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Sample records for rate turn point

  1. Measuring zebrafish turning rate.

    PubMed

    Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; di Bernardo, Mario; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a popular animal model in preclinical research, and zebrafish turning rate has been proposed for the analysis of activity in several domains. The turning rate is often estimated from the trajectory of the fish centroid that is output by commercial or custom-made target tracking software run on overhead videos of fish swimming. However, the accuracy of such indirect methods with respect to the turning rate associated with changes in heading during zebrafish locomotion is largely untested. Here, we compare two indirect methods for the turning rate estimation using the centroid velocity or position data, with full shape tracking for three different video sampling rates. We use tracking data from the overhead video recorded at 60, 30, and 15 frames per second of zebrafish swimming in a shallow water tank. Statistical comparisons of absolute turning rate across methods and sampling rates indicate that, while indirect methods are indistinguishable from full shape tracking, the video sampling rate significantly influences the turning rate measurement. The results of this study can aid in the selection of the video capture frame rate, an experimental design parameter in zebrafish behavioral experiments where activity is an important measure.

  2. Turning points in reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Beckjord, E.S.

    1995-09-01

    This article provides some historical aspects on nuclear reactor design, beginning with PWR development for Naval Propulsion and the first commercial application at Yankee Rowe. Five turning points in reactor design and some safety problems associated with them are reviewed: (1) stability of Dresden-1, (2) ECCS, (3) PRA, (4) TMI-2, and (5) advanced passive LWR designs. While the emphasis is on the thermal-hydraulic aspects, the discussion is also about reactor systems.

  3. Market turning points forecasting using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Limiao; Yan, Sen; Zheng, Xiaolian; Chen, Ben M.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the system adaptation framework we previously proposed, a frequency domain based model is developed in this paper to forecast the major turning points of stock markets. This system adaptation framework has its internal model and adaptive filter to capture the slow and fast dynamics of the market, respectively. The residue of the internal model is found to contain rich information about the market cycles. In order to extract and restore its informative frequency components, we use wavelet multi-resolution analysis with time-varying parameters to decompose this internal residue. An empirical index is then proposed based on the recovered signals to forecast the market turning points. This index is successfully applied to US, UK and China markets, where all major turning points are well forecasted.

  4. Predicting Turning Points for Toy Cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsdell, M. W.; Wick, D. P.

    2005-10-01

    A simple experiment can be performed to estimate a toy car's effective coefficient of friction without the use of sophisticated equipment. The results can be used to predict the car's turning points when traveling on an arbitrarily shaped track containing multiple hills and valleys in a 2-D vertical plane. This activity is based on a team-oriented modeling-based project conducted at Clarkson University, which was published in the American Journal of Physics.

  5. Turning Points: Priorities for Teacher Education in a Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Rosalie M.

    2009-01-01

    Every generation has its moment, some turning point that will mark its place in the historical record. Such points provide the direction of our history and our future. Turning points are, characteristically, times of turmoil based on a fundamental change in models or events--what Thomas Kuhn called a "paradigm shift." In terms of a democratic…

  6. Turning Points in the Development of Classical Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabor, Elena

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the vocational socialization turning points in families of classical musicians. I sampled and interviewed 20 parent-child dyads, for a total of 46 interviews. Data analysis revealed that classical musicians' experiences were marked by 11 turning points that affected their identification with the occupation:…

  7. Turning points in long distance grandparent-grandchild relationships.

    PubMed

    Bangerter, Lauren R; Waldron, Vincent R

    2014-04-01

    This study examines changes in long-distance relationships between grandparents and their adolescent grandchildren by identifying relational turning points and trajectories. Qualitative analysis of data collected from interviews with grandparents yielded 100 unique turning points. Constant comparative analysis revealed eight distinct categories of relational turning points; Spending Time Together, Family Relational Dynamics, Geographic Distance, Lack of Relational Investment, Use of Technology, Relational Investment, Lack of Free Time, and Grandchild Gaining Independence. These varied in the degree to which they positively or negatively impacted relational closeness. Application of the Retrospective Interview Technique (RIT) yielded five distinctive relational trajectories: Decrease in Closeness, Increase in Closeness, Multidimensional Changes in Closeness, Minimal Changes in Closeness, and Consistent Relational Closeness. The results expose the communicative challenges faced by long-distance-grandparents, the diversity of these relationships, and the ways in which grandparenting bonds change over time. Implications for an enriched understanding of grandparenting relationships and practical applications for families are explored. PMID:24655676

  8. Singular perturbations and vanishing passage through a turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Maesschalck, P.; Dumortier, F.

    The paper deals with planar slow-fast cycles containing a unique generic turning point. We address the question on how to study canard cycles when the slow dynamics can be singular at the turning point. We more precisely accept a generic saddle-node bifurcation to pass through the turning point. It reveals that in this case the slow divergence integral is no longer the good tool to use, but its derivative with respect to the layer variable still is. We provide general results as well as a number of applications. We show how to treat the open problems presented in Artés et al. (2009) [1] and Dumortier and Rousseau (2009) [13], dealing respectively with the graphics DI2a and DF1a from Dumortier et al. (1994) [14].

  9. The turning point in the number of traffic fatalities: two hypotheses about changes in underlying trends.

    PubMed

    Brüde, Ulf; Elvik, Rune

    2015-01-01

    The number of traffic fatalities reached a peak in many highly motorised countries around 1970. Some previous studies have suggested that the turning point in the number of traffic fatalities was inevitable and did not reflect a change in the underlying trends influencing the number of traffic fatalities. Other studies suggest that trends in traffic growth and fatality rate changed from before to after the turning point. This paper proposes two hypotheses about the turning point in the number of traffic fatalities. One hypothesis is that the long-term trends in traffic growth and fatality rate were the same before and after the turning point. The other hypothesis is that the long-term trends in traffic growth and fatality rate were different before and after the turning point was reached, in particular that the annual percentage decline in fatality rate became greater after the turning point than before. Such a change would suggest that road safety policy became more effective. Analysis of data for six countries (Denmark, Great Britain, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, United States) lends stronger support to the latter hypothesis than to the former. The lesson for policy makers, in particular in countries where the number of traffic fatalities is still growing, is that they should not expect a turning point to be reached without policy interventions.

  10. Turning Points of the Spherical Pendulum and the Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essen, Hanno; Apazidis, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We study the turning point problem of a spherical pendulum. The special cases of the simple pendulum and the conical pendulum are noted. For simple initial conditions the solution to this problem involves the golden ratio, also called the golden section, or the golden number. This number often appears in mathematics where you least expect it. To…

  11. [Turning points in American psychiatry of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Sabshin, M

    1990-09-01

    Sabshin describes three turning points in twentieth century American psychiatry. Following "the time of the Thirteen", the time of the founders of modern American psychiatry, the first turning point was marked by the rise of Meyerian psychobiology and had its peak impact during the second quarter of the twentieth century. In the post World War II years diverging therapeutic ideologies became dominant, including the important impact of psychoanalysis. But competing ideologies (e.g. in social and biological psychiatry) were of importance also. The most recent turning point was marked by the current surge of neuro-science and psychopharmacology along with empiricism and logical positivsm. It is predicted to peak in the middle of the current decade. Following the preceding demedicalization a remedicalization of psychiatry was the result. For the turn of the 21st century, as Sabshin predicts, a re-emergence of analogues of Meyerian psychobiology will take center stage, particularly concentrating on questions of coping and adaptability, on how the human being keeps himself healthy and sane during subsequent developmental stages as well as in the face of stressful life events. PMID:2262194

  12. Turning points in twentieth-century American psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Sabshin, M

    1990-10-01

    The author examines four major turning points in twentieth-century American psychiatry, emphasizing the movement during the post-World War II period toward a psychotherapeutic/psychoanalytic approach and the emergence of biological psychiatry, neuroscience, and logical positivism during the 1970s and 1980s. He discusses the impact of Adolf Meyer during the mid-twentieth century and his ongoing influence. The final turning point involves a prediction of a late twentieth-century change, including new directions in nosology, emphasis on combined pharmacotherapeutic/psychotherapeutic treatments, efforts to create alternatives to full inpatient care, better outcome data for psychiatric treatments, and beginning resolution of major boundary problems of current practice. PMID:2205113

  13. Changes in the upper turning point due to magnetism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Rekha; Hindman, Bradley W.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1995-01-01

    It was observed that the p-mode power is substantially suppressed in magnetic regions. One possible explanation is that the upper turning point, the acoustic cut-off point of the solar p-modes is lowered in the presence of a magnetic field. A related possibility is that the attenuation length scale in the evanescent region is reduced in the presence of a magnetic field. It is likely that the observations sample a different position in the evanescent tails of the eigenfunctions in magnetic regions because of different temperature structures in these regions. A model is used to quantify the first of these effects.

  14. Turning point sets the stage for emergency preparedness planning.

    PubMed

    Bekemeier, Betty; Dahl, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Nearly a billion dollars were made available to state health departments through federal grants in the spring of 2002 for public health emergency preparedness plans. Twenty-one states had already been participating for some years in The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Turning Point Initiative. This article illustrates how earlier practice and experience in developing cross-sector collaborations and institutionalizing a model of broad-based partnerships for public health decision making can increase effectiveness and efficiency in responding to a call for action around an emergency. PMID:15503602

  15. 77 FR 4989 - Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... Rural Utilities Service Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Availability of an Environmental Assessment... proposal by Turning Point Solar LCC (TPS). The proposal consists of constructing a 49.9 megawatt (MW) ground- mounted solar photovoltaic generating facility in Noble County, Ohio. Turning Point Solar LLC...

  16. 77 FR 25131 - Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Rural Utilities Service Turning Point Solar LLC: Notice of Finding of No Significant Impact AGENCY... Assessment (EA) associated with a solar generation project. The EA was prepared in accordance with the... associated with a potential loan or loan guarantee to Turning Point Solar LLC (Turning Point Solar) for...

  17. "Everything Changed": Relational Turning Point Events in College Teacher-Student Relationships from Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docan-Morgan, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate college teachers' experiences of relational turning points with their students, as well as how these turning point events may affect teacher outcomes. Teachers who were able to identify a relational turning point event with a student (n=306, 78.5% of the overall sample) completed open- and closed-ended…

  18. Experimental design for single point diamond turning of silicon optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.A.

    1996-06-16

    The goal of these experiments is to determine optimum cutting factors for the machining of silicon optics. This report describes experimental design, a systematic method of selecting optimal settings for a limited set of experiments, and its use in the silcon-optics turning experiments. 1 fig., 11 tabs.

  19. Turning Rate Dynamics of Zebrafish Exposed to Ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is emerging as a species of choice in alcohol-related pharmacological studies. In these studies, zebrafish are often exposed to acute ethanol treatments and their activity scored during behavioral assays. Computational modeling of zebrafish behavior is expected to positively impact these efforts by offering a predictive toolbox to plan hypothesis-driven studies, reduce the number of subjects, perform pilot trials, and refine behavioral screening. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the recently proposed jump persistent turning walker to model the turning rate dynamics of zebrafish exposed to acute ethanol administration. This modeling framework is based on a stochastic mean reverting jump process to capture the sudden and large changes in orientation of swimming zebrafish. The model is calibrated on an available experimental dataset of 40 subjects, tested at different ethanol concentrations. We demonstrate that model parameters are modulated by ethanol administration, whereby both the relaxation rate and jump frequency of the turning rate dynamics are influenced by ethanol concentration. This effort offers a first evidence for the possibility of complementing zebrafish pharmacological research with computational modeling of animal behavior.

  20. Routine turning maneuvers of koi carp Cyprinus carpio koi: effects of turning rate on kinematics and hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanhao; Yang, Yan; Zeng, Lijiang

    2007-12-01

    Spontaneous swimming behaviors of koi carp Cyprinus carpio koi were recorded using a video tracking system. Routine single-beat turns were selected from the recorded image sequences for kinematic and hydrodynamic analysis. As with C-starts, the turns can be divided into two stages (stage 1 and stage 2), based on kinematics. Stage 1 involves a bend to one side forming a C-shaped curve in the body, while stage 2 corresponds to the return flip of the body and tail. The turning angle in stage 1 accounts for the greatest portion of the total turning angle and the mean turning rate in stage 1 reflects the intensity of turn. The effects of the turning rate in stage 1 on both kinematics and hydrodynamics were examined. The duration of stage 1 remained relatively stable over a nearly tenfold change in turning rate. Consequently, the turning angle is dominated by the turning rate in stage 1. The turning radius is not related to the swimming speed. Moreover, except in very fast turns, the turning radius is also not affected by the turning rate. The angle between the side jet and the carp's initial orientation of a turn does not change substantially with the turning rate, and it is always close to 90 degrees (94.2+/-3.1 degrees , N=41), so the orientation of the side jet in the forthcoming turn can be predicted. The angle between the jet and the line joining the center of mass of the carp and the trailing edge of the tail (mean value in stage 1) is also always close to 90 degrees (95.3+/-1.3 degrees , N=41). It is helpful for the carp to maximize the torque so as to improve the turning efficiency. In stage 1, the impulsive moment obtained from the beat of the body and tail and the mean angular momentum of the carp show an agreement in magnitude. Two types of flow patterns in the wake of routine single-beat turns are revealed. The difference between the two types of wakes is in whether or not a vortex ring and a thrust jet are generated in stage 2. The recoil speed of the tail

  1. Turning Points during the Life of Student Project Teams: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raes, Elisabeth; Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study a more flexible alternative of conceptualising changes over time in teams is tested within student project teams. The conceptualisation uses turning points during the lifespan of a team to outline team development, based on work by Erbert, Mearns, & Dena (2005). Turning points are moments that made a significant…

  2. Adolescent Turning Points: The Association between Meaning-Making and Psychological Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavernier, Royette; Willoughby, Teena

    2012-01-01

    Research findings indicate that the ability to create meaning out of turning points (i.e., significant life experiences) is related to psychological well-being. It is not clear, however, whether individuals who report meaning-making and higher well-being are better adjusted "prior" to the experience of their turning point event. This study…

  3. Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Drema S.

    1990-01-01

    A Charleston (West Virginia) native recounts her sixth grade experiences when her elementary school was closed and the (mostly poor) children were sent to a larger middle-class school. Obvious class distinctions and instances of social discrimination led her to attend college and become a teacher. (SV)

  4. Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes roundtable discussions held in November 1996 to address the current condition of higher education, the process of change, and possible joint projects under the new Knight Collaborative group. The group defined the four fundamental steps believed necessary to create a framework for institutional change: (1) establishing a…

  5. Ultrasensitive optical microfiber coupler based sensors operating near the turning point of effective group index difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kaiwei; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Guigen; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Mengying; Wei, Lei

    2016-09-01

    We propose and study an optical microfiber coupler (OMC) sensor working near the turning point of effective group index difference between the even supermode and odd supermode to achieve high refractive index (RI) sensitivity. Theoretical calculations reveal that infinite sensitivity can be obtained when the measured RI is close to the turning point value. This diameter-dependent turning point corresponds to the condition that the effective group index difference equals zero. To validate our proposed sensing mechanism, we experimentally demonstrate an ultrahigh sensitivity of 39541.7 nm/RIU at a low ambient RI of 1.3334 based on an OMC with the diameter of 1.4 μm. An even higher sensitivity can be achieved by carrying out the measurements at RI closer to the turning point. The resulting ultrasensitive RI sensing platform offers a substantial impact on a variety of applications from high performance trace analyte detection to small molecule sensing.

  6. Turning point revisited: launching the next generation of performance management in public health.

    PubMed

    DeAngelo, Julia W; Beitsch, Leslie M; Beaudry, Margaret L; Corso, Liza C; Estes, Larissa J; Bialek, Ron G

    2014-01-01

    A decade ago, the Turning Point Performance Management Excellence Collaborative (Turning Point) developed the first public health-specific performance management (PM) system, with accompanying resource materials, assisted by the Public Health Foundation. Since then, dramatic advancements in PM and quality improvement activities have occurred in public health. Public Health Foundation gathered data that revealed Turning Point was still relevant but difficult to implement within public health. To reflect recent advances and current challenges, Public Health Foundation refreshed the Turning Point model and related guidance tools and developed new resources to facilitate PM implementation. In addition, a new fifth component, "Visible Leadership," was added to the 4-quadrant model and the Self-Assessment Tool. In the future, public health organizations should take an active leadership role in innovating and sustaining PM systems, ensuring they become accountable for producing outcomes, leveraging technology advances, and incorporating best practices from all stakeholders.

  7. Self-Designed Points: Turning Responsibility for Learning over to Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    In her recent "Teaching English in the Two-Year College" ("TETYC") article, Denise Marchionda argues for a grading system in her first-year writing course that turns over responsibility to students for earning grades. The approach, which she calls "the point-by-point grading system," is a variation on a contract grading approach in which each…

  8. Guidance analysis of the aeroglide plane change maneuver as a turning point problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracey, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    The development of guidance approximations for the atmospheric (aeroglide) portion of the minimum fuel, orbital plane change, trajectory optimization problem is described. Asymptotic methods are used to reduce the two point, boundary value, optimization problem to a turning point problem from the bank angle control. The turning point problem solution, which yields an approximate optimal control policy, is given in terms of parabolic cylinder functions, which are tabulated, and integral expressions, which must be numerically computed. Comparisons of the former, over their region of validity, with optimal control solutions show good qualitative agreement. Additional work and analysis is needed to compute the guidance approximation work.

  9. Leveraging finances for public health system improvement: results from the Turning Point initiative.

    PubMed

    Bekemeier, Betty; Riley, Catharine M; Berkowitz, Bobbie

    2007-01-01

    Reforming the public health infrastructure requires substantial system changes at the state level; state health agencies, however, often lack the resources and support for strategic planning and systemwide improvement. The Turning Point Initiative provided support for states to focus on large-scale system changes that resulted in increased funding for public health capacity and infrastructure development. Turning Point provides a test case for obtaining financial and institutional resources focused on systems change and infrastructure development-areas for which it has been historically difficult to obtain long-term support. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive survey research was to enumerate the actual resources leveraged toward public health system improvement through the partnerships, planning, and implementation activities funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as a part of the Turning Point Initiative.

  10. Intervention measures, turning point, and reproduction number for dengue, Singapore, 2005.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ying-Hen; Ma, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The 2005 dengue outbreak in Singapore cumulated in > 14,000 cases and 27 reported dengue deaths. We fit the single-phase Richards model to weekly dengue notification numbers to detect the turning point for the outbreak, which enables us to study the impact of intervention measures relating to the turning point. The results indicate that turning point had most likely occurred in late August or early September, before large-scale intervention measures were implemented. The "initial" reproduction number for the outbreak is estimated to be ~1.89-2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.15-3.00). One of the lessons learned from the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak is that multiple phases of outbreak were observed in some affected countries when efforts to intensify intervention or to sustain vigilance were compromised. Intensive and continuing efforts in the implementation of control measures are essential in reducing further dengue occurrences during any resurgence of dengue.

