFM revealed that the surface roughness of the irradiated microspheres increases depending on irradiation. As such, if a parameter is quantifiable, it is proposed as a marker of degradation due to ionizing radiation. PMID:12880695

  1. Antitumor Immunity Induced after α Irradiation123

    PubMed Central

    Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Ménager, Jérémie; Gouard, Sébastien; Maurel, Catherine; Guilloux, Yannick; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Gaschet, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a therapeutic modality that allows delivering of ionizing radiation directly to targeted cancer cells. Conventional RIT uses β-emitting radioisotopes, but recently, a growing interest has emerged for the clinical development of α particles. α emitters are ideal for killing isolated or small clusters of tumor cells, thanks to their specific characteristics (high linear energy transfer and short path in the tissue), and their effect is less dependent on dose rate, tissue oxygenation, or cell cycle status than γ and X rays. Several studies have been performed to describe α emitter radiobiology and cell death mechanisms induced after α irradiation. But so far, no investigation has been undertaken to analyze the impact of α particles on the immune system, when several studies have shown that external irradiation, using γ and X rays, can foster an antitumor immune response. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the immunogenicity of murine adenocarcinoma MC-38 after bismuth-213 (213Bi) irradiation using a vaccination approach. In vivo studies performed in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice induced a protective antitumor response that is mediated by tumor-specific T cells. The molecular mechanisms potentially involved in the activation of adaptative immunity were also investigated by in vitro studies. We observed that 213Bi-treated MC-38 cells release “danger signals” and activate dendritic cells. Our results demonstrate that α irradiation can stimulate adaptive immunity, elicits an efficient antitumor protection, and therefore is an immunogenic cell death inducer, which provides an attractive complement to its direct cytolytic effect on tumor cells. PMID:24862758

  2. Metallographic analysis of irradiated RERTR-3 fuel test specimens.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Strain, R. V.; Clark, C. R.; Stuart, J. R.

    2000-11-08

    The RERTR-3 irradiation test was designed to investigate the irradiation behavior of aluminum matrix U-MO alloy dispersion fuels under high-temperature, high-fission-rate conditions. Initial postirradiation examination of RERTR-3 fuel specimens has concentrated on binary U-MO atomized fuels. The rate of matrix aluminum depletion was found to be higher than predictions based on low temperature irradiation data. Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (WDS) indicates that aluminum is present in the interior of the fuel particles. WDS data is supported by a mass and volume balance calculation performed on the basis of image analysis results. The depletion of matrix aluminum seems to have no detrimental effects on fuel performance under the conditions tested to date.

  3. Reevaluation of conventional pituitary irradiation in the therapy of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, C A

    1999-06-01

    External beam pituitary irradiation has been frequently used in the treatment of growth hormone (GH) secreting pituitary adenomas. Many studies have demonstrated that serum GH declines rapidly and reliably following treatment and early "cure" rates, based on a basal serum GH below 10 micrograms/L were as high as 80%. The definition of "cure" has become more stringent over time and retrospective studies have indicated that GH must be below 2.5 micrograms/L for acromegalics to achieve mortality rates comparable to a normal population. Only 20% of irradiated patients will achieve this goal by 10 yr. Even fewer will achieve a normal serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) levels. Although pituitary irradiation still has a role in the control of tumor size, its importance as a treatment for normalizing serum GH is being reevaluated. PMID:11081173

  4. A thin film recording medium for use in food irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saylor, M. C.; Tamargo, T. T.; McLaughlin, W. L.; Khan, H. M.; Lewis, D. F.; Schenfele, R. D.

    A commercially-available electron recording medium has been examined in terms of response to ionizing radiation in the form of photons emitted from the radionuclides 137Cs and 60Co and accelerated electrons. Operational characteristics of the film have been evaluated using scanning visible spectrophotometry, color photometry, densitometry, and scanning densitometry. The effect of various irradiation parameters (absorbed dose, absorbed dose rate, and irradiation temperature) have been characterized over the absorbed dose range of 0.1 to 5 kGy. Principle attributes of the film appear to be dose-rate independence for a given source, a high degree of uniformity with respect to radiochromic dye coating, and reproducibility of individual film sample measurements. Methods of dosimetry system operation and potential applications are discussed, with emphasis on applications for food irradiation.

  5. Effects of intraoperative electron irradiation in the dog on cell turnover in intact and surgically-anastomosed aorta and intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Sindelar, W.F.; Morrow, B.M.; Travis, E.L.; Tepper, J.; Merkel, A.B.; Kranda, K.; Terrill, R.

    1983-04-01

    Adults dogs were subjected to laparotomy and intraoperative electron irradiation after division and reanastomosis of aorta or after construction of a blind loop of small intestine having a transverse suture line and an end-to-side anastomosis. Dogs received intraoperative irradiation of both intact and anastomosed aorta or intestine in doses of 0, 2000, 3000, or 4500 rad. Animals were sacrificed at seven days or three months following treatment. At 24 hours prior to sacrifice, dogs received 5 mCi tritiated thymidine intravenously. Irradiated and non-irradiated segments of aorta and small intestine, including intact and anastomotic regions, were analyzed for tritiated thymidine incorporation and were subjected to autoradiography. Incorporation studies showed diminution in tritiated thymidine uptake by irradiated portions of aorta and small intestine, in both intact and anastomotic regions. Autoradiograms revealed that irradiated areas of intact or anastomotic aorta or intestine had diminished labeling of stromal cells, suggesting a lowered cell proliferative capacity of irradiated tissue compared to non-irradiated portions. Inflammatory cells showed similar labeling indices in irradiated and non-irradiated tissues, both intact and surgically-manipulated, suggesting that irradiation does not significantly affect a subsequent local inflammatory response. Radiation-induced decreases in tritiated thymidine incoporation in irradiated aorta and small intestine were generally more marked at seven days than at three months following irradiation, suggesting that radiation-induced depression of cell turnover rates decreases with time.

  6. In vivo 3D analysis of systemic effects after local heavy-ion beam irradiation in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kento; Hashimoto, Chika; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Itoh, Kazusa; Yasuda, Takako; Ohta, Kousaku; Oonishi, Hisako; Igarashi, Kento; Suzuki, Michiyo; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nishimaki, Toshiyuki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Oota, Hiroki; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Oga, Atsunori; Ikemoto, Kenzo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment. In addition to inducing effects in the irradiated area, irradiation may induce effects on tissues close to and distant from the irradiated area. Japanese medaka, Oryzias latipes, is a small teleost fish and a model organism for evaluating the environmental effects of radiation. In this study, we applied low-energy carbon-ion (26.7 MeV/u) irradiation to adult medaka to a depth of approximately 2.2 mm from the body surface using an irradiation system at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology. We histologically evaluated the systemic alterations induced by irradiation using serial sections of the whole body, and conducted a heart rate analysis. Tissues from the irradiated side showed signs of serious injury that corresponded with the radiation dose. A 3D reconstruction analysis of the kidney sections showed reductions in the kidney volume and blood cell mass along the irradiated area, reflecting the precise localization of the injuries caused by carbon-beam irradiation. Capillary aneurysms were observed in the gill in both ventrally and dorsally irradiated fish, suggesting systemic irradiation effects. The present study provides an in vivo model for further investigation of the effects of irradiation beyond the locally irradiated area. PMID:27345436

  7. Metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Elias; Morales, Alejandro; Harbinson, Jeremy; Heuvelink, Ep; Prinzenberg, Aina E.; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance can help identify targets for improving crop yields. We used different genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to characterise the importance of Rubisco activase (Rca), stomatal conductance (gs), non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) on photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in leaves exposed to stepwise increases and decreases in irradiance. rwt43, which has a constitutively active Rubisco enzyme in different irradiance intensities (except in darkness), showed faster increases than the wildtype, Colombia-0, in photosynthesis rates after step increases in irradiance. rca-2, having decreased Rca concentration, showed lower rates of increase. In aba2-1, high gs increased the rate of change after stepwise irradiance increases, while in C24, low gs tended to decrease it. Differences in rates of change between Colombia-0 and plants with low levels of NPQ (npq1-2, npq4-1) or SPS (spsa1) were negligible. In Colombia-0, the regulation of Rubisco activation and of gs were therefore limiting for photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance, while levels of NPQ or SPS were not. This suggests Rca and gs as targets for improvement of photosynthesis of plants in fluctuating irradiance. PMID:27502328

  8. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  9. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Giorla, Alain B.; Vaitová, M.; Le Pape, Yann; Štemberk, P.

    2015-10-18

    In this paper, we detail a numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al.,1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damagemore » around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al.,2015). In conclusion, the proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.« less

  10. Combined Effects of Temperature and Irradiation on Concrete Damage

    DOE PAGES

    Le Pape, Yann; Giorla, Alain; Sanahuja, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Aggregate radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) is a predominant mechanism in the formation of mechanical damage in the hardened cement paste (hcp) of irradiated concrete under fast-neutron flux (Giorla et al. 2015). Among the operating conditions difference between test reactors and light water reactors (LWRs), the difference of irradiation flux and temperature is significant. While a temperature increase is quite generally associated with a direct, or indirect (e.g., by dehydration) loss of mechanical properties (Maruyama et al. 2014), we found that it causes a partial annealing of irradiation amorphization of α-quartz, hence, reducing RIVE rate. Based on data collected by Bykovmore » et al. (1981), an incremental RIVE model coupling neutron fluence and temperature is developed. The elastic properties and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of irradiated polycrystalline quartz are interpreted through analytical homogenization of experimental data on irradiated α-quartz published by Mayer and Lecomte (1960). Moreover, the proposed model, implemented in the meso-scale simulation code AMIE, is compared to experimental data obtained on ordinary concrete made of quartz/quartzite aggregate (Dubrovskii et al. 1967). Substantial discrepancy, in terms of damage and volumetric expansion developments, is found when comparing irradiation scenarios assuming constant flux and temperature, as opposed to more realistic test reactor operation conditions.« less

  11. Combined Effects of Temperature and Irradiation on Concrete Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Le Pape, Yann; Giorla, Alain; Sanahuja, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Aggregate radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) is a predominant mechanism in the formation of mechanical damage in the hardened cement paste (hcp) of irradiated concrete under fast-neutron flux (Giorla et al. 2015). Among the operating conditions difference between test reactors and light water reactors (LWRs), the difference of irradiation flux and temperature is significant. While a temperature increase is quite generally associated with a direct, or indirect (e.g., by dehydration) loss of mechanical properties (Maruyama et al. 2014), we found that it causes a partial annealing of irradiation amorphization of α-quartz, hence, reducing RIVE rate. Based on data collected by Bykov et al. (1981), an incremental RIVE model coupling neutron fluence and temperature is developed. The elastic properties and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of irradiated polycrystalline quartz are interpreted through analytical homogenization of experimental data on irradiated α-quartz published by Mayer and Lecomte (1960). Moreover, the proposed model, implemented in the meso-scale simulation code AMIE, is compared to experimental data obtained on ordinary concrete made of quartz/quartzite aggregate (Dubrovskii et al. 1967). Substantial discrepancy, in terms of damage and volumetric expansion developments, is found when comparing irradiation scenarios assuming constant flux and temperature, as opposed to more realistic test reactor operation conditions.

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Gamma-irradiated Chitosan Against Denitrifying Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilcáez, Javier; Watanabe, Tomohide

    2010-11-01

    In order to find an environmentally benign substitute to hazardous inhibitory agents, the inhibitory effect of γ-irradiated chitosans against a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria was experimentally evaluated. Unlike other studies using pure aerobic cultures, the observed effect was not a complete inhibition but a transient inhibition reflected by prolonged lag phases and reduced growth rates. Raw chitosan under acid conditions (pH 6.3) exerted the strongest inhibition followed by the 100 kGy and 500 kGy irradiated chitosans respectively. Therefore because the molecular weight of chitosan decreases with the degree of γ-irradiation, the inhibitory properties of chitosan due to its high molecular weight were more relevant than the inhibitory properties gained due to the modification of the surface charge and/or chemical structure by γ-irradiation. High dosage of γ-irradiated appeared to increase the growth of mixed denitrifying bacteria in acid pH media. However, in neutral pH media, high dosage of γ-irradiation appeared to enhance the inhibitory effect of chitosan.

  13. Proton irradiation of simple gas mixtures: Influence of irradiation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Norbert J.; Schuster, R.; Hofmann, A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to get information about the influence of irradiation parameters on radiolysis processes of astrophysical interest, methane gas targets were irradiated with 6.5 MeV protons at a pressure of 1 bar and room temperature. Yields of higher hydrocarbons like ethane or propane were found by analysis of irradiated gas samples using gas chromatography. The handling of the proton beam was of great experimental importance for determining the irradiation parameters. In a series of experiments current density of the proton beam and total absorbed energy were shown to have a large influence on the yields of produced hydrocarbons. Mechanistic interpretations of the results are given and conclusions are drawn with regard to the chemistry and the simulation of various astrophysical systems.

  14. New facility for post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Ishitsuka, Etsuo; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium is expected as a neutron multiplier and plasma facing materials in the fusion reactor, and the neutron irradiation data on properties of beryllium up to 800{degrees}C need for the engineering design. The acquisition of data on the tritium behavior, swelling, thermal and mechanical properties are first priority in ITER design. Facility for the post irradiation examination of neutron irradiated beryllium was constructed in the hot laboratory of Japan Materials Testing Reactor to get the engineering design data mentioned above. This facility consist of the four glove boxes, dry air supplier, tritium monitoring and removal system, storage box of neutron irradiated samples. Beryllium handling are restricted by the amount of tritium;7.4 GBq/day and {sup 60}Co;7.4 MBq/day.

  15. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE)1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  16. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE). The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  17. Generic phytosanitary irradiation treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallman, Guy J.

    2012-07-01

    The history of the development of generic phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments is discussed beginning with its initial proposal in 1986. Generic PI treatments in use today are 150 Gy for all hosts of Tephritidae, 250 Gy for all arthropods on mango and papaya shipped from Australia to New Zealand, 300 Gy for all arthropods on mango shipped from Australia to Malaysia, 350 Gy for all arthropods on lychee shipped from Australia to New Zealand and 400 Gy for all hosts of insects other than pupae and adult Lepidoptera shipped to the United States. Efforts to develop additional generic PI treatments and reduce the dose for the 400 Gy treatment are ongoing with a broad based 5-year, 12-nation cooperative research project coordinated by the joint Food and Agricultural Organization/International Atomic Energy Agency Program on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. Key groups identified for further development of generic PI treatments are Lepidoptera (eggs and larvae), mealybugs and scale insects. A dose of 250 Gy may suffice for these three groups plus others, such as thrips, weevils and whiteflies.

  18. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  19. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  20. Hardening and microstructural evolution in A533B steels under neutron irradiation and a direct comparison with electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Nakata, H.; Fukuya, K.; Ohkubo, T.; Hono, K.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Yoshiie, T.

    2010-05-01

    A533B steels irradiated at 290 °C up to 10 mdpa in the Kyoto University Reactor were examined by hardness, positron annihilation and atom probe measurements. Dose dependent irradiation hardening and formation of Cu-rich clusters were confirmed in medium Cu (0.12% and 0.16%Cu) steels whereas neither hardening nor cluster formation was detected in low Cu (0.03%Cu) steel. No microvoids were formed in any of the steels. Post-irradiation annealing in medium Cu steels revealed that the hardening recovery at temperatures above 350-400 °C could be attributed to compositional changes and dissociation of the Cu-rich clusters. Compared to electron irradiation at almost the same dose and dose rate, KUR irradiation caused almost the same hardening and produced Cu-rich clusters, more solute-enriched with larger size and lower density. Considering lower production of freely-migrating vacancies in neutron irradiation, the results suggested that cascades enhance the formation of Cu-rich clusters.

  1. Irradiation and post-irradiation examination of uranium-free nitride fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hania, P. R.; Klaassen, F. C.; Wernli, B.; Streit, M.; Restani, R.; Ingold, F.; Fedorov, A. V.; Wallenius, J.

    2015-11-01

    Two identical Phénix-type 15-15Ti steel pinlets each containing a 70 mm Pu0.3Zr0.7N fuel stack in a 1-bar helium atmosphere have been irradiated in the HFR Petten at medium high linear power (46-47 kW/m at BOL) and an average cladding temperature of 505 °C. The pins were irradiated to a plutonium burn-up of 9.7% (88 MWd/kgHM) in 170 full power days. Both pins remained fully intact. Post-irradiation examination performed at NRG and PSI showed that the overall swelling rate of the fuel was 0.92 vol-%/%FIHMA. Fission gas release was 5-6%, while helium release was larger than 50%. No fuel restructuring was observed, and only mild cracking. EPMA measurements show a burn-up increase toward the pellet edge of up to 4 times. All investigated fission products except to some extent the noble metals were found to be evenly distributed over the matrix, indicating good solubility. Local formation of a secondary phase with high Pu content and hardly any Zr was observed. A general conclusion of this investigation is that ZrN is a suitable inert matrix for burning plutonium at high destruction rates.

  2. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two "sun-leaf-like" surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature. PMID:27377989

  3. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-07-05

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two "sun-leaf-like" surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature.

  4. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m−2 s−1. Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two “sun-leaf-like” surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature. PMID:27377989

  5. Effects of gamma irradiation on chemical, microbial quality and shelf life of shrimp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocaoğlu, Aslı; Sükrü Demirci, Ahmet; Gümüs, Tuncay; Demirci, Mehmet

    2012-12-01

    In the present study the combined effect of gamma irradiation (1, 3 and 5 kGy) and storage at two temperatures: refrigeration (+4 °C) and frozen (-18 °C), on the shelf-life extension of fresh shrimp meat was investigated. The study was based on microbiological and physicochemical changes occuring in the shrimp samples. Total volatile base nitrogen values and trimethylamine values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly lower than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures, and the rate of decrease was more pronounced in samples irradiated at the higher dose (p<0.05). Thiobarbituric acid values for irradiated shrimp samples were significantly higher than non-irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). pH values of shrimp samples were affected significantly by both irradiating dose and storage temperatures (p<0.05). Microbial counts for non-irradiated shrimp samples were higher than the respective irradiated samples at both storage temperatures (p<0.05). The results revealed that irradiation at high dose (5 kGy) might enhance lipid oxidation, although the growth of microorganisms and protein oxidation was inhibited.

  6. Irradiation pretreatment for coal desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Process using highly-penetrating nuclear radiation (Beta and Gamma radiation) from nuclear power plant radioactive waste to irradiate coal prior to conventional desulfurization procedures increases total extraction of sulfur.

  7. Irradiation of Northwest agricultural products

    SciTech Connect

    Eakin, D.E.; Tingey, G.L.

    1985-02-01

    Irradiation of food for disinfestation and preservation is increasing in importance because of increasing restrictions on various chemical treatments. Irradiation treatment is of particular interest in the Northwest because of a growing supply of agricultural products and the need to develop new export markets. Several products have, or could potentially have, significant export markets if stringent insect control procedures are developed and followed. Due to the recognized potential benefits of irradiation, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting this program to evaluate the benefits of using irradiation on Northwest agricultural products under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Byproducts Production and Utilization Program. Commodities currently included in the program are cherries, apples, asparagus, spices, hay, and hides.

  8. Building lab-scale x-ray tube based irradiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, Ron; Jackson, Eric; Gomez, Joseph; Light, Doug; Follett, Peter; Simmons, Greg; Higbee, Brad

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the use of x-ray tube based irradiators as alternatives to gamma sources for laboratory scale irradiation. Irradiators were designed with sample placement in closest possible proximity to the source, allowing high dose rates for small samples. Designs using 1000 W x-ray tubes in single tube, double tube, and four tube configurations are described, as well as various cabinet construction techniques. Relatively high dose rates were achieved for small samples, demonstrating feasibility for laboratory based irradiators for research purposes. Dose rates of 9.76, 5.45, and 1.7 Gy/min/tube were measured at the center of a 12.7 cm container of instant rice at 100 keV, 70 keV, and 40 keV, respectively. Dose uniformity varies dramatically as the distance from source to container. For 2.54 cm diameter sample containers containing adult Navel Orangeworm, dose rates of 50-60 Gy/min were measured in the four tube system.

  9. Building lab-scale x-ray tube based irradiators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The construction of economical x-ray tube based irradiators in a variety of configurations is described using 1000 Watt x-ray tubes. Single tube, double tube, and four tube designs are described, as well as various cabinet construction techniques. Relatively high dose rates were achieved for small s...

  10. Excision of pyrimidine dimers from nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid in ultraviolet-irradiated Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.M.; Deering, R.A.

    1987-02-01

    A sensitive endonuclease assay was used to study the fate of pyrimidine dimers introduced by ultraviolet irradiation into the nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid of the cellular slime mold Dictyostellium discoideum. Analysis of the frequency of T4 endonuclease V-induced single-strand breaks by alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation showed that strain NC4 (rad/sup +/) removed >98% of the dimers induced by irradiation at 40 J/m/sup 2/ (254 nm) within 215 min after irradiation. HPS104 (radC44), a mutant sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, removed 91% under these conditions, although at a significantly slower rate than NC4: only 8% were removed during the 10- to 15- min period immediately after irradiation, whereas NC4 excised 64% during this interval. HPS104 thus appears to be deficient in the activity(ies) responsible for rapidly incising ultraviolet-irradiated nuclear deoxyribonucleic acid at the sites of pyrimidine dimers.

  11. Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S; Atzmon, Michael; Wang, Lumin

    2003-04-28

    The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone.

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Yun; Yang, Fuqian; Lee, Sanboh

    2015-11-01

    Gamma irradiation can cause the change of microstructure and molecular structure of polymer, resulting in the change of mechanical properties of polymers. Using the hardness measurement, the effect of gamma irradiation on the high temperature hardness of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) was investigated. The gamma irradiation caused the increase in the melting point, the enthalpy of fusion, and the portion of crystallinity of LDPE. The Vickers hardness of the irradiated LDPE increases with increasing the irradiation dose, annealing temperature, and annealing time. The activation energy for the rate process controlling the reaction between defects linearly decreases with the irradiation dose. The process controlling the hardness evolution in LDPE is endothermic because LDPE is semi-crystalline.

