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Sample records for rate nanosecond laser

  1. All-fiberized SBS-based high repetition rate sub-nanosecond Yb fiber laser for supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Dacheng; Su, Jianjia; Cui, Wei; Yan, Yaxi; Jiang, Peipei

    2014-12-01

    We report an all-fiberized SBS-based high repetition rate sub-nanosecond Yb fiber laser for supercontinuum generation. The high repetition rate ns laser pulses were produced from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-constructed fiber laser cavity consisting of a piece of double cladding Yb fiber as the gain medium and a short piece of Bi/Cr-doped fiber as a saturable absorber (SA). By optimizing the fiber length of the Bi/Cr-doped fiber and the reflectivity of the FBG, the Q-switching state of the fiber laser can be adjusted so that the energy storing condition within the fiber cavity can assure the start of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and as a result, compress the laser pulse duration. The fiber laser had an average laser power output of 1.2 W at 1064 nm with pulse repetition rate of about 80 kHz, almost four times the reported results. The pulse duration was about 1 ns with peak power of about 15 kW. After one stage of amplification, the laser power was raised to about 3 W and was used to pump a 20 m long photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Supercontiuum (SC) laser output was obtained with average power up to 1.24 W and spectrum spanning from 550 to 2200 nm.

  2. Nanosecond component in a femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Semak, V. V.; Zhang Zhili

    2012-11-15

    Experimental and computational results show that the coherent microwave scattering from a laser-induced plasma can be used for measuring the quality of a fs laser pulse. The temporal dynamics of the microwave scattered signal from the fs-laser induced plasma can be related to the effect of nanosecond tail of the fs laser pulse.

  3. Millisecond laser machining of transparent materials assisted by nanosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunxiang; Zhang, Hongchao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2015-01-26

    A new form of double pulse composed of a nanosecond laser and a millisecond laser is proposed for laser machining transparent materials. To evaluate its advantages and disadvantages, experimental investigations are carried out and the corresponding results are compared with those of single millisecond laser. The mechanism is discussed from two aspects: material defects and effects of modifications induced by nanosecond laser on thermal stress field during millisecond laser irradiation. It is shown that the modifications of the sample generated by nanosecond laser improves the processing efficiency of subsequent millisecond laser, while limits the eventual size of modified region.

  4. In vivo near-realtime volumetric optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a high-repetition-rate nanosecond fiber-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Shao, Peng; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is capable of achieving optical-absorption-contrast images with micron-scale spatial resolution. Previous OR-PAM systems have been frame-rate limited by mechanical scanning speeds and laser pulse repetition rate (PRR). We demonstrate OR-PAM imaging using a diode-pumped nanosecond-pulsed Ytterbium-doped 532-nm fiber laser with PRR up to 600 kHz. Combined with fast-scanning mirrors, our proposed system provides C-scan and 3D images with acquisition frame rate of 4 frames per second (fps) or higher, two orders of magnitude faster than previously published systems. High-contrast images of capillary-scale microvasculature in a live Swiss Webster mouse ear with ~6-μm optical lateral spatial resolution are demonstrated.

  5. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V

    2014-05-30

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ∼10{sup 8}. (lasers)

  6. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  7. Nanosecond colloidal quantum dot lasers for sensing.

    PubMed

    Guilhabert, B; Foucher, C; Haughey, A-M; Mutlugun, E; Gao, Y; Herrnsdorf, J; Sun, H D; Demir, H V; Dawson, M D; Laurand, N

    2014-03-24

    Low-threshold, gain switched colloidal quantum dot (CQD) distributed-feedback lasers operating in the nanosecond regime are reported and proposed for sensing applications for the first time to the authors' knowledge. The lasers are based on a mechanically-flexible polymeric, second order grating structure overcoated with a thin-film of CQD/PMMA composite. The threshold fluence of the resulting lasers is as low as 0.5 mJ/cm² for a 610 nm emission and the typical linewidth is below 0.3 nm. The emission wavelength of the lasers can be set at the design stage and laser operation between 605 nm and 616 nm, while using the exact same CQD gain material, is shown. In addition, the potential of such CQD lasers for refractive index sensing in solution is demonstrated by immersion in water.

  8. Nanosecond laser ablation of gold nanoparticle films

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Seung H.; Choi, Yeonho; Hwang, David J.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chung, Jaewon; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2006-10-02

    Ablation of self-assembled monolayer protected gold nanoparticle films on polyimide was explored using a nanosecond laser. When the nanoparticle film was ablated and subsequently thermally sintered to a continuous film, the elevated rim structure by the expulsion of molten pool could be avoided and the ablation threshold fluence was reduced to a value at least ten times lower than the reported threshold for the gold film. This could be explained by the unusual properties of nanoparticle film such as low melting temperature, weak bonding between nanoparticles, efficient laser energy deposition, and reduced heat loss. Finally, submicron lines were demonstrated.

  9. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  10. Texturing of polypropylene (PP) with nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Soto, R.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Quintero, F.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a biocompatible and biostable polymer, showing good mechanical properties that has been recently introduced in the biomedical field for bone repairing applications; however, its poor surface properties due to its low surface energy limit their use in biomedical applications. In this work, we have studied the topographical modification of polypropylene (PP) laser textured with Nd:YVO4 nanosecond lasers emitting at λ = 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm. First, optical response of this material under these laser wavelengths was determined. The application of an absorbing coating was also studied. The influence of the laser processing parameters on the surface modification of PP was investigated by means of statistically designed experiments. Processing maps to tailor the roughness, and wettability, the main parameters affecting cell adhesion characteristics of implants, were also determined. Microhardness measurements were performed to discern the impact of laser treatment on the final mechanical properties of PP.

  11. Parametric studies on the nanosecond laser micromachining of the materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tański, M.; Mizeraczyk, J.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper the results of an experimental studies on nanosecond laser micromachining of selected materials are presented. Tested materials were thin plates made of aluminium, silicon, stainless steel (AISI 304) and copper. Micromachining of those materials was carried out using a solid state laser with second harmonic generation λ = 532 nm and a pulse width of τ = 45 ns. The effect of laser drilling using single laser pulse and a burst of laser pulses, as well as laser cutting was studied. The influence of laser fluence on the diameter and morphology of a post ablation holes drilled with a single laser pulse was investigated. The ablation fluence threshold (Fth) of tested materials was experimentally determined. Also the drilling rate (average depth per single laser pulse) of holes drilled with a burst of laser pulses was determined for all tested materials. The studies of laser cutting process revealed that a groove depth increases with increasing average laser power and decreasing cutting speed. It was also found that depth of the laser cut grooves is a linear function of number of repetition of a cut. The quantitative influence of those parameters on the groove depth was investigated.

  12. Nanosecond pulsed laser texturing of optical diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Sabouri, Aydin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider

    2017-02-01

    High-quality optical glass diffusers have applications in aerospace, displays, imaging systems, medical devices, and optical sensors. The development of rapid and accurate fabrication techniques is highly desirable for their production. Here, a micropatterning method for the fast fabrication of optical diffusers by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation is demonstrated (λ=1064 nm, power=7.02, 9.36 and 11.7 W and scanning speed=200 and 800 mm s-1). The experiments were carried out by point-to-point texturing of a glass surface in spiral shape. The laser machining parameters, the number of pulses and their power had significant effect on surface features. The optical characteristics of the diffusers were characterized at different scattering angles. The features of the microscale structures influenced average roughness from 0.8 μm to 1.97 μm. The glass diffusers scattered light at angles up to 20° and their transmission efficiency were measured up to ˜97% across the visible spectrum. The produced optical devices diffuse light less but do so with less scattering and energy losses as compared to opal diffusing glass. The presented fabrication method can be applied to any other transparent material to create optical diffusers. It is anticipated that the optical diffusers presented in this work will have applications in the production of LED spotlights and imaging devices.

  13. Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy have been carried out in four different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) to investigate the effect of gas species on the laser induced breakdown kinetics and resulting the plasma emission. For this purpose, each mixture that consists of different species has the same atom composition. It is found that the temporal emission spectra and the decay rates of atomic line-intensities are almost identical for the breakdowns in the four different mixtures. This finding may indicate that the breakdown plasmas of these mixtures reach a similar thermodynamic and physiochemical state after its formation, resulting in a similar trend of quenching of excited species.

  14. Laser micro-drilling with nanoseconds: parametrical influences and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Reiner; Moser, Tobias; Liebers, Rene; Holtz, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    Drilling holes with pulsed Nd:YAG lasers is well researched and state-of-the-art within a variety of industrial applications. Surgical needles in the medical field, turbine blades for the aviation industry, and gas filter for the automotive industry are just some examples that come to mind. Similar to other industrial developments over the last century this market asks for higher throughput, smaller diameter, higher aspect ratios, and of course within a minimum of tolerances. New laser sources and specially developed processes are entering the market to move the mere drilling to the next level of micro drilling. It is crucial to understand the application and the influence of the process parameters to develop a suitable, stable, and repeatable work process. Commonly used pulses within the microsecond-regime show a significant thermal side effect which is unacceptable if used e.g. in combustion nozzles. Reducing the thermal load by shortening the pulse length into the nanosecond-regime could be a compromise to bridge the gap between quality and production speed in high precision laser drilling. However, depending on the relation between pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and "helical speed" a reduced, but existent, thermal effect is inevitable. The scope of this paper is to show the influences of the process parameters in helical drilling with a new developed nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at its fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. A variation of drilling-optic principles in different materials are studied and the advantages as much as the disadvantages are discussed.

  15. Multicolor multiphoton microscopy based on a nanosecond supercontinuum laser source.

    PubMed

    Lefort, Claire; O'Connor, Rodney P; Blanquet, Véronique; Magnol, Laetitia; Kano, Hideaki; Tombelaine, Vincent; Lévêque, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Multicolor multiphoton microscopy is experimentally demonstrated for the first time on a spectral bandwidth of excitation of 300 nm (full width half maximum) thanks to the implementation a nanosecond supercontinuum (SC) source compact and simple with a low repetition rate. The interest of such a wide spectral bandwidth, never demonstrated until now, is highlighted in vivo: images of glioma tumor cells stably expressing eGFP grafted on the brain of a mouse and its blood vessels network labelled with Texas Red(®) are obtained. These two fluorophores have a spectral bandwidth covering the whole 300 nm available. In parallel, a similar image quality is obtained on a sample of mouse muscle in vitro when excited with this nanosecond SC source or with a classical high rate, femtosecond and quasi monochromatic laser. This opens the way for (i) a simple and very complete biological characterization never performed to date with multiphoton processes, (ii) multiple means of contrast in nonlinear imaging allowed by the use of numerous fluorophores and (iii) other multiphoton processes like three-photon ones.

  16. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-26

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond timescale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ~1010 K/s for temperature increases of ~100 – 200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (~5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-mortem analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ~ ± 3% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ~ ± 5 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  17. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  18. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, T. Okamura, M.; Kumaki, M.; Ikeda, S.

    2016-02-15

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  19. Intense Nanosecond-Pulsed Cavity-Dumped Laser Radiation at 1.04 THz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    We report first results of intense far-infrared (FIR) nanosecond-pulsed laser radiation at 1.04 THz from a previously described[2] cavity-dumped, optically-pumped molecular gas laser. The gain medium, methyl fluoride, is pumped by the 9R20 line of a TEA CO2 laser[3] with a pulse energy of 200 mJ. The THz laser pulses contain of 30 kW peak power in 5 nanosecond pulse widths at a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. The line width, measured by a scanning metal-mesh FIR Fabry-Perot interferometer, is 100 MHz. The novel THz laser is being used in experiments to resonantly excite coherent ns-pulsed 1.04 THz longitudinal acoustic phonons in silicon doping-superlattices. The research is supported by NASA EPSCoR NNX11AM04A and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0100 awards.

  20. Compact nanosecond laser system for the ignition of aeronautic combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiard-Hudebine, G.; Tison, G.; Freysz, E.

    2016-12-01

    We have studied and developed a compact nanosecond laser system dedicated to the ignition of aeronautic combustion engines. This system is based on a nanosecond microchip laser delivering 6 μJ nanosecond pulses, which are amplified in two successive stages. The first stage is based on an Ytterbium doped fiber amplifier (YDFA) working in a quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) regime. Pumped at 1 kHz repetition rate, it delivers TEM00 and linearly polarized nanosecond pulses centered at 1064 nm with energies up to 350 μJ. These results are in very good agreement with the model we specially designed for a pulsed QCW pump regime. The second amplification stage is based on a compact Nd:YAG double-pass amplifier pumped by a 400 W peak power QCW diode centered at λ = 808 nm and coupled to a 800 μm core multimode fiber. At 10 Hz repetition rate, this system amplifies the pulse delivered by the YDFA up to 11 mJ while preserving its beam profile, polarization ratio, and pulse duration. Finally, we demonstrate that this compact nanosecond system can ignite an experimental combustion chamber.

  1. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Veiko, V. P.; Samokhvalov, A. A. Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.

    2016-06-15

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential “opening” radio pulses with a delay of 0.2–1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  2. Double nanosecond pulses generation in ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Yakovlev, E. B.; Zhitenev, I. Yu.; Kliushin, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Double pulse generation mode for nanosecond ytterbium fiber laser was developed. Two sequential 60-200 ns laser pulses with variable delay between them were generated by acousto-optic modulator opening with continuous diode pumping. A custom radio frequency generator was developed to produce two sequential "opening" radio pulses with a delay of 0.2-1 μs. It was demonstrated that double pulse generation did not decrease the average laser power while providing the control over the laser pulse power profile. Surprisingly, a greater peak power in the double pulse mode was observed for the second laser pulse. Laser crater studies and plasma emission measurements revealed an improved efficiency of laser ablation in the double pulse mode.

  3. Analysis of the plastic deformation of AISI 304 steel induced by the nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, W.; Radziejewska, J.; Sarzyński, A.; Strzelec, M.; Marczak, J.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents result of experimental and numerical tests of plastic deformation of austenitic steel generated by a nanosecond laser pulse. The shock wave generated by the laser pulse was used to induce local plastic deformation of the material. The study examined the possibility of using the process to develop a laser forming of materials under ultra-high strain rate. It has been shown that the laser pulse with intensity 2.5 GW/cm2 induces a repeatable plastic deformation of commercially available 304 steel without thermal effects on the surface.

  4. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ˜1010 K/s for temperature increases of ˜100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (˜5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ˜±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ˜±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  5. Nanosecond laser damage of optical multimode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Guido; Krüger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    For pulse laser materials processing often optical step index and gradient index multimode fibers with core diameters ranging from 100 to 600 μm are used. The design of a high power fiber transmission system must take into account limitations resulting from both surface and volume damage effects. Especially, breakdown at the fiber end faces and selffocusing in the fiber volume critically influence the fiber performance. At least operation charts are desirable to select the appropriate fiber type for given laser parameters. In industry-relevant studies the influence of fiber core diameter and end face preparation on laser-induced (surface) damage thresholds (LIDT) was investigated for frequently used all-silica fiber types (manufacturer LEONI). Experiments on preform material (initial fiber material) and compact specimens (models of the cladding and coating material) accompanied the tests performed in accordance with the relevant LIDT standards ISO 21254-1 and ISO 21254-2 for 1-on-1 and S-on-1 irradiation conditions, respectively. The relation beam diameter vs. LIDT was investigated for fused silica fibers. Additionally, laser-induced (bulk) damage thresholds of fused silica preform material F300 (manufacturer Heraeus) in dependence on external mechanical stress simulating fiber bending were measured. All experiments were performed with 10-ns laser pulses at 1064 and 532 nm wavelength with a Gaussian beam profile.

  6. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  7. Microscale nanosecond laser-induced optical breakdown in water.

    PubMed

    Kudryashov, Sergey I; Zvorykin, Vladimir D

    2008-09-01

    Microscale optical breakdown induced in bulk pure water by high-power nanosecond KrF laser pulses was studied using optical transmission and contact broadband photoacoustic techniques. The breakdown has been identified as a sharp transmission drop coinciding with the appearance of unipolar compressive acoustic pulses, both indicating a thresholdlike rise of local intrinsic absorption in the micrometer-scale laser focal volume. The acoustic pulses, which are much broader than the exciting laser pulse and show a strongly reduced far-field diffraction effect, result from breakdown-induced millimeter-sized steam bubbles. The acoustic pulse amplitudes exhibit a sub-linear ( proportional, variantI(3/4)) pressure dependence on the laser intensity I characteristic of subcritical electron-ion plasma and demonstrating the avalanche enhancement of two-photon ionization above the breakdown threshold until the appearance of the critical plasma. In the critical plasma regime, where the transmission and the acoustic signals slowly vary as a function of laser intensity, the main acoustic pulse is preceded by nanosecond and sub- micros prepulses, where the first one represents a GPa-level plasma-driven shock wave and the second one adjacent to the main pulse appears due to weak submillimeter-long heating of water surrounding the hot plasma by its bremsstrahlung radiation, indicating significant dissociation of water molecules in the plasma.

  8. Nanosecond Laser Photolysis of Opaque Heterogeneous Photosensitizers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    Willsher spent two weeks in Spain during the Summer working on this project and presented a poster at the XIIth Recunion Bienal de Quimica Organica de la...Real Sociedad Espaiola de Quimica , Cordoba, Spain,23-25 September, entitled "Fase Solida : Contribuci6n de la "Laser Flash Photolysis" a la Elucidacion

  9. Nanosecond laser photolysis of opaque heterogeneous photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, F.

    1988-07-01

    The new technique of diffuse reflectance laser flash photolysis has been used to study the photochemistry of molecules, such as acridine and diphenylpolyenes adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces and electronic energy transfer between benzophenone and methylnaphtalene at interfaces. Triplet-triplet absorption spectra and decay kinetics have been observed from aromatic ketones such as xanthone, butyrophenone and valerophenone included within zeolite channels and from ruthenium (II) tris (2,2' bipyridine) both bound to polymers and within cavities of an ion exchange resin. Photophysical processes within dyed fabrics e.g., aluminum phthalocyanine, eosin and erythrosin on cotton have been investigated directly for the first time. Time resolved spectra following laser excitation of porous doped photoelectrodes e.g., zinc oxide doped with cobalt, have been obtained which show isosbestic points as the transient decays by electron transfer to give back Co2 (+). photochemistry, Interfaces, Surfaces, Kubelka munk theory, Laser flash photolysis, Opaque materials, Photochemistry, Picosecond spectroscopy, Semi conductors, Sensitizers, Silica, Thermal effects, Transient absorption, Transient decay, Triplet states. (MJM)

  10. Nanosecond laser photolysis of opaque heterogeneous photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, F.

    1987-10-01

    Work continues on studies of photophysical and photochemical properties of benzoylated polystyrene (polymer-bound benzophenone). We are able to establish the presence of two transients when these samples are subjected to laser flash photolysis exciting at 354 nm, from the time dependent decrease in diffuse reflectance at different analyzing wavelengths. One of these transients is the triplet state of the polymer bound benzophenone which can also be studied in emission which we were able to do. The other is probably the radical formed by hydrogen abstraction by this triplet state by those photo excited species which are close enough to methylene groups to allow reaction.

  11. Irreversible reactions studied with nanosecond transmission electron microscopy movies: Laser crystallization of phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santala, M. K.; Reed, B. W.; Raoux, S.; Topuria, T.; LaGrange, T.; Campbell, G. H.

    2013-04-01

    We use multi-frame, nanosecond-scale photo-emission transmission electron microscopy to create movies of irreversible reactions that occur too rapidly to capture with conventional microscopy. The technique is applied to the crystallization of phase change materials used for optical and resistive memory. For those applications, laser- or current-induced crystallization is orders of magnitude too fast to capture with other imaging techniques. We recorded movies of laser-induced crystallization and measured crystal growth rates at temperatures close to where the maximum growth rate occurs. This paves the way for studying crystallization kinetics of phase change materials over the whole range of technologically relevant temperatures.

  12. Removal of Tattoos by Q-Switched Nanosecond Lasers.

    PubMed

    Karsai, Syrus

    2017-01-01

    Tattoo removal by Q-switched nanosecond laser devices is generally a safe and effective method, albeit a time-consuming one. Despite the newest developments in laser treatment, it is still not possible to remove every tattoo completely and without complications. Incomplete removal remains one of the most common challenges. As a consequence, particular restraint should be exercised when treating multicoloured tattoos, and patients need to be thoroughly informed about remaining pigment. Other frequent adverse effects include hyper- and hypopigmentation as well as ink darkening; the latter is particularly frequent in permanent make-up. Scarring is also possible, although it is rare when treatment is performed correctly. It is becoming more widespread for laser operators to encounter allergic reactions and even malignant tumours in tattoos, and treating these conditions requires a nuanced approach. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  14. Biocompatibility Evaluation of Nanosecond Laser Treated Titanium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Ryo; Mizutani, Masayoshi; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Komotori, Jun

    We developed surface modification technologies for dental implants in this study. The study contributes to shortening the time required for adhesion between alveolar bone and fixtures which consist of dental implants. A Nd:YVO4 nanosecond laser was used to modify the surfaces of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) disks, and their biocompatibility was evaluated cytocompatibility and bioactivity. First, rows of 200 µm spaced rectilinear laser treatments were performed on surfaces of CP Ti disks. Osteoblasts derived from rat mesenchymal stem cells were then cultured on the treated surfaces. Cytocompatibility on the laser treated area was evaluated by observing adhesion behavior of cells on these surfaces. The results indicated that the micro-order structure formed by the laser treatment promoted adhesion of osteoblasts and that traces of laser treatment without microstucture didn't affect the adhesion. Second, surfaces of CP Ti disks were completely covered by traces of laser treatment, which created complex microstructures of titania whose crystal structure is rutile and anatase. This phenomenon allowed the creation of hydroxyapatite on the surface of the disks in 1.5-times simulated body fluid (1.5SBF) while no hydroxyapatite was observed on conventional polished surfaces in the same conditions. This result indicates that bioactivity was enabled on CP Ti by the laser treatment. From these two results, laser treatment for CP Ti surfaces is an effective method for enhancing adhesion of osteoblasts and promoting bioactivity, which are highly appreciated properties for dental implants.

  15. Laser ablation of borosilicate glass with high power shaped UV nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Witzendorff, Philipp; Bordin, Andrea; Suttmann, Oliver; Patel, Rajesh S.; Bovatsek, James; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2016-03-01

    The application of thin borosilicate glass as interposer material requires methods for separation and drilling of this material. Laser processing with short and ultra-short laser pulses have proven to enable high quality cuts by either direct ablation or internal glass modification and cleavage. A recently developed high power UV nanosecond laser source allows for pulse shaping of individual laser pulses. Thus, the pulse duration, pulse bursts and the repetition rate can be set individually at a maximum output power of up to 60 W. This opens a completely new process window, which could not be entered with conventional Q-switched pulsed laser sources. In this study, the novel pulsed UV laser system was used to study the laser ablation process on 400 μm thin borosilicate glass at different pulse durations ranging from 2 - 10 ns and a pulse burst with two 10 ns laser pulses with a separation of 10 ns. Single line scan experiments were performed to correlate the process parameters and the laser pulse shape with the ablation depth and cutting edge chipping. Increasing the pulse duration within the single pulse experiments from 2 ns to longer pulse durations led to a moderate increase in ablation depth and a significant increase in chipping. The highest material removal was achieved with the 2x10 ns pulse burst. Experimental data also suggest that chipping could be reduced, while maintaining a high ablation depth by selecting an adequate pulse overlap. We also demonstrate that real-time combination of different pulse patterns during drilling a thin borosilicate glass produced holes with low overall chipping at a high throughput rate.

  16. Enhanced optical absorbance and fabrication of periodic arrays on nickel surface using nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxiang; Liang, Hao; Zhang, Jingyuan; Wang, Yibo; Liu, Yannan; Zhang, Zhiyan; Lin, Xuechun

    2017-04-01

    A hundred-nanosecond pulsed laser was employed to structure the nickel surface. The effects of laser spatial filling interval and laser scanning speed on the optical absorbance capacity and morphologies on the nickel surface were experimentally investigated. The black nickel surface covered with dense micro/nanostructured broccoli-like clusters with strong light trapping capacity ranging from the UV to the near IR was produced at a high laser scanning speed up to v=100 mm/s. The absorbance of the black nickel is as high as 98% in the UV range of 200-400 nm, more than 97% in the visible spectrum, ranging from 400 to 800 nm, and over 90% in the IR between 800 and 2000 nm. In addition, when the nickel surface was irradiated in two-dimensional crossing scans by laser with different processing parameters, self-organized and shape-controllable structures of three-dimensional (3D) periodic arrays can be fabricated. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such processing, the nanosecond fiber laser used in this work is more cost-effective, compact and allows higher processing rates. This nickel surface structured technique may be applicable in optoelectronics, batteries industry, solar/wave absorbers, and wettability materials.

  17. Laser wavelength effect on nanosecond laser light reflection in ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, O.; de la Cruz May, L.; Mejia, E. B.; Ruz Hernandez, J. A.; Flores Gil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of nanosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths (1.06 and 0.69 µm) in ablation of titanium in air is studied experimentally. The laser wavelength effect on reflection is essential at low laser fluence values. However, it becomes negligible for laser fluence values by about an order of magnitude higher than the plasma ignition threshold. We speculate that the disappearance of the wavelength effect is explained by counter-acting processes of the laser light absorption in plasma, which increases with laser wavelength, and absorption in the surface layer, which decreases with increasing laser wavelength.

  18. Acceleration of neutrals in a nanosecond laser produced nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Philip, Reji

    2014-12-15

    Time of flight dynamics of slow neutrals, fast neutrals, and ions from a nanosecond laser produced nickel (Ni) plasma are investigated. Species arrival times confirm the hypothesis that fast neutrals are formed by the recombination of fast ions with free electrons. Both neutrals and ions are found to accelerate for a short interval immediately after ablation, which is attributed to internal Coulomb forces which create electrostatic potentials resulting in the charged particle acceleration. This process is further enhanced by laser-plasma energy coupling. Emission from neutrals could be measured for longer axial distances in the plume compared to that of ions confirming that the ions recombine to form neutrals as they move away from the target surface.

  19. Dry and wet laser catapulting and ablation of cells and bacteria by nanosecond CO II laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Shishir; Kudryashov, Sergey; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D.

    2006-02-01

    A lot of work has been done in the area of laser sterilization using UV lasers whereas this area is not much explored using an IR laser. In this study the cells were catapulted from glass or oxidized silicon substrates by a nanosecond IR CO II laser. Removal of cells and bacteria was achieved under the micron thick liquid layer pre-deposited on the substrates and lifted off together with biological species at laser fluences exceeding the corresponding boiling thresholds for the liquids used. Catapulting with front-side laser illumination is studied

  20. Fluorescence of silicon nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyang Sui, Xin; Yang, Fang; Ma, Wei; Li, Jishun; Xue, Yujun; Fu, Xing

    2014-03-15

    A pulsed laser fabrication method is used to prepare fluorescent microstructures on silicon substrates in this paper. A 355 nm nanosecond pulsed laser micromachining system was designed, and the performance was verified and optimized. Fluorescence microscopy was used to analyze the photoluminescence of the microstructures which were formed using the pulsed laser processing technique. Photoluminescence spectra of the microstructure reveal a peak emission around 500 nm, from 370 nm laser irradiation. The light intensity also shows an exponential decay with irradiation time, which is similar to attenuation processes seen in porous silicon. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the microstructure in the fabricated region was also analyzed with multifunction scanning electron microscopy. Spherical particles are produced with diameters around 100 nm. The structure is compared with porous silicon. It is likely that these nanoparticles act as luminescence recombination centers on the silicon surface. The small diameter of the particles modifies the band gap of silicon by quantum confinement effects. Electron-hole pairs recombine and the fluorescence emission shifts into the visible range. The chemical elements of the processed region are also changed during the interaction between laser and silicon. Oxidation and carbonization play an important role in the enhancement of fluorescence emission.

  1. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  2. Fluorescence study of silicon fabricated by nanosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyang; Sun, Lidong; Lu, Yulan; Fu, Xing; Sun, Fengming; Zeppenfield, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Some ~20μm wide slots have been fabricated on Si (100) using a homebuilt 355nm nanosecond pulse laser micromachining system. The slots were characterized by fluorescence microscopy, local spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A kind of microstructure like porous silicon was formed in the fabrication zone. Strong photoluminescence emission from the fabricated zone in the wavelength range between 450nm and 700nm has been detected. Furthermore, a strong decay of the PL intensity has been observed as a function of irradiation time for excitation with wavelength between 400nm and 440nm. The analysis of elemental composition in the fabrication zone shows that the fluorescence emission is in relationship with Oxygen distribution and the modified structure.

  3. Millisecond laser machining of transparent materials assisted by a nanosecond laser with different delays.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunxiang; Lv, Xueming; Zhang, Hongchao; Chen, Jun; Han, Bing; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2016-06-15

    A millisecond laser combined with a nanosecond laser was applied to machining transparent materials. The influences of delay between the two laser pulses on processing efficiencies and modified sizes were studied. In addition, a laser-supported combustion wave (LSCW) was captured during laser irradiation. An optimal delay corresponding to the highest processing efficiency was found for cone-shaped cavities. The modified size as well as the lifetime and intensity of the LSCW increased with the delay decreasing. Thermal cooperation effects of defects, overlapping effects of small modified sites, and thermal radiation from LSCW result in all the phenomena.

  4. Mechanism study of skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qiyin

    Understanding the fundamental mechanisms in laser tissue ablation is essential to improve clinical laser applications by reducing collateral damage and laser pulse energy requirement. The motive of this dissertation is to study skin tissue ablation by nanosecond laser pulses in a wide spectral region from near-infrared to ultraviolet for a clear understanding of the mechanism that can be used to improve future design of the pulsed lasers for dermatology and plastic surgery. Multiple laser and optical configurations have been constructed to generate 9 to 12ns laser pulses with similar profiles at 1064. 532, 266 and 213nm for this study of skin tissue ablation. Through measurements of ablation depth as a function cf laser pulse energy, the 589nm spectral line in the secondary radiation from ablated skin tissue samples was identified as the signature of the occurrence of ablation. Subsequently, this spectral signature has been used to investigate the probabilistic process of the ablation near the threshold at the four wavelengths. Measurements of the ablation probability were conducted as a function of the electrical field strength of the laser pulse and the ablation thresholds in a wide spectral range from 1064nm to 213nm were determined. Histology analysis and an optical transmission method were applied in assessing of the ablation depth per pulse to study the ablation process at irradiance levels higher than threshold. Because more than 70% of the wet weight of the skin tissue is water, optical breakdown and backscattering in water was also investigated along with a nonlinear refraction index measurement using a z-scan technique. Preliminary studies on ablation of a gelatin based tissue phantom are also reported. The current theoretical models describing ablation of soft tissue ablation by short laser pulses were critically reviewed. Since none of the existing models was found capable of explaining the experimental results, a new plasma-mediated model was developed

  5. Nanosecond double-pulse fiber laser with arbitrary sub-pulse combined based on a spectral beam combining system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Man; Zheng, Ye; Yang, Yifeng; Chen, Xiaolong; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Wang, Jianhua; Qi, Yunfeng; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In order to improve the processing efficiency and quality of nanosecond pulse laser drilling, a new double-pulse technique is put forward. Two single pulse lasers with different pulse duration or different repetition rate are spectrally combined by a home-made polarization-independent multilayer dielectric reflective diffraction grating. The pulse energy of single lasers and the inter-pulse separation can both be set at one's option. Then, double-pulse lasers represent two closely conjoint pulses with tunable pulse duration and tunable repetition rate and tunable pulse energy and tunable inter-pulse separation are obtained.

  6. Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Duong V.; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2015-12-01

    This work demonstrates superhydrophobic behavior on nanosecond laser patterned copper and brass surfaces. Compared with ultrafast laser systems previously used for such texturing, infrared nanosecond fiber lasers offer a lower cost and more robust system combined with potentially much higher processing rates. The wettability of the textured surfaces develops from hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity over time when exposed to ambient conditions. The change in the wetting property is attributed to the partial deoxidation of oxides on the surface induced during laser texturing. Textures exhibiting steady state contact angles of up to ∼152° with contact angle hysteresis of around 3-4° have been achieved. Interestingly, the superhydrobobic surfaces have the self-cleaning ability and have potential for chemical sensing applications. The principle of these novel chemical sensors is based on the change in contact angle with the concentration of methanol in a solution. To demonstrate the principle of operation of such a sensor, it is found that the contact angle of methanol solution on the superhydrophobic surfaces exponentially decays with increasing concentration. A significant reduction, of 128°, in contact angle on superhydrophobic brass is observed, which is one order of magnitude greater than that for the untreated surface (12°), when percent composition of methanol reaches to 28%.

  7. All-fiber mode-locked nanosecond laser employing intracavity chirped fiber gratings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hushan; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ting; Hu, Xiaohong; Yang, Zhi; Liu, Hongjun; Duan, Kailiang; Liu, Xuemin; Li, Cheng; Shen, Deyuan; Sui, Zhan; Liu, Bin

    2010-03-29

    We demonstrate that nanosecond pulses are generated directly from an all-fiber mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser. A pair of Chirped Fiber Gratings (CFGs) with different sign of dispersion is employed for intracavity dispersion management. Self-starting stabilized mode-locking operation is achieved by nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE). The 1.27 ns pulses are obtained after one CFG with large positive dispersion. The pulse energy is up to 15 nJ at a repetition rate of 3.48 MHz.

  8. Nanosecond laser-cluster interactions at 109-1012 W/cm 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rohtash; Tripathi, V. K.; Vatsa, R. K.; Das, D.

    2017-08-01

    An analytical model and a numerical code are developed to study the evolution of multiple charge states of ions by irradiating clusters of atoms of a high atomic number (e.g., Xe) by 1.06 μm and 0.53 μm nanosecond laser pulses of an intensity in the range of 109-1012 W/cm 2 . The laser turns clusters into plasma nanoballs. Initially, the momentum randomizing collisions of electrons are with neutrals, but soon these are taken over by collisions with ions. The ionization of an ion to the next higher state of ionization is taken to be caused by an energetic free electron impact, and the rates of impact ionization are suitably modelled by having an inverse exponential dependence of ionizing collision frequency on the ratio of ionization potential to electron temperature. Cluster expansion led adiabatic cooling is a major limiting mechanism on electron temperature. In the intensity range considered, ionization states up to 7 are expected with nanosecond pulses. Another possible mechanism, filamentation of the laser, has also been considered to account for the observation of higher charged states. However, filamentation is seen to be insufficient to cause substantial local enhancement in the intensity to affect electron heating rates.

  9. Range extension in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using femtosecond-nanosecond dual-beam laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Li, Ziting; Yao, Jinping; Xie, Hongqiang; Li, Guihua; Wang, Zhanshan; Cheng, Ya

    2017-06-01

    We extend the detection range of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy by combining high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses with high-energy nanosecond CO2 laser pulses. The femtosecond laser pulses ionize the molecules and generate filament in air. The free electrons generated in the self-confined plasma channel by the femtosecond laser serve as the seed electrons which cause efficient avalanche ionization in the nanosecond CO2 laser field. We show that the detection distance has been extended by three times with the assistance of femtosecond laser filamentation.

  10. Laser-induced damage threshold of silicon under combined millisecond and nanosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xueming; Pan, Yunxiang; Jia, Zhichao; Li, Zewen; Zhang, Hongchao; Ni, Xiaowu

    2017-03-01

    The laser-silicon interaction process was investigated with the superposed radiation of two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers. A pulse duration of 1 millisecond (ms) was superposed by 7 nanosecond (ns) pulses, creating a combined pulse laser (CPL). The time-resolved surface temperature of silicon was measured by an infrared radiation pyrometer. The melting thresholds of silicon were attained for a single ms laser and a CPL by infrared radiometry and time-resolved reflectance. The concept of threshold boundary was proposed, and a fitted curve of threshold boundary was obtained. An axisymmetric model was established for laser heating of silicon. The transient temperature fields were obtained for single ms laser and CPL irradiation using finite element analysis. The numerical results were validated experimentally, and an obvious decrease in melting threshold was found under CPL irradiation. That is attributed to pre-heating by the ms laser and the surface damage caused by the ns laser.

  11. Multi-kW IR and green nanosecond thin-disk lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Christian; Schüle, Wolfgang; Angrick, Veit; Bouzid, Montasser; Killi, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Thin-disk lasers with multi-kW output power in continuous-wave operation are widely used for industrial materials processing due to their excellent beam quality, high efficiency, and high reliability with low investment and operation costs. We present our latest laboratory results of nanosecond thin-disk lasers with multi-kW average output power. We show that in pulsed laser systems almost the same average power and beam quality as in CW systems can be realized. Utilizing the cavity-dumping principle for pulse generation we demonstrated more than 4 kW of average output power with pulse energies exceeding 180 mJ. The laser generates pulses with a pulse duration of 20 ns which is almost independent of the power level and the repetition rate. The beam parameter product was measured to be better than 4.5 mm•mrad (M2 < 14). Deploying intracavity frequency conversion the efficient generation of pulsed laser output in the green spectral range is investigated. Results for a q-switched thin-disk laser with an average power exceeding 1.8 kW and pulse durations between 100 ns and 300 ns are presented. First results for the external second and third harmonic generation of a nanosecond thin-disk laser using the cavitydumping principle are presented. With an incident IR average power of 2.3 kW more than 800 W at 515 nm are demonstrated for the second harmonic generation and more than 500 W at 343 nm are shown for the third harmonic generation with a pulse duration measured to be < 20 ns.

  12. All-laser bladeless cataract surgery, combining femtosecond and nanosecond lasers: a novel surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report the safety and efficacy of a novel surgical technique using two lasers in cataract surgery. Methods In this contralateral eye report, a 57-year-old female underwent cataract extraction. Two laser devices and a standard phacoemulsification, platform were used to conduct the procedures. First, a femtosecond laser was used to perform the corneal incision, capsulorhexis, and initial lens fragmentation in each eye. Following this, a nanosecond laser was used to enter the 2.8 mm incision, uni-axially, and complete the viscoelastic-divided nucleus fragment emulsification and removal in one eye. Standard phacoemulsification was used in the completion of the other eye. Posterior chamber foldable acrylic intraocular lenses were implanted in both cases. We evaluated perioperative acuity, refraction, keratometry, Scheimpflug tomography, intraocular pressure, endothelial cell counts, and total energy used with each laser in each case. Results Corrected distance visual acuity improved from preoperative 20/60 and 20/70 to postoperative 20/20 in both eyes, with 6-month follow-up. In the right eye, the total intraocular energy used was 2 J by the femtosecond laser and 6 J by the phacoemulsification device. In the left eye, the nanosecond laser utilized the same energy of 2 J and the nanosecond laser 2.4 J (80 pulses of 30 mJ each). There were no other differences noted in intraocular pressure or endothelial cell counts. Conclusion In this report, we introduce a bladeless all-laser cataract surgery extraction alternative technique, with several potential novel advantages: enhanced incision and capsulorhexis reproducibility, reduction in intraocular energy used, and elimination of the potential of thermal corneal injury. PMID:24049439

  13. All-laser bladeless cataract surgery, combining femtosecond and nanosecond lasers: a novel surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John

    2013-01-01

    To report the safety and efficacy of a novel surgical technique using two lasers in cataract surgery. In this contralateral eye report, a 57-year-old female underwent cataract extraction. Two laser devices and a standard phacoemulsification, platform were used to conduct the procedures. First, a femtosecond laser was used to perform the corneal incision, capsulorhexis, and initial lens fragmentation in each eye. Following this, a nanosecond laser was used to enter the 2.8 mm incision, uni-axially, and complete the viscoelastic-divided nucleus fragment emulsification and removal in one eye. Standard phacoemulsification was used in the completion of the other eye. Posterior chamber foldable acrylic intraocular lenses were implanted in both cases. We evaluated perioperative acuity, refraction, keratometry, Scheimpflug tomography, intraocular pressure, endothelial cell counts, and total energy used with each laser in each case. Corrected distance visual acuity improved from preoperative 20/60 and 20/70 to postoperative 20/20 in both eyes, with 6-month follow-up. In the right eye, the total intraocular energy used was 2 J by the femtosecond laser and 6 J by the phacoemulsification device. In the left eye, the nanosecond laser utilized the same energy of 2 J and the nanosecond laser 2.4 J (80 pulses of 30 mJ each). There were no other differences noted in intraocular pressure or endothelial cell counts. In this report, we introduce a bladeless all-laser cataract surgery extraction alternative technique, with several potential novel advantages: enhanced incision and capsulorhexis reproducibility, reduction in intraocular energy used, and elimination of the potential of thermal corneal injury.

  14. Synthesis of silicon-based nanoparticles by 10.6 μm nanosecond CO2 laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, D. M.; Chai, J. S.; Zekic, A. A.; Trtica, M.; Momcilovic, M.; Maletic, S.

    2013-02-01

    Silicon-based nanoparticles were produced by irradiating a single-crystal silicon target with 10.6 μm nanosecond transverse excited atmospheric (TEA) pulsed CO2 laser in de-ionized water. The effects of the laser pulse energies and repetition rate were studied. To reveal the role of thermal effects, a low laser repetition rate has been applied, excluding the interaction of the laser beam with the previously generated cavitation bubble. The analysis of the influence of the laser pulse energies and the laser repetition rate showed that the increase of the laser pulse energies leads to an increase of the nanoparticle size. An explanation of such results was proposed and the importance of the role of the target surface temperature in the ablation process is discussed.

  15. Specific features of metal surface processing by nanosecond laser pulse trains

    SciTech Connect

    Gornyi, S G; Grigor'ev, A M; Patrov, M I; Solov'ev, V D; Turichin, G A

    2002-10-31

    The process of melt formation upon irradiation of a metal by a train of nanosecond laser pulses is studied theoretically and experimentally. A method is developed for determining the parameters of a train at which the amount of melt is minimal, and the material is removed in the vapour state upon laser irradiation. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, N.; Strader, J.; Kumar, Amit; Vincent, A.; Zhang, P.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Cho, H-J.; Seal, Sudipta; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2011-01-23

    Fast, sensitive and discriminating detection of hydrogen at room temperature is crucial for storage, transportation, and distribution of hydrogen as an energy source. One dimensional nanowires of SnO2 are potential candidates for improved H2 sensor performance. The single directional conducting continuous nanowires can decrease electrical noise, and their large active surface area could improve the response and recovery time of the sensor. In this work we discuss synthesis and characterization of nanowire arrays made using nanosecond ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm) laser interference processing of ultrathin SnO2 films on SiO2 substrates. The laser energy was chosen to be above the melting point of the films. The results show that the final nanowire formation is dominated by preferential evaporation as compared to thermocapillary flow. The nanowire height (and hence wire aspect ratio) increased with increasing initial film thickness ho and with increasing laser energy density Eo. Furthermore, a self-limiting effect was observed where-in the wire formation ceased at a specific final remaining thickness of SnO2 that was almost independent of ho for a given Eo. To understand these effects, finite element modeling of the nanoscale laser heating was performed. This showed that the temperature rise under laser heating was a strong non-monotonic function of film thickness. As a result, the preferential evaporation rate varies as wire formation occurs, eventually leading to a shut-off of evaporation at a characteristic thickness. This results in the stoppage of wire formation. This combination of nanosecond pulsed laser experiments and thermal modeling shows that several unique synthesis approaches can be utilized to control the nanowire characteristics.

  17. Metal oxide hollow nanoparticles formation by a single nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhen; Hwang, David J.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the trend of metal oxide hollow nanoparticles formation is experimentally inspected by a single nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a bulk metal material in water and/or ethanol. Analysis results by transmission electron microscope indicate that the hollow formation can be completed or initiated by a single nanosecond laser pulse, dictated by the diffusive thermo-chemical and/or bubble-assisted assembly mechanisms, depending on the surrounding liquid medium and laser parameters. The results not only provide experimental clues to unveiling complex mechanisms involved with the hollow formation by the multiple laser shots but also will contribute to improving the hollow particle production efficiency.

  18. Ambient femtosecond laser vaporization and nanosecond laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of <100 fs to enable matrix-free laser vaporization with little or no fragmentation. When coupled to electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 10(13) W cm(-2) desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  19. Ambient Femtosecond Laser Vaporization and Nanosecond Laser Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanigan, Paul; Levis, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Recent investigations of ambient laser-based transfer of molecules into the gas phase for subsequent mass spectral analysis have undergone a renaissance resulting from the separation of vaporization and ionization events. Here, we seek to provide a snapshot of recent femtosecond (fs) duration laser vaporization and nanosecond (ns) duration laser desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry experiments. The former employs pulse durations of <100 fs to enable matrix-free laser vaporization with little or no fragmentation. When coupled to electrospray ionization, femtosecond laser vaporization provides a universal, rapid mass spectral analysis method requiring no sample workup. Remarkably, laser pulses with intensities exceeding 1013 W cm-2 desorb intact macromolecules, such as proteins, and even preserve the condensed phase of folded or unfolded protein structures according to the mass spectral charge state distribution, as demonstrated for cytochrome c and lysozyme. Because of the ability to vaporize and ionize multiple components from complex mixtures for subsequent analysis, near perfect classification of explosive formulations, plant tissue phenotypes, and even the identity of the manufacturer of smokeless powders can be determined by multivariate statistics. We also review the more mature field of nanosecond laser desorption for ambient mass spectrometry, covering the wide range of systems analyzed, the need for resonant absorption, and the spatial imaging of complex systems like tissue samples.

  20. Decolorization of methylene blue in aqueous suspensions of gold nanoparticles using parallel nanosecond pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yan P; Liu, Xian H; Du, Xi W; Lu, Yi R; Wang, Mei Y; Wang, Guang Y

    2013-01-01

    Using 532 nm parallel nanosecond pulsed laser, the decolorization of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous suspensions of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) was studied. The effects of various experimental parameters, such as irradiation time, laser energy, and initial MB concentration on the decolorization rate were investigated. Experiments using real samples of textile dyeing wastewater were also carried out to examine the effectiveness of the method in more complex samples. From the results, the following conclusions may be drawn: (i) Under the optimum conditions (pH 7.19, 135 mJ laser energy, 4 mg/L MB concentration, and 11.6 mg/L GNP concentration), the rate of MB decolorization could reach 94% in 15 min. The decolorization follows pseudo-first-order kinetics; (ii) The amount of MB decreased rapidly during the decolorization. No intermediates of the decolorization could be detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. These observations indicate that MB was decolorized through a very rapid degradation mechanism; (iii) The rate of MB decolorization increased with the increase in laser energy (at laser energies of 0 to 135 mJ); and, (iv) The efficient decolorization of MB in real samples of textile dyeing wastewater was achieved at a decolorization rate of about 85% in 15 min.

  1. Compact, 17W average power, 100kW peak power, nanosecond fiber laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, Matthieu J.; Logan, David; Green, Jared; Balsley, David; Nelson, Mike; Small, Jay; Mettlen, Scott; Lowder, Tyson L.; McComb, Timothy S.; Kutscha, Tim; Burkholder, Gary; Smith, Michael R.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Randall, Matthew; Fanning, Geoff; Bell, Jake

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a robust, compact, low-cost, pulsed, linearly polarized, 1064 nm, Yb:fiber laser system capable of generating ~100 kW peak power pulses and >17 W average power at repetition rates of 80 - 285 kHz. The system employs a configurable microchip seed laser that provides nanosecond (~1.0 - 1.5 ns) pulse durations. The seed pulses are amplified in an all-fiber, polarization maintaining, large mode area (LMA) fiber amplifier optimized for high peak power operation. The LMA Yb:fiber amplifier enables near diffraction limited beam quality at 100 kW peak power. The seed laser, fiber amplifier, and beam delivery optics are packaged into an air-cooled laser head of 152×330×87 mm3 with pump power provided from a separate air-cooled laser controller. Due to the high peak power, high beam quality, spectral purity, and linearly polarized nature of the output beam, the laser is readily frequency doubled to 532 nm. Average 532 nm powers up to 7 W and peak powers exceeding 40 kW have been demonstrated. Potential for scaling to higher peak and average powers in both the green and infrared (IR) will be discussed. This laser system has been field tested and demonstrated in numerous materials processing applications in both the IR and green, including scribing and marking. We discuss recent results that demonstrate success in processing a diverse array of representative industrial samples.

  2. Soda-lime glass microlens arrays fabricated by laser: Comparison between a nanosecond and a femtosecond IR pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Tamara; Nieto, Daniel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2016-11-01

    We present the manufacturing of microlens arrays on soda-lime glass substrates by using two different IR pulsed lasers: a nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser (1064 nm) and a femtosecond laser based on Ytterbium crystal technology (1030 nm). In both cases, the fabrication technique consists of the combination of a direct-write laser process, followed by a post-thermal treatment assisted by a CO2 laser. Through the analysis of the morphological characteristics of the generated microlenses, the different physical mechanisms involved in the glass ablation process with a nanosecond and a femtosecond laser are studied. In addition, by analyzing the optical features of the microlenses, a better result in terms of the homogeneity and quality of the spot focuses are observed for those microlenses fabricated with the Nd:YVO4 nanosecond laser. Microlens arrays with a diameter of 80 and 90 μm were fabricated.

  3. Studies on laser material processing with nanosecond and sub-nanosecond and picosecond and sub-picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, laser ablation of widely used metal (Al, Cu. stainless-steel), semiconductor (Si), transparent material (glass, sapphire), ceramic (Al2O3, AlN) and polymer (PI, PMMA) in industry were systematically studied with pulse width from nanosecond (5-100ns), picosecond (6-10ps) to sub-picosecond (0.8-0.95ps). A critical damage zone (CDZ) of up to 100um with ns laser, <=50um with ps laser, and <=20um with sub-ps laser, respectively was observed as a criteria of selecting the laser pulse width. The effects of laser processing parameters on speed and efficiency were also investigated. This is to explore how to provide industry users the best laser solution for device micro-fabrication with best price. Our studies of cutting and drilling with ns, ps, and sub-ps lasers indicate that it is feasible to achieve user accepted quality and speed with cost-effective and reliable laser by optimizing processing conditions.

  4. A Comparison in laser precision drilling of stainless steel 304 with nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyu; Di, Jianke; Zhou, Ming; Yan, Yu

    2014-09-01

    Precision drilling with picosecond laser has been advocated to significantly improve the quality of micro-holes with reduced recast layer thickness and almost no heat affected zone. However, a detailed comparison between nanosecond and picosecond laser drilling techniques has rarely been reported in previous research. In the present study, a series of micro-holes are manufactured on stainless steel 304 using a nanosecond and a picosecond laser drilling system, respectively. The quality of the micro-holes, e.g., recast layer, micro-crack, circularity, and conicity, etc, is evaluated by employing an optical microscope, an optical interferometer, and a scanning electron microscope. Additionally, the micro-structure of the samples between the edges of the micro-holes and the parent material is compared following etching treatment. The researching results show that a great amount of spattering material accumulated at the entrance ends of the nanosecond laser drilled micro-holes. The formation of a recast layer with a thickness of ˜25 μm is detected on the side walls, associated with initiation of micro-cracks. Tapering phenomenon is also observed and the circularity of the micro-holes is rather poor. With regard to the micro-holes drilled by picosecond laser, the entrance ends, the exit ends, and the side walls are quite smooth without accumulation of spattering material, formation of recast layer and micro-cracks. The circularity of the micro-holes is fairly good without observation of tapering phenomenon. Furthermore, there is no obvious difference as for the micro-structure between the edges of the micro-holes and the parent material. This study proposes a picosecond laser helical drilling technique which can be used for effective manufacturing of high quality micro-holes.

  5. Microstructured silicon created with a nanosecond neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeville, W. J.; Shaffer, M. K.; Lu, Yalin; O'Keefe, D.; Knize, R. J.

    2011-08-01

    We produce microstructured silicon using frequency doubled, nanosecond Nd:YAG pulses in SF6 gas. The micro-penitentes formed are up to 20 μm tall with a sulfur concentration of 0.5% near the surface. The infrared absorption is increased to near unity and extends well below the original bandgap far into the infrared. These data are similar to results reported by others using more complicated and less economical femtosecond titanium sapphire and picosecond and nanosecond excimer lasers.

  6. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, M.; Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J. B. A.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Carvou, E.; Menneveux, J.; Yu, J.; Ouf, F.-X.; Carles, S.; Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Perez, J.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Lavisse, L.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O2-N2 gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2-5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O2 percentage in the O2-N2 gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  7. Upconversion emission from amorphous Y 2O 3:Tm 3+, Yb 3+ prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, C. B.; Xia, Y. Q.; Qin, F.; Yu, Y.; Miao, J. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Cao, W. W.

    2011-06-01

    Y 2O 3:Tm 3+, Yb 3+ was prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows that the material produced by laser irradiation is amorphous, which presents strong blue upconversion emission under the excitation of 976 nm diode laser. The relative intensity of the blue emission to the infrared one is linearly dependent on the pump power and is an order of magnitude higher than that of the bulk material. The analyses of rate equations and the time-resolved spectroscopic results indicate that the enhancement of the blue upconversion is attributed to the longer lifetime of the levels of the Tm 3+ and Yb 3+ ions.

  8. Effect of Pulse Length on Engraving Efficiency in Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Engraving of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Matti; Hirvimäki, Marika; Poutiainen, Ilkka; Salminen, Antti

    2015-10-01

    Dependency of laser pulse length on the effectiveness of laser engraving 304 stainless steel with nanosecond pulses was investigated. Ytterbium fiber laser with pulse lengths from 4 to 200 ns was used at a constant average power of 20 W. Measured criteria for effective laser engraving were high material removal rate (MRR), good visual quality of the engraved surface, and low processing temperature. MRR was measured by weighing the samples prior and after the engraving process. Visual quality was evaluated from magnified images. Surface temperature of the samples was measured by two laser spot-welded K-type thermocouples near the laser-processed area. It was noticed that MRR increases significantly with longer pulse lengths, while the quality decreases and processing temperature increases. Some peculiar process behavior was noticed. With short pulses (<20 ns), the process temperature steadily increased as the engraving process continued, whereas with longer pulses the process temperature started to decrease after initially jumping to a specific level. From visually analyzing the samples, it was noticed that the melted and resolidified bottom structure had cracks and pores on the surface when 50 ns or longer pulse lengths were used.

  9. Exploration of the multiparameter space of nanosecond-laser damage growth in fused silica optics

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, Raluca A.; Liao, Zhi M.; Abdulla, Ghaleb M.; Cross, David A.; Norton, Mary A.; Carr, Christopher W.

    2011-08-01

    Historically, the rate at which laser-induced damage sites grow on the exit surface of SiO{sub 2} optics under subsequent illumination with nanosecond-laser pulses of any wavelength was believed to depend solely on laser fluence. We demonstrate here that much of the scatter in previous growth observations was due to additional parameters that were not previously known to affect growth rate, namely the temporal pulse shape and the size of a site. Furthermore, the remaining variability observed in the rate at which sites grow is well described in terms of Weibull statistics. The effects of site size and laser fluence may both be expressed orthogonally in terms of Weibull coefficients. In addition, we employ a clustering algorithm to explore the multiparameter growth space and expose average growth trends. Conversely, this analysis approach also identifies sites likely to exhibit growth rates outside the norm. The ability to identify which sites are likely to grow abnormally fast in advance of the manifestation of such behavior will significantly enhance the accuracy of predictive models over those based on average growth behaviors.

  10. Exploration of the multiparameter space of nanosecond-laser damage growth in fused silica optics.

    PubMed

    Negres, Raluca A; Liao, Zhi M; Abdulla, Ghaleb M; Cross, David A; Norton, Mary A; Carr, Christopher W

    2011-08-01

    Historically, the rate at which laser-induced damage sites grow on the exit surface of SiO2 optics under subsequent illumination with nanosecond-laser pulses of any wavelength was believed to depend solely on laser fluence. We demonstrate here that much of the scatter in previous growth observations was due to additional parameters that were not previously known to affect growth rate, namely the temporal pulse shape and the size of a site. Furthermore, the remaining variability observed in the rate at which sites grow is well described in terms of Weibull statistics. The effects of site size and laser fluence may both be expressed orthogonally in terms of Weibull coefficients. In addition, we employ a clustering algorithm to explore the multiparameter growth space and expose average growth trends. Conversely, this analysis approach also identifies sites likely to exhibit growth rates outside the norm. The ability to identify which sites are likely to grow abnormally fast in advance of the manifestation of such behavior will significantly enhance the accuracy of predictive models over those based on average growth behaviors.

  11. Nanosecond x-ray Laue diffraction apparatus suitable for laser shock compression experiments.

    PubMed

    Suggit, Matthew; Kimminau, Giles; Hawreliak, James; Remington, Bruce; Park, Nigel; Wark, Justin

    2010-08-01

    We have used nanosecond bursts of x-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma, comprised of a mixture of mid-Z elements, to produce a quasiwhite-light spectrum suitable for performing Laue diffraction from single crystals. The laser-produced plasma emits x-rays ranging in energy from 3 to in excess of 10 keV, and is sufficiently bright for single shot nanosecond diffraction patterns to be recorded. The geometry is suitable for the study of laser-shocked crystals, and single-shot diffraction patterns from both unshocked and shocked silicon crystals are presented.

  12. Comparison of glass processing using high-repetition femtosecond (800 nm) and UV (255 nm) nanosecond pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnakis, Dimitris M.; Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Alty, Kevin T.; Schlaf, Martin; Snelling, Howard V.

    2005-01-01

    Laser processing of glass is of significant commercial interest for microfabrication of "lab-on-a-chip" microfluidic devices. High repetition rate pulsed lasers have been investigated and provide adequate processing speeds but suffer from the inherent risk of laser-induced microcracking and other collateral damage induced in the glass. In this paper we present a comparative study between nanosecond deep UV (255nm) frequency doubled copper laser and femtosecond Ti:Sapphire (800nm) regenerative amplifier laser machining of borosilicate glass. Microchannel scribing and high aspect ratio hole drilling is demonstrated in thick glass using direct writing and mask projection techniques. The resulting material structure geometries have been examined using SEM microscopy and white light interferometry. The feasibility of glass laser machining and the significance of each laser type for this application are discussed.