  11. Tolerancing of single point diamond turned diffractive optical elements and optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    Single point diamond turning has an increasing importance with the production of the surfaces for different optical systems such as infrared systems, prototype production of mobile phone cameras or head mounted displays with plastic lenses or master manufacturing for the injection moulding of plastic lenses for mass products. Tolerances which occur during single point diamond turning of aspheric surfaces and diffractive elements or during polar coordinate laser plotting of Computer-generated holograms will be treated. In both cases we expect similar tolerances, because the work piece is rotated in both diamond turning and laser plotting. The purpose is to understand the typical tolerances and to simulate their influence to the aberrations in the optical system.

  12. The Battle of Okinawa, 1945: Final Turning Point in the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzeng, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the last major battle of World War II that occurred at Okinawa (Japan) in 1945. Explains why the Battle of Okinawa was the turning point in World War II. Includes two maps in the appendix and an annotated bibliography. (CMK)

  13. A Systematic Approach to Process Evaluation in the Central Oklahoma Turning Point (COTP) Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolma, Eleni L.; Cheney, Marshall K.; Chrislip, David D.; Blankenship, Derek; Troup, Pam; Hann, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Formation is an important stage of partnership development. Purpose: To describe the systematic approach to process evaluation of a Turning Point initiative in central Oklahoma during the formation stage. The nine-month collaborative effort aimed to develop an action plan to promote health. Methods: A sound planning framework was used in the…

  14. Gender, turning points, and boomerangs: returning home in young adulthood in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Stone, Juliet; Berrington, Ann; Falkingham, Jane

    2014-02-01

    The idea of a generation of young adults "boomeranging" back to the parental home has gained widespread currency in the British popular press. However, there is little empirical research identifying either increasing rates of returning home or the factors associated with this trend. This article addresses this gap in the literature using data from a long-running household panel survey to examine the occurrence and determinants of returning to the parental home. We take advantage of the longitudinal design of the British Household Panel Survey (1991-2008) and situate returning home in the context of other life-course transitions. We demonstrate how turning points in an individual's life course-such as leaving full-time education, unemployment, or partnership dissolution-are key determinants of returning home. An increasingly unpredictable labor market means that employment cannot be taken for granted following university graduation, and returning home upon completion of higher education is becoming normative. We also find that gender moderates the relationship among partnership dissolution, parenthood, and returning to the parental home, reflecting the differential welfare support in Great Britain for single parents compared with nonresident fathers and childless young adults. PMID:24186334

  15. Revealing turning points in ecosystem functioning over the Northern Eurasian agricultural frontier.

    PubMed

    Horion, Stéphanie; Prishchepov, Alexander V; Verbesselt, Jan; de Beurs, Kirsten; Tagesson, Torbern; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2016-08-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 has been a turning point in the World history that left a unique footprint on the Northern Eurasian ecosystems. Conducting large scale mapping of environmental change and separating between naturogenic and anthropogenic drivers is a difficult endeavor in such highly complex systems. In this research a piece-wise linear regression method was used for breakpoint detection in Rain-Use Efficiency (RUE) time series and a classification of ecosystem response types was produced. Supported by earth observation data, field data, and expert knowledge, this study provides empirical evidence regarding the occurrence of drastic changes in RUE (assessment of the timing, the direction and the significance of these changes) in Northern Eurasian ecosystems between 1982 and 2011. About 36% of the study area (3.4 million km(2) ) showed significant (P < 0.05) trends and/or turning points in RUE during the observation period. A large proportion of detected turning points in RUE occurred around the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 and in the following years which were attributed to widespread agricultural land abandonment. Our study also showed that recurrent droughts deeply affected vegetation productivity throughout the observation period, with a general worsening of the drought conditions in recent years. Moreover, recent human-induced turning points in ecosystem functioning were detected and attributed to ongoing recultivation and change in irrigation practices in the Volgograd region, and to increased salinization and increased grazing intensity around Lake Balkhash. The ecosystem-state assessment method introduced here proved to be a valuable support that highlighted hotspots of potentially altered ecosystems and allowed for disentangling human from climatic disturbances.

  16. Revealing turning points in ecosystem functioning over the Northern Eurasian agricultural frontier.

    PubMed

    Horion, Stéphanie; Prishchepov, Alexander V; Verbesselt, Jan; de Beurs, Kirsten; Tagesson, Torbern; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2016-08-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 has been a turning point in the World history that left a unique footprint on the Northern Eurasian ecosystems. Conducting large scale mapping of environmental change and separating between naturogenic and anthropogenic drivers is a difficult endeavor in such highly complex systems. In this research a piece-wise linear regression method was used for breakpoint detection in Rain-Use Efficiency (RUE) time series and a classification of ecosystem response types was produced. Supported by earth observation data, field data, and expert knowledge, this study provides empirical evidence regarding the occurrence of drastic changes in RUE (assessment of the timing, the direction and the significance of these changes) in Northern Eurasian ecosystems between 1982 and 2011. About 36% of the study area (3.4 million km(2) ) showed significant (P < 0.05) trends and/or turning points in RUE during the observation period. A large proportion of detected turning points in RUE occurred around the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 and in the following years which were attributed to widespread agricultural land abandonment. Our study also showed that recurrent droughts deeply affected vegetation productivity throughout the observation period, with a general worsening of the drought conditions in recent years. Moreover, recent human-induced turning points in ecosystem functioning were detected and attributed to ongoing recultivation and change in irrigation practices in the Volgograd region, and to increased salinization and increased grazing intensity around Lake Balkhash. The ecosystem-state assessment method introduced here proved to be a valuable support that highlighted hotspots of potentially altered ecosystems and allowed for disentangling human from climatic disturbances. PMID:26929395

  17. Asymptotic behaviour of solutions near a turning point: The example of the Brusselator equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzinger, É.

    The Brusselator equation is an example of a singularly perturbed differential equation with an additional parameter. It has two turning points: at x=0 and x=-1. We study some properties of so-called canard solutions, that remain bounded in a full neighbourhood of 0 and in the largest possible domain; the main goal is the complete asymptotic expansion of the difference between two values of the additional parameter corresponding to such solutions. For this purpose we need a study of behaviour of the solutions near a turning point; here we prove that, for a large class of equations, if 0 is a turning point of order p, any solution y not exponentially large has, in some sector centred at 0, an asymptotic behaviour (when ɛ→0) of the form ∑Yn(x/ɛ')ɛ, where ɛ=ɛ, for x=ɛ'X with X large enough, but independent of ɛ. In the Brusselator case, we moreover compute a Stokes constant for a particular nonlinear differential equation.

  18. Turning points and lessons learned: stressful life events and personality trait development across middle adulthood.

    PubMed

    Sutin, Angelina R; Costa, Paul T; Wethington, Elaine; Eaton, William

    2010-09-01

    The present research examined stressful life events and personality development across middle adulthood. Participants (N = 533) related the most stressful event they had experienced within the last 10 years, indicated whether they considered the event to be a turning point and/or lesson learned, and twice completed a comprehensive measure of traits defined by the five-factor model of personality; the stressful event occurred between these two assessments. Descriptions were coded to classify events into broad content domains based on the nature of the event. Prospectively, individuals high in Neuroticism perceived the event as a turning point; extraverts learned a lesson from it. Longitudinally, perceiving the event as a negative turning point was associated with increases in Neuroticism, whereas learning a lesson from the event was associated with increases in Extraversion and Conscientiousness. Characteristics of the events themselves were primarily unrelated to trait change. Across middle adulthood, personality trait change may be more strongly related to how individuals understand the stressful events in their lives rather than simply the occurrence of such events.

  19. Taking a historical turn: possible points of connection between social pyschology and history.

    PubMed

    Knights, Mark

    2012-12-01

    The article confronts methodological differences between (and among) social psychologists and historians about how far the social psychologist should be interested only in contemporary or very recent history and how far general conclusions can be drawn about human behaviour across time and space. The article suggests that social psychology need not be present-centric and might take different forms of a 'historical turn'. In turn, it is suggested, historians can benefit from approaches developed by social psychologists. Seven possible points of connection with the discipline of history are put forward in the hope of fostering future collaborations. These are: the nature of modernity; collective memory and the uses of the past; political discourse and ideologies; partisanship; the public sphere; stereotypes; and languages and images. Indeed, just as they can encourage closer collaboration between historians and social psychologists, these themes might also open a wider inter-disciplinary discussion with anthropologists, sociologists, literary scholars, art historians and scholars of political discourse.

  20. Taking a historical turn: possible points of connection between social pyschology and history.

    PubMed

    Knights, Mark

    2012-12-01

    The article confronts methodological differences between (and among) social psychologists and historians about how far the social psychologist should be interested only in contemporary or very recent history and how far general conclusions can be drawn about human behaviour across time and space. The article suggests that social psychology need not be present-centric and might take different forms of a 'historical turn'. In turn, it is suggested, historians can benefit from approaches developed by social psychologists. Seven possible points of connection with the discipline of history are put forward in the hope of fostering future collaborations. These are: the nature of modernity; collective memory and the uses of the past; political discourse and ideologies; partisanship; the public sphere; stereotypes; and languages and images. Indeed, just as they can encourage closer collaboration between historians and social psychologists, these themes might also open a wider inter-disciplinary discussion with anthropologists, sociologists, literary scholars, art historians and scholars of political discourse. PMID:22832918

  1. 76 FR 37313 - Turning Point Solar LLC; Notice of Intent To Hold a Public Scoping Meeting and Prepare an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... monocrystalline photovoltaic panels mounted on fixed solar racking equipment and the construction of access roads... Rural Utilities Service Turning Point Solar LLC; Notice of Intent To Hold a Public Scoping Meeting and... Turning Point Solar LLC. The proposal consists of constructing a 49.9 megawatt (MW) ground-mounted...

  2. Effect of air-flow rate and turning frequency on bio-drying of dewatered sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Gu, Wei-Mei; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Sludge bio-drying is an approach for biomass energy utilization, in which sludge is dried by means of the heat generated by aerobic degradation of its organic substances. The study aimed at investigating the interactive influence of air-flow rate and turning frequency on water removal and biomass energy utilization. Results showed that a higher air-flow rate (0.0909m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) led to lower temperature than did the lower one (0.0455m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) by 17.0% and 13.7% under turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate and lower turning frequency, temperature cumulation was almost similar to that with the lower air-flow rate and higher turning frequency. The doubled air-flow rate improved the total water removal ratio by 2.86% (19.5gkg(-1) initial water) and 11.5% (75.0gkg(-1) initial water) with turning per two days and four days respectively, indicating that there was no remarkable advantage for water removal with high air-flow rate, especially with high turning frequency. The heat used for evaporation was 60.6-72.6% of the total heat consumption (34,400-45,400kJ). The higher air-flow rate enhanced volatile solids (VS) degradation thus improving heat generation by 1.95% (800kJ) and 8.96% (3200kJ) with turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate, heat consumed by sensible heat of inlet air and heat utilization efficiency for evaporation was higher than the lower one. With the higher turning frequency, sensible heat of materials and heat consumed by turning was higher than lower one.

  3. Developing a local public health infrastructure: the Maine Turning Point experience.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul; Conway, Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the efforts of public health leaders to develop local public health capacity across Maine. More than 200 individuals representing both government and nongovernmental organizations became engaged in The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-sponsored Turning Point project in 1999. In recent years, the state has had only two local (city) health departments, only one of substantial capacity covering an extremely small proportion of the total state population. This article describes Maine Turning Point organizational efforts, challenges, successes, and failures, from the perspective of 3 individuals involved in the process. Five years later, a new network of state-financed, community-based partnerships focused on chronic disease risk factors has been established, apparently strong enough politically to survive in an era of severe state budget cuts. Tobacco use has been reduced. Many other serious public health issues, however, from obesity to mental illness and substance abuse, remain to be successfully addressed. The development of a sustainable statewide network of local agencies providing the essential public health services remains an elusive goal.

  4. Diffraction of acoustic-gravity waves in the presence of a turning point.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in an inhomogeneous atmosphere often have caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Unlike acoustic waves and gravity waves in incompressible fluids, AGW fields in the vicinity of a caustic have never been systematically studied. Here, asymptotic expansions of acoustic gravity waves are derived in the presence of a turning point in a horizontally stratified, moving fluid such as the atmosphere. Sound speed and the background flow (wind) velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. It is found that uniform asymptotic expansions of the wave field in the presence of a turning point can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for AGWs, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the dominant term of the uniform asymptotic solution, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by the cosine and sine of the Berry phase, respectively. The physical meaning and corollaries of the asymptotic solutions are discussed. PMID:27475153

  5. Diffraction of acoustic-gravity waves in the presence of a turning point.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) in an inhomogeneous atmosphere often have caustics, where the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified. Unlike acoustic waves and gravity waves in incompressible fluids, AGW fields in the vicinity of a caustic have never been systematically studied. Here, asymptotic expansions of acoustic gravity waves are derived in the presence of a turning point in a horizontally stratified, moving fluid such as the atmosphere. Sound speed and the background flow (wind) velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. It is found that uniform asymptotic expansions of the wave field in the presence of a turning point can be expressed in terms of the Airy function and its derivative. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for AGWs, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In the dominant term of the uniform asymptotic solution, the terms with the Airy function and its derivative are weighted by the cosine and sine of the Berry phase, respectively. The physical meaning and corollaries of the asymptotic solutions are discussed.

  6. Performance evaluation and optimization of a fast tool servo for single point diamond turning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.C. Jr.; Cuttino, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes a new, fast tool servo system for fabricating non-rotationally symmetric components using single point diamond turning machines. A prototype, designed for flexible interfacing to typical machine tool controllers, will be described along with performance testing data of tilted flat and off-axis conic sections. Evaluation data show that servo produced surfaces have an rms roughness less than 175 angstroms (2-200 {mu}m spatial filter). Techniques for linearizing the hysteretic effects in the piezoelectric actuator are also discussed. The nonlinear effects due to hysteresis are reduced using a dynamic compensator module in conjunction with a linear controller. The compensator samples the hysteretic voltage/displacement relation in real time and modifies the effective gain accordingly. Simulation results indicate that errors in the performance of the system caused by hysteresis can be compensated and reduced by 90%. Experimental implementation results in 80% reduction in motion error caused by hysteresis, but peak-to- valley errors are limited by side effects from the compensation. The uncompensated servo system demonstrated a peak-to-valley error of less than 0.80 micrometer for an off-axis conic section turned on-axis.

  7. Liberating sex, knowing desire: "scientia sexualis"and epistemic turning points in the history of sexuality.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Howard H

    2010-01-01

    This study considers the role of epistemic turning points in the historiography of sexuality. Disentangling the historical complexity of "scientia sexualis," I argue that the late 19th century and the mid-20th century constitute two critical epistemic junctures in the genealogy of sexual liberation, as the notion of free love slowly gave way to the idea of sexual freedom in modern western society. I also explore the value of the Foucauldian approach for the study of the history of sexuality in non-western contexts. Drawing on examples from Republican China (1912-49), I propose that the Foucauldian insight concerning the emergence of a "homosexual identity" in the West can serve as a useful guide for thinking about similar issues in the history of sexuality and the historical epistemology of sexology in modern East Asia.

  8. The Cambrian explosion triggered by critical turning point in genome size evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dirson Jian; Zhang, Shengli

    2010-02-01

    The Cambrian explosion is a grand challenge to science today and involves multidisciplinary study. This event is generally believed as a result of genetic innovations, environmental factors and ecological interactions, even though there are many conflicts on nature and timing of metazoan origins. The crux of the matter is that an entire roadmap of the evolution is missing to discern the biological complexity transition and to evaluate the critical role of the Cambrian explosion in the overall evolutionary context. Here, we calculate the time of the Cambrian explosion by a "C-value clock"; our result quite fits the fossil records. We clarify that the intrinsic reason of genome evolution determined the Cambrian explosion. A general formula for evaluating genome size of different species has been found, by which the genome size evolution can be illustrated. The Cambrian explosion, as a major transition of biological complexity, essentially corresponds to a critical turning point in genome size evolution. PMID:20074549

  9. "From that moment on my life changed": turning points in the healing process for men recovering from child sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Easton, Scott D; Leone-Sheehan, Danielle M; Sophis, Ellen J; Willis, Danny G

    2015-01-01

    Recent research indicates that child sexual abuse often undermines the health of boys and men across the lifespan. However, some male survivors experience a turning point marking a positive change in their health trajectories and healing process. Although frequently discussed in reference to physical health problems or addictions, very little is known about turning points with respect to child sexual abuse for men. The purpose of this secondary qualitative analysis was to describe the different types of turning points experienced by male survivors who completed the 2010 Health and Well-Being Survey (N = 250). Using conventional content analysis, researchers identified seven types of turning points that were classified into three broad categories: influential relationships (professional and group support, personal relationships), insights and new meanings (cognitive realizations, necessity to change, spiritual transformation), and action-oriented communication (disclosure of CSA, pursuit of justice). Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  10. The Turning Point Social Marketing National Excellence Collaborative: integrating social marketing into routine public health practice.

    PubMed

    Pirani, Sylvia; Reizes, Tom

    2005-01-01

    Social marketing can be an effective tool for achieving public health goals. Social marketing uses concepts from commercial marketing to plan and implement programs designed to bring about behavior change that will benefit individuals and society. Although social marketing principles have been used to address public health problems, efforts have been dominated by message-based, promotion-only strategies, and effective implementation has been hampered by both lack of understanding of and use of all of the components of a social marketing approach and lack of training. The Turning Point initiative's Social Marketing National Excellence Collaborative (SMNEC) was established to promote social marketing principles and practices to improve public health across the nation. After 4 years, the Collaborative's work has resulted in improved understanding of social marketing among participating members and the development of new tools to strengthen the social marketing skills among public health practitioners. The Collaborative has also made advances in incorporating and institutionalizing the practice of social marketing within public health in participating states.

  11. Backward bifurcations, turning points and rich dynamics in simple disease models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Wahl, Lindi M; Yu, Pei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, dynamical systems theory and bifurcation theory are applied to investigate the rich dynamical behaviours observed in three simple disease models. The 2- and 3-dimensional models we investigate have arisen in previous investigations of epidemiology, in-host disease, and autoimmunity. These closely related models display interesting dynamical behaviors including bistability, recurrence, and regular oscillations, each of which has possible clinical or public health implications. In this contribution we elucidate the key role of backward bifurcations in the parameter regimes leading to the behaviors of interest. We demonstrate that backward bifurcations with varied positions of turning points facilitate the appearance of Hopf bifurcations, and the varied dynamical behaviors are then determined by the properties of the Hopf bifurcation(s), including their location and direction. A Maple program developed earlier is implemented to determine the stability of limit cycles bifurcating from the Hopf bifurcation. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate phenomena of interest such as bistability, recurrence and oscillation. We also discuss the physical motivations for the models and the clinical implications of the resulting dynamics.

  12. Turning points in nonlinear business cycle theories, financial crisis and the 2007-2008 downturn.

    PubMed

    Dore, Mohammed H I; Singh, Ragiv G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reviews three nonlinear dynamical business cycle theories of which only one (The Goodwin model) reflects the stylized facts of observed business cycles and has a plausible turning point mechanism. The paper then examines the US (and now global) financial crisis of 2008 and the accompanying downturn in the US. The paper argues that a skewed income distribution could not sustain effective demand and that over the 2001-2006 expansion demand was maintained through massive amounts of credit, with more than 50 percent of sales in the US being maintained through credit. A vector autoregression model confirms the crucial role played by credit. However legislative changes that dismantled the restrictions placed on the financial sector after the crash of 1929 and the consequent structural changes in the financial sector after 1980 enabled the growth of new debt instruments and credit. But overexpansion of credit when profits and house prices were declining in 2005/06 led to a nonlinear shift due to a new realization of the poor quality of some of this debt, namely mortgage backed securities. Bankruptcies, followed by retrenchment at the banks, then led to the bursting of the credit bubble, with the possibility of a severe recession.