  13. Irradiance Decay in Fluorescent and Light-emitting Diode-based Phototherapy Devices: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Osibanjo, Folashade B; Emokpae, Abieyuwa A; Slusher, Tina M

    2016-10-01

    We set out to determine the rate of decline of irradiance for fluorescent tube (FT) and light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy devices in resource-limited settings where routine irradiance monitoring is uncommon. Irradiance levels (μW/cm(2)/nm) were measured weekly using BiliBlanket(®) II Meter on three FT-based and two LED-based phototherapy devices over a 19 week period. The two LED devices showed stable irradiance levels and did not require any lamp changes. The three FT-based devices showed rapid decline in irradiance, and all required three complete lamp exchanges approximately every 5-6 weeks. FT-based devices are associated with more rapid decline in irradiance to sub-therapeutic levels and require more frequent lamp changes than LED devices. Clinicians should be alert to the maintenance requirements of the phototherapy devices available in their settings to ensure efficacy of treatment.

  14. Irradiance Decay in Fluorescent and Light-emitting Diode-based Phototherapy Devices: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Osibanjo, Folashade B; Emokpae, Abieyuwa A; Slusher, Tina M

    2016-10-01

    We set out to determine the rate of decline of irradiance for fluorescent tube (FT) and light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy devices in resource-limited settings where routine irradiance monitoring is uncommon. Irradiance levels (μW/cm(2)/nm) were measured weekly using BiliBlanket(®) II Meter on three FT-based and two LED-based phototherapy devices over a 19 week period. The two LED devices showed stable irradiance levels and did not require any lamp changes. The three FT-based devices showed rapid decline in irradiance, and all required three complete lamp exchanges approximately every 5-6 weeks. FT-based devices are associated with more rapid decline in irradiance to sub-therapeutic levels and require more frequent lamp changes than LED devices. Clinicians should be alert to the maintenance requirements of the phototherapy devices available in their settings to ensure efficacy of treatment. PMID:27118821

  15. Irradiation response of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tapes: Electromagnetic transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Gapud, A. A.; Greenwood, N. T.; Alexander, J. A.; Khan, A.; Leonard, K. J.; Aytug, T.; List III, F. A.; Rupich, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  16. Irradiation response of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tapes: Electromagnetic transport properties

    DOE PAGES

    Gapud, A. A.; Greenwood, N. T.; Alexander, J. A.; Khan, A.; Leonard, K. J.; Aytug, T.; List III, F. A.; Rupich, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of low dose irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in the irradiative environment of fusion reactors. Three different tapes, each with unique as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results showmore » that at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.« less

  17. Irradiation response of commercial, high-Tc superconducting tapes: Electromagnetic transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapud, A. A.; Greenwood, N. T.; Alexander, J. A.; Khan, A.; Leonard, K. J.; Aytug, T.; List, F. A.; Rupich, M. W.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Effects of low dose ion irradiation on the electrical transport current properties of commercially available high-temperature superconducting, coated-conductor tapes were investigated, in view of potential applications in irradiative environments. Three different tapes, each with unique and tailored as-grown flux-pinning structures, were irradiated with Au and Ni ions at energies that provide a range of damage effects, with accumulated damage levels near that expected for conductors in, for example, a fusion reactor environment. Measurements using transport current determined the pre- and post-irradiation resistivity, critical current density, and pinning force density, yielding critical temperatures, irreversibility lines, and inferred vortex creep rates. Results show that, at the irradiation damage levels tested, any detriment to as-grown pre-irradiation properties is modest; indeed in one case already-superior pinning forces are enhanced, leading to higher critical currents.

  18. Dyeing behaviour of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves (Lawsonia inermis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Fazal-ur; Adeel, Shahid; Qaiser, Summia; Ahmad Bhatti, Ijaz; Shahid, Muhammad; Zuber, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    Dyeing behavior of gamma irradiated cotton fabric using Lawson dye extracted from henna leaves has been investigated. Cotton and dye powder are irradiated to different absorbed doses of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 kGy using Cs-137 gamma irradiator. The dyeing parameters such as dyeing time, electrolyte (salt) concentration and mordant concentrations using copper and iron as mordants are optimized. Dyeing is performed using un-irradiated and irradiated cotton with dye solutions and their color strength values are evaluated in CIE Lab system using Spectraflash -SF650. Methods suggested by International Standard Organization (ISO) have been employed to investigate the colourfastness properties such as colourfastness to light, washing and rubbing of irradiated dyed fabric. It is found that gamma ray treatment of cotton dyed with extracts of henna leaves has significantly improved the color strength as well as enhanced the rating of fastness properties.

  19. Occurrence of tumors and effects on longevity after lmited x-irradiation in man

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, M.; Mackay, I.R.; Buckley, J.D.

    1980-12-01

    An analysis was made of survival times and causes of death of patients given local irradiation in small dosage during 1948 to 1960. The study involved 61 patients with peptic ulcers in whom hyperacidity was treated by partial gastrectomy and gastric irradiation, and their mortality was compared with that of 61 age- and sex-matched gastrectomized but nonirradiated control patients. Ten years after irradiation the relative survival rates of the irradiated and control groups began to diverge, due to more deaths than expected in the irradiated group. The irradiated group had a significantly increased number of deaths due to cancer, particularly carcinoma of the stomach, as well as an increase in deaths not caused by cancer.

  20. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    SciTech Connect

    Teysseyre, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of

  1. Characterization of irradiated blends of alpha-tocopherol and UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ebru; Greenbaum, Evan S; Malhi, Arnaz S; Harris, William H; Muratoglu, Orhun K

    2005-11-01

    Adhesive/abrasive wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been minimized by radiation cross-linking. Irradiation is followed by melting to eliminate residual free radicals and avoid long-term oxidative embrittlement. However, post-irradiation melting reduces the crystallinity of the polymer and hence its strength and fatigue resistance. We proposed an alternative to post-irradiation melting to be the incorporation of the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol into UHMWPE prior to consolidation. alpha-Tocopherol is known to react with oxygen and oxidized lipids, stabilizing them against further oxidative degradation reactions. We blended GUR 1050 UHMWPE resin powder with alpha-tocopherol at 0.1 and 0.3 wt% and consolidated these blends. Then we gamma-irradiated these blends to 100-kGy. We characterized the effect of alpha-tocopherol on the cross-linking efficiency, oxidative stability, wear behavior and mechanical properties of the blends. (I) The cross-link density of virgin, 0.1 and 0.3 wt% alpha-tocopherol blended, 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPEs were 175+/-19, 146+/-4 and 93+/-4 mol/m3, respectively. (II) Maximum oxidation indices for 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPE previously blended with 0, 0.1 and 0.3 wt% alpha-tocopherol that were subjected to accelerated aging at 80 degrees C in air for 5 weeks were 3.32, 0.09, and 0.05, respectively. (III) The pin-on-disc wear rates of 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPE previously blended with 0.1 and 0.3 wt% alpha-tocopherol that were subjected to accelerated aging at 80 degrees C in air for 5 weeks were 2.10+/-0.17 and 5.01+/-0.76 mg/million cycles, respectively. (IV) Both accelerated aged, alpha-tocopherol-blended 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPEs showed higher ultimate tensile strength, higher yield strength, and lower elastic modulus when compared to 100-kGy irradiated, virgin UHMWPE. These results showed that alpha-tocopherol-blended 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPEs were not cross-linked to the same extent as the 100-kGy irradiated

  2. Characterization of irradiated blends of α-tocopherol and UHMWPE #

    PubMed Central

    Oral, Ebru; Greenbaum, Evan S.; Malhi, Arnaz S.; Harris, William H.; Muratoglu, Orhun K.

    2005-01-01

    Adhesive/abrasive wear in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been minimized by radiation cross-linking. Irradiation is followed by melting to eliminate residual free radicals and avoid long-term oxidative embrittlement. However, post-irradiation melting reduces the crystallinity of the polymer and hence its strength and fatigue resistance. We proposed an alternative to post-irradiation melting to be the incorporation of the antioxidant α-tocopherol into UHMWPE prior to consolidation. α-Tocopherol is known to react with oxygen and oxidized lipids, stabilizing them against further oxidative degradation reactions. We blended GUR 1050 UHMWPE resin powder with α-tocopherol at 0.1 and 0.3 wt% and consolidated these blends. Then we gamma-irradiated these blends to 100-kGy. We characterized the effect of α-tocopherol on the cross-linking efficiency, oxidative stability, wear behavior and mechanical properties of the blends. (I) The cross-link density of virgin, 0.1 and 0.3 wt% α-tocopherol blended, 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPEs were 175±19, 146±4 and 93±4 mol/m3, respectively. (II) Maximum oxidation indices for 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPE previously blended with 0, 0.1 and 0.3 wt% α-tocopherol that were subjected to accelerated aging at 80 °C in air for 5 weeks were 3.32, 0.09, and 0.05, respectively. (III) The pin-on-disc wear rates of 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPE previously blended with 0.1 and 0.3 wt% α-tocopherol that were subjected to accelerated aging at 80 °C in air for 5 weeks were 2.10±0.17 and 5.01±0.76 mg/million cycles, respectively. (IV) Both accelerated aged, α-tocopherol-blended 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPEs showed higher ultimate tensile strength, higher yield strength, and lower elastic modulus when compared to 100-kGy irradiated, virgin UHMWPE. These results showed that α-tocopherol-blended 100-kGy irradiated UHMWPEs were not cross-linked to the same extent as the 100-kGy irradiated, virgin UHMWPE. PMID:15993487

  3. Irradiation Induced Creep of Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D; Murty, Prof K.L.; Eapen, Dr. Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The current status of graphite irradiation induced creep strain prediction is reviewed and the major creep models are described. The ability of the models to quantitatively predict the irradiation induced creep strain of graphite is reported. Potential mechanisms of in-crystal creep are reviewed as are mechanisms of pore generation under stress. The case for further experimental work is made and the need for improved creep models across multi-scales is highlighted.

  4. Slag recycling of irradiated vanadium

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, P.K.

    1995-04-05

    An experimental inductoslag apparatus to recycle irradiated vanadium was fabricated and tested. An experimental electroslag apparatus was also used to test possible slags. The testing was carried out with slag materials that were fabricated along with impurity bearing vanadium samples. Results obtained include computer simulated thermochemical calculations and experimentally determined removal efficiencies of the transmutation impurities. Analyses of the samples before and after testing were carried out to determine if the slag did indeed remove the transmutation impurities from the irradiated vanadium.

  5. Consumer attitudes toward irradiated food

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, S.

    1994-12-31

    Throughout history, new methods of food preservation have been met with skepticism and fear. Such processes as pasteurization and canning were denounced as being dangerous, detrimental to nutrients, or an excuse for dirty products. Now comes irradiation, and activists argue against this new process for the same reasons. Publicly, the perception is that consumers, distrustful of nuclear power, will never buy or accept irradiated food.

  6. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  7. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  8. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Irradiator pools. 36.33 Section 36.33 Energy NUCLEAR... Requirements for Irradiators § 36.33 Irradiator pools. (a) For licenses initially issued after July 1, 1993, irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner...

  9. Calculating Irradiance For Photosynthesis In The Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Donald J.; Davis, Curtiss O.; Booth, C. Rockwell; Kiefer, Dale A.; Stallings, Casson

    1990-01-01

    Mathematical model predicts available and usable irradiances. Yields estimates of irradiance available for photosynthesis (Epar) and irradiance usable for photosynthesis (Epur) as functions of depth in ocean. Describes Epur and Epar in terms of spectral parameters measured remotely (from satellites or airplanes). These irradiances useful in studies of photosynthetic productivity of phytoplankton in euphotic layer.

  10. Biomass allocation, morphology and photosynthesis of invasive and noninvasive exotic species grown at four irradiance levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yulong; Wang, Junfeng; Sang, Weiguo

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that invasive species had higher irradiance plasticity, capture ability and efficiency than noninvasive species using two invasive aliens - Ageratina adenophora and Chromolaena odorata, and one noninvasive alien - Gynura sp. The three aliens were grown at 4.5%, 12.5%, 36%, 50% and 100% irradiances for 64 days before harvesting. The plastic response of specific leaf area (SLA) contributed to improved light interception at low irradiance, carbon gain and water balance at high irradiance. It was a good predictor for intraspecific irradiance responses of leaf area ratio (LAR), leaf area:root mass ratio, maximum photosynthetic rate ( Pmax) and net assimilation rate (NAR). Biomass allocation-related traits were species specific and their plasticity to irradiance was low. The high root mass fraction, leaf mass fraction and LAR distinguished the two invaders from Gynura. However, other resource capture-related traits, such as SLA, NAR and Pmax, were not always higher for the invaders than for Gynura. Furthermore, plasticity to irradiance was not different between the invasive and noninvasive aliens. With increasing irradiance, Gynura decreased biomass investment to roots and leaves but increased the investment to support structures adversely affecting both low and high irradiance acclimation. Ageratina might invade new habitat successfully through tolerating shading at low irradiance and outshading competitors by forming dense stands when irradiance is increased. The results suggested that both resource capture-related traits and irradiance acclimation conferred competitive advantage to the two invaders and some traits were common for invasive and noninvasive aliens but others were specific for invaders.

  11. Cancer following medical irradiation.

    PubMed

    Boice, J D

    1981-03-01

    Several generalizations about radiation carcinogenesis can be made: 1) a single exposure is sufficient to elevate cancer incidence many years later: 2) radiation-induced cancer cannot be distinguished from naturally occurring cancer, i.e., there is not unique radiogenic cancer; 3) all cancers appear to be increased after irradiation with the exception of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and possibly Hodgkin's disease, cervical cancer, and a few others; 4) the breast, thyroid, and bone marrow appear especially radiosensitive; 5) leukemia is the most prominent radiogenic tumor and shows a wave-like pattern of excess incidence over time, and the excess begins within two to four years, peaks about six to eight years, and decreases to normal levels about 25 years later; 6) solid tumors have a minimum latent period of about ten years, and for several cancers, the temporal pattern of incidence appears to follow the natural incidence, i.e., the cancers do not occur before the ages normally associated with increased incidence, implying that age-dependent factors influence the expression of disease; 7) age at exposure is perhaps the most important host factor influencing subsequent cancer risk; 8) the percentage increase in cancer incidence per rad is not the same for all cancers, i.e., some cancer of high natural incidence, e.g., colon, have low "relative risks" and some cancers of low natural incidence, e.g., thyroid, have high "relative risks;" 9) dose-effect curves are often linear, but curvilinearity is also observed and is possibly associated with the need for "two ionizing events" for transformation to occur at low doses, the influence of cell sterilization at moderate doses, the likelihood of "wasted" dose at high doses, and/or the influence of factors that effect the expression of disease.

  12. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  13. Ion Irradiation Damage in Zirconate and Titanate Ceramics for Pu Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Martin W.; Begg, Bruce D.; Finnie, K.; Colella, Michael; Li, H.; McLeod, Terry; Smith, Katherine L.; Zhang, Zhaoming; Weber, William J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the effect of ion irradiation on pyrochlore-rich titanate and defect-fluorite zirconate ceramics designed for plutonium immobilisation. Samples, with Ce as an analogue for Pu, were made via oxide routes and consolidated by cold-pressing and sintering. Ion irradiation damage was carried out with 2 MeV Au2+ ions to a fluence of 5 ions nm-2 in the accelerator facilities within the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Irradiated and non-irradiated samples were examined by x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron and infra-red spectroscopy, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Samples underwent accelerated leach testing at pH 1.75 (nitric acid) at 90°C for 28 days. The zirconate samples were more ion-irradiation damage resistant than the titanate samples, showing little change after ion-irradiation whereas the titanate samples formed an amorphous surface layer ~ 500 nm thick. While all samples had high aqueous durability, the titanate leach rate was ~ 5 times that of the zirconate. The ion-irradiation increased the leach rate of the titanate without impurities by ~ 5 times. The difference in the leach rates between irradiated and unirradiated zirconate samples is small. However, the zirconates were less able to incorporate impurities than the titanate ceramics and required higher sintering temperatures, ~ 1500°C compared to 1350°C for the titanates.

  14. Evaluation of the efficiency and throughput of a gamma irradiator treating municipal sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Benny, P G; Shah, M R; Sabharwal, S

    2011-03-01

    Sludge Hygienisation Research Irradiator (SHRI) Facility at Vadodara (India) has been disinfecting liquid sewage sludge with (60)Co gamma rays since 1992. At some point, the radiation process was modified from its originally designed closed-loop system to an open-loop system. Dosimetry experiments were performed to estimate absorbed doses to the sludge for different periods of irradiation of a 15m(3) batch in an open-loop irradiation process. The paper reports the dosimetry results and evaluated operational parameters of the irradiator, namely, effective dose rate in the open-loop system, irradiation efficiency, and throughput. Also, the open-loop system and the closed-loop system are compared in terms of the effective dose rate.

  15. Effect of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes of Aeromonas proteolytica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas proteolytica was selected for studying the effects of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes because it produces an endopeptidase that is capable of degrading proteins and a hemolysin that is active in lysing human erythrocytes. Possible alterations in the rate of enzyme production in response to the test conditions are currently underway and are not available for this preliminary report. Completed viability studies are indicative that little difference exists among the survival curves derived for cells exposed to various components of ultraviolet irradiation in space.

  16. Effects of self-irradiation in plutonium alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Chung, B. W.; Lema, K. E.; Allen, P. G.

    2015-09-16

    In this paper, we present updated results of self-irradiation effects on 238Pu-enriched 239Pu alloys measured by immersion density, dilatometry, and tensile tests. We obtained the self-irradiation equivalent time of nearly 200 years, nearly 100 years longer than in our previous papers. At this extended aging, we find the rate of decrease in density has slowed significantly, stabilizing around 15.73 g/cc, without signs of void swelling. The volume expansion measured at 35°C also shows apparent saturation at less than 0.25%. Quasi-static tensile measurement still show gradual increase in the strength of plutonium alloys with age.

  17. Regeneration of cilia in heavily irradiated sea urchin embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, R.C.

    1981-12-01

    Cilia were removed from blastulae, gastrulae, and plutei of the sea urchins Arbacia punctulata and Lytechinus variegatus by shaking the embryos in hypertonic media. Exposure to 50 krad (and in some experiments 100 krad) of ..gamma.. radiation either before or after deciliation had no effect on the time of appearance of regenerating cilia. There were no visually obvious differences in the rate of growth of the cilia in control and irradiated embryos. The cilia commenced beating at the same time, but the initial beating sometimes seemed less vigorous following irradiation. The data support the hypothesis that radiation has no major effect on the assembly from mature basal bodies of the microtubules of cilia.

  18. Photodynamic therapy with laser scanning mode of tumor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurna, Oksana; Shton, Irina; Kholin, Vladimir; Voytsehovich, Valerii; Popov, Viacheslav; Pavlov, Sergii; Gamaleia, Nikolai; Wójcik, Waldemar; Zhassandykyzy, Maral

    2015-12-01

    In this study we propose a new version of photodynamic therapy performed by laser scanning. The method consists in tumor treatment by a light beam of a small cross section which incrementally moves through the chosen area with a defined delay at each point and repetitively re-scans a zone starting from the initial position. Experimental evaluation of the method in vitro on murine tumor model showed that despite the dose, applied by scanning irradiation mode, was 400 times lower, the tumor inhibition rate conceded to attained with continuous irradiation mode by only 20%.

  19. Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Sanecki, J.E.; Osborne, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel is being studied by heating fuel rod segments in flowing steam and an inert carrier gas to simulate accident conditions. Fuels with a range of irradiation histories are being subjected to several steam flow rates over a wide range of temperatures. Fission product release during each test is measured by gamma spectroscopy and by detailed examination of the collection apparatus after the test has been completed. These release results are complemented by a detailed posttest examination of samples of the fuel rod segment. Results of release measurements and fuel rod characterizations for tests at 1400 through 2000/sup 0/C are presented in this paper.

  20. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-08-26

    In this paper, pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90–850 °C to 0.03–2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (<0.3 dpa), while the formation of intermetallic second phase precipitation, resulting from transmutation, dominates the radiation-induced strengthening beginning with a relativelymore » modest dose (>0.6 dpa). Finally, the precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.« less

  1. Quality of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach irradiated at doses up to 4 kGy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xuetong; Guan, Wenqiang; Sokorai, Kimberly J. B.

    2012-08-01

    Fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce packaged in modified atmosphere packages and spinach in perforated film bags were irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 kGy. After irradiation, the samples were stored for 14 days at 4 °C. O2 levels in the packages of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce decreased and CO2 levels increased with increasing radiation dose, suggesting that irradiation increased respiration rates of lettuce. Tissue browning of irradiated cut lettuce was less severe than that of non-irradiated, probably due to the lower O2 levels in the packages. However, samples irradiated at 3 and 4 kGy had lower maximum force and more severe sogginess than the non-irradiated control. In addition, ascorbic acid content of irradiated lettuce was 22-40% lower than the non-irradiated samples after 14 days of storage. The visual appearance of spinach was not affected by irradiation even at a dose of 4 kGy. Consumer acceptance suggested that more people would dislike and would not buy spinach that was treated at 3 and 4 kGy as compared to the non-irradiated sample. Overall, irradiation at doses of 1 and 2 kGy may be employed to enhance microbial safety of fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce and spinach while maintaining quality.

  2. Contribution to irradiation creep arising from gas-driven bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, C.H.; Garner, F.A.

    1998-03-01

    In a previous paper the relationship was defined between void swelling and irradiation creep arising from the interaction of the SIPA and SIG creep-driven deformation and swelling-driven deformation was highly interactive in nature, and that the two contributions could not be independently calculated and then considered as directly additive. This model could be used to explain the recent experimental observation that the creep-swelling coupling coefficient was not a constant as previously assumed, but declined continuously as the swelling rate increased. Such a model thereby explained the creep-disappearance and creep-damping anomalies observed in conditions where significant void swelling occurred before substantial creep deformation developed. At lower irradiation temperatures and high helium/hydrogen generation rates, such as found in light water cooled reactors and some fusion concepts, gas-filled cavities that have not yet exceeded the critical radius for bubble-void conversion should also exert an influence on irradiation creep. In this paper the original concept is adapted to include such conditions, and its predictions then compared with available data. It is shown that a measurable increase in the creep rate is expected compared to the rate found in low gas-generating environments. The creep rate is directly related to the gas generation rate and thereby to the neutron flux and spectrum.

  3. Developmental inhibition of gamma irradiation on the peach fruit moth Carposina sasakii (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jihoon; Ahn, Jun-Young; Sik Lee, Seung; Lee, Ju-Woon; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing irradiation is a useful technique for disinfestation under plant quarantine as well as post-harvest management. Effects of gamma irradiation treatment were tested on different developmental events of Carposina sasakii, which is a serious pest of various orchard crops. Apple fruits infested by C. sasakii were irradiated by gamma rays ranging from 0 to 300 Gy. Inhibition rates were determined on behavioral events related to development, including larval exit from apples, cocoon formation, adult eclosion, and oviposition. Failure rates of all these developmental events increased with increasing doses of irradiation. Rates of larval exit from apples and cocoon formation decreased to 13.2% and 1.7%, respectively, at 300 Gy. However, the adult eclosion rate decreased to 5.4% at 100 Gy and was completely inhibited at doses greater than 150 Gy. LD99 values for the inhibition of cocoon formation and adult emergence was estimated into 313.4 and 191.0 Gy. Furthermore, adults developed from irradiated larvae completely failed to lay eggs. Thus, irradiation of infested apples at doses of 200 Gy and higher completely inhibited the next generation of C. sasakii. Our results suggest that gamma irradiation treatment would be a promising technique for the control of C. sasakii.