  13. Temporal and spatial diagnosis of nanosecond laser ablation and laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Peng, Xin; Chen, Minsun; Zhao, Guomin

    2017-05-01

    We present a versatile method to diagnose method to diagnose nanosecond laser induced plasma (LIP) plume with good temporal (10 ns here) and spatial (here sub-millimeter) resolution, without requiring the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The spatially resolved emission images from plasmas formed by 532 nm laser ablation of a silicon target in vacuum (10-7 mbar) with incident irradiance of 21 GW/cm2 were recorded at different time delays using a time-gated iCCD camera attached to a spectrograph and image optics. The spectroscopic emission lines associated with different charged species are assigned in the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The further analysis of Stark broadened line shapes of those emission images allows tracking the plume dynamics and provides insight into the early time (i.e. within several tens of nanoseconds) mechanism of laser-target interaction and the subsequent laser-plasma coupling. The electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) values and their variations with space and time are obtained from best-fitting model to the observed line shapes based on a non-LTE electron energy distribution function (EEDF) rather than a Maxwellian EEDF. The value of Ne and Te respectively declined from 1023 to 1021 m-3 and 10 to 0.1 eV since the plume expansion. The time-gated emission images and the spatial and temporal variation of the Ne and Te values both highlight the inhomogeneity of the LIP plume, and provide the future analysis and possible derivation of the electron emitting model from target surface after laser-lattice interaction within sub-nanosecond.

  14. High Intensity Mirror-Free Nanosecond Ytterbium Fiber Laser System in Master Oscillator Power Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Lin, Louis Chang

    Rare-earth-doped fiber lasers and amplifiers are relatively easy to efficiently produce a stable and high quality laser beam in a compact, robust, and alignment-free configuration. Recently, high power fiber laser systems have facilitated wide spread applications in academics, industries, and militaries in replacement of bulk solid-state laser systems. The master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) composed of a highly-controlled seed, high-gain preamplifiers, and high-efficiency power amplifiers are typically utilized to scale up the pulse energy, peak power, or average power. Furthermore, a direct-current-modulated nanosecond diode laser in single transverse mode can simply provide a compact and highly-controlled seed to result in the flexible output parameters, such as repetition rate, pulse duration, and even temporal pulse shape. However, when scaling up the peak power for high intensity applications, such a versatile diode-seeded nanosecond MOPA laser system using rare-earth-doped fibers is unable to completely save its own advantages compared to bulk laser systems. Without a strong seeding among the amplifiers, the guided amplified spontaneous amplification is easy to become dominant during the amplification, leading to the harmful self-lasing or pulsing effects, and the difficulty of the quantitative numerical comparison. In this dissertation, we study a high-efficiency and intense nanosecond ytterbium fiber MOPA system with good beam quality and stability for high intensity applications. The all-PM-fiber structure is achieved with the output extinction ratio of >12 dB by optimizing the interconnection of high power optical fibers. The diode-seeded MOPA configuration without parasitic stimulated amplification (PAS) is implemented using the double-pass scheme to extract energy efficiently for scaling peak power. The broadband PAS was studied experimentally, which matches well with our numerical simulation. The 1064-nm nanosecond seed was a direct

  15. Cellular response to high pulse repetition rate nanosecond pulses varies with fluorescent marker identity.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary A; Tolstykh, Gleb P; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-09-23

    Nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP's) are a well-studied phenomena in biophysics that cause substantial alterations to cellular membrane dynamics, internal biochemistry, and cytoskeletal structure, and induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. While several studies have attempted to measure the effects of multiple nanosecond pulses, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) has received little attention, especially at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. In this study, uptake of Propidium Iodide, FM 1-43, and YO-PRO-1 fluorescent dyes in CHO-K1 cells was monitored across a wide range of PRRs (5 Hz-500 KHz) using a laser-scanning confocal microscope in order to better understand how high frequency repetition rates impact induced biophysical changes. We show that frequency trends depend on the identity of the dye under study, which could implicate transmembrane protein channels in the uptake response due to their chemical selectivity. Finally, YO-PRO-1 fluorescence was monitored in the presence of Gadolinium (Gd(3+)), Ruthenium Red, and in calcium-free solution to elucidate a mechanism for its unique frequency trend. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Femtosecond versus nanosecond laser machining: comparison of induced stresses and structural changes in silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, M. S.; El-Ashry, M. A.; Dosser, L. R.; Hix, K. E.; Maguire, J. F.; Irwin, Bryan

    2005-03-01

    Laser micromachining has proven to be a very successful tool for precision machining and microfabrication with applications in microelectronics, MEMS, medical device, aerospace, biomedical, and defense applications. Femtosecond (FS) laser micromachining is usually thought to be of minimal heat-affected zone (HAZ) local to the micromachined feature. The assumption of reduced HAZ is attributed to the absence of direct coupling of the laser energy into the thermal modes of the material during irradiation. However, a substantial HAZ is thought to exist when machining with lasers having pulse durations in the nanosecond (NS) regime. In this paper, we compare the results of micromachining a single crystal silicon wafer using a 150-femtosecond and a 30-nanosecond lasers. Induced stress and amorphization of the silicon single crystal were monitored using micro-Raman spectroscopy as a function of the fluence and pulse duration of the incident laser. The onset of average induced stress occurs at lower fluence when machining with the femtosecond pulse laser. Induced stresses were found to maximize at fluence of 44 J cm -2 and 8 J cm -2 for nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed lasers, respectively. In both laser pulse regimes, a maximum induced stress is observed at which point the induced stress begins to decrease as the fluence is increased. The maximum induced stress was comparable at 2.0 GPa and 1.5 GPa for the two lasers. For the nanosecond pulse laser, the induced amorphization reached a plateau of approximately 20% for fluence exceeding 22 J cm -2. For the femtosecond pulse laser, however, induced amorphization was approximately 17% independent of the laser fluence within the experimental range. These two values can be considered nominally the same within experimental error. For femtosecond laser machining, some effect of the laser polarization on the amount of induced stress and amorphization was also observed.

  17. Nanosecond passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser based on WS2 saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Li, Lu; Wang, Yonggang; Zhang, Ling; Wen, Qiao; Yang, Guowen

    2017-04-01

    We report on a nanosecond pulse generation in a diode end-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser using a tungsten disulfide (WS2) solution saturable absorber (SA). The WS2 suspension is fabricated by the liquid-phase-exfoliated method and injected into a quartz cell for the use of SA. Compared with solid absorber, such solution absorber has the virtues of good optical transparency, high heat dissipation and long term stability. By inserting the WS2 solution SA in the laser cavity, a stable Q-switched laser operation centered at 1064.45 nm wavelength is obtained with the shortest pulse duration of 788 ns and corresponding repetition rate of 333.5 kHz. The maximum average output power is registered to be 720 mW with the slope efficiency of 7.8%. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest output power so far among pulsed lasers based on transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) SAs. The results demonstrate that WS2 solution absorber is a promising saturable absorber for the generation of high output power pulsed lasers.

  18. Cluster-assisted multiple-ionization of methyl iodide by a nanosecond laser: Wavelength dependence of multiple-charge ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiguo; Li, Haiyang; Niu, Dongmei; Wen, Lihua; Zhang, Nazhen

    2008-09-01

    As efforts continue to elucidate laser-cluster interactions, we investigated the influence of laser wavelength on ion products. In this study, a pulsed methyl iodide cluster was irradiated with a Nd-YAG nanosecond laser, and the ion products were analyzed using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Multiple-charge atomic ions of C q+ and I q+ ( q ⩾ 2) were observed using 532 and 1064 nm laser wavelengths; however, only single-charge atomic and molecular ions appeared at 266 and 355 nm. We show that the charge-state distribution for multiple-charge ions is almost independent of laser intensity. A three-stage model was developed to further understand these experimental results: the inverse electron bremsstrahlung heating rate is proportional to the square of laser wavelength, which seems to explain the dependence of multiple-charge ions on the wavelength.

  19. Comparison of two picosecond lasers to a nanosecond laser for treating tattoos: a prospective randomized study on 49 patients.

    PubMed

    Lorgeou, A; Perrillat, Y; Gral, N; Lagrange, S; Lacour, J-P; Passeron, T

    2017-07-31

    Q-switched nanosecond lasers demonstrated their efficacy in treating most types of tattoos, but complete disappearance is not always achieved even after performing numerous laser sessions. Picosecond lasers are supposed to be more efficient in clearing tattoos than nanosecond lasers, but prospective comparative data remain limited. To compare on different types of tattoos the efficacy of a nanosecond laser with two types of picosecond lasers. We conducted a prospective randomized study performed from December 2014 to June 2016 on adult patients with all types of tattoos. The tattoos were divided into two halves of equal size. After randomization, half of the tattoo was treated with a picosecond laser and the other half with a nanosecond laser. The evaluation was performed on standardized pictures performed before treatment and 2 months after the last session, by two physicians, not involved in the treatment, blinded on the type of treatments received. The main end point was a clearance above 75% of the tattoos. A total of 49 patients were included. Professional tattoos represented 85.7%, permanent make-up 8.2% and non-professional tattoo 6.1%. The majority were black or blue and 10.2% were polychromatic. No patient was lost during follow-up. A reduction of 75% or more of the colour intensity was obtained for 33% of the tattoos treated with the picosecond lasers compared to 14% with the nanosecond laser (P = 0.008). An improvement superior to 75% was obtained in 34% monochromic black or blue tattoos with the picosecond lasers compared to 9% for the nanosecond laser. Only one of the five polychromic tattoos achieved more than 75% of improvement with the two types of laser. Our results show a statistically significant superiority of the picosecond lasers compared to the nanosecond laser for tattoo clearance. However, they do not show better efficacy for polychromic tattoos and the difference in terms of side-effects was also minimal with a tendency of picosecond

  20. Formation of hierarchical porous graphene films with defects using a nanosecond laser on polyimide sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangcheng; Wang, Kedian; Dong, Xia; Mei, Xuesong; Zhai, Zhaoyang; Zheng, Buxiang; Lv, Jing; Duan, Wenqiang; Wang, Wenjun

    2017-10-01

    The cost of effective preparation of graphene-based nanomaterials is a challenge in high-performance flexible electrodes. We demonstrated the formation of hierarchical porous graphene (HPG) films with defects from polyimide (PI) sheets using a high repetition rate nanosecond fiber laser. The honeycomb structure with mesopores and macropores can be rapidly induced on the polyimide by the localized focused laser beam in air atmosphere. Employing laser direct writing method, the one-step synthesis and patterning of conductive HPG films were achieved directly on the surface of polyimide sheets. The results show that the unique honeycomb porous structure on HPG film is composed of few-layer graphene or graphene stacks. The lattice structure of graphene nanoplatelets contains the Stone-Wales defects. Furthermore, there are a lot of small-size graphene nanoplatelets on the surface of HPG films with high content of edge defects. These two defects can not only enhance the adsorption without compromising on high diffusivity of ions, but also contribute to the infiltration and flow of electrolyte on the surface of electrode. The proposed one-step laser direct writing technique with highly valuable suitable for developing large-scale fabrication of conductive HPG based flexible electrodes at low-cost.

  1. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; ...

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protectivemore » thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.« less

  2. Catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in the bulk of potassium titanyl phosphate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Frank R. Natoli, Jean-Yves; Akhouayri, Hassan; Commandré, Mireille; Duchateau, Guillaume

    2014-06-28

    Due to its high effective nonlinearity and the possibility to produce periodically poled crystals, potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO{sub 4}, KTP) is still one of the economically important nonlinear optical materials. In this overview article, we present a large study on catastrophic nanosecond laser induced damage in this material and the very similar RbTiOPO{sub 4} (RTP). Several different systematic studies are included: multiple pulse laser damage, multi-wavelength laser damage in KTP, damage resistance anisotropy, and variations of the laser damage thresholds for RTP crystals of different qualities. All measurements were carried out in comparable experimental conditions using a 1064 nm Q-switched laser and some were repeated at 532 nm. After summarizing the experimental results, we detail the proposed model for laser damage in this material and discuss the experimental results in this context. According to the model, nanosecond laser damage is caused by light-induced generation of transient laser-damage precursors which subsequently provide free electrons that are heated by the same nanosecond pulse. We also present a stimulated Raman scattering measurement and confront slightly different models to the experimental data. Finally, the physical nature of the transient damage precursors is discussed and similarities and differences to laser damage in other crystals are pointed out.

  3. Nanosecond X-ray diffraction from biological samples with a laser-produced plasma source.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R D; Forsyth, J M

    1979-05-11

    By using 4.45-angstrom radiation generated by Cl+15 ions in a laser plasma and nanosecond exposures, low-angle x-ray diffraction patterns were obtained from dried rat spinal nerves and a powder of cholesterol. Three to four 400-picosecond, 45-joule pulses were required for the exposure. This new technique should have wide application in structural kinetic studies.

  4. Explosive boiling of metals upon irradiation by a nanosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Mazhukin, V I; Demin, M M; Shapranov, A V; Samokhin, A A

    2014-04-28

    A repeated effect of explosive boiling has been found in metals exposed to a nanosecond laser pulse in the framework of molecular dynamic simulations combined with a continuum description of a conduction band electrons system. This effect can be used, in particular, as a marker of approaching critical parameters of the region in the irradiated matter. (letters)

  5. Nanosecond laser-induced phase transitions in pulsed laser deposition-deposited GeTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xinxing Thelander, Erik; Lorenz, Pierre; Gerlach, Jürgen W.; Decker, Ulrich; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2014-10-07

    Phase transformations between amorphous and crystalline states induced by irradiation of pulsed laser deposition grown GeTe thin films with nanosecond laser pulses at 248 nm and pulse duration of 20 ns are studied. Structural and optical properties of the Ge-Te phase-change films were studied by X-ray diffraction and optical reflectivity measurements as a function of the number of laser pulses between 0 and 30 pulses and of the laser fluence up to 195 mJ/cm². A reversible phase transition by using pulse numbers ≥ 5 at a fluence above the threshold fluence between 11 and 14 mJ/cm² for crystallization and single pulses at a fluence between 162 and 182 mJ/cm² for amorphization could be proved. For laser fluences from 36 up to 130 mJ/cm², a high optical contrast of 14.7% between the amorphous and crystalline state is measured. A simple model is used that allows the discussion on the distribution of temperature in dependency on the laser fluence.

  6. Lead extraction by selective operation of a nanosecond-pulsed 355nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Amir; Bogdan, Stefan; Glikson, Michael; Ishaaya, Amiel A.; Love, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Lead extraction (LE) is necessary for patients who are suffering from a related infection, or in opening venous occlusions that prevent the insertion of additional lead. In severe cases of fibrous encapsulation of the lead within a vein, laser-based cardiac LE has become one of the foremost methods of removal. In cases where the laser radiation (typically at 308 nm wavelength) interacts with the vein wall rather than with the fibrotic lesion, severe injury and subsequent bleeding may occur. Selective tissue ablation was previously demonstrated by a laser operating in the UV regime; however, it requires the use of sensitizers (e.g.: tetracycline). In this study, we present a preliminary examination of efficacy and safety aspects in the use of a nanosecond-pulsed solid-state laser radiation, at 355 nm wavelength, guided in a catheter consisting of optical fibers, in LE. Specifically, we demonstrate a correlation between the tissue elasticity and the catheter advancement rate, in ex-vivo experiments. Our results indicate a selectivity property for specific parameters of the laser radiation and catheter design. The selectivity is attributed to differences in the mechanical properties of the fibrotic tissue and a normal vein wall, leading to a different photomechanical response of the tissue's extracellular matrix. Furthermore, we performed successful in-vivo animal trials, providing a basic proof of concept for using the suggested scheme in LE. Selective operation using a 355 nm laser may reduce the risk of blood vessel perforation as well as the incidence of major adverse events.

  7. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  8. Damage to dry plasmid DNA induced by nanosecond XUV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Eva; Davídková, Marie; Vyšín, Ludék; Burian, Tomáš; Grisham, Michael E.; Heinbuch, Scott; Rocca, Jorge J.; Juha, Libor

    2011-06-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of DNA damages including single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs), abasic sites, modified sugar and bases. Most theoretical and experimental studies have been focused on DNA strand scissions, in particular production of DNA double-strand breaks. DSBs have been proven to be a key damage at a molecular level responsible for the formation of chromosomal aberrations, leading often to cell death. The complexity of lesions produced in DNA by ionizing radiations is thought to depend on the amount of energy deposited at the site of each lesion. We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced directly by the pulsed 46.9 nm radiation provided by a capillary-discharge Ne-like Ar laser (CDL). Different surface doses were delivered with a repetition rate of a few Hz and an average pulse energy ~ 1 μJ. A simple model DNA molecule, i.e., dried closed-circular plasmid DNA (pBR322), was irradiated. The agarose gel electrophoresis method was used for determination of both SSB and DSB yields. Results are compared with a previous study of plasmid DNA irradiated with a single sub-nanosecond 1-keV X-ray pulse produced by a large-scale, double-stream gas puff target, illuminated by sub-kJ, near-infrared (NIR) focused laser pulses at the PALS facility (Prague Asterix Laser System).

  9. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Generation of diffraction-limited nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu N.; Losev, V. F.; Dudarev, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    The generation of nanosecond and subnanosecond pulses in a XeCl laser is studied. The short radiation pulses are generated in a resonator with a SBS mirror. By focusing laser radiation inside and on the surface of a nonlinear medium, it is possible to generate pulses of duration 3 ns and 150 ps, respectively. The laser beams obtained in this way contain more than 70% of energy within the diffraction angle and have the signal-to-noise ration exceeding 104.

  10. Comparative study of femtosecond and nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, Luke A.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.; Cremers, David A.; Jones, C. Randy; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2011-01-20

    We present spectra of depleted uranium metal from laser plasmas generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and femtosecond Ti:sapphire (800 nm) laser pulses. The latter pulses produce short-lived and relatively cool plasmas in comparison to the longer pulses, and the spectra of neutral uranium atoms appear immediately after excitation. Evidence for nonequilibrium excitation with femtosecond pulses is found in the dependence of spectral line intensities on the pulse chirp.

  11. Investigation of UV Laser Triggered, Nanosecond, Surface Flashover Switches

    SciTech Connect

    Nunnally, W C; Neurath, R; Holmes, C; Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G

    2003-06-03

    Triggered, multi-channel, surface discharges or surface flashover switching have been investigated as a low inductance, low pulse rate switch for conducting large currents. This paper discusses the investigation of UV (355 nm) laser triggered, single channel, low inductance, ns closure and sub-ns jitter switches for applications in switching high dielectric constant, compact pulse forming lines into accelerator loads. The experimental arrangement for evaluating the switch performance and for measuring the high field dielectric constant of the pulse forming lines is presented. Experimental results of delay and jitter measurements versus optical energy on the flashover surface and dc electric field charge.

  12. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X. D.; Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-01

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2-6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  13. Dependence of multiply charged ions on the polarization state in nanosecond laser-benzene cluster interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiguo; Zhao, Wuduo; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Li, Haiyang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigated the dependence of multiply charged ions on the laser polarization state when benzene cluster was irradiated with 532 and 1064 nm nanosecond laser. A circle, square and flower distribution for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed with 532 nm laser respectively, while flower petals for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed at 1064 nm as the laser polarization varied. A theoretical calculation was performed to interpret the polarization state and wavelength dependence of the multiply charged ions. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental observation with considering the contribution from the cluster disintegration.

  14. Selection of CO laser single nanosecond pulse by electro-optic CdTe shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kinyaevskiy, I. O.; Klimachev, Yu. M.; Kotkov, A. A.; Kozlov, A. Yu.; Kryuchkov, D. S.

    2017-09-01

    To select a single laser pulse from a train of nanosecond pulses emitted by a mode-locked CO laser with wavelengths from ∼5 to 6 μm, an electro-optic shutter based on CdTe Pockels cell was developed. A contrast between the selected pulse and unselected laser emission was equal to 20 and twice as much decreased in a CO laser power amplifier. To increase the contrast, a feasibility of applying a narrow-gap semiconductor as a saturable absorber is discussed.

  15. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of laser processing in active crystal with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Alvira, F C; Ródenas, A; Torchia, G A

    2014-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis is applied to study the ablation threshold and the main plasma features of active crystals used for laser processing with Nd(3+) ions. The experiments were conducted by using nanosecond laser pulses from a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser and its harmonics. In particular, we have studied the ablation process in SBN, strontium barium niobate (SrxBa1-xNb2O6, x = 0.6), and SBN, sodium barium niobate (Ba2NaNb5O15), nonlinear and ferroelectric crystals. Two different ablation regimes have been identified by LIBS analysis with high sensitivity compared with the standard method of hole-diameter measurement. Analyzing spectroscopically the plasma emission, we have found a particular behavior with the excitation wavelength. For example, the electronic density and temperature in SBN-generated plasmas present an abnormal behavior with the excitation wavelength. We therefore conclude that the energy gap corresponding to these crystals plays an important role in describing this fact. Hence, the resonant ablation in doped crystals can be a suitable point for exploration in further works in order to use the plasma performances to optimize the laser processing by nanosecond pulses for technological applications.

  16. Selective treatment of atherosclerotic plaques using nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 5.75 μm for less-invasive laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Tsukimoto, H.; Hazama, H.; Awazu, K.

    2009-07-01

    XeCl excimer laser coronary angioplasty (ELCA), has gained more attention for the treatment of serious stenosis blocked by plaque. Low degrees of thermal damage after ablation of atherosclerotic plaques have been achieved by ELCA. However, the large number of risks associated with the procedure, for example, dissections or perforations of the coronary arteries limits its application. The laser treatment technique with high ablation efficiency but low arterial wall injury is desirable. Mid-infrared laser with a wavelength of 5.75 μm is selectively well absorbed in C=O stretching vibration mode of ester bonds in cholesteryl ester. We studied the effectiveness of nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.75 μm for novel less-invasive laser angioplasty. In this study, we used a mid-infrared tunable solid-state laser which is operated by difference-frequency generation, at 5.75 μm, a pulse width of 5 ns and a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz as a treatment light source, and a thoracic aorta of WHHLMI rabbit as an atherosclerosis model. As a result, less-invasive treatment parameters for removing atherosclerotic plaques in a wet condition were confirmed. This study shows that the nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation at 5.75 μm is a powerful tool for selective and less-invasive treatment of atherosclerotic plaques.

  17. Laser welding of glasses using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pablos-Martín, A.; Höche, Th.

    2017-03-01

    This work reports on laser welding of two 1 mm thickness borosilicate glasses through the irradiation with a nanosecond pulsed laser, as a novel alternative to the use of ultrashort pulsed lasers for welding of transparent materials. Two different methodologies were investigated and compared in terms of interface quality. In a first approach, the glasses were joined without any absorbing intermediate layer. However, the bond interface possesses defects. To improve the resulting bond interface, the use of a titanium ultrathin intermediate layer was proposed to weld the glasses substrates, acting as a sealant between them. The laser parameters were optimized to achieve the best joining conditions of the Ti film. The use of the Ti layer gives rise to a bond interface more homogeneous and free of damages. As a further step, thin glasses of 86 μm thickness, of great technological value, were joined through the Ti film as well. The joined interfaces were inspected through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) while the bond quality was evaluated by Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (SAM).

  18. Comparison of responses of tattoos to picosecond and nanosecond Q-switched neodymium: YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Ross, V; Naseef, G; Lin, G; Kelly, M; Michaud, N; Flotte, T J; Raythen, J; Anderson, R R

    1998-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that picosecond laser pulses are more effective than nanosecond domain pulses in clearing of tattoos. Intratattoo comparison trial of 2 laser treatment modalities. A large interdisciplinary biomedical laser laboratory on the campus of a tertiary medical center. Consecutive patients with black tattoos were enrolled; all 16 patients completed the study. We treated designated parts of the same tattoo with 35-picosecond and 10-nanosecond pulses from 2 neodymium:YAG lasers. Patients received a total of 4 treatments at 4-week intervals. All laser pulse parameters were held constant except pulse duration. Radiation exposure was 0.65 J/cm2 at the skin surface. Biopsies were performed for routine microscopic and electron microscopic analysis at the initial treatment session and 4 weeks after the final treatment in 8 consenting patients. Also, ink samples were irradiated in vitro. In vivo, on the completion of treatment, a panel of dermatologists not associated with the study (and blinded to the treatment type) evaluated photographs to assess tattoo lightening. Formalin-fixed specimens were examined for qualitative epidermal and dermal changes as well as depth of pigment alteration. Electron micrographs were examined for particle electron density and size changes (in vivo and in vitro). The gross in vitro optical density changes were measured. In 12 of 16 tattoos, there was significant lightening in the picosecond-treated areas compared with those treated with nanosecond pulses. Mean depth of pigment alteration was greater for picosecond pulses, but the difference was not significant. In vivo biopsy specimens showed similar electron-lucent changes for both pulse durations. In vitro results were similar for both pulse durations, showing increases in particle sizes and decreased electron density as well as gross ink lightening. Picosecond pulses are more efficient than nanosecond pulses in clearing black tattoos. Black tattoos clear principally by laser

  19. Method for acquiring extended real-time kinetic signals in nanosecond laser flash photolysis experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banderini, Andrea; Sottini, Silvia; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2004-07-01

    We report a data acquisition method for detecting transient absorbance signals extended in time which require nanosecond resolution and need to span several decades in time up to the hundreds of milliseconds. A microprocessor is used to generate a sequence of up to 100, 2.120 μs wide radio frequency signals at 500 MHz which are used to trigger the analog-to-digital conversion on a digital oscilloscope, operating in the external clock mode. During these radio frequency bursts the data are sampled at a sampling rate of 500 Ms/s. The delay of each sampling burst can be set at arbitrary values with respect to the first signal, with a minimum delay of 0.96 μs for the second pulse, and 1.2 μs for all other pulses. The microprocessor provides accessory synchronization outputs for laser triggering and for shutter opening and closing. This data acquisition system allows measuring the complete time course of extended kinetics after each laser shot, thus reducing acquisition times and data size. We prove the complete equivalence of the proposed acquisition method with standard methods, where several time bases are acquired to cover the complete kinetic trace for the ligand rebinding to myoglobin after photolysis of a gel embedded myoglobin-CO complex.

  20. Laser damage properties of broadband low-dispersion mirrors in sub-nanosecond laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinlong; Bu, Xiaoqing; Jiao, Hongfei; Ma, Bin; Cheng, Xinbin; Wang, Zhangshan

    2017-01-09

    Broadband low dispersion (BBLD) mirrors are an essential component in femto-second (fs) pulse laser systems. We designed and produced Ta2O5-HfO2/SiO2 composite quarter-wave and non-quarter-wave HfO2/SiO2 BBLD mirrors for the 30fs petawatt laser system. The laser damage properties of the BBLD mirrors were investigated in an uncompressed sub-nanosecond laser pulse. It showed that the Ta2O5-HfO2/SiO2 composite BBLD mirror possessed higher LIDT due to the low electric-field intensity (EFI) in the case of the coating without artificial nodules. Nevertheless, the LIDT of the composite mirror was significantly lower than the non-quarter-wave HfO2/SiO2 mirror when the nodules exist. The EFI simulation and damage morphology of the nodules analysis demonstrated that the nodule leading to the light intensification in the middle of the boundary between the nodular and the surrounding coating, thus the outermost HfO2/SiO2 layers cannot protect the Ta2O5/SiO2 layers, and resulting to the significantly low LIDT. This study shed some light on the development of high-laser-damage BBLD mirrors for pulse compression laser systems.

  1. Nanosecond UV lasers stimulate transient Ca2+ elevations in human hNT astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raos, B. J.; Graham, E. S.; Unsworth, C. P.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Astrocytes respond to various stimuli resulting in intracellular Ca2+ signals that can propagate through organized functional networks. Recent literature calls for the development of techniques that can stimulate astrocytes in a fast and highly localized manner to emulate more closely the characteristics of astrocytic Ca2+ signals in vivo. Approach. In this article we demonstrate, for the first time, how nanosecond UV lasers are capable of reproducibly stimulating Ca2+ transients in human hNT astrocytes. Main results. We report that laser pulses with a beam energy of 4-29 µJ generate transient increases in cytosolic Ca2+. These Ca2+ transients then propagate to adjacent astrocytes as intercellular Ca2+ waves. Significance. We propose that nanosecond laser stimulation provides a valuable tool for enabling the study of Ca2+ dynamics in human astrocytes at both a single cell and network level. Compared to previously developed techniques nanosecond laser stimulation has the advantage of not requiring loading of photo-caged or -sensitising agents, is non-contact, enables stimulation with a high spatiotemporal resolution and is comparatively cost effective.

  2. COMPARISON OF FEMTOSECOND AND NANOSECOND TWO PHOTON ABSORPTION LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE (TALIF) OF ATOMIC OXYGEN IN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE PLASMAS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0118 COMPARISON OF FEMTOSECOND- AND NANOSECOND-TWO-PHOTON-ABSORPTION LASER- INDUCED FLUORESCENCE (TALIF) OF ATOMIC ...LASER-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE (TALIF) OF ATOMIC OXYGEN IN ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE PLASMAS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...copyright protection in the United States. 14. ABSTRACT Absolute number densities of atomic species produced by nanosecond duration, repetitively

  3. Production of Picosecond, Kilojoule, and Petawatt Laser Pulses via Raman Amplification of Nanosecond Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Trines, R. M. G. M.; Bingham, R.; Norreys, P. A.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2011-09-02

    Raman amplification in plasma has been promoted as a means of compressing picosecond optical laser pulses to femtosecond duration to explore the intensity frontier. Here we show for the first time that it can be used, with equal success, to compress laser pulses from nanosecond to picosecond duration. Simulations show up to 60% energy transfer from pump pulse to probe pulse, implying that multikilojoule ultraviolet petawatt laser pulses can be produced using this scheme. This has important consequences for the demonstration of fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

  4. 1.38 MW peak power dual-loss modulated sub-nanosecond green laser with EO and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenjing; Zhao, Jia; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2016-12-01

    By simultaneously employing electro-optic (EO) modulator and Graphene saturable absorber (SA) in a dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locking (QML) Nd:Lu0.15Y0.85VO4/KTP green laser, the sub-nanosecond single mode-locking green laser is demonstrated with high peak power, low repetition rate and high stability. The monolayer and 3-layer graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method were used as SAs in the experiment. When the pump power reached 10.72 W, the maximum peak power obtained from the doubly QML laser with EO and monolayer graphene-SA was 1.38 MW, corresponding to a pulse duration of 480 ps. The shortest pulse width of 340 ps was obtained with a 3-layer graphene-SA.

  5. Passively Q-switched nanosecond erbium-doped fiber laser with MoS(2) saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Wang, Shuxian; Cheng, Zhaochen; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Chen, Yanxue; Mei, Liangmo; Wang, Pu

    2015-03-09

    Passively Q-switched nanosecond pulsed erbium-doped fiber laser based on MoS(2) saturable absorber (SA) is experimentally demonstrated. The high quality MoS(2) SA deposited on the broadband high-reflectivity mirror with a large modulation depth of 9% was prepared by pulsed laser deposition method. By inserting the MoS(2) SA into an erbium-doped fiber laser, stable Q-switched operation can be achieved with the shortest pulse width of 660 ns, the maximum pulse energy up to 152 nJ and pulse repetition rates varying from 116 to 131 kHz. The experimental results further verify that MoS(2) possesses the potential advantage for stable Q-switched pulse generation at 1.5 μm.

  6. Nanosecond laser pulse stimulation of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells

    PubMed Central

    Rettenmaier, Alexander; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Optical stimulation of the inner ear has recently attracted attention, suggesting a higher frequency resolution compared to electrical cochlear implants due to its high spatial stimulation selectivity. Although the feasibility of the effect is shown in multiple in vivo experiments, the stimulation mechanism remains open to discussion. Here we investigate in single-cell measurements the reaction of spiral ganglion neurons and model cells to irradiation with a nanosecond-pulsed laser beam over a broad wavelength range from 420 nm up to 1950 nm using the patch clamp technique. Cell reactions were wavelength- and pulse-energy-dependent but too small to elicit action potentials in the investigated spiral ganglion neurons. As the applied radiant exposure was much higher than the reported threshold for in vivo experiments in the same laser regime, we conclude that in a stimulation paradigm with nanosecond-pulses, direct neuronal stimulation is not the main cause of optical cochlea stimulation. PMID:24761285

  7. Nanosecond laser micro machining using an external beam attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Johan; Kettelarij, Henk; de Kok, Corne J. G. M.

    2003-11-01

    The pulse width -- pulse energy relationship of a solid-state laser can reduce the accuracy of micro machined features. Our goal is to control a depth of a laser mark with an accuracy of 0.1 μm and reduce the line width below the spot diameter. Reaching this depth and width in a stable and industrial viable laser process would not have been possible without the additional control generated by the beam attenuator.

  8. Low-order harmonic generation in metal ablation plasmas in nanosecond and picosecond laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Arias, M.; Oujja, M.; Sanz, M.; Castillejo, M.; Ganeev, R. A.; Boltaev, G. S.; Satlikov, N. Kh.; Tugushev, R. I.; Usmanov, T.

    2012-02-15

    Low-order harmonics, third and fifth, of IR (1064 nm) laser emission have been produced in laser ablation plasmas of the metals manganese, copper and silver. The harmonics were generated in a process triggered by laser ablation followed by frequency up-conversion of a fundamental laser beam that propagates parallel to the target surface. These studies were carried out in two temporal regimes by creating the ablation plasma using either nanosecond or picosecond pulses and then probing the plasma plume with pulses of the same duration. The spatiotemporal behavior of the generated harmonics was characterized and reveals the distinct composition and dynamics of the plasma species that act as nonlinear media, allowing the comparison of different processes that control the generation efficiency. These results serve to guide the choice of laser ablation plasmas to be used for efficient high harmonic generation of laser radiation.

  9. Self-organized 2D periodic arrays of nanostructures in silicon by nanosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Barada K; Sun, Keye; Rothenbach, Christian; Gupta, Mool C

    2011-06-01

    We report a phenomenon of spontaneous formation of self-organized 2D periodic arrays of nanostructures (protrusions) by directly exposing a silicon surface to multiple nanosecond laser pulses. These self-organized 2D periodic nanostructures are produced toward the edge as an annular region around the circular laser spot. The heights of these nanostructures are around 500 nm with tip diameter ~100 nm. The period of the nanostructures is about 1064 nm, the wavelength of the incident radiation. In the central region of the laser spot, nanostructures are destroyed because of the higher laser intensity (due to the Gaussian shape of the laser beam) and accumulation of large number of laser pulses. Optical diffraction from these nanostructures indicates a threefold symmetry, which is in accordance with the observed morphological symmetries of these nanostructures.

  10. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  11. Effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on the surface nanostructure of Au thin films on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ruixuan; Meng, Xuan; Takayanagi, Shinya; Shibayama, Tamaki Yatsu, Shigeo; Ishioka, Junya; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-04-14

    Ion irradiation and short-pulsed laser irradiation can be used to form nanostructures on the surfaces of substrates. This work investigates the synergistic effects of ion and nanosecond-pulsed laser co-irradiation on surface nanostructuring of Au thin films deposited under vacuum on SiO{sub 2} glass substrates. Gold nanoparticles are randomly formed on the surface of the substrate after nanosecond-pulsed laser irradiation under vacuum at a wavelength of 532 nm with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and laser energy density of 0.124 kJ/m{sup 2}. Gold nanoparticles are also randomly formed on the substrate after 100-keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiation at doses of up to 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and nearly all of these nanoparticles are fully embedded in the substrate. With increasing ion irradiation dose (number of incident laser pulses), the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles decreases (increases). However, Au nanoparticles are only formed in a periodic surface arrangement after co-irradiation with 6000 laser pulses and 3.8 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}. The periodic distance is ∼540 nm, which is close to the wavelength of the nanosecond-pulsed laser, and the mean diameter of the Au nanoparticles remains at ∼20 nm with a relatively narrow distribution. The photoabsorption peaks of the ion- or nanosecond-pulsed laser-irradiated samples clearly correspond to the mean diameter of Au nanoparticles. Conversely, the photoabsorption peaks for the co-irradiated samples do not depend on the mean nanoparticle diameter. This lack of dependence is likely caused by the periodic nanostructure formed on the surface by the synergistic effects of co-irradiation.

  12. Optical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) during nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankova, N. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Nikov, Ru. G.; Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Stoyanchov, T. R.; Fukata, N.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of effects of the process parameters on the medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer processed by laser source with irradiation at UV (266 and 355 nm), VIS (532 nm) and NIR (1064 nm). Systematic experiments are done to characterize how the laser beam parameters (wavelength, fluence, and number of pulses) affect the optical properties and the chemical composition in the laser treated areas. Remarkable changes of the optical properties and the chemical composition are observed. Despite the low optical absorption of the native PDMS for UV, VIS and NIR wavelengths, successful laser treatment is accomplished due to the incubation process occurring below the polymer surface. With increasing of the fluence and the number of the pulses chemical transformations are revealed in the entire laser treated area and hence decreasing of the optical transmittance is observed. The incubation gets saturation after a certain number of pulses and the laser ablation of the material begins efficiently. At the UV and VIS wavelengths the number of the initial pulses, at which the optical transmittance begins to reduce, decreases from 16 up to 8 with increasing of the laser fluence up to 1.0, 2.5 and 10 J cm-2 for 266, 355 and 532 nm, respectively. In the case of 1064 nm the optical transmittance begins to reduce at 11th pulse incident at a fluence of 13 J cm-2 and the number of the pulses decreases to 8 when the fluence reaches value of 16 J cm-2. The threshold laser fluence needed to induce incubation process after certain number of pulses of 8 is different for every wavelength irradiation as the values increase from 1.0 for 266 nm up to 16 J cm-2 for 1064 nm. The incubation and the ablation processes occur in the PDMS elastomer material during its pulsed laser treatment are a complex function of the wavelength, fluence, number of pulses and the material properties as well.

  13. Study on Nonlinear Absorption Effect of Nanosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation for GaAs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Liu, Zhongyang; Zhou, Haijiao

    2016-04-01

    In order to research nonlinear absorption effect of pulse laser irradiation for GaAs, a physical model of Gaussian distribution pulse laser irradiation for semiconductor material was established by software COMSOL Multiphysics. The thermal effects of semiconductor material GaAs was analyzed under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with wavelength of 1064 nm. The radial and transverse temperature distribution of semiconductor material GaAs was calculated under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with different power density by solving the thermal conduction equations. The contribution of one-photon absorption, two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption to temperature of GaAs material were discussed. The results show that when the pulse laser power density rises to 10(10) W/cm2, free carrier absorption played a leading role and it was more than that of one-photon absorption of material. The temperature contribution of two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption could be ignored at laser power density lower than 10(8) W/cm2. The result is basically consistent with relevant experiments, which shows that physical model constructed is valid.

  14. Mechanical response of agar gel irradiated with Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Evans, Rodger; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2010-02-01

    Nanosecond long laser pulses are used in medical applications where precise tissue ablation with minimal thermal and mechanical collateral damage is required. When a laser pulse is incident on a material, optical energy will be absorbed by a combination of linear and nonlinear absorption according to both: laser light intensity and material properties. In the case of water or gels, the first results in heat generation and thermoelastic expansion; while the second results in an expanding plasma formation that launches a shock wave and a cavitation/boiling bubble. Plasma formation due to nonlinear absorption of nanosecond laser pulses is originated by a combination of multiphoton ionization and thermionic emission of free electrons, which is enhanced when the material has high linear absorption coefficient. In this work, we present measurements of pressure transients originated when 6 ns laser pulses are incident on agar gels with varying linear absorption coefficient, mechanical properties and irradiation geometry using laser radiant exposures above threshold for bubble formation. The underlying hypothesis is that pressure transients are composed of the superposition of both: shock wave originated by hot expanding plasma resulting from nonlinear absorption of optical energy and, thermoelastic expansion originated by heat generation due to linear absorption of optical energy. The objective of this work is to evaluate the relative contribution of each absorption mechanism to mechanical effects in agar gel. Real time pressure transients are recorded with PVDF piezoelectric sensors and time-resilved imaging from 50 μm to 10 mm away from focal point.

  15. Online monitoring of nanoparticles formed during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nováková, Hana; Holá, Markéta; Vojtíšek-Lom, Michal; Ondráček, Jakub; Kanický, Viktor

    2016-11-01

    The particle size distribution of dry aerosol originating from laser ablation of glass material was monitored simultaneously with Laser Ablation - Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis and two aerosol spectrometers - Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) and Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The unique combination of LA-ICP-MS and FMPS offers the possibility of measuring the particle size distribution every 1 s of the ablation process in the size range of 5.6-560 nm. APS extends the information about particle concentration in the size range 0.54-17 μm. Online monitoring of the dry aerosol was performed for two ablation modes (spot and line with a duration of 80 s) with a 193 nm excimer laser system, using the glass reference material NIST 610 as a sample. Different sizes of laser spot for spot ablation and different scan speeds for line ablation were tested. It was found that the FMPS device is capable of detecting changes in particle size distribution at the first pulses of spot laser ablation and is suitable for laser ablation control simultaneously with LA-ICP-MS analysis. The studied parameters of laser ablation have an influence on the resulting particle size distribution. The line mode of laser ablation produces larger particles during the whole ablation process, while spot ablation produces larger particles only at the beginning, during the ablation of the intact layer of the ablated material. Moreover, spot ablation produces more primary nano-particles (in ultrafine mode size range < 100 nm) than line ablation. This effect is most probably caused by a reduced amount of large particles released from the spot ablation crater. The larger particles scavenge the ultrafine particles during the line ablation mode.

  16. Nanostructuring of sapphire using time-modulated nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Zagoranskiy, I.; Ehrhardt, M.; Bayer, L.; Zimmer, K.

    2017-02-01

    The nanostructuring of dielectric surfaces using laser radiation is still a challenge. The IPSM-LIFE (laser-induced front side etching using in-situ pre-structured metal layer) method allows the easy, large area and fast laser nanostructuring of dielectrics. At IPSM-LIFE a metal covered dielectric is irradiated where the structuring is assisted by a self-organized molten metal layer deformation process. The IPSM-LIFE can be divided into two steps: STEP 1: The irradiation of thin metal layers on dielectric surfaces results in a melting and nanostructuring process of the metal layer and partially of the dielectric surface. STEP 2: A subsequent high laser fluence treatment of the metal nanostructures result in a structuring of the dielectric surface. At this study a sapphire substrate Al2O3(1-102) was covered with a 10 nm thin molybdenum layer and irradiated by an infrared laser with an adjustable time-dependent pulse form with a time resolution of 1 ns (wavelength λ = 1064 nm, pulse duration Δtp = 1 - 600 ns, Gaussian beam profile). The laser treatment allows the fabrication of different surface structures into the sapphire surface due to a pattern transfer process. The resultant structures were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The process was simulated and the simulation results were compared with experimental results.

  17. Fabrication of three-dimensional microfluidic channels inside glass using nanosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changning; Liao, Yang; He, Fei; Shen, Yinglong; Chen, Danping; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2012-02-13

    We show that fabrication of three-dimensional microfluidic channels embedded in glass can be achieved by using a Q-switched, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The processing mainly consists of two steps: (1) formation of hollow microfluidic channels in porous glass immersed in Rhodamine 6G dissolved in water by nanosecond laser ablation; and (2) postannealing of the fabricated porous glass sample at 1120 °C for consolidation of the sample. In particular, a bilayer microfluidic structure is created in glass substrate using this technique for showcasing its capability of three-dimensional structuring.

  18. Role of suprathermal electrons during nanosecond laser energy deposit in fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Grua, P.; Hébert, D.; Lamaignère, L.; Rullier, J.-L.

    2014-08-25

    An accurate description of interaction between a nanosecond laser pulse and a wide band gap dielectric, such as fused silica, requires the understanding of energy deposit induced by temperature changes occurring in the material. In order to identify the fundamental processes involved in laser-matter interaction, we have used a 1D computational model that allows us to describe a wide set of physical mechanisms and intended for comparison with specially designed “1D experiments.” We have pointed out that suprathermal electrons are very likely implicated in heat conduction, and this assumption has allowed the model to reproduce the experiments.

  19. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  20. 200 Hz repetition frequency joule-level high beam quality Nd:YAG nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jisi; Tang, Xiongxin; Fan, Zhongwei; Wang, Haocheng

    2016-06-01

    A joule-level Nd:YAG nanosecond laser of high repetition frequency and high beam quality is developed out. The laser is designed as a MOPA system mainly including single longitudinal mode seed, pre-amplifier unit an d power amplifier unit. In order to obtain the high-quality laser beam output, phase conjugation is adopted to compensate the laser beam distortion. Under the condition of 200 Hz high repetition frequency and 8.19 μJ single pulse energy injected by the single longitudinal mode seed, 1.53 J output energy is gained. The output laser beam is of 9 mm diameter, 7.41 ns pulse width, the far field beam spot 1.32 times the value of the diffraction limit, 1.2% energy stability (RMS) and less than 13 μrad far field beam spot angle shift.

  1. Minimally invasive treatment of carious dentin with a nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.8 μm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-01-01

    Conventional lasers, Er:YAG laser and Er,Cr:YSGG laser, lack the ability for selective excavation to discriminate carious tissue only because they use the laser tissue interaction derived from a strong absorption of water. Based on the absorption property of carious dentin, characteristic absorption bands around 6 μm are candidate for selective excavation. Our group has already observed the difference of ablation depth between demineralized and normal dentin in the wavelength range from 5.75 to 6.60 μm. Also this study has showed the effectiveness of 5.8 μm. Objective of this study is to determine optimal irradiation parameters of selective excavation by using 5.8 μm. Bovine dentin plates demineralized by soaking in lactic acid solution were used as a carious dentin model. A nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.8 μm wavelength was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The laser delivers 5 ns pulse width at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. After irradiation, morphological change and measurement of ablation depth was observed with a scanning electron microscope and a confocal laser microscope, respectively. In 5.8 μm wavelength, high ablation efficiency with a low thermal side effect was observed. 5.8 μm wavelength provides a selective excavation technique for minimal intervention.

  2. Relaxation dynamics of nanosecond laser superheated material in dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, Stavros G.; Negres, Raluca A.; Raman, Rajesh N.; Feit, Michael D.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    2015-08-20

    Intense laser pulses can cause superheating of the near-surface volume of materials. This mechanism is widely used in applications such as laser micromachining, laser ablation, or laser assisted thin film deposition. The relaxation of the near solid density superheated material is not well understood, however. In this work, we investigate the relaxation dynamics of the superheated material formed in several dielectrics with widely differing physical properties. The results suggest that the relaxation process involves a number of distinct phases, which include the delayed explosive ejection of microscale particles starting after the pressure of the superheated material is reduced to about 4 GPa and for a time duration on the order of 1 μs. The appearance of a subset of collected ejected particles in fused silica is similar to that of micro-tektites and provides information about the state of the superheated material at the time of ejection. Lastly, these results advance our understanding of a key aspect of the laser–material interaction pathway and can lead to optimization of associated applications ranging from material processing to laser surgery.

  3. Relaxation dynamics of nanosecond laser superheated material in dielectrics

    DOE PAGES

    Demos, Stavros G.; Negres, Raluca A.; Raman, Rajesh N.; ...

    2015-08-20

    Intense laser pulses can cause superheating of the near-surface volume of materials. This mechanism is widely used in applications such as laser micromachining, laser ablation, or laser assisted thin film deposition. The relaxation of the near solid density superheated material is not well understood, however. In this work, we investigate the relaxation dynamics of the superheated material formed in several dielectrics with widely differing physical properties. The results suggest that the relaxation process involves a number of distinct phases, which include the delayed explosive ejection of microscale particles starting after the pressure of the superheated material is reduced to aboutmore » 4 GPa and for a time duration on the order of 1 μs. The appearance of a subset of collected ejected particles in fused silica is similar to that of micro-tektites and provides information about the state of the superheated material at the time of ejection. Lastly, these results advance our understanding of a key aspect of the laser–material interaction pathway and can lead to optimization of associated applications ranging from material processing to laser surgery.« less

  4. Nanosecond Laser-Assisted Nitrogen Doping of Graphene Oxide Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Kepić, Dejan; Sandoval, Stefania; Pino, Ángel Pérez Del; György, Enikö; Cabana, Laura; Ballesteros, Belén; Tobias, Gerard

    2017-02-09

    N-doped reduced graphene oxide (RGO) has been prepared in bulk form by laser irradiation of graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in an aqueous solution of ammonia. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser with emission wavelengths in the infrared (IR) 1064 nm, visible (Vis) 532 nm, and ultraviolet (UV) 266 nm spectral regions was employed for the preparation of the N-doped RGO samples. Regardless of the laser energy employed, the resulting material presents a higher fraction of pyrrolic nitrogen compared to nitrogen atoms in pyridinic and graphitic coordination. Noticeably, whereas increasing the laser fluence of UV and Vis wavelengths results in an increase in the total amount of nitrogen, up to 4.9 at. % (UV wavelength at 60 mJ cm(-2) fluence), the opposite trend is observed when the GO is irradiated in ammonia solution through IR processing. The proposed laser-based methodology allows the bulk synthesis of N-doped reduced graphene oxide in a simple, fast, and cost efficient manner.

  5. Nanosecond CO2 laser interaction with a dense helium Z-pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, D. F.

    A short pulse CO2 laser system was constructed to investigate the interaction of intense electromagnetic radiation with dense plasma. The laser was focused perpendicular to the axis of a linear helium Z-pinch plasma and properties of the transmitted beam were monitored. Transmitted beam intensity and spatial distribution were measured as functions of incident intensity and interaction time. The results of the experiments with the overdense plasma were found to be consistent with plasma hydrodynamic theory. A 40 nanosecond pulse was sufficiently long to burn through the plasma, but a 4 nanosecond pulse was not. The 4 nanosecond pulse was long enough to form a local density depression in the underdense plasma and density gradients steep enough to produce Fresnel diffraction, despite the absence of a critical surface. The resultant change in refractive index could cause thermal self-focusing. The transmission measurement was not found to be consistent with a simple model of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. At an intensity of 10 to the 12th power W/cu/cm there was a sharp decrease in transmission. This suggests the possibility of either increased absorption due to enhanced ionization or increased reflection due to simulated Brillouin backscatter.

  6. Single laser based pump-probe technique to study plasma shielding during nanosecond laser ablation of copper thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nammi, Srinagalakshmi; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Gurusamy, Balaganesan; Mathur, Anil C.

    2017-09-01

    A plasma shielding phenomenon and its influence on micromachining is studied experimentally and theoretically for laser wavelengths of 355 nm, 532 nm and 1064 nm. A time resolved pump-probe technique is proposed and demonstrated by splitting a single nanosecond Nd3+:YAG laser into an ablation laser (pump laser) and a probe laser to understand the influence of plasma shielding on laser ablation of copper (Cu) clad on polyimide thin films. The proposed nanosecond pump-probe technique allows simultaneous measurement of the absorption characteristics of plasma produced during Cu film ablation by the pump laser. Experimental measurements of the probe intensity distinctly show that the absorption by the ablated plume increases with increase in the pump intensity, as a result of plasma shielding. Theoretical estimation of the intensity of the transmitted pump beam based on the thermo-temporal modeling is in qualitative agreement with the pump-probe based experimental measurements. The theoretical estimate of the depth attained for a single pulse with high pump intensity value on a Cu thin film is limited by the plasma shielding of the incident laser beam, similar to that observed experimentally. Further, the depth of micro-channels produced shows a similar trend for all three wavelengths, however, the channel depth achieved is lesser at the wavelength of 1064 nm.

  7. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wetering, F. M. J. H.; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-01

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10-6%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon-acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  8. Interaction of nanosecond ultraviolet laser pulses with reactive dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wetering, F. M. J. H. van de; Oosterbeek, W.; Beckers, J.; Nijdam, S.; Gibert, T.; Mikikian, M.; Rabat, H.; Kovačević, E.; Berndt, J.

    2016-05-23

    Even though UV laser pulses that irradiate a gas discharge are small compared to the plasma volume (≲3%) and plasma-on time (≲6 × 10{sup −6}%), they are found to dramatically change the discharge characteristics on a global scale. The reactive argon–acetylene plasma allows the growth of nanoparticles with diameters up to 1 μm, which are formed inside the discharge volume due to spontaneous polymerization reactions. It is found that the laser pulses predominantly accelerate and enhance the coagulation phase and are able to suppress the formation of a dust void.

  9. Transient elastic deformation detection on the metal surface induced by nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Yanqun; Huang, Jianyu; Wu, Xiaoyi; Shi, Lin

    2016-10-01

    It is difficult to detect the elastic deformation on the metal surface induced by nanosecond laser pulse. Optical fiber sensor system is suitable for detecting the elastic deformation, which has many advantages such as the high sensitivity, fast speed (GHz), non-contact, non-loss and point-measurement. We set up the measuring system to analyze the deformation mechanism firstly. Then, the elastic deformation on the metal surface was investigated. The relation between the shock-wave and elastic deformation was analyzed. The result of the present work implicated that as the nanosecond laser pulse radiated to the metal surface, elastic deformation had a delay time which was around 320ns. And the deformation presented the damped oscillation law. The data of laser-induced plasma shock wave were fitted and the fitting degree was 97.696%.The variation law of laser-induced plasma shock-wave was obtained. These results helped to make the laser removal applied to the manufacturing technique better.

  10. Insight into electronic mechanisms of nanosecond-laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Marine, Wladimir; Patrone, Lionel; Ozerov, Igor; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.

    2008-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of nanosecond ArF excimer laser desorption and ablation of silicon with insight into material removal mechanisms. The experimental studies involve a comprehensive analysis of the laser-induced plume dynamics and measurements of the charge gained by the target during irradiation time. At low laser fluences, well below the melting threshold, high-energy ions with a narrow energy distribution are observed. When the fluence is increased, a thermal component of the plume is formed superimposing on the nonthermal ions, which are still abundant. The origin of these ions is discussed on the basis of two modeling approaches, thermal and electronic, and we analyze the dynamics of silicon target excitation, heating, melting, and ablation. An electronic model is developed that provides insight into the charge-carrier transport in the target. We demonstrate that, contrary to a commonly accepted opinion, a complete thermalization between the electron and lattice subsystems is not reached during the nanosecond-laser pulse action. Moreover, the charging effects can retard the melting process and have an effect on the overall target behavior and laser-induced plume dynamics.

  11. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  12. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  13. Efficient neutron production from sub-nanosecond laser pulse accelerating deuterons on target front side

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Cikhardt, J.; Rezac, K.; Dudzak, R.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Sila, O.

    2015-09-15

    Neutron-producing experiments have been carried out on the Prague Asterix Laser System. At the fundamental wavelength of 1.315 μm, the laser pulse of a 600 J energy and 300 ps duration was focused on a thick deuterated-polyethylene target. Neutron yields reached (4.1 ± 0.8) × 10{sup 8} at the peak intensity of ≈3 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. A more detailed analysis of neutron time-of-flight signals showed that a significant fraction of neutron yields was produced both by the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and by other neutron-producing reactions. Neutron energies together with delayed neutron and gamma emission showed that MeV deuterons escaped from a laser-produced plasma and interacted ≈50 ns later with a borosilicate blast-shield glass. In order to increase DD neutron yields and to characterize deuteron beams via nuclear reactions, a secondary deuterated polyethylene target was used in a pitcher-catcher scheme at the target front side. In this experimental arrangement, the neutron yield reached (2.0 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 9} with the peak neutron fluence of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 8 }n/sr. From the neutron yield, it was calculated that the secondary target was bombarded by 2 × 10{sup 14} deuterons in the 0.5–2.0 MeV energy range. The neutron yield of 2 × 10{sup 9} at the laser energy of 600 J implied the production efficiency of 3 × 10{sup 6 }n/J. A very important result is that the efficient neutron production was achieved with the low contrast, sub-nanosecond laser pulse of the intensity of 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2}. The latter parameters can be achieved in a rep-rate mode more easily than ultra-high intensities and contrasts.

  14. Controlling the stimulated Brillouin scattering of self-focusing nanosecond laser pulses in silica glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, Sarah; Berge, Luc; Skupin, Stefan

    2011-06-15

    We numerically investigate the interplay between Kerr self-focusing (SF) and transient stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) for nanosecond pulses in bulk silica. The influences of the input power, phase, or amplitude modulations in the pump pulse together with the incident beam shape on the filamentation dynamics are discussed. We show that appropriate amplitude modulations dividing nanosecond laser pumps into picosecond-long pulse trains inhibit SBS at any power. In contrast, phase-modulated pulses with comparable spectral width undergo multiple filamentation and earlier beam collapse due to modulational instabilities. We demonstrate, however, the existence of a critical pump bandwidth above which SBS can be efficiently suppressed by phase modulations even at high powers. This observation also holds for squared beam shapes with much broader spatial spectra, which decay more easily into multiple filaments over short distances. Intensity profiles of the reflected Stokes waves for such broad pumps are finally discussed.

  15. Solitary surface acoustic waves and bulk solitons in nanosecond and picosecond laser ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Hess, Peter; Lomonosov, Alexey M

    2010-02-01

    Recent achievements of nonlinear acoustics concerning the realization of solitons and solitary waves in crystals and their surfaces attained by nanosecond and picosecond laser ultrasonics are discussed and compared. The corresponding pump-probe setups are described, which allow an all-optical contact-free excitation and detection of short strain pulses in the broad frequency range between 10 MHz and about 300 GHz. The formation of solitons in the propagating longitudinal strain pulses is investigated for nonlinear media with intrinsic lattice-based dispersion. The excitation of solitary surface acoustic waves is realized by a geometric film-based dispersion effect. Future developments and potential applications of nonlinear nanosecond and picosecond ultrasonics are discussed.

  16. Three-stage compression of nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Akulinichev, V.V.; Mavrichev, M.E.; Pivinskii, E.G.

    1994-04-01

    Three-stage compression of 8-ns pulses of a Nd:YAG laser was investigated. One of the stages used SBS (Stimulated Brillouin Scattering) in CCl4 and the other two used backward SRS (Stimulated Raman Scattering) in compressed methane. Conditions for substantial enhancement of the energy stability of picosecond pulses formed by the output compression stage were found. 8 refs.

  17. Transformation in iron-platinum thin film via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yatsu, Shigeo; Watanabe, Seiichi; Yamauchi, Akira; Shibano, Jun-ichi

    2017-10-01

    The composite consists of disordered and ordered iron-platinum (FePt) alloys was induced by nanosecond pulsed laser (NPL) irradiation. The process was investigated by laser high-voltage electron microscopy (laser-HVEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The structural transformation upon NPL irradiation was monitored by laser-HVEM imaging, with the structure being modified in a short second after the one pulse. XRD analyses revealed expanded and contracted lattice distances before and after NPL irradiation, respectively. According to the XRD and TEM results, the surface of FePt alloys was transformed from fct to fcc structure with structural strain by NPL irradiation.