  13. Sol-gel replicated optics made from single point diamond turned masters exhibit fractal surface roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R.

    1996-05-01

    Deterministic optics manufacturing, notably single point diamond turning (SPDT) has matured such that the current generation of machines is capable of producing refractive and reflective optics for the visible wavelength region that are quite acceptable for many applications. However, spiral tool marks are still produced that result in unwanted diffractive scattering from grating-like features having a spatial frequency determined by the machine feed, tool radius, and other influences such as vibration and material removal effects. Such regular artifacts are the characteristic of deterministic manufacturing methods such as SPDT. The authors present some initial findings suggesting that fractal, or non-deterministic surfaces can be produced by SPDT through sol-gel replication. The key is the large isotropic shrinkage that occurs through monolithic sol-gel replication (a factor of 2.5) that results in all features, including tooling marks, being reduced by that amount. The large shrinkage itself would be a laudable-enough feature of the replication process. However, by an as-yet-not understood manner, the replication process itself seems to alter the roughness character of the replicated surface such that it appears to be fractal when analyzed using contact profilometry and the power spectrum approach.

  14. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  15. Turning points in nonlinear business cycle theories, financial crisis and the 2007-2008 downturn.

    PubMed

    Dore, Mohammed H I; Singh, Ragiv G

    2009-10-01

    This paper reviews three nonlinear dynamical business cycle theories of which only one (The Goodwin model) reflects the stylized facts of observed business cycles and has a plausible turning point mechanism. The paper then examines the US (and now global) financial crisis of 2008 and the accompanying downturn in the US. The paper argues that a skewed income distribution could not sustain effective demand and that over the 2001-2006 expansion demand was maintained through massive amounts of credit, with more than 50 percent of sales in the US being maintained through credit. A vector autoregression model confirms the crucial role played by credit. However legislative changes that dismantled the restrictions placed on the financial sector after the crash of 1929 and the consequent structural changes in the financial sector after 1980 enabled the growth of new debt instruments and credit. But overexpansion of credit when profits and house prices were declining in 2005/06 led to a nonlinear shift due to a new realization of the poor quality of some of this debt, namely mortgage backed securities. Bankruptcies, followed by retrenchment at the banks, then led to the bursting of the credit bubble, with the possibility of a severe recession. PMID:19781138

  16. Age-related modifications in steering behaviour: effects of base-of-support constraints at the turn point.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Maxime R; Fuller, Jason R; Adkin, Allan L; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2008-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of altering the base of support (BOS) at the turn point on anticipatory locomotor adjustments during voluntary changes in travel direction in healthy young and older adults. Participants were required to walk at their preferred pace along a 3-m straight travel path and continue to walk straight ahead or turn 40 degrees to the left or right for an additional 2-m. The starting foot and occasionally the gait starting point were adjusted so that participants had to execute the turn using a cross-over step with a narrow BOS or a lead-out step with a wide BOS. Spatial and temporal gait variables, magnitudes of angular segmental movement, and timing and sequencing of body segment reorientation were similar despite executing the turn with a narrow or wide BOS. A narrow BOS during turning generated an increased step width in the step prior to the turn for both young and older adults. Age-related changes when turning included reduced step velocity and step length for older compared to young adults. Age-related changes in the timing and sequencing of body segment reorientation prior to the turn point were also observed. A reduction in walking speed and an increase in step width just prior to the turn, combined with a delay in motion of the center of mass suggests that older adults used a more cautious combined foot placement and hip strategy to execute changes in travel direction compared to young adults. The results of this study provide insight into mobility constraints during a common locomotor task in older adults.

  17. Postural Strategies and Sensory Integration: No Turning Point between Childhood and Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Mallau, Sophie; Vaugoyeau, Marianne; Assaiante, Christine

    2010-01-01

    strategies as assessed by very slow support oscillations presents a linear development without any qualitative turning point between childhood and adolescence. PMID:20927328

  18. Billions of Planetary Systems: Turning Point at Mid-20th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, S. J.

    2002-12-01

    The search for planetary systems, an elusive goal for most of the 20th century, is reminiscent of the search for stellar parallax in earlier centuries. Of the latter, John Herschel once wrote that it seemed within reach of the astronomer, "only to elude his seizure when apparently just within his grasp, continually hovering just beyond the limits of his distinct apprehension, and so leading him on in hopeless, endless, and exhausting pursuit." Such was the case for planetary systems, until the discovery of pulsar planets in 1992, and of planets around solar-type stars beginning in 1995. For the early decades of the century the Jeans-Jeffreys tidal theory of planet formation via close stellar encounters predicted that planets should be very rare. But the 15 years between 1943 and 1958 saw a remarkable turning point in the fortunes of planetary systems. It began with Russell's criticism of the Jeans-Jeffreys theory, but was fueled by the revival of a modified nebular hypothesis (von Weizsacker, 1944), developments in fields as diverse as double star astronomy (Kuiper, 1951), the measurement of stellar rotation periods (Struve, 1950), and geochemistry (Urey, 1952) and - most surprising of all - by claims that planetary systems, or their effects had actually been observed (Strand, 1943; Reuyl and Holmberg, 1943). Struve (1952) even suggested a means for planet detection by the radial velocity method. As Harlow Shapley made clear in his work Of Stars and Men: Human Response to an Expanding Universe (1958), the new cosmology was a continual force in the background favoring abundant planetary systems. All this work was in the background as Peter van de Kamp played out his solitary search for planetary systems, culminating in the announcement (1963) of a planet around Barnard's star. The limits that Herschel spoke of have now been breached, and the search is no longer solitary.

  19. Points of Interest: What Determines Interest Rates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Tim

    Interest rates can significantly influence people's behavior. When rates decline, homeowners rush to buy new homes and refinance old mortgages; automobile buyers scramble to buy new cars; the stock market soars, and people tend to feel more optimistic about the future. But even though individuals respond to changes in rates, they may not fully…

  20. Turning point temperature and competition between relativistic and ponderomotive effects in self-focusing of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bokaei, B.; Niknam, A. R.; Jafari Milani, M. R.

    2013-10-15

    The propagation characters of Gaussian laser beam in collisionless plasma are investigated by considering the ponderomotive and relativistic nonlinearities. The second-order differential equation of dimensionless beam width parameter is solved numerically, taking into account the effect of electron temperature. The results show that the ponderomotive force does not facilitate the relativistic self-focusing in all intensity ranges. In fact, there exists a certain intensity value that, if below this value, the ponderomotive nonlinearity can contribute to the relativistic self-focusing, or obstruct it, if above. It is also indicated that there is a temperature interval in which self-focusing can occur, while the beam diverges outside of this region. In addition, the results represent the existence of a “turning point temperature” in the mentioned interval that the self-focusing has the strongest power. The value of the turning point is dependent on laser intensity in which higher intensities result in higher turning point.

  1. Cinderellas and Ugly Ducklings: Positive Turning Points in Students' Educational Careers--Exploratory Evidence and a Future Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yair, Gad

    2009-01-01

    Positive turning points touch upon the essence of education. They epitomize its power and reflect its core agenda: maximizing human capital. Paradoxically, previous studies have not looked into this important phenomenon. The current exploratory study fills this lacuna by building on extensive empirical research of key educational experiences to…

  2. Evaluating the Turning Points Curriculum: A Three-Year Study to Assess Parenting Knowledge in a Sample of Incarcerated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Lynn S.; Burton, Barb

    2015-01-01

    The current study is an evaluation of the Turning Points parenting curriculum specially designed for use with incarcerated populations. The project combines intensive parent education with supervised offender mother/child visits in special family visiting rooms as well as ongoing offender support groups to help offender mothers become more…

  3. Overgrazing- How far are we from passing the tipping point of turning our rangelands into desert?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecological science, particularly with regard to Mongolian rangelands, is not able to estimate when a tipping point will be passed. Nonetheless, it does provide a framework for responding to the threat of desertification tipping points. ...

  4. Expectation of fairness: a turning point in the professional satisfaction of Iranian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Forough; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Forooshani, Zahra Sadat Dibaji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The professional satisfaction of staff is one of the most challenging organizational concepts that can enhance the efficiency level of organizations. In a similar vein, the professional satisfaction of nurses is of considerable importance, in that, professional dissatisfaction among nurses could result in emotional detachment, depression, anger, evasion from work, and inefficacy and would negatively impact the organization’s work rate. The aim of this study was to understand Iranian nurses’ experiences of the concept of professional satisfaction. Methods This was a qualitative study conducted with a targeted sampling of 10 nurses (4 men and 6 women) in 2015. The data were collected through conducting in-depth interviews, and textual data were analyzed subsequently using the Qualitative Content Analysis (QCA) method. Results The findings of this study pointed to “fair conduct,” which was comprised of three sub-categories, i.e., expectation of fairness in social-professional settings, expectation of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and expectation of fairness in the area of professional interactions. Conclusions There are various ups and downs in nursing due to the challenging nature of the profession, from the initial education at the university until retirement. According to the findings of this study, a lack of fairness in social-professional settings, a lack of fairness in receiving professional benefits, and a lack of fairness in the area of professional interactions were among the factors that have great impacts on the degree of professional dissatisfaction among nurses. PMID:27504167

  5. Fabrication of large radii toroidal surfaces by single point diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.P.; Marlar, T.A.; Miller, A.C.; Paterson, R. L.

    1995-12-31

    An unconventional machining technique has been developed for producing relatively large radii quasi-toroidal surfaces which could not normally be produced by conventional diamond turning technology. The maximum radial swing capacity of a diamond turning lathe is the limiting factor for the rotational radius of any toroid. A typical diamond turned toroidal surface is produced when a part is rotated about the spindle axis while the diamond tool contours the surface with any curved path. Toric surfaces sliced horizontally, have been used in laser resonator cavities. This paper will address the fabrication of a special case of toroids where a rotating tool path is a circle whose center is offset from the rotational axis of the toroid by a distance greater than the minor radius of the tool path. The quasi-toroidal surfaces produced by this technique approximate all asymmetrical combinations of concave/convex section of a torus. Other machine configurations have been reported which offer alternative approaches to the fabrication of concave asymmetric aspheric surfaces. Prototypes of unique lenses each having two quasi-toroidal surfaces were fabricated in the Ultraprecision Manufacturing Technology Center at form key components of a scanned laser focusing system. As an example of the problem faced, the specifications for one of the surfaces was equivalent to a section of a torus with a two meter diameter hole. The lenses were fabricated on a Nanoform 600 diamond turning lathe. This is a numerically controlled two axis T-base lathe with an air bearing spindle and oil hydrostatic slides. The maximum radial swing for this machine is approximately 0.3 meters.

  6. Refractive index sensitivity characteristics near the dispersion turning point of the multimode microfiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haipeng; Sun, Qizhen; Li, Xiaolei; Yan, Zhijun; Li, Yanpeng; Liu, Deming; Zhang, Lin

    2015-11-01

    The turning point of the refractive index (RI) sensitivity based on the multimode microfiber (MMMF) in-line Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) is observed. By tracking the resonant wavelength shift of the MZI generated between the HE(11) and HE(12) modes in the MMMF, the surrounding RI (SRI) could be detected. Theoretical analysis demonstrates that the RI sensitivity will reach ±∞ on either side of the turning point due to the group effective RI difference (G) approaching zero. Significantly, the positive sensitivity exists in a very wide fiber diameter range, while the negative sensitivity can be achieved in a narrow diameter range of only 0.3 μm. Meanwhile, the experimental sensitivities and variation trend at different diameters exhibit high consistency with the theoretical results. High RI sensitivity of 10777.8 nm/RIU (RI unit) at the fiber diameter of 4.6 μm and the RI around 1.3334 is realized. The discovery of the sensitivity turning points has great significance on trace detection due to the possibility of ultrahigh RI sensitivity. PMID:26512514

  7. Educational Technology on a Turning Point: Curriculum Implementation in Flanders and Challenges for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderlinde, Ruben; van Braak, Johan; Hermans, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, we state that establishing technology curricula by national governments causes a shift in the policy actions of educational technology support: from a technical rationale with a main focus on funding and resources to a pedagogical rationale with a main focus on student competencies. We illustrate our point of view by describing the…

  8. Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

  9. Two Technologies Generating Aspherical Surfaces: Thermal Polishing Of A Glass-Grain-Settled Surface And Transparent Single-Point Turning Of Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehm, Ruud; Haisma, Jan

    1981-05-01

    Thermal polishing of a settled layer of glass grains on a ground aspherical substrate by heat transfer is described. The layer-glass and substrate-glass have the same index of refraction. A phenomenological description is given of transparent turning of optical glasses by a single-point tool. The glass is turned at an elevated temperature at about the American softening temperature. A process combining abrasive turning and viscous relaxation makes transparent turning of a limited number of glasses possible.

  10. Evolution of the Carbon Cycle During Major Turning Point in Oceanogaphy in the Late Jurassic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais, P.; Louis-Schmid, B.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Weissert, H.

    2005-12-01

    The Late Jurassic was a time of accelerated fragmentation of Pangea resulting in a reorganisation of climate and oceanography. Some of these changes culminated in the Oxfordian as reflected in the Sr-isotope record. The 87/86Sr ratio reach the lowest values of the Mesozoic, indicative for high seafloor spreading and/or low continental weathering rates. Oxygen isotope values suggest that the Late Callovian and the Early Oxfordian were an exceptionally cool time in the Jurassic. The opening Tethyan ocean was chosen for an investigation of the evolution of the global carbon cycle and of changing current patterns along the east-west trending seaway. The carbon isotope curve shows a large-amplitude shift from low values around 1.5‰ (VPDB) in the Early Oxfordian towards values of around 3‰ in the Middle Oxfordian (Transversarium ammonite zone). After these high values, the ratio decreases towards values of 2‰. We used bio- and carbon isotope stratigraphy to correlate the evolution of current intensity based on an expanded reference carbon isotope section from the Vocontian trough (France). Stable carbon isotope records provide a very good tool for correlation between different paleoceanographic settings. Strong oceanic currents sweeping the Tethyan seafloor caused the formation of hardgrounds on sedimentary highs, whereas protected basins act as sedimentary sinks, with high sediment accumulation rates. These hardgrounds are of Late Callovian to Early Oxfordian age. The decrease of current activity corresponds to the top of the condensed sediments and the onset of normal accumulation rates. It coincides with the time of most positive carbon isotope values in the Transversarium ammonite zone. The carbon isotope shift corresponds exactly to the change in current pattern along the northern part of the Tethyan seaway. The synchronous change in carbon cycling and in physical oceanography suggests that there are feedbacks between physical oceanography and carbon cycling

  11. Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed123

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Shu Wen; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the past decade, the United States has seen declining energy intakes and plateauing obesity levels. Objective: We examined whether these observed trends suggest a longer-term shift in dietary and health behavior that is independent of adverse economic conditions. Design: We used nationally representative cross-sectional surveys on intake and longitudinal household food purchase data along with random-effects models to address this question. Data included individuals in NHANES 2003–2004 to 2009–2010 (children: n = 13,422; adults: n = 10,791) and households from the 2000–2011 Nielsen Homescan Panel (households with children: n = 57,298; households with adults only: n = 108,932). Results: In both data sets, we showed that children decreased their calories the most. Even after we controlled for important socioeconomic factors, caloric purchases fell significantly from 2003 to 2011 (P < 0.001), particularly for households with children. The Great Recession was associated with small increases in caloric purchases, in which a 1–percentage point increase in unemployment in the local market was associated with a 1.6–4.1-kcal · capita−1 · d−1 (P < 0.001) increase in total calories purchased. Results also indicated shifts in caloric purchases were driven more by declines in caloric purchases from beverages than food. Conclusions: US consumers have exhibited changes in intake and purchasing behavior since 2003 that were independent from changing economic conditions linked with the Great Recession or food prices. Public health efforts in the past decade may have contributed to this trend. PMID:24429538

  12. Turning point or selection? The effect of rustication on subsequent health for the Chinese Cultural Revolution cohort.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wen

    2016-05-01

    During the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-76), Chairman Mao sent 17 million urban youth to rural areas to be "reeducated." These "sent-down" youth spent years working alongside peasants, enduring inadequate diets, shelter and medical attention. What were the consequences for subsequent health? Was there a benefit to individuals in the leading or trailing edges of this cohort? Was this a fundamental turning point or were selection process at work? Drawing on the 1994 State and Life Chances in Urban China Survey, I find the health disadvantage at midlife is mostly borne by members of the trailing-edge sub-cohort who lived in the countryside for more than five years. Results from propensity-score analysis indicate a selection process: those who suffered most came from disadvantaged backgrounds. Life chances following the rusticates' return home, however, either do not differ from those who stayed in cities or do not relate to health, refuting the turning-point view, at least in terms of midlife health.

  13. Turning point or selection? The effect of rustication on subsequent health for the Chinese Cultural Revolution cohort.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wen

    2016-05-01

    During the Chinese Cultural Revolution (1966-76), Chairman Mao sent 17 million urban youth to rural areas to be "reeducated." These "sent-down" youth spent years working alongside peasants, enduring inadequate diets, shelter and medical attention. What were the consequences for subsequent health? Was there a benefit to individuals in the leading or trailing edges of this cohort? Was this a fundamental turning point or were selection process at work? Drawing on the 1994 State and Life Chances in Urban China Survey, I find the health disadvantage at midlife is mostly borne by members of the trailing-edge sub-cohort who lived in the countryside for more than five years. Results from propensity-score analysis indicate a selection process: those who suffered most came from disadvantaged backgrounds. Life chances following the rusticates' return home, however, either do not differ from those who stayed in cities or do not relate to health, refuting the turning-point view, at least in terms of midlife health. PMID:27062453

  14. [Turning points in cytology].

    PubMed

    Scharf, J H

    1990-01-01

    There is given a concise and woodcut-like survey over the history of cytology with was born by the pioneering of Hooke, Grew, Malpighi, and van Leeuwenhoek at the end of XVIIth century and three crises of this science. The first crisis of cytology resulted from barren discussions of the so-called preformation hypothesis and the monadism of Leibniz. These philosophical speculations caused a melting away of the concrete facts during the XVIIth century. After the rebuilding of cytology by Meyen and Brown during the XIXth century's early thirties and the propounding of the early cell-theory by Schleiden and Schwann, the second crisis was provoked since Schleiden and Schwann, clearer than Meyen, kept the hypothesis of equivocal or spontaneous generation that was alive since Aristotéles. This 2nd crisis showed a belated sequel in the middle of XXth century brought about by sloppy investigations of Lepesinskaja. The third crisis concerns the question whether there is or whether there is not existent a membran enveloping every animal cell. Whereas Schwann himself presupposed the cell membran as an integral part of each cell, Max Schultze negates its existence. After the creation of the membran theory of synapse by Sherrington, the neuron theory by Ramón y Cajal, and the membran theory of narcosis by Meyer and Overton, the negation of the cell membran was being combined successively with the neovitalistic hypothesis of neuronal networks of Bethe and others. This spectre could really wiped out not before the modern histochemistry and electron microscopy were established in the fifties of our century.