  4. Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Imanaka, K.; Ashida, C.; Takashima, H.; Imajo, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1983-04-01

    Active specific immunotherapy using the immune reaction of a low-dose irradiated tumor tissue was studied on the transplanted MM46 tumor of female C3H/He mice after radiotherapy. MM46 tumor cells were inoculated into the right hind paws of mice. On the 5th day, irradiation with the dose irradiated tumor tissue (2000 rad on the fifth day), were injected into the left hind paws of the tumor-bearing mice. Effectiveness of this active specific immunotherapy against tumor was evaluated by the regression of tumor and survival rate of mice. Tumor was markedly regressed and survival rate was significantly increased by the active specific immunitherapy.

  5. Parotid gland pathophysiology after mixed gamma and neutron irradiation of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.W.; Izutsu, K.T.; Rice, J.C.

    1981-11-01

    Electrolyte and protein concentrations were measured in parotid saliva samples obtained from patients receiving localized, fractionated, neutron and gamma irradiation for the treatment of cancer. Salivary sodium chloride concentration increased transiently but then usually decreased to preirradiation values after 2 weeks of therapy. There were concurrent decreases in salivary flow rate, pH, and bicarbonate concentration. The decreases in sodium chloride concentration and flow rate are inconsistent with a previously suggested, irradiation-induced ductal sodium resorption defect. The findings contribute toward understanding how salivary gland physiology is altered in irradiation injury.

  6. Irradiation spectrum and ionization-induced diffusion effects in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1997-08-01

    There are two main components to the irradiation spectrum which need to be considered in radiation effects studies on nonmetals, namely the primary knock-on atom energy spectrum and ionizing radiation. The published low-temperature studies on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO suggest that the defect production is nearly independent of the average primary knock-on atom energy, in sharp contrast to the situation for metals. On the other hand, ionizing radiation has been shown to exert a pronounced influence on the microstructural evolution of both semiconductors and insulators under certain conditions. Recent work on the microstructure of ion-irradiated ceramics is summarized, which provides evidence for significant ionization-induced diffusion. Polycrystalline samples of MgO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} were irradiated with various ions ranging from 1 MeV H{sup +} to 4 MeV Zr{sup +} ions at temperatures between 25 and 650{degrees}C. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the depth-dependent microstructural of the irradiated specimens. Dislocation loop nucleation was effectively suppressed in specimens irradiated with light ions, whereas the growth rate of dislocation loops was enhanced. The sensitivity to irradiation spectrum is attributed to ionization-induced diffusion. The interstitial migration energies in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are estimated to be {le}0.4 eV and {le}0.8 eV, respectively for irradiation conditions where ionization-induced diffusion effects are expected to be negligible.

  7. Characterization of an orthovoltage biological irradiator used for radiobiological research.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Rezvan; Alaei, Parham; Spezi, Emiliano; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-05-01

    Orthovoltage irradiators are routinely used to irradiate specimens and small animals in biological research. There are several reports on the characteristics of these units for small field irradiations. However, there is limited knowledge about use of these units for large fields, which are essential for emerging large-field irregular shape irradiations, namely total marrow irradiation used as a conditioning regimen for hematological malignancies. This work describes characterization of a self-contained Orthovoltage biological irradiator for large fields using measurements and Monte Carlo simulations that could be used to compute the dose for in vivo or in vitro studies for large-field irradiation using this or a similar unit. Percentage depth dose, profiles, scatter factors, and half-value layers were measured and analyzed. A Monte Carlo model of the unit was created and used to generate depth dose and profiles, as well as scatter factors. An ion chamber array was also used for profile measurements of flatness and symmetry. The output was determined according to AAPM Task Group 61 guidelines. The depth dose measurements compare well with published data for similar beams. The Monte Carlo-generated depth dose and profiles match our measured doses to within 2%. Scatter factor measurements indicate gradual variation of these factors with field size. Dose rate measured by placing the ion chamber atop the unit's steel plate or solid water indicate enhanced readings of 5 to 28% compared with those measured in air. The stability of output over a 5-year period is within 2% of the 5-year average. PMID:25694476

  8. Alloy development for irradiation performance in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harling, O. K.; Grant, N. J.

    1980-12-01

    The development of improved structural alloys for the fusion reactor first wall application is addressed. Several new alloys were produced by rapid solidification. Emphasis in alloy design and production was placed on producing austenitic Type 316SS with fine dispersions of TiC and Al2O3 particles. Results of mechanical and microstructural tests are presented. A number of neutron irradiations were initiated on samples fabricated from alloys produced. A dual beam, heavy ion, and helium ion, irradiation was completed using several alloys and a range of temperatures, damage rates, and total doses. Modeling of irradiation phenomena was continued with emphasis on understanding the effect of recoil resolution on relatively stable second phase particles. The microstructure of several ZrB2 doped stainless steels was characterized.

  9. Continuous system with microwave irradiation to obtain alkyl benzoates.

    PubMed

    Cáceres, Ana; Jaimes, María; Chávez, Gerson; Bravo, Bélgica; Ysambertt, Fredy; Márquez, Nelson

    2005-12-15

    In this study, a continuous linear alcohol derivatization is developed. Reaction of alcohol group (ROH) with benzoyl chloride (BC) is carried out in an on-line system with UV detection. All reaction conditions, as flow rate (FR), ROH/BC molar ratio, wavelength, temperature, microwave (MW) irradiation and reaction coil size (internal diameter and length) were optimized. 0.5mLmin(-1), 2.49 [BC]/[ROH], 230nm, 60 degrees C or medium power (225W) when MW irradiation was used and a reactor coil of 159muL (0.5mmx810mm) were the optimum conditions. The on-line system with microwave irradiation was more efficient than the one with a water bath heating. The developed system reduces analysis time consumption, reagent amounts and this system was used to evaluate the composition of commercial samples of alcohols polyethoxylated (surfactants).

  10. Luminescence from VUV Irradiated Cosmic Ice Analogs and Organic Residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Chillier, Xavier; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The optical luminescent properties for a variety of vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) irradiated cosmic ice analogs and the complex organic residues produced from irradiation might be applicable to Solar System and interstellar observations and processes for various astronomical objects with an ice heritage. Some examples include grain temperature determination and vaporization rates, nebula radiation balance, albedo values, color analysis, and biomarker identification. Detailed results are presented for the mixed molecular ice: H2O:CH3OH:NH3:CO (100:50:1:1), a realistic representation for an interstellar/precometary ice. The irradiated ices and the room-temperature residues resulting from this energetic processing have remarkable photoluminescent properties in the visible (520-570 nm). The luminescence dependence on temperature, thermal cycling, and VUV exposure of the residue is described.

  11. Experimental study of swelling of irradiated solid methane during annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalin, E.; Fedorov, A.; Kulagin, E.; Kulikov, S.; Melikhov, V.; Shabalin, D.

    2008-12-01

    Solid methane is still widely in use at pulsed neutron sources due to its excellent neutronic performance (IPNS, KENS, Second Target Station at ISIS), notwithstanding poor radiation properties. One of the specific problems is radiolytic hydrogen gas pressure on the walls of a methane chamber during annealing of methane. In this paper results of an experimental study of this phenomenon under fast neutron irradiation with the help of a specially made low temperature irradiation rig at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are presented. The peak pressure on the wall of the experimental capsule during heating of a sample irradiated at 23-35 K appears to have a maximum of 2.7 MPa at an absorbed dose 20 MGy and then falls down with higher doses. The pressure always reached its peak value at the temperature range 72-79 K. Generally, three phases of methane swelling during heating can be distinguished, each characterized by a proper rate and intensity.

  12. Food irradiation: Public opinion surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian government are discussing the legislation, regulations and practical protocol necessary for the commercialization of food irradiation. Food industry marketing, public relations and media expertise will be needed to successfully introduce this new processing choice to retailers and consumers. Consumer research to date including consumer opinion studies and market trials conducted in the Netherlands, United States, South Africa and Canada will be explored for signposts to successful approaches to the introduction of irradiated foods to retailers and consumers. Research has indicated that the terms used to describe irradiation and information designed to reduce consumer fears will be important marketing tools. Marketers will be challenged to promote old foods, which look the same to consumers, in a new light. Simple like or dislike or intention to buy surveys will not be effective tools. Consumer fears must be identified and effectively handled to support a receptive climate for irradiated food products. A cooperative government, industry, health professional, consumer association and retailer effort will be necessary for the successful introduction of irradiated foods into the marketplace. Grocery Products Manufacturers of Canada is a national trade association of more than 150 major companies engaged in the manufacture of food, non-alcoholic beverages and array of other national-brand consumer items sold through retail outlets.

  13. Constant-dose microwave irradiation of insect pupae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Richard G.

    Pupae of the yellow mealworm Tenebrio molitor L. were subjected to microwave irradiation for 1.5-24 hours at power density levels adjusted to produce a total dosage of approximately 1123 J/g in each insect for every experiment. Insects without visible blemishes were exposed in a standing wave irradiation system such that half of them were exposed in the plane of maximum electric field (E field) and the other half were exposed in the plane of maximum magnetic field (H field). Both E field and H field insects exhibited nearly the same specific absorption rate (SAR) for pupal orientation parallel to the magnetic field vector at 5.95 GHz. Irradiations were conducted both with and without the use of a ventilating fan to control the temperature rise in the irradiation chamber. Abnormal development as a result of the microwave exposure was seen only in the high-power, short-duration experiment without chamber ventilation. This result suggests a thermal interaction mechanism for explanation of observed microwave-induced abnormalities. A study of the time course of the average temperature rise in the irradiated insects indicates that teratological effects for this configuration have a temperature threshold of approximately 40°C.

  14. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  15. Preparation of metallic nanoparticles by irradiation in starch aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Nemţanu, Monica R. Braşoveanu, Mirela Iacob, Nicuşor

    2014-11-24

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized in a single step by electron beam irradiation reduction of silver ions in aqueous solution containing starch. The nanoparticles were characterized by spectrophotocolorimetry and compared with those obtained by chemical (thermal) reduction method. The results showed that the smaller sizes of AgNPs were prepared with higher yields as the irradiation dose increased. The broadening of particle size distribution occurred by increasing of irradiation dose and dose rate. Chromatic parameters such as b* (yellow-blue coordinate), C* (chroma) and ΔE{sub ab} (total color difference) could characterize the nanoparticles with respect of their concentration. Hue angle h{sup o} was correlated to the particle size distribution. Experimental data of the irradiated samples were also subjected to factor analysis using principal component extraction and varimax rotation in order to reveal the relation between dependent variables and independent variables and to reduce their number. The radiation-based method provided silver nanoparticles with higher concentration and narrower size distribution than those produced by chemical reduction method. Therefore, the electron beam irradiation is effective for preparation of silver nanoparticles using starch aqueous solution as dispersion medium.

  16. Preparation of metallic nanoparticles by irradiation in starch aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NemÅ£anu, Monica R.; Braşoveanu, Mirela; Iacob, Nicuşor

    2014-11-01

    Colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized in a single step by electron beam irradiation reduction of silver ions in aqueous solution containing starch. The nanoparticles were characterized by spectrophotocolorimetry and compared with those obtained by chemical (thermal) reduction method. The results showed that the smaller sizes of AgNPs were prepared with higher yields as the irradiation dose increased. The broadening of particle size distribution occurred by increasing of irradiation dose and dose rate. Chromatic parameters such as b* (yellow-blue coordinate), C* (chroma) and ΔEab (total color difference) could characterize the nanoparticles with respect of their concentration. Hue angle ho was correlated to the particle size distribution. Experimental data of the irradiated samples were also subjected to factor analysis using principal component extraction and varimax rotation in order to reveal the relation between dependent variables and independent variables and to reduce their number. The radiation-based method provided silver nanoparticles with higher concentration and narrower size distribution than those produced by chemical reduction method. Therefore, the electron beam irradiation is effective for preparation of silver nanoparticles using starch aqueous solution as dispersion medium.

  17. Disk irradiation and light curves of x ray novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Wheeler, J. C.; Mineshige, S.

    1994-01-01

    We study the disk instability and the effect of irradiation on outbursts in the black hole X-ray nova system. In both the optical and soft X-rays, the light curves of several X-ray novae, A0620-00, GH 2000+25, Nova Muscae 1991 (GS 1124-68), and GRO J0422+32, show a main peak, a phase of exponential decline, a secondary maximum or reflare, and a final bump in the late decay followed by a rapid decline. Basic disk thermal limit cycle instabilities can account for the rapid rise and overall decline, but not the reflare and final bump. The rise time of the reflare, about 10 days, is too short to represent a viscous time, so this event is unlikely to be due to increased mass flow from the companion star. We explore the possibility that irradiation by X-rays produced in the inner disk can produce these secondary effects by enhancing the mass flow rate within the disk. Two plausible mechanisms of irradiation of the disk are considered: direct irradiation from the inner hot disk and reflected radiation from a corona or other structure above the disk. Both of these processes will be time dependent in the context of the disk instability model and result in more complex time-dependent behavior of the disk structure. We test both disk instability and mass transfer burst models for the secondary flares in the presence of irradiation.

  18. [Dosimetry of total skin electron irradiation

    PubMed

    Kontra, Gábor; Horváth, Akos; Bajcsay, András; Németh, György

    2000-07-01

    Elaboration of such a simple technique for total skin electron irradiation which ensures good dose homogeneity and minimal x-ray background dose. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We started large electron field irradiations with the Neptun 10p linear accelerator in the National Institute of Oncology -Budapest in 1986. After the installation of the Siemens Mevatron KD linear accelerator it was possible to introduce the modified Stanford technique. This technique satisfies better the requirements given in the objective. The required field size of 200x75 cm is produced as a result of two fields with 30 degrees angular separation (dual field) at a source skin distance of 465 cm. The patient's body is exposed to six dual electron fields. The electron energy is 6 MeV. Despite the long source skin distance the treatment time is relatively short due to the high dose rate (940 mu/min) capability of our Mevatron KD. The in air dose profiles were measured in miniphantom with semiconductor detector. Depth dose curves were measured in water and in polystyrene phantom with semiconductor detector and with films. RESULTS: The measured dose homogeneity of the 6 MeV energy dual field with 30 degrees angular separation is within +/- 5%in a 200x75cm plane field. The depth of dose maximum of the resulting dose distribution of six dual field irradiation is between 2 mm and 5 mm, while the depth of 80% isodose curve is about 8 mm. The total body x-ray background dose is less than 1% of the skin dose. CONCLUSION: The modified Stanford technique adapted to our Mevatron KD linear accelerator is suitable for total skin electron beam therapy. PMID:12050758

  19. Microstructural evolution in nickel alloy C-276 after Ar-ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuoxue; He, Xinfu; Li, Tiecheng; Ma, Shuli; Tang, Rui; Guo, Liping

    2012-10-15

    In present work, the irradiation damage in nickel-base alloy C-276 irradiated with Ar-ions was studied. Specimens of C-276 alloy were subjected to an irradiation of Ar-ions (with 120 keV) to dose levels of 6 and 10 dpa at 300 and 550 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The size distributions and densities of dislocation loops caused by irradiation were investigated with transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation hardening due to the formation of the loops was calculated using the dispersed barrier-hardening model, showing that irradiation hardening was greatest at 300 Degree-Sign C/6 dpa. The microstructure evolution induced by Ar-ion irradiation (0-10 dpa) in nickel-base alloy C-276 has been studied using a multi-scale modeling code Radieff constructed based on rate theory, and the size of dislocation loops simulated by Radieff was in good agreement with the experiment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High density of dislocation loops appeared after Ar ions irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation hardening due to the formation of loops was calculated by the DBH model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Size of loops simulated by Radieff was in good agreement with the experiment.

  20. Electrical Characterization of High Energy Electron Irradiated Ni/4 H-SiC Schottky Barrier Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradzah, A. T.; Omotoso, E.; Legodi, M. J.; Auret, F. D.; Meyer, W. E.; Diale, M.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of high energy electron irradiation on Ni/4 H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes was evaluated by current-voltage ( I- V) and capacitance-voltage ( C- V) measurements at room temperature. Electron irradiation was achieved by using a radioactive strontium source with peak emission energy of 2.3 MeV. Irradiation was performed in fluence steps of 4.9 × 1013 cm-2 until a total fluence of 5.4 × 1014 cm-2 was reached. The Schottky barrier height determined from I- V measurements was not significantly changed by irradiation while that obtained from C- V measurements increased with irradiation. The ideality factor was obtained before irradiation as 1.05 and this value did not significantly change as a result of irradiation. The series resistance increased from 47 Ω before irradiation to 74 Ω after a total electron fluence of 5.4 × 1014 cm-2. The net donor concentration decreased with increasing irradiation fluence from 4.6 × 1014 cm-3 to 3.0 × 1014 cm-3 from which the carrier removal rate was calculated to be 0.37 cm-1.

  1. Effect of γ-irradiation on structure and physico-chemical properties of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius starch.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chagam Koteswara; Suriya, M; Vidya, P V; Vijina, K; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy

    2015-08-01

    Gamma irradiation is one of the effective techniques able to alter structure and its properties of starch. In this research, the effect of modification in terms of molecular structure and physico-chemical properties of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius starch by γ-irradiation using (60)Co as γ-source at doses of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 kGy with dose rate 2 kGy/h was studied. Morphology of native and irradiated starches under scanning electron microscope revealed that granules are round, elliptical and polygonal in shape with smooth surfaces; no cracking or roughness was noted on irradiated starches. Amylose content, pH, swelling power of the starches and syneresis of the gelatinized starch were significantly decreased by irradiation; while carboxyl content, solubility, light transmittance and water absorption capacity of the starch granules were raised with increased dose of irradiation. Reduced pasting parameters and changes in FTIR spectrum significantly differed from each other. XRD pattern of irradiated starches showed C-type pattern with intermediate peaks of 2θ at 16.92° and 18.12°, strong peaks of 2θ at 23.05° and weak peaks of 2θ at 14.7°, displaying slight decreased in the intensity of peaks in irradiated starches. Irradiation of starches increased gelatinization temperatures and enthalpy value was measured using DSC.

  2. Positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy study on Fe-ion irradiated NHS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huiping; Wang, Zhiguang; Gao, Xing; Cui, Minghuan; Li, Bingsheng; Sun, Jianrong; Yao, Cunfeng; Wei, Kongfang; Shen, Tielong; Pang, Lilong; Zhu, Yabin; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Ji; Song, Peng; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong

    2015-02-01

    In order to study the evolution of irradiation-induced vacancy-type defects at different irradiation fluences and temperatures, a new type of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel named NHS (Novel High Silicon) was irradiated by 3.25 MeV Fe-ion at room temperature and 723 K to fluences of 4.3 × 1015 and 1.7 × 1016 ions/cm2. After irradiation, vacancy-type defects were investigated with variable-energy positron beam Doppler broadening spectra. Energetic Fe-ions produced a large number of vacancy-type defects in the NHS steel, but one single main type of vacancy-type defect was observed in both unirradiated and irradiated samples. The concentration of vacancy-type defects decreased with increasing temperature. With the increase of irradiation fluence, the concentration of vacancy-type defects increased in the sample irradiated at RT, whereas for the sample irradiated at 723 K, it decreased. The enhanced recombination between vacancies and excess interstitial Fe atoms from deeper layers, and high diffusion rate of self-interstitial atoms further improved by diffusion via grain boundary and dislocations at high temperature, are thought to be the main reasons for the reversed trend of vacancy-type defects between the samples irradiated at RT and 723 K.

  3. Low-dose irradiation can be used as a phytosanitary treatment for fresh table grapes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gina C; Rakovski, Cyril; Caporaso, Fred; Prakash, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Grapes (Vitis vinifera var. Sugraone and Vitis labrusca var. Crimson Seedless) were treated with 400, 600, and 800 Gy and the effects on physicochemical factors were measured alongside sensory testing during 3 wk of storage. Significant changes in texture and color with irradiation and age were measured but little visual difference was seen between control and irradiated grapes. However, age had a greater effect on firmness than irradiation for Sugraone grapes. Irradiation did not significantly (P ≤ 0.05) affect the SSC/TA ratio, which increased during storage. The trained panel detected significant changes in the berry texture and rachis color but rated sweetness and flavor significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) for irradiated Sugraone as compared to the control. Consumers liked both the untreated and 800 Gy treated Sugraone grapes, but liked the untreated grapes more for texture (P ≤ 0.05). However, there was no difference in liking between irradiated (600 Gy or 800 Gy) and control samples of Crimson Seedless for any attribute. The results show that there are varietal differences in response to irradiation but the overall maintenance in quality of irradiated grapes during 3 wk of storage indicates that irradiation can serve as a viable phytosanitary treatment. PMID:24460773

  4. Controlling Effects of Irradiance and Heterotrophy on Carbon Translocation in the Temperate Coral Cladocora caespitosa

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Pascale; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Maguer, Jean François; Rottier, Cécile; Legendre, Louis; Grover, Renaud

    2012-01-01

    Temperate symbiotic corals, such as the Mediterranean species Cladocora caespitosa, live in seasonally changing environments, where irradiance can be ten times higher in summer than winter. These corals shift from autotrophy in summer to heterotrophy in winter in response to light limitation of the symbiont’s photosynthesis. In this study, we determined the autotrophic carbon budget under different conditions of irradiance (20 and 120 µmol photons m−2 s−1) and feeding (fed three times a week with Artemia salina nauplii, and unfed). Corals were incubated in H13CO3−-enriched seawater, and the fate of 13C was followed in the symbionts and the host tissue. The total amount of carbon fixed by photosynthesis and translocated was significantly higher at high than low irradiance (ca. 13 versus 2.5–4.5 µg cm−2 h−1), because the rates of photosynthesis and carbon fixation were also higher. However, the percent of carbon translocation was similar under the two irradiances, and reached more than 70% of the total fixed carbon. Host feeding induced a decrease in the percentage of carbon translocated under low irradiance (from 70 to 53%), and also a decrease in the rates of carbon translocation per symbiont cell under both irradiances. The fate of autotrophic and heterotrophic carbon differed according to irradiance. At low irradiance, autotrophic carbon was mostly respired by the host and the symbionts, and heterotrophic feeding led to an increase in host biomass. Under high irradiance, autotrophic carbon was both respired and released as particulate and dissolved organic carbon, and heterotrophic feeding led to an increase in host biomass and symbiont concentration. Overall, the maintenance of high symbiont concentration and high percentage of carbon translocation under low irradiance allow this coral species to optimize its autotrophic carbon acquisition, when irradiance conditions are not favourable to photosynthesis. PMID:22970284

  5. Neutron irradiation of beryllium pebbles

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Ermi, R.M.; Tsai, H.