  18. Very large spot size effect in nanosecond laser drilling efficiency of silicon.

    PubMed

    Brandi, Fernando; Burdet, Nicolas; Carzino, Riccardo; Diaspro, Alberto

    2010-10-25

    The effect of the spot diameter in nanosecond excimer laser percussion drilling of through via in silicon wafer is presented. Experimental results show a ten fold increase of the ablation efficiency when decreasing the spot diameter from 220 μm to 9 μm at constant fluence in the range 7.5 J/cm(2) to 13.2 J/cm(2). Such effect is absent when using 60 ps deep-UV laser pulses. A model is developed that explain the findings in terms of plume shielding effect on the laser pulse. The model is successfully applied also on previously published data on deep-UV laser drilling of Polyamide and Alumina.

  19. Anomalous self-generated electrostatic fields in nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lancia, L.; Antici, P.; Grech, M.; Weber, S.; Marques, J.-R.; Romagnani, L.; Bourgeois, N.; Audebert, P.; Fuchs, J.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Bellue, A.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaie, Ph.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Grismayer, T.; Lin, T.; Nkonga, B.; Kodama, R.

    2011-03-15

    Electrostatic (E) fields associated with the interaction of a well-controlled, high-power, nanosecond laser pulse with an underdense plasma are diagnosed by proton radiography. Using a current three-dimensional wave propagation code equipped with nonlinear and nonlocal hydrodynamics, we can model the measured E-fields that are driven by the laser ponderomotive force in the region where the laser undergoes filamentation. However, strong fields of up to 110 MV/m measured in the first millimeter of propagation cannot be reproduced in the simulations. This could point to the presence of unexpected strong thermal electron pressure gradients possibly linked to ion acoustic turbulence, thus emphasizing the need for the development of full kinetic collisional simulations in order to properly model laser-plasma interaction in these strongly nonlinear conditions.

  20. Aluminum thin film enhanced IR nanosecond laser-induced frontside etching of transparent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Daniel; Cambronero, Ferran; Flores-Arias, María Teresa; Farid, Nazar; O'Connor, Gerard M.

    2017-01-01

    Laser processing of glass is of significant commercial interest for microfabrication of precision optical engineering devices. In this work, a laser ablation enhancement mechanism for microstructuring of glass materials is presented. The method consists of depositing a thin film of aluminum on the front surface of the glass material to be etched. The laser beam modifies the glass material by being incident on this front-side. The influence of ablation fluence in the nanosecond regime, in combination with the deposition of the aluminum layer of various thicknesses, is investigated by determining the ablation threshold for different glass materials including soda-lime, borosilicate, fused silica and sapphire. Experiments are performed using single laser pulse per shot in an air environment. The best enhancement in terms of threshold fluence reduction is obtained for a 16 nm thick aluminum layer where a reduction of two orders of magnitude in the ablation threshold fluence is observed for all the glass samples investigated in this work.

  1. Metal surface coloration by oxide periodic structures formed with nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim; Karlagina, Yulia; Moskvin, Mikhail; Mikhailovskii, Vladimir; Odintsova, Galina; Olshin, Pavel; Pankin, Dmitry; Romanov, Valery; Yatsuk, Roman

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we studied a method of laser-induced coloration of metals, where small-scale spatially periodic structures play a key role in the process of color formation. The formation of such structures on a surface of AISI 304 stainless steel was demonstrated for the 1.06 μm fiber laser with nanosecond duration of pulses and random (elliptical) polarization. The color of the surface depends on the period, height and orientation of periodic surface structures. Adjustment of the polarization of the laser radiation or change of laser incidence angle can be used to control the orientation of the structures. The formation of markings that change their color under the different viewing angles becomes possible. The potential application of the method is metal product protection against falsification.

  2. Spectral and temporal characteristics of target current and electromagnetic pulse induced by nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, J.; De Marco, M.; Cikhardt, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Velyhan, A.; Klír, D.; Řezáč, K.; Limpouch, J.; Krouský, E.; Dostál, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudžák, R.

    2017-06-01

    The current balancing the target charging and the emission of transient electromagnetic pulses (EMP) driven by the interaction of a focused 1.315 μm iodine 300 ps PALS laser with metallic and plastic targets were measured with the use of inductive probes. It is experimentally proven that the duration of return target currents and EMPs is much longer than the duration of laser-target interaction. The laser-produced plasma is active after the laser-target interaction. During this phase, the target acts as a virtual cathode and the plasma-target interface expands. A double exponential function is used in order to obtain the temporal characteristics of EMP. The rise time of EMPs fluctuates in the range up to a few tens of nanoseconds. Frequency spectra of EMP and target currents are modified by resonant frequencies of the interaction chamber.

  3. Comparative study of ornamental granite cleaning using femtosecond and nanosecond pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, T.; Lopez, A. J.; Ramil, A.; Pozo, S.; Fiorucci, M. P.; Silanes, M. E. López de; García, A.; Aldana, J. R. Vazquez de; Romero, C.; Moreno, P.

    2013-08-01

    Granite has been widely used as a structural and ornamental element in public works and buildings. In damp climates it is almost permanently humid and its exterior surfaces are consequently biologically colonized and blackened We describe a comparative analysis of the performance of two different laser sources in removing biological crusts from granite surfaces: nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser (355 nm) and femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at its fundamental wavelength (790 nm) and second harmonic (395 nm). The granite surface was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflection - Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and profilometry, in order to assess the degree of cleaning and to characterize possible morphological and chemical changes caused by the laser sources.

  4. Surface modification of a WTi thin film on Si substrate by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Gaković, B.; Peruško, D.; Trtica, M.; Radak, B.; Panjan, P.; Miljanić, Š.

    2008-04-01

    Interaction of a nanosecond transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO 2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm, with tungsten-titanium thin film (190 nm) deposited on silicon of n-type (1 0 0) orientation, was studied. Multi-pulse irradiation was performed in air atmosphere with laser energy densities in the range 24-49 J/cm 2. The energy absorbed from the laser beam was mainly converted to thermal energy, which generated a series of effects. The following morphological changes were observed: (i) partial ablation/exfoliation of the WTi thin film, (ii) partial modification of the silicon substrate with formation of polygonal grains, (iii) appearance of hydrodynamic features including nano-globules. Torch-like plumes started appearing in front of the target after several laser pulses.

  5. Effect of nanosecond pulse laser ablation on the surface morphology of Zr-based metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunhu; Fu, Jie; Zheng, Chao; Ji, Zhong

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the ripple patterns formation on the surface of Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 (vit1) bulk metallic glass using a nanosecond pulse laser ablation in air with a wavelength of 1064 nm. The strong thermal ablation phenomenon could be observed on vit1 BMG surface at laser energy of 200 mJ as a result of the adhibition of confining overlay. Many periodic ripples had formed on the edge of the ablated area at laser energy of 400 mJ because of the high intensity pulsed laser beam. The underlying mechanism of the periodic ripples formation could be explained by the K-H hydrodynamic instability theory. It had been shown that laser ablation with 600 mJ and 200 pulses results in the formation of many micro-cracks on the ablated area. Further analysis showed that the spatial occupation of the laser ablated area and the spacing between two adjacent ripples increased as the laser energy and the number of incident laser pulses increasing. The surface ripples feature on the edge of ablated area became more obvious with increasing laser pulses, but it was not correlated closely with the laser energies variation.

  6. Negative response of HgCdTe photodiode induced by nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zuodong; Zhang, Jianmin; Lin, Xinwei; Shao, Bibo; Yang, Pengling

    2017-05-01

    Photodetectors' behavior and mechanism of transient response are still not understood very well, especially under high photon injection. Most of the researches on this topic were carried out with ultra-short laser pulse, whose pulse width ranged from femtosecond scale to picosecond scale. However, in many applications the durations of incident light are in nanosecond order and the light intensities are strong. To investigate the transient response characteristics and mechanisms of narrow-bandgap photovoltaic detectors under short laser irradiation, we performed an experiment on HgCdTe photodiodes. The n+-on-p type HgCdTe photodiodes in the experiment were designed to work in spectrum from 1.0μm to 3.0μm, with conditions of zero bias and room temperature. They were exposed to in-band short laser pulses with dwell time of 20 nanosecond. When the intensity of incident laser beam rose to 0.1J/cm2 order, the photodiodes' response characteristics turned to be bipolar from unipolar. A much longer negative response with duration of about 10μs to 100μs followed the positive light response. The amplitude of the negative response increased with the laser intensity, while the dwell time of positive response decreased with the laser intensity. Considering the response characteristics and the device structure, it is proposed that the negative response was caused by space charge effect at the electrodes. Under intense laser irradiation, a temperature gradient formed in the HgCdTe material. Due to the temperature gradient, the majority carriers diffused away from upper surface and left space charge at the electrodes. Then negative response voltage could be measured in the external circuit. With higher incident laser intensity, the degree of the space charge effect would become higher, and then the negative response would come earlier and show larger amplitude.

  7. Stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; An, Xiaokang; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying; Sun, Rui

    2017-07-01

    Laser-induced plasma ignition has been applied in various combustion systems, however, work on flame stabilization with repetitive laser-induced plasma (LIP) is rather limited. In this paper, stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond LIP is reported. The plasma energy coupling and the temporal evolution of the flame kernels generated by the LIPs are investigated with different laser repetition rates, i.e., 1 Hz, 100 Hz and 250 Hz, respectively. The plasma energy coupling is not affected in the air flow and in the premixed methane-air flow with the applied laser repetition rates. Continuous combustion flame stabilization has been achieved with LIPs of 100 Hz and 250 Hz, in terms of catch-up and merging of the consecutive flame kernels. The flame kernel formed by the last LIP does not affect the evolution of the newly formed flame kernel by the next LIP. The catch-up distance, defined as the distance from the LIP initiation site to the flame kernel catch-up position, is estimated for different laser repetition rates based on the temporal evolution of the flame kernels. A higher laser repetition rate will lead to a shorter catch-up distance which is beneficial for flame stabilization. The up limit for the laser repetition rate to realize effective flame stabilization is determined from the critical inter-pulse delay defined from the onset of the LIP to the return of the initially contraflow propagating lower front to the LIP initiation site. The up limit is 377 Hz under the flow conditions of this work (equivalence ratio of 1, flow speed of 2 m/s, and Reynolds number of 1316).

  8. Nanosecond laser-induced damage of transparent conducting ITO film at 1064nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Adams, John J.; Menor, Marlon G.; Olson, Tammy Y.; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Samanta, Amit; Bude, Jeff; Elhadj, Selim

    2016-12-01

    Transparent conducting films with superior laser damage performance have drawn intense interests toward optoelectronic applications under high energy density environment. In order to make optoelectronic applications with high laser damage performance, a fundamental understanding of damage mechanisms of conducting films is crucial. In this study, we performed laser damage experiments on tin-doped indium oxide films (ITO, Bandgap = 4.0 eV) using a nanosecond (ns) pulse laser (1064 nm) and investigated the underlying physical damage mechanisms. Single ns laser pulse irradiation on ITO films resulted in common thermal degradation features such as melting and evaporation although the laser photon energy (1.03 eV, 1064 nm) was smaller than the bandgap. Dominant laser energy absorption of the ITO film is attributed to free carriers due to degenerate doping. Upon multi-pulse irradiation on the film, damage initiation and growth were observed at lower laser influences, where no apparent damage was formed upon single pulse, suggesting a laser-induced incubation effect.

  9. Cutting and drilling of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by 70W short pulse nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeschke, Peter; Stolberg, Klaus; Bastick, Stefan; Ziolkowski, Ewa; Roehner, Markus; Suttmann, Oliver; Overmeyer, Ludger

    2014-02-01

    Continuous carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) are recognized as having a significant lightweight construction potential for a wide variety of industrial applications. However, a today`s barrier for a comprehensive dissemination of CFRP structures is the lack of economic, quick and reliable manufacture processes, e.g. the cutting and drilling steps. In this paper, the capability of using pulsed disk lasers in CFRP machining is discussed. In CFRP processing with NIR lasers, carbon fibers show excellent optical absorption and heat dissipation, contrary to the plastics matrix. Therefore heat dissipation away from the laser focus into the material is driven by heat conduction of the fibres. The matrix is heated indirectly by heat transfer from the fibres. To cut CFRP, it is required to reach the melting temperature for thermoplastic matrix materials or the disintegration temperature for thermoset systems as well as the sublimation temperature of the reinforcing fibers simultaneously. One solution for this problem is to use short pulse nanosecond lasers. We have investigated CFRP cutting and drilling with such a laser (max. 7 mJ @ 10 kHz, 30 ns). This laser offers the opportunity of wide range parameter tuning for systematic process optimization. By applying drilling and cutting operations based on galvanometer scanning techniques in multi-cycle mode, excellent surface and edge characteristics in terms of delamination-free and intact fiber-matrix interface were achieved. The results indicate that nanosecond disk laser machining could consequently be a suitable tool for the automotive and aircraft industry for cutting and drilling steps.

  10. 240 W high-average-power square-shaped nanosecond all-fiber-integrated laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailong; Tao, Rumao; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Chen, Jinbao

    2014-10-01

    We report an all-fiber-integrated high-average-power square-shaped nanosecond pulse laser operating at 1068 nm based on the master oscillator power amplifier configuration. The seed source is a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser with fundamental cavity repetition rate of 1.86 MHz. Output pulses with a square shape can be tuned in pulse width from 271 ps to the nanosecond level. The average output power reaches to 9.21 W after three preamplifiers. Finally, a main amplifier is developed to boost the average output power to 240 W, and the corresponding pulse energy and peak power are ∼ 129.3 μJ and 36 kW, respectively. The efficiency of the main amplifier is ∼ 61.3%, and the beam quality represented by M(2) factors is below 1.3 and 1.2 in the X and Y directions.

  11. In vivo imaging rhodopsin distribution in the photoreceptors with nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Liu, Xiaojing; Wen, Rong; Lam, Byron L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhodopsin is a biomarker for the function of rod photoreceptors, the dysfunction of which is related to many blinding diseases like retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Imaging rhodopsin quantitatively may provide a powerful clinical tool for diagnosis of these diseases. To map rhodopsin distribution accurately in the retina, absorption by rhodopsin intermediates need to be minimized. Methods and materials We developed nano-second pulsed scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) to image rhodopsin distribution in the retina. The system takes advantage of the light-induced shift of rhodopsin absorption spectra, which in turn affects the fundus spectral reflection before and after photo-bleaching. By imaging the retina twice, one in the dark-adapted state and the other one in the light-adapted state, the rhodopsin absorption change can be calculated from the differential image, which is a function of the rhodopsin concentration in the rod photoreceptors. Results The system was successfully applied to in vivo imaging of rat retina in different bleaching conditions to verify its feasibility. Our studies showed that the differential image between the dark- and light-adapted states represents rhodopsin distribution in the retina. We also conducted a dynamic bleaching experiment to prove the importance of reducing light absorption of rhodopsin intermediates. Conclusions The preliminary results showed that our nano-second pulsed-light SLO is promising in imaging the functional biomarker of the rod photoreceptors. By using nanosecond pulsed laser, in which one laser pulse generates one pixel of the image, the absorption of rhodopsin intermediates can be reduced. PMID:25694955

  12. EXAFS measurement of iron bcc-to-hcp phase transformation in nanosecond-laser shocks.

    PubMed

    Yaakobi, B; Boehly, T R; Meyerhofer, D D; Collins, T J B; Remington, B A; Allen, P G; Pollaine, S M; Lorenzana, H E; Eggert, J H

    2005-08-12

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements have demonstrated the phase transformation from body-centered-cubic (bcc) to hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) iron due to nanosecond, laser-generated shocks. The EXAFS spectra are also used to determine the compression and temperature in the shocked iron, which are consistent with hydrodynamic simulations and with the compression inferred from velocity interferometry. This is a direct, atomic-level, and in situ proof of shock-induced transformation in iron, as opposed to the previous indirect proof based on shock-wave splitting.

  13. Nanoparticle formation after nanosecond-laser irradiation of thin gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Ratautas, Karolis; Gedvilas, Mindaugas; Raciukaitis, Gediminas; Grigonis, Alfonsas

    2012-07-01

    Evolution in nanoparticle formation was observed after nanosecond-laser irradiation of thin gold films on a silicon substrate and physical phenomena leading to the formation of nanoparticles were studied. Gold films of different thickness (3, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 nm) were evaporated on the silicon (110) substrate and irradiated with the pulsed nanosecond laser using different pulse energies and the number of pulses in a burst. Experimentally morphological changes appeared in the films only when the pulse energy was high enough to initiate the phase transition. The threshold energy density for phase transitions in the films was estimated from the thermal model of the laser beam and sample interaction. With the pulse energy just above the threshold, it was possible to observe evolution of nanoparticle formation from a plane metal film by changing the number of pulses applied, as duration of the pulse burst represented the time how long the liquid phase existed. The final size of nanoparticles was a function of the film thickness and was found to be independent of the pulse energy and the number of pulses.

  14. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    PubMed

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  15. Picosecond and nanosecond laser annealing and simulation of amorphous silicon thin films for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakos, I.; Zergioti, I.; Vamvakas, V.; Tsoukalas, D.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a picosecond diode pumped solid state laser and a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser have been used for the annealing and the partial nano-crystallization of an amorphous silicon layer. These experiments were conducted as an alternative/complementary to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for fabrication of micromorph tandem solar cell. The laser experimental work was combined with simulations of the annealing process, in terms of temperature distribution evolution, in order to predetermine the optimum annealing conditions. The annealed material was studied, as a function of several annealing parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, fluence), as far as it concerns its structural properties, by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and micro-Raman techniques.

  16. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  17. Selective removal of carious dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Awazu, Kunio

    2010-04-01

    Conventional laser light sources for the treatment of a hard tissue in dental (Er:YAG laser, Er,Cr:YSGG laser and CO2 laser etc.) are good for removal of caries. However these lasers cannot achieve to give a selective treatment effect for caries without a side effect for normal tissue. The objective of this study is to develop the less-invasive treatment technique of carious dentin by selective absorption effect using the laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm which corresponds to an absorption peak of organic matters called amide 1 band. Mid-infrared nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for the experiment of selective treatment. A tunable wavelength range, pulse width and repetition rate is from 5.5 to 10 μm, 5 ns and Hz, respectively. The laser with a wavelength of 6.02 μm and predetermined energy parameters was irradiated to the plate of carious dentin model which is made by soaking in lactic acid solution. After laser irradiation, the surface and cross-sectional surface of samples were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Average power density about 15 W/cm2 realized to excavate a demineralized region (carious dentin model) selectively in a SEM observation. In the same energy condition, serious side effect was not observed on the surface of normal dentin. A wavelength of 6.02 μm realizes a selective excavation of carious dentin. Using 6.02 μm is a novel and promising technique toward to next-generation dental treatment procedure for realizing MI.

  18. 100μJ-level single frequency linearly-polarized nanosecond pulsed laser at 775 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Fang, Qiang; Fan, Jingli; Cui, Xuelong; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Jinhui; Zhou, Guoqing

    2017-02-01

    We report a single frequency, linearly polarized, near diffraction-limited, pulsed laser source at 775 nm by frequency doubling a single frequency nanosecond pulsed all fiber based master oscillator-power amplifier, seeded by a fiber coupled semiconductor DFB laser diode at 1550 nm. The laser diode was driven by a pulsed laser driver to generate 5 ns laser pulses at 260 Hz repetition rate with 50 pJ pulse energy. The pulse energy was boosted to 200 μJ using two stages of core-pumped fiber amplifiers and two stages of cladding-pumped fiber amplifiers. The multi-stage synchronous pulse pumping technique was adopted in the four stages of fiber amplifiers to mitigate the ASE. The frequency doubling is implemented in a single pass configuration using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The crystal is 3 mm long, 1.4 mm wide, 1 mm thick, with a 19.36 μm domain period chosen for quasi-phase matching at 33°C. It was AR coated at both 1550 nm and 775 nm. The maximum pulse energy of 97 μJ was achieved when 189 μJ fundamental laser was launched. The corresponding conversion efficiency is about 51.3%. The pulse duration was measured to be 4.8 ns. So the peak power of the generated 775 nm laser pulses reached 20 kW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a 100 μJ-level, tens of kilowatts-peak-power-level single frequency linearly polarized 775 nm laser based on the frequency doubling of the fiber lasers.

  19. Data Fitting to Study Ablated Hard Dental Tissues by Nanosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Daiem, A. M.; Ansari, M. Shahnawaze; Babkair, Saeed S.; Salah, Numan A.; Al-Mujtaba, A.

    2016-01-01

    Laser ablation of dental hard tissues is one of the most important laser applications in dentistry. Many works have reported the interaction of laser radiations with tooth material to optimize laser parameters such as wavelength, energy density, etc. This work has focused on determining the relationship between energy density and ablation thresholds using pulsed, 5 nanosecond, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; Nd:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nanometer. For enamel and dentin tissues, the ablations have been performed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The ablation thresholds and relationship between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines, which appeared in LIBS, were determined using data fitting. Furthermore, the morphological changes were studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Moreover, the chemical stability of the tooth material after ablation has been studied using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The differences between carbon atomic % of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were tested using statistical t-test. Results revealed that the best fitting between energy densities and peak areas of calcium lines were exponential and linear for enamel and dentin, respectively. In addition, the ablation threshold of Nd:YAG lasers in enamel was higher than that of dentin. The morphology of the surrounded ablated region of enamel showed thermal damages. For enamel, the EDX quantitative analysis showed that the atomic % of carbon increased significantly when laser energy density increased. PMID:27228169

  20. Ultrashort Two-Photon-Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Nanosecond-Duration, Repetitively Pulsed Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob Brian

    Absolute number densities of atomic species produced by nanosecond duration, repetitively pulsed electric discharges are measured by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). Relatively high plasma discharge pulse energies (=1 mJ/pulse) are used to generate atomic hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen in a variety of discharge conditions and geometries. Unique to this work is the development of femtosecond-laser-based TALIF (fs-TALIF). Fs-TALIF offers a number of advantages compared to more conventional ns-pulse-duration laser systems, including better accuracy of direct quenching measurements in challenging environments, significantly reduced photolytic interference including photo-dissociation and photo-ionization, higher signal and increased laser-pulse bandwidth, the ability to collect two-dimensional images of atomic species number densities with far greater spatial resolution compared with more conventional diagnostics, and much higher laser repetition rates allowing for more efficient and accurate measurements of atomic species number densities. In order to fully characterize the fs-TALIF diagnostic and compare it with conventional ns-TALIF, low pressure (100 Torr) ns-duration pulsed discharges are operated in mixtures of H2, O2, and N2 with different buffer gases including argon, helium, and nitrogen. These discharge conditions are used to demonstrate the capability for two-dimensional imaging measurements. The images produced are the first of their kind and offer quantitative insight into spatially and temporally resolved kinetics and transport in ns-pulsed discharge plasmas. The two-dimensional images make possible comparison with high-fidelity plasma kinetics models of the presented data. The comparison with the quasi-one-dimensional kinetic model show good spatial and temporal agreement. The same diagnostics are used at atmospheric pressure, when atomic oxygen fs-TALIF is performed in an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ). Here, the

  1. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Fuqiang; Wang Yi; Shi Hongsheng; Lei Qingquan

    2008-06-15

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N{sub 2} as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  2. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fuqiang; Wang, Yi; Shi, Hongsheng; Lei, Qingquan

    2008-06-01

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N(2) as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  3. Viscous liquid expulsion in nanosecond UV laser ablation: From ``clean'' ablation to nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarev, V. N.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reviews recent results on modeling UV nanosecond laser ablation. Particular attention is given to a viscous liquid flow driven by ablation pressure. Based on the analysis of the Navier-Stokes equation, various strongly different manifestations of this phenomenon are explained. These are (i) a “clean” laser ablation, when the laser spot has a clean sharp spot border free of resolidified melt dross; (ii) a new form of material removal in laser ablation, expulsion on a poly(methyl methacrylate) target of long (up to 1 mm) nanofibers with a radius about 150-200 nm to the exterior of the spot under the action of a single pulse of a KrF excimer laser; and (iii) a new method of laser surface nanostructuring, the formation of a surface foam having a structure of micropores interconnected by nanofilaments with diameters of about 100 nm as a result of single-pulse KrF laser ablation of biopolymer films.

  4. Surface morphological modification of crosslinked hydrophilic co-polymers by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primo, Gastón A.; Alvarez Igarzabal, Cecilia I.; Pino, Gustavo A.; Ferrero, Juan C.; Rossa, Maximiliano

    2016-04-01

    This work reports an investigation of the surface modifications induced by irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses of ultraviolet and visible wavelengths on crosslinked hydrophilic co-polymeric materials, which have been functionalized with 1-vinylimidazole as a co-monomer. A comparison is made between hydrogels differing in the base co-monomer (N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide) and in hydration state (both swollen and dried states). Formation of craters is the dominant morphological change observed by ablation in the visible at 532 nm, whereas additional, less aggressive surface modifications, chiefly microfoams and roughness, are developed in the ultraviolet at 266 nm. At both irradiation wavelengths, threshold values of the incident laser fluence for the observation of the various surface modifications are determined under single-pulse laser irradiation conditions. It is shown that multiple-pulse irradiation at 266 nm with a limited number of laser shots can be used alternatively for generating a regular microfoam layer at the surface of dried hydrogels based on N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate. The observations are rationalized on the basis of currently accepted mechanisms for laser-induced polymer surface modification, with a significant contribution of the laser foaming mechanism. Prospective applications of the laser-foamed hydrogel matrices in biomolecule immobilization are suggested.

  5. Comparison of ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis in glass, monazite, and zircon.

    PubMed

    Poitrasson, Franck; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S; Freydier, Rémi; Russo, Richard E

    2003-11-15

    We compared the analytical performance of ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The benefit of ultrafast lasers was evaluated regarding thermal-induced chemical fractionation, that is otherwise well known to limit LA-ICPMS. Both lasers had a Gaussian beam energy profile and were tested using the same ablation system and ICPMS analyzer. Resulting crater morphologies and analytical signals showed more straightforward femtosecond laser ablation processes, with minimal thermal effects. Despite a less stable energy output, the ultrafast laser yielded elemental (Pb/U, Pb/Th) and Pb isotopic ratios that were more precise, repeatable, and accurate, even when compared to the best analytical conditions for the nanosecond laser. Measurements on NIST glasses, monazites, and zircon also showed that femtosecond LA-ICPMS calibration was less matrix-matched dependent and therefore more versatile.

  6. Improved hollow-core photonic crystal fiber design for delivery of nanosecond pulses in laser micromachining applications.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Jonathan D; Couny, Francois; Russell, Phillip St J; Jones, Julian D C; Knight, Jonathan C; Hand, Duncan P

    2005-07-20

    We report the delivery of high-energy nanosecond pulses (approximately 65 ns pulse width) from a high-repetition-rate (up to 100 kHz) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through the fundamental mode of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) at 1064 nm. The guided mode in the HC-PCF has a low overlap with the glass, allowing delivery of pulses with energies above those attainable with other fibers. Energies greater than 0.5 mJ were delivered in a single spatial mode through the hollow-core fiber, providing the pulse energy and high beam quality required for micromachining of metals. Practical micromachining of a metal sheet by fiber delivery has been demonstrated.

  7. Fabrication of high aspect ratio metal nanotips by nanosecond pulse laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Bo; Wu, Lin; Chou, Stephen Y.

    2008-08-01

    The authors have developed an approach to fabricate sharp and high aspect ratio metal tips using nanosecond pulse laser melting. A quartz wafer covered with a thin chromium (Cr) film was placed on top of a second wafer with a sub-micrometer gap between them and the Cr film facing the second wafer. Then an excimer laser pulse (308 nm wavelength, 20 ns pulse duration) was shone from the back of the quartz wafer and melted the Cr film momentarily (several hundred nanoseconds). It is found that the molten Cr films can self-form discrete metal pillars connecting the two wafers. After separating the two wafers, nanotips were formed at the broken pillar necks. The sharpest tip achieved has an apex diameter 10 nm and height 180 nm. The self-formation of Cr pillars between the two wafers was attributed to the attractive electrostatic force caused by the work function difference of two wafers that were in close proximity. This technique could be extended to other metals, and a periodic uniform tip array could be obtained by pre-patterning the metal into identical isolated mesas and precisely controlling the gap between the two wafers.

  8. Graphite to ultrafine nanocrystalline diamond phase transition model and growth restriction mechanism induced by nanosecond laser processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X. D. Liu, R.; Zheng, L. M.; Ren, Y. P.; Hu, Z. Z.; He, H.

    2015-10-05

    To have a clear insight into nanocrystal growth from graphite to diamond upon high energy pulsed laser irradiation of graphite suspension, synthesis of ultrafine nanocrystalline diamonds with laser energy set up from 0.3 J to 12 J, repetition rate of 10 Hz has been studied. The method allows synthesizing ultrafine nanocrystalline particles continuously at the ambient temperature and normal pressure. The particle size is shown independent of laser energy, which is ultrafine and ranges in 2–6 nm. The theoretical grown size of nano-diamonds is found in well agreement with the experiment results. Four kinds of production were found: nano-diamond, spherical carbon nano-particles, flocculent amorphous carbon, and graphene nano-ribbon rolls. A solid-vapor-plasma-liquid coexistence model describing phase transition from graphite to diamond induced by nanosecond laser processing was proposed. Graphene nano-ribbon rolls might be the intermediate phase in the conversion from graphite to diamond.

  9. Stable nanosecond passively Q-switched all-fiber erbium-doped laser with a 45° tilted fiber grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianxing; Yan, Zhijun; Mou, Chengbo; Zhou, Kaiming; Zhang, Lin

    2017-04-20

    Nanosecond passive Q-switching generation from an all-fiber erbium-doped laser with a UV inscribed 45° tilted fiber grating (TFG) is systematically demonstrated. The 45° TFG is employed as a polarizer together with two polarization controllers (PCs) to realize nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR). Because of the NPR effect, stable Q-switched pulses with an average output power of 17.5 mW, a single pulse energy of 72.7 nJ, a repetition rate of 241 kHz, a pulse width of 466 ns, and a signal to noise ratio (SNR) of 58.8 dB are obtained with 600 mW pump power. To the best of our knowledge, the SNR is the highest among all-fiber passively Q-switched erbium-doped laser. The stability of this erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) is also examined by monitoring the laser consecutively for 5 h under laboratory conditions.

  10. Environmental resistance of oxide tags fabricated on 304L stainless steel via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Samantha Kay; Adams, David P.; Bahr, David F.; Moody, Neville R.

    2015-11-14

    Nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation was used to fabricate colored, mechanically robust oxide “tags” on 304L stainless steel. Immersion in simulated seawater solution, salt fog exposure, and anodic polarization in a 3.5% NaCl solution were employed to evaluate the environmental resistance of these oxide tags. Single layer oxides outside a narrow thickness range (~ 100–150 nm) are susceptible to dissolution in chloride containing environments. The 304L substrates immediately beneath the oxides corrode severely—attributed to Cr-depletion in the melt zone during laser processing. For the first time, multilayered oxides were fabricated with pulsed laser irradiation in an effort to expand the protective thickness range while also increasing the variety of film colors attainable in this range. Layered films grown using a laser scan rate of 475 mm/s are more resistant to both localized and general corrosion than oxides fabricated at 550 mm/s. Furthermore, in the absence of pre-processing to mitigate Cr-depletion, layered films can enhance environmental stability of the system.

  11. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  12. One-step fabrication of near superhydrophobic aluminum surface by nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdheesh, R.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.; Ocaña, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the micro and nano structures of biological surface such as lotus leaf, rice leaves, etc. a functional near superhydrophobic surface of pure aluminum has been fabricated using one-step nanosecond laser processing. Thin aluminum sheets are micro-patterned with ultraviolet laser pulses to create near superhydrophobic surface in one-step direct laser writing technique. The impact of number of pulses/microhole with respect to the geometry and static contact angle measurements has been investigated. The microstructure shows the formation of blind microholes along with the micro-wall by laser processing, which improves the composite interface between the three phases such as water, air and solid, thus enhance the wetting property of the surface. The geometrical changes are supported by the chemical changes induced on the surface for improving the degree of hydrophobicity. Laser processed microholes exhibited near superhydrophobic surface with SCA measurement of 148 ± 3°. The static contact angle values are very consistent for repeated measurement at same area and across the laser patterned surface.

  13. Laser-induced damage morphology in fused silica at 1064 nm in the nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambonneau, Maxime; Diaz, Romain; Duchateau, Guillaume; Grua, Pierre; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Rullier, Jean-Luc; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    The morphology of laser-induced damage sites at the exit surface of fused silica is tightly correlated to the mode composition of the nanosecond laser pulses at 1064 nm. In the single longitudinal mode (SLM) configuration, a molten and fractured central zone is surrounded by a funnel-shaped surface modification. Ring patterns surround the damage sites when these are initiated by multiple longitudinal modes (MLM) laser pulses. In this last mode configuration, the pulses temporal profiles as well as the damage ring patterns differ from pulse to pulse. The appearance chronology of the rings is found to be closely related to the temporal shape of the laser pulses. This supports that the damage morphology originates from the coupling of a laser-supported detonation wave propagating in air with an ablation mechanism in silica. In our experiments, the propagation speed of the detonation wave reaches about 20 km/s and scales as the cube root of the laser intensity, in good agreement with theory.

  14. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  15. Reflection of nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses in ablation of metals.

    PubMed

    Benavides, O; Lebedeva, O; Golikov, V

    2011-10-24

    Hemispherical total reflectivity of copper, nickel, and tungsten in ablation by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses in air of atmospheric pressure is experimentally studied as a function of laser fluence in the range of 0.1-100 J/cm(2). Our experiment shows that at laser fluences below the plasma formation threshold the reflectivity of mechanically polished metals remains virtually equal to the table room-temperature reflectivity values. The hemispherical total reflectivity of the studied metals begins to drop at a laser fluence of the plasma formation threshold. With increasing laser fluence above the plasma formation threshold the reflectivity sharply decreases to a low value and then remains unchanged with further increasing laser fluence. Computation of the surface temperature at the plasma formation threshold fluence reveals that its value is substantially below the melting point that indicates an important role of the surface nanostructural defects in the plasma formation on a real sample due to their enhanced heating caused by both plasmonic absorption and plasmonic nanofocusing.

  16. Investigation of laser induced breakdown in liquid nitromethane using nanosecond shadowgraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wencan; Zheng, Xianxu; Yu, Guoyang; Zhao, Jun; Zeng, Yangyang; Liu, Cangli

    2016-09-01

    A nanosecond time-resolved shadowgraphy is performed to observe a laser-induced breakdown in nitromethane. The digital delays are introduced between a pump beam and an illumination light to achieve a measuring range from 40 ns to 100 ms, which enable us to study the shock wave propagation, bubble dynamics, and other process of the laser-induced breakdown. Compared with distilled water, there are two obvious differences observed in nitromethane: (1) the production of a non-evaporative gas at the final stage, and (2) an absence of the secondary shock wave after the first collapse of the bubble. We also calculated the bubble energy in nitromethane and distilled water under a different incident energy. The results indicate that the bubble energy in nitromethane is more than twice as large as that in water. It is suggested that chemical reactions contribute to the releasing of energy.

  17. Simulation of nanosecond laser-induced thermal dynamics of hollow gold nanoshells for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatef, Ali; Fortin-Deschênes, Simon; Meunier, Michel

    2014-03-01

    In this report, we investigate numerically the thermodynamics of hollow gold nanoshell (AuNS) irritated by near-infrared (NIR) light. Simulations are performed for the AuNS in aqueous medium. The nanostructure is illuminated by a nanosecond pulsed laser at plasmonic resonance. The spatiotemporal evolution of the temperature profile inside and outside the AuNS is computed using a numerical framework based on the finite element method (FEM). In particular, we show how the temperature varies with the laser fluence and pulse duration. The aim of this study is to provide a description of the physics of heat release of AuNSs and useful insights for the development of these nanostructures for biomedical applications such as drug delivery, photothermal cancer therapy and optoporation of cells.

  18. One - step nanosecond laser microstructuring, sulfur hyperdoping, and annealing of silicon surfaces in liquid carbondisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Luong, Nguyen; Danilov, P. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Khmel'nitskii, P. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Mel'nik, N. N.; Saraeva, I. N.; Смirnov, H. A.; Rudenko, A. A.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    We perform a single-shot IR nanosecond laser processing of commercial silicon wafers in ambient air and under a 2 mm thick carbon disulfide liquid layer. We characterize the surface spots modified in the liquid ambient and the spots ablated under the same conditions in air in terms of its surface topography, chemical composition, band-structure modification, and crystalline structure by means of SEM and EDX microscopy, as well as of FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy. These studies indicate that single-step microstructuring and deep (up to 2-3% on the surface) hyperdoping of the crystalline silicon in its submicron surface layer, preserving via pulsed laser annealing its crystallinity and providing high (103 - 104 cm-1) spectrally at near- and mid-IR absorption coefficients, can be obtained in this novel approach, which is very promising for thin - film silicon photovoltaic devices

  19. A single-sweep, nanosecond time resolution laser temperature-jump apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballew, R. M.; Sabelko, J.; Reiner, C.; Gruebele, M.

    1996-10-01

    We describe a fast temperature-jump (T-jump) apparatus capable of acquiring kinetic relaxation transients via real-time fluorescence detection over a time interval from nanoseconds to milliseconds in a single sweep. The method is suitable for aqueous solutions, relying upon the direct absorption of laser light by the bulk water. This obviates the need for additives (serving as optical or conductive heaters) that may interact with the sample under investigation. The longitudinal temperature profile is made uniform by counterpropagating heating pulses. Dead time is limited to one period of the probe laser (16 ns). The apparatus response is tested with aqueous tryptophan and the diffusion-controlled dimerization of proflavine.

  20. Gold nanoparticle transfer through photothermal effects in a metamaterial absorber by nanosecond laser

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Hanmo; Yang, Yuanqing; Chen, Xingxing; Zhao, Ding; Chen, Xi; Chen, Yiting; Yan, Min; Li, Qiang; Qiu, Min

    2014-01-01

    A non-complicated, controllable method of metallic nanoparticle fabrication at low operating light power is proposed. The method is based on laser-induced forward transfer, using a metamaterial absorber as the donor to significantly enhance the photothermal effect and reduce the operating light fluence to 35 mJ/cm2, which is much lower than that in previous works. A large number of metallic nanoparticles can be transferred by one shot of focused nanosecond laser pulses. Transferred nanoparticles exhibit good size uniformity and the sizes are controllable. The optical properties of transferred particles are characterized by dark-field spectroscopy and the experimental results agree with the simulation results. PMID:25156404

  1. Simulation of nanosecond laser-induced thermal dynamics of hollow gold nanoshells for hyperthermia therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hatef, Ali Fortin-Deschênes, Simon Meunier, Michel

    2014-03-31

    In this report, we investigate numerically the thermodynamics of hollow gold nanoshell (AuNS) irritated by near-infrared (NIR) light. Simulations are performed for the AuNS in aqueous medium. The nanostructure is illuminated by a nanosecond pulsed laser at plasmonic resonance. The spatiotemporal evolution of the temperature profile inside and outside the AuNS is computed using a numerical framework based on the finite element method (FEM). In particular, we show how the temperature varies with the laser fluence and pulse duration. The aim of this study is to provide a description of the physics of heat release of AuNSs and useful insights for the development of these nanostructures for biomedical applications such as drug delivery, photothermal cancer therapy and optoporation of cells.

  2. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Franta, Benjamin Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija

    2015-12-14

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  3. Visible and near infrared resonance plasmonic enhanced nanosecond laser optoporation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    St-Louis Lalonde, Bastien; Boulais, Étienne; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Meunier, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a light driven, non-invasive cell membrane perforation technique based on the localized field amplification by a nanosecond pulsed laser near gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The optoporation phenomena is investigated with pulses generated by a Nd:YAG laser for two wavelengths that are either in the visible (532 nm) or near infrared (NIR) (1064 nm). Here, the main objective is to compare on and off localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR) to introduce foreign material through the cell membrane using nanosecond laser pulses. The membrane permeability of human melanoma cells (MW278) has been successfully increased as shown by the intake of a fluorescent dye upon irradiation. The viability of this laser driven perforation method is evaluated by propidium iodide exclusion as well as MTT assay. Our results show that up to 25% of the cells are perforated with 532 nm pulses at 50 mJ/cm2 and around 30% of the cells are perforated with 1064 nm pulses at 1 J/cm2. With 532 nm pulses, the viability 2 h after treatment is 64% but it increases to 88% 72 h later. On the other hand, the irradiation with 1064 nm pulses leads to an improved 2 h viability of 81% and reaches 98% after 72 h. Scanning electron microscopy images show that the 5 pulses delivered during treatment induce changes in the AuNPs size distribution when irradiated by a 532 nm beam, while this distribution is barely affected when 1064 nm is used. PMID:23577284

  4. Rapid Laser Induced Crystallization of Amorphous NiTi Films Observed by Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy (DTEM)

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrange, T; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D; Reed, B W; Grummon, D S

    2010-03-01

    The crystallization processes of the as-deposited, amorphous NiTi thin films have been studied in detail using techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry and, in-situ TEM. The kinetic data have been analyzed in terms of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolomogrov (JMAK) semi-empirical formula. The kinetic parameters determined from this analysis have been useful in defining process control parameters for tailoring microstructural features and shape memory properties. Due to the commercial push to shrink thin film-based devices, unique processing techniques have been developed using laser-based annealing to spatially control the microstructure evolution down to sub-micron levels. Nanosecond, pulse laser annealing is particularly attractive since it limits the amount of peripheral heating and unwanted microstructural changes to underlying or surrounding material. However, crystallization under pulsed laser irradiation can differ significantly from conventional thermal annealing, e.g., slow heating in a furnace. This is especially true for amorphous NiTi materials and relevant for shape memory thin film based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) applications. There is little to no data on the crystallization kinetics of NiTi under pulsed laser irradiation, primarily due to the high crystallization rates intrinsic to high temperature annealing and the spatial and temporal resolution limits of standard techniques. However, with the high time and spatial resolution capabilities of the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the rapid nucleation events occurring from pulsed laser irradiation can be directly observed and nucleation rates can be quantified. This paper briefly explains the DTEM approach and how it used to investigate the pulsed laser induced crystallization processes in NiTi and to determine kinetic parameters.

  5. Study of laser-plasma interaction using a physics-based model for understanding the physical mechanism of double-pulse effect in nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Benxin; Zhou Yun; Forsman, Andrew

    2009-12-21

    This paper studies the double-pulse effect in high-intensity ({>=}{approx}GW/cm{sup 2}) nanosecond (ns) laser ablation, which refers to the significant material removal rate enhancement for ablation by two ns laser pulses (often separated by a delay time of {approx}10 to 100 ns). The early-stage interaction of the second laser pulse with the plasma plume created by the first pulse is very important for understanding the physical mechanism of the double pulse effect. However, the plasma properties in the early stage (during a laser pulse or within 20 to 30 ns after the completion of the pulse) are very difficult to measure experimentally. In this letter, a physics-based predictive model is used as the investigation tool, which was previously verified based on experiments on plasma properties in the late stage, which are relatively easy to measure. The study shows that the second laser pulse does not directly strike the target condensed phase. Instead, it mainly interacts with the plasma plume created by the first laser pulse, heats and accelerates the ablated material in the plume lingering above the target surface.

  6. Comparative Study of the Dissociative Ionization of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane Using Nanosecond and Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    du Plessis, Anton; Strydom, Christien; Botha, Lourens

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the laser induced molecular dissociation of 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE) were studied using a range of intensities and standard laser wavelengths with nanosecond and femtosecond pulse durations. TCE contains C-H, C-C and C-Cl bonds and selective bond breakage of one or more of these bonds is of scientific interest. Using laser ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, it was found that considerable variation of fragment ion peak heights as well as changes in relative peak ratios is possible by varying the laser intensity (by attenuation), wavelength and pulse duration using standard laser sources. The nanosecond laser dissociation seems to occur via C-Cl bond breakage, with significant fragmentation and only a few large mass ion peaks observed. In contrast, femtosecond laser dissociative ionization results in many large mass ion peaks. Evidence is found for various competing dissociation and ionization pathways. Variation of the nanosecond laser intensity does not change the fragmentation pattern, while at high femtosecond intensities large changes are observed in relative ion peak sizes. The total ionization yield and fragmentation ratios are presented for a range of wavelengths and intensities, and compared to the changes observed due to a linear chirp variation. PMID:20480004

  7. Characterization of nanosecond, femtosecond and dual pulse laser energy deposition in air for flow control and diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbach, Christopher M.

    The non-resonant heating of gases by laser irradiation and plasma formation has been under investigation since the development of 100 megawatt peak power, Q-switched, nanosecond pulse duration lasers and the commensurate discovery of laser air sparks. More recently, advances in mode-locking and chirped pulse amplification have led to commercially available 100 gigawatt peak power, femtosecond pulse duration lasers with a rapidly increasing number of applications including remote sensing, laser spectroscopy, aerodynamic flow control, and molecular tagging velocimetry and thermometry diagnostics. This work investigates local energy deposition and gas heating produced by focused, non-resonant, nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses in the context of flow control and laser diagnostic applications. Three types of pulse configurations were examined: single nanosecond pulses, single femtosecond pulses and a dual pulse approach whereby a femtosecond pre-ionizing pulse is followed by a nanosecond pulse. For each pulse configuration, optical and laser diagnostic techniques were applied in order to qualitatively and quantitatively measure the plasmadynamic and hydrodynamic processes accompanying laser energy deposition. Time resolved imaging of optical emission from the plasma and excited species was used to qualitatively examine the morphology and decay of the excited gas. Additionally, Thomson scattering and Rayleigh scattering diagnostics were applied towards measurements of electron temperature, electron density, gas temperature and gas density. Gas heating by nanosecond and dual pulse laser plasmas was found to be considerably more intense than femtosecond plasmas, irrespective of pressure, while the dual pulse approach provided substantially more controllability than nanosecond pulses alone. In comparison, measurements of femtosecond laser heating showed a strong and nonlinearly dependence on focusing strength. With comparable pulse energy, measurements of maximum

  8. Time-resolved study of the mechanical response of tissue phantoms to nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2011-11-01

    We present a time-resolved study of the interaction of nanosecond laser pulses with tissue phantoms. When a laser pulse interacts with a material, optical energy is absorbed by a combination of linear (heat generation and thermoelastic expansion) and nonlinear absorption (expanding plasma), according to both the laser light irradiance and material properties. The objective is to elucidate the contribution of linear and nonlinear optical absorption to bubble formation. Depending on the local temperatures and pressures reached, both interactions may lead to the formation of bubbles. We discuss three experimental approaches: piezoelectric sensors, time-resolved shadowgraphy, and time-resolved interferometry, to follow the formation of bubbles and measure the pressure originated by 6 ns laser pulses interacting with tissue phantoms. We studied the bubble formation and pressure transients for varying linear optical absorption and for radiant exposures above and below threshold for bubble formation. We report a rapid decay (of 2 orders of magnitude) of the laser-induced mechanical pressure measured (by time-resolved shadowgraphy) very close to the irradiation spot and beyond 1 mm from the irradiation site (by the piezoelectric sensor). Through time-resolved interferometry measurements, we determined that bubble formation can occur at marginal temperature increments as low as 3°C.

  9. Characteristics of moderate current vacuum discharge triggered by multipicosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Moorti, A.; Kumbhare, S.R.; Naik, P.A.; Gupta, P.D.; Romanov, I.V.; Korobkin, Yu.V.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.

    2005-02-15

    A comparative study of the characteristics of moderate-current ({approx}10 kA), low-energy ({<=}20 J) vacuum discharge triggered by multipicosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses is performed. Temporal profiles of the x-ray emission, discharge current, and anode voltage measured in vacuum discharge created between a planar titanium cathode and a conical point-tip anode are observed to be quite different for the two regimes of the laser pulse duration. While cathode plasma jet pinching is clearly observed in the discharge created by low-energy ({approx}5 mJ), 27 ps full width at half-maximum (FWHM) laser pulses, a feeble pinching occurred for 4 ns (FWHM) laser pulses only above a threshold energy of {approx}250 mJ. In addition to the multiple K-shell x-ray pulses emitted from the titanium anode up to 100 ns, evidence of a much harder x-ray component (h{nu}>100 keV) is also seen in the discharge triggered by picosecond laser pulses.

  10. Nanosecond pulsed laser nanostructuring of Au thin films: Comparison between irradiation at low and atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Aké, C.; Canales-Ramos, A.; García-Fernández, T.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2017-05-01

    Au thin films with tens of nm in thickness deposited on glass substrates were irradiated with nanosecond UV (355 nm) laser pulses at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum conditions (∼600 and 10-5 Torr). We studied the effect of the laser fluence (200-400 mJ/cm2), thickness of the starting film (∼40-80 nm) and surrounding pressure on the partial ablation/evaporation of the films and the morphology of the produced nanoparticles (NPs). The dynamics of NPs formation was studied by measuring in real time the transmission of the samples upon continuous-wave laser exposure, and by means of probe beam deflection technique. The ejection of material from the film as a result of the irradiation was confirmed by time-resolved shadowgraphy technique. Experiments show that the NPs diameter and their size distribution are smaller when the irradiation is performed in vacuum regardless the laser fluence and thickness of the started film. It is also shown that the plasmon band shifts to higher frequencies with lower background pressure. The optical measurements show that the films melt and ablate during the laser pulse, but the transmission of the irradiated areas continues changing during tens of microseconds due to ejection of material and solidification of the remaining gold. Our results indicate that partial ablation cannot be neglected in nanostructuration by ns-pulsed irradiation of thin films when their thickness is in the studied range.

  11. Velocity measurements in the nanosecond range realized by variably delayed dye laser exposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Zsuzsanna; Hopp, Bela; Toth, Zsolt; Csete, Maria; Ignacz, Ferenc; Bor, Zsolt

    1998-09-01

    An imaging system with nanosecond resolution was developed and used for investigation of excimer laser induced ablation. The photographic recordings were made by means of a videocamera equipped with a microscope. Dye laser pulses used for exposition were delayed appropriately with respect to the incidence of the excimer laser light. The movement of the plume ejected from the sample and the propagation of the mechanical waves developed in and above the sample were visualized. Using single recording pulses the distance-time functions were obtained. The velocity-time functions were calculated by derivation of those. Applying a Michelson interferometer for generating double exposing dye laser pulses with delay dt, the average velocity for dt could be measured directly. The propagation velocity of shock waves originating from the polymethyl-methacrylate surface was investigated by this technique in Schlieren arrangement. Velocities as high as 40 times the sound velocity in the air were measured. The material ablated from the polymethyl-methacrylate was observed in vacuum by single exposition transmission arrangement. During the excimer laser ablation of cornea several phenomena occur, such as shock wave in the air, shear wave on the surface, internal acoustic wave, plume ejection and so on. The characteristic velocities of these are shown. 7

  12. Coupling statistics and heat transfer to study laser-induced crystal damage by nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, Guillaume; Dyan, Anthony

    2007-04-16

    By coupling statistics and heat transfer, we investigate numerically laser-induced crystal damage by multi-gigawatt nanosecond pulses. Our model is based on the heating of nanometric absorbing defects that may cooperate when sufficiently aggregated. In that configuration, they induce locally a strong increase of temperature that may lead to a subsequent damage. This approach allows to predict cluster size distribution and damage probabilities as a function of the laser fluence. By studying the influence of the pulse duration onto the laser-induced damage threshold, we have established scaling laws that link the critical laser fluence to its pulse duration tau. In particular, this approach provides an explanation to the deviation from the standard tau(1/2) scaling law that has been recently observed in laser-induced damage experiments with KH(2)PO(4) (KDP) crystals [J.J. Adams et al., Proc. of SPIE 5991, 5991R-1 (2005)]. In the present paper, despite the 3D problem is tackled, we focus our attention on a 1D modeling of thermal diffusion that is shown to provide more reliable predictions than the 3D one. These results indicate that absorbers involved in KDP damage may be associated with a collection of planar defects. First general comparisons with some experimental facts have been performed.

  13. Nanosecond laser ablation enhances cellular infiltration in a hybrid tissue scaffold.

    PubMed

    Jahnavi, S; Arthi, N; Pallavi, S; Selvaraju, C; Bhuvaneshwar, G S; Kumary, T V; Verma, R S

    2017-08-01

    Hybrid tissue engineered (HTE) scaffolds constituting polymeric nanofibers and biological tissues have attractive bio-mechanical properties. However, they suffer from small pore size due to dense overlapping nanofibers resulting in poor cellular infiltration. In this study, using nanosecond (ns) laser, we fabricated micro-scale features on Polycaprolactone (PCL)-Chitosan (CH) nanofiber layered bovine pericardium based Bio-Hybrid scaffold to achieve enhanced cellular adhesion and infiltration. The laser energy parameters such as fluence of 25J/cm(2), 0.1mm instep and 15 mark time were optimized to get structured microchannels on the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. Laser irradiation time of 40μs along with these parameters resulted in microchannel width of ~50μm and spacing of ~35μm between adjacent lines. The biochemical, thermal, hydrophilic and uniaxial mechanical properties of the Bio-Hybrid scaffolds remained comparable after laser ablation reflecting extracellular matrix (ECM) stability. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and mouse cardiac fibroblasts seeded on these laser-ablated Bio-Hybrid scaffolds exhibited biocompatibility and increased cellular adhesion in microchannels when compared to non-ablated Bio-Hybrid scaffolds. These findings suggest the feasibility to selectively ablate polymer layer in the HTE scaffolds without affecting their bio-mechanical properties and also describe a new approach to enhance cellular infiltration in the HTE scaffolds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Examination of nanosecond laser melting thresholds in refractory metals by shear wave acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaev, A.; Muminov, B.; Rakhymzhanov, A.; Mynbayev, N.; Utegulov, Z. N.

    2017-07-01

    Nanosecond laser pulse-induced melting thresholds in refractory (Nb, Mo, Ta and W) metals are measured using detected laser-generated acoustic shear waves. Obtained melting threshold values were found to be scaled with corresponding melting point temperatures of investigated materials displaying dissimilar shearing behavior. The experiments were conducted with motorized control of the incident laser pulse energies with small and uniform energy increments to reach high measurement accuracy and real-time monitoring of the epicentral acoustic waveforms from the opposite side of irradiated sample plates. Measured results were found to be in good agreement with numerical finite element model solving coupled elastodynamic and thermal conduction governing equations on structured quadrilateral mesh. Solid-melt phase transition was handled by means of apparent heat capacity method. The onset of melting was attributed to vanished shear modulus and rapid radial molten pool propagation within laser-heated metal leading to preferential generation of transverse acoustic waves from sources surrounding the molten mass resulting in the delay of shear wave transit times. Developed laser-based technique aims for applications involving remote examination of rapid melting processes of materials present in harsh environment (e.g. spent nuclear fuels) with high spatio-temporal resolution.

  15. Laser-induced damage of KDP crystals by 1omega nanosecond pulses: influence of crystal orientation.

    PubMed

    Reyné, Stéphane; Duchateau, Guillaume; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Lamaignère, Laurent

    2009-11-23

    We investigate the influence of THG-cut KDP crystal orientation on laser damage at 1064 nm under nanosecond pulses. Since laser damage is now assumed to initiate on precursor defects, this study makes a connection between these nanodefects (throughout a mesoscopic description) and the influence of their orientation on laser damage. Some investigations have already been carried out in various crystals and particularly for KDP, indicating propagation direction and polarization dependences. We performed experiments for two orthogonal positions of the crystal and results clearly indicate that KDP crystal laser damage depends on its orientation. We carried out further investigations on the effect of the polarization orientation, by rotating the crystal around the propagation axis. We then obtained the evolution of the damage probability as a function of the rotation angle. To account for these experimental res ts, we propose a laser damage model based on ellipsoid-shaped defects. This modeling is a refined implementation of the DMT model (Drude Mie Thermal) [Dyan et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 1087-1095 (2008)], by introducing absorption efficiency calculations for an ellipsoidal geometry. Modeling simulations are in good agreement with experimental results.

  16. Flash-lamp-pumped 4 J, 50 Hz Nd:YAG nanosecond laser system for mobile and transportable equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, Katsuhiro; Hasegawa, Noboru; Okada, Hajime; Kondo, Shuji; Nishikino, Masaharu; Kawachi, Tetsuya

    2017-08-01

    A simplified flash-lamp pumped high-average-power Nd:YAG nanosecond laser system based on a master oscillator power amplifier platform was developed toward outside laser remote sensing. The performance of the laser system was demonstrated, obtaining 4 J output pulse energy with a 50 Hz operating frequency. Thermal lens effects were compensated for by using only simple image relays and up to 97% of the laser energy could be contained in the focal spot. The developed laser system was constructed using only components suitable for operation under outside conditions.

  17. Nanosecond soliton pulse generation by mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser using single-walled carbon-nanotube-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohd Afiq; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Zulkepely, Nurul Rozullyah; Nor, Roslan Md; Ahmad, Fauzan; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-12-20

    We demonstrate a simple and low cost mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) operating in the nanosecond region using a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based saturable absorber (SA). A droplet of SWCNT solution is applied on the end of a fiber ferrule, which is then mated to another clean connector ferrule to construct an SA. Then the SA is integrated into a ring EDFL cavity for nanosecond pulse generation. The EDFL operates at around 1570.4 nm, with a soliton-like spectrum with small Kelly sidebands, which confirms the attainment of the anomalous dispersion. It produces a soliton pulse train with a 332 ns width, repetition rate of 909.1 kHz, an average output power of 0.31 mW, and energy of 0.34 nJ at the maximum pump power of 130.8 mW.

  18. Effects of ultraviolet nanosecond laser irradiation on structural modification and optical transmission of single layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhong; Kang, Xiaoli; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo

    2017-03-01

    Structural modifications and optical transmission change of single layer graphene (SLG) on transparent SiO2 substrate induced by nanosecond 355 nm laser irradiation were systematically studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser-excited Raman, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis transmission spectra. In this study, to avoid damage to graphene, the selected irradiation fluence was set to be smaller than the laser damage threshold of SLG. Laser-driven formation of nano-dots, carbon clusters and spherical carbon morphologies were clearly presented using SEM magnification images, and the formation mechanism of such structures were discussed. Raman spectra revealed formation of D' peak and the continuously increasing of ID/IG intensity ratio with the concurrent increase of laser fluence, indicating the increase in amount of structural defects and disordering in SLG. XPS results disclosed that the oxygen content in SLG increases with laser fluence. The formation and relative content increase of Cdbnd O, Csbnd Osbnd C and Osbnd Cdbnd O bonds in SLG induced by laser irradiation were also revealed by XPS. Laser-driven micro-structure modifications of crystalline graphene to nano-crystalline graphene and photo-chemical reactions between graphene and O2 and H2O in air environment were suggested to be responsible for the Raman and XPS revealed modifications in SLG. It is worthy to point out that the above mentioned structural modifications only caused a slight decrease (<2% @ 550 nm) in the optical transmittance of SLG. These results may provide more selections for the batch processing of large scale graphene aiming at modifying its structure and thus taiorling its properties.