  15. [Turning points in cytology].

    PubMed

    Scharf, J H

    1990-01-01

    There is given a concise and woodcut-like survey over the history of cytology with was born by the pioneering of Hooke, Grew, Malpighi, and van Leeuwenhoek at the end of XVIIth century and three crises of this science. The first crisis of cytology resulted from barren discussions of the so-called preformation hypothesis and the monadism of Leibniz. These philosophical speculations caused a melting away of the concrete facts during the XVIIth century. After the rebuilding of cytology by Meyen and Brown during the XIXth century's early thirties and the propounding of the early cell-theory by Schleiden and Schwann, the second crisis was provoked since Schleiden and Schwann, clearer than Meyen, kept the hypothesis of equivocal or spontaneous generation that was alive since Aristotéles. This 2nd crisis showed a belated sequel in the middle of XXth century brought about by sloppy investigations of Lepesinskaja. The third crisis concerns the question whether there is or whether there is not existent a membran enveloping every animal cell. Whereas Schwann himself presupposed the cell membran as an integral part of each cell, Max Schultze negates its existence. After the creation of the membran theory of synapse by Sherrington, the neuron theory by Ramón y Cajal, and the membran theory of narcosis by Meyer and Overton, the negation of the cell membran was being combined successively with the neovitalistic hypothesis of neuronal networks of Bethe and others. This spectre could really wiped out not before the modern histochemistry and electron microscopy were established in the fifties of our century. PMID:2080255

  16. Turning Points in Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Brad; Moreno, Monica Vidal

    1999-01-01

    Recounts experiences of Brigham Young University student teachers in Mexican schools. Explores reasons for lack of interest in facilitating creativity, despite a rich culture. Discusses four positive changes occurring in Mexican education: (1) students allowed to write about their own topics; (2) open-ended questions and informal debates; (3)…

  17. Control of optical and electrical properties of nanosheets by the chemical structure of the turning point in a foldable polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Taichi; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Oligomers of tetra(ethylene glycol)-disubstituted phenyl-capped bithiophene (Ph2TPh) linked by catechol and resorcinol were prepared. Catechol and resorcinol link the monomers via the ortho- and meta-positions of the benzene ring, respectively, and function as turning points in the folding process of the polymer. It was confirmed that the ortho-linked 8mer (o-8mer) and meta-linked 8mer (m-8mer) could form nanosheets through the self-assembly of folded polymers in o-dichlorobenzene. We confirmed that the arrangement of thiophene units inside the nanosheets was controllable by changing the chemical structure of the turning point. The different arrangements of the Ph2TPh units led to changes in other physical properties such as UV-Vis absorption, nanosheet thickness and charge carrier transport. The absorption spectrum of the o-8mer nanosheets suggested that the Ph2TPh units are arranged vertical to the lateral direction of the nanosheets. On the other hand, the Ph2TPh units in the m-8mer nanosheets were considered to have a tilted orientation. The change in the Ph2TPh tilt angle inside the nanosheets was supported by the different thicknesses of the o-8mer and m-8mer nanosheets. The relationship between the absorption spectrum and Ph2TPh unit arrangement was discussed based on the DFT calculation. Intrinsic charge carrier transport properties were evaluated by a noncontact microwave-based method. The o-8mer nanosheets showed higher conductivity than the m-8mer and triazole-linked-8mer nanosheets. The lifetime of charge carriers in the nanosheet was longer than that in the lamellar structure of the drop-cast film.Oligomers of tetra(ethylene glycol)-disubstituted phenyl-capped bithiophene (Ph2TPh) linked by catechol and resorcinol were prepared. Catechol and resorcinol link the monomers via the ortho- and meta-positions of the benzene ring, respectively, and function as turning points in the folding process of the polymer. It was confirmed that the ortho-linked 8mer (o

  18. 30 years of change in understory plant communities along the Tanana River, Alaska: Revisiting the concept of turning points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, T. N.; Lloyd, A. H.; Ruess, R. W.; Viereck, L. A.; Charlton, B. A.

    2008-12-01

    In interior Alaska, the most productive forests occur along the floodplain of the glacially fed Tanana River. The Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest (BCEF) is located approximately 20 km southwest of Fairbanks, Alaska and was established in 1963 to include representative floodplain forests along the Tanana River. Both the sequence and the mechanisms of succession have been relatively well studied along the Tanana River, where biological and physical "turning points" are hypothesized to be the main proponents of plant community succession. However, prior research has concentrated almost exclusively on four dominant woody taxa: willows, thin-leaf alder, balsam poplar, and white spruce. Comparatively little is known about successional changes in the understory taxa, including shrubs, herbaceous vascular plants, and nonvascular mosses and lichens. Long-term monitoring in BCEF not only provides a unique opportunity to investigate the relationships between vegetation and climate over a 30-year period, but also increases our knowledge and understanding about floodplain successional dynamics. Here, we analyze vegetation and climate data collected since 1977 located in the BCEF at the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research (BNZ- LTER) site in order to address the following questions: 1) Are there identifiable understory turning points that mirror the overstory changes in succession? 2) Have changes in climate been manifested in unexpected understory vegetation changes? When examining understory vegetation, we found that the sites established in the 1970s rarely follow the traditional succesional paradigm. In addition, we found changes in functional abundance and diversity in late succesional stands that could indicate vegetation patterns related to associated changes in climate.

  19. Fixed-Rate Compressed Floating-Point Arrays.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Current compression schemes for floating-point data commonly take fixed-precision values and compress them to a variable-length bit stream, complicating memory management and random access. We present a fixed-rate, near-lossless compression scheme that maps small blocks of 4(d) values in d dimensions to a fixed, user-specified number of bits per block, thereby allowing read and write random access to compressed floating-point data at block granularity. Our approach is inspired by fixed-rate texture compression methods widely adopted in graphics hardware, but has been tailored to the high dynamic range and precision demands of scientific applications. Our compressor is based on a new, lifted, orthogonal block transform and embedded coding, allowing each per-block bit stream to be truncated at any point if desired, thus facilitating bit rate selection using a single compression scheme. To avoid compression or decompression upon every data access, we employ a software write-back cache of uncompressed blocks. Our compressor has been designed with computational simplicity and speed in mind to allow for the possibility of a hardware implementation, and uses only a small number of fixed-point arithmetic operations per compressed value. We demonstrate the viability and benefits of lossy compression in several applications, including visualization, quantitative data analysis, and numerical simulation.

  20. Fixed-Rate Compressed Floating-Point Arrays.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Current compression schemes for floating-point data commonly take fixed-precision values and compress them to a variable-length bit stream, complicating memory management and random access. We present a fixed-rate, near-lossless compression scheme that maps small blocks of 4(d) values in d dimensions to a fixed, user-specified number of bits per block, thereby allowing read and write random access to compressed floating-point data at block granularity. Our approach is inspired by fixed-rate texture compression methods widely adopted in graphics hardware, but has been tailored to the high dynamic range and precision demands of scientific applications. Our compressor is based on a new, lifted, orthogonal block transform and embedded coding, allowing each per-block bit stream to be truncated at any point if desired, thus facilitating bit rate selection using a single compression scheme. To avoid compression or decompression upon every data access, we employ a software write-back cache of uncompressed blocks. Our compressor has been designed with computational simplicity and speed in mind to allow for the possibility of a hardware implementation, and uses only a small number of fixed-point arithmetic operations per compressed value. We demonstrate the viability and benefits of lossy compression in several applications, including visualization, quantitative data analysis, and numerical simulation. PMID:26356981

  1. Resources, roadblocks and turning points: a qualitative study of American Indian/Alaska Native adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jennifer L; Brown, Jennifer; Khan, Burhan; Mau, Marjorie K; Dillard, Denise

    2013-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a worldwide health problem that has reached epidemic proportions in some communities. Alaska Native and American Indian (AN/AI) people are disproportionately diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and incidence is increasing in many Alaska communities. Developing effective interventions requires understanding the social and psychological factors that impact effective management of diabetes, yet little is known about these factors in AN/AI communities. The objective of this study was to explore perceived psychosocial needs and barriers to management of diabetes among AN/AI adults with type 2 diabetes receiving care at the Alaska Native Primary Care Center (ANPCC) to inform programmatic efforts and potential future research. We conducted three focus groups and five interviews with 13 AN/AI adults with type 2 diabetes. Interview and focus group questions elicited perceived factors that affect management of diabetes, with a focus on the psychological, social and spiritual impacts of diabetes. Data were transcribed, coded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Key themes that emerged from these data included resources and roadblocks, as well as turning points in the trajectory of diabetes. Resources are factors with a perceived positive impact on management of diabetes, including: (1) knowledge and education about diabetes, (2) social support from other people with diabetes, (3) spirituality, and (4) self-efficacy. Roadblocks are factors with a perceived negative impact on management of diabetes and include: (1) self-reported lack of knowledge about nutrition and diet, (2) social difficulties caused by dietary restrictions, and (3) co-morbid medical conditions. Finally, turning points are experiences described by participants as having transformed roadblocks in resources and thus facilitating improvement in the management of diabetes. Future programmatic interventions to improve management of diabetes with this population should focus on improving dietary

  2. Nucleotide sequence determines the accelerated rate of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Kini, R Manjunatha; Chinnasamy, Arunkumar

    2010-09-01

    Although the theory of evolution was put forth about 150 years ago our understanding of how molecules drive evolution remains poor. It is well-established that proteins evolve at different rates, essentially based on their functional role and three-dimensional structure. However, the highly variable rates of evolution of different proteins - especially the rapidly evolving ones - within a single organism are poorly understood. Using examples of genes for fast-evolving toxins and human hereditary diseases, we show for the first time that specific nucleotide sequences appear to determine point mutation rates. Based on mutation rates, we have classified triplets (not just codons) into stable, unstable and intermediate groups. Toxin genes contain a relatively higher percentage of unstable triplets in their exons compared to introns, whereas non-toxin genes contain a higher percentage of unstable triplets in their introns. Thus the distribution of stable and unstable triplets is correlated with and may explain the accelerated evolution of point mutations in toxins. Similarly, at the genomic level, lower organisms with genes that evolve faster contain a higher percentage of unstable triplets compared to higher organisms. These findings show that mutation rates of proteins, and hence of the organisms, are DNA sequence-dependent and thus provide a proximate mechanism of evolution at the molecular level. PMID:20362603

  3. On the oxygen abundances of M 67 stars from the turn-off point through the red giant branch†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi; Honda, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    With an aim to examine whether the surface oxygen composition suffers any appreciable change due to evolution-induced mixing of nuclear-processed material in the envelope of red giants, abundance determinations for O/Fe/Ni based on the synthetic spectrum-fitting method were performed by using the moderate-dispersion spectra in the 7770-7792 Å region (comprising O I 7771-5, Fe I 7780, and Ni I 7788 lines) for 16 stars of the old open cluster M 67 in various evolutionary stages from the turn-off point through the red giant branch. We could not find any meaningful difference in the oxygen abundances between the non-giant group (Teff > 5000 K) and the red-giant group (Teff < 5000 K), which are almost consistent with each other on average (despite that both have rather large dispersions of a few tenths dex caused by insufficient data quality), though only one giant star (S 1054) appears to show an exceptionally low O abundance and thus needs a more detailed study. This result may suggest that oxygen content in the stellar envelope is hardly affected (or any changes are insignificant) by the mixing of H-burning products in the red giant phase, as far as M 67 stars of low mass (˜ 1.3 M⊙) are concerned, which is consistent with the prediction from the conventional stellar evolution theory of first dredge-up.

  4. Fixed-rate compressed floating-point arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P.

    2014-03-30

    ZFP is a library for lossy compression of single- and double-precision floating-point data. One of the unique features of ZFP is its support for fixed-rate compression, which enables random read and write access at the granularity of small blocks of values. Using a C++ interface, this allows declaring compressed arrays (1D, 2D, and 3D arrays are supported) that through operator overloading can be treated just like conventional, uncompressed arrays, but which allow the user to specify the exact number of bits to allocate to the array. ZFP also has variable-rate fixed-precision and fixed-accuracy modes, which allow the user to specify a tolerance on the relative or absolute error.

  5. Fixed-rate compressed floating-point arrays

    2014-03-30

    ZFP is a library for lossy compression of single- and double-precision floating-point data. One of the unique features of ZFP is its support for fixed-rate compression, which enables random read and write access at the granularity of small blocks of values. Using a C++ interface, this allows declaring compressed arrays (1D, 2D, and 3D arrays are supported) that through operator overloading can be treated just like conventional, uncompressed arrays, but which allow the user tomore » specify the exact number of bits to allocate to the array. ZFP also has variable-rate fixed-precision and fixed-accuracy modes, which allow the user to specify a tolerance on the relative or absolute error.« less

  6. Transitions in State Public Health Law: Comparative Analysis of State Public Health Law Reform Following the Turning Point Model State Public Health Act

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Gebbie, Kristine M.

    2009-01-01

    Given the public health importance of law modernization, we undertook a comparative analysis of policy efforts in 4 states (Alaska, South Carolina, Wisconsin, and Nebraska) that have considered public health law reform based on the Turning Point Model State Public Health Act. Through national legislative tracking and state case studies, we investigated how the Turning Point Act's model legal language has been considered for incorporation into state law and analyzed key facilitating and inhibiting factors for public health law reform. Our findings provide the practice community with a research base to facilitate further law reform and inform future scholarship on the role of law as a determinant of the public's health. PMID:19150900

  7. Detection rates of geckos in visual surveys: Turning confounding variables into useful knowledge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lardner, Bjorn; Rodda, Gordon H.; Yackel Adams, Amy A.; Savidge, Julie A.; Reed, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Transect surveys without some means of estimating detection probabilities generate population size indices prone to bias because survey conditions differ in time and space. Knowing what causes such bias can help guide the collection of relevant survey covariates, correct the survey data, anticipate situations where bias might be unacceptably large, and elucidate the ecology of target species. We used negative binomial regression to evaluate confounding variables for gecko (primarily Hemidactylus frenatus and Lepidodactylus lugubris) counts on 220-m-long transects surveyed at night, primarily for snakes, on 9,475 occasions. Searchers differed in gecko detection rates by up to a factor of six. The worst and best headlamps differed by a factor of at least two. Strong winds had a negative effect potentially as large as those of searchers or headlamps. More geckos were seen during wet weather conditions, but the effect size was small. Compared with a detection nadir during waxing gibbous (nearly full) moons above the horizon, we saw 28% more geckos during waning crescent moons below the horizon. A sine function suggested that we saw 24% more geckos at the end of the wet season than at the end of the dry season. Fluctuations on a longer timescale also were verified. Disturbingly, corrected data exhibited strong short-term fluctuations that covariates apparently failed to capture. Although some biases can be addressed with measured covariates, others will be difficult to eliminate as a significant source of error in longterm monitoring programs.

  8. Rate Change Graph Technology: Absolute Value Point Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Ken; Duvernois, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Absolute Value Point Methodology (AVPM) is a new theoretical tool for science research centered on Rate Change Graph Technology (RCGT). The modeling techniques of AVPM surpass conventional methods by extending the geometrical rules of mathematics. Exact geometrical structures of matter and energy become clearer revealing new ways to compile advanced data. RCGT mechanics is realized from geometrical intersections that are the result of plotting changing value vs. changing geometry. RCGT methods ignore size and value to perform an objective analysis in geometry. Value and size are then re-introduced back into the analytical system for a clear and concise solution. Available AVPM applications reveal that a massive amount of data from the Big Bang to vast super-clusters is untouched by human thought. Once scientists learn to design tools from RCGT Mechanics, new and formidable approaches to experimentation and theory may lead to new discoveries. In the creation of AVPM, it has become apparent there is a particle-world that exists between strings and our familiar universe. These unrealized particles in their own nature exhibit inflation like properties and may be the progenitor of the implements of our universe. Thus space, time, energy, motion, space-time and gravity are born from its existence and decay. This announcement will be the beginning of many new ideas from the study of RCGT mechanics.

  9. Motor and dorsal root ganglion axons serve as choice points for the ipsilateral turning of dI3 axons.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Oshri; Hadas, Yoav; Vald, Lilach; Hong, Seulgi; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Klar, Avihu

    2010-11-17

    The axons of the spinal intersegmental interneurons are projected longitudinally along various funiculi arrayed along the dorsal-ventral axis of the spinal cord. The roof plate and the floor plate have a profound role in patterning their initial axonal trajectory. However, other positional cues may guide the final architecture of interneuron tracks in the spinal cord. To gain more insight into the organization of specific axonal tracks in the spinal cord, we focused on the trajectory pattern of a genetically defined neuronal population, dI3 neurons, in the chick spinal cord. Exploitation of newly characterized enhancer elements allowed specific labeling of dI3 neurons and axons. dI3 axons are projected ipsilaterally along two longitudinal fascicules at the ventral lateral funiculus (VLF) and the dorsal funiculus (DF). dI3 axons change their trajectory plane from the transverse to the longitudinal axis at two novel checkpoints. The axons that elongate at the DF turn at the dorsal root entry zone, along the axons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and the axons that elongate at the VLF turn along the axons of motor neurons. Loss and gain of function of the Lim-HD protein Isl1 demonstrate that Isl1 is not required for dI3 cell fate. However, Isl1 is sufficient to impose ipsilateral turning along the motor axons when expressed ectopically in the commissural dI1 neurons. The axonal patterning of dI3 neurons, revealed in this study, highlights the role of established axonal cues-the DRG and motor axons-as intermediate guidepost cues for dI3 axons.

  10. Canard solution and its asymptotic approximation in a second-order nonlinear singularly perturbed boundary value problem with a turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jianhe; Han, Maoan

    2014-08-01

    This paper considers the existence and uniformly valid asymptotic approximation of canard solutions in a second-order nonlinear singularly perturbed boundary value problem with a turning point. We get the main results by constructing the asymptotic solution first and then defining a couple of upper and lower solutions suitably on the basis of the asymptotic solution. Two examples are carried out to illustrate and verify the theoretical results.

  11. A turning point for natural product discovery--ESF-EMBO research conference: synthetic biology of antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Takano, Eriko; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Breitling, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic Biology is in a critical phase of its development: it has finally reached the point where it can move from proof-of-principle studies to real-world applications. Secondary metabolite biosynthesis, especially the discovery and production of antibiotics, is a particularly relevant target area for such applications of synthetic biology. The first international conference to explore this subject was held in Spain in October 2011. In four sessions on General Synthetic Biology, Filamentous Fungal Systems, Actinomyces Systems, and Tools and Host Structures, scientists presented the most recent technological and scientific advances, and a final-day Forward Look Plenary Discussion identified future trends in the field.

  12. The Management of Intercollegiate Athletics at UC Berkeley: Turning Points and Consequences. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.12.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, John; Hextrum, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    This white paper was prepared at the request of the Advisory Committee to the Athletic Study Center as a result of their concern over poor graduation rates in football as released by the NCAA in 2012. The paper received extensive review by the members of that committee as well as several other knowledgeable faculty and senior administrators before…

  13. A 3 Permil Change in Carbon Isotope Fractionation Between Carbonates and Organic Matter: the Oxfordian Turning Point in Climate and Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis-Schmid, B.; Rais, P.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Weissert, H.