    1998-03-01

    Seven subcapsules from the FFTF/MOTA 2B irradiation experiment containing 97 or 100% dense sintered beryllium cylindrical specimens in depleted lithium have been opened and the specimens retrieved for postirradiation examination. Irradiation conditions included 370 C to 1.6 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, 425 C to 4.8 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, and 550 C to 5.0 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}. TEM specimens contained in these capsules were also retrieved, but many were broken. Density measurements of the cylindrical specimens showed as much as 1.59% swelling following irradiation at 500 C in 100% dense beryllium. Beryllium at 97% density generally gave slightly lower swelling values.

  6. Jumplike deformation of γ-irradiated polymethyl methacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschanskaya, N. N.; Smolyanskiĭ, A. S.; Shvedov, A. S.

    2009-06-01

    Nonuniformity of the microdeformation rate and the parameters of microdeformation jumps were studied in the creep regime for a polymethyl methacrylate irradiated by various dozes of the Co-60 γ radiation. The creep rate during compression of the polymethyl methacrylate was measured by an interferogram on 300-nm deformation increments. It is shown that the periods L of rate oscillations (jumps of deformation) on three scale levels are dependent on the irradiation doze and are also changed after prolonged exposure of samples in air. In the doze range 0 to 330 kGy, both a decrease and an increase in L are observed, which corresponds to the unstable kinetics of radiation chemical processes. The deformation jumps permit estimates of the radiation effect on various structural levels. It is concluded that the effect of radiation on coarser microstructural formations is the largest.

  7. Growth of ZnO nanostructures by femtosecond laser irradiation of polycrystalline targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalante, G.; Ryu, Y. K.; de la Cruz, A. Ruíz; Puerto, D.; Solís, J.; Fernández, P.

    2015-11-01

    The formation of LIPSS upon irradiation with ultrashort laser pulses on the surface of polycrystalline ZnO samples and the potential use of irradiated areas as growth patterns for the production of highly ordered nanostructures upon redeposition have been studied. For this purpose, we have performed different sets of irradiation experiments including static irradiation experiments at low and high repetition rates, as well as scanned beam experiments at high repetition rate, this later in order to generate relatively large template regions for nanostructure growth by redeposition. In all cases, LIPSS formation has been achieved in the ZnO polycrystalline surface. Under appropriate irradiation conditions, the material is redeposited rendering a high density of nanostructures with high aspect ratios and good crystal quality. Given the special luminescent properties and applications of ZnO, particular attention has been paid to the luminescence properties after irradiation and after post-irradiation thermal treatments. The observed evolution has been correlated with evolution of point defects in the treated surfaces. Thermal treatments cause significant changes in both the topography and the cathodoluminescent emission, such as the development of laminar structures, the emergence of nucleation centers and the recovery of ultraviolet emission previously quenched as a consequence of irradiation. Interestingly, LIPSS remain after the luminescent recovery by thermal annealing, opening the possibility to control both luminescence properties and grain size while maintaining an ordered structure with a high effective surface area.

  8. Healing in the irradiated wound

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.H.; Rudolph, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Poor or nonhealing of irradiated wounds has been attributed to progressive obliterative endarteritis. Permanently damaged fibroblasts may also play an important part in poor healing. Regardless of the cause, the key to management of irradiated skin is careful attention to prevent its breakdown and conservative, but adequate, treatment when wounds are minor. When wounds become larger and are painful, complete excision of the wound or ulcer is called for and coverage should be provided by a well-vascularized nonparasitic distant flap.16 references.

  9. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  10. Effect of boron on post irradiation tensile properties of reduced activation ferritic steel (F-82H) irradiated in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Suzuki, Masahide; Hishinuma, Akimichi; Pawel, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F-82H (Fe-8Cr-2W-V-Ta), was irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses between 11 and 34 dpa at 400 and 500 C. Post irradiation tensile tests were performed at the nominal irradiation temperature in vacuum. Some specimens included {sup 10}B or natural boron (nB) to estimate the helium effect on tensile properties. Tensile properties including the 0.2% offset yield stress, the ultimate tensile strength, the uniform elongation and the total elongation were measured. The tensile properties were not dependent on helium content in specimens irradiated to 34 dpa, however {sup 10}B-doped specimens with the highest levels of helium showed slightly higher yield strength and less ductility than boron-free specimens. Strength appears to go through a peak, and ductility through a trough at about 11 dpa. The irradiation to more than 21 dpa reduced the strength and increased the elongation to the unirradiated levels. Ferritic steels are one of the candidate alloys for nuclear fusion reactors because of their good thermophysical properties, their superior swelling resistance, and the low corrosion rate in contact with potential breeder and coolant materials.

  11. Pterygia: Single-fraction postoperative beta irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, D.C. )

    1991-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation was performed with records of 128 patients with 146 eyes that underwent applications of strontium-90 after pterygium excisions performed between 1982 and 1988. With a median follow-up of 13 months, 135 eyes were evaluable. Most pterygia (127 of 135) were treated with a single postoperative application of Sr-90 that delivered 3,000 cGy of beta radiation in one fraction. The actuarial freedom from relapse was 87%; all recurrences occurred within the first 18 months, and 46% of these within the first 3 months. Of the 13 recurrences, 10 have been re-treated with surgery and a second course of beta irradiation with excellent results. All eight eyes for which follow-up was available had no evidence of disease. The ultimate control rate was 96.3% for the series. Correlation of various treatment parameters, including age, bilaterality, prior recurrence, and interval from surgery to irradiation, was performed, and no statistically significant difference was seen. No serious complications have developed. Transient conjunctivitis and photophobia were almost universally seen, with five cases lasting beyond 5 months. The authors conclude that a single application of Sr-90 after surgery is effective and safe in managing pterygia.

  12. Dissolution of ordered precipitates under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Camus, E.; Bourdeau, F.; Abromeit, C.; Wanderka, N.; Wollenberger, H.

    1995-09-01

    The stability of the ordered {gamma}{prime} precipitates under 300-keV Ni{sup +} irradiation was investigated between room temperature and 623 K. The two competing mechanisms of destabilization by cascade producing irradiation, i.e. disordering and dissolution of the {gamma}{prime} precipitates in Nimonic PE16 alloy, has been studied separately by electron microscopy and field-ion microscopy with atom probe. At high temperatures, the precipitates are stable. At intermediate temperatures, the precipitates dissolve by ballistic mixing into the matrix, but the interface is restored by the radiation-enhanced atomic jumps. The order in the precipitates remains stable. At low temperatures, the precipitates are dissolved by atomic mixing. The dissolution proceeds in a diffusional manner with a diffusion coefficient normalized by the displacement rate D/K = 0.75 nm{sup 2}dpa{sup {minus}1}. The precipitates become disordered by a fluence of 0.1 dpa, whereas precipitate dissolution needs much higher fluences.

  13. Radioprotection of mice by lactoferrin against irradiation with sublethal X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kim, Hee-Sun; Kakuta, Izuru

    2014-01-01

    The influence of a host defense protein, lactoferrin (LF), contained in exocrine secretions such as milk, on radiation disorder was investigated. A total of 25 C3H/He mice in each of two groups were maintained with 0.1% LF-added and LF-free diets, respectively, for one month. The mice were then treated with single whole-body X-ray irradiation at a sublethal dose (6.8 Gy), and the survival rate after irradiation was investigated. The survival rate at 30 d after irradiation was relatively higher in the LF group than in the control group (LF-free), (85 and 62%, respectively). The body weight 15 d after X-ray irradiation was also significantly greater in the LF group than in the control group. The hemoglobin level and hematocrit value were higher in the LF group at 5 d before X-ray irradiation. Another 52 mice underwent whole-body X-ray irradiation at the sublethal dose (6.8 Gy), and then LF was intraperitoneally injected once at 4 mg/animal to half of them. The survival rate in LF-treated mice 30 d after irradiation was 92%, significantly higher than in mice treated with saline (50%) (P = 0.0012). In addition, LF showed hydroxyl radical scavenger activity in vitro. These findings suggest that LF may inhibit radiation damage. PMID:24508645

  14. Radioprotection of mice by lactoferrin against irradiation with sublethal X-rays.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Kim, Hee-Sun; Kakuta, Izuru

    2014-03-01

    The influence of a host defense protein, lactoferrin (LF), contained in exocrine secretions such as milk, on radiation disorder was investigated. A total of 25 C3H/He mice in each of two groups were maintained with 0.1% LF-added and LF-free diets, respectively, for one month. The mice were then treated with single whole-body X-ray irradiation at a sublethal dose (6.8 Gy), and the survival rate after irradiation was investigated. The survival rate at 30 d after irradiation was relatively higher in the LF group than in the control group (LF-free), (85 and 62%, respectively). The body weight 15 d after X-ray irradiation was also significantly greater in the LF group than in the control group. The hemoglobin level and hematocrit value were higher in the LF group at 5 d before X-ray irradiation. Another 52 mice underwent whole-body X-ray irradiation at the sublethal dose (6.8 Gy), and then LF was intraperitoneally injected once at 4 mg/animal to half of them. The survival rate in LF-treated mice 30 d after irradiation was 92%, significantly higher than in mice treated with saline (50%) (P = 0.0012). In addition, LF showed hydroxyl radical scavenger activity in vitro. These findings suggest that LF may inhibit radiation damage.

  15. Electrostatic discharging behaviour of Kapton irradiated with electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdin, D.

    1981-01-01

    The electrostatic charging and discharging of Kapton when irradiated with monoenergetic electrons of 5 to 30 keV energy were studied. The leakage currents and rates of discharging always increased with the incident electron energy and flux, whereas the surface voltage showed a more complex behavior depending on the thickness of the material: for the thinner films it exhibited a maximum and then fell at higher energies. The surface voltage, the rate of discharging, and the peak current and total charge flow during a discharge were enhanced as the temperature was decreased from 70 C to -180 C, and were accompanied by a decreasing leakage current. Visible light or the presence of an aluminum coating on the irradiated surface caused reductions in the surface voltage and changes in the discharging characteristics. The results are discussed in terms of the leakage currents and the secondary emission of electrons. Photomicrographs taken after irradiation, and photographs of samples during irradiation, show good correlations between the positions of light flashes and of pinholes produced by the discharge arcs.

  16. Morphological changes in neutron irradiated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C; Wyle, H R

    1985-01-01

    Living human red blood cells (erythrocytes) were irradiated with a beam of thermal neutrons having a thermal neutron flux of 9.4 X 10(9) neutrons/cm2 per sec corresponding to a dose rate of 5 Gray per hour. The neutron beam was obtained from the thermal neutron facility at the MIT Nuclear Reactor and contained some gamma-ray contamination which contributes approximately 8% of the dose effect. Approximately 92% of the dose effect is due to the neutron radiation. Populations of neutron irradiated red blood cells were examined under scanning electron microscopy to observe morphological changes due to the radiation dose. The thermal neutron doses ranged from zero for controls to 75 Gray, and cell populations were examined at various post-irradiation time periods of 10, 48, and 96 h. A four-stage discoid to spheroid shape transformation of the damaged red blood cells was characterized, and the time dependence of each transformation stage was determined for both unirradiated and irradiated cells. The radiation dose caused an initial dose-dependent shift from Stage 1 to Stage 2 with an associated increase in the transformation rate constants. The thermal neutron doses delivered are considered to be in the low dose range for radiation effects on red blood cells, yet the pronounced effects indicate a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for thermal neutrons.

  17. Effect of different laser irradiation on the dysentery bacilli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Lin; Chen, Rong; Chen, Yanjiao; Li, Depin; Wen, Caixia

    1998-08-01

    The S. flexnesi, which have high drug-resistance especially in Cm, Sm, Tc, SD, were irradiated by Ar+ laser at 488 nm and semiconductor laser at 808 nm. The experiment results have shown that both Ar+ laser and semiconductor laser with power density of 1.7 w/cm2 and irradiation dose of 2000 J/cm2 can conduce to the bacterial lethality and increase the mutation rates of the bacterial drug-sensitivity, and 'Colony Count' method have the superiority over the 'Inhibacteria Ring' method. At the mean time it further indicate that the high power semiconductor laser would play an important role in the sciences of laser biological medicine. But the effect of the near infrared semiconductor laser is far lower than that of Ar+ laser of shorter wavelength at the same irradiation dose. It is clear that the output and irradiation dose of near infrared semiconductor laser shall be increased in order to get the same rates of the bacterial lethality and the drug-sensitivity mutation as Ar+ laser's.

  18. Increased inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protraction of UV irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, R; Haider, T; Cabaj, A; Heidenreich, E; Kundi, M

    1996-01-01

    The principle of equi-effectivity of the product of intensity and exposure time (principle of Bunsen-Roscoe) of UV irradiation has been assumed to be valid for the inactivation of microorganisms in general. Earlier studies claimed higher survival of Escherichia coli B/r with fractionated irradiation compared with single-exposure survival. However, data on the inactivation effect of protraction of UV irradiation are not available. By means of a specially designed UV irradiation apparatus which secured absolute UV dose measurements throughout the experiments, the effects of variation of UV irradiation intensities (253.7 nm) and exposure times were tested on the inactivation of a bacterial virus (Staphylococcus aureus phage A994), a vegetative bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922), and bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) as well as three haploid laboratory strains (RC43a, YNN281, and YNN282) and two diploid strains (commercial bakery yeast strain and laboratory strain YNN281 x YNN282) or yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and spores of the latter diploid yeast strain. Each test organism was exposed to three UV intensities (0.02, 0.2, and 2 W/m2), with corresponding exposure times resulting in three dose levels for each intensity. Differences in inactivation rates were tested by analyses of variance and Newman-Keuls tests. Virus and bacteria showed no differences in inactivation rates by variation of intensities and exposure times within selected UV doses; hence, the principle of Bunsen-Roscoe could not be rejected for these strains. However, in the eukaryotic test strains of S. cerevisiae longer exposure times with lower intensities led to enhanced inactivation in both haploid and diploid strains, with a more pronounced effect in the diploid yeast strains, whereas in yeast spores in this dose rate effect could not be observed. PMID:8787396

  19. NANOSTRUCTURE PATTERNING UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE BEAM IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lumin; Lu, Wei

    2013-01-31

    Energetic ion bombardment can lead to the development of complex and diverse nanostructures on or beneath the material surface through induced self-organization processes. These self-organized structures have received particular interest recently as promising candidates as simple, inexpensive, and large area patterns, whose optical, electronic and magnetic properties are different from those in the bulk materials [1-5]. Compared to the low mass efficiency production rate of lithographic methods, these self-organized approaches display new routes for the fabrication of nanostructures over large areas in a short processing time at the nanoscale, beyond the limits of lithography [1,4]. Although it is believed that surface nanostructure formation is based on the morphological instability of the sputtered surface, driven by a kinetic balance between roughening and smoothing actions [6,7], the fundamental mechanisms and experimental conditions for the formation of these nanostructures has still not been well established, the formation of the 3-D naopatterns beneath the irradiated surface especially needs more exploration. During the last funding period, we have focused our efforts on irradiation-induced nanostructures in a broad range of materials. These structures have been studied primarily through in situ electron microscopy during electron or ion irradiation. In particular, we have performed studies on 3-D void/bubble lattices (in metals and CaF2), embedded sponge-like porous structure with uniform nanofibers in irradiated semiconductors (Ge, GaSb, and InSb), 2-D highly ordered pattern of nanodroplets (on the surface of GaAs), hexagonally ordered nanoholes (on the surface of Ge), and 1-D highly ordered ripple and periodic arrays (of Cu nanoparticles) [3,8-11]. The amazing common feature in those nanopatterns is the uniformity of the size of nanoelements (nanoripples, nanodots, nanovoids or nanofibers) and the distance separating them. Our research focuses on the

  20. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  1. Irradiation enhancement of biomass conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. S.; Kiesling, H. E.; Galyean, M. L.; Bader, J. R.

    The vast supply of cellulosic agricultural residues and industrial by-products that is produced each year is a prospective resource of biomass suitable for conversion to useful products such as feedstock for the chemicals industry and feedstuffs for the livestock industry. Conversions of such biomass is poor at present, and utilization is inefficient, because of physio-chemical barriers to biological degradation and (or) anti-quality components such as toxicants that restrict biological usages. Improvements in biodegradability of ligno-cellulosic materials have been accomplished by gamma-ray and electron-beam irradiation at intermediate dosage (˜ 50 Mrad; .5 MGy); but applications of the technology have been hampered by questionable interpretations of results. Recent research with organic wastes such as sewage sludge and straw suggests opportunity for important applications of irradiation technology in enhancement of biomass conversion. Data from experiments using irradiated straw as feed for ruminants are presented and discussed in relation to research on prospective usage of sewage products as feed for ruminants. Findings are discussed in regard to prospective applications in industrial fermentation processes. Possible usage of irradiation technology for destruction of toxicants in exotic plants is considered in regard to prospective new feedstuffs.

  2. Irradiance Variability of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froehlich, Claus

    1990-01-01

    Direct measurements of the solar constant--the total irradiance at mean Sun-Earth distance--during the last ten years from satellites show variations over time scales from minutes to years and decades. At high frequencies the spectral power is determined by granulation, super- and mesogranulation. In the 5-minute range, moreover, it is dominated by power from the solar p-mode oscillations. Their power and frequencies change with time, yielding information about changes in the convection zone. During periods of several hours, the power is steadily increasing and may be partly due to solar gravity modes. The most important variance is in the range from days to several months and is related to the photospheric features of solar activity, decrease of the irradiance during the appearance of sunspots, and increasing by faculae and the magnetic network. Long-term modulation by the 11-year activity cycle are observed conclusively with the irradiance being higher during solar maximum. All these variations can be explained--at least qualitatively--by their manifestation on the photosphere. For the long-term changes, the simultaneous changes of the frequencies of solar p-mode oscillations suggest a more global origin of the variations. Indeed, it seems that the observed irradiance modulation is a true luminosity change with the magnetic cycle of the Sun.

  3. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  4. Food Irradiation Research and Technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food Irradiation is a safe and effective U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved process that can be used to disinfest or delay the maturation of fruits and vegetables, improve the microbiological safety of shellfish, eggs, raw meat and poultry, spices, and seeds used for sprouting. FDA ap...

  5. Studying Solar Irradiance Variability with Wavelet Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigouroux, Anne; Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    The detection of variations in solar irradiance by satellite-based experiments during the last 17 years stimulated modelling efforts to help to identify their causes and to provide estimates for irradiance data when no satellite observations exist.

  6. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  7. Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

    2014-04-01

    Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

  8. Influence of gamma-irradiation and microwaves on the antioxidant property of some essential oils.

    PubMed

    Farag, R S; el-Khawas, K H

    1998-03-01

    The antioxidant property of anise, caraway, cumin and fennel essential oils extracted from untreated, gamma-irradiated and microwaved fruits against sunflower oil oxidative rancidity was evaluated. The fruits were exposed to gamma-irradiation at 10 KGy and to microwaves at low oven power setting for 1 min. The essential oils were added individually (200 ppm) to sunflower oil and the rate of oil oxidation was followed by determining the peroxide value during storage at room temperature. The irradiated and microwaved essential oils exhibited an antioxidant activity and was superior to that of sunflower oil catalysed by a mixture of BHT + BHA (200 ppm) in most cases. The present data show that gamma-irradiation and microwave treatments did not affect the antioxidant property of the essential oils under study. In addition the essential oils extracted from the gamma-irradiated fruits were more effective as an antioxidant in sunflower oil than those produced from microwaved fruits.

  9. Modeling microstructure evolution of binary systems subjected to irradiation and mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, Dmitrii O.; Shchokotova, Olga M.; Lysenko, Irina O.; Kharchenko, Vasyl O.

    2015-07-01

    We study a change in mechanical properties of binary systems subjected to irradiation influence described by ballistic flux of atomic mixing having regular and stochastic contributions. By using numerical modeling based on the phase field approach we study dynamics of deformation fields in a previously irradiated system and in the binary system deformed during irradiation. An influence of both deterministic and stochastic components of ballistic flux onto both yield strength and ultimate strength is studied. We have found that degradation of mechanical properties relates to the formation of percolating clusters of shear bands. Considering a hardening coefficient we analyze stages of plastic deformation of both initially irradiated alloy and alloy subjected to sustained irradiation. Stability of binary alloy under mechanical loading in the form of shear strain with a constant rate and cyclic deformation is discussed.

  10. Comparison between irradiated and thermally pasteurized liquid egg white on functional, physical, and microbiological properties.

    PubMed

    Wong, Y C; Herald, T J; Hachmeister, K A

    1996-06-01

    A comparative study was undertaken to determine the effect of irradiation and thermal pasteurization on the functional, physical, and microbiological properties of liquid egg white (LEW). The LEW was irradiated or thermally pasteurized then stored at 4 C for 3 mo. Both treatments destroyed the inoculum, Salmonella typhimurium. The microbial growth rate was slower in the irradiated LEW than in the thermally pasteurized treatment. Irradiated samples had 47% lower foam drainage and more stable viscosity than samples that were thermally pasteurized. Volume of angel food cake prepared with irradiated or pasteurized LEW decreased 48 and 57%, respectively, after 90 d. Color did not differ between treatments. Ionizing radiation is an alternative processing method that inhibits microbial growth and helps maintain functionality of LEW.

  11. Irradiation and annealing effects on delamination toughness in carbon/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, D. R.; Gordic, M. V.; Djordjevic, I. M.; Petrovic, Z. S.; Stevanovic, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma irradiation to various doses (4.8-27.2 MGy) was performed on unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite plates. Unidirectional composite coupons irradiated to various doses were annealed at 180 and 250 °C, in vacuum. The strain energy release rate GIC, as a measure of delamination fracture toughness, was determined by Mode I fracture testing on double cantilever beam coupons. The glass transition temperature ( Tg) of the tested coupons matrices was determined in DMA tests. The effects of irradiation and annealing on GIC values - the mean values of 10 propagation points ( GIC,mean) and that of fracture initiation ( GIC,init) - were established. These values were analyzed as a function of irradiation dose and annealing temperatures, having in mind glass transition temperature values changes, as well as the possible mechanisms and phenomena of irradiation and annealing.