  19. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Ge investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection technique and SEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Nazish; Bashir, Shazia; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Akram, Mahreen; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Haq, Faizan-ul; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif

    2016-06-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser ablation phenomena of single crystal Ge (100) has been investigated by employing photoacoustic deflection as well as SEM analysis techniques. Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 1-10 Hz) at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2 is employed as pump beam to ablate Ge targets. In order to evaluate in-situe ablation threshold fluence of Ge by photoacoustic deflection technique, Continuous Wave (CW) He-Ne laser (632 nm, power 10 mW) is employed as a probe beam. It travels parallel to the target surface at a distance of 3 mm and after passing through Ge plasma it causes deflection due to density gradient of acoustic waves. The deflected signal is detected by photodiode and is recorded by oscilloscope. The threshold fluence of Ge, the velocity of ablated species and the amplitude of the deflected signal are evaluated. The threshold fluence of Ge comes out to be 0.5 J cm-2 and is comparable with the analytical value. In order to compare the estimated value of threshold with ex-situe measurements, the quantitative analysis of laser irradiated Ge is performed by using SEM analysis. For this purpose Ge is exposed to single and multiple shots of 5, 10, 50 and 100 at various laser fluences ranging from 0.2 to 11 J cm-2. The threshold fluence for single and multiple shots as well as incubation coefficients are evaluated. It is observed that the value of incubation co-efficient decreases with increasing number of pulses and is therefore responsible for lowering the threshold fluence of Ge. SEM analysis also reveals the growth of various features such as porous structures, non-uniform ripples and blisters on the laser irradiated Ge. It is observed that both the fluence as well as number of laser shots plays a significant role for the growth of these structures.

  20. Broadly tunable optical harmonic generation in type I collagen using IR nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, Theodossis; Georgiou, Efstratios; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Politopoulos, Konstantine; Rapti, Georgia; Yova, Dido M.

    2000-11-01

    Under pulsed nanosecond laser irradiation of type I pure collagen over the 760 - 1070 nm spectral range, optical up- conversion of the incident radiation is observed. More specifically irradiation of collagen at 1064, 901, 892, 828, 785 and 766 nm produces monochromatic second harmonic signals at half the original wavelengths i.e. 532, 451, 446, 414, 393 and 383 nm respectively. The dependence of the second harmonic signal on the excitation intensity was found to be quadratic [log(I532) equals 1.92*log(I1064]. A weaker third harmonic signal was also observed from collagen at 355 nm when irradiated by 1064 nm nanosecond pulses. This signal was found to bear a near cubic dependence upon the irradiation intensity ]log(I356) equals 2.53*log(I1064)]. The polar distribution of the second harmonic radiation was recorded for both pure fibrous collagen as well a for collagen diluted in acetic acid and forming a semitransparent dry film. In the latter case, significant optical behavior was demonstrated, potentially important for further studies of these nonlinear phenomena and for novel applications.

  1. A scheme for recording a fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin; Di, Jianglei; Jiang, Biqiang

    2015-04-01

    A scheme for recording fast process at nanosecond scale by using digital holographic interferometry with continuous wave (CW) laser is described and demonstrated experimentally, which employs delayed-time fibers and angular multiplexing technique and can realize the variable temporal resolution at nanosecond scale and different measured depths of object field at certain temporal resolution. The actual delay-time is controlled by two delayed-time fibers with different lengths. The object field information in two different states can be simultaneously recorded in a composite hologram. This scheme is also suitable for recording fast process at picosecond scale, by using an electro-optic modulator.

  2. Observation of nanosecond laser induced fluorescence of in vitro seawater phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Bensky, Thomas J.; Clemo, Lisa; Gilbert, Chris; Neff, Bryan; Moline, Mark A.; Rohan, Dov

    2008-08-01

    Seawater has been irradiated using a train of 70 ns flashes from a 440 nm laser source. This wavelength is on resonance with the blue absorption peak of Chlorophyll pigment associated with the photosystem of in vitro phytoplankton. The resulting fluorescence at 685 nm is instantaneously recorded during each laser pulse using a streak camera. Delayed fluorescence is observed, yielding clues about initiation of the photosynthetic process on a nanosecond time scale. Further data processing allows for determination of the functional absorption cross section, found to be 0.0095 ?{sup 2}, which is the first reporting of this number for in vitro phytoplankton. Unlike other flash-pump studies of Chlorophyll, using a LED or flashlamp-based sources, the short laser pulse used here does not reveal any pulse-to-pulse hysteresis (i.e., variable fluorescence), indicating that the laser pulses used here are not able to drive the photosynthetic process to completion. This is attributed to competition from a back reaction between the photoexcited photosystem II and the intermediate electron acceptor. The significance of this work as a new type of deployable ocean fluorimeter is discussed, and it is believed the apparatus will have applications in thin-layer phytoplankton research.

  3. Surface modification induced by UV nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser structuring on biometals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, M. Paula; López, Ana J.; Ramil, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Laser surface texturing is a promising tool for improving metallic biomaterials performance in dental and orthopedic bone-replacing applications. Laser ablation modifies the topography of bulk material and might alter surface properties that govern the interactions with the surrounding tissue. This paper presents a preliminary evaluation of surface modifications in two biometals, stainless steel 316L and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V by UV nanosecond Nd:YVO4. Scanning electron microscopy of the surface textured by parallel micro-grooves reveals a thin layer of remelted material along the grooves topography. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction allowed us to appreciate a grain refinement of original crystal structure and consequently induced residual strain. Changes in the surface chemistry were determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; in this sense, generalized surface oxidation was observed and characterization of the oxides and other compounds such hydroxyl groups was reported. In case of titanium alloy, oxide layer mainly composed by TiO2 which is a highly biocompatible compound was identified. Furthermore, laser treatment produces an increase in oxide thickness that could improve the corrosion behavior of the metal. Otherwise, laser treatment led to the formation of secondary phases which might be detrimental to physical and biocompatibility properties of the material.

  4. Observation of nanosecond laser induced fluorescence of in vitro seawater phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bensky, Thomas J; Clemo, Lisa; Gilbert, Chris; Neff, Bryan; Moline, Mark A; Rohan, Dov

    2008-08-01

    Seawater has been irradiated using a train of 70 ns flashes from a 440 nm laser source. This wavelength is on resonance with the blue absorption peak of Chlorophyll pigment associated with the photosystem of in vitro phytoplankton. The resulting fluorescence at 685 nm is instantaneously recorded during each laser pulse using a streak camera. Delayed fluorescence is observed, yielding clues about initiation of the photosynthetic process on a nanosecond time scale. Further data processing allows for determination of the functional absorption cross section, found to be 0.0095 A(2), which is the first reporting of this number for in vitro phytoplankton. Unlike other flash-pump studies of Chlorophyll, using a LED or flashlamp-based sources, the short laser pulse used here does not reveal any pulse-to-pulse hysteresis (i.e., variable fluorescence), indicating that the laser pulses used here are not able to drive the photosynthetic process to completion. This is attributed to competition from a back reaction between the photoexcited photosystem II and the intermediate electron acceptor. The significance of this work as a new type of deployable ocean fluorimeter is discussed, and it is believed the apparatus will have applications in thin-layer phytoplankton research.

  5. NANOSECOND INTERFEROMETRIC STUDIES OF SURFACE DEFORMATIONS OF DIELECTRICS INDUCED BY LASER IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. GREENFIELD; ET AL

    2000-05-01

    Transient surface deformations in dielectric materials induced by laser irradiation were investigated with time-resolved interferometry. Deformation images were acquired at various delay times after exposure to single pulses (100 ps at 1.064 {micro}m) on fresh sample regions. Above the ablation threshold, we observe prompt ejection of material and the formation of a single unipolar compressional surface acoustic wave propagating away from the ablation crater. For calcite, no deformation--either transient or permanent--is discernable at laser fluences below the threshold for material ejection. Above and below-threshold behavior was investigated using a phosphate glass sample with substantial near infrared absorption (Schott filter KG3). Below threshold, KG3 exhibits the formation of a small bulge roughly the size of the laser spot that reaches its maximum amplitude by {approx}5 ns. By tens of nanoseconds, the deformations become quite complex and very sensitive to laser fluence. The above-threshold behavior of KG3 combines the ablation-induced surface acoustic wave seen in calcite with the bulge seen below threshold in KG3. A velocity of 2.97 {+-} 0.03 km/s is measured for the KG3 surface acoustic wave, very close to the Rayleigh wave velocity calculated from material elastic parameters. Details of the transient interferometry system will also be given.

  6. Mechanisms governing the interaction of metallic particles with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Negres, Raluca A; Raman, Rajesh N; Shen, Nan; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2016-04-04

    The interaction of nanosecond laser pulses at 1064- and 355-nm with micro-scale, nominally spherical metallic particles is investigated in order to elucidate the governing interaction mechanisms as a function of material and laser parameters. The experimental model used involves the irradiation of metal particles located on the surface of transparent plates combined with time-resolved imaging capable of capturing the dynamics of particle ejection, plume formation and expansion along with the kinetics of the dispersed material from the liquefied layer of the particle. The mechanisms investigated in this work are informative and relevant across a multitude of materials and irradiation geometries suitable for the description of a wide range of specific applications. The experimental results were interpreted using physical models incorporating specific processes to assess their contribution to the overall observed behaviors. Analysis of the experimental results suggests that the induced kinetic properties of the particle can be adequately described using the concept of momentum coupling introduced to explain the interaction of plane metal targets to large-aperture laser beams. The results also suggest that laser energy deposition on the formed plasma affects the energy partitioning and the material modifications to the substrate.

  7. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  8. Damage caused by a nanosecond UV laser on a heated copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henč-Bartolić, V.; Bončina, T.; Jakovljević, S.; Panjan, P.; Zupanič, F.

    2016-08-01

    This work studied the effect of thin copper plate temperature on its surface morphology after irradiation using a pulsed nanosecond UV laser. The surface characteristics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, focused ion beam and stylus profilometry. When a target was at room temperature, a crater and the radial flow of molten Cu from the crater was observed. When the thin target was warm (about 360 °C ± 20 °C), a crater was smaller, and quasi-semicircular waves with the periodicity of around 3 μm appeared in its vicinity. The origin of the waves is Marangoni effect, causing thermocapillary waves, which in same occasions had a structure of final states of chaos in Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  9. Solid-like ablation propulsion generation in nanosecond pulsed laser interaction with carbon-doped glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Si-Qi; Liang, Tian; Qi, Jing; Tang, Wei-Chong; Xiao, Ke; Gao, Lu; Gao, Hua; Zhang, Zi-Li

    2017-03-01

    A solid-like propellant of carbon-doped glycerol ablated by a nanosecond pulsed laser is investigated. The results show that the specific impulse increases with increasing carbon content, and a maximum value of 228 s is obtained. The high specific impulse is attributed to the low ablated mass loss that occurs at high carbon content. More importantly, with increasing carbon content, the properties of the doped glycerol approach to those of a solid. These results indicate that propulsion at the required coupling coefficient and specific impulse can be realized by doping a liquid propellant with an absorber. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 53200859165 and 2562010050).

  10. Magnetic properties on the surface of FeAl stripes induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiju, H.; Yoshida, Y.; Watanabe, S.; Kondo, K.; Ishibashi, A.; Yoshimi, K.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate the formation of magnetic nanostripes on the surface of Fe52Al48 induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation and investigate their magnetic properties. The magnetic stripe consists of a disordered A2 phase of Fe-Al alloys with Al-oxide along the [110] direction on the (111)-oriented plane. According to the focused magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement, the coercive force of the magnetic stripe obeys the 1/cos θ law, where θ is the field rotation angle estimated from the stripe direction. Also, the jump field can be observed in the magnetic hysteresis loop. These results indicate that the magnetization reversal in the magnetic stripe originates from the domain pinning, showing that the magnetization rotates incoherently.

  11. Explosive boiling of a metallic glass superheated by nanosecond pulse laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M. Q. E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn; Wei, Y. P.; Wilde, G.; Dai, L. H. E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn

    2015-01-12

    We report an explosive boiling in a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1) bulk metallic glass irradiated by a nanosecond pulse laser with a single shot. This critical phenomenon is accompanied by the ejection of high-temperature matter from the target and the formation of a liquid-gas spinodal pattern on the irradiated area. An analytical model reveals that the glassy target experiences the normal heating (melting) and significant superheating, eventually culminating in explosive boiling near the spinodal limit. Furthermore, the time lag of nucleation and the critical radius of vapor bubbles are theoretically predicted, which are in agreement with the experimental observations. This study provides the investigation on the instability of a metallic glass liquid near the thermodynamic critical temperature.

  12. A mass quadrupole spectrometry investigation on proton emission by nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Caridi, F.

    2015-02-15

    A nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm and at an intensity of about 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2} was employed to irradiate hydrogenated polymers in vacuum. The produced plasma was characterized in terms of thermal and Coulomb interactions evaluating the equivalent temperature and the acceleration voltage developed in the non-equilibrium plasma core. Particles emission along the normal to the target surface was investigated by measuring, with the Hiden EQP 300 mass quadrupole spectrometer, ion energy distributions and fitting experimental data with the “Coulomb-Boltzmann-shifted” function. Time-of-flight technique was employed in order to measure the proton energy and yield. A comparison between experimental results is presented and discussed, with a special regard to the protons emission.

  13. Study of nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmosphere by spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-09-21

    We investigate the evolution of the species from both the target and the air, and the plasma parameter distribution of the nanosecond laser-produced plasmas in atmospheric air. The technique used is spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is argued that the N II from the air, which is distributed over a wider region than the target species in the early stages of the discharge, is primarily formed by the shock wave. The ionized species have a larger expansion velocity than the excited atoms in the first ∼100 ns, providing direct evidence for space-charge effects. The electron density decreases with the distance from the target surface in the early stages of the discharge, and both the electron density and the excited temperature variation in the axial direction are found to become insignificant at later stages.

  14. Real temperature calculation of shock wave driven by sub-nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, M. H.; Hall, T. A.

    2003-05-01

    Time history of thermal band emission of a shock front, when breakout from aluminium target into vacuum, has been calculated numerically. It is assumed that the shock is produced by irradiation of high intensity sub-nanosecond pulsed laser on the surface of aluminium planar targets in vacuum. The opacity of dense plasma at the shock front and in the vacuum-aluminium interface, and its effects on thermal emissions was considered in these calculations. Using the results of an experiment that was recently reported and those of our model, the real temperature of the shock front was estimated. In that experiment simultaneous measurements of the colour temperature of dense plasma in a shock front, and the shock velocity at the time of shock breakout from the aluminium targets into the vacuum were reported for the study of the equation of state (EOS). The results of the model show a good agreement with the SESAME library EOS.

  15. High power burst-mode operated sub-nanosecond fiber laser based on 20/125 μm highly doped Yb fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Kaihua; Wu, Pinghui; Wen, Ruhua; Song, Jiangxin; Guo, Yan; Lai, Xiaomin

    2016-02-01

    A master oscillator power amplification (MOPA) structured high power sub-nanosecond fiber laser with pulse bunch output is experimentally demonstrated. The seed was a figure-of-eight structured mode-locked fiber laser with a pulse duration of 700 ps and a repetition rate of 2.67 MHz. The seed pulse via two cascaded fiber couplers was multiplied to a pulse bunch, which was composed of 6 sub-pulses. The multiplied pulses were pre-amplified to an average power of 1.5 W through a cladding-pumping fiber amplifier. The pre-amplified laser was further amplified using a 20/125 μm large mode area (LMA) Yb-doped fiber. The laser emitted from the power-amplifier had an average power of 36 W, and a slope efficiency of 72%.

  16. Low-density plasma formation in aqueous biological media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Genc, Suzanne L; Ma, Huan; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate the formation of low- and high-density plasmas in aqueous media using sub-nanosecond laser pulses delivered at low numerical aperture (NA = 0.25). We observe two distinct regimes of plasma formation in deionized water, phosphate buffered saline, Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), and MEM supplemented with phenol red. Optical breakdown is first initiated in a low-energy regime and characterized by bubble formation without plasma luminescence with threshold pulse energies in the range of Ep ≈ 4-5 μJ, depending on media formulation. The onset of this regime occurs over a very narrow interval of pulse energies and produces small bubbles (Rmax = 2-20 μm) due to a tiny conversion (η < 0.01%) of laser energy to bubble energy EB. The lack of visible plasma luminescence, sharp energy onset, and low bubble energy conversion are all hallmarks of low-density plasma (LDP) formation. At higher pulse energies (Ep = 11-20 μJ), the process transitions to a second regime characterized by plasma luminescence and large bubble formation. Bubbles formed in this regime are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger in size [Formula: see text] due to a roughly two-order-of-magnitude increase in bubble energy conversion (η ≳ 3%). These characteristics are consistent with high-density plasma formation produced by avalanche ionization and thermal runaway. Additionally, we show that supplementation of MEM with fetal bovine serum (FBS) limits optical breakdown to this high-energy regime. The ability to produce LDPs using sub-nanosecond pulses focused at low NA in a variety of cell culture media formulations without FBS can provide for cellular manipulation at high throughput with precision approaching that of femtosecond pulses delivered at high NA.

  17. Plasma Membrane Integrity and Survival of Melanoma Cells After Nanosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Evans, Rodger; Guillén, Gabriel; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) photoacoustic detection systems can aid clinical decision-making in the treatment of cancer. Interaction of melanin within melanoma cells with nanosecond laser pulses generates photoacoustic waves that make its detection possible. This study aims at: (1) determining melanoma cell survival after laser pulses of 6 ns at λ = 355 and 532 nm; (2) comparing the potential enhancement in the photoacoustic signal using λ = 355 nm in contrast with λ = 532 nm; (3) determining the critical laser fluence at which melanin begins to leak out from melanoma cells; and (4) developing a time-resolved imaging (TRI) system to study the intracellular interactions and their effect on the plasma membrane integrity. Monolayers of melanoma cells were grown on tissue culture-treated clusters and irradiated with up to 1.0 J/cm2. Surviving cells were stained with trypan blue and counted using a hemacytometer. The phosphate buffered saline absorbance was measured with a nanodrop spectrophotometer to detect melanin leakage from the melanoma cells post-laser irradiation. Photoacoustic signal magnitude was studied at both wavelengths using piezoelectric sensors. TRI with 6 ns resolution was used to image plasma membrane damage. Cell survival decreased proportionally with increasing laser fluence for both wavelengths, although the decrease is more pronounced for 355 nm radiation than for 532 nm. It was found that melanin leaks from cells equally for both wavelengths. No significant difference in photoacoustic signal was found between wavelengths. TRI showed clear damage to plasma membrane due to laser-induced bubble formation. PMID:20589533

  18. 1 mJ nanosecond all-fiber thulium-doped fiber laser at 2.05 μm.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Bin; Yin, Ke; Yang, Linyong; Hou, Jing

    2015-07-13

    A high energy all-fiber format nanosecond thulium-doped fiber laser at 2050 nm with a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration is presented in this paper. The seed oscillator is a linearly polarized gain-switched fiber laser pumped by a 1550 nm fiber laser. The output pulse of the seed has a polarization extinction ratio (PER) better than 16 dB with a maximal output power of 470 mW. After two-stage double- cladding fiber amplifiers, the average power at 40 kHz was boosted up to 40.5 W. The output pulse has a maximum pulse energy of 1 mJ with a pulse width of 100 ns, which corresponds to a peak power of 10 kW. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest single pulse energy ever reported for a nanosecond thulium-doped all-fiber MOPA system at 2050 nm.

  19. Bombyx mori silk protein films microprocessing with a nanosecond ultraviolet laser and a femtosecond laser workstation: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazare, S.; Sionkowska, A.; Zaborowicz, M.; Planecka, A.; Lopez, J.; Dijoux, M.; Louména, C.; Hernandez, M.-C.

    2012-01-01

    Laser microprocessing of several biopolymers from renewable resources is studied. Three proteinic materials were either extracted from the extracellular matrix like Silk Fibroin/Sericin and collagen, or coming from a commercial source like gelatin. All can find future applications in biomedical experimentation, in particular for cell scaffolding. Films of ˜hundred of microns thick were made by aqueous solution drying and laser irradiation. Attention is paid to the properties making them processable with two laser sources: the ultraviolet and nanosecond (ns) KrF (248 nm) excimer and the infrared and femtosecond (fs) Yb:KGW laser. The UV radiation is absorbed in a one-photon resonant process to yield ablation and the surface foaming characteristics of a laser-induced pressure wave. To the contrary, resonant absorption of the IR photons of the fs laser is not possible and does not take place. However, the high field of the intense I>˜1012 W/cm2 femtosecond laser pulse ionizes the film by the multiphoton absorption followed by the electron impact mechanism, yielding a dense plasma capable to further absorb the incident radiation of the end of the pulse. The theoretical model of this absorption is described in detail, and used to discuss the presented experimental effects (cutting, ablation and foaming) of the fs laser. The ultraviolet laser was used to perform simultaneous multiple spots experiments in which energetic foaming yields melt ejection and filament spinning. Airborne nanosize filaments "horizontally suspended by both ends" (0.25 μm diameter and 10 μm length) of silk biopolymer were observed upon irradiation with large fluences.

  20. Graphene patterning by nanosecond laser ablation: the effect of the substrate interaction with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mas, Ana M.; Álvarez, Patricia; Campos, Nuria; Gómez, David; Menéndez, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on the development of patterned graphene/substrate by means of green nanosecond pulse laser irradiation. Monolayer graphene samples supported on a Si/SiO2 substrate were patterned using 532 nm laser irradiation under fluence conditions ranging from 31 mJ cm-2 to 4240 mJ cm-2. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the graphene. It was found that at 356 mJ cm-2 selective ablation of the graphene occurs. However, at fluence values above 1030 mJ cm-2 (when damage to the substrate is observed) no ablation of the graphene takes place. In contrast, its graphenic structure was found to have been modified. Only at fluence values where the ablation of the substrate occurs, is graphene eliminated in an area almost equivalent to that of the ablated substrate. In this case, additional damage to the graphene sheet edges is produced. The increment in the number of oxygenated functional groups in these regions, as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), suggests that this damage is probably caused by thermal phenomena during the ablation of the substrate.

  1. Observation of repetitively nanosecond pulse-width transverse patterns in microchip self-Q-switched laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jun; Ueda, Ken-ichi

    2006-05-15

    Repetitively nanosecond pulse-width transverse pattern formation in a plane-parallel microchip Cr,Nd: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) self-Q-switched laser was investigated. The complex point-symmetric transverse patterns were observed by varying the pump beam diameter incident on the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal. The gain guiding effect and the thermal effect induced by the pump power in microchip Cr,Nd:YAG laser control the oscillating transverse modes. These transverse pattern formations were due to the variation of the saturated inversion population and the thermal induced index profile along radial and longitudinal direction in the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal induced by the pump power incident on the Cr,Nd:YAG crystal. These were intrinsic properties of such a microchip self-Q-switched laser. The longitudinal distribution of the saturated inversion population inside the gain medium plays an important role on the transverse pattern formation. Different sets of the transverse patterns corresponds to the different saturated inversion population distribution inside microchip Cr,Nd:YAG crystal.

  2. Dynamics of liquid nanodroplet formation in nanosecond laser ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzi, A.; Gorrini, F.; Miotello, A.

    2017-10-01

    The laser ablation mechanisms of metallic targets leading to liquid nanodroplet ejection are of wide interest both from a fundamental point of view and for applications in various fields, especially when nanoparticle synthesis is required. The phase explosion process was recognized as the driving mechanism of the expulsion of a mixture of vapor and liquid nanodroplets in the short pulse laser ablation of metals. A model based on thermodynamics that links the theory of homogeneous vapor bubble nucleation to the size distribution of the generated liquid nanoclusters has been recently proposed. The present work aims to take a step ahead to remove some assumptions made in previous work. Here an improved computational approach allows us to describe time-dependent nucleation in a homogeneous system with no temperature spatial gradients under nanosecond laser irradiation. Numerical results regarding the size distribution of formed liquid clusters and the time evolution of the process are shown for aluminum, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, silver and gold. Connections with experimental data and molecular dynamics simulations, when available from literature, are reported and discussed.

  3. Role of spectroscopic diagnostics in studying nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Miloš; Pantić, Dragan; Nikolić, Zoran; Djeniže, Stevan

    2017-05-01

    We studied the impact of varying the intensity of Nd:YAG nanosecond 1.06 μm laser radiation on the morphology and internal structure of copper plasma plumes were examined. Standard diagnostic techniques used to deduce axial distributions of electron density and temperature revealed effects of a pronounced plasma screening regime. Methods of fast imaging spectroscopy are used to examine the transition from weak- to high-screening plasma, applying irradiance on the order of 109 W cm-2 in helium atmosphere. Behavior of both ionized and neutral species was observed up to 1 μs after the laser pulse. Showing significant differences with an increase of laser irradiance, the change in plasma propagation mechanisms is attributed to internal shockwave dynamics within the plasma plume. Implications of observed behavior to plasma uniformity can affect diagnostics, and are relevant to both modeling and applications. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  4. Studies on nanosecond 532nm and 355nm and ultrafast 515nm and 532nm laser cutting super-hard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Tao, Sha; Wang, Brian; Zhao, Jay

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, micro-processing of three kinds of super-hard materials of poly-crystal diamond (PCD)/tungsten-carbide (WC), CVD-diamond and cubic boron nitride (CNB) has been systematically studied using nanosecond laser (532nm and 355nm), and ultrafast laser (532nm and 515nm). Our purpose is to investigate a full laser micro-cutting solution to achieve a ready-to-use cutting tool insert (CTI). The results show a clean cut with little burns and recasting at edge. The cutting speed of 2-10mm/min depending on thickness was obtained. The laser ablation process was also studied by varying laser parameters (wavelength, pulse width, pulse energy, repetition rate) and tool path to improve cutting speed. Also, studies on material removal efficiency (MRE) of PCD/WC with 355nm-ns and 515nm-fs laser as a function of laser fluence show that 355nm-ns laser is able to achieve higher MRE for PCD and WC. Thus, ultrafast laser is not necessarily used for superhard material cutting. Instead, post-polishing with ultrafast laser can be used to clean cutting surface and improve smoothness.

  5. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    SciTech Connect

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J.; El-Sayed, Hany A.

    2015-05-18

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HF solution. Pt thin films (3–5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6–9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  6. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; El-Sayed, Hany A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J.

    2015-05-01

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H2SO4 and HF solution. Pt thin films (3-5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6-9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm2. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm2, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  7. Modification of wetting property of Inconel 718 surface by nanosecond laser texturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Tian, Y. L.; Yang, C. J.; Wang, F. J.; Liu, X. P.

    2017-08-01

    Topographic and wetting properties of Inconel 718 (IN718) surfaces were modified via nanosecond laser treatment. In order to investigate surface wetting behavior without additional post treatment, three kinds of microstructures were created on IN718 surfaces, including line pattern, grid pattern and spot pattern. From the viewpoint of surface morphology, the results show that laser ablated grooves and debris significantly altered the surface topography as well as surface roughness compared with the non-treated surfaces. The effects of laser parameters, such as laser scanning speed and laser power, on surface features were also discussed. We have observed the laser treated surfaces of IN718 showed very high hydrophilicity just after laser ablation under ambient air condition. And this hydrophilic property has changed rapidly to the other state, very high hydrophobicity over about 20 days. Further experiments and analysis have been carried out so as to investigate this phenomenon. Based on the XPS analysis, the results indicate that the change of wetting property from hydrophilic to hydrophobic over time may be due to the surface chemistry modifications, especially carbon content. After the contact angles reached steady state, the maximum water contact angle (WCA) for line-patterned and grid-patterned surfaces increased to 152.3 ± 1.2° and 156.8 ± 1.1° with the corresponding rolling angle (RA) of 8.8 ± 1.1° and 6.5 ± 0.8°, respectively. These treated IN718 surfaces exhibited superhydrophobic property. However, the maximum WCA for the spot-patterned surfaces just increased to 140.8 ± 2.8° with RA above 10°. Therefore, it is deduced that laser-inscribed modification of surface wettability has high sensitivity to surface morphology and surface chemical compositions. This work can be utilized to optimize the laser processing parameters so as to fabricate desired IN718 surfaces with hydrophobic or even superhydrophobic property and thus extend the applications

  8. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jong Hyun

    2000-05-01

    mechanism for high irradiance laser ablation. Laser processing parameters were also investigated for nanosecond laser ablation of silicon. Longer incident wavelengths and larger laser beam sizes were associated with higher values of a threshold irradiance.

  9. Comparison of defects responsible for nanosecond laser-induced damage and ablation in common high index optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yejia; Abdulameer, Mohammed R.; Emmert, Luke A.; Day, Travis; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen S.; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporally resolved optical laser-induced damage is an experimental technique used to study nanosecond laser damage and initiation of ablation in dielectric metal-oxide films used for optical coatings. It measures the fluence (intensity) at the initiation of damage during a single laser pulse. The technique was applied to coatings of HfO2, Sc2O3, and Ta2O5, which were prepared by ion-beam sputtering, and HfO2 which was prepared by electron-beam evaporation. Using the data obtained, we were able to retrieve the defect density distributions of these films without a priori assumptions about their functional form.

  10. Biomolecular dynamics studied with IR-spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers combined with nanosecond perturbation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Alexander; Scheerer, David; Heck, Benjamin; Hauser, Karin

    2017-06-01

    Early events of protein folding can be studied with fast perturbation techniques triggering non-equilibrium relaxation dynamics. A nanosecond laser-excited pH-jump or temperature-jump (T-jump) was applied to initiate helix folding or unfolding of poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA). PGA is a homopolypeptide with titratable carboxyl side-chains whose protonation degree determines the PGA conformation. A pH-jump was realized by the photochemical release of protons and induces PGA folding due to protonation of the side-chains. Otherwise, the helical conformation can be unfolded by a T-jump. We operated under conditions where PGA does not aggregate and temperature and pH are the regulatory properties of its conformation. The experiments were performed in such a manner that the folding/unfolding jump proceeded to the same PGA conformation. We quantified the increase/decrease in helicity induced by the pH-/T-jump and demonstrated that the T-jump results in a relatively small change in helical content in contrast to the pH-jump. This is caused by the strong pH-dependence of the PGA conformation. The conformational changes were detected by time-resolved single wavelength IR-spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers (QCL). We could independently observe the kinetics for α-helix folding and unfolding in PGA by using different perturbation techniques and demonstrate the high sensitivity of time-resolved IR-spectroscopy to study protein folding mechanisms.

  11. Breakdown in a bulk of transparent solids under irradiation of a nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Z. U.; Grigorov, Y. V.; Tran, K. A.; Janulewicz, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    A single pulse of a nanosecond laser was tightly focused in the bulk of transparent materials (soda lime glass, borosilicate glass, fused silica , sapphire and Gorilla Glass) to a beam spot diameter of ~ 2.1μm. A value of the total energy absorbed in the materials was measured with corrections for the transmitted, scattered and reflected components of the incident energy. It was found that 3-11% of the incident radiation was scattered but the total absorption still achieved a very high level of up to 88%. Absorptance dependence on the incident fluence was reasonably approximated by the sigmoidal Hill function. Here we suggest using this analytical description to identify empirical intrinsic laser-induced breakdown threshold (LIBT). Optical damage threshold (ODT) was identified by optical inspection. The results for some materials suggest significantly lower breakdown threshold than that reported earlier for more loosely focused beams. A study of the damage area morphology with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission microscope (HRTEM) revealed existence of the shock waves-affected area with a localized nano-crystallization. Spectroscopic study of the light emission accompanying breakdown showed typical quasi-continuum emission with temperature as high as 8917K (0.8 eV).

  12. Heat Transfer And Vapor Dynamics Induced By Nanosecond Laser Ablation Of Titanium Target

    SciTech Connect

    Hamadi, F.; Amara, E. H.; Mezaoui, D.

    2008-09-23

    A numerical modelling describing a pulsed nanosecond laser interaction with a titanium target is presented, resulting in the study of the plume expansion in vacuum or in background gas, using the species transport model available in Fluent computational fluid dynamics code. The heat transfers in the solid target and the molten material are modeled using an enthalpy formulation for the solid-liquid phase changing. The effect of laser fluences is investigated, and results are presented as a function of time. Moreover, the plasma or the vapour dynamics is calculated by solving a set of Navier-Stokes equations. The plasma absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung, the ionization states and the density profiles of the Titanium ions and electrons in the plume are interactively included in the Fluent calculation process by the mean of User Defined Functions (UDFs) used in order to take into account the specificity of our problem. The ionization is computed by solving the Saha-Eggert equation assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions.

  13. Material ejection in nanosecond Er:YAG laser ablation of water, liver, and skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apitz, I.; Vogel, A.

    2005-07-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of material ejection in Q-switched Er:YAG laser tissue ablation (70-ns pulse duration) where moderate and large radiant exposures are associated with large volumetric energy densities in the target material. For water, an initial phase of non-equilibrium surface vaporization is followed by an explosive vaporization of the superficial liquid volume from a supercritical state. The ablation of deeper layers with lower peak temperatures proceeds as phase explosion. For mechanically strong tissues, non-equilibrium surface vaporization is followed by a vapour explosion coupled with thermal dissociation of the biomolecules into volatile products. In deeper layers, ablation proceeds as confined boiling with mechanical tearing of the tissue matrix by the vapour pressure. The recoil stress induced at a radiant exposure of 5.4 J/cm2 is in the order of 500 900 MPa. For water and soft tissues such as liver, the recoil causes a powerful secondary material expulsion. For stronger tissues such as skin, no secondary expulsion was observed even though the recoil stress largely exceeds the static tensile strength of the tissue. Recoil-induced material expulsion results in an increase of both ablation efficiency and mechanical side effects of ablation. Theoretical modelling of the succession of phase transitions in nanosecond-laser tissue ablation and of recoil-induced material expulsion remain a major challenge for future work.

  14. Mechanism of nanosecond laser drilling process of 4H-SiC for through substrate vias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byunggi; Iida, Ryoichi; Doan, Duc Hong; Fushinobu, Kazuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Role of optical parameters on nanosecond laser drilling of 4H-SiC was experimentally studied. Using ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser, parametric studies on effects of wavelength (1064 nm or 532 nm), beam profile (Gaussian or Bessel), and ambient condition (air or water) were conducted. The wavelengths which have large optical penetration depth were selected as wavefront has to propagate through materials to generate Bessel beam. The experimental results showed that carbonization of SiC surface accelerates thermal ablation of the materials with fluence under the lattice melting threshold. Especially, pattern of side lobes with small fluence was formed by irradiation of Bessel beam. The pattern disturbed penetration of wavefronts through materials. Implementation of water environment was not effective to suppress carbonization and had slight effect on improvement of drilling quality. For this reason, deep drilling with small entrance was not achieved using Bessel beam. Irradiation of 1064 nm Gaussian beam with large fluence led to formation of critical amount of re-solidified silicon due to the large optical penetration depth. Carbonization and silicon formation had a significant effect on unique fluence dependence of drilling depth. Absorption mechanism was studied as well to discuss effect of wavelength on processing characteristics.

  15. Production of nanometer-size GaAs nanocristals by nanosecond laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Abderrafi, Kamal; Jiménez, Ernesto; Ben, Teresa; Molina, Sergio I; Ibáñez, Rafael; Chirvony, Vladimir; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the formation and characterization of spherical GaAs quantum dots obtained by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in a liquid (ethanol or methanol). The produced bare GaAs nanoparticles demonstrate rather narrow size distribution which depends on the applied laser power density (from 4.25 to 13.9 J/cm2 in our experiments) and is as low as 2.5 nm for the highest power used. The absolute value of the average diameter also decreases significantly, from 13.7 to 8.7 nm, as the laser power increases in this interval. Due to the narrow nanoparticle size dispersion achieved at the highest laser powers two absorption band edges are clearly distinguishable at about 1.72 and 3.15 eV which are ascribed to E0 and E1 effective optical transitions, respectively. A comparison of the energies with those known for bulk GaAs allows one to conclude that an average diameter of the investigated GaAs nanoparticles is close to 10 nm, i.e., they are quantum dots. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images show that the bare GaAs nanoparticles are nanocrystalline, but many of them exhibit single/multiple twin boundary defects or even polycrystallinity. The formation of the GaAs crystalline core capped with a SiO2 shell was demonstrated by HRTEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Effective band edges can be better distinguished in SiO2 capped nanoparticles than in bare ones, In both cases the band edges are correlated with size quantum confinement effect.

  16. Optimal irradiation condition of demineralized dentin treatment with a nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.8 μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Saiki, Masayuki; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-06-01

    Conventional dental lasers have not realized a selective excavation of carious dentin. Objective of this study is to determine the optimal irradiation condition for the selective excavation by using a wavelength around 5.8 μm. A nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 5.8 μm was obtained by difference-frequency generation technique. The laser delivers 5 ns pulse width at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. 5.8 μm wavelength range, a short wavelength required high excavation energy and a long wavelength required low excavation energy to induce the selective excavation with a low thermal side effect. 5.8 μm wavelength provides a selective excavation technique for minimal intervention.

  17. Rhodamine B as an optical thermometer in cells focally exposed to infrared laser light or nanosecond pulsed electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Burke, Ryan; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature-dependent fluorescence property of Rhodamine B was used to measure changes in temperature at the cellular level induced by either infrared laser light exposure or high intensity, ultrashort pulsed electric fields. The thermal impact of these stimuli were demonstrated at the cellular level in time and contrasted with the change in temperature observed in the extracellular bath. The method takes advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine B which has a quantum yield linearly dependent on temperature. The thermal effects of different temporal pulse applications of infrared laser light exposure and of nanosecond pulsed electric fields were investigated. The temperature increase due to the application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields was demonstrated at the cellular level. PMID:26504658

  18. Rhodamine B as an optical thermometer in cells focally exposed to infrared laser light or nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Burke, Ryan; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2015-10-01

    The temperature-dependent fluorescence property of Rhodamine B was used to measure changes in temperature at the cellular level induced by either infrared laser light exposure or high intensity, ultrashort pulsed electric fields. The thermal impact of these stimuli were demonstrated at the cellular level in time and contrasted with the change in temperature observed in the extracellular bath. The method takes advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine B which has a quantum yield linearly dependent on temperature. The thermal effects of different temporal pulse applications of infrared laser light exposure and of nanosecond pulsed electric fields were investigated. The temperature increase due to the application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields was demonstrated at the cellular level.

  19. Advanced micromachining combining nanosecond lasers with water jet-guided laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauchard, A.; Lee, K.; Vago, N.; Pavius, M.; Obi, S.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the first scribing results obtained by combining a short-pulse 10ns green laser with the water jet-guided laser technology. A number of high-potential applications are presented, from the grooving of low-k silicon wafers, the scribing of metallic and amorphous Si layers of thin film solar cells, the grooving of SiC wafers, and dot marking of Si wafers. The combination of a short pulse laser beam with the water jet-guided laser technology offers a new industry-proven alternative for grooving and scribing processes, providing superior speed and quality compared to legacy laser technologies.

  20. Experimental study of mechanical response of artificial tissue models irradiated with Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2011-07-01

    Nanosecond long laser pulses are used in medical applications where precise tissue ablation with minimal thermal and mechanical collateral damage is required. When a laser pulse is incident on a material, optical energy will be absorbed by a combination of linear and nonlinear absorption according to both: laser light irradiance and material properties. In the case of water or gels, the first results in heat generation and thermoelastic expansion; while the second results in an expanding plasma formation that launches a shock wave and a cavitation/boiling bubble. Plasma formation due to nonlinear absorption of nanosecond laser pulses is originated by a combination of multiphoton ionization and thermionic emission of free electrons, which is enhanced when the material has high linear absorption coefficient. In this work, we present three experimental approaches to study pressure transients originated when 6 ns laser pulses are incident on agar gels and water with varying linear absorption coefficient, using laser radiant exposures above and below threshold for bubble formation: (a) PVDF sensors, (b) Time-resolved shadowgraphy and (c) Time-resolved interferometry. The underlying hypothesis is that pressure transients are composed of the superposition of both: shock wave originated by hot expanding plasma resulting from nonlinear absorption of optical energy and, thermoelastic expansion originated by heat generation due to linear absorption of optical energy. The objective of this study is to carry out a comprehensive experimental analysis of the mechanical effects that result when tissue models are irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses to elucidate the relative contribution of linear and nonlinear absorption to bubble formation. Furthermore, we investigate cavitation bubble formation with temperature increments as low as 3 °C.

  1. Measuring the effective pulse duration of nanosecond and femtosecond laser pulses for laser-induced damage experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorila, Alexandru; Rusen, Laurentiu; Stratan, Aurel; Nemes, George

    2013-05-01

    We report on our approach to measure the quantity named effective pulse duration as defined in the ISO 21254-1:2011 standard, which deals with laser-induced damage (LID) threshold measurements. The approach is applied to measure pulses from two laser sources: an injection-seeded electro-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond system with 10-Hz pulse repetition frequency, and a fully integrated Ti:sapphire laser with 150-400 fs and 2-kHz pulse repetition frequency. For comparison, the full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the same pulses is also measured. The analysis and description of the measurement process, the experimental results, and the corresponding uncertainties are presented. A smaller combined uncertainty is obtained for the effective pulse duration than for the FWHM-defined pulse duration for each time scale involved in experiments. This suggests that the effective pulse duration is the appropriate parameter to characterize the pulse duration in LID experiments.

  2. Temperature dependence of nanosecond laser pulse thresholds of melanosome and microsphere microcavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanosome microcavitation is the threshold-level retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage mechanism for nanosecond (ns) pulse exposures in the visible and near-infrared (NIR). Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes were determined as a function of temperature (20 to 85°C) using single ns laser pulses at 532 and 1064 nm. Melanosomes were irradiated using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG (doubled for 532-nm irradiation). For comparison to melanosome data, a similar temperature (20 to 65°C) dependence study was also performed for 532 nm, ns pulse exposures of black polystyrene microbeads. Results indicated a decrease in the microcavitation average radiant exposure threshold with increasing sample temperature for both 532- and 1064-nm single pulse exposures of melanosomes and microbeads. Threshold data and extrapolated nucleation temperatures were used to estimate melanosome absorption coefficients in the visible and NIR, and microbead absorption coefficients in the visible, indicating that melanin is a better absorber of visible light than black polystyrene. The NIR melanosome absorption coefficients ranged from 3713 cm-1 at 800 nm to 222 cm-1 at 1319 nm. These data represent the first temperature-dependent melanosome microcavitation study in the NIR and provide additional information for understanding melanosome microcavitation threshold dependence on wavelength and ambient temperature.

  3. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George Joseph; McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Judge, Elizabeth; Dirmyer, Matthew R.; Campbell, Keri; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.

    2016-10-20

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  4. Supercontinuum generation in polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber by using various harmonics of sub-nanosecond Q-switched laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengelis, Julius; Jarutis, Vygandas; Sirutkaitis, Valdas

    2016-04-01

    We present results of supercontinuum generation in highly nonlinear polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber using various harmonics of sub-nanosecond passively Q-switched Nd:YAG microlaser. The pump source was a Nd:YAG microlaser generating 50 μJ energy 300 ps duration pulses at 1064 nm with kilohertz repetition rate. We demonstrated that we can expand the supercontinuum spectrum to cover the whole visible range and beyond using either first or second harmonic of our pump laser in simple experimental setups: supercontinuum extended from 400 nm to 1300 nm in case of λp = 1064 nm and from 400 nm to 900 nm in case of λp = 532 nm. We compared supercontinuum evolution and dependence on pump pulse energy in both cases. We also performed numerical simulations of supercontinuum generation in PCF by applying the traditional approach of solving generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation (GNLSE) and also presented a new numerical simulation approach -deriving and solving equation for evolution of spectral components of pulse propagating in the PCF. In case of GNLSE approach, the simulated supercontinuum spectra display the same qualitative features as the ones measured in the experiment.

  5. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  6. On the formation of nanostructures on a CdTe surface, stimulated by surface acoustic waves under nanosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasenko, A. I.; Baidullaeva, A.; Veleschuk, V. P. Mozol, P. E.; Boiko, N. I.; Litvin, O. S.

    2015-02-15

    The formation of nanoscale structures in the unirradiated part of a p-CdTe crystal surface irradiated by a nanosecond ruby laser is revealed and investigated. It is shown that their formation is caused by the effect of the long-range action of a laser pulse with an intensity of I = 20 MW/cm{sup 2}. Nanoscale-structure formation is explained by the influence of the pressure gradient of the surface acoustic wave, in particular, within the “vacancy-pump” mechanism on the surface.

  7. Through nanohole formation in thin metallic film by single nanosecond laser pulses using optical dielectric apertureless probe.

    PubMed

    Kulchin, Y N; Vitrik, O B; Kuchmizhak, A A; Nepomnyashchii, A V; Savchuk, A G; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V

    2013-05-01

    Separate nanoholes with the minimum size down to 35 nm (~λ/15) and nanohole arrays with the hole size about 100 nm (~λ/5) were fabricated in a 50 nm optically "thick" Au/Pd film, using single 532 nm pump nanosecond laser pulses focused to diffraction-limited spots by a specially designed apertureless dielectric fiber probe. Nanohole fabrication in the metallic film was found to result from lateral heat diffusion and center-symmetrical lateral expulsion of the melt by its vapor recoil pressure. The optimized apertureless dielectric microprobe was demonstrated to enable laser fabrication of deep through nanoholes.

  8. Gene transfer of human hepatocyte growth factor by the use of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Hasegawa, Makoto; Ashida, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Obara, Minoru

    2006-05-01

    We successfully delivered a therapeutic vector construct, which carries hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) gene, to rat skin in vivo. After HGF expression vector had been intradermally injected to rat skin, LISWs were generated by irradiating the laser target put on the rat skin with nanosecond pulses from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Concentration of HGF protein increased by a factor of four by the application of LISWs when compared with that of control samples without LISW application. We also investigated the effects of LISWs on the integrity of plasmid DNA.

  9. Condensation of ablation plumes in the irradiation of metals by high-intensity nanosecond laser pulses at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2016-01-31

    The Anisimov–Luk'yanchuk model is adapted for describing the condensation of vapour-plasma plumes produced in the irradiation of metal targets by high-intensity (10{sup 8} – 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) nanosecond (10 – 100 ns) pulses at atmospheric pressure. The resultant data suggest that the initial stages of the development of metal ablation plumes correspond with a high degree of accuracy to the Zel'dovich–Raizer theory of dynamic condensation; however, at the stage of the ablation plume decay, the liquid-droplet phase is formed primarily by coalescence of 'nuclei'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  10. Time-resolved analysis of thickness-dependent dewetting and ablation of silver films upon nanosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Dongfeng; Paeng, Dongwoo; Yeo, Junyeob; Kim, Eunpa; Wang, Letian; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Chen, Songyan

    2016-05-23

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting and ablation of thin silver films is investigated by time-resolved imaging. Laser pulses of 532 nm wavelength and 5 ns temporal width are irradiated on silver films of different thicknesses (50 nm, 80 nm, and 350 nm). Below the ablation threshold, it is observed that the dewetting process does not conclude until 630 ns after the laser irradiation for all samples, forming droplet-like particles in the spot central region. At higher laser intensities, ablative material removal occurs in the spot center. Cylindrical rims are formed in the peripheral dewetting zone due to the solidification of transported matter at about 700 ns following the laser pulse exposure. In addition to these features, droplet fingers are superposed upon irradiation of 350-nm thick silver films with higher intensity.

  11. Laser-assisted vacuum arc extreme ultraviolet source: a comparison of picosecond and nanosecond laser triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyene, Girum A.; Tobin, Isaac; Juschkin, Larissa; Hayden, Patrick; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sokell, Emma; Zakharov, Vassily S.; Zakharov, Sergey V.; O'Reilly, Fergal

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light generation by hybrid laser-assisted vacuum arc discharge plasmas, utilizing Sn-coated rotating-disc-electrodes, was investigated. The discharge was initiated by localized ablation of the liquid tin coating of the cathode disc by a laser pulse. The laser pulse, at 1064 nm, was generated by Nd:YAG lasers with variable energy from 1 to 100 mJ per pulse. The impact of shortening the laser pulse from 7 ns to 170 ps on the EUV generation has been investigated in detail. The use of ps pulses resulted in an increase in emission of EUV radiation. With a fixed discharge energy of ~4 J, the EUV conversion efficiency tends to plateau at ~2.4  ±  0.25% for the ps laser pulses, while for the ns pulses, it saturates at ~1.7  ±  0.3%. Under similar discharge and laser energy conditions, operating the EUV source with the ps-triggering resulted also in narrower spectral profiles of the emission in comparison to ns-triggering. The results indicate an advantage in using ps-triggering in laser-assisted discharges to produce brighter plasmas required for applications such as metrology.

  12. Threshold characteristics of ultraviolet and near infrared nanosecond laser induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, Ciprian; Limbach, Christopher M.; Yalin, Azer P.

    2016-09-01

    The present contribution compares the energy absorption, optical emission, temperature, and fluid dynamics of ultraviolet (UV) λ = 266 nm and near infrared (NIR) λ = 1064 nm nanosecond laser induced plasmas in ambient air. For UV pulses at the conditions studied, energy absorption by the plasmas increases relatively gradually with laser pulse energy starting at delivered energy of E ˜ 8 mJ. Corresponding measurements of plasma luminosity show that the absorption of UV radiation does not necessarily result in visible plasma emission. For the NIR induced plasmas, the energy absorption profile is far more abrupt and begins at ˜55 mJ. In contrast with UV, the absorption of NIR radiation is always accompanied by intense optical emission. The temperatures of both types of plasma have been measured with Rayleigh scattering thermometry (at times after the Thomson signal sufficiently diminishes). The UV plasmas can attain a wider range of temperatures, including lower temperatures, depending on the pulse energy (e.g., T ˜ 400-2000 K for E ˜ 7-35 mJ at Δt = 10 μs after the pulse) while the NIR plasmas show only hotter temperatures (e.g., T ˜ 12 000 K for E = 75 mJ at Δt = 10 μs after the pulse) as is consistent with the literature. Differences in the fluid dynamics for UV versus NIR pulses are shown with Schlieren imaging. The contrast in the UV and NIR plasma threshold behavior is attributed to differing roles of avalanche ionization and multiphoton ionization as is also illustrated by a simple numerical model.

  13. Selective removal of cholesterol ester in atherosclerotic plaque using nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.75 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Tsukimoto, H.; Hazama, H.; Awazu, K.

    2008-02-01

    Laser angioplasty, for example XeCl excimer laser angioplasty, has gained more attention in addition to conventional methods of surgical and interventional treatment of atherosclerotic diseases such as bypass operation and balloon dilatation. Low degrees of thermal damage after ablation of atherosclerotic lesions have been achieved by XeCl excimer laser at 308 nm. However, in most cases, laser ablation is not selective and normal arterial wall is also damaged. To avoid complications such as severe dissections or perforation of the arterial wall in an angioplasty, a laser light source with high ablation efficiency but low arterial wall injury is desirable. At atherosclerotic lesions, cholesterol accumulates on the tunica intima by establishing an ester bond with fatty acids such as oleic acid, and thus cholesterol ester is the main component of atherosclerotic plaques. Mid-infrared pulsed laser at 5.75 μm is selectively well absorbed in C=O stretching vibration mode of ester bonds. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.75 μm irradiation of cholesterol ester in atherosclerotic plaques. In this study, we used a mid-infrared tunable solid-state laser which is operated by difference frequency generation method, with a wavelength of 5.75 μm, a pulse width of 5 nsec and a pulse duration of 10 Hz. It was confirmed that non-invasive interaction to normal thoracic aortas could be induce by the parameters, the wavelength of 5.75 μm, the average power densities of 35 W/cm2 and the irradiation time under 10 sec. This study shows that nanosecond pulsed laser irradiations at 5.75 μm provide an alternative laser light source as an effectively cutting, less traumatic tool for removal of atherosclerotic plaque.

  14. The influence of the repetition rate on the nanosecond pulsed pin-to-pin microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2014-10-01

    The effect of repetition rate on a nanosecond atmospheric pressure discharge is investigated. The discharge is generated between two pins in a mixture of Ne and Ar. The voltage, current, power waveforms and the temporally and spatially resolved electron density and an ‘effective’ electron temperature are measured, with a pulse interval between 1.5 and 200 µs. It is found that not only does the repetition rate have a strong influence on the breakdown voltage and the peak discharge power, but it can also affect the rise rate of the volume averaged electron density and its peak value. Temporally and spatially resolved measurement of the electron density and the effective electron temperature show that the spatial distributions of both quantities are also influenced by the repetition rate. In the initial discharge period of all cases, the sharp rise of the electron density correlates with the drastic drop of the effective electron temperature. It is suggested that the residual charges have a strong impact on the axial distribution of the electric field and energetic electrons between the electrodes during the breakdown period, as illustrated by a simple sheath model.

  15. Permeabilisation de membranes cellulaires a l'aide d'un laser nanoseconde amplifie par nanoparticules plasmoniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Louis Lalonde, Bastien

    The plasmic membrane of eukaryot cells provides a selective permeability between the cytoplasm and the external environment. It regulates the passage of ions (O2, N 2, K, etc...) and molecules (H2 O, C2H6 O, etc...) by mechanisms like passive diffusion and active transport. In various fields like molecular biology or drug development, it is sometimes needed to bypass this selective permeability to introduce external molecules that are normally impermeable to cell membrane. Examples of external molecules may be DNA plasmid, RNA segment or drugs. We propose a method based on laser amplification by plasmonic nanoparticles to overcome this biological barrier. This non invasive method increases the membrane permeability of a large number of cells in a short time. Optoporation by laser amplified with plasmonic nanoparticles consists of pulsed laser irradiation on cells that have been previously incubated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The laser-AuNPs interactions will create a cavitation bubble which in turn will decrease the membrane permeability by disrupting the bilipid layer arrangement. Molecules in the external medium may then penetrate inside the cells and under the right experimental conditions, the cells will rapidly reseal their membrane and continue living without nefast effects. The feasibility of high throughput optical perforation amplified by plasmonic nanoparticles have been tested with a nanosecond pulsed laser working at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The plasma membrane of cancerous human fibroblast (melanoma wm278) have been successfully perforated while keeping an excellent viability rate. Up to 30% of cells are perforated in which the Lucifer Yellow fluorophore have been incorporated. The viability 2 h after the treatment was evaluated by PI exclusion and the long term vitality was tested by MTT essay. Under optimal conditions at 532 nm, the 2 h viability is 84% and the vitality start at 64% for 2h and reaches 88% after 72 h. With 1064 nm pusles, the 2 h

  16. Influence of cerium on the pulsed UV nanosecond laser processing of photostructurable glass ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, F. E.; Adams, P. M.; Helvajian, H.

    2005-07-01

    Photostructurable glass ceramic (PSGC) materials contain a sensitizer that is used to facilitate the optical exposure process. The primary role of the sensitizer is to absorb incident radiation and generate photoelectrons. With thermal treatment, these photoelectrons can then interact with nascent metal ions to induce the formation of metallic clusters and the precipitation of a soluble crystalline phase in the glass matrix. The photo-ionization efficiency of the sensitizer species is strongly dependent on its spectral absorption and oxidation state in the base glass. Stabilizing compounds are typically added to the glass matrix to maintain the photo-active oxidation state and promote efficient exposure. To investigate the effectiveness of the photo-initiator, we have conducted experiments in which sample coupons of a commercial PSGC material (Foturan™, Schott Corp., Germany) were carefully exposed to various photon doses by pulsed UV nanosecond lasers at λ = 266 nm and 355 nm. Foturan is a lithium aluminosilicate glass that contains trace amounts of cerium as the photosensitive agent (0.01-0.04 wt.% admixture Ce 2O 3). The photo-initiator efficiency was investigated by using samples with cerium and without cerium. The irradiation wavelengths were selected because they lie above and below the primary absorption band of the cerium photo-initiator. Optical transmission spectroscopy (OTS) was employed to identify and monitor the population density of the photo-induced trapped electron state as a function of incident laser irradiance. The irradiated samples were thermally processed and then analyzed again with OTS to measure the quenching of the trapped electron state and the concurrent growth of a spectral band associated with the formation of nanometer-scale metallic clusters. The growth of metallic clusters signifies the "fixing" of the exposure and permanent image formation in the glass. The OTS results reveal that for λ = 266 nm laser irradiation, at least two

  17. Generation of high-peak-power sub-nanosecond 650-nm-band optical pulses based on semiconductor-laser-controlling technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Sato, Kazuo; Fang, Yi-Cheng; Peng, Lung-Han; Nemoto, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    We have developed a method to generate sub-nanosecond 650-nm-band optical pulses. These pulses have a peak power of 40 W and a pulse energy of 13 nJ at a 1-MHz repetition rate. This technology is intended for application in stimulated-emission-depletion microscopy. Our method is based on the pulsed operation of a 1.3-µm-band semiconductor-laser optical amplifier and the second-harmonic generation of the optical pulses after amplification by a Pr-doped fiber amplifier. The resultant peak power and pulse energy of the 650-nm-band optical pulses are two orders of magnitude higher than those directly obtained from a laser diode.

  18. Performance enhancement of sub-nanosecond diode-pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG microchip laser with diamond surface cooling.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, W Z; Chen, Yi-Fan; Su, K W; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2012-09-24

    We experimentally confirm that diamond surface cooling can significantly enhance the output performance of a sub-nanosecond diode-end-pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser. It is found that the pulse energy obtained with diamond cooling is approximately 1.5 times greater than that obtained without diamond cooling, where a Cr(4+):YAG absorber with the initial transmission of 84% is employed. Furthermore, the standard deviation of the pulse amplitude peak-to-peak fluctuation is found to be approximately 3 times lower than that measured without diamond cooling. Under a pump power of 3.9 W, the passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser can generate a pulse train of 3.3 kHz repetition rate with a pulse energy of 287 μJ and with a pulse width of 650 ps.

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Percolation upon expansion of nanosecond-pulse-produced laser plasma into a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kask, Nikolai E.; Michurin, Sergei V.; Fedorov, Gennadii M.