    2005-12-01

    %. If this hypothesis will be confirmed by C-isotope measurements on individual organic compounds, other processes such as increased volcanic activity need to be included into the history of the Oxfordian. Thus, the mid-Oxfordian positive excursion in C-isotopes marks one of the major turning points in Mesozoic oceanography and climate.

  14. Collateral Damage and Critical Turning Points: Public Health Implications of HPV Vaccine News Coverage for Boys and Men in 2011.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Melinda; Rogers, Brian

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officially expanded approval of the Gardasil vaccine to include human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for boys and men, and in 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a formal recommendation for routine vaccination for this population. Despite these efforts, HPV vaccination rates for boys and men continue to fall short of public health targets. While news was breaking about the benefits of the HPV vaccine for boys and men, public attention shifted as a result of political debates concerning the vaccine. This study examines a pivotal time period for public health in which the vaccine became officially recommended for boys and men and at the same time became the center of political controversies in the lead-up to the 2012 presidential campaign. The current study extends previous research and presents a content analysis of newspaper articles (N = 154) about the HPV vaccine for the year 2011. Results indicate that the lack of comprehensive coverage of HPV and the HPV vaccine found in previous studies continued in this year. Results shed light on key political events that may have functioned to overshadow the recommendation of the HPV vaccine for boys and men. The implications of this pattern of news coverage can inform public health efforts to address low rates of HPV vaccination uptake among boys and men in present day. PMID:26799666

  15. Collateral Damage and Critical Turning Points: Public Health Implications of HPV Vaccine News Coverage for Boys and Men in 2011.

    PubMed

    Krakow, Melinda; Rogers, Brian

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officially expanded approval of the Gardasil vaccine to include human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for boys and men, and in 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a formal recommendation for routine vaccination for this population. Despite these efforts, HPV vaccination rates for boys and men continue to fall short of public health targets. While news was breaking about the benefits of the HPV vaccine for boys and men, public attention shifted as a result of political debates concerning the vaccine. This study examines a pivotal time period for public health in which the vaccine became officially recommended for boys and men and at the same time became the center of political controversies in the lead-up to the 2012 presidential campaign. The current study extends previous research and presents a content analysis of newspaper articles (N = 154) about the HPV vaccine for the year 2011. Results indicate that the lack of comprehensive coverage of HPV and the HPV vaccine found in previous studies continued in this year. Results shed light on key political events that may have functioned to overshadow the recommendation of the HPV vaccine for boys and men. The implications of this pattern of news coverage can inform public health efforts to address low rates of HPV vaccination uptake among boys and men in present day.

  16. Investigation of Surface Roughness of Single Point Diamond Turned Germanium Substrate by Coherence Correlation Interferometry and Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shivani; Khatri, Neha; Karar, Vinod; Dhami, S. S.

    2016-09-01

    Germanium is a widely used material in the infrared range. Single crystal germanium is used as semiconductor and optical material due to its salient features like high refractive index and proper working in cryogenic conditions. Thus, germanium is an important substrate for infrared lens having many applications in thermal imaging cameras, optical telescopes and miniaturization of infrared optical elements. These applications require optical elements of excellent surface quality and high dimensional accuracy. In addition to fulfil the demands, ultraprecision machine is used to fabricate the optical components. In this work, single crystal germanium (111) mirror is fabricated by using single point diamond tool with, negative rake angle. A large number of experiments are performed to achieve the surface finish of nanometric range. The best and worst combinations of process parameters are found on the basis of surface roughness with the help of coherence correlation interferometry(CCI) measurement and image processing using Canny, Prewitt, Roberts and Sobel edge filters and histogram. These results can be used for fabrication of diffractive optical elements and aspheric lenses of germanium.

  17. Learning turning points--in life with long-term illness--visualized with the help of the life-world philosophy.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Mia M U

    2014-01-01

    A long-term illness is an occurrence that changes one's life and generates a need to learn how to live with it. This article is based on an empirical study of interviews on people living with different long-term illnesses. The results have shown that the learning process is a complex phenomenon interwoven with life as a whole. The essential meaning of learning to live with long-term illness concerns a movement toward a change of understanding of access to the world. In this movement, in which everyday lives as well as relationships with oneself and others are affected, a continual renegotiation is needed. Texts from existential/lifeworld philosopher, Heidegger and Gadamer, have been used to get a greater understanding of the empirical results. These texts have been analysed with particular focus on learning turning points and the importance of reflection. The results are highlighted under the following themes: Pursuit of balance-the aim of learning, The tense grip-the resistance to learning, To live more really-the possibilities of the learning, Distancing-the how of the learning, and The tense of the learning-the whole of the learning. In those learning turning points are present. Knowledge from this study has been used to make a didactic model designed to give caregivers a tool to support patients' learning. The didactic model is called: The challenge to take charge of life with a long-term illness.

  18. Optimum Conditions for the Efficacy and Safety of Cryofiltration Apheresis: An Analysis of Circuit Temperatures Depending on Plasma Flow Rate and Cooling Coil Lengths/Turns.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Shuzo; Sato, Yukihiro; Takano, Tomoo; Hosino, Toshihisa

    2015-08-01

    A system providing both appropriate cooling and warming are needed for the efficacy and safety of cryofiltration (CF) plasmapheresis. We measured some points of CF circuit temperatures with varying plasma flow rates (QP  = 10-40 mL/min) and the numbers of connecting cooling coils (one or two) under the conditions of blood flow rate (QB ) 100 mL/min with 7700-mm coil length, 19 turns, and 50-mL priming volume. We measured the respective temperatures of each point of starting/returning for an extracorporeal circuit (TA /TV ), intracooling coil (TC ), and post-plasma fractionator (PF) (TPF ). The subtraction of TV from TA (ΔT) was used as an indicator of safe return. There were no significant differences in TC , TPF , or ΔT in accordance with each QP between that of one and two coils. All of the Tc values under the condition QP  ≤ 20 mL/min achieved <4°C. The TPF under the condition QP  ≥ 20 mL/min was not significantly different compared to that of QP 30 mL/min (the lowest condition). Although the ΔT increased depending on the QP increase, the ΔT under the condition QP  ≤ 15 mL/min was not significantly different from that of the control (one-way double-filtration plasmapheresis [DFPP]) group. We conclude that (i) one coil is enough for effective cooling in CF, and (ii) an ideal QP that fulfills the required conditions for both effective cooling and sufficient warming of returning fluid does not exist, but QP from 15 to 20 mL/min may be a relevant range.

  19. Opportunity at the Turning Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Travis F.; Preston, Bethany Q.

    2003-01-01

    The authors examine the developmental process by which a reclaiming environment was created in an alternative program for students designated emotionally disturbed. Efforts to identify the impetus for change, specific actions, and the ongoing evolution of the program's philosophy are discussed. The current environment is examined in the following…

  20. Unique cost-effective approach for multisurfaced micro-aspheric lens prototyping and fabrication by single-point diamond turning and micro-injection molding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Ashley M.; Wong, Chi-Choy; Chan, Norman S.; Louie, Derek C.; Li, Li-Man

    2004-02-01

    The latest development of sophisticated high-precision optical devices necessitates precision fabrication methodologies of freeform microlens having very tight, up to micron tolerance. Instead of adopting high-end multi-axis freeform machining approach, the proposed acrylic multi-surfaced microaspheric lens, with the axial diameter of 1.3mm, was cost-effectively prototyped and fabricated by single point diamond turning and micro-injection molding technology respectively. The micro-optical component was used as an opto-electronic module for high-speed data-transmission in fiber optics. Sequential fixturing technique was applied to facilitate the precise fabrication of the optical surfaces from different optical alignments. The aspherical accuracy and surface finish of the machined surfaces were evaluated, and end result was determined to be satisfactory. Further, the ultra precision tooling would be developed for micro-injection molding for carrying out mass production of the micro-optical component.

  1. High species richness of Chironomidae (Diptera) in temporary flooded wetlands associated with high species turn-over rates.

    PubMed

    Lundström, J O; Brodin, Y; Schäfer, M L; Vinnersten, T Z Persson; Ostman, O

    2010-08-01

    Species richness and species turn-over of Chironomidae was studied in irregularly flooded wetlands of the River Dalälven flood-plains in central Sweden. The chironomid fauna, sampled with emergence traps in six wetlands over six summers, contained as much as 135 species, and the cumulative species curves indicated that the regional species pool contain several more species. Recurrent irregular floods may have induced this high chironomid species richness and the high species turn-over in the temporary wetlands, as the dominance between terrestrial and aquatic species shifted between years. Half of the wetlands were treated with Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) against larvae of the flood-water mosquito Aedes sticticus. These treatments had no significant effect on chironomid species richness, but there was a higher species turn-over between years of primarily low abundance species in the treated wetlands. The cumulative number of species was also higher in the Bti-treated experimental wetlands than in the untreated reference wetlands. Thus, Bti treatment against mosquito larvae seemed to have only small effects on chironomid species richness but seemed to increase the colonisation-extinction dynamics.

  2. Study on characteristic parameters influencing laser-induced damage threshold of KH2PO4 crystal surface machined by single point diamond turning

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingjun; Li, Mingquan; Cheng, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Jian; Xu, Qiao

    2011-01-01

    It has fundamental meaning to find the elements influencing the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of KH2PO4 (KDP) crystal and to provide suitable characterization parameters for these factors in order to improve the LIDT of KDP. Using single-point diamond turning (SPDT) to process the KDP crystal, the machined surface quality has important effects on its LIDT. However, there are still not suitable characteristic parameters of surface quality of KDP to correspond with the LIDT nowadays. In this paper, guided by the Fourier model theory, we study deeply the relationship between the relevant characteristic parameters of surface topography of KDP crystal and the experimental LIDT. Research results indicate that the waviness rather than the roughness is the leading topography element on the KDP surface machined by the SPDT method when the LIDT is considered and the amplitude of micro-waviness has greater influence on the light intensity inside the KDP crystal within the scope of dangerous frequencies between (180 μm)−1 and (90 μm)−1; with suitable testing equipment, the characteristic parameters of waviness amplitude, such as the arithmetical mean deviation of three-dimensional profile Sa or root mean square deviation of three-dimensional contour Sq, are able to be considered as suitable parameters to reflect the optical quality of the machined surface in order to judge approximately the LIDT of the KDP surface and guide the machining course. PMID:22247567

  3. An Interactive Point Kernel Program For Photon Dose Rate Prediction of Cylindrical Source/Shield Arrangements.

    1990-10-26

    Version 00 The program ZYLIND is an interactive point kernel program for photon dose rate prediction of a homogeneous cylindrical source shielded by cylindrical (radial) or plane (axial) layered shields.

  4. On the relationship between the Hurst exponent, the ratio of the mean square successive difference to the variance, and the number of turning points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2016-11-01

    The long range dependence of the fractional Brownian motion (fBm), fractional Gaussian noise (fGn), and differentiated fGn (DfGn) is described by the Hurst exponent H. Considering the realizations of these three processes as time series, they might be described by their statistical features, such as half of the ratio of the mean square successive difference to the variance, A, and the number of turning points, T. This paper investigates the relationships between A and H, and between T and H. It is found numerically that the formulae A(H) = aebH in case of fBm, and A(H) = a + bHc for fGn and DfGn, describe well the A(H) relationship. When T(H) is considered, no simple formula is found, and it is empirically found that among polynomials, the fourth and second order description applies best. The most relevant finding is that when plotted in the space of (A, T), the three process types form separate branches. Hence, it is examined whether A and T may serve as Hurst exponent indicators. Some real world data (stock market indices, sunspot numbers, chaotic time series) are analyzed for this purpose, and it is found that the H's estimated using the H(A) relations (expressed as inverted A(H) functions) are consistent with the H's extracted with the well known wavelet approach. This allows to efficiently estimate the Hurst exponent based on fast and easy to compute A and T, given that the process type: fBm, fGn or DfGn, is correctly classified beforehand. Finally, it is suggested that the A(H) relation for fGn and DfGn might be an exact (shifted) 3 / 2 power-law.

  5. Predicting protein folding rate change upon point mutation using residue-level coevolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Das, Smita; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Change in folding kinetics of globular proteins upon point mutation is crucial to a wide spectrum of biological research, such as protein misfolding, toxicity, and aggregations. Here we seek to address whether residue-level coevolutionary information of globular proteins can be informative to folding rate changes upon point mutations. Generating residue-level coevolutionary networks of globular proteins, we analyze three parameters: relative coevolution order (rCEO), network density (ND), and characteristic path length (CPL). A point mutation is considered to be equivalent to a node deletion of this network and respective percentage changes in rCEO, ND, CPL are found linearly correlated (0.84, 0.73, and -0.61, respectively) with experimental folding rate changes. The three parameters predict the folding rate change upon a point mutation with 0.031, 0.045, and 0.059 standard errors, respectively.

  6. Taking Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  7. Determining oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus using an improved respirometer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Longwu; Jiang, Haifeng; Tong, Guangxiang; Xu, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of oxygen consumption rates and asphyxiation points in fish is important to determine appropriate stocking and water quality management in aquaculture. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point in Chanodichthys mongolicus were detected under laboratory conditions using an improved respirometer chamber. The results revealed that more accurate estimates can be obtained by adjusting the volume of the respirometer chamber, which may avoid system errors caused by either repeatedly adjusting fish density or selecting different equipment specifications. The oxygen consumption rate and asphyxiation point of C. mongolicus increased with increasing water temperature and decreasing fish size. Changes in the C. mongolicus oxygen consumption rate were divided into three stages at water temperatures of 11-33°C: (1) a low temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 11-19°C, (2) the optimum temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was 19-23°C, and (3) a high temperature oxygen consumption rate stage when water temperature was > 27°C. The temperature quotients (Q10) obtained suggested that C. mongolicus preferred a temperature range of 19-23°C. At 19°C, C. mongolicus exhibited higher oxygen consumption rates during the day when the maximum values were observed at 10:00 and 14:00 than at night when the minimum occurred at 02:00.

  8. Constraining the Pluripotent Fate of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Cell Therapy – The Turning Point of Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Xuejun H.

    2014-01-01

    nuclear translocation of the neuronal specific transcription factor Nurr-1. Similarly, nicotinamide was rendered sufficient to induce the specification of cardiomesoderm direct from the pluripotent state of hESCs by promoting the expression of the earliest cardiac-specific transcription factor Csx/Nkx2.5 and triggering progression to cardiac precursors and beating cardiomyocytes with high efficiency. This technology breakthrough enables direct conversion of pluripotent hESCs into a large supply of high purity neuronal cells or heart muscle cells with adequate capacity to regenerate CNS neurons and contractile heart muscles for developing safe and effective stem cell therapies. Transforming pluripotent hESCs into fate-restricted therapy derivatives dramatically increases the clinical efficacy of graft-dependent repair and safety of hESC-derived cellular products. Such milestone advances and medical innovations in hESC research allow generation of a large supply of clinical-grade hESC therapy derivatives targeting for major health problems, bringing cell-based regenerative medicine to a turning point. PMID:24926434

  9. [A turning point in the therapeutic history of open leg fractures: osteosynthesis coupled to the immediate dressing in the presence of major damage to the soft tissues].

    PubMed

    Vichard, P; Tropet, Y; Garbuio, P

    1999-01-01

    A brief history of the treatment of open leg fractures (OLF) points out the problems posed by the present therapy with regard to the soft tissues in the most serious cases (type III from cauchoix, Duparc, type III A and B from Gustilo). Which strategy should be foremost, knowing that the debridement, stabilization and cover are the three essential procedures? Rigorous debridement certainly carries unanimous approval but some are opposed to this procedure during the first few days. Also widely recognized is the beneficial aspect of early cover when regarding aseptic evolution, consolidation, low rate of complications, rehabilitation and the patient's helplessness. However, despite the well demonstrated results of BYRD [14] and GODINA [15] and because of the debridement concept and logistical insufficiencies, thorough treatment in a true emergency has not achieved full acceptance. In general, the majority of surgeons first clear, stabilize with the use of an external fixator in true emergency situations and cover several days later. For the past ten years, in real emergencies, in the Department of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Plastic Surgery at the Besançon University Hospital Center we have subscribed to a radical treatment which simultaneously combines debridement, osteosynthesis (locked centro-medullary nailing) and cover with the use of free flaps in the same operating period. A study based on 27 wounded patients seeks to validate the advantages of looked centro-medullary nailing over the use of an external fixator and the use of free flaps rather than local flaps in the most serious cases. PMID:10437287

  10. Turn-over rate of academic faculty at the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University: a 20-year analysis (1991 to 2011)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Faculty turn-over affects both workers and organizations. Turnover of faculty and researchers is increasing alarmingly and costing the universities and the country at large. Fast turnover of health professionals from the health system and from academic institutions has recently received substantial attention from both academia and health sector managers. This paper calculates the faculty turnover rate at the College of Health Sciences of Addis Ababa University during the period of September 1991 to August 2011. Methods The study was conducted at the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University. Retrospective analysis of employee records was done. All records of the faculty that were working in the College during the 20-year period, starting from September 1991 to August 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected from the employee records accessed from the College’s human resources database and supplemented by payroll sheets and different reports. A structured checklist was used to extract the required data from the database. The crude turnover rate for academic faculty was calculated. Results Within the 20-year period of September 1991 to August 2011, a total of 120 faculty members left. The overall turn-over rate was 92.8 %. The rate in the most recent five years (172 %) is 8.5 times higher than the rate for the first five years (20 %). The average retention period before the termination of an employment contract was 4.9 years. The top five departments where employment contracts were relatively higher include: Nursing 15 (15.6 %), Internal Medicine 12 (12.5%), Public Health 10 (10.4%), Pediatrics 9 (9.4%) and Surgery 9 (9.4%). About two thirds (66.6%) of the faculty who were leaving were at the ranks of assistant professorship and above. Conclusion This study revealed that outflow of faculty has been continuously increasing in the period reviewed. This implies that the College had been losing highly skilled professionals with

  11. To turn or not to turn?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beta, Carsten

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria typically swim in straight runs, interruped by sudden turning events. In particular, some species are limited to a reversal in the swimming direction as the only turning maneuver at their disposal. In a recent article, Großmann et al (2016 New J. Phys. 18 043009) introduce a theoretical framework to analyze the diffusive properties of active particles following this type of run-and-reverse pattern. Based on a stochastic clock model to mimic the regulatory pathway that triggers reversal events, they show that a run-and-reverse swimmer can optimize its diffusive spreading by tuning the reversal rate according to the level of rotational noise. With their approach, they open up promising new perspectives of how to incorporate the dynamics of intracellular signaling into coarse-grained active particle descriptions.