  12. Characterization of nuclear transmutations in materials irradiated test facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-05-01

    This study presents a comparison of nuclear transmutation rates for candidate fusion first wall/blanket structural materials in available, fission test reactors with those produced in a typical fusion spectrum. The materials analyzed in this study include a vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti), a reduced activation martensitic steel (Fe-9Cr-2WVTa), a high conductivity copper alloy (Cu-Cr-Zr), and the SiC compound. The fission irradiation facilities considered include the EBR-II fast reactor, and two high flux mixed spectrum reactors, HFIR (High Flux Irradiation Reactor) and SM-3 (Russian reactor). The transmutation and dpa rates that occur in these test reactors are compared with the calculated transmutation and dpa rates characteristic of a D-T fusion first wall spectrum. In general, past work has shown that the displacement damage produced in these fission reactors can be correlated to displacement damage in a fusion spectrum; however, the generation of helium and hydrogen through threshold reactions [(n,x,{alpha}) and (n,xp)] are much higher in a fusion spectrum. As shown in this study, the compositional changes for several candidate structural materials exposed to a fast fission reactor spectrum are very low, similar to those for a characteristic fusion spectrum. However, the relatively high thermalized spectrum of a mixed spectrum reactor produces transmutation rates quite different from the ones predicted for a fusion reactor, resulting in substantial differences in the final composition of several candidate alloys after relatively short irradiation time.

  13. A Study on Gamma Irradiation Synthesis of Copper Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Shahrul Izwan Bin; Ahmad, Md. Soot Bin Hj.; Radiman, Shahidan Bin

    2009-06-01

    A study on the effect of gamma radiation dose and dose rate on the yield of copper nanoparticles produced had been done. Its objective is to show the relationship between the absorbed doses with the yield of production. The copper sulphate solution is prepared with addition of ethanol as radical scavenger. Then the solution is bubbled with nitrogen for before being irradiated at different absorbed dose and dose rate. There are five different dose rates being used in this experiment. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to detect directly the quantity of copper nanoparticles produced. The AAS results show positive linear relationship between the yields of copper nanoparticles with increasing absorbed dose. Yield of production show independency with dose rate at every absorbed dose. AAS result is supported with UV-Vis analysis data on the supernatant from irradiated products. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) confirms the existence of copper nanoparticles in all samples that being irradiated at absorbed dose of 100 kGy. The size of nanoparticles is range from 2 to 10 nm. Peak from the XRD analysis show the existence of pure copper.

  14. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  15. AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise P. Collin

    2012-06-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one

  16. The asteroids - Accretion, differentiation, fragmentation, and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkening, L. L.

    1979-01-01

    Various types of meteorites have experienced processes of condensation, accretion, metamorphism, differentiation, brecciation, irradiation and fragmentation. A typical view of meteorite formation has been that the processes following accretion take place in a few asteroidal-sized (approximately 100 km) objects. Discovery of decay products of now extinct Al-26 and Pd-107 in meteorites, discovery of isotopic heterogeneity among meteorite types, re-analysis of meteorite cooling rates, and continuing study of meteoritic compositions have led some meteoriticists to conclude that meteorites obtained their chemical, isotopic, and some textural characteristics in objects initially less than 10 km in diameter. Such a scenario, which is described in this paper, raises the possibility that some of these small planetesimals may have been 'condensation nuclei' for the formation of comets as well as the precursors of asteroids.

  17. Irradiation and surgery for selected cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.T.

    1982-08-01

    Combinations of radiation therapy with surgery originated when the surgeon thought he had transected cancer. Unrealistic expectations, however, plagued these combinations until it was appreciated that the dose required to eradicate a given cancerous mass varied primarily with its volume and the associated oxygen tension of its cells. This helped to establish the rationale for combining irradiation and surgery and enabled the radiation therapist to more closely tailor dose needs to each specific clinical problem. Tailoring of dose remains crude. Our greatest errors continue to be attributable to poor definition of tumor extent and the underestimation of residual tumor volume. We need more precise information from the surgeon and pathologist along with greater knowledge of patterns of spread. To the degree that such added information becomes available, we have the means to increase loco-regional control rates.

  18. Deformation mechanisms of irradiated metallic nanofoams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A.; Martinez, E.; Caro, M.; Fu, E. G.; Caro, A.

    2013-07-01

    It was recently proposed that within a particular window in the parameter space of temperature, ion energy, dose rate, and filament diameter, nanoscale metallic foams could show radiation tolerance [Bringa et al., Nano Lett. 12, 3351 (2012)]. Outside this window, damage appears in the form of vacancy-related stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT), with no effects due to interstitials [Fu et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 191607 (2012)]. These SFT could be natural sources of dislocations within the ligaments composing the foam and determine their mechanical response. We employ molecular dynamics simulations of cylindrical ligaments containing an SFT to obtain an atomic-level picture of their deformation behavior under compression. We find that plastic deformation originates at the edges of the SFT, at lower stress than needed to create dislocations at the surface. Our results predict that nanoscale foams soften under irradiation, a prediction not yet tested experimentally.

  19. Biological effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bees

    SciTech Connect

    Es`kov, E.K.

    1995-09-01

    The influence of natural solar and artificial ultraviolet irradiation on developing bees was studied. Lethal exposures to irradiation at different stages of development were determined. The influence of irradiation on the variability of the morphometric features of bees was revealed. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1997-04-01

    To provide an updated summary of the status of irradiation experiments for the neutron-interactive materials program. The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has two irradiation experiments in reactor; and 8 experiments in the planning or design stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on 18 experiments.

  1. Physiological Interaction of Heart and Lung in Thoracic Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Veen, Sonja van der; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Boer, Rudolf A. de; Dickinson, Michael G.; Jong, Johan R. de; Faber, Hette; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Luijk, Peter van

    2012-12-01

    Introduction: The risk of early radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) limits the dose and efficacy of radiation therapy of thoracic tumors. In addition to lung dose, coirradiation of the heart is a known risk factor in the development RILT. The aim of this study was to identify the underlying physiology of the interaction between lung and heart in thoracic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Rat hearts, lungs, or both were irradiated to 20 Gy using high-precision proton beams. Cardiopulmonary performance was assessed using breathing rate measurements and F{sup 18}-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) scans biweekly and left- and right-sided cardiac hemodynamic measurements and histopathology analysis at 8 weeks postirradiation. Results: Two to 12 weeks after heart irradiation, a pronounced defect in the uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG in the left ventricle (LV) was observed. At 8 weeks postirradiation, this coincided with LV perivascular fibrosis, an increase in LV end-diastolic pressure, and pulmonary edema in the shielded lungs. Lung irradiation alone not only increased pulmonary artery pressure and perivascular edema but also induced an increased LV relaxation time. Combined irradiation of lung and heart induced pronounced increases in LV end-diastolic pressure and relaxation time, in addition to an increase in right ventricle end-diastolic pressure, indicative of biventricular diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, enhanced pulmonary edema, inflammation and fibrosis were also observed. Conclusions: Both lung and heart irradiation cause cardiac and pulmonary toxicity via different mechanisms. Thus, when combined, the loss of cardiopulmonary performance is intensified further, explaining the deleterious effects of heart and lung coirradiation. Our findings show for the first time the physiological mechanism underlying the development of a multiorgan complication, RILT. Reduction of dose to either of these organs offers new opportunities to

  2. Trabeculectomy combined with beta irradiation for congenital glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M. H.; Rice, N. S.

    1991-01-01

    Sixty-six eyes with congenital glaucoma were subjected to trabeculectomy between July 1975 and June 1989 are presented. Thirty-one were treated with beta irradiation at the time of surgery with a strontium-90 applicator; 35 were not treated with beta irradiation. The usual dose was 750 rad. Analysis was limited to three years because of the shorter follow-up of the irradiated eyes. Failure in the two groups was compared statistically. When failure was categorised as IOP greater than 21 mm Hg, beta irradiation was found to be significantly protective with an adjusted risk ratio of 0.31 (95% confidence interval 0.11-0.90, p less than 0.05). Failure categorised as the need for additional medical treatment or further surgery showed significant protection with an adjusted risk ratio of 0.33 (confidence interval 0.12-0.94, p less than 0.05). Multiple regression models were used for the analysis of intraocular pressure; beta irradiation was associated with a significantly lower IOP at six months, one year, and three years (p less than 0.05). Other factors identified as being associated with a reduced failure rate or lower IOP were: no previous topical glaucoma medications: age over seven years; lack of previous surgery involving the conjunctiva. The results indicate that beta irradiation may have a beneficial effect on the prognosis of trabeculectomy in children with congenital glaucoma. However, because of the retrospective and observational nature of the study, the results must be regarded as tentative. PMID:1954206

  3. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Gruber, Eugene E.; Shack, William J.

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  4. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to {approx}14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with {approx}25% {delta}-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  5. Re-Irradiation for Recurrent Gliomas: Treatment Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeongshim; Cho, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of re-irradiation in patients with recurrent gliomas and to identify subgroups for whom re-irradiation for recurrent gliomas is most beneficial. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 36 patients with recurrent or progressive gliomas who received re-irradiation between January 1996 and December 2011. Re-irradiation was offered to recurrent glioma patients with good performance or at least 6 months had passed after initial radiotherapy (RT), with few exceptions. Results Median doses of re-irradiation and initial RT were 45.0 Gy and 59.4 Gy, respectively. The median time interval between initial RT and re-irradiation was 30.5 months. Median overall survival (OS) and the 12-month OS rate were 11 months and 41.7%, respectively. In univariate analysis, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70 (p<0.001), re-irradiation dose ≥45 Gy (p=0.040), and longer time interval between initial RT and re-irradiation (p=0.040) were associated with improved OS. In multivariate analysis, KPS (p=0.030) and length of time interval between initial RT and re-irradiation (p=0.048) were important predictors of OS. A radiographically suspected mixture of radiation necrosis and progression after re-irradiation was seen in 5 patients. Conclusion Re-irradiation in conjunction with surgery could be a salvage treatment for selected recurrent glioma patients with good performance status and recurrence over a long time. PMID:27189273

  6. Effect of fast neutron irradiation on fatigue-crack growth behavior of three nickel-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Nickel-base alloys are often employed in reactor structural applications where high strength, resistance to corrosion, or swelling resistance are important considerations. In this study, fatigue-crack growth rate tests were conducted at 427/degree/C on Inconel 600, Inconel X-750, and Incoloy 800 irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II to total fluences ranging between 2.5 and 6.0*10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/. Following irradiation, minor increases were noted in the crack growth rates of Inconel 600, minor decreases in the growth rates of Inconel X-750, and no irradiation effect in the cracking behavior of Incoloy 800. 14 refs.

  7. [The dependence of the level of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes on the duration of their cultivation under ultraviolet irradiation].

    PubMed

    Rushkovskiĭ, S R; Bezrukov, V F; Bariliak, I R

    1998-01-01

    The effect of duration of cultivation of lymphocytes of human UV-irradiated peripheral blood on the chromosomal aberration rate was studied. Under prolonged cultivation the more irradiated blood samples revealed higher level of chromosomal aberrations. The existence of UV-induced delayed chromosomal instability is supposed that may be found under prolonged cultivation. The mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed.

  8. Investigation of solid phase upon γ-irradiation of ferrihydrite-ethanol suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkin, Tanja; Zadro, Krešo; Gotić, Marijan; Musić, Svetozar

    2011-07-01

    Ferrihydrite (FH) nanoparticles were synthesised and subjected to γ-irradiation in the form of FH-ethanol suspension. The dose rate of γ-radiation was ˜16 kGy/h and the samples were irradiated to doses of up to 2590 kGy. γ-irradiation of FH-ethanol suspensions did not cause the transformation of FH to any of the other iron oxide phases. Likewise, neither the Mössbauer and FT-IR spectroscopy nor the quantitative analysis using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy gave any evidence of structural changes of FH upon γ-irradiation. C, H analysis showed that the C concentration in FH gradually increased with dose and was higher in γ-irradiated FH samples than in non-irradiated FH sample. This finding suggested that carbon in FH originated from ethanol degradation. The H concentration in FH gradually increased to the dose of up to 340 kGy and then slightly decreased. Magnetic measurements showed a progressive decrease in magnetisation with an increase in γ-irradiation. The results of magnetic measurements and C, H analysis suggested the carbonisation of FH surface. It was supposed that γ-irradiation of FH-ethanol suspension reductively decomposed ethanol thus generating unsaturated hydrocarbons and acetylides, which in turn formed a conjugate iron complex, thus carbonating the FH surface. The carbonisation of the FH surface prevented FH transformation to other iron oxide phases.

  9. Effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the microbial quality of steamed tofu rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qian; Gao, Meixu; Li, Shurong; Wang, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of two kinds of radiation processing, gamma and electron beam (ebeam) irradiation, for the inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enteritidis and Listeria innocua which were inoculated in pre-sterilised steamed tofu rolls was studied. The corresponding effects of both irradiation types on total bacterial counts (TBCs) in commercial steamed tofu rolls available in the market were also examined. The microbiological results demonstrated that gamma irradiation yielded D10 values of 0.20, 0.24 and 0.22 kGy for S. aureus, S. enteritidis and L. innocua, respectively. The respective D10 values for ebeam irradiation were 0.31, 0.35 and 0.27 kGy. Gamma and ebeam irradiation yielded D10 values of 0.48 and 0.43 kGy for total bacterial counts in commercial steamed tofu rolls, respectively. The results suggest that ebeam irradiation has similar effect on decreasing TBCs in steamed tofu rolls, and gamma irradiation is slightly more effective than ebeam irradiation in reducing the populations of pathogenic bacteria. The observed differences in D10-values between them might be due to the significant differences in dose rate applied, and radiation processing of soybean products to improve their microbial quality could be available for other sources of protein.

  10. Cracking behavior of thermally aged and irradiated CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, W.-Y.; Natesan, K.; Li, Z.; Yang, Y.; Rao, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    To assess the combined effect of thermal aging and neutron irradiation on the cracking behavior of CF-8 cast austenitic stainless steel, crack growth rate (CGR) and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were carried out on compact-tension specimens in high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen. Both unaged and thermally aged specimens were irradiated at ∼320 °C to 0.08 dpa. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h apparently had no effect on the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking behavior in the test environment. The cracking susceptibility of CF-8 was not elevated significantly by neutron irradiation at 0.08 dpa. Transgranular cleavage-like cracking was the main fracture mode during the CGR tests, and a brittle morphology of delta ferrite was often seen on the fracture surfaces at the end of CGR tests. The fracture toughness J-R curve tests showed that both thermal aging and neutron irradiation can induce significant embrittlement. The loss of fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation was more pronounced in the unaged than aged specimens. After neutron irradiation, the fracture toughness values of the unaged and aged specimens were reduced to a similar level. G-phase precipitates were observed in the aged and irradiated specimens with or without prior aging. The similar microstructural changes resulting from thermal aging and irradiation suggest a common microstructural mechanism of inducing embrittlement in CF-8.

  11. Void swelling and precipitation in a titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, T.; Shiraishi, H.

    1985-07-01

    The correlation between void swelling and precipitation behavior in a 10% cold worked Fe-16.2Ni-14.6Cr-2.37Mo-1.79Mn-0.53Si-0.24Ti-0.06C alloy was examined with 200 keV proton irradiation. Swelling peak temperature after the proton irradiation to 10 dpa was about 823 K, and void swelling decreased steeply with increase in irradiation temperature from 823 to 923 K. Void swelling increased rapidly from 1.9 to 12.1% with increase in irradiation dose from 20 to 45 dpa at 873 K. Fine intragranular TiC precipitates, which were formed during initial stage of irradiation, dissolved gradually with increase in irradiation dose from 10 to 45 dpa at 873 K, while the amount of precipitation of needle-shaped Fe 2P phase containing titanium increased with increasing dose. The reduction of sink strength of the TiC precipitates due to the dissolution during irradiation was thought to cause the increase of swelling rate with increase in irradiation dose from 20 to 45 dpa at 873 K.

  12. Effect of gamma irradiation on biopolymer composite films of poly(vinyl alcohol) and bacterial cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jipa, Iuliana Mihaela; Stroescu, Marta; Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Dobre, Tanase; Jinga, Sorin; Zaharescu, Traian

    2012-05-01

    Composite materials containing in different ratios poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), bacterial cellulose (BC) and glycerol (G) as plasticizer were obtained and exposed to different γ radiation doses using an irradiator GAMMATOR provided with 137Cs source. These films successively received up to 50 kGy absorbed doses at a dose rate of 0.4 kGy/h at room temperature. In order to study the chemical and structural changes during γ irradiation, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy were used. Water vapour permeability (WVP), Hunter colour parameters and hardness were also measured for the irradiated samples. Investigation revealed that WVP was not significantly affected by the irradiation. Colour measurements indicated a slight decrease of pure PVA films transparency and it made clear that all samples became more reddish and yellowish after irradiation. The samples hardness was not affected by the irradiation doses used. However, the results showed no drastic structural or chemical changes of the irradiated samples, which prove, in consequence, a good durability. These composite materials could be used as packaging materials for γ irradiated products.

  13. Effect of microwave irradiation on TATB explosive.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weifei; Zhang, Tonglai; Huang, Yigang; Yang, Li; Li, Gang; Li, Haibo; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui

    2009-09-15

    Finished TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) explosive safety under 800W microwave irradiation was experimented. No burning, deflagration and detonation were observed during 30-min continuous irradiation and no remarkable change were observed after irradiation according to HPLC, particles size analysis, and differential thermal analysis. Wet TATB sampled from synthesis line was irradiated with microwave vacuum method and irradiated TATB was measured to accord with military standard specifications including appearance, moisture and volatile, chloride content, HPLC, mean particle size, DTA exothermic peak, ash, acetone soluble content, PH value, etc. Microwave vacuum desiccation was deemed laborsaving, energy-efficient, and practicable compared to conventional processing method. PMID:19324496

  14. Effect of microwave irradiation on TATB explosive.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weifei; Zhang, Tonglai; Huang, Yigang; Yang, Li; Li, Gang; Li, Haibo; Li, Jinshan; Huang, Hui

    2009-09-15

    Finished TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) explosive safety under 800W microwave irradiation was experimented. No burning, deflagration and detonation were observed during 30-min continuous irradiation and no remarkable change were observed after irradiation according to HPLC, particles size analysis, and differential thermal analysis. Wet TATB sampled from synthesis line was irradiated with microwave vacuum method and irradiated TATB was measured to accord with military standard specifications including appearance, moisture and volatile, chloride content, HPLC, mean particle size, DTA exothermic peak, ash, acetone soluble content, PH value, etc. Microwave vacuum desiccation was deemed laborsaving, energy-efficient, and practicable compared to conventional processing method.

  15. Contamination of Optical Surfaces Under Irradiation by Outgassed Volatile Products

    SciTech Connect

    Khasanshin, R. H.; Grigorevskiy, A. V.; Galygin, A. N.; Alexandrov, N. G.

    2009-01-05

    Deposition of outgassed products of a polymeric composite on model material surfaces being irradiated by electrons and protons with initial energies of E{sub e} = 40 keV and E{sub p} = 30 keV respectively was studied. It was shown that deposition of volatile products on model material surfaces being under ionizing radiations results in increase of organic film growth rate.

  16. Photocatalytic activities of various pentavalent bismuthates under visible light irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Takei, Takahiro; Haramoto, Rie; Dong, Qiang; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Yonesaki, Yoshinori; Kinomura, Nobukazu; Mano, Takayuki; Nishimoto, Shunsuke; Kameshima, Yoshikazu; Miyake, Michihiro

    2011-08-15

    LiBiO{sub 3}, NaBiO{sub 3}, MgBi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, KBiO{sub 3}, ZnBi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6}, AgBiO{sub 3}, BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and PbBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} were synthesized by various processes such as hydrothermal treatment, heating and so on. These materials were examined for their photocatalytic activities in the decolorization of methylene blue and decomposition of phenol under visible light irradiation. For methylene blue decolorization, the presence of KBiO{sub 3} resulted in complete decoloration within 5 min. For phenol decomposition, NaBiO{sub 3} showed the highest activity, while LiBiO{sub 3}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} possessed almost comparable decomposition rates. Their decomposition rates were apparently higher than that by anatase (P25) under UV irradiation. - Graphical abstract: Nine pentavalent bismuthates were synthesized and were examined for their photocatalytic activities by decomposition of phenol under visible light irradiation. NaBiO{sub 3}, LiBiO{sub 3}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} indicated faster decomposition rate than that of anatase (P25) under UV-vis light irradiation. Highlights: > KBiO{sub 3} decolorize methylene blue aqueous solution immediately within 5 min. > NaBiO{sub 3}, LiBiO{sub 3}, SrBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and BaBi{sub 2}O{sub 6} indicated high decomposition rate of phenol. > The d electron of Zn, Ag and Pb form broad conduction band. > The broad conduction band poses to diminish photocatalytic activity.

  17. The role of UV-irradiation pretreatment on the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water.

    PubMed

    Tchaikovskaya, O; Sokolova, I; Mayer, G V; Karetnikova, E; Lipatnikova, E; Kuzmina, S; Volostnov, D

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in water by the combination process of UV-irradiation, humic acids and activated sludge treatment has been studied. The photoreaction rate of all irradiated samples was lowest for the sample irradiated at 308 nm (the XeCl excilamp) in the absence and in the presence of humic acids, and highest for the sample irradiated at 222 nm (the KrCl excilamp). Photolysis of 2,4-D has been shown to enhance the subsequent microbial degradation.

  18. Growth and quality of soybean sprouts (Glycine max L. Merrill) as affected by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Juan; Li, Xihong; Fan, Xuetong; Li, Weili; Jiang, Yuqian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, soybean seeds and sprouts (Glycine max L. Merrill) were exposed to radiation doses up to 3.0 kGy. The irradiated and non-irradiated seeds were germinated, and then germination rate, sprouts length, vitamin C content, antioxidants and visual and olfactory quality were determined after irradiation. Results indicated that there was no significant difference in the germination rate and sprouts length between the control and 0.3 kGy treated soybeans, however, the reductions in sprouts length of the 1.0 kGy and 3.0 kGy treated samples were quite significant with reductions of 20.4% and 58.8%, respectively. Irradiated sprouts had similar visual and olfactory quality as the non-irradiated one. Therefore, irradiation of seeds alone would have limited value in terms of commercial use due to reduced germination and length of sprouts. However, irradiation of sprouts at doses up to 3.0 kGy was feasible to enhance microbial safety of sprouts.