    2005-01-01

    Spectral studies of a plasma expanding into the ambient gas upon ablation of various targets by nanosecond laser pulses of moderate intensities are performed. It is found that the dependences of the intensities of spectral lines on the pressure of the buffer gas and the target composition have a threshold character typical of percolation. It is ascertained that a three-dimensional percolation occurs in plasma, and its threshold is determined by the atomic density of the metal component contained in the target. It is shown that percolation clusters, existing at temperatures higher than the boiling temperature of the target material, affect the plasma absorption ability, temperature, and spectral continuum of plasma emission.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Laser swelling model for polymers irradiated by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshev, A. Yu; Bityurin, N. M.

    2005-09-01

    Mechanisms of laser swelling of polymers are considered. A theoretical model for one of such mechanisms is constructed and investigated. This mechanism is based on the formation of a thermoelastic wave upon absorption of a laser pulse. Tensile stresses in this wave lead to elastic and plastic deformation of a polymer in the heated region and to the formation of convex structures (humps). The threshold energy density of a laser pulse required for the production of a residual hump under laser irradiation is obtained analytically. A formula for the height of this hump is also derived. The model explains the earlier experimental data from the literature on swelling of a PMMA film irradiated by UV pulses.

  1. Double-pulse machining as a technique for the enhancement of material removal rates in laser machining of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, A.C.; Banks, P.S.; Perry, M.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Dodell, A.L.; Armas, M.S.

    2005-08-01

    Several nanosecond 0.53-{mu}m laser pulses separated by several tens of nanoseconds have been shown to significantly enhance (three to ten times) material removal rates while minimizing redeposition and heat-affected zones. Economic, high-quality, high-aspect ratio holes (>10:1) in metals are produced as a result. A phenomenological model whereby the second laser pulse interacts with the ejecta produced by the first laser pulse and in close proximity to the material surface is consistent with the observations. Incident laser wavelengths of 1.05 and 0.35 {mu}m also benefit from this pulse format.

  2. 1.1 MW peak power in doubly QML composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser with EO and Bi-GaAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Shixia; Li, Dechun; Zhao, Shengzhi; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Xiangyang; Qiao, Hui

    2016-02-22

    By simultaneously employing electro-optic (EO) modulator and Bi-doped GaAs, dual-loss-modulated Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) multi-segment composite Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/Nd:YVO4/KTP sub-nanosecond green laser is demonstrated with low repetition rate and high peak power. When the incident pump power is up to 6.93 W, only one mode-locking pulse underneath a Q-switching envelope is generated with sub-nanosecond pulse duration at one kilohertz repetition rate. An average output power of 445 mW and a pulse duration of 399 ps are obtained with the incident pump power of 11.13 W, corresponding to a peak power of 1.115 MW which is the highest one in doubly QML sub-nanosecond green laser by now. The laser characteristics are better than those obtained with EO and GaAs. The experimental results indicate that Bi-GaAs is a promising saturable absorber for dual-loss-modulated QML laser.

  3. Calcium detection of human hair and nail by the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of laser-ablation plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruna, Masamitsu; Ohmi, Masato; Nakamura, Mitsuo; Morimoto, Shigeto

    2000-04-01

    We demonstrate the nanosecond time-gated spectroscopy of plume in laser ablation of biological tissue, which allows us to detect calcium (Ca) with high sensitivity by the use of either a UV or a near-IR laser pulse. Clear and sharp peaks of Ca+ appear in the luminescence spectrum of laser-ablation plume although the Ca content is only 0.1 percent in human hair and nail. Luminescence peaks of sodium atom (Na) and ionized carbon are also detectable. This specific spectroscopy is low invasive because a single low-energy laser pulse illuminates the tissue sample, and it does not require any poisonous sensititizers like fluorescence dye. This method, therefore, is a promising candidate for optical biopsy in the near future. In particular, Ca detection of human hair may lead to new diagnosis, including monitor of daily intake of Ca and a screening diagnosis of osteoporosis.

  4. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  5. Nanosecond laser texturing of uniformly and non-uniformly wettable micro structured metal surfaces for enhanced boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupančič, Matevž; Može, Matic; Gregorčič, Peter; Golobič, Iztok

    2017-03-01

    Microstructured uniformly and non-uniformly wettable surfaces were created on 25-μm-thin stainless steel foils by laser texturing using a marking nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) and utilizing various laser fluences and scan line separations. High-speed photography and high-speed IR thermography were used to investigate nucleate boiling heat transfer on the microstructured surfaces. The most pronounced results were obtained on a surface with non-uniform microstructure and non-uniform wettability. The obtained results show up to a 110% higher heat transfer coefficients and 20-40 times higher nucleation site densities compared to the untextured surface. We show that the number of active nucleation sites is significantly increased in the vicinity of microcavities that appeared in areas with the smallest (10 μm) scan line separation. Furthermore, this confirms the predictions of nucleation criteria and proves that straightforward, cost-effective nanosecond laser texturing allows the production of cavities with diameters of up to a few micrometers and surfaces with non-uniform wettability. Additionally, this opens up important possibilities for a more deterministic control over the complex boiling process.

  6. Efficient Intracellular Delivery of Molecules with High Cell Viability Using Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser-Activated Carbon Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5–9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:24547946

  7. Efficient intracellular delivery of molecules with high cell viability using nanosecond-pulsed laser-activated carbon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Aritra; Kelly, Sean C; Dwivedi, Nishant; Thadhani, Naresh; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2014-03-25

    Conventional physical and chemical methods that efficiently deliver molecules into cells are often associated with low cell viability. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of carbon nanoparticles believed to emit photoacoustic waves due to nanosecond-pulse laser activation to test the hypothesis that this method could achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability. Suspensions of DU145 human prostate carcinoma cells, carbon black (CB) nanoparticles, and calcein were exposed to 5-9 ns long laser pulses of near-infrared (1064 nm wavelength) light and then analyzed by flow cytometry for intracellular uptake of calcein and cell viability by propidium iodide staining. We found that intracellular uptake increased and in some cases saturated at high levels with only small losses in cell viability as a result of increasing laser fluence, laser exposure time, and as a unifying parameter, the total laser energy. Changing interpulse spacing between 0.1 and 10 s intervals showed no significant change in bioeffects, suggesting that the effects of each pulse were independent when spaced by at least 0.1 s intervals. Pretreatment of CB nanoparticles to intense laser exposure followed by mixing with cells also had no significant effect on uptake or viability. Similar uptake and viability were seen when CB nanoparticles were substituted with India ink, when DU145 cells were substituted with H9c2 rat cardiomyoblast cells, and when calcein was substituted with FITC-dextran. The best laser exposure conditions tested led to 88% of cells with intracellular uptake and close to 100% viability, indicating that nanosecond-pulse laser-activated carbon nanoparticles can achieve efficient intracellular delivery while maintaining high cell viability.

  8. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  9. Pattern analysis of laser-tattoo interactions for picosecond- and nanosecond-domain 1,064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers in tissue-mimicking phantom.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Keun Jae; Zheng, Zhenlong; Kwon, Tae Rin; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Hye Sun; Cho, Sung Bin

    2017-05-08

    During laser treatment for tattoo removal, pigment chromophores absorb laser energy, resulting in fragmentation of the ink particles via selective photothermolysis. The present study aimed to outline macroscopic laser-tattoo interactions in tissue-mimicking (TM) phantoms treated with picosecond- and nanosecond-domain lasers. Additionally, high-speed cinematographs were captured to visualize time-dependent tattoo-tissue interactions, from laser irradiation to the formation of photothermal and photoacoustic injury zones (PIZs). In all experimental settings using the nanosecond or picosecond laser, tattoo pigments fragmented into coarse particles after a single laser pulse, and further disintegrated into smaller particles that dispersed toward the boundaries of PIZs after repetitive delivery of laser energy. Particles fractured by picosecond treatment were more evenly dispersed throughout PIZs than those fractured by nanosecond treatment. Additionally, picosecond-then-picosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-picosecond treatment) induced greater disintegration of tattoo particles within PIZs than picosecond-then-nanosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-nanosecond treatment). High-speed cinematography recorded the formation of PIZs after repeated reflection and propagation of acoustic waves over hundreds of microseconds to a few milliseconds. The present data may be of use in predicting three-dimensional laser-tattoo interactions and associated reactions in surrounding tissue.

  10. A unified model to determine the energy partitioning between target and plasma in nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Galasso, G.; Kaltenbacher, M.; Tomaselli, A.; Scarpa, D.

    2015-03-28

    In semiconductor industry, pulsed nanosecond lasers are widely applied for the separation of silicon wafers. Here, the high intensities employed activate a cascade of complex multi-physical and multi-phase mechanisms, which finally result in the formation of a laser induced plasma, shielding the target from the incoming laser beam. Such induced plasma plume, by preventing the laser to effectively reach the target, reduces the overall efficiency and controllability of the ablation process. Modelling can be a useful tool in the optimization of industrial laser applications, allowing a deeper understanding of the way the laser energy distributes between target and induced plasma. Nevertheless, the highly multi-physical character of laser ablation poses serious challenges on the implementation of the various mechanisms underlying the process within a common modelling framework. A novel strategy is here proposed in order to simulate in a simplified, yet physically consistent way, a typical industrial application as laser ablation of silicon wafers. Reasonable agreement with experimental findings is obtained. Three fundamental mechanisms have been identified as the main factors influencing the accuracy of the numerical predictions: the transition from evaporative to volumetric mass removal occurring at critical temperature, the collisional and radiative processes underlying the initial plasma formation stage and the increased impact of the liquid ejection mechanism when a sub-millimeter laser footprint is used.

  11. Specifications of nanosecond laser ablation with solid targets, aluminum, silicon rubber, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshedian, Nader

    2017-09-01

    The ablation parameters such as threshold fluence, etch depth, ablation rate and the effect of material targets were investigated under the interaction of laser pulse with low intensity. The parameters of the laser system are: laser pulse energy in the range of 110-140 mJ, wavelength 1064 nm and pulse duration 20 ns. By macroscopic estimation of the outward images of the ablation and data obtained, we can conclude that the photothermal and photoionization processes have more influence for aluminum ablation. In contrast, for polymer samples, from the macroscopic observation of the border pattern at the irradiated spot, and also the data obtained from the experiment results, we deduce that both chemical change due to heating and photochemical dissociation were effective mechanisms of ablation. However, concerning the two polymer samples, apart from considering the same theoretical ablation model, it is conceived that the photomehanical specifications of PMMA are involved in the ablation parameters. The threshold fluence for an ablation rate of 30 laser shots were obtained as 12.4, 24.64, and 11.71 J cm-2, for aluminum, silicon rubber and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) respectively. The ablation rate is exponentially decreased by the laser-shot number, especially for aluminum. Furthermore, the etch depth after 30 laser shots was measured as 180, 630 and 870 μm, for aluminum, silicon rubber and PMMA, respectively.

  12. Selective removal of cholesteryl ester in atherosclerotic plaque by nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.75 μm for less-invasive laser angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Tsukimoto, Hideki; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2009-02-01

    Laser angioplasty, for example XeCl excimer laser coronary angioplasty (ELCA), has gained more attention for the treatment of serious stenosis blocked by plaque. Low degrees of thermal damage after ablation of atherosclerotic plaques have been achieved by ELCA. However, the large number of risks associated with the procedure, for example, dissections or perforations of the coronary arteries limits its application. A laser treatment technique with high ablation efficiency but low arterial wall injury is desirable. Mid-infrared laser with a wavelength of 5.75 µm is selectively well absorbed in C=O stretching vibration mode of ester bonds in cholesteryl ester. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of nanosecond pulsed laser at 5.75 µm irradiation for atherosclerotic plaques. We made a study on the irradiation effect to atherosclerotic plaques in tunica intima in a wet condition. In this study, we used a mid-infrared tunable solid-state laser which is operated by difference-frequency generation, with a wavelength of 5.75 µm, a pulse width of 5 ns and a pulse duration of 10 Hz as a treatment light source, and a thoracic aorta of WHHLMI rabbit as an atherosclerosis model. As a result, less-invasive interaction parameters for removing atherosclerotic plaques were confirmed. This study shows that the nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation at 5.75 µm is a powerful tool for selective and less-invasive treatment of atherosclerotic plaques.

  13. Pd nanoparticles formation by femtosecond laser irradiation and the nonlinear optical properties at 532 nm using nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Guanghua; Qu Shiliang; Wang Qiang; Zhao Chongjun; Zhang Lei; Li Zhongguo

    2011-01-15

    Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by focused femtosecond laser irradiation of PdCl{sub 2} dissolved in ethanol. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that Pd NPs show certain crystalline microstructure, and the average diameter is 3.4 nm with narrow size distribution from 2.0 to 6.0 nm. The nonlinear optical absorption and refraction of Pd NPs solution were investigated with nanosecond laser pulses at 532 nm. The nonlinear absorption of Pd NPs is saturable at low intensity of 3.28x10{sup 11} W/m{sup 2} but it is changed to reverse saturable with the intensity increased to 7.96x10{sup 11} W/m{sup 2}, which accordingly indicates the nonlinear refraction is changed from self-defocusing to self-focusing. The transition of the nonlinear absorption with the increase in pulse intensity is analyzed by an empirical model which includes mostly saturable absorption (SA) and two-photon absorption (TPA). The intensity of saturable I{sub s} is obtained, along with TPA coefficient {beta}. SA and TPA are both originated from the interband transition between the d band and s-p conduction band. The SA possess less occupied density of states in the ground state and less unoccupied density of states in the excited state than that of TPA, so the TPA dominates the nonlinear absorption when the pulse intensity is high, leading to as-observed transition from SA to TPA. The refraction variation with increase in pulse intensity is attributed to the interband transition of electrons from d band to s-p conduction band in the Pd NPs.

  14. Spectral responsivity measurement of photovoltaic detectors by comparison with a pyroelectric detector on individual nano-second laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kee-Suk; Park, Seongchong; Hwang, Jisoo; Atkinson, Errol; Manson, Peter; Lee, Dong-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the individual single pulse of a nano-second laser can be used to measure the spectral responsivity of photovoltaic detectors. With this new scheme, the relative spectral responsivity of a photodiode can be determined from the spectral reflectance of the surface of a pyroelectric detector. We also developed the adequate data acquisition procedure, which can eliminate systematic errors caused by the nonlinear pulse response. The method is experimentally demonstrated for Si and Ge photodiodes in a wide wavelength range from 420 nm to 1600 nm and verified by comparison with the method using a CW source.

  15. Possibility of applying a hydrodynamic model to describe the laser erosion of metals irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozadaev, K. V.

    2014-04-01

    We report the results of experimental investigations of the production and development of plasma-vapour plumes upon irradiation of metal targets by nanosecond (10-100 ns) pulses with a high (108-1010 W cm-2) power density under atmospheric conditions. The transition from a quasi-stationary thermal mechanism of metal erosion to an explosion hydrodynamic one takes place when the radiation power density increases from 108 to 109 W cm-2. The resultant experimental information is extremely important for the laser deposition of metal nanostructures under atmospheric conditions, which is possible only for power densities of 108-109 W cm-2.

  16. Femto- and nanosecond pulse laser ablation dependence on irradiation area: The role of defects in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghilou, Aida; Armbruster, Oskar; Kautek, Wolfgang

    2017-10-01

    Pulse laser ablation experiments at semiconductor-grade silicon <111> and SAE 304 stainless steel were performed with femto- and nanosecond pulse durations. Threshold fluences in dependence of beam radius (1.6-100 μm) and density of low-density defects (LDDs) have been determined for both materials and pulse durations. The experimental findings are supported by a recent quantitative model describing the strong dependence of the modification/ablation/damage threshold fluence on beam radius and pulse number. The importance of LDDs in the ablation mechanism has been confirmed.

  17. Experimental study of the critical point region of aluminum under the action of the powerful nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepetskaya, E. B.; Karabutov, A. A.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Ksenofontov, D. M.; Makarov, V. A.; Podymova, N. B.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is a report on the novel experimental method of the study of the thermodynamic parameters of thin aluminum films in the critical point region. The controlled supercritical state of aluminum is achieved for the first time as a result of the heating of these films by the absorption of the powerful nanosecond pulse of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength. The possibility is demonstrated to find simultaneously the temporal dependencies of the temperature, of the pressure and of the density of aluminum during the experiment with the thin aluminum films confined at both sides by the quartz glass substrates. These dependencies are obtained taking into account the nonlinear dependence on the incident laser intensity of the light reflection coefficient from the irradiated surface of aluminum. For the first time the thermodynamic cooling cycle of aluminum after its heating by the powerful nanosecond laser pulse is plotted in the space of variables’ temperature—pressure and temperature—density that get into the supercritical region.

  18. Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Laserna, J J; Reyes, R Fernández; González, R; Tobaria, L; Lucena, P

    2009-06-08

    We report on an experimental study of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. The characteristics of the atmosphere dictate specific performance constraints to this technology. Unlike classical laboratory LIBS systems where the distance to the sample is well known and characterized, LIBS systems working at several tens of meters to the target have specific atmospheric propagation conditions that cause the quality of the LIBS signals to be affected to a significant extent. Using a new LIBS based sensor system fitted with a nanosecond laser emitting at 1064 nm, propagation effects at distances of up to 120 m were investigated. The effects observed include wander and scintillation in the outgoing laser beam and in the return atomic emission signal. Plasmas were formed on aluminium targets. Average signal levels and signal fluctuations are measured so the effect of atmospheric turbulence on LIBS measurements is quantified.

  19. Comparative investigation of damage performance on K9 and SiO2 under 1064-nm nanosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjie; Wang, Fengrui; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Xinda; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2011-11-01

    Laser damage performance of K9 glass and fused silica glass were tested respectively at same experimental condition with 1064 nm nanosecond laser. The initial damage threshold (IDT), the damage growth threshold (DGT) and the damage growth laws of the two optics glass were investigated comparatively. The results show that the damage growth behavior of the two glasses are quite different, for example, the lower damage growth threshold and the higher damage growth coefficient for K9 glass, which can attribute to the difference of the material's damage morphology, optical absorption, residual stress near damage site between the two optics glass. The research is very important to choose transparent optical material applied in high power laser.

  20. Comparative investigation of damage performance on K9 and SiO2 under 1064-nm nanosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongjie; Wang, Fengrui; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Xinda; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2012-01-01

    Laser damage performance of K9 glass and fused silica glass were tested respectively at same experimental condition with 1064 nm nanosecond laser. The initial damage threshold (IDT), the damage growth threshold (DGT) and the damage growth laws of the two optics glass were investigated comparatively. The results show that the damage growth behavior of the two glasses are quite different, for example, the lower damage growth threshold and the higher damage growth coefficient for K9 glass, which can attribute to the difference of the material's damage morphology, optical absorption, residual stress near damage site between the two optics glass. The research is very important to choose transparent optical material applied in high power laser.

  1. Nanosecond near-spinodal homogeneous boiling of water superheated by a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Lyon, Kevin; Allen, Susan D.

    2007-03-15

    The fast boiling dynamics of superheated surface layers of bulk water cavitating under near-spinodal conditions during nanosecond CO{sub 2} laser heating pulses was studied using contact broad-band photoacoustic spectroscopy. Characteristic pressure-tension cycles recorded by an acoustic transducer at different incident laser fluences represent (a) weak random oscillations of transient nanometer-sized near-critical bubbles-precursors and (b) well-defined stimulated oscillations of micron-sized supercritical bubbles and their submicrosecond coalescence products. These findings provide an important insight into basic thermodynamic parameters, spatial and temporal scales of bubble nucleation during explosive liquid/vapor transformations in absorbing liquids ablated by short laser pulses in the thermal confinement regime.

  2. Thrust noise minimization in long-term laser ablation of propellant material in the nanosecond and picosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Scharring, Stefan; Karg, Stephanie; Pastow, Jan; Pastuschka, Lisa; Förster, Daniel Johannes; Eckel, Hans-Albert

    2017-01-01

    The avoidance of any moving parts in a microthruster exhibits a great potential for low-noise thrust generation in the micronewton range. This is required, e.g., for scientific missions that need attitude and orbit control systems with exquisite precision. Laser ablation propulsion offers the opportunity of permanent inertia-free, electro-optical delivery of laser energy to access the propellant entirely without moving it. New propellant is accessed by ablating the previous surface in layers, essentially damaging the surface with a laser over and over again. The resulting surface properties for different fluences and scanning patterns were investigated for multiple layers of aluminum, copper, and gold. The pulse-length-specific issues of various ablation mechanisms such as vaporization, spallation, and phase explosion are accounted for by the use of a 10-ps laser system and a 500-ps laser system. We show that the surface roughness produced with 500-ps laser pulses is approximately twice the surface roughness generated by using 10-ps laser pulses. Furthermore, with 500-ps pulses, the surface roughness shows low dependency on the fluence for carefully chosen scanning parameters. Therefore, we conclude that laser pulse duration differences in the picosecond and nanosecond regimes will not necessarily alter surface roughness properties.

  3. Highly site-selective transvascular drug delivery by the use of nanosecond pulsed laser-induced photomechanical waves.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shunichi; Yoshida, Ken; Kawauchi, Satoko; Hosoe, Kazue; Akutsu, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Norihiro; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2014-10-28

    Photomechanical waves (PMWs), which were generated by irradiation of a light-absorbing material (laser target) with nanosecond laser pulses, were used for targeted transvascular drug delivery in rats. An Evans blue (EB) solution was injected into the tail vein, and laser targets were placed on the skin, muscle and brain. Each laser target was irradiated with a laser pulse(s) and 4h later, the rat was perfused and the distribution of EB fluorescence in the targeted tissues was examined. We observed laser fluence-dependent and hence PMW pressure-dependent extravasation of EB selectively in the tissues that had been exposed to a PMW(s). Uptake of leaked EB into cells in extravascular space was also observed in the targeted tissues. Tissue damage or hemorrhage was not apparent except in the brain exposed to the highest laser fluence used. The results for the brain indicated opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Reverse-order (PMW application before EB injection) experiments showed that the BBB was closed in the duration from 8h to 12h after PMW application at a laser fluence of 0.5J/cm(2). Since EB molecules are strongly bound with serum albumin in blood, the results indicate that the present method can be applied not only to small molecules but also to macromolecules.

  4. A coupling model to simulate the dynamic process of blister-actuated nanosecond laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yongxiang; Cheng, Han; Xu, Jiaxi; Yao, Zhenqiang

    2017-08-01

    The modeling of laser-induced forward transfer process (LIFT) is helpful to understand and optimize its complex transfer process. In this work, a coupling model is developed to investigate the dynamic response of a thin polymer layer used as the release layer in the blister-actuated LIFT. In this model, the vapor pressure generated by nanosecond laser irradiation is computed through coupling with the transient vapor volume obtained from different step durations to simulate the dynamic blister formation. And the model is validated by experiments on polyimide film irradiated with different laser fluences, which is found to be capable of providing a consistent prediction of blister profiles under several laser conditions. The calibrated energy conversion ratios imply that laser pulse energy is mainly allocated for the heating and vaporizing of polymers, but increasing laser fluence can make this expense gradually saturated to allow more pulse energy to increase the vapor pressure. Transient pressure development from the coupling model is observed to increase rapidly within the pulse duration, but then to decrease because of vapor expansion. Forward velocity in axial direction is also observed to increase with laser fluence. The maximum velocity is possible to exceed the sound velocity under a high laser fluence. And the thin polymer layer is more preferred to obtain a high transfer velocity.

  5. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-01

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was ˜100ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  6. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-20

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was {approx}100 ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  7. Nanosecond electron microscopes

    PubMed

    Bostanjoglo; Elschner; Mao; Nink; Weingartner

    2000-04-01

    Combining electron optics, fast electronics and pulsed lasers, a transmission and a photoelectron emission microscope were built, which visualize events in thin films and on surfaces with a time resolution of several nanoseconds. The high-speed electron microscopy is capable to track fast laser-induced processes in metals below the ablation threshold, which are difficult to detect by other imaging techniques. The material response to nano- and femtosecond laser pulses was found to be very different. It was dominated by thermo/chemocapillary flow and chemical reactions in the case of nanosecond pulses, and by mechanical deformations and non-thermal electron emission after a femtosecond pulse.

  8. Comparison of nanosecond and picosecond excitation for interference-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of atomic hydrogen in flames.

    PubMed

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Patterson, Brian D; Frank, Jonathan H; Settersten, Thomas B

    2008-09-10

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) line imaging of atomic hydrogen was investigated in a series of premixed CH4/O2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/O2/N2 flames using excitation with either picosecond or nanosecond pulsed lasers operating at 205 nm. Radial TP-LIF profiles were measured for a range of pulse fluences to determine the maximum interference-free signal levels and the corresponding picosecond and nanosecond laser fluences in each of 12 flames. For an interference-free measurement, the shape of the TP-LIF profile is independent of laser fluence. For larger fluences, distortions in the profile are attributed to photodissociation of H2O, CH3, and/or other combustion intermediates, and stimulated emission. In comparison with the nanosecond laser, excitation with the picosecond laser can effectively reduce the photolytic interference and produces approximately an order of magnitude larger interference-free signal in CH4/O2/N2 flames with equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5< or =Phi< or =1.4, and in H2/O2 flames with 0.3< or =Phi< or =1.2. Although photolytic interference limits the nanosecond laser fluence in all flames, stimulated emission, occurring between the laser-excited level, H(n=3), and H(n=2), is the limiting factor for picosecond excitation in the flames with the highest H atom concentration. Nanosecond excitation is advantageous in the richest (Phi=1.64) CH4/O2/N2 flame and in H2/O2/N2 flames. The optimal excitation pulse width for interference-free H atom detection depends on the relative concentrations of hydrogen atoms and photolytic precursors, the flame temperature, and the laser path length within the flame.

  9. Comparison of nanosecond and picosecond excitation for interference-free two-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of atomic hydrogen in flames

    SciTech Connect

    Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Patterson, Brian D.; Frank, Jonathan H.; Settersten, Thomas B

    2008-09-10

    Two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (TP-LIF) line imaging of atomic hydrogen was investigated in a series of premixed CH4/O2/N2, H2/O2, and H2/O2/N2 flames using excitation with either picosecond or nanosecond pulsed lasers operating at 205 nm. Radial TP-LIF profiles were measured for a range of pulse fluences to determine the maximum interference-free signal levels and the corresponding picosecond and nanosecond laser fluences in each of 12 flames. For an interference-free measurement, the shape of the TP-LIF profile is independent of laser fluence. For larger fluences, distortions in the profile are attributed to photodissociation of H2O, CH3, and/or other combustion intermediates, and stimulated emission. In comparison with the nanosecond laser, excitation with the picosecond laser can effectively reduce the photolytic interference and produces approximately an order of magnitude larger interference-free signal in CH4/O2/N2 flames with equivalence ratios in the range of 0.5{<=}{phi}{<=}1.4, and in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} flames with 0.3{<=}{phi}{<=}1.2. Although photolytic interference limits the nanosecond laser fluence in all flames, stimulated emission, occurring between the laser-excited level, H(n=3), and H(n=2), is the limiting factor for picosecond excitation in the flames with the highest H atom concentration. Nanosecond excitation is advantageous in the richest ({phi}=1.64) CH4/O2/N2 flame and in H2/O2/N2 flames. The optimal excitation pulse width for interference-free H atom detection depends on the relative concentrations of hydrogen atoms and photolytic precursors, the flame temperature, and the laser path length within the flame.

  10. Nanosecond laser damage resistance of differently prepared semi-finished parts of optical multimode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Guido; Vogel, Jens; Preuß, Rüdiger; Vaziri, Pouya; Zoheidi, Mohammadali; Eberstein, Markus; Krüger, Jörg

    2007-12-01

    Optical multimode fibers are applied in materials processing (e.g. automotive industry), defense, aviation technology, medicine and biotechnology. One challenging task concerning the production of multimode fibers is the enhancement of laser-induced damage thresholds. A higher damage threshold enables a higher transmitted average power at a given fiber diameter or the same power inside a thinner fiber to obtain smaller focus spots. In principle, different material parameters affect the damage threshold. Besides the quality of the preform bulk material itself, the drawing process during the production of the fiber and the preparation of the fiber end surfaces influence the resistance. Therefore, the change of the laser-induced damage threshold of preform materials was investigated in dependence on a varying thermal treatment and preparation procedure. Single and multi-pulse laser-induced damage thresholds of preforms (F300, Heraeus) were measured using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm wavelength emitting pulses with a duration of 15 ns, a pulse energy of 12 mJ and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The temporal and spatial shape of the laser pulses were controlled accurately. Laser-induced damage thresholds in a range from 150 J cm -2 to 350 J cm -2 were determined depending on the number of pulses applied to the same spot, the thermal history and the polishing quality of the samples, respectively.

  11. Dependence of optimal initial density on laser parameters for multi-keV x-ray radiators generated by nanosecond laser-produced underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Shao-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Miao, Wen-yong; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun; Hu, Guang-yue Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-15

    Efficient multi-keV x-ray sources can be produced using nanosecond laser pulse-heated middle-Z underdense plasmas generated using gas or foam. Previous experimental results show that an optimal initial target density exists for efficient multi-keV x-ray emission at which the laser ionization wave is supersonic. Here we explore the influence of the laser intensity and the pulse duration on this optimal initial target density via a one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulation. The simulation shows that the optimal initial density is sensitive to both the laser intensity and the pulse duration. However, the speed of the supersonic ionization wave at the end of the laser irradiation is always maintained at 1.5 to 1.7 times that of the ion acoustic wave under the optimal initial density conditions.

  12. Predictive modeling, simulation, and optimization of laser processing techniques: UV nanosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of polymers and selective laser melting of powder metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criales Escobar, Luis Ernesto

    One of the most frequently evolving areas of research is the utilization of lasers for micro-manufacturing and additive manufacturing purposes. The use of laser beam as a tool for manufacturing arises from the need for flexible and rapid manufacturing at a low-to-mid cost. Laser micro-machining provides an advantage over mechanical micro-machining due to the faster production times of large batch sizes and the high costs associated with specific tools. Laser based additive manufacturing enables processing of powder metals for direct and rapid fabrication of products. Therefore, laser processing can be viewed as a fast, flexible, and cost-effective approach compared to traditional manufacturing processes. Two types of laser processing techniques are studied: laser ablation of polymers for micro-channel fabrication and selective laser melting of metal powders. Initially, a feasibility study for laser-based micro-channel fabrication of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) via experimentation is presented. In particular, the effectiveness of utilizing a nanosecond-pulsed laser as the energy source for laser ablation is studied. The results are analyzed statistically and a relationship between process parameters and micro-channel dimensions is established. Additionally, a process model is introduced for predicting channel depth. Model outputs are compared and analyzed to experimental results. The second part of this research focuses on a physics-based FEM approach for predicting the temperature profile and melt pool geometry in selective laser melting (SLM) of metal powders. Temperature profiles are calculated for a moving laser heat source to understand the temperature rise due to heating during SLM. Based on the predicted temperature distributions, melt pool geometry, i.e. the locations at which melting of the powder material occurs, is determined. Simulation results are compared against data obtained from experimental Inconel 625 test coupons fabricated at the National

  13. Laser induced shock wave lithotripsy--biologic effects of nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, R.; Hartung, R.; Geissdoerfer, K.A.; Ascherl, R.; Erhardt, W.; Schmidt-Kloiber, H.; Reichel, E.

    1988-05-01

    Laser energy of a Nd-YAG laser (1064 nm. wave length, 8 nsec pulse duration) was directed against various tissue cultures and the urothelium of the ureter, bladder and kidney parenchyma in pigs. Single pulse energy was 50 to 120 mJ with a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Urothelium and kidney parenchyma were irradiated in seven pigs. Tissue samples were examined histologically and electron microscopically directly, two, four, eight and 12 days after irradiation. No macroscopic lesion could be found. Maximum energy caused a small rupture cone of 40 micron. depth. No thermic effects or necrosis resulted, so that no harm is to be expected with unintentional irradiation during laser stone disintegration.

  14. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscicki, T.; Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1-100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm2 with a power density of 1 × 109 W/cm2 (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  15. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  16. Characterization of Titanium Oxide Layers Formation Produced by Nanosecond Laser Coloration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brihmat-Hamadi, F.; Amara, E. H.; Kellou, H.

    2017-03-01

    Laser marking technique is used to produce colors on titanium while scanning a metallic sample under normal atmospheric conditions. To proceed with different operating conditions related to the laser beam, the parameters of a Q-switched diode-pumped Nd:YAG (λ = 532 nm) laser, with a pulse duration of τ = 5 ns, are varied. The effect on the resulting mark quality is the aim of the present study which is developed to determine the influence of the operating parameters (i.e., pulse frequency, beam scanning speed, and pumping intensity) and furthermore their combination, such as the accumulated fluences and the overlapping rate of laser impacts. From the obtained experimental results, it is noted that the accumulated fluences and the scanning speed are the most influential operating parameters during laser marking, since they have a strong effect on the surface roughness and reflectance, and the occurrence of many oxide phases such as TiO, Ti2O3, TiO2 (γ- phase, anatase, and rutile).

  17. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts accumulate differentially on titanium surfaces treated with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Radmanesh, Mitra; Ektesabi, Amin M; Wyatt, Rachael A; Crawford, Bryan D; Kiani, Amirkianoosh

    2016-10-01

    Biomaterial engineering, specifically in bone implant and osseointegration, is currently facing a critical challenge regarding the response of cells to foreign objects and general biocompatibility of the materials used in the production of these implants. Using the developing technology of the laser surface treatment, this study investigates the effects of the laser repetition rate (frequency) on cell distribution across the surface of the titanium substrates. The main objective of this research is building a fundamental understanding of how cells interact with treated titanium and how different treatments affect cell accumulation. Cells respond differently to surfaces treated with different frequency lasers. The results of this research identify the influence of frequency on surface topography properties and oxidation of titanium, and their subsequent effects on the pattern of cell accumulation on its surface. Despite increased oxidation in laser-treated regions, the authors observe that fibroblast cells prefer untreated titanium to laser-treated regions, except the regions treated with 25 kHz pulses, which become preferentially colonized after 72 h.

  18. Numerical investigation of nanosecond laser induced plasma and shock wave dynamics from air using 2D hydrodynamic code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Shiva, S.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.; Sijoy, C. D.; Ikkurthi, V. R.; Chaturvedi, S.

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional axis symmetric hydrodynamic model was developed to investigate nanosecond laser induced plasma and shock wave dynamics in ambient air over the input laser energies of 50-150 mJ and time scales from 25 ns to 8 μs. The formation of localized hot spots during laser energy deposition, asymmetric spatio-temporal evolution, rolling, and splitting of the plasma observed in the simulations were in good agreement with the experimental results. The formed plasma was observed to have two regions: the hot plasma core and the plasma outer region. The asymmetric expansion was due to the variation in the thermodynamic variables along the laser propagation and radial directions. The rolling of the plasma was observed to take place in the core region where very high temperatures exist. Similarly, the splitting of the plasma was observed to take place in the core region between the localized hot spots that causes the hydrodynamic instabilities. The rolling and splitting times were observed to vary with the input laser energy deposited. The plasma expansion was observed to be asymmetric for all the simulated time scales considered, whereas the shock wave evolution was observed to transfer from asymmetric to symmetric expansion. Finally, the simulated temporal evolution of the electron number density, temperature of the hot core plasma, and the temperature evolution across the shock front after the detachment from the plasma were presented over the time scales 25 ns-8 μs for different input laser pulse energies.

  19. Transient bond scission of polytetrafluoroethylene under laser-induced shock compression studied by nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kazutaka; Wakabayashi, Kunihiko; Konodo, Ken-Ichi

    2001-06-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved Raman spectroscopy has been performed to study polymer films, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), under laser driven shock compression at laser power density of 4.0 GW/cm^2. The overtone-mode line of PTFE showed red shift (18 cm-1) at delay time of 9.3 ns due to the shock compression and corresponding pressure was estimated to be approximately 2.7 GPa by analyzing static and shock compression data. The estimated pressure was in good agreement with that estimated by ablation pressure in glass-confined geometry. A new vibrational line at 1900 cm-1 appeared only under shock compression and was assigned to the C=C streching in transient species such as a monomer (C_2F_4) produced by the shock-induced bond scission. Intensity of the new line increased with increasing delay time along propagation of the shock compression with a shock velocity of 2.5 km/s.

  20. Heat and Momentum Transfer on the Rapid Phase Change of Liquid Induced by Nanosecond-Pulsed Laser Irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hee Kuwon

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the physics of the liquid -vapor phase transition phenomenon induced by nanosecond -pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiation. This work is concerned with the science and technological applications of the phenomenon of rapid nucleation and explosive vaporization of a liquid in contact with a pulsed-laser heated solid surface. The thermodynamics of the phase transition, the kinetics of collective bubble growth and collapse, and the transient development of pressure field have been investigated experimentally by various fast optical sensing techniques. The purpose of this study is to provide new insight into the physics of the liquid-vapor transition and the interaction between laser and liquid-solid interface. A detailed study on the practical aspects of a novel technological application, the laser cleaning technology, is also included. A model system investigated throughout this work is pure water, methanol, or isopropanol in contact with a solid chromium surface that is heated by ultraviolet KrF excimer laser pulses of nanosecond duration. The dynamics of bubble nucleation, growth, and collapse is studied by optical specular reflectance and scattering probe, which isolates the onset of phase transformation with great accuracy. The thermodynamics of phase transition and metastability of liquid matter have been studied by transient photothermal reflectance probe, which monitors the transient temperature field non-intrusively with nanosecond time resolution. The transient response from the photothermal reflectance probe which utilizes temperature-dependent optical properties of an embedded thin film sensor are coupled with heat transfer modeling results in order to predict the thermodynamic condition for the vaporization in nanosecond time scale. The generation of transient pressure pulses by bubble growth and the effect of static pressure on the phase transition are studied by the piezoelectric transducer probe, photoacoustic probe beam deflection

  1. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range.

    PubMed

    Sola, Daniel; Peña, Jose I

    2013-11-19

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth, removed volume and ablation yields reached their maximum, placing the sample out of focus. It was shown that these characteristics do not depend on the processing conditions, the wavelength or the optical configuration, and that this is intrinsic behavior of the processing method. Furthermore, the existence of a close relation between material hardness and ablation yields was demonstrated.

  2. Possibility of applying a hydrodynamic model to describe the laser erosion of metals irradiated by high-intensity nanosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kozadaev, K V

    2014-04-28

    We report the results of experimental investigations of the production and development of plasma-vapour plumes upon irradiation of metal targets by nanosecond (10–100 ns) pulses with a high (10{sup 8}–10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) power density under atmospheric conditions. The transition from a quasi-stationary thermal mechanism of metal erosion to an explosion hydrodynamic one takes place when the radiation power density increases from 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. The resultant experimental information is extremely important for the laser deposition of metal nanostructures under atmospheric conditions, which is possible only for power densities of 10{sup 8}–10{sup 9} W cm{sup -2}. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. Study of the Wavelength Dependence in Laser Ablation of Advanced Ceramics and Glass-Ceramic Materials in the Nanosecond Range

    PubMed Central

    Sola, Daniel; Peña, Jose I.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, geometrical dimensions and ablation yields as a function of the machining method and reference position were studied when advanced ceramics and glass-ceramic materials were machined with pulsed lasers in the nanosecond range. Two laser systems, emitting at 1064 and 532 nm, were used. It was shown that the features obtained depend on whether the substrate is processed by means of pulse bursts or by grooves. In particular, when the samples were processed by grooves, machined depth, removed volume and ablation yields reached their maximum, placing the sample out of focus. It was shown that these characteristics do not depend on the processing conditions, the wavelength or the optical configuration, and that this is intrinsic behavior of the processing method. Furthermore, the existence of a close relation between material hardness and ablation yields was demonstrated. PMID:28788391

  4. A high repetition rate passively Q-switched microchip laser for controllable transverse laser modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Bai, Sheng-Chuang; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Kaminskii, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    A Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 microchip laser for versatile controllable transverse laser modes has been demonstrated by adjusting the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal along the tilted pump beam direction. The pump beam diameter-dependent asymmetric saturated inversion population inside the Nd:YVO4 crystal governs the oscillation of various Laguerre-Gaussian, Ince-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian modes. Controllable transverse laser modes with repetition rates over 25 kHz and up to 183 kHz, depending on the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal, have been achieved. The controllable transverse laser beams with a nanosecond pulse width and peak power over hundreds of watts have been obtained for potential applications in optical trapping and quantum computation.

  5. Hybrid Q-switched laser with MoS2 saturable absorber and AOM driven sub-nanosecond KTP-OPO.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Junpeng; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao

    2017-02-20

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials, especially transition-metal dichalcogenides, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) and tungsten disulfide (WS2), have attracted great interests due to their exceptional optical properties as saturable absorbers in laser systems. In this work, at first, we presented a diode-pumped passively Q-switched laser with MoS2 saturable absorber (MoS2-SA). At an incident pump power of 6.54 W, a maximum output power of 1.15 W with a minimum pulse duration of 70.6 ns was obtained, which is the shortest pulse duration of diode pumped passively Q-switched laser with MoS2-SA to the best of our knowledge. Then, by using a hybrid Q-switched laser with a MoS2-SA and an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) as pumping fundamental laser, a sub-nanosecond KTiOPO4 (KTP) based intracavity optical parametric oscillation (IOPO) was realized. With an incident pump power of 10.2 W and AOM repetition rate of 10 kHz, the maximum output power of 183 mW with minimum pulse duration of 850 ps was obtained. The experimental results indicate that the IOPO pumped by the hybrid Q-switched laser with AOM and MoS2-SA can generate signal wave with shorter pulse duration than those IOPOs pumped by hybrid Q-switched laser with AOM and Cr4+:YAG or single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absober (SWCNT-SA) or monolayer graphene SA.

  6. Infrared long nanosecond laser pulse ablation of silicon: Integrated two-dimensional modeling and time-resolved experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Sha; Zhou, Yun; Wu, Benxin; Gao, Yibo

    2012-07-01

    Nanosecond (ns) laser ablation may provide good solutions to many industrial silicon micromachining applications. However, most of the previous work is on lasers in ultraviolet (UV) or visible spectral ranges, and ns laser ablation of silicon at the infrared (IR) wavelength has not been well understood, particularly for long ns pulses with durations on the order of ∼100 ns. IR ns lasers often have lower costs and less external energy consumption for the same laser energy output than UV or visible lasers, which is desirable for many practical applications. This paper aims to understand the mechanism of IR ns laser ablation of silicon, by combining time-resolved experimental observations with physics-based modeling study. The observation is through a ns-gated intensified charged-coupled devices (ICCD) camera coupled with a microscope tube, while the model is based on two-dimensional (2D) gas dynamic equations for the gaseous phases coupled with the condensed phase heat transfer equation through the Knudsen layer relations. The research shows that the material removal mechanism under the studied laser ablation conditions is surface vaporization in the early stage (yielding a plasma plume above the target), followed by subsequent liquid ejection. The measured plasma front propagation matches reasonably well with the model prediction. The experimentally observed spatial distribution of the plasma radiation intensity is consistent with and has been understood through the model. The study also shows that the observed liquid ejection is induced by the total surface pressure difference between the near-boundary region of the target melt pool and the other remaining region of the pool. The pressure difference is mainly due to the surface vaporization flux drop after laser pulse ends.

  7. Synthesis of polycaprolactone-titanium oxide multilayer films by nanosecond laser pulses and electrospinning technique for better implant fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghshine, Babak B.; Cosman, James A.; Kiani, Amirkianoosh

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a combination of electrospinning and laser texturing is introduced as a novel method for increasing the biocompatibility of metal implants. Besides having a rough laser treated surface, the implant benefits from the high porosity and better wettability of an electrospun fibrous structure, which is a more favorable environment for cell proliferation. Titanium samples were patterned using a nanosecond laser beam and were placed as collectors in an electrospinning machine. They were then soaked in simulated body fluid for four weeks. Energy Dispersive X-ray and X-Ray Diffraction results indicate significantly more hydroxyapatite formation on laser treated samples with nanoscale fibers deposited on their surface. This shows that having a laser treated surface underneath the fibrous layer can improve short-term biocompatibility even before degradation of fibers. The thermal conductivity of the electrospun layer, measured using a Hot Disk Transient Plane Source instrument and computer code, was shown to be considerably lower than that of titanium and very close to bone. The presence of this layer can therefore be beneficial in making the implant more compatible to a biological medium. In case of dental implants, it was shown that this layer can act as a thermal barrier while a hot beverage is consumed and it can decrease the temperature rise by about 60%, which avoids any possible damage to newly formed cells during the healing period.

  8. Synthesis of polycaprolactone-titanium oxide multilayer films by nanosecond laser pulses and electrospinning technique for better implant fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshine, Babak B.; Cosman, James A.; Kiani, Amirkianoosh

    2016-08-28

    In this study, a combination of electrospinning and laser texturing is introduced as a novel method for increasing the biocompatibility of metal implants. Besides having a rough laser treated surface, the implant benefits from the high porosity and better wettability of an electrospun fibrous structure, which is a more favorable environment for cell proliferation. Titanium samples were patterned using a nanosecond laser beam and were placed as collectors in an electrospinning machine. They were then soaked in simulated body fluid for four weeks. Energy Dispersive X-ray and X-Ray Diffraction results indicate significantly more hydroxyapatite formation on laser treated samples with nanoscale fibers deposited on their surface. This shows that having a laser treated surface underneath the fibrous layer can improve short-term biocompatibility even before degradation of fibers. The thermal conductivity of the electrospun layer, measured using a Hot Disk Transient Plane Source instrument and computer code, was shown to be considerably lower than that of titanium and very close to bone. The presence of this layer can therefore be beneficial in making the implant more compatible to a biological medium. In case of dental implants, it was shown that this layer can act as a thermal barrier while a hot beverage is consumed and it can decrease the temperature rise by about 60%, which avoids any possible damage to newly formed cells during the healing period.

  9. Selective removal of composite sealants with near-ultraviolet laser pulses of nanosecond duration.

    PubMed

    Louie, Tiffany M; Jones, Robert S; Sarma, Anupama V; Fried, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    It is often necessary to replace pit and fissure sealants and composite restorations. This task is complicated by the necessity for complete removal of the remaining composite to enable suitable adhesion of new composite. Previous studies have shown that 355-nm laser pulses from a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser can selectively remove residual composite after orthodontic bracket removal on enamel surfaces. Our objective is to determine if such laser pulses are suitable for selective removal of composite pit and fissure sealants and restorations. Optical coherence tomography is used to acquire optical cross sections of the occlusal topography nondestructively before sealant application, after sealant application, and after sealant removal. Thermocouples are used to monitor the temperature in the pulp chamber during composite removal under clinically relevant ablation rates, i.e., 30 Hz and 30 mJ/pulse. At an irradiation intensity of 1.3 J/cm2, pit and fissure sealants are completely removed without visible damage to the underlying enamel. At intensities above 1.5 J/cm2, incident laser pulses remove the resin layer while at the same time preferentially etching the surface of the enamel. Temperature excursions in the pulp chamber of extracted teeth are limited to less than 5 degrees C if air-cooling is used during the rapid removal (1 to 2 min) of sealants, water-cooling is not necessary. Selective removal of composite restorative materials is possible without damage to the underlying sound tooth structure.

  10. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  11. Selective removal of carious human dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at a wavelength of 5.85 μ m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-05-01

    Less invasive methods for treating dental caries are strongly desired. However, conventional dental lasers do not always selectively remove caries or ensure good bonding to the composite resin. According to our previous study, demineralized dentin might be removed by a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at wavelengths of around 5.8 μm. The present study investigated the irradiation effect of the light on carious human dentin classified into "remove," "not remove," and "unclear" categories. Under 5.85-μm laser pulses, at average power densities of 30 W/cm2 and irradiation time of 2 s, the ablation depth of "remove" and "not remove," and also the ablation depth of "unclear" and "not remove," were significantly different (p<0.01). The ablation depth was correlated with both Vickers hardness and Ca content. Thus, a nanosecond pulsed laser operating at 5.85 μm proved an effective less-invasive caries treatment.

  12. Correlation between laser-induced damage densities of fused silica and average incubation fluences at 1064 nm in the nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamaignère, L.; Diaz, R.; Chambonneau, M.; Grua, P.; Natoli, J.-Y.; Rullier, J.-L.

    2017-01-01

    The chronology of the physical processes involved in the nanosecond laser damage of fused silica is investigated at 1064 nm. From experiments realized with multiple longitudinal mode pulses, the correspondence between ring pattern damage morphology and the corresponding intensity profile allows the distinction of two damage phases: an incubation phase followed by a damage expansion phase that leads to the final damage diameter. It allows us to determine both the incubation and the expansion fluences. These results are compared to damage density measurements for different laser configurations, different optics, and different environments. It was found that damage densities were as high as incubation fluences were low. This approach shows a deterministic part of laser damage in nanosecond regime and contributes to reinforce the statistical results by reducing their random nature and is more able to guide the physical interpretations of laser damage experiments.

  13. Measurement of OH, O, and NO densities and their correlations with mouse melanoma cell death rate treated by a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Ippei; Shirakawa, Yuki; Hirakata, Kenta; Akiyama, Taketoshi; Yonemori, Seiya; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2015-10-01

    Mouse melanoma cells in a culture medium are treated using a nanosecond pulsed streamer discharge plasma and the correlations between the rate of cell death and the densities of reactive species (OH, O, and NO) in the plasma are measured. The plasma is irradiated onto the culture medium surface with a vertical gas flow of an O2/N2 mixture from a glass tube at various gas flow rates and O2 concentrations. The densities of the reactive species are measured very close to the culture medium surface, where the reactive species interact with the culture medium, using laser-induced fluorescence. In the case of the N2 discharge (O2 = 0%), an increase in gas flow rate decreases OH density because it lowers the water vapor concentration by diluting the vapor, which is required for OH production. The increase in gas flow rate also leads to a decreased cell death rate. In the case of the O2/N2 discharge, on the other hand, an increase in O2 concentration at a fixed flow rate does not affect the rate of cell death, although it considerably changes the O and NO densities. These findings indicate that some reactive species derived from water vapor such as OH are responsible for the melanoma cell death, whereas those from O2, such as O and NO, are less likely responsible. They also indicate the importance of water evaporation from the culture medium surface in cell treatment.

  14. Laser Cutting of CFRP with a Fibre Guided High Power Nanosecond Laser Source - Influence of the Optical Fibre Diameter on Quality and Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluemel, S.; Bastick, S.; Staehr, R.; Jaeschke, P.; Suttmann, O.; Overmeyer, L.

    For the development of a robot based laser cutting process of automotive 3D parts consisting of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP), investigations with a newly developed fibre guided nanosecond pulsed laser with an average power of PL = 1.5 kW were conducted. In order to investigate the best combination of quality and process time 2 different optical fibres were used, with diameters of df = 400 μm and df = 600 μm. The main differences between the two setups are the resulting focal diameter and the maximum available pulse energy up to EP = 80 mJ. In a first instance, a comparable investigation was performed with both fibres for a constant pulse overlap. For each fibre the minimum required line energy was investigated and cuts were performed, distributed over the complete parameter range of the laser source. The influences of the fibre diameter on the quality and efficiency of the cutting process are summarized and discussed.

  15. Identification of the formation phases of filamentary damage induced by nanosecond laser pulses in bulk fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chao; Xu, Zhongjie; Chambonneau, Maxime E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Jiang, Tian E-mail: jiangtian198611@163.com

    2015-09-14

    Employing a pump-probe polarization-based two-frame shadowgraphy setup, the formation of filamentary damage induced in bulk fused silica by a nanosecond pulse at 1064 nm is investigated with a picosecond probe. Three different phases are exhibited in the damage experiments. The first phase is the formation of a micrometric plasma channel along the laser direction during the beginning of the pulse likely caused by multi-photon ionization. This channel exhibits growth during ∼400 ps, and the newly grown plasma is discrete. Then, during the end of the pulse, this channel evolves into a tadpole-like morphology showing an elliptical head upstream the laser flux followed by a thin tail. This observed asymmetry is attributed to shielding effects caused by both the plasma and hot modified silica. Once the damage shows its almost final morphology, a last phase consists in the launch of a pressure wave enlarging it after the laser pulse. The physical mechanisms that might be involved in the formation of plasma channels are discussed. The experimental data are first confronted to the moving breakdown model which overestimates the filamentary damage length. Finally, taking into account the temporal shape of the laser pulses, the coupling between Kerr-induced self-focusing and stimulated Brillouin scattering is discussed to interpret the observations.

  16. Gold nanoshell photomodification under a single-nanosecond laser pulse accompanied by color-shifting and bubble formation phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif; Khlebtsov, Boris; Akchurin, Georgy; Tuchin, Valery; Zharov, Vladimir; Khlebtsov, Nikolai

    2008-01-01

    Laser-nanoparticle interaction is crucial for biomedical applications of lasers and nanotechnology to the treatment of cancer or pathogenic microorganisms. We report on the first observation of laser-induced coloring of gold nanoshell solution after a one nanosecond pulse and an unprecedentedly low bubble formation (as the main mechanism of cancer cell killing) threshold at a laser fluence of about 4 mJ cm-2, which is safe for normal tissue. Specifically, silica/gold nanoshell (140/15 nm) suspensions were irradiated with a single 4 ns (1064 nm) or 8 ns (900 nm) laser pulse at fluences ranging from 0.1 mJ cm-2 to 50 J cm-2. Solution red coloring was observed by the naked eye confirmed by blue-shifting of the absorption spectrum maximum from the initial 900 nm for nanoshells to 530 nm for conventional colloidal gold nanospheres. TEM images revealed significant photomodification of nanoparticles including complete fragmentation of gold shells, changes in silica core structure, formation of small 20-30 nm isolated spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanoshells with central holes, and large and small spherical gold particles attached to a silica core. The time-resolved monitoring of bubble formation phenomena with the photothermal (PT) thermolens technique demonstrated that after application of a single 8 ns pulse at fluences 5-10 mJ cm-2 and higher the next pulse did not produce any PT response, indicating a dramatic decrease in absorption because of gold shell modification. We also observed a dependence of the bubble expansion time on the laser energy with unusually very fast PT signal rising (~3.5 ns scale at 0.2 J cm-2). Application of the observed phenomena to medical applications is discussed, including a simple visual color test for laser-nanoparticle interaction.

  17. Energy Scaling of Nanosecond Gain-Switched Cr2+:ZnSe Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Keywords: infrared laser, solid - state lasers, chromium, gain-switched 1. INTRODUCTION Since the first demonstration of the laser 50 years ago [1...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Proceedings Vol. 7912 Solid State Lasers XX: Technology and Devices, Date: 15 February 2011 14. ABSTRACT In this...Berry, P., A., and Schepler, K. L., ൔ-Watt CW Polycrystalline Cr2+:ZnSe Laser Pumped by Tm-fiber Laser," Proc. Advanced Solid State Photonics , WB30

  18. Nucleation dynamics around single microabsorbers in water heated by nanosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, Joerg; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2007-06-01

    Suspensions containing micro- and nanoabsorbers, which are irradiated by short laser pulses, are used for a manifold of procedures in medicine, biotechnology, and other fields. Detailed knowledge of the bubble nucleation and dynamics, which is induced by the heat transfer from the absorber to the surrounding transparent water, is essential for understanding the underlying processes occurring on a microscopic scale. We investigated the rapid phase change phenomena including temperature, heating rates, pressure generation, bubble nucleation, and initial bubble growth around absorbing micron-sized melanin particles (retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes) during irradiation with 12 ns (full width at half maximum) laser pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm. The melanosomes were heated at rates in the order of 10{sup 10} K/s. A mean bubble nucleation temperature of 136 deg. C was found. The initial bubble expansion was observed by time-resolved microscopy. The expansion velocities range from 10 m/s at 1.5-fold to 85 m/s at 8.5-fold threshold radiant exposure for bubble formation, respectively. The expansion velocity increases in the investigated range almost linearly with the applied radiant exposure.

  19. High-repetition-rate laser ignition of fuel-air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Roy, Sukesh; Zhang, Zhili; Sawyer, Jordan; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Mance, Jason G; Gord, James R

    2016-04-01

    A laser-ignition (LI) method is presented that utilizes a high-repetition-rate (HRR) nanosecond laser to reduce minimal ignition energies of individual pulses by ∼10 times while maintaining comparable total energies. The most common LI employs a single nanosecond-laser pulse with energies on the order of tens of millijoules to ignite combustible gaseous mixtures. Because of the requirements of high energy per pulse, fiber coupling of traditional LI systems is difficult to implement in real-world systems with limited optical access. The HRR LI method demonstrated here has an order of magnitude lower per-pulse energy requirement than the traditional single-pulse LI technique, potentially allowing delivery through standard commercial optical fibers. Additionally, the HRR LI approach significantly increases the ignition probability of lean combustible mixtures in high-speed flows while maintaining low individual pulse energies.

  20. The crystallization behavior of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 films induced by a multi-pulsed nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, T.; Liu, F. R.; Li, W. Q.; Guo, J. C.; Wang, Y. H.; Sun, N. X.; Liu, F.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, accumulated crystallization of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 (a-GST) films induced by a multi-pulsed nanosecond (ns) excimer laser was investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a spectrophotometer. XRD analyses revealed that detectable crystallization was firstly observed in the preferred orientation (200), followed by the orientations (220) and (111) after two pulses. Optical contrast, determined by crystallinity as well as surface roughness, was found to retain a linear relation within the first three pulses. A layered growth mechanism from the top surface to the interior of a-GST films was used to explain the crystallization behavior induced by the multi-pulse ns laser. XPS analyses for bond rearrangement and electronic structure further suggested that the crystallization process was performed by generating new bonds of Ge-Te and Sb-Te after laser irradiations. This paper presents the potential of multi-level devices and tunable thermal emitters based on controllable crystallization of phase-change materials.

  1. Darkening effect on AZ31B magnesium alloy surface induced by nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Y. C.; Zhou, W.; Zheng, H. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2013-09-01

    Permanent darkening effect was achieved on surface of AZ31B Mg alloy irradiated with nanosecond pulse Nd:YAG laser, and special attention was made to examine how surface structure as well as oxidation affect the darkening effect. Experiments were carried out to characterize morphological evolution and chemical composition of the irradiated areas by optical reflection spectrometer, Talysurf surface profiler, SEM, EDS, and XPS. The darkening effect was found to be occurred at the surface under high laser energy. Optical spectra showed that the induced darkening surface was uniform over the spectral range from 200 nm to 1100 nm. SEM and surface profiler showed that surface morphology of darkening areas consisted of large number of micron scale cauliflower-like clusters and protruding particles. EDS and XPS showed that compared to non-irradiated area, oxygen content at the darkening areas increased significantly. It was proposed a mechanism that involved trapping of light in the surface morphology and chemistry variation of irradiated areas to explain the laser-induced darkening effect on AZ31B Mg alloy.