  12. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Dendrite Coherency Point During Solidification of Al2024 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoncheh, M. H.; Shabestari, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Most research related to dendrite coherency point (DCP) has been done on cast aluminum alloys and at a low cooling rate condition. In this research, the DCP of a wrought aluminum alloy is calculated in the range of high cooling rates used in the direct-chill casting process. The two-thermocouple thermal analysis technique was used to determine the DCP of Al2024 alloy. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of different cooling rates on the dendrite coherency characteristics of Al2024. The cooling rates used in the present study range from 0.4 to 17.5 °C s-1. Also, the effect of 1.2 wt pct Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner on the DCP was studied. To calculate the solid fraction at dendrite coherency, solid fraction versus time is plotted based on Newtonian technique. The results show that by increasing the cooling rate, both time and temperature of dendrite coherency are decreased. Also, by adding the Al-5Ti-1B master alloy, dendrite coherency temperature is reduced and dendrite impingement is postponed. To reduce casting defects occurring during equiaxed solidification, e.g., macrosegregation, porosities, and hot tearing, these two operations which lead to postpone the transition from mass to inter-dendritic feeding, or dendrite coherency, can be useful. By increasing the cooling rate, solid fraction at dendrite coherency increases initially and then decreases at higher cooling rates. Presence of grain refiner leads to increasing of solid fraction at DCP. Thus, by delaying the dendrite coherency and increasing the solid fraction at DCP, semi-solid forming can be performed on parts with higher solid fraction and less shrinkage. Microstructural evaluation was carried out to present the correlation between the cooling rate and solid fraction in 2024 aluminum alloy.

  13. A Globally Stable Lyapunov Pointing and Rate Controller for the Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Neerav

    2011-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS) is scheduled to launch in late 2014. Its primary goal is to discover the fundamental plasma physics processes of reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere. Each of the four MMS spacecraft is spin-stabilized at a nominal rate of 3 RPM. Traditional spin-stabilized spacecraft have used a number of separate modes to control nutation, spin rate, and precession. To reduce the number of modes and simplify operations, the Delta-H control mode is designed to accomplish nutation control, spin rate control, and precession control simultaneously. A nonlinear design technique, Lyapunov's method, is used to design the Delta-H control mode. A global spin rate controller selected as the baseline controller for MMS, proved to be insufficient due to an ambiguity in the attitude. Lyapunov's design method was used to solve this ambiguity, resulting in a controller that meets the design goals. Simulation results show the advantage of the pointing and rate controller for maneuvers larger than 90 deg and provide insight into the performance of this controller.

  14. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2. PMID:25162649

  15. Heart rate deflection point relates to second ventilatory threshold in a tennis test.

    PubMed

    Baiget, Ernest; Fernández-Fernández, Jaime; Iglesias, Xavier; Rodríguez, Ferran A

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) has been studied in continuous sports, but never in a tennis-specific test. The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between HRDP and the VT2, and between the maximal test performance and the maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) in an on-court specific endurance tennis test. Thirty-five high-level tennis players performed a progressive tennis-specific field test to exhaustion to determine HRDP, VT2, and (Equation is included in full-text article.). Ventilatory gas exchange parameters were continuously recorded by a portable telemetric breath-by-breath gas exchange measurement system. Heart rate deflection point was identified at the point at which the slope values of the linear portion of the time/heart rate (HR) relationship began to decline and was successfully determined in 91.4% of the players. High correlations (r = 0.79-0.96; p < 0.001) between physiological (HR and oxygen uptake [(Equation is included in full-text article.)]) and performance (Time, Stage, and Frequency of balls [Ballf]) variables corresponding to HRDP and VT2 were observed. Frequency of balls at the HRDP (BallfHRDP) was detected at 19.8 ± 1.7 shots per minute. Paired t-test showed no significant differences in HR (178.9 ± 8.5 vs. 177.9 ± 8.7 b·min for HRDP vs. HRVT2, respectively) at intensities corresponding to HRDP and VT2. Maximal test performance and (Equation is included in full-text article.)were moderately correlated (r = 0.56; p < 0.001). Heart rate deflection point obtained from this specific tennis test can be used to determine the VT2, and the BallfHRDP can be used as a practical performance variable to prescribe on-court specific aerobic training at or near VT2.

  16. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  17. Stagnation-point heat-transfer rate predictions at aeroassist flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Jones, Jim J.; Rochelle, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented for the stagnation-point heat-transfer rates used in the design process of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle over its entire aeropass trajectory. The prediction methods used in this investigation demonstrate the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to a wide range of flight conditions and their usefulness in a design process. The heating rates were computed by a viscous-shock-layer (VSL) code at the lower altitudes and by a Navier-Stokes (N-S) code for the higher altitude cases. For both methods, finite-rate chemically reacting gas was considered, and a temperature-dependent wall-catalysis model was used. The wall temperature for each case was assumed to be radiative equilibrium temperature, based on total heating. The radiative heating was estimated by using a correlation equation. Wall slip was included in the N-S calculation method, and this method implicitly accounts for shock slip. The N-S/VSL combination of projection methods was established by comparison with the published benchmark flow-field code LAURA results at lower altitudes, and the direct simulation Monte Carlo results at higher altitude cases. To obtain the design heating rate over the entire forward face of the vehicle, a boundary-layer method (BLIMP code) that employs reacting chemistry and surface catalysis was used. The ratio of the VSL or N-S method prediction to that obtained from the boundary-layer method code at the stagnation point is used to define an adjustment factor, which accounts for the errors involved in using the boundary-layer method.

  18. Return rates from intertidal foraging from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point: Understanding early human economies.

    PubMed

    De Vynck, Jan C; Anderson, Robert; Atwater, Chloe; Cowling, Richard M; Fisher, Erich C; Marean, Curtis W; Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The south coast of South Africa provides the earliest evidence for Middle Stone Age (MSA) coastal resource exploitation by early Homo sapiens. In coastal archaeology worldwide, there has been a debate over the general productivity of intertidal foraging, leading to studies that directly measure productivity in some regions, but there have been no such studies in South Africa. Here we present energetic return rate estimates for intertidal foraging along the southern coast of South Africa from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point. Foraging experiments were conducted with Khoi-San descendants of the region, and hourly caloric return rates for experienced foragers were measured on 41 days near low tide and through three seasons over two study years. On-site return rates varied as a function of sex, tidal level, marine habitat type and weather conditions. The overall energetic return rate from the entire sample (1492 kcal h(-1)) equals or exceeds intertidal returns reported from other hunter-gatherer studies, as well as measured return rates for activities as diverse as hunting mammals and plant collecting. Returns are projected to be exceptionally high (∼ 3400 kcal h(-1) for men, ∼ 1900 kcal h(-1) for women) under the best combination of conditions. However, because of the monthly tidal cycle, high return foraging is only possible for about 10 days per month and for only 2-3 h on those days. These experiments suggest that while intertidal resources are attractive, women and children could not have subsisted independently, nor met all their protein-lipid needs from marine resources alone, and would have required substantial additional energy and nutrients from plant gathering and/or from males contributing game.

  19. Return rates from intertidal foraging from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point: Understanding early human economies.

    PubMed

    De Vynck, Jan C; Anderson, Robert; Atwater, Chloe; Cowling, Richard M; Fisher, Erich C; Marean, Curtis W; Walker, Robert S; Hill, Kim

    2016-03-01

    The south coast of South Africa provides the earliest evidence for Middle Stone Age (MSA) coastal resource exploitation by early Homo sapiens. In coastal archaeology worldwide, there has been a debate over the general productivity of intertidal foraging, leading to studies that directly measure productivity in some regions, but there have been no such studies in South Africa. Here we present energetic return rate estimates for intertidal foraging along the southern coast of South Africa from Blombos Cave to Pinnacle Point. Foraging experiments were conducted with Khoi-San descendants of the region, and hourly caloric return rates for experienced foragers were measured on 41 days near low tide and through three seasons over two study years. On-site return rates varied as a function of sex, tidal level, marine habitat type and weather conditions. The overall energetic return rate from the entire sample (1492 kcal h(-1)) equals or exceeds intertidal returns reported from other hunter-gatherer studies, as well as measured return rates for activities as diverse as hunting mammals and plant collecting. Returns are projected to be exceptionally high (∼ 3400 kcal h(-1) for men, ∼ 1900 kcal h(-1) for women) under the best combination of conditions. However, because of the monthly tidal cycle, high return foraging is only possible for about 10 days per month and for only 2-3 h on those days. These experiments suggest that while intertidal resources are attractive, women and children could not have subsisted independently, nor met all their protein-lipid needs from marine resources alone, and would have required substantial additional energy and nutrients from plant gathering and/or from males contributing game. PMID:26989020

  20. Migration as a turning point in food habits: the early phase of dietary acculturation among women from South Asian, African, and Middle Eastern Countries living in Norway.

    PubMed

    Terragni, Laura; Garnweidner, Lisa M; Pettersen, Kjell Sverre; Mosdøl, Annhild

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the early phase of dietary acculturation after migration. South Asian, African and Middle Eastern women (N = 21) living in Norway were interviewed about their early experiences with food in a new context. The findings pointed to abrupt changes in food habits in the first period after migration. To various degrees, women reported unfamiliarity with foods in shops, uncertainty about meal formats and food preparation and fear of eating food prohibited by their religion. Their food consumption tended to be restricted to food items perceived as familiar or safe. Our findings indicate that the first period after migration represents a specific phase in the process of dietary acculturation. Early initiatives aimed at enhancing confidence in food and familiarity with the new food culture are recommended.

  1. Use of dew-point detection for quantitative measurement of sweating rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brengelmann, G. L.; Mckeag, M.; Rowell, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    A method of measuring sweat rate (SR) based on detection of dew point (DP) is proposed which has advantages that may be attractive to other laboratories concerned with recording SR from selected areas of skin. It is similar to other methods in that dry gas is passed through a capsule which isolates several square centimeters of skin surface. The difference is in the means of determining how much gaseous water is carried off in the effluent moist gas. The DP detector used is free of the drawbacks of previous devices. DP is obtained through the fundamental technique of determining the temperature at which condensate forms on a mirror. Variations in DP are tracked rapidly, and accurately (+ or - 0.8 C nominal, sensitivity + or - 0.05 C) over a wide range ( -40 C to +50 C) without measurable hysteresis. The detector asembly is rugged and readily opened for cleaning and inspection.

  2. Instantaneous monitoring of sleep fragmentation by point process heart rate variability and respiratory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Citi, Luca; Bianchi, Matt T; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel, automatic point-process approach that is able to provide continuous, instantaneous estimates of heart rate variability (HRV) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in long duration data recordings such as those during an entire night of sleep. We analyze subjects with and without sleep apnea who underwent diagnostic polysomnography. The proposed algorithm is able to quantify multi-scale high time resolution autonomic signatures of sleep fragmentation, such as arousals and stage transitions, throughout an entire night. Results demonstrate the ability of our methods to track fast dynamic transitions from sleep to wake and between REM sleep and other sleep stages, providing resolution details not available in sleep scoring summaries. An automatic threshold-based procedure is further able to detect brief arousals, with the instantaneous indices characterizing specific arousal dynamic signatures.

  3. Rain Fallspeeds and Rates Derived from Airborne Nadir-Pointing Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, L.; Geerts, Bart

    1999-01-01

    The use of vertical-incidence Doppler velocity in addition to radar reflectivity may yield information on drop size distribution and therefore result in better rainrate estimates. Doppler velocity can provide useful information on the raindrop size distribution. Doppler velocities from a zenith-pointing radar represent the sum of the mean reflectivity-weighted hydrometeor fallspeed and the vertical air motion. Dual-parameter rain estimation methods using the Doppler velocity, require that the latter can be removed, or is negligible. Atlas et al. (1972) derived relations between Doppler velocity, reflectivity, and rain rate assuming an exponential size distribution for rain. Ulbrich (1994) expanded on this work by deriving the relation between the Doppler velocity and the reflectivity assuming a Gamma size distribution. This distribution provides a more realistic representation of the small rain drops. To get accurate information on raindrop size distributions with the above method, the air motions must be removed from the observed Doppler velocities

  4. Meloxicam transdermal delivery: effect of eutectic point on the rate and extent of skin permeation

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Mohammadi, Farhad; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Drug delivery through the skin can transfer therapeutic levels of drugs for pharmacological effects. Analgesics such as NSAIDs have gastrointestinal side effects and topical dosage forms of these drugs are mainly preferred, especially for local pains. Meloxicam is one of NSAIDs with no topical form in the market. In this research, we attempted to quantify the skin permeation of a meloxicam topical preparation and to show how permeation would be increased by using thymol as an enhancer. The effect of eutectic point of drug and thymol mixture on rate and extent of skin permeation was also studied. Materials and Methods: Different mixtures of thymol and meloxicam (2:8, 4:6, 5:5, 6:4, 8:2) were prepared and their melting point were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Then drug permeation was measured using diffusion cells and the Guinea pig skin. Results: Mixtures in ratios 5:5 and 4:6 of meloxicam / thymol showed a new endotherm at 149 and 140°C in DSC thermograms. The permeability of meloxicam from the creams containing 6:4, 5:5 and 4:6 ratios of meloxicam to thymol were 4.71, 15.2, 22.06 µg/cm2 respectively. This was significantly different from the cream of pure meloxicam (3.76 µg/cm2). Conclusion: This study set out to determine that thymol plays as a skin permeation enhancer and increases the meloxicam skin absorption and this enhancement is significant at the eutectic point of drug-enhancer mixture. PMID:24711894

  5. Detection of change points in underlying earthquake rates, with application to global mega-earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touati, Sarah; Naylor, Mark; Main, Ian

    2016-02-01

    The recent spate of mega-earthquakes since 2004 has led to speculation of an underlying change in the global `background' rate of large events. At a regional scale, detecting changes in background rate is also an important practical problem for operational forecasting and risk calculation, for example due to volcanic processes, seismicity induced by fluid injection or withdrawal, or due to redistribution of Coulomb stress after natural large events. Here we examine the general problem of detecting changes in background rate in earthquake catalogues with and without correlated events, for the first time using the Bayes factor as a discriminant for models of varying complexity. First we use synthetic Poisson (purely random) and Epidemic-Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) models (which also allow for earthquake triggering) to test the effectiveness of many standard methods of addressing this question. These fall into two classes: those that evaluate the relative likelihood of different models, for example using Information Criteria or the Bayes Factor; and those that evaluate the probability of the observations (including extreme events or clusters of events) under a single null hypothesis, for example by applying the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and `runs' tests, and a variety of Z-score tests. The results demonstrate that the effectiveness among these tests varies widely. Information Criteria worked at least as well as the more computationally expensive Bayes factor method, and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and runs tests proved to be the relatively ineffective in reliably detecting a change point. We then apply the methods tested to events at different thresholds above magnitude M ≥ 7 in the global earthquake catalogue since 1918, after first declustering the catalogue. This is most effectively done by removing likely correlated events using a much lower magnitude threshold (M ≥ 5), where triggering is much more obvious. We find no strong evidence that the background rate of large

  6. Lactic acidosis, potassium, and the heart rate deflection point in professional road cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, A; Hoyos, J; Santalla, A; Perez, M; Carvajal, A; Chicharro, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the influence of lactic acidosis, the Bohr effect, and exercise induced hyperkalaemia on the occurrence of the heart rate deflection point (HRDP) in elite (professional) cyclists. Methods: Sixteen professional male road cyclists (mean (SD) age 26 (1) years) performed a ramp test on a cycle ergometer (workload increases of 5 W/12 s, averaging 25 W/min). Heart rate (HR), gas exchange parameters, and blood variables (lactate, pH, P50 of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve, and K+) were measured during the tests. Results: A HRDP was shown in 56% of subjects at about 88% of their maximal HR (HRDP group; n = 9) but was linear in the rest (No-HRDP group; n = 7). In the HRDP group, the slope of the HR-workload regression line above the HRDP correlated inversely with levels of K+ at the maximal power output (r = -0.67; p<0.05). Conclusions: The HRDP phenomenon is associated, at least partly, with exercise induced hyperkalaemia. PMID:11916893

  7. Benthic remineralisation rates in southern North Sea - from point measurements to areal estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2015-04-01

    The southern North Sea is enclosed by densely populated hinterland with intensive use by agriculture and industry and thus substantially affected by anthropogenic influences. As a coastal subsystem, this applies especially to the German Wadden Sea, a system of back-barrier tidal flats along the whole German Bight. Ongoing efforts to implement environmental protection policies during the last decades changed the significance of various pollutants such as reactive nitrogen or phosphate, which raises the desire for constant monitoring of the coastal ecosystem to assess the efficiency of the employed environmental protection measures. Environmental monitoring is limited to point measurements which thus have to be interpolated with appropriate models. However, existing models to estimate various sediment characteristics for the interpolation of point measurements appear insufficient when compared with actual field measurements in the southern North Sea. We therefore seek to improve these models by identifying and quantifying key variables of benthic solute fluxes by comprehensive measurements which cover the complete spatial and seasonal variability. We employ in-situ measurements with the eddy-correlation technique and flux chambers in combination with ex-situ incubations of sediment cores to establish benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients. Additional ex-situ measurements determine basic sediment characteristics such as permeability, volumetric reaction rates, and substrate concentration. With our first results we mapped the distribution of measured sediment permeability, which suggest that areas with water depth greater than 30 m are impervious whereas sediment in shallower water at the Dogger Bank and along the coast is substantially permeable with permeability between 10-12 m2 and 10-10 m2. This implies that benthic fluxes can be estimated with simple diffusion-type models for water depths >30 m, whereas estimates especially for coastal sediments require

  8. Comparison of ventilation threshold and heart rate deflection point in fast and standard treadmill test protocols.

    PubMed

    Vucetić, Vlatko; Sentija, Davor; Sporis, Goran; Trajković, Nebojsa; Milanović, Zoran

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two methods for determination of anaerobic threshold from two different treadmill protocols. Forty-eight Croatian runners of national rank (ten sprinters, fifteen 400-m runners, ten middle distance runners and thirteen long distance runners), mean age 21.7 +/- 5.1 years, participated in the study. They performed two graded maximal exercise tests on a treadmill, a standard ramp treadmill test (T(SR), speed increments of 1 km x h(-1) every 60 seconds) and a fast ramp treadmill test (T(FR), speed increments of 1 km x h(-1) every 30 seconds) to determine and compare the parameters at peak values and at heart rate at the deflection point (HR(DP)) and ventilation threshold (VT). There were no significant differences between protocols (p > 0.05) for peak values of oxygen uptake (VO(2max), 4.48 +/- 0.43 and 4.44 +/- 0.45 L x min(-1)), weight related VO(2max) (62.5 +/- 6.2 and 62.0 +/- 6.0 mL x kg(-1) x min(-1)), pulmonary ventilation (VE(max), 163.1 +/- 18.7 and 161.3 +/- 19.9 L x min(-1)) and heart rate (HR(max), 192.3 +/- 8.5 and 194.4 +/- 8.7 bpm) (T(FR) and T(SR), respectively). Moreover, no significant differences between T(FR) and T(SR) where found for VT and HR(DP) when expressed as VO2 and HR. However, there was a significant effect of ramp slope on running speed at VO(2max) and at the anaerobic threshold (AnT), independent of the method used (VT: 16.0 +/- 2.2 vs 14.9 +/- 2.2 km x h(-1);HR(DP): 16.5 +/- 1.9 vs 14.9 +/- 2.0 km x h(-1) for T(FR) and T(SR) respectively). Linear regression analysis revealed high between-test and between-method correlations for VO2, HR and running speed parameters (r = 0.78-0.89, p < 0.01). The present study has indicated that the VT and HR(DP) for running (VO2, ventilation, and heart rate at VT/HR(DP)) are independent of test protocol, while there is a significant effect of ramp slope on VT and HR(DP) when expressed as running speed. Moreover, this study demonstrates that the point of deflection