  19. Hepatobiliary kinetics after whole-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Durakovic, A.

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study hepatobiliary kinetics after whole-body gamma irradiation. Two groups of nine male beagle dogs were irradiated with a single whole body dose of 4- and 8-Gy cobalt-60 photons. Each animal was injected with 2 mCi Tc-99m DISIDA and scintigraphic studies were obtained with a gamma camera with a parallel hole multipurpose collimator. The parameters studied included: peak activity of the liver and gall bladder and gall bladder and intestinal visualization from the time of Tc-99m DISIDA administration. Total and indirect bilirubin, LDH, SGOT, and SGPT determined as baseline studies before irradiation and at different time intervals after irradiation were not changed in irradiated animals. Whole body Co-60 irradiation with 4 and 8 Gy produced no significant changes in the Tc-99m DISIDA visualization of the gall bladder or in the peak activity in the gall bladder or the liver 1 and 7 days after irradiation. Intestinal visualization occurred significantly earlier in 8 Gy Co-60 irradiated animals on both day 1 and day 7 post irradiation, compared to baseline values where it was never observed before 195.0 minutes. Gall bladder emptying is significantly accelerated after 8 Gy but not after 4-Gy Co-60 gamma irradiation. These observations suggest that gamma irradiation stimulates gall bladder contractility without modifying intrahepatic biliary kinetics.

  20. Langevin model for real-time Brownian dynamics of interacting nanodefects in irradiated metals

    SciTech Connect

    Dudarev, S. L.; Arakawa, K.; Mori, H.; Yao, Z.; Jenkins, M. L.; Derlet, P. M.

    2010-06-01

    In situ real-time electron microscope observations of metals irradiated with ultrahigh-energy electrons or energetic ions show that the dynamics of microstructural evolution in these materials is strongly influenced by long-range elastic interactions between mobile nanoscale radiation defects. Treating long-range interactions is also necessary for modeling microstructures formed in ex situ high-dose-rate ion-beam irradiation experiments, and for interpolating the ion-beam irradiation data to the low-dose-rate limit characterizing the neutron irradiation environments of fission or fusion power plants. We show that simulations, performed using an algorithm where nanoscale radiation defects are treated as interacting Langevin particles, are able to match and explain the real-time dynamics of nanodefects observed in in situ electron microscope experiments.

  1. Effects of He-Ne regional irradiation on 53 cases in the field of pediatric surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing-Zhen

    1991-06-01

    We report the clinical observation of the effect on 53 surgical cases with Helium-Neon laser local irradiation therapy. Of those cases 15 were suffered from chronic and acute infection, 5 were traumatic, 15 of hemangioma had been treated by solid CO freezing therapy and sclerosing injection previously. 18 cases were received incisional irradiation postoperatively. All showed remarkable results. There were no infection, and the healing process was shortened by Helium-Neon laser local irradiation for 2-3 days. The results showed that the curative rate was 88.68%, the marked effective rate was 9.43%, and the fair was 1.89$. We emphasize that because of the characteristic of anatomical physiology and histology in children. so the result in children is better than in adults. Thus, we strongly recommend using Helium-Laser local irradiation in surgical pediatric field. It is reliable, safe, painless, convenient, economic, and no side effects at all.

  2. Study on DNA Damage Induced by Neon Beam Irradiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dong; Li, Wenjian; Wu, Xin; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Shuang; Liu, Qingfang; He, Jinyu; Jing, Xigang; Ding, Nan; Dai, Zhongying; Zhou, Jianping

    2010-12-01

    Yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae was irradiated with different doses of 85 MeV/u 20Ne10+ to investigate DNA damage induced by heavy ion beam in eukaryotic microorganism. The survival rate, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA polymorphic were tested after irradiation. The results showed that there were substantial differences in DNA between the control and irradiated samples. At the dose of 40 Gy, the yeast cell survival rate approached 50%, DNA double-strand breaks were barely detectable, and significant DNA polymorphism was observed. The alcohol dehydrogenase II gene was amplified and sequenced. It was observed that base changes in the mutant were mainly transversions of T→G and T→C. It can be concluded that heavy ion beam irradiation can lead to change in single gene and may be an effective way to induce mutation.

  3. Dental implants in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in dental implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants and being previously irradiated in the head and neck region versus nonirradiated patients against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. The study suggests that irradiation negatively affects the survival of implants, as well as the difference in implant location (maxilla vs mandible), but there is no statistically significant difference in survival when implants are inserted before or after 12 months after radiotherapy. The study failed to support the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in irradiated patients. It was observed that there was a tendency of lower survival rates of implants inserted in the patients submitted to higher irradiation doses. The results should be interpreted with caution because of the presence of uncontrolled confounding factors in the included studies.

  4. Irradiation effects on hydrases for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Ohashi, Isao; Oka, Masahito; Hayashi, Toshio

    2000-03-01

    To apply an irradiation technique to sterilize "Hybrid" biomedical materials including enzymes, we selected papain, a well-characterized plant endopeptidase as a model to examine durability of enzyme activity under the practical irradiation condition in which limited data were available for irradiation inactivation of enzymes. Dry powder and frozen aqueous solution of papain showed significant durability against 60Co-gamma irradiation suggesting that, the commercial irradiation sterilizing method is applicable without modification. Although irradiation of unfrozen aqueous papain solution showed an unusual change of the enzymatic activity with the increasing doses, and was totally inactivated at 15 kGy, we managed to keep the residual activity more than 50% of initial activity after 30-kGy irradiation, taking such optimum conditions as increasing enzyme concentration from 10 to 100 mg/ml and purging with N 2 gas to suppress the formation of free radicals.

  5. Experimental Verification of Heavy Ion Irradiation Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shengyun; Iwata, T.; Xu, Yongjun; Zheng, Yongnan; Zhou, Dongmei; Zhu, Jiazheng; Wang, Zhiqqiang; Yuan, Daqing; Du, Enpeng; Zuo, Yi

    The heavy ion irradiation simulation of neutron and/or proton irradiation has been verified experimentally by the detailed study of radiation damage in α-Al2O3 irradiated at the equivalent dose by 5.28×1015 cm-285 MeV 19F ions and by 3×1020 cm-2 En≥1MeV neutrons, respectively. The radiation damage created by irradiation was examined by a positron annihilation lifetime technique. The positron annihilation parameters of lifetime and intensity obtained for both irradiations in α-Al2O3 are all in good agreement. This demonstrates that the heavy ion irradiation can well simulate the neutron and/or proton irradiation.

  6. [Vitamin A in irradiated foodstuffs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Diehl, J F

    1979-01-29

    Vitamin A losses induced by 10 MeV electrons in cream cheese, calf liver sausage, pig liver, whole egg powder and margarine continued to increase during storage for 4--8 weeks in presence of air. Thus vitamin A loss in sausage irradiated with 5 Mrad was 22% on the day after irradiation, 61% after 4 weeks. Irradiation and storage at 0 degrees C instead of at ambient temperature reduced these losses considerably. Exclusion of air (vacuum, nitrogen) or irradiation on dry ice (approx. -80 degrees C) were even more effective in preventing destruction of vitamin A. After 4 weeks of storage, cream cheese irradiated at 5 Mrad had lost 60% when irradiated and stored in air at ambient temperature, 20% in nitrogen atmosphere, 5% in vacuum package, and 5% when irradiated on dry ice and stored at ambient temperature.

  7. Color formation in irradiated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, R. L.; Gillen, K. T.; Malone, G. M.; Wallace, J. S.

    1996-11-01

    Discoloration is a problem in the radiation processing of polymers (such as radiation sterilization), and also in emerging applications in which optical-property materials are used in radiation environments (such as scintillation detectors). We have completed a survey of 17 different types of optical polymers, in which it is found that these materials form both permanent and annealable color centers, but in very different magnitudes and ratios. Optical absorption spectra of irradiated polymers both immediately after irradiation and following different time periods of annealing are provided. Also provided are tables showing rank ordering of the relative resistance of different polymer types to induced discoloration. It is found that the extent of radiation-induced discoloration of polymers has little or no dependence on whether the macromolecule is aromatic or aliphatic, and shows no correlation with the relative extent of radiation-induced mechanical property change. Examples of the influence of stabilizer additives on the extent of discoloration are discussed.

  8. GTL-1 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; G. S. Chang; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of the Gas Test Loop (GTL-1) miniplate experiment is to confirm acceptable performance of high-density (i.e., 4.8 g-U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel plates clad in Al-6061 and irradiated under the relatively aggressive Booster Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) booster fuel conditions, namely a peak plate surface heat flux of 450 W/cm2. As secondary objectives, several design and fabrication variations were included in the test matrix that may have the potential to improve the high-heat flux, high-temperature performance of the base fuel plate design.1, 2 The following report summarizes the life of the GTL-1 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  9. Proton Irradiation Creep in Pyrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary S.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-10-01

    This project aims to understand irradiation creep in pyrocarbon using proton irradiation under controlled stresses and temperatures. Experiments will be conducted over a range of temperatures and stresses per the proposal submitted. The work scope will include the preparation of samples, measurement of deposition thickness, thickness uniformity, and anisotropy. The samples produced will be made in strips, which will be used for the creep experiments. Materials used will include pyrolytic carbon (PyC), Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG), or graphite strip samples in that order depending upon success. Temperatures tested under will range from 800°C to 1200°C, and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa. Optional testing may occur at 900°C and 1100°C and stresses from 6MPa to 20.7MPa if funding is available.

  10. Food irradiation development in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, I.

    The large scale trials were held to extend the storage life of potatoes, onions and dry fruits by gamma radiation. It was concluded that radiation preservation of potatoes and onions was much cheaper as compared to conventional methods. A dose of 1 kGy can control the insects in dry fruits and nuts. The consumers' acceptability and market testing performed during the last four years are also conducive to the commercialization of the technology in this country. The Government of Pakistan has accorded clearance for the irradiation of some food items like potatoes, onions, garlic and spices for human consumption. The Pakistan Radiation Services (PARAS), the commercial irradiator (200 Kci) at Lahore, has already started functioning in April, 1987. It is planned to start large scale sterilization of spices by gamma radiation in PARAS shortly.

  11. Spectrophotometric analysis of irradiated spices.

    PubMed

    Josimović, L; Cudina, I

    1987-01-01

    Seven different spices (thyme, cinnamon, coriander, caraway, pimento, paprika, black pepper) were treated by gamma radiation at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy, and the effect on chemical quality was determined. The effects of this dose were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis of some water-soluble constituents of spices (carbohydrates; carbonyl compounds) and on the content of water-insoluble steam-volatile oils. The colour of paprika and the content of piperine in pepper held in different packaging materials were measured in unirradiated and irradiated samples as a function of storage time. In all cases irradiation does not bring about any distinct qualitative or quantitative chemical changes based on spectrophotometric analysis of spice extracts.

  12. Silver ion beam irradiation effects on poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Surinder; Mehta, Rajeev

    2014-12-01

    Swift heavy ions induced modification of thin films of blends of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) (50:50) with organically modified nanoclay (Cloisite® 30B) has been studied, using optical, structural and surface morphological analysis. Presence of nanoclay is found to enhance the properties of this degradable copolymer by reducing the rate of degradation even at high irradiation fluence. Optical and structural analysis of the polymer nanocomposites suggests that both the cross-linking and chain scission phenomenon are caused by swift heavy ion irradiation. XRD measurements show intercalation of PLGA in the clay galleries. Surface morphology of a nanocomposite indicates significant changes after irradiation at various fluences.

  13. The effects of UV irradiation on titania deposition from titanium tetra-isopropoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egashira, Yasuyuki; Sugimachi, Masato; Nishizawa, Kouichi; Saito, Kazunobu; Osawa, Toshio; Komiyama, Hiroshi

    1994-05-01

    The influence of UV irradiation on the deposition of titania from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) under reduced pressure was studied. It was found that UV irradiation accelerates the titania growth rate by a factor of 2-3 in the temperature range of 573 to 623 K. The coverage quality of micron-size trenches in the cases with and without UV irradiation indicates the role of the photo-enhanced surface reaction. The threshold wavelength of 380 nm which is equivalent to the energy gap of anatase indicates strongly that band-to-band excitation is responsible for the photo-enhanced surface reaction.

  14. Increase in RNA and protein synthesis by mitochondria irradiated with helium-neon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, M.; Guida, G.; Perlino, E.; Marra, E.; Quagliariello, E. )

    1989-09-29

    To gain further insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, both RNA and protein synthesis were measured in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser (Energy dose: 5 Joules/cm{sup 2}). Following mitochondrial irradiation, both the rate and amount of incorporation of alpha-({sup 32}P)UTP and L-({sup 35}S)methionine, used to monitor RNA and protein synthesis respectively, proved to increase. Electrophoretic analysis made of the synthesis products clearly shows that He-Ne laser irradiation stimulates the synthesis of all mitochondrial transcription and translation products.

  15. Controlled blueshift of the resonant wavelength in porous silicon microcavities using ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mangaiyarkarasi, D.; Breese, M. B. H.; Ow, Y. S.; Vijila, C.

    2006-07-10

    High-energy focused proton beam irradiation has been used to controllably blueshift the resonant wavelength of porous silicon microcavities in heavily doped p-type wafers. Irradiation results in an increased resistivity, hence a locally reduced rate of anodization. Irradiated regions are consequently thinner and of a higher refractive index than unirradiated regions, and the microcavity blueshift arises from a net reduction in the optical thickness of each porous layer. Using this process wafers are patterned on a micrometer lateral scale with microcavities tuned to different resonant wavelengths, giving rise to high-resolution full-color reflection images over the full visible spectrum.

  16. Performance degradation of QAM based inter-satellite optical communication system under gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Zhao, Shanghong; Gong, Zizheng; Zhao, Jing; Li, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Main devices in quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) based inter-satellite optical communication system were irradiated to a total dose of 20 krad with the dose rate of 5 rad/s using a Co60 radiation source. Gamma irradiation impacts on devices were analyzed and on the basis, system performance degradation was simulated. Variety of system BER along with onboard working time for different inter-satellite links was presented. In addition, some adaption methods were proposed to reduce gamma irradiation induced degradation.

  17. The tolerance of primate spinal cord to re-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, K.K.; Jiang, G.L.; Feng, Y.; Peters, L.J.; Price, R.E.; Stephens, L.C.; Schultheiss, T.E. )

    1993-02-15

    This study was designed to assess the tolerance of the cervical spinal cord of rhesus monkeys to re-irradiation. This information is essential for treatment recommendations in previously irradiated patients. Control animals received a single course of treatment to total doses of 70.4 Gy, 77.0 Gy, or 83.6 Gy in daily fractions of 2.2 Gy. Twelve asymptomatic animals that received 70.4 Gy were re-irradiated two years later to cumulative doses of 83.6, 92.4, or 101.2 Gy. Another group of 15 animals received 44 Gy and two years later were re-irradiated to cumulative doses of 83.6, 92.4, 101.2 or 110 Gy. The clinical endpoint was myeloparesis. A complete necropsy was performed in all animals when myeloparesis manifested or at the end of the observation period. Only two of the 12 asymptomatic animals of the 70.4 dose-response study group and two of the 15 animals that had received 44 Gy initially developed myelopathy within two years of re-irradiation. The ED[sub 50] value of the single-course irradiation was 76.1 [+-] 1.9 Gy, while the extrapolated ED[sub 50] for retreatment after 44 Gy was [>=] 110 Gy. The lesions of the two symptomatic animals that received 70.4 Gy initially were mixtures of white matter and vascular lesions similar to those observed after single course irradiation. However, both symptomatic animals given 44 Gy initially had hemorrhagic infarcts in the white matter. The results of this study indicate that substantial recovery of occult injuries induced by the initial 44 Gy had occurred within two years. The difference between the types of lesions observed after a single course and re-irradiation suggests that vascular injury may recover less efficiently or at a slower rate than white matter damage. The dependence of the extent of recovery on the initial dose and the time course of such recovery in primates are being investigated. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Proton irradiation creep of FM steel T91

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Was, Gary S.

    2015-04-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel T91 was subjected to irradiation with 3 MeV protons while under load at stresses of 100-200 MPa, temperatures between 400 °C and 500 °C, and dose rates between 1.4 × 10-6 dpa/s and 5 × 10-6 dpa/s to a total dose of less than 1 dpa. Creep behavior was analyzed for parametric dependencies. The temperature dependence was found to be negligible between 400 °C and 500 °C, and the dose rate dependence was observed to be linear. Creep rate was proportional to stress at low stress values and varied with stress to the power 14 above 160 MPa. The large stress exponent of the proton irradiation creep experiments under high stress suggested that dislocation glide was driving both thermal and irradiation creep. Microstructure observations of anisotropic dislocation loops also contributed to the total creep strain. After subtracting the power law creep and anisotropic dislocation loop contributions, the remaining creep strain was accounted for by dislocation climb enabled by stress induced preferential absorption (SIPA) and preferential dislocation glide (PAG).

  19. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of laser-irradiated cementum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; White, Joel M.; Cecchini, Silvia C. M.; Hennig, Thomas

    2003-06-01

    Utilizing Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) in specular reflectance mode chemical changes of root cement surfaces due to laser radiation were investigated. A total of 18 samples of root cement were analyzed, six served as controls. In this study laser energies were set to those known for removal of calculus or for disinfection of periodontal pockets. Major changes in organic as well as inorganic components of the cementum were observed following Nd:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 1064 nm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, fiber diameter 320 μm, contact mode; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia). Er:YAG laser irradiation (wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250 μs, free running, pulse repetition rate 6 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air water cooling 30 ml/min; Iskra Twinlight, Fontona, Slovenia) significantly reduced the Amid bands due to changes in the organic components. After irradiation with a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 200 ns, q-switched, pulse repetition rate 20 Hz, beam diameter 800 μm, contact mode, water cooling 30 ml/min; laboratory prototype) only minimal reductions in the peak intensity of the Amide-II band were detected.

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma arising in previously burned or irradiated skin

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.J.; Hirsch, R.M.; Broadwater, J.R.; Netscher, D.T.; Ames, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising in previously burned or irradiated skin was reviewed in 66 patients treated between 1944 and 1986. Healing of the initial injury was complicated in 70% of patients. Mean interval from initial injury to diagnosis of SCC was 37 years. The overwhelming majority of patients presented with a chronic intractable ulcer in previously injured skin. The regional relapse rate after surgical excision was very high, 58% of all patients. Predominant patterns of recurrence were in local skin and regional lymph nodes (93% of recurrences). Survival rates at 5, 10, and 20 years were 52%, 34%, and 23%, respectively. Five-year survival rates in previously burned and irradiated patients were not significantly different (53% and 50%, respectively). This review, one of the largest reported series, better defines SCC arising in previously burned or irradiated skin as a locally aggressive disease that is distinct from SCC arising in sunlight-damaged skin. An increased awareness of the significance of chronic ulceration in scar tissue may allow earlier diagnosis. Regional disease control and survival depend on surgical resection of all known disease and may require radical lymph node dissection or amputation.

  1. RERTR-13 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-13 was designed to assess performance of different types of neutron absorbers that can be potentially used as burnable poisons in the low enriched uranium-molybdenum based dispersion and monolithic fuels.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-13 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  2. RERTR-8 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-8, was designed to test monolithic mini-fuel plates fabricated via hot isostatic pressing (HIP), the effect of molybdenum (Mo) content on the monolithic fuel behavior, and the efficiency of ternary additions to dispersion fuel particles on the interaction layer behavior at higher burnup. The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-8 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis, thermal analysis and hydraulic testing results.

  3. Microstructure evolution in irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Caturla, M

    1999-11-30

    Study the interaction of defects produced during irradiation or deformation of a metal with the microstructure of that particular material, such as dislocations and grain boundaries. In particular we will study the interaction of dislocation with interstitial loops and stacking fault tetrahedral, and the production of displacement cascades close to dislocations and grain boundaries. The data obtained from these simulations will be used as input to diffusion models and dislocation dynamics models.

  4. Improvements in plant growth rate using underwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, K.; Takahata, J.; Watanabe, S.; Satta, N.; Yamada, O.; Fujio, T.; Sasaki, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The drainage water from plant pots was irradiated by plasma and then recycled to irrigate plants for improving the growth rate by supplying nutrients to plants and inactivating the bacteria in the bed-soil. Brassica rapa var. perviridis (Chinese cabbage; Brassica campestris) plants were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included the use of chicken droppings as a fertiliser. The water was recycled once per day from a drainage water pool and added to the bed-soil in the pots. A magnetic compression type pulsed power generator was used to produce underwater discharge with repetition rate of 250 pps. The plasma irradiation times were set as 10 and 20 minutes per day over 28 days of cultivation. The experimental results showed that the growth rate increased significantly with plasma irradiation into the drainage water. The growth rate increased with the plasma irradiation time. The nitrogen concentration of the leaves increased as a result of plasma irradiation based on chlorophyll content analysis. The bacteria in the drainage water were inactivated by the plasma irradiation.

  5. Gamma irradiation of sorghum flour: Effects on microbial inactivation, amylase activity, fermentability, viscosity and starch granule structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukisa, Ivan M.; Muyanja, Charles M. B. K.; Byaruhanga, Yusuf B.; Schüller, Reidar B.; Langsrud, Thor; Narvhus, Judith A.

    2012-03-01

    Malted and un-malted sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) flour was gamma irradiated with a dose of 10 kGy and then re-irradiated with 25 kGy. The effects of irradiation on microbial decontamination, amylase activity, fermentability (using an amylolytic L. plantarum MNC 21 strain), starch granule structure and viscosity were determined. Standard methods were used during determinations. The 10 kGy dose had no effect on microbial load of un-malted flour but reduced that of malted flour by 3 log cycles. Re-irradiation resulted in complete decontamination. Irradiation of malt caused a significant ( p<0.05) reduction in alpha and beta amylase activity (22% and 32%, respectively). Irradiation of un-malted flour increased the rates of utilization of glucose and maltose by 53% and 100%, respectively, during fermentation. However, microbial growth, rate of lactic acid production, final lactic acid concentration and pH were not affected. Starch granules appeared normal externally even after re-irradiation, however, granules ruptured and dissolved easily after hydration and gelatinization. Production of high dry matter density porridge (200 g dry matter/L) with a viscosity of 3500 cP was achieved by irradiation of un-malted flout at 10 kGy. Gamma irradiation can be used to decontaminate flours and could be utilized to produce weaning porridge from sorghum.

  6. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Phase transformations and defect clusters in single crystal SrTiO3 irradiated at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, M. J.; Yan, L.; Fu, E. G.; Wang, Y. Q.; Misra, A.; Nastasi, M.; Uberuaga, B. P.; Jia, Q. X.