  2. On the applicability of arbitrarily shaped nanosecond laser pulses for high-quality, high-efficiency micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselen, Sasia; Riedel, Sebastian; Schmidt, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Progressive developments in temporal shaping of short laser pulses offer entirely new approaches at influence and investigate laser-matter-interactions. Commonly used parameters for describing the behavior of short or ultrashort pulses or pulse trains are fluence and intensity. However, fluence does not imply any information about the temporal behavior of energy input during specific pulse duration τ while using the pulse intensity as describing parameter is more meaningful. Nevertheless it still is an averaging over pulse duration and no change in intensity can be determined if the temporal pulse shape changes within a certain combination of pulse duration and pulse energy. Using a flexible programmable MOPA fiber laser experimental studies on the impact of temporal energy distribution within one single laser pulse in micro machining applications were therefore carried out. With this laser source a direct modulation of the temporal pulse shape in the nanosecond regime can easily be controlled. Experiments were carried out with moved as well as with un-moved beam resulting in areas and dimples respectively drilling holes. The presented results clearly show that any averaging over pulse duration results in missing information about time-dependent interactions but can at the same time lead to significant differences in ablation results. Thus, resulting surface roughness Sa can be decreased up to 25 % when changing the pulse shape at constant parameters of fluence and pulse peak power at a pulse duration of 30 ns. It can be observed that the combination of an intensity peak and a lower edge within one pulse can lead to increasing ablation efficiency as well as higher ablation quality compared to the commonly used Gaussian-like temporal pulse shape.

  3. Formation of micron and submicron structures on a zirconium oxide surface exposed to nanosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ganin, D V; Mikolutskiy, S I; Khomich, V Yu; Yamshchikov, V A; Tokarev, V N; Shmakov, V A

    2014-04-28

    Possibility of forming quasi-periodic structures of micron and submicron dimensions on a surface of zirconium dioxide under the action of eximer ArF laser radiation is shown experimentally and theoretically. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  4. Density jumps in the plasma of a nanosecond laser-induced spark and their dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Malyutin, A A; Podvyaznikov, V A; Chevokin, V K

    2011-01-31

    Experimental investigation of the structure of a laser-induced spark emerging in the focusing of 50-ns radiation pulses is described. Two density jumps were discovered in the plasma of the laser-induced spark. One of them is localised in the vicinity of the focal plane of the lens, the other propagates from this plane in the laser propagation direction at a constant velocity of {approx}7.5 km s{sup -1}. (laser plasma)

  5. A geometry for sub-nanosecond X-ray diffraction from laser-shocked polycrystalline foils

    SciTech Connect

    Wark, Justin; Higginbotham, Andrew; Kimminau, Giles; Murphy, William; Nagler, Bob; Whitcher, Thomas; Hawreliak, James; Kalantar, Dan; Butterfield, Martin; El-Dasher, Bassem; McNaney, James; Milathianaki, Despina; Lorenzana, Hector; Remington, Bruce; Davies, Huw; Thornton, Lee; Park, Nigel; Lukezic, Stan

    2007-12-12

    In situ picosecond X-ray diffraction has proved to be a useful tool in furthering our understanding of the response of shocked crystals at the lattice level. To date the vast majority of this work has used single crystals as the shocked samples, owing to their diffraction efficiency, although the study of the response of polycrystalline samples is clearly of interest for many applications. We present here the results of experiments to develop sub-nanosecond powder/polycrystalline diffraction using a cylindrical pinhole camera. By allowing the incident X-ray beam to impinge on the sample at non-normal angles, the response of grains making a variety of angles to the shock propagation direction can potentially be interrogated.

  6. Quantitative measurement of electron number in nanosecond and picosecond laser-induced air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan C.; Su, Liu; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-05-07

    Here we present quantitative measurements of total electron numbers in laser-induced air breakdown at pressures ranging from atmospheric to 40 bar{sub g} by 10 ns and 100 ps laser pulses. A quantifiable definition for the laser-induced breakdown threshold is identified by a sharp increase in the measurable total electron numbers via dielectric-calibrated coherent microwave scattering. For the 10 ns laser pulse, the threshold of laser-induced breakdown in atmospheric air is defined as the total electron number of ∼10{sup 6}. This breakdown threshold decreases with an increase of pressure and laser photon energy (shorter wavelength), which is consistent with the theory of initial multiphoton ionization and subsequent avalanche processes. For the 100 ps laser pulse cases, a clear threshold is not present and only marginal pressure effects can be observed, which is due to the short pulse duration leading to stronger multiphoton ionization and minimal collisional avalanche ionization.

  7. Anti-bacterial selenium nanoparticles produced by UV/VIS/NIR pulsed nanosecond laser ablation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisbiers, G.; Wang, Q.; Khachatryan, E.; Arellano-Jimenez, M. J.; Webster, T. J.; Larese-Casanova, P.; Nash, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to produce nanoparticles free of any surface contamination is very challenging especially for bio-medical applications. Using a pulsed nanosecond Nd-YAG laser, pure selenium nanoparticles have been synthesized by irradiating selenium powder (99.999%) immerged in de-ionized water and ethanol. The wavelength of the laser beam has been varied from the UV to NIR (355, 532 and 1064 nm) and its effect on the particle size distribution has been studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), revealing then the production of selenium quantum dots (size < 4 nm) by photo-fragmentation. It has been found that the crystallinity of the nanoparticles depends on their size. The zeta-potential measurement reveals that the colloidal solutions produced in de-ionized water were stable while the ones synthesized in ethanol agglomerate. The concentration of selenium has been measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The anti-bacterial effect of selenium nanostructures has been analyzed on E. Coli bacteria. Finally, selenium quantum dots produced by this method can also be useful for quantum dot solar cells.

  8. Combination of Functional Nanoengineering and Nanosecond Laser Texturing for Design of Superhydrophobic Aluminum Alloy with Exceptional Mechanical and Chemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila B; Modin, Evgeny B; Sayfutdinova, Adeliya R; Emelyanenko, Kirill A; Vasiliev, Alexander L; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M

    2017-09-07

    Industrial application of metallic materials is hindered by several shortcomings, such as proneness to corrosion, erosion under abrasive loads, damage due to poor cold resistance, or weak resistance to thermal shock stresses, etc. In this study, using the aluminum-magnesium alloy as an example of widely spread metallic materials, we show that a combination of functional nanoengineering and nanosecond laser texturing with the appropriate treatment regimes can be successfully used to transform a metal into a superhydrophobic material with exceptional mechanical and chemical properties. It is demonstrated that laser chemical processing of the surface may be simultaneously used to impart multimodal roughness and to modify the composition and physicochemical properties of a thick surface layer of the substrate itself. Such integration of topographical and physicochemical modification leads to specific surface nanostructures such as nanocavities filled with hydrophobic agent and hard oxynitride nanoinclusions. The combination of superhydrophobic state, nano- and micro features of the hierarchical surface, and the appropriate composition of the surface textured layer allowed us to provide the surface with the outstanding level of resistance of superhydrophobic coatings to external chemical and mechanical impacts. In particular, experimental data presented in this study indicate high resistance of the fabricated coatings to pitting corrosion, superheated water vapor, sand abrasive wear, and rapid temperature cycling from liquid nitrogen to room temperatures, without notable degradation of superhydrophobic performance.

  9. Growth and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films by nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Hsieh, Dan-Hua; Jiang, Hsin; Liao, Yu-Kuang; Lai, Fang-I; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Luo, Chih Wei; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2014-01-01

    In this work, CuIn1 - x Ga x Se2 (CIGS) thin films were prepared by nanosecond (ns)- and femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processes. Different film growth mechanisms were discussed in perspective of the laser-produced plasmas and crystal structures. The fs-PLD has successfully improved the inherent flaws, Cu2 - x Se, and air voids ubiquitously observed in ns-PLD-derived CIGS thin films. Moreover, the prominent antireflection and excellent crystalline structures were obtained in the fs-PLD-derived CIGS thin films. The absorption spectra suggest the divergence in energy levels of radiative defects brought by the inhomogeneous distribution of elements in the fs-PLD CIGS, which has also been supported by comparing photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ns- and fs-PLD CIGS thin films at 15 K. Finally, the superior carrier transport properties in fs-PLD CIGS were confirmed by fs pump-probe spectroscopy and four-probe measurements. The present results indicate a promising way for preparing high-quality CIGS thin films via fs-PLD.

  10. Growth and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films by nanosecond and femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, CuIn1 - x Ga x Se2 (CIGS) thin films were prepared by nanosecond (ns)- and femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processes. Different film growth mechanisms were discussed in perspective of the laser-produced plasmas and crystal structures. The fs-PLD has successfully improved the inherent flaws, Cu2 - x Se, and air voids ubiquitously observed in ns-PLD-derived CIGS thin films. Moreover, the prominent antireflection and excellent crystalline structures were obtained in the fs-PLD-derived CIGS thin films. The absorption spectra suggest the divergence in energy levels of radiative defects brought by the inhomogeneous distribution of elements in the fs-PLD CIGS, which has also been supported by comparing photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ns- and fs-PLD CIGS thin films at 15 K. Finally, the superior carrier transport properties in fs-PLD CIGS were confirmed by fs pump-probe spectroscopy and four-probe measurements. The present results indicate a promising way for preparing high-quality CIGS thin films via fs-PLD. PMID:24959108

  11. Supercontinuum generation enhanced by conventional Raman amplification at pumping by nanosecond pulses from a directly modulated DFB laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Jaime; Kuzin, Evgeny A.; Ibarra-Escamilla, Baldemar; Mendoza-Vázquez, Sergio; Estudillo-Ayala, Julián Moisés; Haus, Joseph W.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated spectral broadening in a standard fiber using a nanosecond directly modulated DFB laser (λ=1549 nm), amplified by a two stage Erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The amplifier provided amplification of 2-mW peak power input pulses to 100-W peak power output pulses. In other hand, the directly modulation of DFB lasers caused transient oscillations at the beginning of pulses. In our case pulses consisted of a 2-ns transient part followed by a steady-state plateau. We used a monochromator to measure the spectrum at the fiber output. A fast photodetector was placed at the monochromator output and pulse shapes were measured for different wavelengths. This technique allowed the separate measurement of different parts in output pulses spectrum. We used the SMF-28 fiber with the standard dispersion of 20 ps/nm-km for our wavelength. We made measurements of the output spectra for three fiber lengths: 0.6-km, 4.46-km and 9.15-km; finding that the initial transient part of a pulse shows supercontinuum generation whereas the plateau results in conventional Raman amplification of this supercontinuum.

  12. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using the nanosecond pulsed laser in 5.8-μm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of human carious dentin.

  13. Cell damage extent due to irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses under cell culturing medium and dry environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G.; Guillen, Gabriel; Evans, Rodger; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2009-02-01

    Cell mono-layers were irradiated with nanosecond laser pulses under two distinct scenarios: (a) with culturing medium positioning the beam waist at different stand-off distances γ and (b) without cell culturing medium, positioning the beam waist directly on top of the cell mono-layer. Damaged cells were marked with Trypan Blue, a vital cell marker. Three different zones of damage were identified: (1) a zone of complete cell clearance, surrounded by (2) a ring of dead cells marked with Trypan Blue and (3) the rest of the cell culture where the cells remain alive and viable. Different hydrodynamic mechanisms damage cells as it was shown by high speed video for γ=0 and comparison with time resolved imaging. The cell damage mechanism has its origin on the optical breakdown plasma formation. For the case with culturing medium, a combination of plasma formation and shear stresses are responsible for cell damage; wheras for the case without cell culturing medium, the plasma formation is the only mechanism of interaction between laser pulses and cells. The rapidly expanding plasma generates shock waves whose pressure is most likely responsible for the cell detachment observed.

  14. High-peak-power sub-nanosecond intracavity KTiOPO4 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a dual-loss modulated laser with acousto-optic modulator and single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Junpeng; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Li, Tao; Qiao, Wenchao; Lu, Jianren; Wang, Yonggang; Chu, Hongwei; Luan, Chao

    2016-08-01

    A high-peak-power low-repetition-rate sub-nanosecond intracavity KTiOPO4 (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a doubly Q-switched and mode-locked (QML) YVO4/Nd:YVO4 laser with an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and a single-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber (SWCNT-SA) has been demonstrated. A maximum output power of 373 mW at a signal wavelength of 1570 nm was obtained. The smallest pulse width, highest pulse energy, and greatest peak power of mode-locking pulses were estimated to be 119 ps, 124 µJ, and 1.04 MW, respectively, under a maximum incident pump power of 8.3 W and an AOM repetition rate of 2 kHz. This OPO operation paves a simple way to produce eye-safe laser sources at 1570 nm with low repetition rates, small pulse widths, and high peak powers.

  15. Computational study of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation and the application to momentum coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Hong; Tong Huifeng; Li Mu; Sun Chengwei

    2012-07-15

    During the evaporation and ablation of a matter induced by intensive laser radiation, the vapor plasma is ejected from the surface of the target which induces the recoil pressure and impulse in the target. Impulse coupling of laser beams with matter has been extensively studied as the basis of laser propulsion and laser clearing space debris. A one-dimensional (1D) bulk absorption model to simulate the solid target ablated directly by the laser beam is presented; numerical calculation of impulse acting on the target in vacuum with different laser parameters is performed with fluid dynamics theory and 1D Lagrange difference scheme. The calculated results of the impulse coupling coefficients are in good agreement with the experimental results and Phipps' empirical value. The simulated results show that the mechanical coupling coefficients decrease with the increment of laser intensity when the laser pulses generate plasma. The present model can be applied when the laser intensity is 10{sup 8} - 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, which will provide a guide to the study of momentum coupling of laser beams with matter.

  16. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    SciTech Connect

    Altana, C.; Lanzalone, G.; Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S.; Muoio, A.

    2016-02-15

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  17. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime.

    PubMed

    Consoli, F; De Angelis, R; Duvillaret, L; Andreoli, P L; Cipriani, M; Cristofari, G; Di Giorgio, G; Ingenito, F; Verona, C

    2016-06-15

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation.

  18. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Duvillaret, L.; Andreoli, P. L.; Cipriani, M.; Cristofari, G.; di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Verona, C.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation.

  19. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime

    PubMed Central

    Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Duvillaret, L.; Andreoli, P. L.; Cipriani, M.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Verona, C.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation. PMID:27301704

  20. Approximate theory of highly absorbing polymer ablation by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furzikov, N. P.

    1990-04-01

    Surface interference, nonlinearly saturated instability of laser-induced thermodestruction, and subsequent oscillation of absorption mode permit the description of analytical ablation thresholds and depths per pulse of polymers having high absorption at laser wavelengths, e.g., polyimide and poly(ethylene terephtalate). Inverse problem solution for polycarbonate and ablation invariant designing are also realized.

  1. Nanosecond laser nanostructuring of fused silica surfaces assisted by a chromium triangle template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Grüner, C.; Frost, F.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.

    2017-10-01

    The well-reproducible, fast and cost-effective nanostructuring is a big challenge for laser methods. The laser nanostructuring of fused silica assisted by chromium nanotriangles was studied using a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm, Δtp = 25 ns, top hat beam profile). Therefore, a fused silica substrate was covered with periodically ordered polystyrene (PS) spheres with a diameter of 1.59 μm. Subsequently, this system was covered with 30 nm chromium by electron beam evaporation. Afterwards the PS spheres were removed and the bare and resultant periodic Cr triangles were irradiated. The laser irradiation with high laser fluences resulted in a removal of the chromium and in localized modifications of the fused silica like a localized ablation of the fused silica. The resultant structures were studied by scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as the surface composition was analysed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The laser process allows the production of well-defined periodic hole structures into the fused silica surface where the resultant surface structure depends on the laser parameters. The multi-pulse irradiation of the Cr/SiO2 sample with moderate laser fluences (Φ ∼ 650 mJ/cm2) allows the fabrication of periodic pyramidal-like structures (depth Δz = 130 nm).

  2. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser microprocessing in a gas environment at a high repetition rate of ablative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2004-06-01

    The parameters of laser ablation of channels in steel are studied in a wide range of nanosecond pulse repetition rates f (5 Hz <= f <= 200 kHz). It is found that for f >= 4 kHz, the results of ablation in air are identical to those obtained under the action of single laser pulses in vacuum. The experimental data as well as the estimates of the parameters of laser plasma and the gas environment in the region of the laser action lead to the conclusion that there exists a long-lived region of hot rarefied gas, known as a fire ball in the theory of explosions. The emerging rarefaction reduces the screening effect of the surface plasma formed under the action of subsequent pulses. This makes it possible to use lasers with a high pulse repetition rate for attaining ablation conditions close to the conditions in vacuum without complicating the technology of microprocessing by using vacuum chambers and evacuating pumps.

  3. Experimental investigation of the spectro-temporal dynamics of the light pulses of Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers and nanosecond optical parametric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anstett, G.; Wallenstein, R.

    2004-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the spectro-temporal dynamics of the pulse formation in Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers and in nanosecond optical parametric oscillators (OPOs). The temporal evolution of the spectral intensity distribution of the light pulses was measured with a 1-m Czerny Turner spectrometer in combination with a fast streak camera. This detection system allows the analysis of temporal changes in the spectrum of single nanosecond pulses. The measurements were performed for a flashlamp-pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and for an unseeded as well as for a seeded singly-resonant nanosecond OPO. The laser output spectrum varies strongly from pulse to pulse and even within a single pulse due to mode beating. In an unseeded OPO, individual spectral modes start to oscillate statistically from the parametric noise for pump powers close to the OPO threshold. With increasing pump power a strong modulation in the spectral formation of the pulse is observed, resulting from a strong interaction of parametric conversion and back conversion of signal and idler radiation into pump radiation. By means of injection seeding, the starting condition was controlled for a single mode. Due to the seed radiation, the seeded mode starts sooner than the unseeded modes. These are suppressed completely in the case of sufficient seed power and moderate pump power. The observations are in good agreement with results of corresponding numerical simulations.

  4. Crank-Nicholson method for rate equations in powder random lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ramiro, B.; Illarramendi, M. A.; Zubia, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we show the resolution of the rate equations in powder random lasers by using the Crank-Nicholson finite difference method. Light propagation in our powders is described by the model of light diffusion. The generalized time-dependent random laser equations describing our system are formed by three differential coupled equations: two diffusion equations for the pump and emitted light and a rate equation for the density of the dopant molecules in the excited state. The system has been solved for two pumping schemes (one-photon and two-photon excitation) and for a wide range of temporal incident pulses (from femtoseconds to nanoseconds).

  5. Simple models for laser-induced damage and conditioning of potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals by nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, Guillaume

    2009-06-22

    When potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals (KH(2)PO(4) or KDP) are illuminated by multi-gigawatt nanosecond pulses, damages may appear in the crystal bulk. One can increase damage resistance through a conditioning that consists in carrying out a laser pre-exposure of the crystal. The present paper addresses the modeling of laser-induced damage and conditioning of KDP crystals. The method is based on heating a distribution of defects, the cooperation of which may lead to a dramatic temperature rise. In a previous investigation [Opt. Express 15, 4557-4576 (2007)], calculations were performed for cases where the heat diffusion was permitted in one and three spatial dimensions, corresponding respectively to planar and point defects. For the sake of completeness, the present study involves the 2D heat diffusion that is associated with linear defects. A comparison to experimental data leads to the conclusion that 1D calculations are the most appropriate for describing the laser-induced damage in KDP. Within this framework, the evolution of the damage density is given as a function of the laser energy density and an in-depth analysis of the results is provided based on simple analytical expressions that can be used for experimental design. Regarding the conditioning, assuming that it is due to a decrease in the defect absorption efficiency, two scenarios associated with various defect natures are proposed and these account for certain of the observed experimental facts. For instance, in order to improve the crystal resistance to damage, one needs to use a conditioning pulse duration shorter than the testing pulse. Also, a conditioning scenario based on the migration of point (atomic-size) defects allows the reproduction of a logarithmic-like evolution of the conditioning gain with respect to the number of laser pre-exposures. Moreover, this study aims at refining the knowledge regarding the precursor defects responsible for the laser-induced damage in KDP crystals

  6. Direct generation of superhydrophobic microstructures in metals by UV laser sources in the nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Jose L.; Jagdheesh, R.; García-Ballesteros, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    The current availability of new advanced fiber and DPSS lasers with characteristic pulse lengths ranging from ns to fs has provided a unique frame in which the development of laser-generated microstructures has been made possible for very diverse kinds of materials and applications. At the same time, the development of the appropriate laser-processing workstations granting the appropriate precision and repeatability of the respective laser interaction processes in line with the characteristic dimension features required in the microstructured samples has definitively consolidated laser surface microstructuring as a reference domain, nowadays, unavoidable for the design and manufacturing of current use microsystem: MEMSs, fluidic devices, advanced sensors, biomedical devices and instruments, etc., are all among the most well-known developments of the micromanufacturing technology. Completing the broad spectrum of applications developed mostly involving the generation of geometrical features on a subtrate with specific functional purposes, a relatively new, emerging class of laser-microstructuring techniques is finding an important niche of application in the generation of physically structured surfaces (particularly of metallic materials) with specific contact, friction, and wear functionalities, for whose generation the concourse of different types of laser sources is being found as an appropriate tool. In this paper, the application of laser sources with emission in the UV and at ns time regime to the surface structuration of metal surfaces (specifically Al) for the modification of their wettability properties is described as an attractive application basis for the generation of self-cleaning properties of extended functional surfaces. Flat aluminum sheets of thickness 100 μm were laser machined with ultraviolet laser pulses of 30 ns with different laser parameters to optimize the process parameters. The samples produced at the optimum conditions with respect to

  7. Nanosecond laser-induced nanostructuring of thin metal layers and dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Klöppel, M.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Schwaller, P.

    2015-03-01

    Nanostructuring of dielectric surfaces has a widespread field of applications. In this work the recently introduced laser method validates this novel concept for complex nanostructuring of dielectric surfaces. This concept combines the mechanism of self-assembly of metal films due to laser irradiation with the concept of laser-assisted transfer of these patterns into the underlying material. The present work focuses on pattern formation in fused silica near the border of the laser spot, where distorted nested ring-like patterns were found in contrast to concentric ring patterns at homogeneous laser irradiation. For the experiments a lateral homogeneous spot of a KrF excimer laser (λ = 248 nm) and a Gaussian beam Yb fiber laser (λ = 1064 nm) was used for irradiation of a thin chromium layer onto fused silica resulting in the formation of different ring structures into the fused silica surface. The obtained structures were analysed by AFM and SEM. It is found that the mechanism comprises laser-induced metal film melting, contraction of the molten metal, and successive transfer of the metal hole geometry to the fused silica. Simulations taking into account the heat and the Navier-Stokes equations were compared with the experimental results. A good agreement of simulation results with experimental data was found. These first results demonstrate that the variation of the laser beam profile allows the local control of the melt dynamics which causes changes of the shape and the size of the ring patterns. Hence, a light-controlled self-assembly is feasible.

  8. Amplification of sub-nanosecond pulse in THL-100 laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losev, V. F.; Alekseev, S. V.; Ivanov, M. V.; Ivanov, N. G.; Mesyats, G. A.; Mikheev, L. D.; Panchenko, Yu. N.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Yastremsky, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the formation and amplification of positive chirped 0.1 ns laser pulse at a central wavelength of 470 nm in the laser system THL-100 are presented. It is shown that a front-end allows forming a radiation pulse with a Gaussian intensity profile and the energy up to 7 mJ. At amplification in XeF(C-A) amplifier of the pulse with 2-5 mJ energy a saturated mode is realized and 3.2 J output laser beam energy is reached.

  9. Nanosecond laser photolysis studies of vitamin K 3 in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. F.; Ge, X. W.; Chu, G. S.; Zhang, Z. C.; Zhang, M. W.; Yao, S. D.; Lin, N. Y.

    1999-06-01

    Vitamin K 3 in aqueous solution was investigated by 248 nm laser flash photolysis. Laser-induced transient species were characterized according to kinetic analysis and quenching experiments by Mn 2+ and O 2. In neutral solutions, the intermediates recorded were assigned to excited triplet states and dehydrogenated radicals of vitamin K 3. In comparison with the results of pulse radiolytical experiment, vitamin K 3 not only has strong electron affinity but could also could be photoionized by UV laser light. All this shows that vitamin K 3 acts as an effective electron carrier and electron transfer agent.

  10. Thermal denaturation of egg protein under nanosecond pulsed laser heating of gold nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Lapin, I N; Svetlichnyi, Valery A

    2011-08-31

    Thermal denaturation of egg protein in the presence of gold nanoparticles via their heating at the plasmon resonance wavelength by the pulsed radiation of the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) is investigated. The experimental dependence of the protein denaturation time on the mean laser power is obtained. The heating temperature of the medium with gold nanoparticles is calculated. The numerical estimates of the temperature of the heated medium containing protein and gold nanoparticles (45.3 deg. C at the moment of protein denaturation) are in good agreement with the literature data on its thermal denaturation and with the data of pyrometric measurements (42.0 {+-} 1.5 deg. C). The egg protein may be successfully used to investigate the specific features of laser heating of proteins in the presence of metal nanoparticles under their excitation at the plasmon resonance wavelength. (laser methods in biology)

  11. High-energy, sub-nanosecond linearly polarized passively Q-switched MOPA laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee Chul; Chang, Dong Wook; Lee, Eun Jung; Yoon, Hyun Woong

    2017-10-01

    This study introduces a linearly polarized laser with a 0.6 J output energy and a 420 ps pulse width. Accordingly, [1 1 1]-cut Nd:YAG and [1 1 0]-cut Cr4+:YAG crystals are used to fabricate a linearly polarized seed laser. One side of both crystals is configured with a Brewster angle to enhance the extinction ratio of polarization. The output energy and the pulse duration of the seed laser are 2.51 mJ and 552 ps, respectively. The seed laser pulse is compressed to 420 ps using a fused-silica block, while its energy is amplified to 600 mJ. The output energy instability over a 90 min operation is ±4.7%.

  12. Nanosecond laser-induced periodic surface structuring of cross-linked azo-polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Marco; Biver, Émeric; Maria, Sébastien; Phan, Trang N. T.; D'Aleo, Anthony; Delaporte, Philippe; Fages, Frederic; Gigmes, Didier

    2013-10-01

    In this work we discuss the response to laser ablation of a poly(4-vinylbenzyl azide-random-methyl methacrylate) (p((S-N3)-r-MMA)) random copolymer. This material is cross-linkable thermally and upon exposure to UV light, and on cross-linked films the irradiation with a 248 nm ns KrF laser induces the formation of laser induced periodical surface structure (LIPSS). The LIPSS morphology is dependent on the amount of 4-vinylbenzyl azide (S-N3) groups in the pristine copolymer. We propose a crosslinking mechanism based on the scission of azide with formation of azo groups and we discuss the possible relationship between this chemical modifications and the formation of ripples on the bottom of laser ablation cavities.

  13. The agglomeration state of nanosecond laser-generated aerosol particles entering the ICP.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Hans-Rudolf; Günther, Detlef

    2005-10-01

    Fundamental understanding of aerosol formation and particle transport are important aspects of understanding and improving laser-ablation ICP-MS. To obtain more information about particles entering the ICP, laser aerosols generated under different ablation conditions were collected on membrane filters. The particles and agglomerates were then visualised using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. To determine variations between different sample matrices, opaque (USGS BCR-2G) and transparent (NIST SRM 610) glass, CaF(2), and brass (MBH B26) samples were ablated using two different laser wavelengths, 193 and 266 nm. This study showed that the condensed nano-particles ( approximately 10 nm in diameter) formed by laser ablation reach the ICP as micron-sized agglomerates; this is apparent from filters which contain only a few well-separated particles and particle agglomerates. Ablation experiments on different metals and non-metals show that the structure of the agglomerates is matrix-dependent. Laser aerosols generated from silicates and metals form linear agglomerates whereas particle-agglomerates of ablated CaF(2) have cotton-like structures. Amongst other conditions, this study shows that the absorption characteristics of the sample and the laser wavelength determine the production of micron-sized spherical particles formed by liquid droplet ejection.

  14. Proton Acceleration Driven by a Nanosecond Laser from a Cryogenic Thin Solid-Hydrogen Ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Dostal, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Perin, J. P.; Chatain, D.; Garcia, S.; Bonnay, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Dudzak, R.; Rosinski, M.; Krasa, J.; Giuffrida, L.; Prokupek, J.; Scuderi, V.; Psikal, J.; Kucharik, M.; De Marco, M.; Cikhardt, J.; Krousky, E.; Kalinowska, Z.; Chodukowski, T.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Korn, G.

    2016-10-01

    A high-power pulsed laser is focused onto a solid-hydrogen target to accelerate forward a collimated stream of protons in the range 0.1-1 MeV, carrying a very high energy of about 30 J (˜5 % laser-ion conversion efficiency) and extremely large charge of about ˜0.1 mC per laser pulse. This result is achieved for the first time through the combination of a sophisticated target system (H2 thin ribbon) operating at cryogenic temperature (˜10 K ) and a very hot H plasma (˜300 keV "hot electron" temperature) generated by a subnanosecond laser with an intensity of ˜3 ×1016 W /cm2 . Both the H plasma and the accelerated proton beam are fully characterized by in situ and ex situ diagnostics. Results obtained using the ELISE (experiments on laser interaction with solid hydrogen) H2 target delivery system at PALS (Prague) kJ-class laser facility are presented and discussed along with potential multidisciplinary applications.

  15. Numerical investigation of heating of a gold nanoparticle and the surrounding microenvironment by nanosecond laser pulses for nanomedicine applications.

    PubMed

    Sassaroli, E; Li, K C P; O'Neill, B E

    2009-09-21

    We have modeled, by finite element analysis, the process of heating of a spherical gold nanoparticle by nanosecond laser pulses and of heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding medium, with no mass transfer. In our analysis, we have included thermal conductivity changes, vapor formation, and changes of the dielectric properties as a function of temperature. We have shown that such changes significantly affect the temperature reached by the particle and surrounding microenvironment and therefore the thermal and dielectric properties of the medium need to be known for a correct determination of the temperature elevation. We have shown that for sufficiently low intensity and long pulses, it is possible to establish a quasi-steady temperature profile in the medium with no vapor formation. As the intensity is increased, a phase-change with vapor formation takes place around the gold nanoparticle. As phase-transition starts, an additional increase in the intensity does not significantly increase the temperature of the gold nanoparticle and surrounding environment. The temperature starts to rise again above a given intensity threshold which is particle and environment dependent. The aim of this study is to provide useful insights for the development of molecular targeting of gold nanoparticles for applications such as remote drug release of therapeutics and photothermal cancer therapy.

  16. Broadband supercontinuum generation in a telecommunication fibre pumped by a nanosecond Tm, Ho:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren-Lai, Zhou; Jian-Cun, Ren; Shu-Li, Lou; You-Lun, Ju; Yue-Zhu, Wang

    2015-07-01

    Broadband supercontinuum (SC) generation in a telecommunication fibre [8/125-μm single mode fibre (SMF) and 50/125-μm multimode fibre (MMF)] directly pumped by a nanosecond Q-switched Tm, Ho:YVO4 laser is demonstrated. At a 7-kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), an output average power of 0.53 W in the 1.95 - 2.5-μm spectral band and 3.51 W in the 1.9 - 2.6-μm spectral band are achieved in SMF and MMF, respectively (the corresponding optic-to-optic conversion efficiencies are 34.6% and 73.7%). The output spectra have extremely high flat segments in the range 2070 - 2390 nm and 2070 - 2475 nm with negligible intensity variation (less than 2%). The SC average power is scalable from 2.1 to 4.2 W by increasing the PRF from 5 to 15 kHz, while maintaining pump power. Compared with the input pump pulse, the output SC pulse width is broadened, and no split is found. The stability of the output SC power has been monitored for a week and the fluctuations being less than 6%.

  17. Synergistic Effect of Superhydrophobicity and Oxidized Layers on Corrosion Resistance of Aluminum Alloy Surface Textured by Nanosecond Laser Treatment.

    PubMed

    Boinovich, Ludmila B; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Modestov, Alexander D; Domantovsky, Alexandr G; Emelyanenko, Kirill A

    2015-09-02

    We report a new efficient method for fabricating a superhydrophobic oxidized surface of aluminum alloys with enhanced resistance to pitting corrosion in sodium chloride solutions. The developed coatings are considered very prospective materials for the automotive industry, shipbuilding, aviation, construction, and medicine. The method is based on nanosecond laser treatment of the surface followed by chemisorption of a hydrophobic agent to achieve the superhydrophobic state of the alloy surface. We have shown that the surface texturing used to fabricate multimodal roughness of the surface may be simultaneously used for modifying the physicochemical properties of the thick surface layer of the substrate itself. Electrochemical and wetting experiments demonstrated that the superhydrophobic state of the metal surface inhibits corrosion processes in chloride solutions for a few days. However, during long-term contact of a superhydrophobic coating with a solution, the wetted area of the coating is subjected to corrosion processes due to the formation of defects. In contrast, the combination of an oxide layer with good barrier properties and the superhydrophobic state of the coating provides remarkable corrosion resistance. The mechanisms for enhancing corrosion protective properties are discussed.

  18. Broadband supercontinuum generation in a telecommunication fibre pumped by a nanosecond Tm, Ho:YVO{sub 4} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ren-Lai; Ren Jian-Cun; Lou Shu-Li; Ju You-Lun; Wang Yue-Zhu

    2015-07-31

    Broadband supercontinuum (SC) generation in a telecommunication fibre [8/125-μm single mode fibre (SMF) and 50/125-μm multimode fibre (MMF)] directly pumped by a nanosecond Q-switched Tm, Ho:YVO{sub 4} laser is demonstrated. At a 7-kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), an output average power of 0.53 W in the 1.95 – 2.5-μm spectral band and 3.51 W in the 1.9 – 2.6-μm spectral band are achieved in SMF and MMF, respectively (the corresponding optic-to-optic conversion efficiencies are 34.6% and 73.7%). The output spectra have extremely high flat segments in the range 2070 – 2390 nm and 2070 – 2475 nm with negligible intensity variation (less than 2%). The SC average power is scalable from 2.1 to 4.2 W by increasing the PRF from 5 to 15 kHz, while maintaining pump power. Compared with the input pump pulse, the output SC pulse width is broadened, and no split is found. The stability of the output SC power has been monitored for a week and the fluctuations being less than 6%. (control of radiation parameters)

  19. Nonlinear reflection of a nanosecond laser pulse from thin aluminum film in the temperature range 2-14 kK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabutov, A. A.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Ksenofontov, D. M.; Makarov, V. A.; Cherepetskaya, E. B.; Podymova, N. B.

    2015-11-01

    This letter aims to experimentally demonstrate the possibility of measuring the temporal dependencies of the surface temperature of an aluminum film confined by a transparent dielectric in the range below and above the critical temperature of aluminum (from 2 kK to 14 kK). Such temperatures are achieved under the action of a powerful linearly-polarized laser pulse of one nanosecond in duration onto the film’s surface. To find the temporal dependencies of the temperature of the aluminum film the nonlinear reflection coefficient of its irradiated surface is measured to determine the radiation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength.

  20. Damage threshold and focusability of mid-infrared free-electron laser pulses gated by a plasma mirror with nanosecond switching pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaolong; Nakajima, Takashi; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2013-11-04

    The presence of a pulse train structure of an oscillator-type free-electron laser (FEL) results in the immediate damage of a solid target upon focusing. We demonstrate that the laser-induced damage threshold can be significantly improved by gating the mid-infrared FEL pulses with a plasma mirror. Although the switching pulses we employ have a nanosecond duration which does not guarantee the clean wavefront of the gated FEL pulses, the high focusability is experimentally confirmed through the observation of spectral broadening by a factor of 2.1 when we tightly focus the gated FEL pulses onto the Ge plate.

  1. XUV generation from the interaction of pico- and nanosecond laser pulses with nanostructured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barte, Ellie Floyd; Lokasani, Ragava; Proska, Jan; Stolcova, Lucie; Maguire, Oisin; Kos, Domagoj; Sheridan, Paul; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; McCormack, Tom; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Dunne, Padraig; Limpouch, Jiri

    2017-05-01

    Laser-produced plasmas are intense sources of XUV radiation that can be suitable for different applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography, beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography and water window imaging. In particular, much work has focused on the use of tin plasmas for extreme ultraviolet lithography at 13.5 nm. We have investigated the spectral behavior of the laser produced plasmas formed on closely packed polystyrene microspheres and porous alumina targets covered by a thin tin layer in the spectral region from 2.5 to 16 nm. Nd:YAG lasers delivering pulses of 170 ps (Ekspla SL312P )and 7 ns (Continuum Surelite) duration were focused onto the nanostructured targets coated with tin. The intensity dependence of the recorded spectra was studied; the conversion efficiency (CE) of laser energy into the emission in the 13.5 nm spectral region was estimated. We have observed an increase in CE using high intensity 170 ps Nd:YAG laser pulses as compared with a 7 ns pulse.

  2. Femtosecond and nanosecond laser damage thresholds of doped and undoped triazenepolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonse, J.; Solis, J.; Urech, L.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.

    2007-07-01

    The influence of pulse duration on the laser-induced damage in undoped or infrared-absorbing-dye doped thin triazenepolymer films on glass substrates has been investigated for single, near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser pulses with durations ranging from 130 fs up to 540 fs and complementarily for infrared (1064 nm) Nd:YAG ns-laser single-pulse irradiation. The triazenepolymer material has been developed for high resolution ablation with irradiation at 308 nm. Post-irradiation optical microscopy observations have been used to determine quantitatively the threshold fluence for permanent laser damage. In contrast to our previous studies on a triazenepolymer with different composition [J. Bonse, S.M. Wiggins, J. Solis, T. Lippert, Appl. Surf. Sci. 247 (2005) 440], a significant dependence of the damage threshold on the pulse duration is found in the sub-picosecond regime with values ranging from ˜500 mJ/cm 2 (130 fs) up to ˜1500 mJ/cm 2 (540 fs). Other parameters such as the film thickness (50 nm and 1.1 μm samples) or the doping level show no significant influence on the material behavior upon irradiation. The results for fs- and ns-laser pulse irradiation are compared and analyzed in terms of existent ablation models.

  3. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  4. Nitrogen optical emission during nanosecond laser ablation of metals: prompt electrons or photo-ionization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Dilecce, G.; Tolias, P.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments on the interaction of metal targets with a Nd:YAG laser beam ( = 1,064 nm, intensity -) are carried out in a finite Nitrogen pressure environment. The observed spectra are unambiguous evidence of the existence of an ionization and excitation source, arriving at the observation volume prior to the plume. Such a source can be either prompt electrons or VUV radiation. The analysis reveals that the prompt electron interpretation requires energies in excess of 1 keV, incompatible with any acceleration mechanisms relevant for such laser intensities. On the other hand, VUV radiation is sufficiently strong to explain the observed spectra.

  5. Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Processing of Ion Implanted Single Crystal Silicon Carbide Thin Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özel, Tuğrul; Thepsonthi, Thanongsak; Amarasinghe, Voshadhi P.; Celler, George K.

    The attractiveness of single crystal SiC in a variety of high power, high voltage, and high temperature device applications such as electric vehicles and jet engines is counteracted by the very high cost of substrates. Precision cutting of multiple micrometre thick SiC layers and transferring them to lower cost substrates would drive the cost down and allow expanding the use of single crystal SiC. In this study, laser beam processing has been utilized to exfoliate thin layers from a surface of single crystal SiC that was prepared with hydrogen and boron ion implantation. The layer thickness of 1 μm has been achieved by ion implantation that formed voids and microcracks under the surface at a layer of 150 nm thick. High energy laser pulses provided the layer removal and its transfer to bonded Si substrate has been shown. Exfoliated surfaces and topography have been evaluated with Scanning Electron Microscopy. Furthermore, thermal modelling of pulse laser irradiation of implanted multi-layer SiC material has been conducted and temperature profiles are obtained at different peak pulse intensity settings to optimize exfoliation process parameters. It was found that laser exfoliation mechanism can be further improved by higher optical absorptance of defect rich layer obtained with boron ion implantation.

  6. Effect of advanced nanowire-based targets in nanosecond laser-matter interaction (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S.; Muoio, A.; Malferrari, L.; Odorici, F.

    2016-02-15

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the effects of innovative nanostructured targets based on Ag nanowires on laser energy absorption in the ns time domain has been carried out at the Laser Energy for Nuclear Science laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania. The tested targets were realized at INFN-Bologna by anodizing aluminium sheets in order to obtain layers of porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of different thicknesses, on which nanowires of various metals are grown by electro-deposition with different heights. Targets were then irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser at different pumping energies. Advanced diagnostic tools were used for characterizing the plasma plume and ion production. As compared with targets of pure Al, a huge enhancement (of almost two order of magnitude) of the X-ray flux emitted by the plasma has been observed when using the nanostructured targets, with a corresponding decrease of the “optical range” signal, pointing out that the energetic content of the laser produced plasma was remarkably increased. This analysis was furthermore confirmed from time-of-flight spectra.

  7. TNSA ion acceleration at 1016 W/cm2 sub-nanosecond laser intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Calcagno, L.; Rosinski, M.; Ullschmied, J.

    2014-04-01

    Micrometric thin targets have been irradiated in vacuum in TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration) configuration at PALS Laboratory in Prague by using 1016 W/cm2 laser intensity, 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and different laser beam energies and focal positions. The plasmas produced were characterized by using ion collectors, semiconductor SiC detectors, X-ray streak camera and Thomson parabola spectrometer. Time of flight techniques, time resolved imaging and ion deflection spectrometry were used to characterize the laser-generated non-equilibrium plasma and the electric field driving ion acceleration developed at the rear side of the target. The maximum ion acceleration can be obtained for optimal film thickness depending on the laser energy and on the kind of irradiated targets. Special targets containing nanostructures, showing high absorption and low reflective coefficients, induce resonant absorption effects enhancing the electric acceleration field. The maximum kinetic energy measured for proton ions was above 5.0 MeV and the ion distributions can be fitted with Coulomb-Boltzmann shifted functions.

  8. Characterization Of Nano-Second Laser Induced Plasmas From Al Target In Air At Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, H.; Abdel-Rahim, F. M.; Nossair, A. M. A.; Allam, S. H.; El-Sherbini, Th. M.

    2008-09-23

    In the present work we study the effect of the laser beam energy on the properties of the plasma generated by focusing an intense laser beam on Al solid target in air at atmospheric pressure. Plasma is generated using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 6 ns pulse duration with a maximum pulse energy of 750mJ. The emission spectrum is collected using an Echelle spectrometer equipped with ICCD camera Andor type. The measurements were performed at several delay times between 0 to 9 {mu}s. Measurements of temperature and electron density of the produced plasmas at different laser energies and at different delay times are described using different emission spectral lines. Based on LTE assumption, excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot using O I spectral lines at 777.34, 794.93, and 848.65 nm and the electron density is determined from Stark width of Al II at 281.6 and 466.3 nm. The determined density is compared with the density determined from H{sub {alpha}} spectral line.

  9. Effect of advanced nanowire-based targets in nanosecond laser-matter interaction (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Altana, C.; Mascali, D.; Muoio, A.; Malferrari, L.; Odorici, F.; Malandrino, G.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the effects of innovative nanostructured targets based on Ag nanowires on laser energy absorption in the ns time domain has been carried out at the Laser Energy for Nuclear Science laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania. The tested targets were realized at INFN-Bologna by anodizing aluminium sheets in order to obtain layers of porous Al2O3 of different thicknesses, on which nanowires of various metals are grown by electro-deposition with different heights. Targets were then irradiated by using a Nd:YAG laser at different pumping energies. Advanced diagnostic tools were used for characterizing the plasma plume and ion production. As compared with targets of pure Al, a huge enhancement (of almost two order of magnitude) of the X-ray flux emitted by the plasma has been observed when using the nanostructured targets, with a corresponding decrease of the "optical range" signal, pointing out that the energetic content of the laser produced plasma was remarkably increased. This analysis was furthermore confirmed from time-of-flight spectra.

  10. Residual stress near cracks of K and fused silica under 1064 nm nanosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Hongjie; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Ren, Dahua; Cheng, Xinlu; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2012-11-01

    Measurements of birefringence induced in K9 and fused silica specimens by cracks produced by 1064 nm Nd∶YAG laser have been presented. The Birefringence data is converted into the units of stress, thus permitting the estimation of residual stress near crack. The intensity of residual stress in K9 glass is larger than that in fused silica under the same condition. The similarity of residual stress distribution along the y-axis reveals that the nature of shock wave transmission in optical materials under 1064 nm laser irradiation is the same with each other. The value of residual stress can be influenced by laser parameters and characterization of optical material. Simulation based on a theoretical model giving the residual stress field around a crack is developed for comparison with experiment results. The probability of initial damage and the direction of the energy dissipation in cracks determine the residual stress distribution. The thermal stress coupling enlarges the asymmetry of residual stress distribution. Residual stress in optical material has a strong effect on fracture and should be taken into account in any formulation that involves the enhanced damage resistance of optical components used in laser induced damage experiments.

  11. Process and parameter optimisation for micro structuring of 3D freeform metallic surfaces: a comparative study of short-pulse (nanosecond) and ultrafast (picosecond, femtosecond) laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Steffen G.; Sampaio, Daniel J. B. S.; Mangang, Melanie; Pfleging, Wilhelm

    2017-02-01

    Layer-based laser ablation of three dimensional micro structured freeform surfaces has become of significant importance for technical applications such as biomimetic surfaces in recent years. In order to identify the optimum set of process parameters for a complex laser ablation operation, a design of experiments (DoE) study has been carried out with laser sources covering pulse durations regime of femtosecond (fs), picosecond (ps) and nanosecond (ns). The aim was to identify the optimum parameter set for achieving best surface roughness and, as a second criteria, for machining time to be reduced to a minimum. In a first step, rectangular pockets have been machined and a DoE based parameter variation was performed. In particular, the parameters wavelength (1030 nm, 515 nm, 343 nm), machining speed, laser power, and laser pulse duration (fs, ps, ns) have been modified. Surface roughness and ablated depth were measured and an optimum set of parameters was calculated. The results show that the ultraviolet laser type (343nm) has the best performance to achieve lowest surface roughness and with a laser pulse duration of 3445 fs reaches also the best ablation efficiency in relation to machining time. While machining speed and laser power have an almost linear influence on achievable roughness, laser pulse duration has a quadratic influence in relation to a global minimum on the surface roughness result. For the ablated depth, machining speed and laser power have an almost linear influence while laser pulse duration has a quadratic influence in relation to a global maximum.

  12. Controlling Dopant Profiles in Hyperdoped Silicon by Modifying Dopant Evaporation Rates During Pulsed Laser Melting

    SciTech Connect

    Recht, D.; Sullivan, J. T.; Reedy, R.; Buonassisi, T.; Aziz, M. J.

    2012-03-12

    We describe a method to control the sub-surface dopant profile in 'hyperdoped' silicon fabricated by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting. Dipping silicon ion implanted with sulfur into hydrofluoric acid prior to nanosecond pulsed laser melting leads to a tenfold increase in the rate of sulfur evaporation from the surface of the melt. This results in an 80% reduction of the near-surface dopant concentration, effectively embedding the hyperdoped region in a layer up to 180 nm beneath the surface. This method should facilitate the development of blocked impurity band devices.

  13. Nanosecond laser-induced damage of high-reflection coatings: NUV through NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanshan; Ma, Hongping; Cheng, Xinbin; Zhang, Jinlong; He, Pengfei; Ma, Bin; Jiao, Hongfei; Tang, Yongjian

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced damage of high reflection (HR) coatings, working at near ultraviolet (NUV) and near infrared (NIR) regions was investigated. For NIR HR coatings, the nodules still remain the most limiting defects. The E-field intensity (EFI) enhancement in nodules plays a central role for triggering laser-induced damage. We established a simple model for EFI enhancement in nodules using the focusing and light penetrating concept. With the help of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulations, we found that refractive indices and nodular geometries affected the focal length as well as the size of focal spots. Furthermore, the angular reflection bandwidth (ARB) of nodules determined the fraction of light that can penetrate to the focal region. For NUV HR coatings, we explored the increase of the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) by increasing the incident angle from 0 degrees to 65 degrees for S-polarization. The EFI in a 65 degree HR coating is more than 4 times lower compared to 0 degree HR coatings, which suggests that the LIDT of 65 degree HR coating is much higher compared to 0 degree HR coating. However, we found some contradictory results. For small testing laser beam size with a diameter of 20 μm, the LIDT of 65 degree HR coating is 3.5 times higher compared to a 0 degree HR coating. However, for a large sized testing laser beam with a diameter of 1000 μm, the LIDT of 65 degree HR coating is 2 times lower compared to a 0 degree HR coating. Possible reasons for the observed damage phenomena are discussed.

  14. Spatial confinement effects on spectroscopic and morphological studies of nanosecond laser-ablated Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Zaheer, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Spatial confinement effects on plasma parameters and surface morphology of laser ablated Zr (Zirconium) are studied by introducing a metallic blocker. Nd:YAG laser at various fluencies ranging from 8 J cm-2 to 32 J cm-2 was employed as an irradiation source. All measurements were performed in the presence of Ar under different pressures. Confinement effects offered by metallic blocker are investigated by placing the blocker at different distances of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm from the target surface. It is revealed from LIBS analysis that both plasma parameters i.e. excitation temperature and electron number density increase with increasing laser fluence due to enhancement in energy deposition. It is also observed that spatial confinement offered by metallic blocker is responsible for the enhancement of both electron temperature and electron number density of Zr plasma. This is true for all laser fluences and pressures of Ar. Maximum values of electron temperature and electron number density without blocker are 12,600 K and 14 × 1017 cm-3 respectively whereas, these values are enhanced to 15,000 K and 21 × 1017 cm-3 in the presence of blocker. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Zr plasma parameters are plasma compression, confinement and pronounced collisional excitations due to reflection of shock waves. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis was performed to explore the surface morphology of laser ablated Zr. It reveals the formation of cones, cavities and ripples. These features become more distinct and well defined in the presence of blocker due to plasma confinement. The optimum combination of blocker distance, fluence and Ar pressure can identify the suitable conditions for defining the role of plasma parameters for surface structuring.

  15. Dynamics of low- and high-Z metal ions emitted during nanosecond laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsied, Ahmed M.; Diwakar, Prasoon K.; Polek, Mathew; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of metal ions during laser-produced plasmas was studied. A 1064 nm, Nd: YAG laser pulse was used to ablate pure Al, Fe, Co, Mo, and Sn samples. Ion flux and velocity were measured using Faraday cup ion collector. Time-of-flight measurements showed decreasing ion flux and ion velocity with increasing atomic weight, and heavy metal ion flux profile exhibited multiple peaks that was not observed in lighter metals. Slow peak was found to follow shifted Maxwell Boltzmann distribution, while the fast peak was found to follow Gaussian distribution. Ion flux angular distribution that was carried out on Mo and Al using fixed laser intensity 2.5 × 1010 W/cm2 revealed that the slow ion flux peaks at small angles, that is, close to normal to the target ˜0° independent of target's atomic weight, and fast ion flux for Mo peaks at large angles ˜40° measured from the target normal, while it completely absents for Al. This difference in spatial and temporal distribution reveals that the emission mechanism of the fast and slow ions is different. From the slow ion flux angular distribution, the measured plume expansion ratio (plume forward peaking) was 1.90 and 2.10 for Al and Mo, respectively. Moreover, the effect of incident laser intensity on the ion flux emission as well as the emitted ion velocity were investigated using laser intensities varying from 2.5 × 1010 W/cm2 to 1.0 × 1011 W/cm2. Linear increase of fast ion flux and velocity, and quadratic increase of slow ion flux and velocity were observed. For further understanding of plume dynamics, laser optical emission spectroscopy was used to characterize Sn plasma by measuring the temporal and spatial evolution of plasma electron density Ne and electron temperature Te. At 3.5 mm away from the target, plasma density showed slow decrease with time, however electron temperature was observed to decrease dramatically. The maximum plasma density and temperature occurred at 0.5 mm away from target and were measured to

  16. Sub-nanosecond Yb:KLu(WO4)2 microchip laser.

    PubMed

    Loiko, P; Serres, J M; Mateos, X; Yumashev, K; Yasukevich, A; Petrov, V; Griebner, U; Aguiló, M; Díaz, F

    2016-06-01

    A diode-pumped Yb:KLu(WO4)2 microchip laser passively Q-switched by a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber generated a maximum average output power of 590 mW at 1031 nm with a slope efficiency of 55%. The pulse characteristics were 690 ps/47.6 μJ at a pulse repetition frequency of 12.4 kHz. The output beam had an excellent circular profile with M2<1.05. Yb:KLu(WO4)2 is very promising for ultrathin sub-ns microchip lasers.

  17. Rapid solidification of polymorphic transition metals induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitta, Satish

    1991-01-01

    An Nd-YAG laser giving 5 ns, 266 nm pulses was used to melt and subsequently quench thin, pure metallic films on a liquid Al/Al2O3 substrate at 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th K/s. Transmission electron microscopy together with electron diffraction was used to study the competitive nucleation and growth behavior of the crystals from the undercooled melt. In the case of Fe and Co, the high-temperature bcc and fcc structures were retained after laser quenching. Ti and Zr in spite of the structural similarities exhibit different preferences for nucleation from the undercooled melt. In all the metals the solid-state transformations were completely suppressed and the crystal growth was found to be limited by the collisional frequency of the atoms onto the growing interface.

  18. Formation of nanosecond 100 GW radiation pulses in the TIR-1 CO2 laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Baranov, V. Yu; Borzenko, V. L.; Burtsev, V. A.; Kozochkin, S. M.; Malyuta, D. D.; Satov, Yu A.; Sebrant, A. Yu; Smakovskiĭ, Yu B.; Strel'tsov, A. P.

    1980-07-01

    Experiments were carried out using a single-beam CO2 laser system (designated TIR-1), comprising a master oscillator, an electrooptic switch, a system of amplifiers with optical gas filters, and a chamber for interactions with a target. Measurements were made of the energy characteristics of the laser beam and of the shape of a radiation pulse at different points in the system. Gas absorption cells, designed to suppress self-excitation in the amplifiers, were investigated. The dependence of the cell transmission on the energy of the incident radiation was determined. An analysis was made of the energy parameters and the efficiency of the system was calculated for various real operating regimes.

  19. Rapid solidification of polymorphic transition metals induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitta, Satish

    1991-01-01

    An Nd-YAG laser giving 5 ns, 266 nm pulses was used to melt and subsequently quench thin, pure metallic films on a liquid Al/Al2O3 substrate at 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th K/s. Transmission electron microscopy together with electron diffraction was used to study the competitive nucleation and growth behavior of the crystals from the undercooled melt. In the case of Fe and Co, the high-temperature bcc and fcc structures were retained after laser quenching. Ti and Zr in spite of the structural similarities exhibit different preferences for nucleation from the undercooled melt. In all the metals the solid-state transformations were completely suppressed and the crystal growth was found to be limited by the collisional frequency of the atoms onto the growing interface.

  20. Internal modification of intrinsic and doped silicon using infrared nanosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoming; Wang, Xinya; Chanal, Margaux; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos A.; Grojo, David; Lei, Shuting

    2016-12-01

    We report experimental results of three-dimensional (3D) modification inside intrinsic and doped silicon wafers using laser pulses with 1.55 µm wavelength and 3.5 ns pulse duration. Permanent modification in the form of lines is generated inside silicon by tightly focusing and continuously scanning the laser beam inside samples, without introducing surface damage. Cross sections of these lines are observed after cleaving the samples and are further analyzed after mechanical polishing followed by chemical etching. With the objective lens corrected for spherical aberration, tight focusing inside silicon is achieved and the optimal focal depth is identified. The laser-induced modification has triangular shape and appears in regions prior to the geometrical focus, indicating significant absorption in those regions. Experiments with doped samples show similar modification for doping concentrations (and corresponding initial free carrier densities) in the range of 1013-1016 cm-3. At carrier densities of 1018 cm-3, linear absorption of light becomes significant and the modification is reduced in size.

  1. High brightness sub-nanosecond Q-switched laser using volume Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Brian M.; Hale, Evan; Venus, George; Ott, Daniel; Divliansky, Ivan; Glebov, Leonid

    2016-03-01

    The design of Q-switched lasers capable of producing pulse widths of 100's of picoseconds necessitates the cavity length be shorter than a few centimeters. Increasing the amount of energy extracted per pulse requires increasing the mode area of the resonator that for the same cavity length causes exciting higher order transverse modes and decreasing the brightness of the output radiation. To suppress the higher order modes of these multimode resonators while maintaining the compact cavity requires the use of intra-cavity angular filters. A novel Q-switched laser design is presented using transmitting Bragg gratings (TBGs) as angular filters to suppress the higher order transverse modes. The laser consists of a 5 mm thick slab of Nd:YAG, a 3 mm thick slab of Cr:YAG with a 20% transmission, one TBG aligned to suppress the higher order modes along the x-axis, and a 40% output coupler. The gratings are recorded in photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass, which has a high damage threshold that can withstand both the high peak powers and high average powers present within the resonator. Using a 4.1 mrad TBG in a 10.8 mm long resonator with an 800μm x 400 μm pump beam, a nearly diffraction limited beam quality of M2 = 1.3 is obtained in a 0.76 mJ pulse with a pulse width of 614 ps.

  2. Reduction of picosecond laser ablation threshold and damage via nanosecond pre-pulse for removal of dielectric layers on silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, A. A.; Meyer, F.; Nekarda, J.-F.; Preu, R.

    2014-10-01

    Laser microstructuring of thin dielectric layers on sensitive electronic devices, such as crystalline silicon solar cells, requires a careful design of the laser ablation process. For instance, degradation of the substrate's crystallinity can vastly decrease minority carrier lifetime and consequently impair the efficiency of such devices. Short-pulse laser ablation seems well suited for clean and spatially confined structuring because of the small heat-affected zone in the remaining substrate material [Dube and Gonsiorawski in Conference record of the twenty first IEEE photovoltaic specialists conference, 624-628 1990]. The short-time regimes, however, generate steep temperature gradients that can lead to amorphization of the remaining silicon surface. By `heating' the substrate via a non-ablative laser pulse in the nanosecond regime before the actual ablation pulse occurs we are able to prevent amorphization of the surface of the silicon solar cell substrate, while lowering the ablation thresholds of a SiNx layer on crystalline silicon wafers.