  9. Noninvasive Determination of Anaerobic Threshold Based on the Heart Rate Deflection Point in Water Cycling.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Stephanie S; Brasil, Roxana M; Alberton, Cristine L; Ferreira, Hector K; Bagatini, Natália C; Calatayud, Joaquin; Colado, Juan C

    2016-02-01

    This study compared heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), percentage of maximal HR (%HRmax), percentage of maximal VO2, and cadence (Cad) related to the anaerobic threshold (AT) during a water cycling maximal test between heart rate deflection point (HRDP) and ventilatory (VT) methods. In addition, the correlations between both methods were assessed for all variables. The test was performed by 27 men in a cycle ergometer in an aquatic environment. The protocol started at a Cad of 100 b · min(-1) for 3 minutes with subsequent increments of 15 b · min(-1) every 2 minutes until exhaustion. A paired two-tailed Student's t-test was used to compare the variables between the HRDP and VT methods. The Pearson product-moment correlation test was used to correlate the same variables determined by the 2 methods. There was no difference in HR (166 ± 13 vs. 166 ± 13 b · min(-1)), VO2 (38.56 ± 6.26 vs. 39.18 ± 6.13 ml · kg(-1) · min(-1)), %HRmax (89.24 ± 3.84 vs. 89.52 ± 4.29%), VO2max (70.44 ± 7.99 vs. 71.64 ± 8.32%), and Cad (174 ± 14 b · min(-1) vs. 171 ± 8 b · min(-1)) related to AT between the HRDP and VT methods. Moreover, significant relationships were found between the methods to determine the AT for all variables analyzed (r = 0.57-0.97). The estimation of the HRDP may be a noninvasive and easy method to determine the AT, which could be used to adapt individualized training intensities to practitioners during water cycling classes. PMID:26200195

  10. Heart dimensions may influence the occurrence of the heart rate deflection point in highly trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, A.; Carvajal, A.; Boraita, A.; Serratosa, L.; Hoyos, J.; Chicharro, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the heart rate (HR) response to exercise in 21 highly trained cyclists (mean (SD) age 25 (3) years) was related to their heart dimensions. METHODS: Before performing an incremental exercise test involving a ramp protocol with workload increases of 25 W/min, each subject underwent echocardiographic evaluation of the following variables: left ventricular end diastolic internal diameter (LVIDd), left ventricular posterior wall thickness at end diastole (LVPWTd), interventricular septal wall thickness at end diastole (IVSTd), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), left atrial dimension (LAD), longitudinal left atrial (LLAD) and right atrial (LRAD) dimensions, and the ratio of early to late (E/A) diastolic flow velocity. RESULTS: The HR response showed a deflection point (HRd) at about 85% VO2MAX in 66.7% of subjects (D group; n = 14) and was linear in 33.3% (NoD group; n = 7). Several echocardiographic variables (LVMI, LAD, LLAD, LRAD) indicative of heart dimensions were similar in each group. However, mean LPWTd (p<0.01) and IVSTd (p<0.05) values were significantly higher in the D group. Finally, no significant difference between groups was found with respect to the E/A. CONCLUSIONS: The HR response is curvilinear during incremental exercise in a considerable number of highly trained endurance athletes-that is, top level cyclists. The departure of HR increase from linearity may predominantly occur in athletes with thicker heart walls. 


 PMID:10597846

  11. Turning Point Values of Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Vivian Center

    While the literature reveals interpersonal relations important to females, little specific data is available on values of adolescent females. Social comparison research reveals that when objective measures are unavailable to set standards, individuals compare traits and abilities with similar others. This tendency is more pronounced in periods of…

  12. Foundation for the Future: Turning Points.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Arlington, VA. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    This booklet, the third publication in the Foundation for the Future series, illustrates how involvement in the Directorate for Education and Human Resources' (EHR's) projects has been a watershed for many people. The personal profiles contained within describe how EHR programs are: changing people's lives, opening people's minds to new…

  13. Turning Points In My Medical Career

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    I have reviewed briefly persons who have influenced me during my years as a student of medicine and to date. I have been blessed in my teachers and owe everything I am to them. The chief lessons they taught me were integrity, sincerity, the need to keep learning and practice ethically keeping the welfare of the patient in mind all the time. Above all, they taught me to observe the Golden Rule**. PMID:22013339

  14. A Still Point in a Turning World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Judy

    2003-01-01

    There is an estimated 1 million children who are homeless each year. Many bounce from school to school as they move from place to place. They miss class, lose ground academically, and their grades slip. They have problems socially because they don't have clean clothes or a place to shower. They fall asleep in class because they don't feel safe…

  15. At a long-awaited turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2014-07-01

    Research in nanotechnology in India is on an upswing given the substantial investments in the past two decades. Making an impact globally will now require investing in education, entrepreneurship, translational science, infrastructure for manufacturing, and changing the administrative mindset.

  16. Clinical Facts, Turning Points and Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lush, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I explore how we might link ideas about clinical facts to current issues in child psychotherapy research. I consider what our understanding of clinical facts might contribute to our research methods and how our research methods might better represent the clinical facts. The paper introduces a selection of psychoanalytic writers'…

  17. Canard solutions near a degenerate turning point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, T.

    2006-12-01

    We are interested in the study of canard solutions in a singularly perturbed real first order ODE of the form epsilonu' = Ψ(x, u, a, epsilon), where epsilon > 0 is a small parameter, and a in Script R is a control parameter. An existence result for such solutions is given, and the method used in the demonstration allow us to conjecture the existence of a generalized epsilon1/(p+1)-asymptotic expansion for those solutions.

  18. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of a biological "antifreeze", AFGP 1-5: an explanation in terms of adsorption rate for the concentration dependence of the freezing point.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L

    2009-07-21

    It is widely accepted, and we agree, that the lowering of the temperature at which ice can grow in a water solution of one of the biological antifreezes is a result of adsorption of the antifreeze molecules at the ice surface. However, how this can produce a well-defined "freezing point" that varies with the solution concentration has remained problematical. The results of a series of measurements of ice growing in supercooled solutions of an effective antifreeze are reported and interpreted in terms of this fundamental problem. It seemed that the solution of the problem would have to rely upon adsorption rate, because that appeared to be the only way for the concentration in solution to be so important. The crystal growth results are most unusual, and appear to confirm this. The growth rates over a wide range of antifreeze concentration in solution (about 0.05 to 9 mg ml(-1)) are zero from the thermodynamic freezing point down to the "non-equilibrium" freezing point, where there is a very sudden increase to a plateau value that then remains about constant as the supercooling is increased by about 2 degrees C. The plateau values of growth rate are faster than those from pure water at the lower-supercooling ends of the plateaus, but slower at higher supercooling, until the growth rate starts rising toward that from pure water. These plateau values of growth rate increase markedly with increasing concentration of the antifreeze in solution. Along with these changes there are complex changes in the growth orientations, from c-axis spicules in the plateaus to those more characteristic of growth from pure water at greater supercooling. We conclude that the non-equilibrium freezing point is determined by the adsorption rate. It is the warmest temperature at which the ice growth rate on the basal plane (where the antifreeze does not adsorb) is fast enough to prevent the area of basal face on a growing ice crystal from becoming too small to grow, which is determined in

  19. Nematode Chemotaxis: Gradual Turns, Sharp Turns, and Modulated Turn Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Amar; Padmanabhan, Venkat; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Vanapalli, Siva; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-03-01

    We examine strategies used by the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans for chemotaxis in complex environments. The proposed description is based on our recently developed piecewise-harmonic-curvature model of nematode locomotion [PLoS ONE, 7(7) e40121 (2012)], where random harmonic-curvature modes represent elementary locomotory movements. We show that the previously described gradual-turn and sharp-turn chemotaxis strategies can be unified in our model. The gradual-turn mechanism relies on crawling amplitude changes commensurate with the undulation frequency. The sharp-turn mechanism consists in modulation of the frequency of jumps to large-amplitude modes. We hypothesize that there exists a third strategy, where the nematode adjusts the variance of the amplitude distribution. Such adjustments result in a modulation of the magnitude of random turns, with smaller turns performed when the nematode moves toward the increasing chemoatractant concentration. Experiments are proposed to determine if the third strategy is present in the nematode behavior. This work was supported by NSF grant No. CBET 1059745.

  20. Agricultural Turns, Geographical Turns: Retrospect and Prospect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carol; Evans, Nick

    2004-01-01

    It is accepted that British rural geography has actively engaged with the "cultural turn", leading to a resurgence of research within the sub-discipline. However, a reading of recent reviews suggests that the cultural turn has largely, if not completely, bypassed those geographers interested in the agricultural sector. Farming centred engagements…

  1. Turning towards History: Turning towards Utopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2004-01-01

    Turning towards history--to be contrasted with turning away from history--captures the Marxian sense of education. Marx worked out the elements of a theory of political education in relation to history by equating education with the coincidence of the changing of circumstances and people. This theory received its most comprehensive yet succinct…

  2. Evaluating acute pain intensity relief: challenges when using an 11-point numerical rating scale.

    PubMed

    Chauny, Jean-Marc; Paquet, Jean; Lavigne, Gilles; Marquis, Martin; Daoust, Raoul

    2016-02-01

    Percentage of pain intensity difference (PercentPID) is a recognized way of evaluating pain relief with an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS) but is not without flaws. A new metric, the slope of relative pain intensity difference (SlopePID), which consists in dividing PercentPID by the time between 2 pain measurements, is proposed. This study aims to validate SlopePID with 3 measures of subjective pain relief: a 5-category relief scale (not, a little, moderate, very, complete), a 2-category relief question ("I'm relieved," "I'm not relieved"), and a single-item question, "Wanting other medication to treat pain?" (Yes/No). This prospective cohort study included 361 patients in the emergency department who had an initial acute pain NRS > 3 and a pain intensity assessment within 90 minutes after analgesic administration. Mean age was 50.2 years (SD = 19.3) and 59% were women. Area under the curves of receiver operating characteristic curves analyses revealed similar discriminative power for PercentPID (0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.88) and SlopePID (0.82; 95% CI, 0.77-0.86). Considering the "very" category from the 5-category relief scale as a substantial relief, the average cutoff for substantial relief was a decrease of 64% (95% CI, 59-69) for PercentPID and of 49% per hour (95% CI, 44-54) for SlopePID. However, when a cutoff criterion of 50% was used as a measure of pain relief for an individual patient, PercentPID underestimated pain-relieved patients by 12.1% (P < 0.05) compared with the SlopePID measurement, when pain intensity at baseline was an odd number compared with an even number (32.9% vs 45.0%, respectively). SlopePID should be used instead of PercentPID as a metric to evaluate acute pain relief on a 0 to 10 NRS.

  3. Transitioning to the New High School Graduation Rate. Policy on Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenard, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    For nearly a decade, states have had flexibility in collecting and reporting graduation rate data for state and federal accountability purposes. But in 2008, the U.S. Department of Education issued new guidelines that require all states to report a new rate--the four-year adjusted cohort graduation rate--beginning in the 2011-2012 school year.…

  4. Body size, but not cooling rate, affects supercooling points in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Daniel A; Martin, Adam R; Porter, Sanford D

    2008-10-01

    The level of an animal's stress resistance is set by multiple intrinsic physiological and extrinsic environmental parameters. Body size is a critical intrinsic parameter that affects numerous fitness-related organismal traits including fecundity, survival, mating success, and stress resistance. The rate of cooling is a critical extrinsic environmental factor that can affect thermal stress resistance. Workers of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), display considerable variation in adult body size. Therefore, developing ecologically realistic models of thermotolerance in this species requires a consideration of body size. We tested the hypothesis that body size and cooling rate would interact to set the supercooling point in fire ant workers by exposing workers of a range of body sizes to three different cooling regimens: a very fast ramp of -10 degrees C/min, an intermediate ramp of -1 degrees C/min, and an ecologically relevant slow ramp of -0.1 degrees C/min. Specifically, we asked whether large workers were more susceptible to differences in cooling rate than smaller workers. We found that body size had a considerable effect on supercooling point with the largest workers freezing at a temperature approximately 3 degrees C higher than the smallest workers. Cooling rate had a very small effect on supercooling point, and there was no interaction between the two factors. Therefore, the allometry of supercooling points across the range of worker body sizes does not change with cooling rate.

  5. Relationships Among Grade Point Average, Vocabulary, Reading Comprehension, and Reading Rate of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutchler, Virginia

    Relationships among grade point averages and reading test scores were sought in an effort to learn whether successful students are characterized by good vocabularies, understanding, and rapid reading. Seniors within a few weeks of graduation and obtaining their elementary teaching certificates were given the Nelson-Denny Reading Test. Pearson's…

  6. Peak capacity, peak-capacity production rate, and boiling point resolution for temperature-programmed GC with very high programming rates

    PubMed

    Grall; Leonard; Sacks

    2000-02-01

    Recent advances in column heating technology have made possible very fast linear temperature programming for high-speed gas chromatography. A fused-silica capillary column is contained in a tubular metal jacket, which is resistively heated by a precision power supply. With very rapid column heating, the rate of peak-capacity production is significantly enhanced, but the total peak capacity and the boiling-point resolution (minimum boiling-point difference required for the separation of two nonpolar compounds on a nonpolar column) are reduced relative to more conventional heating rates used with convection-oven instruments. As temperature-programming rates increase, elution temperatures also increase with the result that retention may become insignificant prior to elution. This results in inefficient utilization of the down-stream end of the column and causes a loss in the rate of peak-capacity production. The rate of peak-capacity production is increased by the use of shorter columns and higher carrier gas velocities. With high programming rates (100-600 degrees C/min), column lengths of 6-12 m and average linear carrier gas velocities in the 100-150 cm/s range are satisfactory. In this study, the rate of peak-capacity production, the total peak capacity, and the boiling point resolution are determined for C10-C28 n-alkanes using 6-18 m long columns, 50-200 cm/s average carrier gas velocities, and 60-600 degrees C/min programming rates. It was found that with a 6-meter-long, 0.25-mm i.d. column programmed at a rate of 600 degrees C/min, a maximum peak-capacity production rate of 6.1 peaks/s was obtained. A total peak capacity of about 75 peaks was produced in a 37-s long separation spanning a boiling-point range from n-C10 (174 degrees C) to n-C28 (432 degrees C).

  7. Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a SingleDownwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a Single Downwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor With the tremendous advances in onshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) capability comes the realization that new tools are needed to support env...

  8. Does Scale Length Matter? A Comparison of Nine- versus Five-Point Rating Scales for the Mini-CEX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Educators must often decide how many points to use in a rating scale. No studies have compared interrater reliability for different-length scales, and few have evaluated accuracy. This study sought to evaluate the interrater reliability and accuracy of mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) scores, comparing the traditional mini-CEX…

  9. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: A conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Albertson, John D.

    2015-08-01

    Emerging mobile fugitive emissions detection and measurement approaches require robust inverse source algorithms to be effective. Two Gaussian plume inverse approaches are described for estimating emission rates from ground-level point sources observed from remote vantage points. The techniques were tested using data from 41 controlled methane release experiments (14 studies) and further investigated using 7 field studies executed downwind of oil and gas well pads in Wyoming. Analyzed measurements were acquired from stationary observation locations 18-106 m downwind of the emission sources. From the fluctuating wind direction, the lateral plume geometry is reconstructed using a derived relationship between the wind direction and crosswind plume position. The crosswind plume spread is determined with both modeled and reconstructed Gaussian plume approaches and estimates of source emission rates are found through inversion. The source emission rates were compared to a simple point source Gaussian emission estimation approach that is part of Draft EPA Method OTM 33A. Compared to the known release rates, the modeled, reconstructed, and point source Gaussian controlled release results yield average percent errors of -5%, -2%, and 6% with standard deviations of 29%, 25%, and 37%, respectively. Compared to each other, the three methods agree within 30% for 78% of all 48 observations (41 CR and 7 Wyoming).

  10. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: a conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a technique for determining the trace gas emission rate from a point source. The technique was tested using data from controlled methane release experiments and from measurement downwind of a natural gas production facility in Wyoming. Concentration measuremen...

  11. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.10 Application of rates...

  12. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.10 Application of rates...

  13. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.10 Application of rates...

  14. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.10 Application of rates...

  15. 18 CFR 341.10 - Application of rates to intermediate points.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT OIL PIPELINE TARIFFS: OIL PIPELINE COMPANIES SUBJECT TO SECTION 6 OF THE INTERSTATE COMMERCE ACT § 341.10 Application of rates...

  16. Atomistic studies of point defect migration rates in the iron-chromium system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherly, Jeffrey

    Generation and migration of helium and other point defects under irradiation causes ferritic steels based on the Fe-Cr system to age and fail. This is motivation to study point defect migration and the He equation of state using atomistic simulations due to the steels' use in future reactors. A new potential for the Fe-Cr-He system developed by collaborators at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was validated using published experimental data. The results for the He equation of state agree well with experimental data. The activation energies for the migration of He- and Fe-interstitials in varying compositions of Fe-Cr lattices agree well with prior work. This research did not find a strong correlation between lattice ordering and interstitial migration energy.

  17. [Turning points in world history: urological comments on pathography of famous people: did Napoleon Bonaparte have a cystitis during the battle of Waterloo and was the battle lost because of that?].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Stastny, M; Haferkamp, A

    2011-03-01

    Apparently unimportant diseases of some prominent figures can have a considerable effect on the course of time at turning points in world history. It is quite conceivable that the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815 had been lost by France because Napoleon was not in full possession of his powers, because he was suffering from acute cystitis. Adverse weather conditions with continuous rain and coldness in advance of the battle, extremely primitive hygienic conditions and more than simple quarters for the night led to the development of cystitis. Based on the records of his biographers, his personal physician and the letters to his brother, we know that Napoleon was not able to give the command to attack in the early morning as intended, but in the early noon, only because of his bad general condition. This delay of several hours led, as we all know, to the intervention of Prussia and the devastating defeat of France. Thus it appears that a relatively unimportant urological disease influenced the course of world history crucially.

  18. [Turning points in world history: urological comments on pathography of famous people: did Napoleon Bonaparte have a cystitis during the battle of Waterloo and was the battle lost because of that?].