    2013-11-01

    Radiation damage mechanisms in single crystal SrTiO3 irradiated with 250 keV Ne ions to a fluence of 1.11 × 1020 ions/m2 at both room temperature and 773 K were systematically investigated. The irradiation-induced microstructural evolution was characterized using transmission electron microscopy. Ion irradiation at room temperature results in amorphization of crystalline SrTiO3 near the peak damage region at this fluence. On the other hand, ion irradiation at high temperature leads to less irradiation-induced damage in SrTiO3 due to the higher recovery rate of defects. Nevertheless, the formation of dislocation loops has been observed in the SrTiO3 crystals irradiated at high temperature. These dislocation loops were determined to be unfaulted loops with Burgers vector along <0 1 1>.

  8. Polymerization of vinyl acetate in bulk and emulsion by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesquita, Andrea C.; Mori, Manoel N.; Andrade e Silva, Leonardo G.

    2004-09-01

    The vinyl acetate polymerization to produce poly(vinyl acetate) was carried out in bulk and emulsion using a 60Co gamma irradiator Gammacell-220 type. The irradiation was carried out in a dose rate of 5.25 and 5.30 kGy/h, respectively. The polymers obtained were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Tests of density, hardness and Vicat softening temperature were carried out.

  9. Induction of haploid androgenesis in Pacific oyster by UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Hisatsune, Tomoko; Kijima, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    Androgenesis, development from paternal but not maternal chromosomes, can be induced in some organisms including fish, but has not been induced previously in mollusk. In this study we investigated the induction of haploid androgenesis in the Pacific oyster by ultraviolet irradiation and observed nuclear behavior in the androgenetic eggs. Irradiation for 90 seconds at a UV intensity of 72 erg/mm2 per second (6480 erg/mm2) was the optimal dose to achieve haploid androgenesis. The fertilization and development rates of D-shaped larvae decreased with increasing exposure time, and the development of the genetically inactivated eggs terminated before reaching the D-shaped stage. Cytologic observations showed that UV irradiation did not affect germinal vesicle breakdown or chromosomal condensation but caused various nuclear behavioral patterns during meiosis and first mitosis: 21.7% of eggs extruded all maternal chromosomes as 2 or 3 polar bodies, and 59.1% of eggs formed one female pronucleus. The maternally derived nucleus did not participate, or partially participated, in the first karyokinesis. The cytologic evidence demonstrates that the male genome is directing development in haploids produced by UV irradiation. PMID:15136919

  10. Light irradiance and spectral distribution effects on cyanobacterial hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatihah Salleh, Siti; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Hekarl Uzir, Mohamad; Rahman Mohamed, Abdul; Halim Shamsuddin, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    Light is an essential energy source for photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Changes in both light irradiance and spectral distribution will affect their photosynthetic productivity. Compared to the light irradiance, little investigations have been carried out on the effect of light spectra towards cyanobacterial hydrogen production. Hence, this work aims to investigate the effects of both light quantity and quality on biohydrogen productivity of heterocystous cyanobacterium, A.variabilis. Under white light condition, the highest hydrogen production rate of 31 µmol H2 mg chl a -1 h-1 was achieved at 70 µE m-2 s-1. When the experiment was repeated at the same light irradiance but different light spectra of blue, red and green, the accumulations of hydrogen were significantly lower than the white light except for blue light. As the light irradiance was increased to 350 µE m-2 s-1, the accumulated hydrogen under the blue light doubled that of the white light. Besides that, an unusual prolongation of the hydrogen production up to 120 h was observed. The results obtained suggest that blue light could be the most desirable light spectrum for cyanobacterial hydrogen production.

  11. [Variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer].

    PubMed

    Tao, An-qi; Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Sun, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The variation of irradiance affect the melting rate of the sea ice in the arctic pole, and the research on it is an important component of the global climate change research. The present research was based on the spectrum data collected during the 4th scientific research on the arctic of China in 2010, analyzed the variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer and discussed the reasons for the change. This research shows that many factors lead to the change, among which the weather and the solar elevation angle affect the irradiance directly. The weather factors determine the amount of solar radiation that reached the ground after the absorption and attenuation of the clouds; In high-latitude areas, there is a low solar elevation angle and the attenuation of solar radiation was obvious. Our research shows that the spectrum at shorter wavelength is more sensitive to the changes in altitude of the sun, while the impact of weather on the irradiance increases with wavelength. Moreover, moisture content in the atmosphere also affects the solar radiation reaching the ground and the its impact is in a particular band but not for the entire spectrum range.

  12. [Variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer].

    PubMed

    Tao, An-qi; Ke, Chang-qing; Xie, Hong-jie; Sun, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The variation of irradiance affect the melting rate of the sea ice in the arctic pole, and the research on it is an important component of the global climate change research. The present research was based on the spectrum data collected during the 4th scientific research on the arctic of China in 2010, analyzed the variation of irradiance in the arctic pole during the summer and discussed the reasons for the change. This research shows that many factors lead to the change, among which the weather and the solar elevation angle affect the irradiance directly. The weather factors determine the amount of solar radiation that reached the ground after the absorption and attenuation of the clouds; In high-latitude areas, there is a low solar elevation angle and the attenuation of solar radiation was obvious. Our research shows that the spectrum at shorter wavelength is more sensitive to the changes in altitude of the sun, while the impact of weather on the irradiance increases with wavelength. Moreover, moisture content in the atmosphere also affects the solar radiation reaching the ground and the its impact is in a particular band but not for the entire spectrum range. PMID:23156748

  13. Stress corrosion cracking on irradiated 316 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, Gen; Nakajima, Nobuo; Konishi, Takao; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2001-02-01

    Tests on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) were carried out by using cold-worked (CW) 316 stainless steel (SS) in-core flux thimble tubes which were irradiated up to 5×10 26 n/m 2 ( E>0.1 MeV) at 310°C in a Japanese PWR. Unirradiated thimble tube was also tested for comparison with irradiated tubes. Mechanical tests such as the tensile, hardness tests and metallographic observations were performed. The susceptibility to SCC was examined by the slow strain rate test (SSRT) under PWR primary water chemistry condition and compositional analysis on the grain boundary segregation was made. Significant changes in the mechanical properties due to irradiation such as a remarkable increase of strength and hardness, and a considerable reduction of elongation were seen. SSRT results revealed that the intergranular fracture ratio (%IGSCC) increased as dissolved hydrogen (DH) increased. In addition, SSRT results in argon gas atmosphere showed a small amount of intergranular cracking. The depletion of Fe, Cr, Mo and the enrichment of Ni and Si were observed in microchemical analyses on the grain boundary.

  14. Irradiation creep and density changes observed in MA957 pressurized tubes irradiated to doses of 40-110 dpa at 400-750°C in FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Garner, Frank A.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2012-12-30

    An irradiation creep and swelling study was performed on tubing constructed from the Y2O3-strengthened ODS ferritic steel MA957. As a result of the reduction operations during manufacture, the grains in the tubing were highly elongated in the direction of the tubing axis, with an aspect ratio of ~10:1. Pressurized creep tubes were irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to doses ranging from 40 dpa to 110 dpa at temperatures ranging from 400 to 750°C. The diametral strains produced during irradiation exhibit very strong transient strains that are linearly dependent on stress and increase with irradiation temperature before reaching temperature-independent steady-state creep rates of 0.6-0.7 X 10-6 (MPa dpa)-1. Contributions to transient strains may not arise only from classical thermal creep or irradiation creep considerations, but also may result from an irradiation-stimulated growth process whereby the highly elongated grain structure reduces the aspect ratio to produce fatter grains and thereby increases in the tube diameter. One manifestation of this process is a change in tube diameter that is not accompanied by a density change characteristic of void swelling or precipitation-induced changes in lattice parameter. These results provide the first conclusive demonstration that resistance to irradiation creep can be extended to higher temperatures by dispersoid addition, and most importantly, this resistance is maintained to high radiation damage levels. However, the irradiation creep compliance is not reduced by dispersoid addition, casting some doubt on various proposed climb and glide mechanisms of irradiation creep.

  15. Pyrolysis of Municipal Solid Waste for Syngas Production by Microwave Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gedam, Vidyadhar V.; Regupathi, Iyyaswami

    2012-03-15

    In the present study, we discuss the application of microwave-irradiated pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW) for total recovery of useful gases and energy. The MSW pyrolysis under microwave irradiation highly depends on the process parameters, like microwave power, microwave absorbers, and time of irradiation. The thoroughness of pyrolysis and product recovery were studied by changing the abovesaid variables. Pyrolysis of MSW occurs in the power rating range of 450-850 W-outside this power rating range, pyrolysis is not possible. Experiments were carried out using various microwave absorbers (i.e., graphite, charcoal, and iron) to enhance the pyrolysis even at lower power rating. The results show that the pyrolysis of MSW was possible even at low power ratings. The major composition of the pyrolysis gaseous product were analyzed with GC-MS which includes CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, etc.

  16. THEORY OF A QUODON GAS WITH APPLICATION TO PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN SOLIDS UNDER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinko, Volodymyr; Shapovalov, Roman V.

    2014-06-17

    Rate theory of the radiation-induced precipitation in solids is modified with account of non-equilibrium fluctuations driven by the “gas” of lattice solitons (a.k.a. “quodons”) produced by irradiation. According to quantitative estimations, a steady-state density of the quodon gas under sufficiently intense irradiation can be comparable to the density of classical phonon gas. The modified rate theory is applied to modelling of copper precipitation in FeCu binary alloys under electron irradiation. In contrast to the classical rate theory, which disagrees strongly with experimental data on all precipitation parameters, the modified rate theory describes quite well both the evolution of precipitates and the matrix concentration of copper measured by different methods.

  17. Optimization of irradiation conditions for {sup 177}Lu production at the LVR-15 research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lahodova, Z.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V.; Srank, J.

    2012-07-01

    The use of lutetium in medicine has been increasing over the last few years. The {sup 177}Lu radionuclide is commercially available for research and test purposes as a diagnostic and radiotherapy agent in the treatment of several malignant tumours. The yield of {sup 177}Lu from the {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu nuclear reaction depends significantly on the thermal neutron fluence rate. The capture cross-sections of both reaction {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu and reaction {sup 177}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 178}Lu are very high. Therefore a burn-up of target and product nuclides should be taken into account when calculating {sup 177}Lu activity. The maximum irradiation time, when the activity of the {sup 177}Lu radionuclide begins to decline, was found for different fluence rates. Two vertical irradiation channels at the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor were compared in order to choose the channel with better irradiation conditions, such as a higher thermal neutron fluence rate in the irradiation volume. In this experiment, lutetium was irradiated in a titanium capsule. The influence of the Ti capsule on the neutron spectrum was monitored using activation detectors. The choice of detectors was based on requirements for irradiation time and accurate determination of thermal neutrons. The following activation detectors were selected for measurement of the neutron spectrum: Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, Ag and W. (authors)

  18. Deformation behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels as a clue to understanding irradiation hardening.

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R. J.; Alexander, D. E.; Rehn, L. E.

    1999-10-25

    In this paper, we examine the post-yield true stress vs true strain behavior of irradiated pressure vessel steels and iron-based alloys to reveal differences in strain-hardening behavior associated with different irradiating particles (neutrons and electrons) and different alloy chernky. It is important to understand the effects on mechanical properties caused by displacement producing radiation of nuclear reactor pressure steels. Critical embrittling effects, e.g. increases in the ductile-to-brittle-transition-temperature, are associated with irradiation-induced increases in yield strength. In addition, fatigue-life and loading-rate effects on fracture can be related to the post-irradiation strain-hardening behavior of the steels. All of these properties affect the expected service life of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. We address the characteristics of two general strengthening effects that we believe are relevant to the differing defect cluster characters produced by neutrons and electrons in four different alloys: two pressure vessel steels, A212B and A350, and two binary alloys, Fe-0.28 wt%Cu and Fe-0.74 wt%Ni. Our results show that there are differences in the post-irradiation mechanical behavior for the two kinds of irradiation and that the differences are related both to differences in damage produced and alloy chemistry. We find that while electron and neutron irradiations (at T {le} 60 C) of pressure vessel steels and binary iron-based model alloys produce similar increases in yield strength for the same dose level, they do not result in the same post-yield hardening behavior. For neutron irradiation, the true stress flow curves of the irradiated material can be made to superimpose on that of the unirradiated material, when the former are shifted appropriately along the strain axis. This behavior suggests that neutron irradiation hardening has the same effect as strain hardening for all of the materials analyzed. For electron irradiated steels, the

  19. Nonlocal electron transport in the presence of high-intensity laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Epperlein, E.M.; Short, R.W. )

    1994-08-01

    We investigate electron transport in a plasma heated by spatially modulated laser irradiation. When the heating rate is greater than the electron-electron collision rate, the thermal conductivity is reduced by a factor of 3 to 4 from the Spitzer-Haerm [Phys. Rev. 89, 977 (1953)] value for [ital K][lambda][sub [ital e

  20. Gamma Irradiation of Active Self-healing PLGA Microspheres for Efficient Aqueous Encapsulation of Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Kashappa-Goud H.; Kadous, Samer; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of γ-irradiation of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)/Al(OH)3/0 or 5 wt% diethyl phthalate (DEP) microspheres for active self-healing encapsulation of vaccine antigens. Methods Microspheres were irradiated with 60Co at 2.5 and 1.8 MRad and 0.37 and 0.20 MRad/h. Encapsulation of tetanus toxoid (TT) was achieved by mixing Al(OH)3-PLGA microspheres with TT solution at 10-38°C. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to examine free radical formation. Glass transition temperature (Tg) and molecular weight of PLGA was measured by differential scanning calorimetry and gel permeation chromatography, respectively. Loading and release of TT were examined by modified Bradford, amino acid analysis, and ELISA assays. Results EPR spectroscopy results indicated absence of free radicals in PLGA microspheres after γ-irradiation. Antigen-sorbing capacity, encapsulation efficiency, and Tg of the polymer were also not adversely affected. When DEP-loaded microspheres were irradiated at 0.2 MRad/h, some PLGA pores healed during irradiation and PLGA healing during encapsulation was suppressed. The molecular weight of PLGA was slightly reduced when DEP-loaded microspheres were irradiated at the same dose rate. These trends were not observed at 0.37 MRad/h. Gamma irradiation slightly increased TT initial burst release. Apart from the slightly higher polymer molecular weight decline caused by higher irradiation dose in case of DEP-loaded microspheres, the small increase in total irradiation dose from 1.8 to 2.5 MRad had insignificant effect on the polymer and microspheres properties analyzed. Conclusion Gamma irradiation is a plausible approach to provide a terminally sterilized, self-healing encapsulation PLGA excipient for vaccine delivery. PMID:23515830

  1. Effects of proton and electron irradiation on the structural and tribological properties of MoS 2/polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baixing; Pei, Xianqiang; Wang, Qihua; Sun, Xiaojun; Wang, Tingmei

    2011-11-01

    To study the structural and tribological properties of MoS2/polyimide (MoS2/PI) composite under the irradiation environment of proton and electron, the MoS2/PI composites were investigated in a ground-based simulation facility, in which the energy of proton and electron was 25 keV and the flux was 2.5 × 1014 cm-2 s-1. The experimental results revealed that the simplex and combined irradiation of proton and electron induced bond break and cross-link, proton irradiation can break the PI bond easier than electron irradiation and then formed the graphite-like structure at surface area of the samples. Irradiation decreased the friction coefficient and wear rate remarkably of the composites comparing with the pristine one. The wear rate increased with the increasing of the proton and combined radiation time, and decreased with the electron radiation conditions.

  2. Improving the RPC rate capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aielli, G.; Camarri, P.; Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Stante, L.; Iuppa, R.; Liberti, B.; Paolozzi, L.; Pastori, E.; Santonico, R.; Toppi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper has the purpose to study the rate capability of the Resistive Plate Chamber, RPC, starting from the basic physics of this detector. The effect of different working parameters determining the rate capability is analysed in detail, in order to optimize a new family of RPCs for applications to heavy irradiation environments and in particular to the LHC phase 2. A special emphasis is given to the improvement achievable by minimizing the avalanche charge delivered in the gas. The paper shows experimental results of Cosmic Ray tests, performed to study the avalanche features for different gas gap sizes, with particular attention to the overall delivered charge. For this purpose, the paper studies, in parallel to the prompt electronic signal, also the ionic signal which gives the main contribution to the delivered charge. Whenever possible the test results are interpreted on the basis of the RPC detector physics and are intended to extend and reinforce our physical understanding of this detector.

  3. Deuterium ion irradiation induced precipitation in Fe-Cr alloy: Characterization and effects on irradiation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P. P.; Yu, R.; Zhu, Y. M.; Zhao, M. Z.; Bai, J. W.; Wan, F. R.; Zhan, Q.

    2015-04-01

    A new phase was found to precipitate in a Fe-Cr model alloy after 58 keV deuterium ion irradiation at 773 K. The nanoscale radiation-induced precipitate was studied systematically using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), image simulation and in-situ ultrahigh voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVEM). B2 structure is proposed for the new Cr-rich phase, which adopts a cube-on-cube orientation relationship with regard to the Fe matrix. Geometric phase analysis (GPA) was employed to measure the strain fields around the precipitate and this was used to explain its characteristic 1-dimensional elongation along the <1 0 0> Fe direction. The precipitate was stable under subsequent electron irradiation at different temperatures. We suggest that the precipitate with a high interface-to-volume ratio enhances the radiation resistance of the material. The reason for this is the presence of a large number of interfaces between the precipitate and the matrix, which may greatly reduce the concentration of point defects around the dislocation loops. This leads to a significant decrease in the growth rate.

  4. Focused Ultrasound Simultaneous Irradiation/MRI Imaging, and Two-Stage General Kinetic Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Yao; Ko, Chia-En; Chen, Gin-Shin; Chung, I-Fang; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have investigated how to use focused ultrasound (FUS) to temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in order to facilitate the delivery of medication into lesion sites in the brain. In this study, through the setup of a real-time system, FUS irradiation and injections of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) and Gadodiamide (Gd, an MRI contrast agent) can be conducted simultaneously during MRI scanning. By using this real-time system, we were able to investigate in detail how the general kinetic model (GKM) is used to estimate Gd penetration in the FUS irradiated area in a rat's brain resulting from UCA concentration changes after single FUS irradiation. Two-stage GKM was proposed to estimate the Gd penetration in the FUS irradiated area in a rat's brain under experimental conditions with repeated FUS irradiation combined with different UCA concentrations. The results showed that the focal increase in the transfer rate constant of Ktrans caused by BBB disruption was dependent on the doses of UCA. Moreover, the amount of in vivo penetration of Evans blue in the FUS irradiated area in a rat's brain under various FUS irradiation experimental conditions was assessed to show the positive correlation with the transfer rate constants. Compared to the GKM method, the Two-stage GKM is more suitable for estimating the transfer rate constants of the brain treated with repeated FUS irradiations. This study demonstrated that the entire process of BBB disrupted by FUS could be quantitatively monitored by real-time dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). PMID:24949997

  5. Irradiation and annealing of p-type silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Alexander A.; Bogdanova, Elena V.; Grigor'eva, Maria V.; Lebedev, Sergey P.; Kozlovski, Vitaly V.

    2014-02-21

    The development of the technology of semiconductor devices based on silicon carbide and the beginning of their industrial manufacture have made increasingly topical studies of the radiation hardness of this material on the one hand and of the proton irradiation to form high-receptivity regions on the other hand. This paper reports on a study of the carrier removal rate (V{sub d}) in p-6H-SiC under irradiation with 8 MeV protons and of the conductivity restoration in radiation- compensated epitaxial layers of various p-type silicon carbide polytypes. V{sub d} was determined by analysis of capacitance-voltage characteristics and from results of Hall effect measurements. It was found that the complete compensation of samples with the initial value of Na - Nd ≈ 1.5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} occurs at an irradiation dose of ∼1.1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. It is shown that specific features of the sublimation layer SiC (compared to CVD layers) are clearly manifested upon the gamma and electron irradiation and are hardly noticeable under the proton and neutron irradiation. It was also found that the radiation-induced compensation of SiC is retained after its annealing at ≤1000°C. The conductivity is almost completely restored at T ≥ 1200°C. This character of annealing of the radiation compensation is independent of a silicon carbide polytype and the starting doping level of the epitaxial layer. The complete annealing temperatures considerably exceed the working temperatures of SiC-based devices. It is shown that the radiation compensation is a promising method in the technology of high-temperature devices based on SiC.

  6. Considerations for How to Rate CPV

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.; Miller, M.; Marion, B.; Emery, K.; McConnell, R.; Surendran, S.; Kimber, A.

    2011-02-01

    The concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) industry is introducing multiple products into the marketplace, but, as yet, the; community has not embraced a unified method for assessing a nameplate rating. The choices of whether to use 850,; 900, or 1000 W/m2 for the direct-normal irradiance and whether to link the rating to ambient or cell temperature will; affect how CPV modules are rated and compared with other technologies. This paper explores the qualitative and; quantitative ramifications of these choices using data from two multi-junction CPV modules and two flat-plate; modules.

  7. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    SciTech Connect

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-23

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100 deg. C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  9. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I.; Georgescu, R.

    2007-04-01

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100° C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  10. Thermal analysis applied to irradiated propolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Andrea Harumi; Machado, Luci Brocardo; del Mastro, Nélida Lucia

    2002-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by bees. Raw propolis requires a decontamination procedure and irradiation appears as a promising technique for this purpose. The valuable properties of propolis for food and pharmaceutical industries have led to increasing interest in its technological behavior. Thermal analysis is a chemical analysis that gives information about changes on heating of great importance for technological applications. Ground propolis samples were 60Co gamma irradiated with 0 and 10 kGy. Thermogravimetry curves shown a similar multi-stage decomposition pattern for both irradiated and unirradiated samples up to 600°C. Similarly, through differential scanning calorimetry , a coincidence of melting point of irradiated and unirradiated samples was found. The results suggest that the irradiation process do not interfere on the thermal properties of propolis when irradiated up to 10 kGy.

  11. Calibration of an automatic TLD irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, J.C.; Pasciak, W.J. )

    1987-07-01

    The Panasonic UD-801 TLDs used in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's environmental monitoring program are calibrated using the Williston Elin Model 2001 Irradiator. This article describes the procedure used to calibrate this irradiator for the delivery of exposures in the range of 40 to 1200 mR. A select group of TLDs, another source, and an NBS-calibrated ion chamber were used to perform a secondary calibration of the WE-2001. Extraneous exposure contributions (background radiation from the irradiator's source and exposure occurring during TLD travel into and out of the irradiation chamber) were measured and evaluated. The WE-2001 TLD Irradiator was calibrated to a total uncertainty of {plus minus}3.2%; however, TLD travel time exposures were found to be quite significant for the short irradiation times typically used in environmental applications.