  3. Characteristics of plasma plume expansion from Al target induced by oblique incidence of 1064 and 355 nm nanosecond Nd : YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianhang; Gao, Xun; Hao, Zuoqiang; Liu, Zehao; Lin, Jingquan

    2013-12-01

    Evolution of a plasma plume from an Al target ablated with a nanosecond 1064 and 355 nm laser respectively under oblique incidence in air is studied using the time-resolved shadowgraph imaging technique. The characteristics of plasma plume expansion with different focusing conditions (focal point on, ahead of and after the target surface) are experimentally investigated. Experimental results show that the evolution of the plasma plume is strongly influenced by air breakdown which occurs prior to the laser beam reaching the target. Without the occurrence of air breakdown, the temporal evolution of the Al plasma plume with both UV and IR ablation laser wavelengths shows the plume expansion with an ellipsoid-shaped plume front travelling mainly against the incoming laser beam due to the formation of a laser-supported detonation wave at the initial stage of laser ablation, and then the shape of the plume front turns into a sphere. Experimental results also show that a higher portion of the laser pulse energy reaches the target surface at UV laser wavelength than that of an IR laser due to the higher penetrating ability of the UV laser wavelength to the plasma.

  4. Anomalous shear band characteristics and extra-deep shock-affected zone in Zr-based bulk metallic glass treated with nanosecond laser peening

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanpeng; Xu, Guangyue; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Zhe; Guo, Yacong; Huang, Chenguang; Wei, Bingchen

    2017-01-01

    The effects of nanosecond laser peening on Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 metallic glass were investigated in this study. The peening treatment produced an extra-deep shock-affected zone compared to crystal metal. As opposed to the conventional shear bands, numerous arc shear bands appeared and aggregated in the vertical direction of the laser beam, forming basic units for accommodating plastic deformation. The arc shear bands exhibited short and discrete features near the surface of the material, then grew longer and fewer at deeper peened layer depths, which was closely related to the laser shock wave attenuation. An energy dissipation model was established based on Hugoniot Elastic Limit and shear band characteristics to represent the formation of an extra-deep shock-affected zone. The results presented here suggest that the bulk modification of metallic glass with a considerable affected depth is feasible. Further, they reveal that nanosecond laser peening is promising as an effective approach to tuning shear bands for improved MGs ductility. PMID:28266649

  5. Anomalous shear band characteristics and extra-deep shock-affected zone in Zr-based bulk metallic glass treated with nanosecond laser peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanpeng; Xu, Guangyue; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Zhe; Guo, Yacong; Huang, Chenguang; Wei, Bingchen

    2017-03-01

    The effects of nanosecond laser peening on Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 metallic glass were investigated in this study. The peening treatment produced an extra-deep shock-affected zone compared to crystal metal. As opposed to the conventional shear bands, numerous arc shear bands appeared and aggregated in the vertical direction of the laser beam, forming basic units for accommodating plastic deformation. The arc shear bands exhibited short and discrete features near the surface of the material, then grew longer and fewer at deeper peened layer depths, which was closely related to the laser shock wave attenuation. An energy dissipation model was established based on Hugoniot Elastic Limit and shear band characteristics to represent the formation of an extra-deep shock-affected zone. The results presented here suggest that the bulk modification of metallic glass with a considerable affected depth is feasible. Further, they reveal that nanosecond laser peening is promising as an effective approach to tuning shear bands for improved MGs ductility.

  6. Influence of coating thickness on laser-induced damage characteristics of anti-reflection coatings irradiated by 1064  nm nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhi; Cheng, Xinbin; Ma, Hongping; Zhang, Jinlong; Ma, Bin; Jiao, Hongfei; Wang, Zhanshan

    2017-02-01

    The influence of coating thickness on laser-induced damage (LID) characteristics of anti-reflection (AR) coatings irradiated by 1064 nm nanosecond laser pulses was investigated. Two HfO2/SiO2 AR coatings with different physical thicknesses, 0.7 and 2.7 μm, were prepared and tested. To study the effect of coating thickness on a laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) in isolation, electric field intensities (EFIs) at the substrate-coating interface were kept the same by using proper AR designs. Moreover, 2 nm artificial gold particles with a density of 10  mm-2 were implanted into the substrate-coating interface to achieve reliable experimental results. An optical microscope (OM) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for an online LIDT test and offline LID morphology observation, respectively. The typical LID morphology of thicker AR coatings was flat bottom craters with diameters of 20-50 μm, which can be easily observed by an online OM. For thinner AR coatings, hemispherical craters with diameters down to 1 μm were found as typical LID morphology by a SEM. However, these tiny craters could not be observed by an online OM. Moreover, such tiny craters did not grow with subsequent pulses, so they did not degrade the functional laser damage resistance of the thin AR coatings. When identified with an online OM, the LIDT of thinner AR coatings is found to be about two times higher than the thicker ones, and large delamination was mainly found as the LID morphology of AR coatings with high fluence. When observed with a SEM, the LIDT of thin AR coatings with tiny craters was over 60% lower than the LIDT of thick AR coatings, which agrees with the model that less energy is required to form smaller LID craters of thinner coatings.

  7. Evaluation of plasma produced by first and second harmonic nano-second laser for enhancing the capability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Hosam; Abdel-Wahab, Essam A.; Abdel-Rahim, Farid M.; Allam, Sami H.; Nossair, Abd ElDaim M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Evaluation of plasmas produced and optimized for improving the capability of convenential laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analytical purposes of solid samples is the main goal of the present work. The plasma produced in the present study was generated by focusing a single nano-second Nd:YAG laser at the fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm and at the second harmonic wavelength of 532 nm on an Al target in air at atmospheric pressure. The emission spectrum was recorded time resolved over the whole UV-NIR (200-1000 nm) spectral range. This work describes an extension of previously reported studies and focuses now on the determination of the plasma parameters at the optimum condition - highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and minimum limit of detection (LOD) - of the LIBS technique, which is now widely applied to the elemental analysis of materials in atmospheric air. Parameters of the produced plasma in the time interval from 0 to 10 μs are determined for to further understanding the LIBS plasma dynamics. O I and Mn I spectral lines are used in the present work as thermometric lines for the determination of the plasma temperature based on Boltzmann plots. Stark broadening of lines yields the electron density. The widths of the Hα-line at 656.27 nm, of the O I line at 844.65 nm, of Al II lines at 281.65 nm and 466.30 nm and of the Si I line at 288.15 nm has been utilized for that. The plasma temperature ranged from 0.73 eV to around 1 eV for the different laser energies with both laser wavelengths for the optimized plasma used for LIBS analysis. This temperature is very close to that well known for the other spectrochemical analytical techniques or in excitation sources such as inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

  8. Time evolution of domain-wall motion induced by nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, M. V.; Logunov, M. V.; Spirin, A. V.; Nozdrin, Yu. N.; Tokman, I. D.

    2016-07-01

    The time evolution of the magnetization normal component change in a garnet film with a labyrinthine domain structure under the action of circularly and linearly polarized laser pump pulses (the pulse duration is 5 ns; the wavelength is 527 nm) has been studied. The dynamic state of the magnetic film was registered using an induction method with a time resolution of 1 ns. It was found that for the initial state of the magnetic film with an equilibrium domain structure, the form of the photomagnetization pulse reflects the time evolution of a domain-wall motion. The domain-wall motion initiated by the circularly polarized laser pump pulse continues in the same direction for a time more than an order of magnitude exceeding the laser pulse duration. In general, the time evolution of the domain-wall movement occurs in three stages. The separation of the contributions to the photomagnetization from the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects was carried out. The photomagnetization pulses that reflect the contributions by the aforementioned effects differ by form, and more than two orders of magnitude by duration. Their form doesn't change under a magnetic bias field change, only the photomagnetization pulse amplitude does: for the polarization-dependent contribution, it's an even function of the field, and for the polarization-independent contribution, it's an odd function. The interconnection between the polarization-dependent and polarization-independent effects, on the one hand, and the domain-wall displacement and the change of the film's saturation magnetization, on the other hand, was identified and described.

  9. Melting of nanocrystals embedded in a crystal matrix heated by nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zinoviev, V. A. Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Smagina, Zh. V.; Ivlev, G. D.; Gatskevich, E. I.; Malevich, V. L.

    2012-09-15

    The kinetics of phase transformations of nanocrystals in a crystal matrix is considered upon non-stationary heating by laser pulses. The melting and crystallization kinetics of nanocrystals is described taking into account their size, shape, elemental composition, and elastic deformations appearing due to the mismatch of the lattice constants for nanocrystals and the matrix. The possibility of decreasing the dispersion of nanocrystals over their size in heterostructures with quantum dots is predicted. As an example, melting of Ge nanocrystals in a Si matrix is considered.

  10. Laser Pyro System Standardization and Man Rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher W.

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews an X-38 laser pyro system standardization system designed for a new manned rated program. The plans to approve this laser initiation system and preliminary ideas for this system are also provided.

  11. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Behavior of gain-guided lasers generating high-power nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbert, G.

    1988-11-01

    Computer-controlled apparatus was used in an investigation of gain-guided narrow-stripe AlGaAs double heterostructure lasers. These lasers were excited with current pulses of 10 ns duration and amplitudes up to 3 A. The watt-ampere characteristics together with near- and far-field radiation patterns were considered using an analytic model of the lasers. The results showed that the values of the gain under a stripe contact or of the absorption outside this region varied with the output power.

  12. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6 ns, 1064 nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ∼300 Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ∼100 Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  13. Self-consistent modeling of jet formation process in the nanosecond laser pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mézel, C.; Hallo, L.; Souquet, A.; Breil, J.; Hébert, D.; Guillemot, F.

    2009-12-01

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct printing technique. Because of its high application potential, interest continues to increase. LIFT is routinely used in printing, spray generation and thermal-spike sputtering. Biological material such as cells and proteins have already been transferred successfully for the creation of biological microarrays. Recently, modeling has been used to explain parts of the ejection transfer process. No global modeling strategy is currently available. In this paper, a hydrodynamic code is utilized to model the jet formation process and estimate the constraints obeyed by the bioelements during the transfer. A self-consistent model that includes laser energy absorption, plasma formation via ablation, and hydrodynamic processes is proposed and confirmed with experimental results. Fundamental physical mechanisms via one-dimensional modeling are presented. Two-dimensional (2D) simplified solutions of the jet formation model equations are proposed. Predicted results of the model are jet existence and its velocity. The 2D simulation results are in good agreement with a simple model presented by a previous investigator.

  14. Self-consistent modeling of jet formation process in the nanosecond laser pulse regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mezel, C.; Hallo, L.; Breil, J.; Souquet, A.; Guillemot, F.; Hebert, D.

    2009-12-15

    Laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct printing technique. Because of its high application potential, interest continues to increase. LIFT is routinely used in printing, spray generation and thermal-spike sputtering. Biological material such as cells and proteins have already been transferred successfully for the creation of biological microarrays. Recently, modeling has been used to explain parts of the ejection transfer process. No global modeling strategy is currently available. In this paper, a hydrodynamic code is utilized to model the jet formation process and estimate the constraints obeyed by the bioelements during the transfer. A self-consistent model that includes laser energy absorption, plasma formation via ablation, and hydrodynamic processes is proposed and confirmed with experimental results. Fundamental physical mechanisms via one-dimensional modeling are presented. Two-dimensional (2D) simplified solutions of the jet formation model equations are proposed. Predicted results of the model are jet existence and its velocity. The 2D simulation results are in good agreement with a simple model presented by a previous investigator.

  15. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.; Camacho-Lopez, S.

    2010-11-15

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, {lambda}=532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 {mu}J, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  16. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R.; Camacho-López, S.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, λ =532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 μJ, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  17. A comparative study of emission efficiencies in low-pressure argon plasmas induced by picosecond and nanosecond Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangasi Marpaung, Alion; Ramli, Muliadi; Idroes, Rinaldi; Suyanto, Hery; Lahna, Kurnia; Nur Abdulmadjid, Syahrun; Idris, Nasrullah; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Sukra Lie, Zener; Putra Kurniawan, Davy; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Jie Lie, Tjung; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2016-11-01

    An experimental study is performed on the comparative advantages of nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) lasers in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis. The experiment focused on the relative efficiencies of the plasma emission induced by the two lasers in low-pressure Ar ambient gas for samples of various hardnesses. It is shown that the emission intensities are consistenly reduced when the ns laser is replaced by the ps laser. This is explained as the consequence of the increased power density delivered by the ps laser, which results in a time mismatch between the passage of the ablated atoms and the formation of the shock wave. The time mismatch in turn leads to less effective thermal excitation by the shock wave plasma and the hence reduced emission intensity. Furthermore, this adverse effect is found to worsen for softer samples due to the slower formation of the shock wave. These results are obtained with the same volumes of craters produced by the two lasers on the same sample, which implies that ns laser irradiation has higher emission efficiency than ps laser irradiation.

  18. Influences on the Emissions of Bacterial Plasmas Generated through Nanosecond Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenfant, Dylan J.

    In the past decade, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been shown to provide compositional data that can be used for discrimination between bacterial specimens at the strain level. This work demonstrates the viability of this technique in a clinical setting. Studies were conducted to investigate the impact of emissions generated by a nitrocellulose filter paper background on the classification of four species: E. coli, S. epidermidis, M. smegmatis, and P. aeruginosa. Limits of detection were determined as 48+/-12 kCFU per ablation event for new mounting procedures using standard diagnostic laboratory techniques, and a device for centrifuge filtration was designed for sampling from low-titer bacterial suspensions. Plasma emissions from samples grown at biological levels of magnesium, zinc, and glucose were shown not to deviate from controls. A limit of detection for environmental zinc was found to be 11 ppm. Discrimination with heat-killed samples was demonstrated, providing a sterile diagnostic environment.

  19. Laser-assisted fabrication and size distribution modification of colloidal gold nanostructures by nanosecond laser ablation in different liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Atanasov, P. A.; Karashanova, D. B.

    2017-07-01

    This study presents results on pulsed laser ablation of gold target immersed in different liquids. In the experiments chloroform, toluene and ethanol are used as liquid media for the laser ablation. Two different wavelengths: the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser, are utilized to produce various colloids. The optical properties of the colloids were evaluated by optical transmittance measurements in the UV-Vis spectral range. The morphology of the colloidal nanoparticles created and the evaluation of their size distribution are investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The selected area electron diffraction is employed for chemical phase identification of the created nanostructures. Ablation in chloroform resulted in formation of spherical and spheroidal gold nanoparticles with the similar mean size at both laser wavelengths used—11.5 nm at 1064 and 9.3 nm at 532 nm. Nanoparticles with smaller mean size (below 5 nm) in the case of ablation in toluene were observed. Spherical nanoparticles with mean diameter of 7.7 nm produced by 1064 nm and thin elongated nanostructures with thickness of about 5 nm using 532 nm are observed in the case of ablation in ethanol. An additional laser irradiation of the colloids demonstrated the changing of the optical properties and size distribution of the nanostructures produced by ablation in ethanol and chloroform. The irradiation of toluene-based colloid does not induce observable change of the colloid properties.

  20. Numerical simulation of the dynamics of phase transitions in CdTe induced by irradiation with nanosecond pulses of an excimer laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhvavyi, S. P. Zykov, G. L.

    2006-06-15

    Simulation of the effect of KrF nanosecond pulse excimer laser radiation ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau} = 20 ns) on phase transitions in cadmium telluride was performed taking into account the diffusion of the melt components and their evaporation from the surface. It is shown that the surface region of the melt is enriched with tellurium due to the evaporation and diffusion of the cadmium telluride components. The obtained value 0.05 J/cm{sup 2} of the threshold energy density for melting is in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Ablation of human carious dentin with a nanosecond pulsed laser at a wavelength of 5.85 μm: relationship between hardness and ablation depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Kita, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2014-02-01

    Less invasive treatment and preservation of teeth, referred to as minimal intervention, are strong requirements in dentistry. In our previous study, the fundamental ablation properties of human dentin at wavelengths around 5.8 μm were investigated, and the results indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm was optimal for selective removal of carious dentin with less damage to normal dentin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the ablation depth and hardness of human dentin including carious lesion. A nanosecond pulsed laser produced by difference-frequency generation was used for irradiations to human carious dentin. It was observed that correlation between ablation depth and Vickers hardness after 2 s laser irradiation at the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2. On the other hand, ablations did not depend on Vickers hardness at the wavelength of 6.00 μm. A nanosecond pulsed laser with the wavelength at 5.85 μm is useful for selective ablation of human carious dentin in accordance with the hardness.

  2. Characteristics of colloidal aluminum nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in deionized water in presence of parallel external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Mozaffari, Hossein

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate experimentally the effect of electric field on the size, optical properties and crystal structure of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) of aluminum prepared by nanosecond Pulsed Laser Ablation (PLA) in deionized water. The experiments were conducted for two different conditions, with and without the electric field parallel to the laser beam path and the results were compared. To study the influence of electric field, two polished parallel aluminum metals plates perpendicular to laser beam path were used as the electrodes. The NPs were synthesized for target in negative, positive and neutral polarities. The colloidal nanoparticles were characterized using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results indicate that initial charge on the target has strong effect on the size properties and concentration of the synthesized nanoparticles. The XRD patterns show that the structure of produced NPs with and without presence of electric field is Boehmite (AlOOH).

  3. Deuterium separation at high pressure by nanosecond CO2 laser multiple-photon dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marling, Jack B.; Herman, Irving P.; Thomas, Scott J.

    1980-05-01

    Photochemical deuterium separation is evaluated at pressures up to 1 atm using 2 ns duration CO2 laser pulses to achieve multiple-photon dissociation (MPD) as the isotopic separation step. Photochemical performance is compared for Freon 123 (2,2-dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane), difluoromethane, and trifluoromethane based on deuterium optical selectivity in absorption, photoproduct yield, and single-step deuterium enrichment factor. The absorption coefficient versus energy fluence is measured from 0.01 to 3 J/cm2 fluence for CF3CDCl2, CDF3, and CHDF2; added buffer gas results in an order-of-magnitude increase in the CDF3 absorption coefficient. The deuterium optical selectivity in absorption at 0.5 J/cm2 fluence with added buffer is 80 for CF3CDCl2 at 10.65 μ, 800 for CHDF2 at 10.48 μ, and 2500 for CDF3 at 10.21 μ. The absorption coefficients and hence optical isotopic selectivities are dependent on fluence, and the optical selectivity attains a maximum value of 8000 for CDF3 below 0.01 J/cm2 fluence. The deuterium-bearing MPD photoproducts at high pressure are trifluoroethylene for Freon 123, hydrogen fluoride for trifluoromethane, and both hydrogen fluoride and monofluoroacetylene for difluoromethane. Yield data determined by gas chromatography are analyzed using a model describing MPD due to a focused Gaussian beam in an absorbing medium to remove compositional and geometrical effects; this analysis results in a saturation fluence (at which the dissociation probability approaches 100%) of 12±2 J/cm2 for CF3CDCl2, 20±2 J/cm2 for CDF3 buffered by 1 atm argon, 30±2 J/cm2 for CDF3 buffered by 60-400 Torr CHF3, and 22±3 J/cm2 for CHDF2 buffered by 100-400 Torr CH2F2. Near unity dissociation probabilities are obtained for samples unbuffered by argon with operating pressures up to 40 Torr for Freon 123, and up to 400 Torr for both difluoromethane and trifluoromethane; the methane derivatives are much more resistant to high pressure collisional quenching than

  4. Nanosecond vortex laser pulses with millijoule pulse energies from a Yb-doped double-clad fiber power amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Mio; Hirose, Tetsuya; Okida, Masahito; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Omatsu, Takashige

    2011-07-01

    Nanosecond vortex pulses were generated using a stressed, large-mode-area, Yb-doped, fiber amplifier with an off-axis coupling technique for the first time. A pulse energy of 0.83 mJ (corresponding to a peak power of 59 kW) was achieved at a pump power of 25.7 W. The optical-optical efficiency was measured to be 31%. The millijoule nanosecond vortex pulses will be potentially applied to novel material processing, such as metal microneedle fabrication.

  5. DiPOLE: a 10 J, 10 Hz cryogenic gas cooled multi-slab nanosecond Yb:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Ertel, Klaus; Mason, Paul D; Phillips, P Jonathan; De Vido, Mariastefania; Smith, Jodie M; Butcher, Thomas J; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Greenhalgh, R Justin S; Collier, John L

    2015-07-27

    The Diode Pumped Optical Laser for Experiments (DiPOLE) project at the Central Laser Facility aims to develop a scalable, efficient high pulse energy diode pumped laser amplifier system based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG technology. We present recent results obtained from a scaled down prototype laser system designed for operation at 10 Hz pulse repetition rate. At 140 K, the system generated 10.8 J of energy in a 10 ns pulse at 1029.5 nm when pumped by 48 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 22.5%. To our knowledge, this represents the highest pulse energy obtained from a cryo cooled Yb laser to date and the highest efficiency achieved by a multi-Joule diode pumped solid state laser system. Additionally, we demonstrated shot-to-shot energy stability of 0.85% rms for the system operated at 7 J, 10 Hz during several runs lasting up to 6 hours, with more than 50 hours in total. We also demonstrated pulse shaping capability and report on beam, wavefront and focal spot quality.

  6. Luminescence in the fluoride-containing phosphate-based glasses: A possible origin of their high resistance to nanosecond pulse laser-induced damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Lu, Min; Gao, Fei; Guo, Haitao; Xu, Yantao; Hou, Chaoqi; Zhou, Zhiwei; Peng, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Fusion power offers the prospect of an almost inexhaustible source of energy for future generations. It was reported that fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were achieved, but so far great deal of scientific and engineering challenges have to be overcome for realizing fusion power generation. There is a bottleneck for color-separation gratings in NIF and other similar inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers. Here we show a series of high performance phosphate-based glasses that can transmit the third harmonic frequency (3ω) laser light with high efficiency meanwhile filter the fundamental (1ω) and the second harmonic frequency (2ω) laser lights through direct absorption, and especially they exhibit excellent damage threshold induced by nanosecond pulse laser compared with that of the fused silica used in NIF. Yellowish-orange fluorescence emits during the laser-material interaction process, and it can be tailored through regulating the glass structure. Study on its structural origin suggests that the fluorescence emission is a key factor that conduces to the high laser-induced damage resistance of these glasses. The results also indicated the feasibility of utilizing these high performance glasses in novel color separation optics, allowing novel design for the final optics assembly in ICF lasers. PMID:25716328

  7. Luminescence in the fluoride-containing phosphate-based glasses: A possible origin of their high resistance to nanosecond pulse laser-induced damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengfei; Lu, Min; Gao, Fei; Guo, Haitao; Xu, Yantao; Hou, Chaoqi; Zhou, Zhiwei; Peng, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Fusion power offers the prospect of an almost inexhaustible source of energy for future generations. It was reported that fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were achieved, but so far great deal of scientific and engineering challenges have to be overcome for realizing fusion power generation. There is a bottleneck for color-separation gratings in NIF and other similar inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers. Here we show a series of high performance phosphate-based glasses that can transmit the third harmonic frequency (3ω) laser light with high efficiency meanwhile filter the fundamental (1ω) and the second harmonic frequency (2ω) laser lights through direct absorption, and especially they exhibit excellent damage threshold induced by nanosecond pulse laser compared with that of the fused silica used in NIF. Yellowish-orange fluorescence emits during the laser-material interaction process, and it can be tailored through regulating the glass structure. Study on its structural origin suggests that the fluorescence emission is a key factor that conduces to the high laser-induced damage resistance of these glasses. The results also indicated the feasibility of utilizing these high performance glasses in novel color separation optics, allowing novel design for the final optics assembly in ICF lasers.

  8. Luminescence in the fluoride-containing phosphate-based glasses: a possible origin of their high resistance to nanosecond pulse laser-induced damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Lu, Min; Gao, Fei; Guo, Haitao; Xu, Yantao; Hou, Chaoqi; Zhou, Zhiwei; Peng, Bo

    2015-02-26

    Fusion power offers the prospect of an almost inexhaustible source of energy for future generations. It was reported that fusion fuel gains exceeding unity on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were achieved, but so far great deal of scientific and engineering challenges have to be overcome for realizing fusion power generation. There is a bottleneck for color-separation gratings in NIF and other similar inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers. Here we show a series of high performance phosphate-based glasses that can transmit the third harmonic frequency (3ω) laser light with high efficiency meanwhile filter the fundamental (1ω) and the second harmonic frequency (2ω) laser lights through direct absorption, and especially they exhibit excellent damage threshold induced by nanosecond pulse laser compared with that of the fused silica used in NIF. Yellowish-orange fluorescence emits during the laser-material interaction process, and it can be tailored through regulating the glass structure. Study on its structural origin suggests that the fluorescence emission is a key factor that conduces to the high laser-induced damage resistance of these glasses. The results also indicated the feasibility of utilizing these high performance glasses in novel color separation optics, allowing novel design for the final optics assembly in ICF lasers.

  9. Tungsten carbide precursors as an example for influence of a binder on the particle formation in the nanosecond laser ablation of powdered materials.

    PubMed

    Holá, Markéta; Mikuska, Pavel; Hanzlíková, Renáta; Kaiser, Jozef; Kanický, Viktor

    2010-03-15

    A study of LA-ICP-MS analysis of pressed powdered tungsten carbide precursors was performed to show the advantages and problems of nanosecond laser ablation of matrix-unified samples. Five samples with different compositions were pressed into pellets both with silver powder as a binder serving to keep the matrix unified, and without any binder. The laser ablation was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser working at 213 nm. The particle formation during ablation of both sets of pellets was studied using an optical aerosol spectrometer allowing the measurement of particle concentration in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 microm) and particle size distribution in the range of 0.25-17 microm. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the particle chemical composition was determined by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS). The matrix effect was proved to be reduced using the same silver powdered binder for pellet preparation in the case of the laser ablation of powdered materials. The LA-ICP-MS signal dependence on the element content present in the material showed an improved correlation for Co, Ti, Ta and Nb of the matrix-unified samples compared to the non-matrix-unified pellets. In the case of W, the ICP-MS signal of matrix-unified pellets was influenced by the changes in the particle formation. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Enhanced photocatalytic efficiency in zirconia buffered n-NiO/p-NiO single crystalline heterostructures by nanosecond laser treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Molaei, R.; Bayati, M. R.; Alipour, H. M.; Nori, S.; Narayan, J.

    2013-06-21

    We report the formation of NiO based single crystalline p-n junctions with enhanced photocatalytic activity induced by pulsed laser irradiation. The NiO epilayers were grown on Si(001) substrates buffered with cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (c-YSZ) by using pulsed laser deposition. The NiO/c-YSZ/Si heterostructures were subsequently laser treated by 5 pulses of KrF excimer laser (pulse duration = 25 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} s) at lower energies. Microstructural studies, conducted by X-ray diffraction ({theta}-2{theta} and {phi} techniques) and high resolution transmission electron microscope, showed a cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship at the c-YSZ/Si interface; the epitaxial relationship across the NiO/c-YSZ interface was established as NiO<111 > Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line c-YSZ<001> and in-plane NiO<110> Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line c-YSZ<100>. Electron microscopy studies showed that the interface between the laser annealed and the pristine region as well as the NiO/c-YSZ interface was atomically sharp and crystallographically continuous. The formation of point defects, namely oxygen vacancies and NiO, due to the coupling of the laser photons with the NiO epilayers was confirmed by XPS. The p-type electrical characteristics of the pristine NiO epilayers turned to an n-type behavior and the electrical conductivity was increased by one order of magnitude after laser treatment. Photocatalytic activity of the pristine (p-NiO/c-YSZ/Si) and the laser-annealed (n-NiO/p-NiO/c-YSZ/Si) heterostructures were assessed by measuring the decomposition rate of 4-chlorophenol under UV light. The photocatalytic reaction rate constants were determined to be 0.0059 and 0.0092 min{sup -1} for the as-deposited and the laser-treated samples, respectively. The enhanced photocatalytic efficiency was attributed to the suppressed charge carrier recombination in the NiO based p-n junctions and higher electrical conductivity. Besides, the oxygen vacancies

  11. Sub-Nanosecond Time-Resolved Emission Studies with a Mode-Locked CW Dye Laser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Mitchell Dale

    A new technique is developed for time-resolved observation of light emission in the picosecond regime. The technique makes use of optical sum-frequency generation in a crystal having a high non-linear optical dielectric coefficient. The crystal acts as a shutter and provides a time resolution which is limited only by the duration of the light pulses used in the measurement. In this work, the resolution is 10-15 picoseconds. This technique is used in two studies of time -resolved emission from molecules in solution. In the first of these, emission decay curves are obtained for the dye malachite green in solutions of different viscosity. The form of the decay curves is not consistent with a model proposed previously (Th. Foerster and G. Hoffman, Z. Physik. Chem. NF 75, 63 (1961)) to account for the viscosity dependence of the emission quantum efficiency in molecules of this type. The intensity of emission within the first 10 picoseconds following excitation of the molecule is itself observed to decrease with decreasing viscosity. The decrease of the quantum efficiency with decreasing viscosity is shown to be the result of two effects combined: a decrease in overall decay time, which is probably the result of an increasing non-radiative decay rate; and an independent overall reduction in the intensity of emission. Kinetic models for the relaxation processes in the molecule are proposed to account for these findings. In the second study a decay time of 14 (+OR-) 3 picoseconds is measured for emission at room temperature from the molecule bacteriorhodopsin, obtained from the purple membrane of the bacterium Halobacterium Halobium. This result, combined with previous measurements of the quantum efficiency, suggests that the state of the molecule immediately following absorption of a photon and the initial state of the emitting transition are very different in character.

  12. Experimental investigation on colloidal alumina nanoparticles produced by collinear nanosecond double-pulse laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, M. H.; Fattahi, B.; Akbari Jafarabadi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we investigated the effect of inter-pulse delay times on production of colloidal alumina nanoparticles by collinear double pulse laser ablation. In comparison to single pulse laser ablation, collinear double pulse laser ablation with inter-pulse delay times of 5, 10, 15 and 20 ns results in production of colloidal nanoparticles with smaller mean size and lower variance size distribution. In the case of 5 ns inter-pulse delay time, the highest concentration of nanoparticles was obtained due to more rapid cooling time of the plasma as a result of higher rate of nuclei generation than particle growth. The results also showed that the main pulse and the pre-pulse with 5 ns delay time have significant overlap and consequently such condition leads to maximum influence on the ablation.

  13. Sub-5-ps optical pulse generation from a 1.55-µm distributed-feedback laser diode with nanosecond electric pulse excitation and spectral filtering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoqiang; Sato, Aya; Ito, Takashi; Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki

    2012-10-22

    This paper reports generation of sub-5-ps Fourier-transform limited optical pulses from a 1.55-µm gain-switched single-mode distributed-feedback laser diode via nanosecond electric excitation and a simple spectral-filtering technique. Typical damped oscillations of the whole lasing spectrum were observed in the time-resolved waveform. Through a spectral-filtering technique, the initial relaxation oscillation pulse and the following components in the output pulse can be well separated, and the initial short pulse can be selectively extracted by filtering out the short-wavelength components in the spectrum. Short pulses generated by this simple method are expected to have wide potential applications comparable to mode-locking lasers.

  14. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Emission of fluorescence from chlorophyll a in vivo due to nanosecond pulsed laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunin, D. K.; Gorbunov, M. Yu; Fadeev, V. V.; Chekalyuk, A. M.

    1992-05-01

    A model was proposed and tested experimentally to describe the emission of fluorescence by chlorophyll a in vivo as a result of pulsed laser excitation. This model takes into account the migration of excitons between various photosynthetic units, singlet-singlet annihilation of excitons, pigment bleaching, and also the influence of various states of the photosystem II reaction centers. A method was developed to measure the average number of excitons reaching a photosystem II reaction center during a pulse. This involved two-pulse laser excitation. It was found that the rates of exciton capture by the reaction centers were the same for the PIQ and P +IQ - states of the photosystem II reaction centers, whereas the rate of exciton capture in the P +I -Q - state was half that for the PIQ - state.

  15. A simple method for experimental determination of electron temperature and electron density in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge used for excitation of high-power atomic and ionic metal and metal halide vapour lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    A simple method based on the time-resolved measurement of electrical discharge parameters, such as tube voltage and discharge current, is developed and applied for determination of electron temperature and electron density in the discharge period of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge, exciting high-power DUV Cu+ Ne-CuBr, He-Hg+ and He-Sr+ lasers.

  16. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  17. Nanosecond laser-induced selective removal of the active layer of CuInGaSe2 solar cells by stress-assisted ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzás, András; Geretovszky, Zsolt

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrate that laser pulses of nanosecond duration (λ=1064 nm, τ=25 ns, PRR =5 kHz) are capable of the clean removal of the CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) and ZnO:Al layers in the layer structure of chalcogenide-based solar cells, leaving the underlying Mo layer undamaged and producing excellent crater morphology. Our results prove that the material removal process is governed by the thermomechanical stress developing in the CIGS layer due to rapid laser heating. In the mechanical ablation of the active layer, three phenomena play a crucial role, namely, delamination, buckling, and fracture. Morphological and compositional analysis of the laser-processed areas is used to identify the experimental parameters where clean mechanical ablation can be achieved. Numerical calculations, performed in the comsol software environment, are also presented to complement the experimental tendencies and verify the proposed model. Our calculation proves the development of a stress distribution that drives the delamination of the CIGS and Mo layers. As the delamination front proceeds radially outward, the separation of the layers ceases in the colder outer regions according to the Griffith's criterion and defines the size of the craters produced afterwards. The free-standing chalcogenide layer continues to deform, and buckling results in a growing tensile stress at the perimeter of the delaminated area, where ultimately fracture will finalize the removal process and facilitate the clean ablation of the laser-irradiated area.

  18. Treatment of pigmentary disorders in patients with skin of color with a novel 755 nm picosecond, Q-switched ruby, and Q-switched Nd:YAG nanosecond lasers: A retrospective photographic review.

    PubMed

    Levin, Melissa Kanchanapoomi; Ng, Elise; Bae, Yoon-Soo Cindy; Brauer, Jeremy A; Geronemus, Roy G

    2016-02-01

    Laser procedures in skin of color (SOC) patients are challenging due to the increased risk of dyspigmentation and scarring. A novel 755 nm alexandrite picosecond laser has demonstrated effectiveness for tattoo removal and treatment of acne scars. No studies to date have evaluated its applications in pigmentary disorders. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the safety profile and efficacy of the picosecond alexandrite laser compared to the current standard treatment, Q-switched ruby and neodynium (Nd):YAG nanosecond lasers, for pigmentary disorders in SOC patients. A retrospective photographic and chart evaluation of seventy 755 nm alexandrite picosecond, ninety-two Q-switched frequency doubled 532 nm and 1,064 nm Nd:YAG nanosecond, and forty-seven Q-switched 694 nm ruby nanosecond laser treatments, in forty-two subjects of Fitzpatrick skin types III-VI was conducted in a single laser specialty center. The picosecond laser was a research prototype device. Treatment efficacy was assessed by two blinded physician evaluators, using a visual analog scale for percentage of pigmentary clearance in standard photographs. Subject assessment of efficacy, satisfaction, and adverse events was performed using a questionnaire survey. The most common pigmentary disorder treated was Nevus of Ota (38.1%), followed by solar lentigines (23.8%). Other pigmentary disorders included post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, congenital nevus, café au lait macule, dermal melanocytosis, Nevus of Ito, and Becker's nevus. Clinical efficacy of the Q-switched nanosecond lasers and picosecond laser treatments were comparable for lesions treated on the face with a mean visual analog score of 2.57 and 2.44, respectively, corresponding to approximately 50% pigmentary clearance. Subject questionnaires were completed in 58.8% of the picosecond subjects and 52.0% of the Q-switched subjects. Eighty four percent of subjects receiving Q-switched nanosecond laser treatments and 50% of the

  19. A comparative study of pressure-dependent emission characteristics in different gas plasmas induced by nanosecond and picosecond neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers.

    PubMed

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Idris, Nasrullah; Marpaung, Alion Mangasi; Pardede, Marincan; Jobiliong, Eric; Hedwig, Rinda; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Ramli, Muliadi; Suyanto, Heri; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Tjia, May On; Lie, Zener Sukra; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kurniawan, Hendrik Koo

    2013-11-01

    An experimental study has been performed on the pressure-dependent plasma emission intensities in Ar, He, and N2 surrounding gases with the plasma induced by either nanosecond (ns) or picosecond (ps) yttrium aluminum garnet laser. The study focused on emission lines of light elements such as H, C, O, and a moderately heavy element of Ca from an agate target. The result shows widely different pressure effects among the different emission lines, which further vary with the surrounding gases used and also with the different ablation laser employed. It was found that most of the maximum emission intensities can be achieved in Ar gas plasma generated by ps laser at low gas pressure of around 5 Torr. This experimental condition is particularly useful for spectrochemical analysis of light elements such as H, C, and O, which are known to suffer from intensity diminution at higher gas pressures. Further measurements of the spatial distribution and time profiles of the emission intensities of H I 656.2 nm and Ca II 396.8 nm reveal the similar role of shock wave excitation for the emission in both ns and ps laser-induced plasmas, while an additional early spike is observed in the plasma generated by the ps laser. The suggested preference of Ar surrounding gas and ps laser was further demonstrated by outperforming the ns laser in their applications to depth profiling of the H emission intensity and offering the prospect for the development of three-dimensional analysis of a light element such as H and C.

  20. Analysis of temperature and thermal stress fields of K9 glass damaged by 1064nm nanosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yunxiang; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2013-02-01

    There are residual scratches, inclusions and other forms of defects at surfaces of optical materials after the processes of grinding and polishing, which could either enhance the local electric field or increase the absorption rate of the material. As a result, the laser-induced damage threshold at the surface of the material is reduced greatly. In order to study underlying mechanisms and process of short pulsed laser-induced damage to K9 glass, a spatial axisymmetric model where the K9 glass was irradiated by a laser whose wavelength and pulse width are respectively 1064nm and 10ns was established. Taking into account the fact that the surface of the K9 glass is more likely to be damaged, 2μm-thick layers whose absorption coefficients are larger than bulk were set at both the input and output surfaces in the model. In addition, the model assumed that once the calculated tensile/compressive stress was greater than the tensile/compressive strength of K9 glass, the local absorption coefficient increased. The finite element method(FEM) was applied to calculate the temperature and thermal stress fields in the K9 glass. Results show that only the temperature of a small part of interacted region exceeds the melting point, while most of the damage pit is generated by thermal stress. The simulated damage morphology and the size of the damage region are consistent with those reported in literatures, which indicates that the model built in our work is reasonable.

  1. Determination of gas and electron temperatures for a powerful MIR He-SrBr2 laser excited in nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Slaveeva, S. I.; Vuchkov, N. K.; Lyutov, L.; Sabotinov, N. V.

    2010-09-01

    Using a gas discharge tube typical for the middle infrared He-SrBr2 laser, a study on gas and electron temperatures of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in pure He, as well as with Ne admixture, is carried out. Thermal conductivities of Ne-He binary gas systems are obtained on the base of experimental data fit, rigid sphere and 12-6 Lennard-Jones inter-atomic interaction approximations. Assuming that the gas temperature varies only in the radial direction and using the calculated thermal conductivities, analytical solution of the steady-state heat conduction equation is found for uniform power input. Measurement of the relative intensities of some He and Ne spectral lines, originating from different upper levels has enabled us to determine the average electron temperature.

  2. Morphology of ejected particles and impact sites on intercepting substrates following exit-surface laser damage with nanosecond pulses in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demos, Stavros G.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2017-01-01

    A volume of superheated material reaching localized temperatures of the order of 1 eV and pressures of the order of 10 GPa is generated following laser-induced damage (breakdown) on the surface of transparent dielectric materials using nanosecond pulses. This leads to material ejection and the formation of a crater. To elucidate the material behaviors involved, we examined the morphologies of the ejected particles and found distinctive features that support their classification into different types. The different morphologies arise from the difference in the structure and physical properties (such as the dynamic viscosity and presence of instabilities) of the superheated and surrounding affected material at the time of ejection of each individual particle. In addition, the temperature and kinetic energy of a subset of the ejected particles were found to be sufficient to initiate irreversible modification on the intercepting silica substrates. The modifications observed are associated with mechanical damage and fusion of melted particles on the collector substrate.

  3. Reversible phase transition in laser-shocked 3Y-TZP ceramics observed via nanosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianbo; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koguchi, Hiroaki; Akasaka, Takeaki; Kawai, Nobuaki; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Sato, Tokushi; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.

    2012-03-01

    The high-pressure phase stability of the metastable tetragonal zirconia is still under debate. The transition dynamics of shocked Y2O3 (3 mol. %) stabilized tetragonal zirconia ceramics under laser-shock compression has been directly studied using nanosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The martensitic phase transformation to the monoclinic phase, which is the stable phase for pure zirconia at ambient pressure and room temperature, has been observed during compression at 5 GPa within 20 ns without any intermediates. This monoclinic phase reverts back to the tetragonal phase during pressure release. The results imply that the stabilization effect due to the addition of Y2O3 is to some extent negated by the shear stress under compression.

  4. Morphology of ejected particles and impact sites on intercepting substrates following exit-surface laser damage with nanosecond pulses in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, Stavros G.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2016-09-08

    A volume of superheated material reaching localized temperatures of the order of 1 eV and pressures of the order of 10 GPa is generated following laser-induced damage (breakdown) on the surface of transparent dielectric materials using nanosecond pulses. This leads to material ejection and the formation of a crater. To elucidate the material behaviors involved, we examined the morphologies of the ejected particles and found distinctive features that support their classification into different types. The different morphologies arise from the difference in the structure and physical properties (such as the dynamic viscosity and presence of instabilities) of the superheated and surrounding affected material at the time of ejection of each individual particle. In addition, the temperature and kinetic energy of a subset of the ejected particles were found to be sufficient to initiate irreversible modification on the intercepting silica substrates. Finally, the modifications observed are associated with mechanical damage and fusion of melted particles on the collector substrate.

  5. Histological distinction of mechanical and thermal defects produced by nanosecond laser pulses in striated muscle at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratzl, Thomas; Dohr, Gottfried; Schmidt-Kloiber, Heinz; Reichel, Erich

    1991-06-01

    For the therapeutic application of laser light it is necessary to minimize defects in the non-irradiated tissue. These defects depend on the primary mechanism of interaction which is determined by the duration of laser action. In the case of continuous wave laserlight a tissue layer surrounding the irradiated volume is thermally affected. On using laser pulsed with a certain energy this layer becomes smaller with decreasing pulse duration. With the pulses of a Q-switched laser tissue cutting will be obtained by the laser-induced breakdown (LIB). Thereby shockwaves are emitted which stress the tissue mechanically. Even in this case thermal lesions can be found. To be able to distinguish between thermal and mechanical effects by histological examination, experiments were performed with ns- and microsecond(s) -laserpulses under the same conditions. A Nd:YAG-laser at 1064 nm was used either Q-switched (pulse duration: 8 ns) or flashlamp-pulsed (100 microsecond(s) ) with a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. The beam was focused through air below the tissue surface (focal length in air: 80 mm). The beam geometry in the focal region was identical for both cases. The position of the focal plane relative to the surface was exactly controlled, as it influences extension and kind of the defect. To produce evaluable defects in the microsecond(s) experiments 200 laserpulses with an energy of 340 mJ per pulse had to be applied. The unfixed striated muscle samples of Sprague Dawley rats were immediately dissected prior to laser exposure. For the microsecond(s) experiments the defect region could be divided into 4 zones surrounding a crater, which was found at a focal plane position 2 mm below the surface. Zone 1 shows vacuoles and intensive staining. In zone 2 the myofibrils were displaced and torn apart. Zone 3 represents a sharply bordered intensively stained region. In zone 4 muscle cells are contracted. The zones are all of thermal origin, which could be derived from experiments

  6. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    DOE PAGES

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronicmore » states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.« less

  7. Wavelength Dependence of Nanosecond IR Laser-Induced Breakdown in Water: Evidence for Multiphoton Initiation via an Intermediate State

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    of seed electron density. PACS numbers: 79.20.Ds, 79.20.Ws, 42.62.Fi, 42.62.Be 79.20.Ds Laser beam impact phenomena 79.20.Ws Multiphoton...absorption 42.62.Fi Laser spectroscopy 42.62.Be Biological and medical laser applications 2 1. INTRODUCTION IR laser -induced breakdown in water and...experimentally explored through breakdown threshold spectroscopy . Measurements are performed using single- longitudinal mode (slm) laser pulses

  8. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca; Margot, Joëlle E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca

    2015-11-15

    The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure) and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium) on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  9. A comparative study on reflection of nanosecond Nd-YAG laser pulses in ablation of metals in air and in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Benavides, O; May, L de la Cruz; Gil, A Flores

    2013-06-03

    A comparative study on reflection of nanosecond Nd-YAG laser pulses in ablation of aluminum in air and in vacuum under the same other experimental conditions is performed. We find that, hemispherical total reflectivity of aluminum undergoes a sharp drop at the plasma formation threshold both in the air and in vacuum. The initial large value (0.8) of aluminum reflectivity decreases to a level of about 0.14 and 0.24 for ablation in the air and in vacuum, respectively. These decreased reflectivity values remain virtually unchanged with further increasing laser fluence. The reflectivity drop in the air is observed to be sharper than in vacuum. Our study indicates that the reflectivity drop is predominantly caused by absorption of the laser light in plasma. Nano/micro-structural defects present on practical sample surfaces play the important role in the plasma formation, especially for the ablation in the air, where the plasma formation threshold is found to be by a factor of 3 smaller than in vacuum.

  10. Nanosecond laser switching of surface wettability and epitaxial integration of c-axis ZnO thin films with Si(111) substrates.

    PubMed

    Molaei, R; Bayati, M R; Alipour, H M; Estrich, N A; Narayan, J

    2014-01-08

    We have achieved integration of polar ZnO[0001] epitaxial thin films with Si(111) substrates where cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (c-YSZ) was used as a template on a Si(111) substrate. Using XRD (θ-2θ and φ scans) and HRTEM techniques, the epitaxial relationship between the ZnO and the c-YSZ layers was shown to be [0001]ZnO || [111]YSZ and [21¯1¯0]ZnO || [1¯01](c-YSZ), where the [21¯1¯0] direction lies in the (0001) plane, and the [1¯01] direction lies in the (111) plane. Similar studies on the c-YSZ/Si interface revealed epitaxy as (111)YSZ || (111)Si and in-plane (110)YSZ || (110)Si. HRTEM micrographs revealed atomically sharp and crystallographically continuous interfaces. The ZnO epilayers were subsequently laser annealed by a single pulse of a nanosecond excimer KrF laser. It was shown that the hydrophobic behavior of the pristine sample became hydrophilic after laser treatment. XPS was employed to study the effect of laser treatment on surface stoichiometry of the ZnO epilayers. The results revealed the formation of oxygen vacancies, which are envisaged to control the observed hydrophilic behavior. Our AFM studies showed surface smoothing due to the coupling of the high energy laser beam with the surface. The importance of integration of c-axis ZnO with Si(111) substrates is emphasized using the paradigm of domain matching epitaxy on the c-YSZ[111] buffer platform along with their out-of-plane orientation, which leads to improvement of the performance of the solid-state devices. The observed ultrafast response and switching in photochemical characteristics provide new opportunities for application of ZnO in smart catalysts, sensors, membranes, DNA self-assembly and multifunctional devices.

  11. Compact sources for the generation of high-peak power wavelength-stabilized laser pulses in the picoseconds and nanoseconds ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, H.; Klehr, A.; Schwertfeger, S.; Liero, A.; Hoffmann, Th.; Brox, O.; Thomas, M.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G.

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers are ideally suited for the generation of optical pulses in the nanoseconds and picoseconds ranges by gainswitching, Q-switching or mode-locking. We have developed diode-laser based light sources where the pulses are spectrally stabilized and nearly-diffraction limited as required by many applications. Diffraction limited emission is achieved by a several microns wide ridge waveguide (RW), so that only the fundamental lateral mode should lase. Spectral stabilization is realized with a Bragg grating integrated into the semiconductor chip, resulting in distributed feedback (DFB) or distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) lasers. We obtained a peak power of 3.8W for 4ns long pulses using a gain-switched DFB laser and a peak power of more than 4W for 65ps long pulses using a three-section DBR laser. Higher peak powers of several tens of Watts can be reached by an amplification of the pulses with semiconductor optical amplifiers, which can be either monolithically or hybrid integrated with the master oscillators. We developed compact modules with a footprint of 4×5cm2 combining master oscillator, tapered power amplifier, beam-shaping optical elements and high-frequency electronics. In order to diminish the generation of amplified spontaneous emission between the pulses, the amplifier is modulated with short-pulses of high amplitude, too. Beyond the amplifier, we obtained a peak power of more than 10W for 4ns long pulses, a peak power of about 35W for 80ps long pulses and a peak power of 70W for 10ps long pulses at emission wavelengths around 1064nm.

  12. Hybrid master oscillator power amplifier high-power narrow-linewidth nanosecond laser source at 257 nm.

    PubMed

    Délen, Xavier; Deyra, Loïc; Benoit, Aurélien; Hanna, Marc; Balembois, François; Cocquelin, Benjamin; Sangla, Damien; Salin, François; Didierjean, Julien; Georges, Patrick

    2013-03-15

    We report on a high-power narrow-linewidth pulsed laser source emitting at a wavelength of 257 nm. The system is based on a master oscillator power amplifier architecture, with Yb-doped fiber preamplifiers, a Yb:YAG single crystal fiber power amplifier used to overcome the Brillouin limitation in glass fiber and nonlinear frequency conversion stages. This particularly versatile architecture allows the generation of Fourier transform-limited 15 ns pulses at 1030 nm with 22 W of average power and a diffraction-limited beam (M(2)<1.1). At a repetition rate of 30 kHz, 106 μJ UV pulses are generated corresponding to an average power of 3.2 W.

  13. Optimization of graffiti removal on natural stone by means of high repetition rate UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, M. P.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.; Pozo, S.; Rivas, T.

    2013-08-01

    The use of laser for graffiti removal is a promising alternative to conventional cleaning methods, though irradiation parameters must be carefully selected in order to achieve the effective cleaning without damaging the substrate, especially when referring to natural stone. From a practical point of view, once a safe working window is selected, it is necessary to determine the irradiation conditions to remove large paint areas, with minimal time consumption. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic procedure to select the optimum parameters for graffiti removal by means of the 3rd harmonic of a high repetition rate nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser. Ablation thresholds of four spray paint colors were determined and the effect of pulse repetition frequency, beam diameter and line scan separation was analyzed, obtaining a set of values which optimize the ablation process.

  14. Dynamics of flavin semiquinone protolysis in L-alpha-hydroxyacid-oxidizing flavoenzymes--a study using nanosecond laser flash photolysis.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Lars; Apostol, Simona; El Hanine-Lmoumene, Chaibia; Lederer, Florence

    2010-02-01

    The reactions of the flavin semiquinone generated by laser-induced stepwise two-photon excitation of reduced flavin have been studied previously (El Hanine-Lmoumene C & Lindqvist L. (1997) Photochem Photobiol 66, 591-595) using time-resolved spectroscopy. In the present work, we have used the same experimental procedure to study the flavin semiquinone in rat kidney long-chain hydroxy acid oxidase and in the flavodehydrogenase domain of flavocytochrome b(2) FDH, two homologous flavoproteins belonging to the family of FMN-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid-oxidizing enzymes. For both proteins, pulsed laser irradiation at 355 nm of the reduced enzyme generated initially the neutral semiquinone, which has rarely been observed previously for these enzymes, and hydrated electron. The radical evolved with time to the anionic semiquinone that is known to be stabilized by these enzymes at physiological pH. The deprotonation kinetics were biphasic, with durations of 1-5 micros and tens of microseconds, respectively. The fast phase rate increased with pH and Tris buffer concentration. However, this increase was about 10-fold less pronounced than that reported for the neutral semiquinone free in aqueous solution. pK(a) values close to that of the free flavin semiquinone were obtained from the transient protolytic equilibrium at the end of the fast phase. The second slow deprotonation phase may reflect a conformational relaxation in the flavoprotein, from the fully reduced to the semiquinone state. The anionic semiquinone is known to be an intermediate in the flavocytochrome b(2) catalytic cycle. In light of published kinetic studies, our results indicate that deprotonation of the flavin radical is not rate-limiting for the intramolecular electron transfer processes in this protein.

  15. Action Spectroscopy on Dense Samples of Photosynthetic Reaction Centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides WT Based on Nanosecond Laser-Flash C Photo-CIDNP MAS NMR.

    PubMed

    Daviso, Eugenio; Diller, Anna; Gast, Peter; Alia, A; Lugtenburg, Johan; Müller, Marc G; Matysik, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (photo-CIDNP MAS NMR) allows for the investigation of the electronic structure of the photochemical machinery of photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) at atomic resolution. For such experiments, either continuous radiation from white xenon lamps or green laser pulses are applied to optically dense samples. In order to explore their optical properties, optically thick samples of isolated and quinone-removed RCs of the purple bacteria of Rhodobacter sphaeroides wild type are studied by nanosecond laser-flash (13)C photo-CIDNP MAS NMR using excitation wavelengths between 720 and 940 nm. Action spectra of both the transient nuclear polarization as well as the nuclear hyperpolarization, remaining in the electronic ground state at the end of the photocycle, are obtained. It is shown that the signal intensity is limited by the amount of accessible RCs and that the different mechanisms of the photo-CIDNP production rely on the same photophysical origin, which is the photocycle induced by one single photon.

  16. Selective excavation of human carious dentin using a nanosecond pulsed laser with a wavelength of 5.85 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tetsuya; Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshikawa, Kazushi; Yasuo, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Kazuyo; Awazu, Kunio

    2013-06-01

    Less-invasive treatment of caries has been needed in laser dentistry. Based on the absorption property of dentin substrates, 6 μm wavelength range shows specific absorptions and promising characteristics for the excavation. In our previous study, 5.8 μm wavelength range was found to be effective for selective excavation of carious dentin and restoration treatment using composite resin from the irradiation experiment with bovine sound and demineralized dentin. In this study, the availability of 5.8 μm wavelength range for selective excavation of human carious dentin was investigated for clinical application. A mid-infrared tunable nanosecond pulsed laser by difference-frequency generation was used for revealing the ablation property of human carious dentin. Irradiation experiments indicated that the wavelength of 5.85 μm and the average power density of 30 W/cm2 realized the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but ablation property was different with respect to each sample because of the different caries progression. In conclusion, the wavelength of 5.85 μm could realize the selective excavation of human carious dentin, but it was necessary to evaluate the stage of caries progression in order to control the ablation property.

  17. Nanosecond laser-induced damage at different initial temperatures of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films prepared by dual ion beam sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Cheng Jia, Jiaojiao; Fan, Heliang; Qiang, Yinghuai; Liu, Jiongtian; Yang, Di; Hu, Guohang; Li, Dawei

    2014-08-07

    Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} films were deposited by dual ion beam sputtering method. The nanosecond laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) at different initial temperatures and time of the films was investigated by an in situ high temperature laser-induced damage testing platform. It was shown that, when the initial temperature increased from 298 K to 383 K, the LIDT at 1064 nm and 12 ns significantly decreased by nearly 14%. Then the LIDT at 1064 nm and 12 ns decreased slower with the same temperature increment. Different damage morphologies were found at different initial temperatures. At low initial temperatures, it was the defects-isolated damage while at high initial temperatures it was the defects-combined damage. The theoretical calculations based on the defect-induced damage model revealed that both the significant increase of the highest temperature and the duration contributed to the different damage morphologies. With the initial temperature being increased, the thermal-stress coupling damage mechanism transformed gradually to the thermal dominant damage mechanism.

  18. Efficient multi-keV x-ray source generated by nanosecond laser pulse irradiated multi-layer thin foils target

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Shao-yong; Hu, Guang-yue Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian; Miao, Wen-yong; Yuan, Yong-teng; Zhan, Xia-yu; Hou, Li-fei; Jiang, Shao-en; Ding, Yong-kun

    2014-04-15

    A new target configuration is proposed to generate efficient multi-keV x-ray source using multiple thin foils as x-ray emitters. The target was constructed with several layers of thin foils, which were placed with a specific, optimized spacing. The thin foils are burned though one by one by a nanosecond-long laser pulse, which produced a very large, hot, underdense plasma. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations show that the emission region and the multi-keV x-ray flux generated by multi-layer thin foil target are similar to that of the low-density gas or foam target, which is currently a bright multi-keV x-ray source generated by laser heating. Detailed analysis of a range of foil thicknesses showed that a layer-thickness of 0.1 μm is thin enough to generate an efficient multi-keV x-ray source. Additionally, this type of target can be easily manufactured, compared with the complex techniques for fabrication of low-density foam targets. Our preliminary experimental results also verified that the size of multi-keV x-ray emission region could be enhanced significantly by using a multi-layer Ti thin foil target.

  19. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  20. Neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) 1064-nm picosecond laser vs. Nd:YAG 1064-nm nanosecond laser in tattoo removal: a randomized controlled single-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pinto, F; Große-Büning, S; Karsai, S; Weiß, C; Bäumler, W; Hammes, S; Felcht, M; Raulin, C

    2017-02-01

    For decades, nanosecond lasers (NSLs) have been used to remove tattoos. Since 2012, pulses of picosecond lasers (PSLs) have been available for tattoo removal. Based on a few observational studies, the claim has been made that PSLs are considerably more effective while showing fewer side-effects in comparison with NSLs. To compare the efficacy and side-effects of a PSL side by side with an NSL for tattoo removal. Twenty-one patients with 30 black tattoos were treated with PSL and NSL in a split-study design in two sessions at intervals of 6 weeks. The safety and efficacy of laser treatments were determined by blinded observers assessing randomized digital photographs in this prospective clinical study. The primary end point was the clearance of the tattoos ranging in quartiles from 0% to 100%; secondary end points were side-effects and pain. The average clearance overall as evaluated showed no statistical difference between NSL and PSL (P = 1·00). Using a visual analogue scale (0 = no pain, 10 = maximum pain), a value of 3·8 ± 1·0 was reported for the PSL, which was statistically different from NSL (7·9 ± 1·1, P < 0·001). Transient side-effects were observed, as well as hypo- and hyperpigmentation, but there was no statistically significant difference between PSL and NSL. After two treatments of black tattoos with a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet laser (1064 nm), the use of picosecond pulses does not provide better clearance than nanosecond pulses. However, pain is less severe when using a PSL. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  1. Two-photon microscopy using fiber-based nanosecond excitation

    PubMed Central

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Sauer, Benjamin; Reinholz, Fred; Hüttmann, Gereon; Huber, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful technique for sensitive tissue imaging at depths of up to 1000 micrometers. However, due to the shallow penetration, for in vivo imaging of internal organs in patients beam delivery by an endoscope is crucial. Until today, this is hindered by linear and non-linear pulse broadening of the femtosecond pulses in the optical fibers of the endoscopes. Here we present an endoscope-ready, fiber-based TPEF microscope, using nanosecond pulses at low repetition rates instead of femtosecond pulses. These nanosecond pulses lack most of the problems connected with femtosecond pulses but are equally suited for TPEF imaging. We derive and demonstrate that at given cw-power the TPEF signal only depends on the duty cycle of the laser source. Due to the higher pulse energy at the same peak power we can also demonstrate single shot two-photon fluorescence lifetime measurements. PMID:27446680

  2. Two-photon microscopy using fiber-based nanosecond excitation.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Sebastian; Eibl, Matthias; Sauer, Benjamin; Reinholz, Fred; Hüttmann, Gereon; Huber, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy is a powerful technique for sensitive tissue imaging at depths of up to 1000 micrometers. However, due to the shallow penetration, for in vivo imaging of internal organs in patients beam delivery by an endoscope is crucial. Until today, this is hindered by linear and non-linear pulse broadening of the femtosecond pulses in the optical fibers of the endoscopes. Here we present an endoscope-ready, fiber-based TPEF microscope, using nanosecond pulses at low repetition rates instead of femtosecond pulses. These nanosecond pulses lack most of the problems connected with femtosecond pulses but are equally suited for TPEF imaging. We derive and demonstrate that at given cw-power the TPEF signal only depends on the duty cycle of the laser source. Due to the higher pulse energy at the same peak power we can also demonstrate single shot two-photon fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  3. Modification of measurement methods for evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage function and biochemical properties using nanosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Masato; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Ishihara, Masayuki; Mochida, Joji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    There is a demand in the field of regenerative medicine for measurement technology that enables determination of functions and components of engineered tissue. To meet this demand, we developed a method for extracellular matrix characterization using time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopy, which enabled simultaneous measurements with mechanical properties using relaxation of laser-induced stress wave. In this study, in addition to time-resolved fluorescent spectroscopy, hyperspectral sensor, which enables to capture both spectral and spatial information, was used for evaluation of biochemical characterization of tissue-engineered cartilage. Hyperspectral imaging system provides spectral resolution of 1.2 nm and image rate of 100 images/sec. The imaging system consisted of the hyperspectral sensor, a scanner for x-y plane imaging, magnifying optics and Xenon lamp for transmmissive lighting. Cellular imaging using the hyperspectral image system has been achieved by improvement in spatial resolution up to 9 micrometer. The spectroscopic cellular imaging could be observed using cultured chondrocytes as sample. At early stage of culture, the hyperspectral imaging offered information about cellular function associated with endogeneous fluorescent biomolecules.

  4. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  5. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  6. Comparative study of CW, nanosecond- and femtosecond-pulsed laser microcutting of AZ31 magnesium alloy stents.

    PubMed

    Gökhan Demir, Ali; Previtali, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys constitute an interesting solution for cardiovascular stents due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability in human body. Laser microcutting is the industrially accepted method for stent manufacturing. However, the laser-material interaction should be well investigated to control the quality characteristics of the microcutting process that concern the surface roughness, chemical composition, and microstructure of the final device. Despite the recent developments in industrial laser systems, a universal laser source that can be manipulated flexibly in terms of process parameters is far from reality. Therefore, comparative studies are required to demonstrate processing capabilities. In particular, the laser pulse duration is a key factor determining the processing regime. This work approaches the laser microcutting of AZ31 Mg alloy from the perspective of a comparative study to evaluate the machining capabilities in continuous wave (CW), ns- and fs-pulsed regimes. Three industrial grade machining systems were compared to reach a benchmark in machining quality, productivity, and ease of postprocessing. The results confirmed that moving toward the ultrashort pulse domain the machining quality increases, but the need for postprocessing remains. The real advantage of ultrashort pulsed machining was the ease in postprocessing and maintaining geometrical integrity of the stent mesh after chemical etching. Resultantly, the overall production cycle time was shortest for fs-pulsed laser system, despite the fact that CW laser system provided highest cutting speed.

  7. Nanosecond Nd-YAG laser induced plasma emission characteristics in low pressure CO{sub 2} ambient gas for spectrochemical application on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Tjia, May On; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-08-28

    An experimental study is conducted on the possibility and viability of performing spectrochemical analysis of carbon and other elements in trace amount in Mars, in particular, the clean detection of C, which is indispensible for tracking the sign of life in Mars. For this study, a nanosecond Nd-YAG laser is employed to generate plasma emission from a pure copper target in CO{sub 2} ambient gas of reduced pressure simulating the atmospheric condition of Mars. It is shown that the same shock wave excitation mechanism also works this case while exhibiting remarkably long cooling stage. The highest Cu emission intensities induced by 4 mJ laser ablation energy is attained in 600 Pa CO{sub 2} ambient gas. Meanwhile the considerably weaker carbon emission from the CO{sub 2} gas appears relatively featureless over the entire range of pressure variation, posing a serious problem for sensitive trace analysis of C contained in a solid sample. Our time resolved intensity measurement nevertheless reveals earlier appearance of C emission from the CO{sub 2} gas with a limited duration from 50 ns to 400 ns after the laser irradiation, well before the initial appearance of the long lasting C emission from the solid target at about 1 μs, due to the different C-releasing processes from their different host materials. The unwanted C emission from the ambient gas can thus be eliminated from the detected spectrum by a proper time gated detection window. The excellent spectra of carbon, aluminum, calcium, sodium, hydrogen, and oxygen obtained from an agate sample are presented to further demonstrate and verify merit of this special time gated LIBS using CO{sub 2} ambient gas and suggesting its viability for broad ranging in-situ applications in Mars.

  8. Nanosecond Nd-YAG laser induced plasma emission characteristics in low pressure CO2 ambient gas for spectrochemical application on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Pardede, Marincan; Tjia, May On; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study is conducted on the possibility and viability of performing spectrochemical analysis of carbon and other elements in trace amount in Mars, in particular, the clean detection of C, which is indispensible for tracking the sign of life in Mars. For this study, a nanosecond Nd-YAG laser is employed to generate plasma emission from a pure copper target in CO2 ambient gas of reduced pressure simulating the atmospheric condition of Mars. It is shown that the same shock wave excitation mechanism also works this case while exhibiting remarkably long cooling stage. The highest Cu emission intensities induced by 4 mJ laser ablation energy is attained in 600 Pa CO2 ambient gas. Meanwhile the considerably weaker carbon emission from the CO2 gas appears relatively featureless over the entire range of pressure variation, posing a serious problem for sensitive trace analysis of C contained in a solid sample. Our time resolved intensity measurement nevertheless reveals earlier appearance of C emission from the CO2 gas with a limited duration from 50 ns to 400 ns after the laser irradiation, well before the initial appearance of the long lasting C emission from the solid target at about 1 μs, due to the different C-releasing processes from their different host materials. The unwanted C emission from the ambient gas can thus be eliminated from the detected spectrum by a proper time gated detection window. The excellent spectra of carbon, aluminum, calcium, sodium, hydrogen, and oxygen obtained from an agate sample are presented to further demonstrate and verify merit of this special time gated LIBS using CO2 ambient gas and suggesting its viability for broad ranging in-situ applications in Mars.

  9. Synchronizing single-shot high-energy iodine photodissociation laser PALS and high-repetition-rate femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, J.; Dudzak, R.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Huynh, J.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Krousky, E.; Skala, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Juha, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2017-04-01

    A system of precise pulse synchronization between a single-shot large-scale laser exploiting an acousto-optical modulator and a femtosecond high repetition rate laser is reported in this article. This opto-electronical system has been developed for synchronization of the sub-nanosecond kJ-class iodine photodissociation laser system (Prague Asterix Laser System—PALS) with the femtosecond 25-TW Ti:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser operating at a repetition rate 1 kHz or 10 Hz depending on the required energy level of output pulses. At 1 kHz synchronization regime, a single femtosecond pulse of duration about 45 fs and a small energy less than 1 mJ are exploited as a probe beam for irradiation of a three-frame interferometer, while at 10 Hz repetition rate a single femtosecond pulse with higher energy about 7-10 mJ is exploited as a probe beam for irradiation of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. The synchronization accuracy ±100 ps between the PALS and the Ti:Sa laser pulses has been achieved in both regimes of synchronization. The femtosecond interferograms of laser-produced plasmas obtained by the three-frame interferometer and the femtosecond polarimetric images obtained by the two-frame polaro-interferometer confirm the full usefulness and correct functionality of the proposed method of synchronization.

  10. High energy, low repetition rate, photonic crystal fiber generated supercontinuum for nanosecond to millisecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Julie L. H.; Rohde, Charles A.; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Cather Simpson, M.

    2013-05-01

    High energy density per pulse (-15 dBm nm-1) supercontinuum (SC) source has been developed as a probe for transient absorption (TrA) spectroscopy of systems with lifetimes from nanoseconds to a few milliseconds. We have generated a 600-1600 nm, broadband SC by pumping a 15 m photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with relatively high power, 7 ns, 1064 nm pulses. The SC generated at peak pump power of 7.1 kW was randomly polarized and maintained a stable output (6.5% rms average power; 9.1% rms shot-to-shot power). Co-pumping with both 1064 and 532 nm light extended the wavelength range of the SC by about 20%, to 500-1700 nm. Power conversion efficiency and spectral flatness were improved as well. In the visible range, the single-pump SC shows a flatness of 5 dB while the dual-pump SC exhibits 3 dB. In the NIR (1100-1600 nm), the flatness in single- and dual-pump configurations were 3 and 2 dB, respectively. Optically induced fiber breakdown was characterized.

  11. A Study of Polycrystalline Silicon Damage Features Based on Nanosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation with Different Wavelength Effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangmin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Tengfei; Han, Zhenchun

    2017-03-03

    Based on PVDF (piezoelectric sensing techniques), this paper attempts to study the propagation law of shock waves in brittle materials during the process of three-wavelength laser irradiation of polysilicon, and discusses the formation mechanism of thermal shock failure. The experimental results show that the vapor pressure effect and the plasma pressure effect in the process of pulsed laser irradiation lead to the splashing of high temperature and high density melt. With the decrease of the laser wavelength, the laser breakdown threshold decreases and the shock wave is weakened. Because of the pressure effect of the laser shock, the brittle fracture zone is at the edge of the irradiated area. The surface tension gradient and surface shear wave caused by the surface wave are the result of coherent coupling between optical and thermodynamics. The average propagation velocity of laser shock wave in polysilicon is 8.47 × 103 m/s, and the experiment has reached the conclusion that the laser shock wave pressure peak exponentially distributes attenuation in the polysilicon.

  12. A Study of Polycrystalline Silicon Damage Features Based on Nanosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation with Different Wavelength Effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiangmin; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Tengfei; Han, Zhenchun

    2017-01-01

    Based on PVDF (piezoelectric sensing techniques), this paper attempts to study the propagation law of shock waves in brittle materials during the process of three-wavelength laser irradiation of polysilicon, and discusses the formation mechanism of thermal shock failure. The experimental results show that the vapor pressure effect and the plasma pressure effect in the process of pulsed laser irradiation lead to the splashing of high temperature and high density melt. With the decrease of the laser wavelength, the laser breakdown threshold decreases and the shock wave is weakened. Because of the pressure effect of the laser shock, the brittle fracture zone is at the edge of the irradiated area. The surface tension gradient and surface shear wave caused by the surface wave are the result of coherent coupling between optical and thermodynamics. The average propagation velocity of laser shock wave in polysilicon is 8.47 × 103 m/s, and the experiment has reached the conclusion that the laser shock wave pressure peak exponentially distributes attenuation in the polysilicon. PMID:28772620

  13. Nanosecond laser-induced back side wet etching of fused silica with a copper-based absorber liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Zehnder, Sarah; Ehrhardt, Martin; Frost, Frank; Zimmer, Klaus; Schwaller, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Cost-efficient machining of dielectric surfaces with high-precision and low-roughness for industrial applications is still challenging if using laser-patterning processes. Laser induced back side wet etching (LIBWE) using UV laser pulses with liquid heavy metals or aromatic hydrocarbons as absorber allows the fabrication of well-defined, nm precise, free-form surfaces with low surface roughness, e.g., needed for optical applications. The copper-sulphatebased absorber CuSO4/K-Na-Tartrate/NaOH/formaldehyde in water is used for laser-induced deposition of copper. If this absorber can also be used as precursor for laser-induced ablation, promising industrial applications combining surface structuring and deposition within the same setup could be possible. The etching results applying a KrF excimer (248 nm, 25 ns) and a Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 20 ns) laser are compared. The topography of the etched surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), white light interferometry (WLI) as well as laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The chemical composition of the irradiated surface was studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For the discussion of the etching mechanism the laser-induced heating was simulated with finite element method (FEM). The results indicate that the UV and IR radiation allows micro structuring of fused silica with the copper-based absorber where the etching process can be explained by the laser-induced formation of a copper-based absorber layer.

  14. Nanosecond high-power dense microplasma switch for visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Bataller, A. Koulakis, J.; Pree, S.; Putterman, S.

    2014-12-01

    Spark discharges in high-pressure gas are known to emit a broadband spectrum during the first 10 s of nanoseconds. We present calibrated spectra of high-pressure discharges in xenon and show that the resulting plasma is optically thick. Laser transmission data show that such a body is opaque to visible light, as expected from Kirchoff's law of thermal radiation. Nanosecond framing images of the spark absorbing high-power laser light are presented. The sparks are ideal candidates for nanosecond, high-power laser switches.

  15. Raman spectroscopic analysis of iron chromium oxide microspheres generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Soto-Bernal, J J; Frausto-Reyes, C; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2015-06-15

    Iron chromium oxide microspheres were generated by pulsed laser irradiation on the surface of two commercial samples of stainless steel at room temperature. An Ytterbium pulsed fiber laser was used for this purpose. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the microspheres, whose size was found to be about 0.2-1.7 μm, as revealed by SEM analysis. The laser irradiation on the surface of the stainless steel modified the composition of the microspheres generated, affecting the concentration of the main elemental components when laser power was increased. Furthermore, the peak ratio of the main bands in the Raman spectra has been associated to the concentration percentage of the main components of the samples, as revealed by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. These experiments showed that it is possible to generate iron chromium oxide microspheres on stainless steel by laser irradiation and that the concentration percentage of their main components is associated with the laser power applied.

  16. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  17. Morphology of ejected particles and impact sites on intercepting substrates following exit-surface laser damage with nanosecond pulses in silica

    DOE PAGES

    Demos, Stavros G.; Negres, Raluca A.

    2016-09-08

    A volume of superheated material reaching localized temperatures of the order of 1 eV and pressures of the order of 10 GPa is generated following laser-induced damage (breakdown) on the surface of transparent dielectric materials using nanosecond pulses. This leads to material ejection and the formation of a crater. To elucidate the material behaviors involved, we examined the morphologies of the ejected particles and found distinctive features that support their classification into different types. The different morphologies arise from the difference in the structure and physical properties (such as the dynamic viscosity and presence of instabilities) of the superheated andmore » surrounding affected material at the time of ejection of each individual particle. In addition, the temperature and kinetic energy of a subset of the ejected particles were found to be sufficient to initiate irreversible modification on the intercepting silica substrates. Finally, the modifications observed are associated with mechanical damage and fusion of melted particles on the collector substrate.« less

  18. Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles obtained by nanosecond laser irradiation of gold and platinum bulk targets in an ethylene glycol solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniri, Samira; Reza Hantehzadeh, Mohammad; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Asadi Asadabad, Mohsen

    2017-07-01

    Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) of different compositions ( Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 were obtained using the nanosecond laser ablation of gold and platinum bulk targets in ethylene glycol, followed by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Pt nanocolloids, for the first time. UV-vis absorption spectra of NPs showed that by increasing the Au content in the Au-Pt NPs, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak red-shifted, from 260 to 573nm in a nonlinear way. In addition, the mean crystalline size, crystal structure, d-spacing, and lattice parameters of NPs were estimated from the XRD spectra. Microscopy studies revealed the most NPs have a spherical or near-spherical shape, and the average sizes of Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 NPs were calculated to be 12.50, 14.15, 18.53, 19.29, and 26.38nm, respectively. Also, the chemical identity of the molecules adhering to the NPs surface was considered by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. Among different synthesis methods, the demonstrated technique allows easy synthesis of alloy NPs in aqueous media at room temperature with no formation of by-products.

  19. Fluorescence Detection of H5N1 Virus Gene Sequences Based on Optical Tweezers with Two-Photon Excitation Using a Single Near Infrared Nanosecond Pulse Laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Cao, Di; Kang, Ya-Feng; Lin, Yi; Cui, Ran; Pang, Dai-Wen; Tang, Hong-Wu

    2016-04-19

    We present an analytical platform by combining near-infrared optical tweezers with two-photon excitation for fluorescence detection of H5N1 virus gene sequences. A heterogeneous enrichment strategy, which involved polystyrene (PS) microsphere and quantum dots (QDs), was adopted. The final hybrid-conjugate microspheres were prepared by a facile one-step hybridization procedure by using PS microspheres capturing target DNA and QDs tagging, respectively. Quantitative detection was achieved by the optical tweezers setup with a low-cost 1064 nm nanosecond pulse laser for both optical trapping and two-photon excitation for the same hybrid-conjugate microsphere. The detection limits for both neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences and hemagglutinin (HA) gene sequences are 16-19 pM with good selectivity for one-base mismatch, which is approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than the most existing fluorescence-based analysis method. Besides, because of the fact that only signal from the trapped particle is detected upon two-photon excitation, this approach showed extremely low background in fluorescence detection and was successfully applied to directly detect target DNA in human whole serum without any separation steps and the corresponding results are very close to that in buffer solution, indicating the strong anti-interference ability of this method. Therefore, it can be expected to be an emerging alternative for straightforward detecting target species in complex samples with a simple procedure and high-throughput.

  20. Application of External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Infrared Lasers to Nanosecond Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy of Condensed-Phase Samples Following Pulse Radiolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, D.C.; Cook, A.R.; Fujita, E.; George, M.W.; Miller, J.R.; Preses, J.M.; Wishart, J.F.

    2010-06-01

    Pulse radiolysis, utilizing short pulses of high-energy electrons from accelerators, is a powerful method for rapidly generating reduced or oxidized species and other free radicals in solution. Combined with fast time-resolved spectroscopic detection (typically in the ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared), it is invaluable for monitoring the reactivity of species subjected to radiolysis on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, it is often difficult to identify the transient intermediates definitively due to a lack of structural information in the spectral bands. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy offers the structural specificity necessary for mechanistic investigations but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis experiments. For example, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy has only been applied to a handful of gas-phase studies, limited mainly by several technical challenges. We have exploited recent developments in commercial external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) technology to construct a nanosecond TRIR apparatus that has allowed, for the first time, TRIR spectra to be recorded following pulse radiolysis of condensed-phase samples. Near single-shot sensitivity of DeltaOD <1 x 10(-3) has been achieved, with a response time of <20 ns. Using two continuous-wave EC-QCLs, the current apparatus covers a probe region from 1890-2084 cm(-1), and TRIR spectra are acquired on a point-by-point basis by recording transient absorption decay traces at specific IR wavelengths and combining these to generate spectral time slices. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by monitoring the formation and decay of the one-electron reduced form of the CO(2) reduction catalyst, [Re(I)(bpy)(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)](+), in acetonitrile with nanosecond time resolution following pulse radiolysis. Characteristic red-shifting of the nu(CO) IR bands confirmed that one-electron reduction of the complex took place. The availability of

  1. Application of external-cavity quantum cascade infrared lasers to nanosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy of condensed-phase samples following pulse radiolysis.

    PubMed

    Grills, David C; Cook, Andrew R; Fujita, Etsuko; George, Michael W; Preses, Jack M; Wishart, James F

    2010-06-01

    Pulse radiolysis, utilizing short pulses of high-energy electrons from accelerators, is a powerful method for rapidly generating reduced or oxidized species and other free radicals in solution. Combined with fast time-resolved spectroscopic detection (typically in the ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared), it is invaluable for monitoring the reactivity of species subjected to radiolysis on timescales ranging from picoseconds to seconds. However, it is often difficult to identify the transient intermediates definitively due to a lack of structural information in the spectral bands. Time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy offers the structural specificity necessary for mechanistic investigations but has received only limited application in pulse radiolysis experiments. For example, time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy has only been applied to a handful of gas-phase studies, limited mainly by several technical challenges. We have exploited recent developments in commercial external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) technology to construct a nanosecond TRIR apparatus that has allowed, for the first time, TRIR spectra to be recorded following pulse radiolysis of condensed-phase samples. Near single-shot sensitivity of DeltaOD <1 x 10(-3) has been achieved, with a response time of <20 ns. Using two continuous-wave EC-QCLs, the current apparatus covers a probe region from 1890-2084 cm(-1), and TRIR spectra are acquired on a point-by-point basis by recording transient absorption decay traces at specific IR wavelengths and combining these to generate spectral time slices. The utility of the apparatus has been demonstrated by monitoring the formation and decay of the one-electron reduced form of the CO(2) reduction catalyst, [Re(I)(bpy)(CO)(3)(CH(3)CN)](+), in acetonitrile with nanosecond time resolution following pulse radiolysis. Characteristic red-shifting of the nu(CO) IR bands confirmed that one-electron reduction of the complex took place. The availability of

  2. Comparison of 265 nm Femtosecond and 213 nm Nanosecond Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry for Pb Isotope Ratio Measurements.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Nonose, Naoko; Dorta, Ladina; Günther, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The analytical performance of 265 nm femtosecond laser ablation (fs-LA) and 213 nm nanosecond laser ablation (ns-LA) systems coupled with multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) for Pb isotope ratio measurements of solder were compared. Although the time-resolved signals of Pb measured by fs-LA-MC-ICPMS showed smoother signals compared to those obtained by ns-LA-MC-ICPMS, similar precisions on Pb isotope ratio measurements were obtained between them, even though their operating conditions were slightly different. The mass bias correction of the Pb isotope ratio measurement was carried out by a comparison method using a Pb standard solution prepared from NIST SRM 981 Pb metal isotopic standard, which was introduced into the ICP by a desolvation nebulizer (DSN) via a dual-sample introduction system, and it was successfully demonstrated for Pb isotope ratio measurements for either NIST 981 metal isotopic standard or solder by fs-LA-MC-ICPMS since the analytical results agreed well with the certified value as well as the determined value within their standard deviations obtained and the expanded uncertainty of the certified or determined value. The Pb isotope ratios of solder obtained by ns-LA-MC-ICPMS also showed agreement with respect to the determined value within their standard deviations and expanded uncertainty. From these results, it was evaluated that the mass bias correction applied in the present study was useful and both LA-MC-ICPMS could show similar analytical performance for the Pb isotope ratio microanalysis of metallic samples such as solder.

  3. High speed fabrication of absorbance-enhanced micro-nanostructures on nickel surface using hundred-nanosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jinxiang; Zhang, Jingyuan; Liang, Hao; Wang, Yibo; Zhang, Zhiyan; Liu, Yannan; Lin, Xuechun

    2017-01-01

    We report the generation of micro-nanostructures on nickel surface using a pulsed laser with pulse duration of 100/200 ns. The blacken nickel, which is covered with dense broccoli-like clusters having strong light trapping capacity covering broad spectrum (200-2000 nm), can be produced at a high laser scanning speed up to 100 mm/s. The absorbance of the blacken nickel can be over 98% in the UV, more than 97% in the visible, and over 90% in the near IR. In addition, by treating the nickel surface with two crossing scans of the laser, highly organized and shape-controllable periodic arrays of hump-craters can be fabricated.

  4. Laser Control of a Self-Organized Microporous Structure by a Shock Wave Induced with a Nano-Second Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Yukimasa; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2011-04-01

    We present a controlling technique of a microporous structure by laser irradiation during the self-organization process. A polymer solution was dropped on a substrate at a high humid condition, and the honeycomb structure of regularly aligned pores on the film was fabricated by attaching water droplets on the solution surface. We demonstrated that it was possible to prevent the forming of pores at the region of laser irradiation and the flat surface was fabricated. We also demonstrated a combination structure with two sizes of pores by laser irradiation. Our method is a unique microfabrication processing technique that combines the advantages of bottom up and top down techniques. This method is expected to be applied to photonic crystals, biological cell culturing, surface science and electronics fields, etc.

  5. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  6. Ablation of (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.3}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.7} glass with an ultra-violet nano-second laser

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, P.; Navesnik, J.; Cernohorsky, T.; Kincl, M.; Vlcek, M.; Tichy, L.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The interaction of (GeS{sub 2}){sub 0.3}(Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}){sub 0.7} bulk glass and film with UV nanosecond laser. • Ablation process, topography of crater and structure of the material were studied. • Ablation threshold fluencies changed with the spot diameter and number of pulses. • The photo-thermal expansion of the material occurred for low laser fluency. • Laser direct writing process applicable for fabrication of passive optical elements. - Abstract: The results of an experimental study of the laser ablation of bulk and thin films of a GeSbS chalcogenide glass using UV nanosecond pulses are reported. The response of the samples to illumination conditions was studied through the use of atomic force spectroscopy, digital holographic microscopy, Raman scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The multi-pulse ablation thresholds were determined for both the bulk and thin film samples for varying number of pulses and illuminated spot diameter. The possible application of direct laser writing into the bulk and thin films of this material is presented.

  7. Enhanced x-ray emissions from Au-Gd mixture targets ablated by a high-power nanosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Shang, Wanli; Yang, Jiamin Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Zhan, Xiayu; Du, Huabing; Deng, Bo; Pu, Yikang

    2014-01-28

    As an important x-ray source, enhancement of x-ray emissions from laser-produced plasmas is imperative for various applications. High-Z Au-Gd mixture targets are proposed to enhance the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency compared to pure Au target. In the experiments, a 1 ns frequency-tripled (351 nm wavelength) laser light was used to obtain an intensity of 3×10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} on the targets. The x-ray spectra, total absolute x-ray emissions of all space, M-band fraction and backscattering from pure Au and Au-Gd mixture have been measured, respectively. It is shown that the absolute laser to x-ray conversion efficiency for the Au-Gd mixture containing 60% gold by atom is 47.7%, which has a 15% enhancement compared with that of the pure Au target. The experimental results are consistent with the radiation hydrodynamic simulations.

  8. The Influence of spot size on the expansion dynamics of nanosecond-laser-produced copper plasmas in atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xingwen; Wei, Wenfu; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-06-28

    Laser produced copper plasmas of different spot sizes in air were investigated using fast photography and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The laser energy was 33 mJ. There were dramatic changes in the plasma plume expansion into the ambient air when spot sizes changed from {approx}0.1 mm to {approx}0.6 mm. A stream-like structure and a hemispherical structure were, respectively, observed. It appeared that the same spot size resulted in similar expansion dynamics no matter whether the target was located in the front of or behind the focal point, although laser-induced air breakdown sometimes occurred in the latter case. Plasma plume front positions agree well with the classic blast wave model for the large spot-size cases, while an unexpected stagnation of {approx}80 ns occurred after the laser pulse ends for the small spot size cases. This stagnation can be understood in terms of the evolution of enhanced plasma shielding effects near the plasma front. Axial distributions of plasma components by OES revealed a good confinement effect. Electron number densities were estimated and interpreted using the recorded Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) images.

  9. Process and application of shock compression by nanosecond pulses of frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Yuji; Kimura, Motohiko; Mukai, Naruhiko; Yoda, Masaki; Obata, Minoru; Ogisu, Tatsuki

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed a new process of laser-induced shock compression to introduce a residual compressive stress on material surface, which is effective for prevention of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and enhancement of fatigue strength of metal materials. The process developed is unique and beneficial. It requires no pre-conditioning for the surface, whereas the conventional process requires that the so-called sacrificial layer is made to protect the surface from damage. The new process can be freely applied to water- immersed components, since it uses water-penetrable green light of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The process developed has the potential to open up new high-power laser applications in manufacturing and maintenance technologies. The laser-induced shock compression process (LSP) can be used to improve a residual stress field from tensile to compressive. In order to understand the physics and optimize the process, the propagation of a shock wave generated by the impulse of laser irradiation and the dynamic response of the material were analyzed by time-dependent elasto-plastic calculations with a finite element program using laser-induced plasma pressure as an external load. The analysis shows that a permanent strain and a residual compressive stress remain after the passage of the shock wave with amplitude exceeding the yield strength of the material. A practical system materializing the LSP was designed, manufactured, and tested to confirm the applicability to core components of light water reactors (LWRs). The system accesses the target component and remotely irradiates laser pulses to the heat affected zone (HAZ) along weld lines. Various functional tests were conducted using a full-scale mockup facility, in which remote maintenance work in a reactor vessel could be simulated. The results showed that the system remotely accessed the target weld lines and successfully introduced a residual compressive stress. After sufficient training

  10. Effects of laser acupuncture on blood perfusion rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-ju; Zeng, Chang-chun; Liu, Han-ping; Liu, Song-hao; Liu, Liang-gang

    2006-09-01

    Based on Pennes equation, the influences of the intensity and the impulse frequency of laser acupuncture on the point tissues' blood flow perfusion rate are discussed. We find that the blood perfusion rate of point tissue increases with the intensity of laser acupuncture increasing. After impulse laser acupuncture the point tissue blood perfusion rate increase little, but after continuum laser acupuncture the point tissues blood perfusion rate increase much.

  11. DARPA-NRL Laser Program - Semiannual Technical Report to Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency - 1 July 1975 to 31 December 1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-08-01

    Electron Beam Initiated Visible/ UV Transition Lasers 90 2. Discharge XeF and KrF Lasers 103 3. Chemical Ba Laser 104 4. Collisional Quenching of...the boil-off rate of liquid helium in the detector dewar, minimizes heating effects in the sample, and provides a trigger signal to the nanosecond ...diagram of SF6. The double arrow represents pumping by the nanosecond laser . The levels in the upper right hand part of the diagram are in rapid

  12. Space-resolved analysis of trace elements in fresh vegetables using ultraviolet nanosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvé, Vincent; Portelli, Richard; Boueri, Myriam; Baudelet, Matthieu; Yu, Jin

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to analyze trace elements contained in fresh vegetables. A quadrupled Nd:YAG laser is used in the experiments for ablation. Analyzed samples come from local markets and represent frequently consumed vegetables. For a typical root vegetable, such as potato, spectral analysis of the plasma emission reveals more than 400 lines emitted by 27 elements and 2 molecules, C 2 and CN. Among these species, one can find trace as well as ultra-trace elements. A space-resolved analysis of several trace elements with strong emissions is then applied to typical root, stem and fruit vegetables. The results from this study demonstrate the potential of an interesting tool for botanical and agricultural studies as well for food quality/safety and environment pollution assessment and control.

  13. Characterization of 1064nm nanosecond laser-induced damage on antireflection coatings grown by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin; Ma, Ping; Wei, Yaowei; Zheng, Yi; Pan, Feng; Liu, Hao; Tang, Gengyu

    2012-01-16

    Damage tests are carried out at 1064nm to measure the laser resistance of TiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) and HfO(2)/Al(2)O(3) antireflection coatings grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The damage results are determined by S-on-1 and R-on-1 tests. Interestingly, the damage performance of ALD coatings is similar to those grown by conventional e-beam evaporation process. A decline law of damage resistance under multiple irradiations is revealed. The influence of growth temperature on damage performance has been investigated. Result shows that the crystallization of TiO(2) layer at higher temperature could lead to numerous absorption defects that reduce the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT). In addition, it has been found that using inorganic compound instead of organic compound as precursors for ALD process maybe effectively prevent carbon impurities in films and will increase the LIDT obviously.

  14. Comparison of simultaneous on-line optical and acoustic laser damage detection methods in the nanosecond pulse duration domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somoskoi, T.; Vass, Cs; Mero, M.; Mingesz, R.; Bozoki, Z.; Osvay, K.

    2015-05-01

    We carried out single-shot laser-induced damage threshold measurements on dielectric high reflectors guided by the corresponding ISO standard. Four simultaneous on-line detection techniques were tested and compared using 532 nm, 9 ns and 266 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Two methods, microscope aided visual inspection and detection of scattered light off the damaged surface, were based on optical signals. The other two techniques exploited the acoustic waves accompanying a damage event in ambient air and in the substrate by a microphone and a piezoelectric sensor, respectively. A unified criterion based on the statistical analysis of the detector signals was applied to assign an objective and unambiguous damage threshold value for all of our diverse detection methods. Microscope aided visual inspection showed the lowest damage thresholds for both wavelengths. However, the sensitivity of the other three techniques proved to be only slightly lower.

  15. Formation of nanosecond 100 GW radiation pulses in the TIR-1 CO/sub 2/ laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, V.N.; Baranov, V.Y.; Borzenko, V.L.; Burtsev, V.A.; Kozochkin, S.M.; Malyuta, D.D.; Satov, Y.A.; Sebrant, A.Y.; Smakovskii, Y.B.; Strel'tsov, A.P.

    1980-07-01

    Experiments were carried out using a single-beam CO/sub 2/ laser system (designated TIR-1), comprising a master oscillator, an electrooptic switch, a system of amplifiers with optical gas filters, and a chamber for interactions with a target. Measurements were made of the energy characteristics of the laser beam and of the shape of a radiation pulse at different points in the system. Gas absorption cells, designed to suppress self-excitation in the amplifiers, were investigated. The dependence of the cell transmission on the energy of the incident radiation was determined. An analysis was made of the energy parameters and the efficiency of the system was calculated for various real operating regimes.

  16. Comparison of plasma temperature and electron density on nanosecond laser ablation of Cu and nano-Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Jiang, Yuanfei; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Jin, Mingxing

    2015-03-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is performed through the collection of spectra by spectral detection equipment at different delay times and distances from targets composed of Cu and nano-Cu, which are ablated using a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) in our experiments. The measured wavelength range is from 475 nm to 525 nm. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium model, we analyze the characteristics of the plasma temperature and the electron number density for different distances between the target surface and the lens. The results show that when compared with the nano-Cu plasma case, the temperature of the Cu plasma is higher, while its electron number density is lower.

  17. Characterization of charge and kinetic energy distribution of ions emitted during nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of several metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogar, A. H.; Ullah, S.; Qayyum, H.; Rehman, Z. U.; Qayyum, A.

    2017-09-01

    The ion flux from various metals (Al, Ti, Cu, Sn and W) ablated with 20 ns Nd:YAG laser radiation at a wavelength of 1064 nm was investigated by an ion collector operating in time-of-flight (TOF) configuration. The laser irradiance at the target was varied in the range of 1.7  ×  108–5.73  ×  108 W cm‑2. Ion yield from various metals showed a linearly increasing trend with increasing laser irradiance, whereas ion yield was found to decrease with an increasing atomic mass of the target. Our results clearly indicate that ion yield is not a function of the volatility of the metal. TOF ion spectra showed at least two groups of low intensity peaks due to fast ions. The first group of ion peaks, which was present in the spectra of all five metals, was due to surface contamination. The additional fast ion structures in the spectra of Sn and W can be related to the ion acceleration due to the prompt electron emission from these high-Z metals. The ion velocity follows the anticipated inverse square root dependence on the ion mass. For the range of laser irradiance investigated here, the most probable energy of the Cu ions increases from about 100–600 eV. The fast increase in ion energy above ~3  ×  108 W cm‑2 is related to the increase of the Columb part of the ion energy due to the production of multiply charged ions.

  18. Change of self-focusing behavior of phosphate glass resulting from exposure to ultraviolet nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Ehrmann, Paul R; Johnson, Michael A; Schaffers, Kathleen I; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Feit, Michael D

    2013-02-25

    The self-focusing characteristic of 355 nm, 3.3 ns pulses propagating through phosphate glass samples is found to significantly change during repeated exposure. The results indicate this change is related to the formation of color centers in the material as well as the generation of a transient defect population during exposure to the laser pulses. A model is used to fit the experimental data and obtain an estimated range of values for the modified linear and nonlinear indices of refraction.

  19. Usefulness and limitation of measurement methods for evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage function and characterization using nanosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Masato; Kaneshiro, Nagatoshi; Mitani, Genya; Nagai, Toshihiro; Kutsuna, Toshiharu; Ishihara, Masayuki; Mochida, Joji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2007-02-01

    There is a demand in the field of regenerative medicine for measurement technology that enables determination of functions and characterizations of engineered tissue. Regenerative medicine involving the articular cartilage in particular requires measurement of viscoelastic properties and characterization of the extracellular matrix, which plays a major role in articular cartilage. To meet this demand, we previously proposed a noninvasive method for determination of the viscoelasticity using laser-induced thermoelastic wave (1,2). We also proposed a method for characterization of the extracellular matrix using time-resolved autofluorescence spectroscopy, which could be performed simultaneously with laser-induced thermoelastic wave measurement(3). The purpose of this study was to verify the usefulness and limitation of these methods for evaluation of actual engineered cartilage. 3rd Q-SW Nd:YAG laser pulses, which are delivered through optical fiber, were used for the light source. Laser-induced thermoelastic waves were detected by a sensor consisting of a piezoelectric transducer, which was designed for use in arthroscopy(4). The time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was measured by a photonic multichannel analyzer with 4ch digital signal generator. Various tissue-engineered cartilages were developed as samples. Only a limited range of sample thickness could be measured, however, the measured viscoelastic parameters had a positive correlation with culture time, that is, the degree of formation of extracellular matrix(5,6). There were significant differences in the fluorescent parameters among the phenotypic expressions of cartilage because chondrocyte produces specific extracellular matrix as in collagen types depending on its phenotype.

  20. Electro-optical characteristics of 808 nm ridge-waveguide lasers operated with high-current nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klehr, A.; Wünsche, H. J.; Liero, A.; Prziwarka, T.; Erbert, G.; Wenzel, H.; Knigge, A.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present detailed experimental and theoretical investigations of the behavior of ridge-waveguide (RW) lasers emitting at 808 nm under injection of 3 ns long current pulses with amplitudes higher than 10 A. The RW lasers are based on tensile-strained GaAsP quantum wells embedded in asymmetric and extremely asymmetric AlGaAs based waveguide structures, which differ mainly in the ratio between the thicknesses of the p- and n-type confinement layers. The width of the ridges is 4.4 μm and the length of the cavities is 3.9 mm. The laser diodes are mounted on an in-house developed high-frequency unit electrically driven by nearly rectangular shaped current pulses with a length of 3 ns and a repetition frequency of 1 MHz. At a pulse current of 15 A maximum pulse powers of 4.0 and 5.4 W are reached for the asymmetric and extremely asymmetric structures, respectively. After turning off the bias a pronounced negative current superimposed by current oscillations caused by the external circuitry appears. Two-dimensional simulations based on a solution of the time-dependent drift-diffusion, waveguide and power-balance equations reveal that a part of the carriers injected into the laser diode does not recombine in the active region and accumulates under the ridge in the bulk layers and beyond the ridge in the active layer. At the end of the electrical pulse the electrons flow back and generate a reverse (negative) current. The simulation exaggerates the achievable output power, in particular for the extremely asymmetric structure. Further theoretical studies are needed to resolve this discrepancy.

  1. Investigation of optical fibers for high-repetition-rate, ultraviolet planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the fundamental transmission characteristics of nanosecond-duration, 10 kHz repetition rate, ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses through state-of-the-art, UV-grade fused-silica fibers being used for hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. Studied in particular are laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs), nonlinear absorption, and optical transmission stability during long-term UV irradiation. Solarization (photodegradation) effects are significantly enhanced when the fiber is exposed to high-repetition-rate, 283 nm UV irradiation. For 10 kHz laser pulses, two-photon absorption is strong and LIDTs are low, as compared to those of laser pulses propagating at 10 Hz. The fiber characterization results are utilized to perform single-laser-shot, OH-PLIF imaging in pulsating turbulent flames with a laser that operates at 10 kHz. The nearly spatially uniform output beam that exits a long multimode fiber becomes ideal for PLIF measurements. The proof-of-concept measurements show significant promise for extending the application of a fiber-coupled, high-speed OH-PLIF system to harsh environments such as combustor test beds, and potential system improvements are suggested.

  2. Study of hydrogen states in a-Si:H films, dehydrogenization treatments and influence of hydrogen on nanosecond pulse laser crystallization of a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. A.; Galkov, M. S.; Safronova, N. A.; Kamaev, G. N.; Antonenko, A. H.; Kochubey, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Structures based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited on various substrates (including not refractory ones) are widely applied in giant microelectronics devices, such as flat panel displays based on active matrix thin-film transistors and solar cells. The a-Si:H films produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) methods, contain up to 40% atoms of hydrogen. The influence of hydrogen on the optical and electrical properties of the films and their degradation is important. Therefore, the development of express and non-destructive methods for control of the hydrogen concentration in thin films continues to be an actual task to date. Previously, from a comparative analysis of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy, the ratios of the integral intensities of Raman peaks due to scattering by vibrations of the Si-H and Si-H2 bonds to the intensity of Raman peak of the Si-Si bonds were experimentally determined. Knowing these ratios, it is possible to measure the hydrogen concentration, moreover, separately in Si-H and Si-H2 states. Proposed quantitative method for determining of the hydrogen concentration from analysis of the Raman spectra is an express, non-destructive method and can be used for "in situ" monitoring of the hydrogen. The aim of this work was to determine the polarization dependence of Raman scattering by stretching vibrations of Si-H bonds and find the form of the corresponding Raman tensors. From analysis of Raman intensities in different polarizations the Raman tensors for Si-H and Si-H2 bonds were determined. The regimes for dehydrogenization of thick (up to 1 micron) a-Si:H films were found. The nanosecond pulse XeCl laser with wavelength of 308 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns was used for pulse crystallization of as-deposited and dehydrogenated films. As it was studied earlier, for a-Si:H films with high hydrogen concentration, the threshold for crystallization is very close to threshold of

  3. Nanosecond laser-induced ablation and laser-induced shockwave structuring of polymer foils down to sub-μm patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, P.; Bayer, L.; Ehrhardt, M.; Zimmer, K.; Engisch, L.

    2015-03-01

    Micro- and nanostructures exhibit a growing commercial interest where a fast, cost-effective, and large-area production is attainable. Laser methods have a great potential for the easy fabrication of surface structures into flexible polymer foils like polyimide (PI). In this study two different concepts for the structuring of polymer foils using a KrF excimer laser were tested and compared: the laser-induced ablation and the laser-induced shock wave structuring. The direct front side laser irradiation of these polymers allows the fabrication of different surface structures. For example: The low laser fluence treatment of PI results in nano-sized cone structures where the cone density can be controlled by the laser parameters. This allows inter alia the laser fabrication of microscopic QR code and high-resolution grey-tone images. Furthermore, the laser treatment of the front side of the polymer foil allows the rear side structuring due to a laserinduced shock wave. The resultant surface structures were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as well as white light interferometry (WLI).

  4. Multi-parametric modeling of solid sample heating by nanosecond laser pulses in application for nano-ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; Fomichev, S. V.; Jabbour, C.; Lacour, J.-L.; Tabarant, M.; Chartier, F.

    2017-10-01

    Multi-parametric theoretical studies to analyze the effect of both the matter properties (absorption coefficient, thermal conductivity and diffusivity) and the heating field parameters (spatial distribution and pulse duration) on the resulted temperature distribution are presented. For heating in sub-micrometric range (< 1 μm), a low dependence of heating temperature distribution on the sample thermal properties and heating source duration was observed. Nano-ablation thresholds are found to be increasing inversely with heating source dimensions. The simulation results demonstrated a good agreement with the nanometer-size craters (100 nm diameters, 10 nm depth) obtained experimentally with a tip-enhanced near-field ablation (4 ns laser pulse duration, 266 nm wavelength) of Si- and Au-samples.

  5. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  6. Picosecond-nanosecond laser photolysis studies on the photochemical reaction of excited benzophenone with 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane in acetonitrile solution: proton abstraction of the free benzophenone anion radical from the ground state amine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Morita, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kenji; Mataga, Noboru

    1991-04-01

    Picosecond and nanosecond dynamics of the ion pair produced by the electron transfer reaction between the triplet state benzophenone ( 3BP*) and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) was investigated by means of transient absorption spectroscopy and laser-induced photoconductivity measurement. It has been revealed that the solvated free anion radical of BP, produced by the rapid ionic dissociation of the ion pair within 2 ns, abstracts proton from the neutral DABCO giving benzophenone ketyl radical, competing with the charge recombination reaction at encounter with DABCO +, decomposition and/or impurity scavenging processes.

  7. Diode-pumped large-aperture Nd:YAG slab amplifier for high energy nanosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Guangyan; Chen, Yanzhong; He, Jianguo; Lang, Ye; Lin, Weiran; Tang, Xiongxin; Zhang, Hongbo; Kang, Zhijun; Fan, Zhongwei

    2017-10-01

    A high gain, low thermal-induced wavefront distortion, laser diode-pumped Nd: YAG slab amplifier is demonstrated with its active media dimensions of 7 mm ×35 mm ×138.2 mm. Under the 200 Hz, 1440 W pulse pumping condition while no seed light to amplify, the thermal induced wavefront aberration of a He-Ne probe passing through the gain meUdium is 0.165 λ@633 nm (RMS). The amplifier shows stable aberration character with two major low-order terms, defocus and 0° astigmatism. The fluorescence distribution, stored energy, and small-signal gain of the amplifier are measured and have a good agreement with the calculated results. In the amplifier, the fluorescence is uniformly distributed and the maximum stored energy of 3.2 J can be achieved with a plane-concave cavity at 200 Hz pump repetition frequency. For a repetition frequency of 200 Hz, 25 μJ injection polarized seed-light and 1440 W pump power, the small signal gain reaches 9.45. The amplifier has been successfully employed in a 200 Hz, 5 J, MOPA system with 1.7 times diffraction limited output.

  8. Spatial characterization of red and white skin potatoes using nano-second laser induced breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, Imran; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, S.; Haq, M. Oun ul; Niazi, Muhammad Zubair Khan; Muhammad, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    We presents spectroscopic study of the plasma generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation of the flesh of red and white skin potatoes. From the spectra recorded with spectrometer (LIBS2500+, Ocean Optics, USA) 11 elements were identified in red skin potato, whereas, the white skin potato was found to have nine elements. Their relative concentrations were estimated using CF-LIBS method for the plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The target was placed in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The electron temperature and number density were calculated from Boltzmann plot and stark broadened line profile methods, respectively using Fe I spectral lines. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters were also studied which show a decreasing trend of 6770 K-4266 K and (3-2.0) × 1016 cm-3. Concentrations of the detected elements were monitored as a function of depth of the potatoes. Our study reveals a decreasing tendency in concentration of iron from top to the centre of potato's flesh, whereas, the concentrations of other elements vary randomly.

  9. Ultrastructural imaging and molecular modeling of live bacteria using soft x-ray contact microscopy with nanoseconds laser plasma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kado, M.; Richardson, M.C.; Gabel, K.; Torres, D.; Rajyaguru, J.; Muszynski, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Detection for clinical diagnosis and study of microbial cell is performed by a combination of low magnification optical microscopy and direct and indirect labeling techniques. Visual ultrastructural studies on subcellular organelles are possible with variations of electron microscopy (thin section, scanning and freeze fracture), although specimen preparation steps such as fixation, dehydration, resin embedding, ultra-thin sectioning, coating and staining are very specialized, extensive and may introduce artifacts in the original sample. The development of high resolution x-ray microscopy is a new technique well suited to observe the intact structure of a biological specimen at high resolution without any artifacts. Here, x ray images of the various live bacteria, such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, and micromolecule such as chromosomal DNA from Escherichia coli, and Lipopolysaccharide from Burkholderia cepacia, are obtained with soft x-ray contact microscopy. A compact tabletop type glass laser system is used to produce x rays from Al, Si, and Au targets. The PMMA photoresists are used to record x-ray images. An AFM (atomic force microscope) is used to reproduce the x-ray images from the developed photoresists. The performance of the 50 nm spatial resolutions are achieved and images are able to be discussed on the biological view.

  10. Nanosecond pulsed laser ablated sub-10 nm silicon nanoparticles for improving photovoltaic conversion efficiency of commercial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, H. R.; Ghobadi, A.; Ulusoy Ghobadi, T. G.; Ates, H.; Topalli, K.; Okyay, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the enhancement of photovoltaic (PV) solar cell efficiency using luminescent silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs). Sub-10 nm Si-NPs are synthesized via pulsed laser ablation technique. These ultra-small Si nanoparticles exhibit photoluminescence (PL) character tics at 425 and 517 nm upon excitation by ultra-violet (UV) light. Therefore, they can act as secondary light sources that convert high energetic photons to ones at visible range. This down-shifting property can be a promising approach to enhance PV performance of the solar cell, regardless of its type. As proof-of-concept, polycrystalline commercial solar cells with an efficiency of ca 10% are coated with these luminescent Si-NPs. The nanoparticle-decorated solar cells exhibit up to 1.64% increase in the external quantum efficiency with respect to the uncoated reference cells. According to spectral photo-responsivity characterizations, the efficiency enhancement is stronger in wavelengths below 550 nm. As expected, this is attributed to down-shifting via Si-NPs, which is verified by their PL characteristics. The results presented here can serve as a beacon for future performance enhanced devices in a wide range of applications based on Si-NPs including PVs and LED applications.

  11. A study of laser-induced blue emission with nanosecond decay of silicon nanoparticles synthesized by a chemical etching method.

    PubMed

    Bagabas, Abdulaziz A; Gondal, Mohammed A; Dastageer, Mohammed A; Al-Muhanna, Abdulrahman A; Alanazi, Thaar H; Ababtain, Moath A

    2009-09-02

    Silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs), exhibiting a strong visible photoluminescence (PL), have found many applications in optoelectronics devices, biomedical tags and flash memories. Chemical etching is a well-known method for synthesizing orange-luminescent, hydride-capped silicon nanoparticles (H/Si NPs). However, a blueshift in emission wavelength occurs when reducing the particle size to exciton Bohr radius or less. In this paper, we attempted to synthesize and characterize H/Si NPs that emit lower wavelengths at room temperature. We proved that our method succeeded in synthesizing H/Si NPs with emission in the blue region. The wavelength-resolved and time-resolved studies of the PL were executed for H/Si NPs in methanol (MeOH), pyridine (py) and furan, using the 355 nm pulsed radiation from a Nd:YAG laser. In addition, excitation wavelength-dependent and PL studies were executed using the spectrofluorometer with a xenon (Xe) broad band light source. We noticed solvent-dependent PL spectra with sharp peaks near 420 nm and a short lifetime less than 100 ns. The morphology and particle size were investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Particles as small as one nanometer were observed in MeOH and py suspensions while two-nanometer particles were observed in the furan suspension.

  12. Development of a noninvasive multifunctional measurement method using nanosecond pulsed laser for evaluation of regenerative medicine for articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Sato, Masato; Kaneshiro, Nagatoshi; Mitani, Genya; Sato, Shunichi; Ishihara, Masayuki; Mochida, Joji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrated the capability of a photoacoustic method for viscoelastic measurement. The measurement method has already proved to be useful for evaluation of regenerative medicine of articular cartilage. However, characterization of the extracellular matrix as well as determination of the viscoelastic property should be carried out for evaluation of regenerative medicine because the extracellular matrix plays an important role. We therefore developed a method for characterization of the extracellular matrix that can be performed simultaneously with the photoacoustic measurement. Since collagen molecules, which are the major contents of the cartilage extracellular matrix, are well known as endogenous fluorescent molecules, it is possible that fluorescence measurement will enable characterization of the extracellular matrix. Third harmonic Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses were used as an excitation light source. The time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was obtained by using a photonic multi-channel analyzer. Tissue-engineered cartilages cultured under different conditions for various periods were used as samples. Different culture conditions resulted in different extracellular matrix formations. There were significant differences in the measured fluorescent parameters among the culture conditions of cartilage because chondrocytes produce a specific extracellular matrix depending on its culture condition. The specific extracellular matrix contained a specific type of collagen such as collagen type I or type II, which each have specific fluorescent features. Thus, the fluorescent parameters enabled characterization of synthesis of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix. Therefore, the combination of fluorescence and photoacoustic measurement is expected to become a useful evaluation method in regenerative medicine.

  13. Comparison of the effects of the repetition rate between microsecond and nanosecond pulses: electropermeabilization-induced electro-desensitization?

    PubMed

    Silve, A; Guimerà Brunet, A; Al-Sakere, B; Ivorra, A; Mir, L M

    2014-07-01

    Applications of cell electropermeabilization are rapidly growing but basic concepts are still unclear. In particular, the impact of electric pulse repetition rate in the efficiency of permeabilization has not yet been understood. The impact of electric pulse repetition rate in the efficiency of permeabilization was analyzed in experiments performed on potato tissue and partially transposed on mice liver. On potato tissue, pulses with durations of 100μs or 10ns are applied. The intensity of permeabilization was quantified by means of bioimpedance changes and electric current measurements and a new index was defined. For the two pulse durations tested, very low repetition rates (below 0.1Hz) are much more efficient to achieve cell permeabilization in potato tissue. In mice liver, using 100μs pulses, the influence of the repetition rate is more complex. Indeed, repetition rates of 1Hz and 10Hz are more efficient than 100Hz or 1kHz, but not the repetition rate of 0.1Hz for which there is an impact of the living mice organism response. We propose that the effects reported here might be caused by an electroporation-induced cell membrane 'electro-desensitization' which requires seconds to dissipate due to membrane resealing. This study not only reinforces previous observations, but moreover it sustains a new concept of 'electro-desensitization' which is the first unifying mechanism enabling to explain all the results obtained until now both in vitro and in vivo, with long and short pulses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanosecond frame cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A M; Wilkins, P R

    2001-01-05

    The advent of CCD cameras and computerized data recording has spurred the development of several new cameras and techniques for recording nanosecond images. We have made a side by side comparison of three nanosecond frame cameras, examining them for both performance and operational characteristics. The cameras include; Micro-Channel Plate/CCD, Image Diode/CCD and Image Diode/Film; combinations of gating/data recording. The advantages and disadvantages of each device will be discussed.

  15. Kinetic Studies of Plasma Chemical Fuel Oxidation in Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges by Single and Two Photon Laser Induced Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    kHz repetition rate in fuel lean hydrogen, methane , ethylene, and propane-air plasmas at P = 100 Torr is compared to predictions from a plasma...hydrogen, methane , ethylene, and propane-air plasmas at P = 100 Torr is compared to predictions from a plasma-chemical fuel oxidation code. It is found...3.0, USC, and Konnov mechanisms. 3. Atomic Oxygen Measurements Atomic oxygen (O) production and decay is studied in the diffuse single filament

  16. Effect of defocusing distance on the contaminated surface of brass ring with nanosecond laser in a 3D laser scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mali; Liu, Tiegen; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Meng

    2014-08-01

    Defocusing distance plays a key role in laser cleaning result and can be either positive or negative, depending on the focus position relative to the sample surface. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the defocusing distance on the cleaning efficiency of oxidized brass surface. The oxide layer from the surface of a brass ring was processed with a three dimensional (3-D) dynamically focused laser galvanometer scanning system. The relationship between removal efficiency of the oxide layer and the defocusing distance was analyzed. The sample surface topography, element content before and after the laser cleaning were analyzed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the surface quality after laser cleaning was analyzed by a Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), the chemical constituents of the oxide layer on the sample surface after being processed with different defocusing distances were examined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The results show that the ratios of Cu/O and Zn/O reach the maximum of 53.2 and 27.78 respectively when the defocusing distance is +0.5 mm. The laser pulses will lose the ability to remove the oxide layer from the substrate surface when the defocusing distance is larger than ±2 mm.

  17. Laser nanoablation of diamond surface at high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Pashinin, V. P.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The chemical etching of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses with a high repetition rate (f ≤slant 500 {\\text{kHz}}) in air is experimentally investigated. The irradiation has been performed by the second-harmonic (515 {\\text{nm}}) radiation of a disk Yb : YAG laser. Dependences of the diamond surface etch rate on the laser energy density and pulse repetition rate are obtained.

  18. Generation of nanosecond and subnanosecond laser pulses by AlGaAs/GaAs laser-thyristor with narrow mesa stripe contact.

    PubMed

    Slipchenko, Sergey O; Podoskin, Aleksandr A; Soboleva, Olga S; Pikhtin, Nikita A; Bagaev, Timur A; Ladugin, Maxim A; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Simakov, Vladimir A; Tarasov, Il'ya S

    2016-07-25

    Lasers-thyristors with a narrow (20 μm) mesa stripe contact have been studied. It was shown that the laser peak power reaches a value of 2.5 W in the long-pulse mode at a pulse width of 13 ns. It was demonstrated that generation of a controlled train of laser pulses with peak power of 1.6 W and width of 90 ps is possible in the short-pulse mode. The maximum value of the pulse repetition frequency was 470 kHz at the following working characteristics of the laser-thyristor: blocking voltage 5.8 V, control current pulse 25 mA. A number of specific features were observed in the short-pulse mode. It was found that the blocking voltage and amplitude of the control current pulse affect the lasing process. We observed that in short pulse mode the lasing spectra have a two-band structure and the lateral near field may degenerate into a single spot with size substantially smaller than the mesa stripe width. It was shown that the main reason for the observed specific features of lasing is the clearly pronounced effect of the spatial localization of the current.

  19. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Brendon; Berrill, Mark A; Wernsing, Keith; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  20. Ablation Study of WC and PCD Composites Using 10 Picosecond and 1 Nanosecond Pulse Durations at Green and Infrared Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Gregory; Wegener, Konrad

    An ablation study is carried out to compare 10 picosecond and 1 nanosecond pulse durations as well as 532 nanometre and 1064 nanometre wavelengths at each corresponding pulse duration. All laser parameters are kept constant in order to understand the influence of pulse duration and wavelength independently. The materials processed according to the electronic band structure are a metal and an insulator/metal composite, i.e. tungsten carbide and polycrystalline diamond composite respectively. After laser processing said materials, the ablation rate and surface roughness are determined. Analysis into the ablation behaviour between the various laser parameters and the materials processed is given, with a particular emphasis on the graphitisation of diamond.