  12. Neutron Exposure Parameters for the Dosimetry Capsule in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Baldwin; F.B.K. Kam; I. Remec

    1998-10-01

    This report describes the computational methodology for the least-squares adjustment of the dosimetry data from the HSSI 10.OD dosimetry capsule with neutronics calculations. It presents exposure rates at each dosimetry location for the neutron fluence greater than 1.0 MeV, fluence greater than 0.1 MeV, and displacements per atom. Exposure parameter distributions are also described in terms of three- dimensional fitting functions. When fitting functions are used it is suggested that an uncertainty of 6% (1 o) should be associated with the exposure rate values. The specific activity of each dosimeter at the end of irradiation is listed in the Appendix.

  13. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  14. Safety Assurance for ATR Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the world’s premiere test reactor for performing high fluence, large volume, irradiation test programs. The ATR has many capabilities and a wide variety of tests are performed in this truly one of a kind reactor, including isotope production, simple self-contained static capsule experiments, instrumented/controlled experiments, and loop testing under pressurized water conditions. Along with the five pressurized water loops, ATR may also have gas (temperature controlled) lead experiments, fuel boosted fast flux experiments, and static sealed capsules all in the core at the same time. In addition, any or all of these tests may contain fuel or moderating materials that can affect reactivity levels in the ATR core. Therefore the safety analyses required to ensure safe operation of each experiment as well as the reactor itself are complex. Each test has to be evaluated against stringent reactor control safety criteria, as well as the effects it could have on adjacent tests and the reactor as well as the consequences of those effects. The safety analyses of each experiment are summarized in a document entitled the Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP). The ESAP references and employs the results of the reactor physics, thermal, hydraulic, stress, seismic, vibration, and all other analyses necessary to ensure the experiment can be irradiated safely in the ATR. The requirements for reactivity worth, chemistry compatibilities, pressure limitations, material issues, etc. are all specified in the Technical Safety Requirements and the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) for the ATR. This paper discusses the ESAP process, types of analyses, types of safety requirements and the approvals necessary to ensure an experiment can be safely irradiated in the ATR.

  15. Irradiation effects in ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-08-01

    Since 1979 the Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the US Department of Energy has been studying the 2-12Cr class of ferritic steels to establish the feasibility of using them in fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket (FW/B) applications. The advantages of ferritic steels include superior swelling resistance, low thermal stresses compared to austenitic stainless steels, attractive mechanical properties up to 600°C. and service histories exceeding 100 000 h. These steels are commonly used in a range of microstructural conditions which include ferritic, martensitic. tempered martensitic, bainitic etc. Throughout this paper where the term "ferritic" is used it should be taken to mean any of these microstructures. The ADIP task is studying several candidate alloy systems including 12Cr-1MoWV (HT-9), modified 9Cr-1MoVNb, and dual-phased steels such as EM-12 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-Mo. These materials are ferromagnetic (FM), body centered cubic (bcc), and contain chromium additions between 2 and 12 wt% and molybdenum additions usually below 2%. The perceived issues associated with the application of this class of steel to fusion reactors are the increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) with neutron damage, the compatibility of these steels with liquid metals and solid breeding materials, and their weldability. The ferromagnetic character of these steels can also be important in reactor design. It is the purpose of this paper to review the current understanding of these bcc steels and the effects of irradiation. The major points of discussion will be irradiation-induced or -enhanced dimensional changes such as swelling and creep, mechanical properties such as tensile strength and various measurements of toughness, and activation by neutron interactions with structural materials.

  16. Collagen metabolism in mouse lung after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.C.; Parkins, C.S.

    1987-09-01

    Collagen and total protein synthesis rates have been determined in the lungs of CBA mice irradiated with single doses of X rays between 8 and 16 Gy. Mice were injected with (/sup 3/H)proline accompanied by a large dose of unlabeled proline, and synthesis rates were measured at 2-month intervals from 8 to 31 weeks after irradiation. At 2 months after radiation treatment, collagen and total protein synthesis rates were significantly depressed but they had recovered by 4 months. By 6 months collagen synthesis rates had increased above control in a dose-dependent manner, so that in the 14-Gy dose group the fractional synthesis rate for collagen was 4.6 times higher than in control mice as measured by incorporation of (/sup 3/H)proline. However, a significant net accumulation of collagen was seen only in the lungs of the highest dose group at 31 weeks, as indicated by total hydroxyproline measurements. There was a slight increase in the ratio of types I and III collagen. Late radiation damage in the CBA mouse lung is characterized by increased collagen metabolism, which may or may not lead to a net accumulation of collagen.

  17. HIGH-RATE DISINFECTION TECHNIQUES FOR COMBIND SEWER OVERFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents high-rate disinfection technologies for combined sewer overflow (CSO). The high-rate disinfection technologies of interest are: chlorination/dechlorination, ultraviolet light irradiation (UV), chlorine dioxide (ClO2 ), ozone (O3), peracetic acid (CH3COOOH )...

  18. Food irradiation and airline catering.

    PubMed

    Preston, F S

    1988-04-01

    Food poisoning from contaminated airline food can produce serious consequences for airline crew and passengers and can hazard flight. While irradiation of certain foodstuffs has been practised in a number of countries for some years, application of the process has not been made to complete meals. This paper considers the advantages, technical considerations, costs and possible application to airline meals. In addition, the need to educate the public in the advantages of the process in the wake of incidents such as Chernobyl is discussed.

  19. [Tooth extraction in irradiated areas].

    PubMed

    Gourmet, René; Chaux-Bodard, Anne-Ga lle

    2002-04-01

    Tooth avulsion after head and neck radiotherapy has always been and is still a risk gesture when the avulsion is situated on the irradiation sites. The post-operating effects can become complicated with a delay in healing which can eventually induce an osteoradionecrosis. Dental treatment before the begining of radiotherapy aiming at the elimination of any suspicious tooth, and the generalisation of fluorotherapy aiming at limiting the decayed degeneration, did not make the avulsion indication disappear. At present tooth avulsion is still possible in case of tooth infection or broken tooth.

  20. Thymus irradiation for myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Currier, R.D.; Routh, A.; Hickman, B.T.; Douglas, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with progressive myasthenia gravis without thymoma received treatment of 3000 rads (30 Gy) to the anterior mediastinum, and a followup was conducted for five to 18 years. Twenty-four patients had generalized myasthenia, and four had ocular myasthenia gravis. Twenty patients with generalized myasthenia survived the several month post-treatment period and improved, but four died during that period. The improvement lasted a median of 1.5 years, and older patients had longer remissions than younger patients. The four patients who had ocular myasthenia did not change after treatment. Mediastinal irradiation produces a temporary remission in generalized myasthenia.

  1. Food irradiation and airline catering

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, F.S.

    1988-04-01

    Food poisoning from contaminated airline food can produce serious consequences for airline crew and passengers and can hazard flight. While irradiation of certain foodstuffs has been practised in a number of countries for some years, application of the process has not been made to complete meals. This paper considers the advantages, technical considerations, costs and possible application to airline meals. In addition, the need to educate the public in the advantages of the process in the wake of incidents such as Chernobyl is discussed.

  2. Electron spin resonance identification of irradiated fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffi, Jacques J.; Agnel, Jean-Pierre L.

    The electron spin resonance spectrum of achenes, pips, stalks and stones from irradiated fruits (strawberry, raspberry, red currant, bilberry, apple, pear, fig, french prune, kiwi, water-melon and cherry) always displays, just after γ-treatment, a weak triplet ( aH≈30 G) due to a cellulose radical; its left line (lower field) can be used as an identification test of irradiation, at least for strawberries, rapsberries, red currants or bilberries irradiated in order to improve their storage time.

  3. Irradiated food: Is there a need?

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.

    1992-06-01

    Economic, medical, social, and technical issues related to the irradiation of food with nuclear gamma rays from radioactive sources are discussed in this article. Reasons cited for considering food irradiation include food loss due to spoilage and food-borne illnesses. Research studies investigating the effects of irradiation on the formation of carcinogens and radiolytics, and on the nutritional value of food are summarized. The support of international organizations and political aspects in the United States are also discussed in some detail.

  4. Irradiation Embritlement in Alloy HT-­9

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano De Caro, Magdalena

    2012-08-27

    HT-9 steel is a candidate structural and cladding material for high temperature lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. In typical advanced fast reactor designs fuel elements will be irradiated for an extended period of time, reaching up to 5-7 years. Significant displacement damage accumulation in the steel is expected (> 200 dpa) when exposed to dpa-rates of 20-30 dpa{sub Fe}/y and high fast flux (E > 0.1 MeV) {approx}4 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}s. Core temperatures could reach 400-560 C, with coolant temperatures at the inlet as low as 250 C, depending on the reactor design. Mechanical behavior in the presence of an intense fast flux and high dose is a concern. In particular, low temperature operation could be limited by irradiation embrittlement. Creep and corrosion effects in liquid metal coolants could set a limit to the upper operating temperature. In this report, we focus on the low temperature operating window limit and describe HT-9 embrittlement experimental findings reported in the literature that could provide supporting information to facilitate the consideration of a Code Case on irradiation effects for this class of steels in fast reactor environments. HT-9 has an extensive database available on irradiation performance, which makes it the best choice as a possible near-term candidate for clad, and ducts in future fast reactors. Still, as it is shown in this report, embrittlement data for very low irradiation temperatures (< 200 C) and very high radiation exposure (> 150 dpa) is scarce. Experimental findings indicate a saturation of DBTT shifts as a function of dose, which could allow for long lifetime cladding operation. However, a strong increase in DBTT shift with decreasing irradiation temperature could compromise operation at low service temperatures. Development of a deep understanding of the physics involved in the radiation damage mechanisms, together with multiscale computer simulation models of irradiation embrittlement will provide the basis to

  5. Early Energetic Particle Irradiation of the HED Parent Body Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rao, M. N.

    1996-01-01

    the maximum time peRiod for the solar irradiation. Various asteroidal regolith models, based on Monte Carlo modeling of impact rates as a function of size and on irradiation features of meteorites, predict surface exposure times of about 0.1 to 10 m.y., and depend on such factors as gravity, rock mechanical properties, and micrometeoroid flux. Because the depth at which solar Fe tracks are produced (is much less than 1 micrometer) is much less than the depth at which Solar Cosmic Rays (SCR) Ne is produced (about 1 cm), for a reasonably well-stirred HED regolith the "surface exposure time" for SCR 21-Ne production should be significantly longer than that for solar tracks and some other surface irradiation features. Enhanced Solar Proton Irradiation: For bulk samples of Kapoeta dark feldspar and a one-component regolith model, the derived ratio of 21-Ne/22-Ne = 0.68 implies that the early production ratio of SCR 21-Ne to GCR 21-Ne was about 0.5-1.5. This ratio is independent of any assumptions about the fraction of dark grains that are irradiated or of the variability in the degree of solar irradiation among grains. The 21-Ne SCR/GCR ratio indirectly derived from bulk Kapoeta pyroxene is somewhat larger, as is the ratio derived for simple two-component regolith models. Individual feldspar grains that were extensively solar irradiated would require even larger 21-Ne SCR/GCR production ratios. In contrast, the theoretical SCR/GCR production ratio for lunar feldspar with 0 g/CM2 shield ing is is less than or equal to 2, and the lowest ratio observed in near-surface samples of lunar anorthosites is less than or equal to 1. Considering the greater solar distance of Vesta (compared to the Moon), the likelihood that SCR 21-Ne was acquired under some shielding where production rates are lower, and the likelihood that the exposure time to galactic protons exceeded the exposure time to solar protons because of their very different penetration depths, the 21-Ne SCR/GCR production

  6. Actinometric measurement of solar ultraviolet and development of a weighted solar UV integral. [photochemical reaction rate determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Coulbert, C.

    1978-01-01

    An actinometer has been developed to measure outdoor irradiance in the range 295-400 nm. Actinometric measurements of radiation are based on determination of photochemical reaction rates for reactions of known quantum efficiency. Actinometers have the advantage of providing irradiance data over surfaces of difficult accessibility; in addition, actinometrically determined irradiance data are wavelength weighted and therefore provide a useful means of assessing the degradation rates of polymers employed in solar energy systems.

  7. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

    2012-08-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

  8. The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chosdu, R.; Erizal; Iriawan, T.; Hilmy, N.

    1995-02-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin component of Curcuma domestica rhizome were investigated. Pure curcumin, sliced and powdered rhizome with 10% of moisture content were irradiated at 0, 10, 30 and 50 kGy (dose rate of 6 kGy/h). Curcumin content was analysed using HPLC method and ESR spectra. Results show that free radicals are already present in unirradiated rhizome. Gamma irradiation at the doses of 10, 30 and 50 kGy induced the free radicals formation of pure curcumin and Curcuma domestica rhizome. The ESR spectra of irradiated rhizome gave a very similar spectra to the signal of irradiated pure curcumin. The percentage of free radicals intensity from pure curcumin was very stable at room temperature up to 670 hours of storage. However, the percentage intensity of free radicals in the irradiated rhizome were decay during storage. Irradiation treatment and storage time did not give a significant change on curcumin content, water activity, pH and moisture content of rhizome investigated.

  9. Mechanisms of Neutron Irradiation Hardening in Impurity-Doped Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Y.; Liu, X. Y.; Kameda, J.

    2008-05-01

    Mechanisms of neutron irradiation hardening in phosphorus (P)-doped, sulfur (S)-doped, and copper (Cu)-doped ferritic alloys have been studied by applying a rate theory to the temperature dependence of the yield strength. Hardening behavior induced by neutron irradiation at various temperatures (473 to 711 K) is characterized in terms of the variations in athermal stress and activation energy for plasticity controlled by precipitation or solid solution, and kink-pair formation with the content and type of impurities. In P-doped alloys, neutron irradiation below 563 K brings about a remarkable increase in the athermal stress and activation energy, due to the dispersion of fine (˜1.7-nm) P-rich precipitates that is more extensive than that for the Cu-rich precipitates reported in irradiated steel. During neutron irradiation above 668 K, precipitation hardening occurs to some extent in Cu-doped and S-doped alloys, compared to small or negligible hardening in the P-doped alloys. In alloys with a low to moderate content of various dissolved impurities subjected to high-temperature irradiation, the formation of kink pairs becomes considerably difficult. Differing dynamic interactions of dissolved and precipitated impurities, i.e., P and Cu, with the nucleation and growth of dislocations are discussed, giving rise to irradiation hardening.

  10. Solid target irradiation and transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-01

    A compact, fully automated solid target irradiation, handling and transfer system was developed for the 100Mo/99m Tc production; however, it can be used for any solid target material. All the target handling is fully automated. The target is pneumatically transferred to the irradiation station where it is removed from the carrier, placed in the irradiation chamber and the cooling water connected. At the end of irradiation the target is returned to the carrier and transferred to the processing hot cell where it is automatically placed in a distillation unit. 100 Mo targets are prepared by plasma spraying or laser cladding of the copper target.

  11. Study of irradiation creep of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    Thin-wall tubing was produced from the 832665 (500 kg) heat of V-4 wt.% Cr-4 wt.% Ti to study its irradiation creep behavior. The specimens, in the form of pressurized capsules, were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor experiments (ATR-A1 and HFIR RB-12J, respectively). The ATR-A1 irradiation has been completed and specimens from it will soon be available for postirradiation examination. The RB-12J irradiation is not yet complete.

  12. Thermoluminescence analysis of irradiated oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Marcazzó, J; Della Monaca, S; Boniglia, C; Gargiulo, R; Bortolin, E

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis performed on the oyster shells powder. TL response of (60)Co gamma-rays irradiated samples were studied in the range from 80 Gy to 8 kGy doses. TL signal of irradiated shell powder was higher as compared to the unirradiated control samples, which allowed to identify the irradiated oysters. Results show that the oyster shells have good TL properties and can be useful for the identification of irradiated seafood as well as for the evaluation of the treatment dose.

  13. Healing burns using atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kanai, Takao; Mori, Akira

    2014-01-01

    An experiment testing the effects of plasma irradiation with an atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) reactor on rats given burns showed no evidence of electric shock injuries upon pathology inspection of the irradiated skin surface. In fact, the observed evidence of healing and improvement of the burns suggested healing effects from plasma irradiation. The quantities of neovascular vessels in the living tissues at 7 days were 9.2 ± 0.77 mm-2 without treatment and 18.4 ± 2.9 mm-2 after plasma irradiation.

  14. Glucose stabilizes collagen sterilized with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohan, Mark P; Dunn, Michael G

    2003-12-15

    Gamma irradiation sterilization (gamma-irradiation) fragments and denatures collagen, drastically decreasing critical physical properties. Our goal was to maintain strength and stability of gamma-irradiated collagen by adding glucose, which in theory can initiate crosslink formation in collagen during exposure to gamma-irradiation. Collagen films prepared with and without glucose were gamma-irradiated with a standard dose of 2.5 Mrad. Relative amounts of crosslinking and denaturation were approximated based on solubility and the mechanical properties of the films after hydration, heat denaturation, or incubation in enzymes (collagenase and trypsin). After exposure to gamma-irradiation, collagen films containing glucose had significantly higher mechanical properties, greater resistance to enzymatic degradation, and decreased solubility compared with control films. The entire experiment was repeated with a second set of films that were exposed first to ultraviolet irradiation (254 nm) to provide higher initial strength and then gamma-irradiated. Again, films containing glucose had significantly greater mechanical properties and resistance to enzymatic degradation compared with controls. Gel electrophoresis showed that glucose did not prevent peptide fragmentation; therefore, the higher strength and stability in glucose-incorporated films may be due to glucose-derived crosslinks. The results of this study suggest that glucose may be a useful additive to stabilize collagenous materials or tissues sterilized by gamma-irradiation.

  15. Radiolytic degradation scheme for 60Co-irradiated corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, M.P.; Tsuji, K.

    1983-01-01

    The cobalt 60 radiolytic degradation products have been identified in the following corticosteroids: cortisone, cortisone acetate, hydrocortisone, hydrocortisone acetate, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, isoflupredone acetate, methylprednisolone, methylprednisolone acetate, prednisolone, prednisolone acetate, and prednisone. Two major types of degradation processes have been identified: loss of the corticoid side chain on the D-ring to produce the C-17 ketone and conversion of the C-11 alcohol, if present, to the C-11 ketone. Minor degradation products derived from other changes affecting the side chain are also identified in several corticosteroids. These compounds are frequently associated in corticosteroids as process impurities or degradation compounds. No new radiolytic compounds unique to 60Co-irradiation have been found. The majority of corticosteroids have been shown to be stable to 60Co-irradiation. The rates of radiolytic degradation ranged from 0.2 to 1.4%/Mrad.

  16. Neutron irradiation and compatibility testing of Li 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, D. L.; Krsul, J. R.; Laug, M. T.; Walters, L. C.; Tetenbaum, M.

    1984-05-01

    A study was made of the neutron irradiation behavior of 6Li-enriched Li 2O in EBR-II. In addition, a stress corrosion study was performed ex-reactor to test the compatibility of Li 2O with a variety of stainless steels. The irradiation tests showed that tritium and helium retention in the Li 2O (˜ 89% dense) lessened with neutron exposure, and the retentions appear to approach a steady-state after ˜ 1% 6Li burnup. The stress corrosion studies, using 316 stainless steel (Ti-modified) and a 35% Ni alloy, showed that stress does not enhance the corrosion, and that dry Li 2O is not significantly corrosive, the LiOH content producing the corrosive effects. Corrosion, in general, was not severe because a passivation in sealed capsules seemed to occur after a time which greatly reduced corrosion rates.

  17. Irradiation mixing of Al into U{sub 3}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ding, F.R.; Kestel, B.J.; Baldo, P.M.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1995-11-01

    Thermal and irradiation induced intermixing of uranium silicide reactor fuels with the aluminum cladding is an important consideration in understanding their fission gas and fuel swelling behavior. The authors have used Rutherford backscattering to follow the behavior of an Al thin film on U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} during 1.5 MeV Kr ion irradiation at temperatures of 30 and 350 C. After an initial dose during which no intermixing occurs, the Al mixes quickly into U{sub 3}Si. The threshold dose is believed to be associated with an oxide layer between the Al and the uranium silicide. At 300 C and doses greater than threshold, rates of mixing and aluminide phase growth are extracted.

  18. Irradiation preservation of Hangzhou White Chrysanthemum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu-gen, Huang; Rong-min, Huang

    1993-07-01

    A study on the irradiation preservation of Hangzhou White Chrysanthemum (HWC for short) was carried out to keep the quality of HWC and prolong its shelf life. The results showed that: 1). γ-irradiation with proper dosage was one of the key steps to prolong the shelf-life of HWC. After γ - treatment at the dose level of 3-5kGy, the laminated plastic film packed HWC could be stored in ambient temperature for over 300 days, remaining its original colour, aroma and taste. 2). Different dose rate had no effect on the treatment results. 3). The main quality indexes of HWC treated with 10.0 kGy γ - rays were not changed, moreover, it had the higher hygienic qualities.

  19. Effects of self-irradiation in plutonium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, B. W.; Lema, K. E.; Allen, P. G.

    2015-09-16

    In this paper, we present updated results of self-irradiation effects on 238Pu-enriched 239Pu alloys measured by immersion density, dilatometry, and tensile tests. We obtained the self-irradiation equivalent time of nearly 200 years, nearly 100 years longer than in our previous papers. At this extended aging, we find the rate of decrease in density has slowed significantly, stabilizing around 15.73 g/cc, without signs of void swelling. The volume expansion measured at 35°C also shows apparent saturation at less than 0.25%. Quasi-static tensile measurement still show gradual increase in the strength of plutonium alloys with age.

  20. Irradiation testing of an asphalt-based grout vault sealant

    SciTech Connect

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1993-09-01

    In general, Nokorode 705M (a) showed only minimal effects from irradiation at the levels calculated for a 300-year lifetime, while in contact with the basic fluids expected in actual use. In no instance was loss of adhesion on concrete or loss of water tightness encountered in this testing. In contrast to simpler materials tested over 30 years ago, the Nokorode showed only small changes in density and virtually no changes in the mechanical properties examined. The much higher dose rate used to perform these tests within a reasonable time presumably amplified all irradiation effects, and nevertheless produced no changes which would make the material obviously unsuitable for its intended use. Although the effects observed were not examined in enough detail to determine the dominant degradation mechanism(s), the material is qualified from an engineering point of view.