    PubMed

    Hatzinger, M; Stastny, M; Haferkamp, A

    2011-03-01

    Apparently unimportant diseases of some prominent figures can have a considerable effect on the course of time at turning points in world history. It is quite conceivable that the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June 1815 had been lost by France because Napoleon was not in full possession of his powers, because he was suffering from acute cystitis. Adverse weather conditions with continuous rain and coldness in advance of the battle, extremely primitive hygienic conditions and more than simple quarters for the night led to the development of cystitis. Based on the records of his biographers, his personal physician and the letters to his brother, we know that Napoleon was not able to give the command to attack in the early morning as intended, but in the early noon, only because of his bad general condition. This delay of several hours led, as we all know, to the intervention of Prussia and the devastating defeat of France. Thus it appears that a relatively unimportant urological disease influenced the course of world history crucially. PMID:21340596

  19. The Turning and Evolution of the Recent Acceleration Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi; Tan, A.

    2007-05-01

    The turning point and evolution characteristics of the universe are investigated through solving the Friedmann equation with a non-zero cosmological constant. Choosing the present-time Hubble constant, the radius of the present universe , and the density parameter in matter as three key parameters, we obtain the density parameter in dark energy, the cosmological constant, the mass of the universe, the turning point redshif, the age of the present universe, and the time-dependent expansion rate, velocity, radius, and acceleration parameter of the universe. It is shown that the turing point redshift is soly dependent of the density parameters in matter and dark energy. For the flat universe, it turned from past deceleration to recent acceleration when its size was 1/2 to 2/3 of the present size if the density parameter in matter is between 0.2 and 0.4. The expansion rate is very large at initial and decreases with time to approach the Hubble constant. The expansion velocity can be over the light speed in the early period, which decreases to the minimum at the turning point and then increases with time to approach the ratio of the present radius to the Hubble radius times the square root of the density parameter in dark energy. The solution of the time-dependent radius increases with time. The present time depends on the three key parameters. The universe with a larger present radius, smaller Hubble constant, or smaller density parameter in dark energy is elder. The universe with greater density parameter in dark energy accelerates faster recently. The open and closed universes can also be accelerated recently. The turning points and evolution characteristics among different types of the universe and different sets of key parameters are compared. This presentation will show the details, supported by NASA grant (NNG04GD59G).

  20. Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkel, J.A.; Biggs, J.E.

    1994-03-01

    The Magnet Coil Shorted Turn Detector has been developed to facilitate the location of shorted turns in magnet coils. Finding these shorted turns is necessary to determine failure modes that are a necessary step in developing future production techniques. Up to this point, coils with shorted turns had the insulation burned off without the fault having been located. This disassembly process destroyed any chance of being able to find the fault. In order to maintain a flux balance in a coupled system such as a magnet coil, the current in a shorted turn must be opposed to the incident current. If the direction of the current in each conductor can be measured relative to the incident current, then the exact location of the short can be determined. In this device, an AC voltage is applied to the magnet under test. A small hand held B-dot pickup coil monitors the magnetic field produced by current in the individual magnet conductors. The relative phase of this pickup coil voltage is compared to a reference signal derived from the input current to detect a current reversal as the B-dot pickup coil is swept over the conductors of the coil under test. This technique however, is limited to only those conductors that are accessible to the hand held probe.

  1. Furry picture transition rates in the intense fields at a lepton collider interaction point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartin, A.

    2015-04-01

    The effect on particle physics processes by intense electromagnetic fields in the charge bunch collisions at future lepton colliders is considered. Since the charge bunch fields are tied to massive sources (the e+e- charges), a reference frame is chosen in which the fields appear to be co-propagating. Solutions of the Dirac equation minimally coupled to the electromagnetic fields reasonably associated with two intense overlapping charge bunches are obtained and found to be a Volkov solution with respect to a null 4-vector whose 3-vector part lies in the common propagation direction. These solutions are used within the Furry interaction picture to calculate the beamstrahlung transition rate for electron radiation due to interaction with the electromagnetic fields of two colliding charge bunches. New analytic expressions are obtained and compared numerically with the beamstrahlung in the electromagnetic field of one charge bunch. The techniques developed will be applied to other collider physics processes in due course.

  2. Spatial statistical point prediction guidance for heating-rate-limited aeroassisted orbital transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipto; Conway, Bruce A.

    2015-06-01

    Feedback control of constrained non-linear dynamical systems satisfying a certain optimality criterion and meeting a specified transfer objective in the state space is recognized as one of the most challenging problems in control theory. One approach to computing optimal feedback policies is the dynamic programming route of numerically solving the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) partial differential equation directly. In this paper an alternate and more tractable dynamic programming approach, the optimal feedback synthesis method, is utilized. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated through an explicit guidance scheme for the heating-rate-constrained maneuver of an Aeroassisted Transfer Vehicle (AOTV). In optimal feedback synthesis, a feedback chart is constructed from a family of open-loop extremals, thus ensuring optimality with respect to any initial condition in the family. This paper presents a solution to the AOTV optimal feedback synthesis problem using the Gaussian process spatial prediction method of universal kriging. A closed-form expression for a near-optimal guidance law is derived. Its performance is found to be very promising; initial atmospheric entry errors due to simulated thruster misfiring are seen to be accurately corrected while the algebraic state-inequality constraint is closely respected.

  3. Quantifying Knick Point Migration Rates Related to the Messinian Crisis. The Case of the Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stüwe, Kurt; Pucher, Christoph; Robl, Jörg; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Messinian crisis is a temporally well-constrained period between 5.3 my and 5.9 my, when the strait of Gibraltar was tectonically closed and the Mediterranean Sea had consequently desiccated. This dramatic base level drop by about 1500 vertical meters had a profound influence on the geomorphic evolution of the major drainages surrounding the Mediterranean basin. In particular, it caused substantial knickpoints in the major rivers including the Rhone, the Ebro, the Po and the Nile. While the knickpoints of the Rhone and Ebro have been studied previously and the knickpoints created by the Po may lie today underneath the Po plains, the knickpoint and its migration along the Nile has not been studied and would have migrated along its current river channel. In this contribution we focus on numerical modelling of the knickpoint migration in the Nile and use our modelling results in comparison with the present day morphological analyses of the river to constrain absolute migration rates. We suspect that the first Nile cataract near Assuan, some 1000 km upstream of today's river mouth may be the relict of the Messinian salinity crisis making it to one of the fastest migrating knickpoints in the world.

  4. Diamond turning of thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single point diamond turning studies were made using a series of thermoplastic polymers with different glass transition temperatures. Variations in surface morphology and surface roughness were observed as a function of cutting speed. Lower glass transition temperatures facilitate smoother surface cuts and better surface finish. This can be attributed to the frictional heating that occurs during machining. Because of the very low glass transition temperatures in polymeric compared to inorganic glasses, the precision machining response can be very speed sensitive.

  5. Correlation of Point B and Lymph Node Dose in 3D-Planned High-Dose-Rate Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Russell, Anthony; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To compare high dose rate (HDR) point B to pelvic lymph node dose using three-dimensional-planned brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with FIGO Stage IB-IIIB cervical cancer received 70 tandem HDR applications using CT-based treatment planning. The obturator, external, and internal iliac lymph nodes (LN) were contoured. Per fraction (PF) and combined fraction (CF) right (R), left (L), and bilateral (Bil) nodal doses were analyzed. Point B dose was compared with LN dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters by paired t test and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: Mean PF and CF doses to point B were R 1.40 Gy +- 0.14 (CF: 7 Gy), L 1.43 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.15 Gy), and Bil 1.41 +- 0.15 (CF: 7.05 Gy). The correlation coefficients between point B and the D100, D90, D50, D2cc, D1cc, and D0.1cc LN were all less than 0.7. Only the D2cc to the obturator and the D0.1cc to the external iliac nodes were not significantly different from the point B dose. Significant differences between R and L nodal DVHs were seen, likely related to tandem deviation from irregular tumor anatomy. Conclusions: With HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer, per fraction nodal dose approximates a dose equivalent to teletherapy. Point B is a poor surrogate for dose to specific nodal groups. Three-dimensional defined nodal contours during brachytherapy provide a more accurate reflection of delivered dose and should be part of comprehensive planning of the total dose to the pelvic nodes, particularly when there is evidence of pathologic involvement.

  6. High rates of energy expenditure and water flux in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crocker, D.E.; Kofahl, N.; Fellers, G.D.; Gates, N.B.; Houser, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    We measured water flux and energy expenditure in free-ranging Point Reyes mountain beavers Aplodontia rufa phaea by using the doubly labeled water method. Previous laboratory investigations have suggested weak urinary concentrating ability, high rates of water flux, and low basal metabolic rates in this species. However, free-ranging measurements from hygric mammals are rare, and it is not known how these features interact in the environment. Rates of water flux (210 ?? 32 mL d-1) and field metabolic rates (1,488 ?? 486 kJ d-1) were 159% and 265%, respectively, of values predicted by allometric equations for similar-sized herbivores. Mountain beavers can likely meet their water needs through metabolic water production and preformed water in food and thus remain in water balance without access to free water. Arginine-vasopressin levels were strongly correlated with rates of water flux and plasma urea : creatinine ratios, suggesting an important role for this hormone in regulating urinary water loss in mountain beavers. High field metabolic rates may result from cool burrow temperatures that are well below lower critical temperatures measured in previous laboratory studies and suggest that thermoregulation costs may strongly influence field energetics and water flux in semifossorial mammals. ?? 2007 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  7. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  8. Interpreting human behavior from depositional rates and combustion features through the study of sedimentary microfacies at site Pinnacle Point 5-6, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Karkanas, Panagiotis; Brown, Kyle S; Fisher, Erich C; Jacobs, Zenobia; Marean, Curtis W

    2015-08-01

    Using fine and coarse resolution geoarchaeological studies at the Middle Stone Age site of PP5-6 at Pinnacle Point, Mossel Bay, South Africa, we discovered different patterns of anthropogenic input and changes in behavior through time. Through the microfacies approach, we documented the various geogenic and anthropogenic processes that formed the deposits of the site. By deciphering large scale rate differences in the production of these microfacies we estimated anthropogenic input rates and therefore gained understanding of occupational duration and intensity. The PP5-6 sediments document occupations characterized by small groups and short visits during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. This part of the sequence is characterized by numerous single (and mostly intact) hearth structures in a roofspall-rich matrix. During this time the sea was very close to the site and the people were focused on exploiting the rocky shores. With the advent of the glacial conditions of MIS4, the occupation of the site became much more intense. The occurrence of thick palimpsests of burnt remains, sometimes disturbed by small-scale sedimentary gravity processes, supports this conclusion. As sea level dropped and the coastline retreated, the geogenic input shifted to predominately aeolian sediments, implying an exposed shelf probably associated with a rich but more distant coastal environment. The occupants of PP5-6 turned their preference to silcrete as a raw material and they began to make microlithic stone tools. Since sites dating to MIS4 are abundant in the Cape, we suggest that populations during MIS4 responded to glacial conditions with either demographic stability or growth as well as technological change. PMID:26024567

  9. Interpreting human behavior from depositional rates and combustion features through the study of sedimentary microfacies at site Pinnacle Point 5-6, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Karkanas, Panagiotis; Brown, Kyle S; Fisher, Erich C; Jacobs, Zenobia; Marean, Curtis W

    2015-08-01

    Using fine and coarse resolution geoarchaeological studies at the Middle Stone Age site of PP5-6 at Pinnacle Point, Mossel Bay, South Africa, we discovered different patterns of anthropogenic input and changes in behavior through time. Through the microfacies approach, we documented the various geogenic and anthropogenic processes that formed the deposits of the site. By deciphering large scale rate differences in the production of these microfacies we estimated anthropogenic input rates and therefore gained understanding of occupational duration and intensity. The PP5-6 sediments document occupations characterized by small groups and short visits during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. This part of the sequence is characterized by numerous single (and mostly intact) hearth structures in a roofspall-rich matrix. During this time the sea was very close to the site and the people were focused on exploiting the rocky shores. With the advent of the glacial conditions of MIS4, the occupation of the site became much more intense. The occurrence of thick palimpsests of burnt remains, sometimes disturbed by small-scale sedimentary gravity processes, supports this conclusion. As sea level dropped and the coastline retreated, the geogenic input shifted to predominately aeolian sediments, implying an exposed shelf probably associated with a rich but more distant coastal environment. The occupants of PP5-6 turned their preference to silcrete as a raw material and they began to make microlithic stone tools. Since sites dating to MIS4 are abundant in the Cape, we suggest that populations during MIS4 responded to glacial conditions with either demographic stability or growth as well as technological change.

  10. High rate of A2142G point mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance among Iranian Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Khashei, Reza; Dara, Mahintaj; Bazargani, Abdollah; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Taghavi, Alireza; Moeini, Maryam; Dehghani, Behzad; Sohrabi, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clarithromycin resistance and its associated molecular mechanisms among Helicobacter pylori isolates from dyspeptic patients in Shiraz, Iran. From January to May 2014, 100 H. pylori strains were isolated from patients with gastroduodenal disorders. The resistance to clarithromycin was quantitatively evaluated, using Epsilometer (E-test) method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed on all the isolates to detect A2143G and A2142G mutations in 23S rRNA gene. The H. pylori isolation rate was found to be 31.4%. E-test showed that 20% of isolates were resistant to clarithromycin (MIC ≥ 1 mg/L). MIC of clarithromycin ranged between 0.016 and 24 mg/L. Findings of PCR-RFLP showed that the A2142G was the most (90%) frequently point mutation, followed by the A2143G (10%). No statistically significant difference was found between H. pylori clarithromycin resistance point mutations and patients' gender or age. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high frequency of A2142G point mutation in Iran and probably in other regions of the world. Considering the increasing trend of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin due to these mutations, it is crucial to investigate the new therapeutic approaches against H. pylori infection. PMID:27357065

  11. Radar-derived asteroid shapes point to a 'zone of stability' for topography slopes and surface erosion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J.; Graves, K.; Bowling, T.

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies of the combined effects of asteroid shape, spin, and self-gravity have focused primarily upon the failure limits for bodies with a variety of standard shapes, friction, and cohesion values [1,2,3]. In this study, we look in the opposite direction and utilize 22 asteroid shape-models derived from radar inversion [4] and 7 small body shape-models derived from spacecraft observations [5] to investigate the region in shape/spin space [1,2] wherein self-gravity and rotation combine to produce a stable minimum state with respect to surface potential differences, dynamic topography, slope magnitudes, and erosion rates. This erosional minimum state is self-correcting, such that changes in the body's rotation rate, either up or down, will increase slope magnitudes across the body, thereby driving up erosion rates non-linearly until the body has once again reached a stable, minimized surface state [5]. We investigated this phenomenon in a systematic fashion using a series of synthesized, increasingly prolate spheroid shape models. Adjusting the rotation rate of each synthetic shape to minimize surface potential differences, dynamic topography, and slope magnitudes results in the magenta curve of the figure (right side), defining the zone of maximum surface stability (MSS). This MSS zone is invariant both with respect to body size (gravitational potential and rotational potential scale together with radius), and density when the scaled-spin of [2] is used. Within our sample of observationally derived small-body shape models, slow rotators (Group A: blue points), that are not in the maximum surface stability (MSS) zone and where gravity dominates the slopes, will generally experience moderate erosion rates (left plot) and will tend to move up and to the right in shape/spin space as the body evolves (right plot). Fast rotators (Group C: red points), that are not in the MSS zone and where spin dominates the slopes, will generally experience high erosion rates

  12. Take a breath and take the turn: how breathing meets turns in spontaneous dialogue

    PubMed Central

    Rochet-Capellan, Amélie; Fuchs, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological rhythms are sensitive to social interactions and could contribute to defining social rhythms. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the implications of breathing in conversational turn exchanges remains limited. In this paper, we addressed the idea that breathing may contribute to timing and coordination between dialogue partners. The relationships between turns and breathing were analysed in unconstrained face-to-face conversations involving female speakers. No overall relationship between breathing and turn-taking rates was observed, as breathing rate was specific to the subjects' activity in dialogue (listening versus taking the turn versus holding the turn). A general inter-personal coordination of breathing over the whole conversation was not evident. However, specific coordinative patterns were observed in shorter time-windows when participants engaged in taking turns. The type of turn-taking had an effect on the respective coordination in breathing. Most of the smooth and interrupted turns were taken just after an inhalation, with specific profiles of alignment to partner breathing. Unsuccessful attempts to take the turn were initiated late in the exhalation phase and with no clear inter-personal coordination. Finally, breathing profiles at turn-taking were different than those at turn-holding. The results support the idea that breathing is actively involved in turn-taking and turn-holding. PMID:25385777

  13. Take a breath and take the turn: how breathing meets turns in spontaneous dialogue.

    PubMed

    Rochet-Capellan, Amélie; Fuchs, Susanne

    2014-12-19

    Physiological rhythms are sensitive to social interactions and could contribute to defining social rhythms. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the implications of breathing in conversational turn exchanges remains limited. In this paper, we addressed the idea that breathing may contribute to timing and coordination between dialogue partners. The relationships between turns and breathing were analysed in unconstrained face-to-face conversations involving female speakers. No overall relationship between breathing and turn-taking rates was observed, as breathing rate was specific to the subjects' activity in dialogue (listening versus taking the turn versus holding the turn). A general inter-personal coordination of breathing over the whole conversation was not evident. However, specific coordinative patterns were observed in shorter time-windows when participants engaged in taking turns. The type of turn-taking had an effect on the respective coordination in breathing. Most of the smooth and interrupted turns were taken just after an inhalation, with specific profiles of alignment to partner breathing. Unsuccessful attempts to take the turn were initiated late in the exhalation phase and with no clear inter-personal coordination. Finally, breathing profiles at turn-taking were different than those at turn-holding. The results support the idea that breathing is actively involved in turn-taking and turn-holding.

  14. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  15. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2015-12-18

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks. PMID:26722945

  16. Enhancement of the Liquefaction Rate in Small-Scale Helium Liquefiers Working Near and Above the Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rillo, C.; Gabal, M.; Lozano, M. P.; Sesé, J.; Spagna, S.; Diederichs, J.; Sager, R.; Chialvo, C.; Terry, J.; Rayner, G.; Warburton, R.; Reineman, R.

    2015-05-01

    Low-temperature research laboratories with typical liquid-helium consumption of the order of tens of liters per day have greatly benefited from the recent development of small-scale liquefiers. In general, these liquefiers are based on Gifford-McMahon or pulse-tube closed-cycle refrigerators with a nominal cooling power ranging from 1 to 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The liquefaction rate for these cryocooler-based liquefiers depends on the pressure at which the helium is liquefied, although the final user conditions of the produced liquid helium are always atmospheric pressure and boiling temperature (e.g., 4.2 K at 100 kPa). Here, we show a systematic study on this effect, in which an enhancement in excess of 70% in liquefaction rate is found experimentally for pressures near and above the critical point of helium (220 kPa). We propose that the underlying mechanism for the liquefaction enhancement is based on the increase in cryocooler cooling power with temperature and the decrease of the helium enthalpy with pressure.

  17. Flip Turns with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queeney, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Kate Queeney, a professor of chemistry at Smith College, turned to a former student to receive one-on-one instruction in swimming. The student, who had been unsure and scared in chemistry class, seemed like an entirely different person when teaching the teacher. This article describes how the author learned that there is something undeniably…

  18. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  19. Warrants for left-turn lanes

    SciTech Connect

    Agent, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Most states use accident, traffic-volume, or delay data as guidelines for installing left-turn lanes. Computer simulation of these data compares statistics of intersections with left-turn lanes to those without. The study found that special lanes always lead to improvement in traffic flow, but noted that all intersections cannot accommodate a special lane. The recommendations specify the accident rate, critical-volume determination, and the rate of traffice conflicts which warrant a separate left-turn lane. 10 references, 6 figures, 4 tables. (DCK)

  20. Turn Openings in Academic Talk: Where Goals and Roles Intersect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evison, Jane

    2013-01-01

    This study uses Corpus Linguistic (CL) techniques to explore multiple turn openings in conjunction with comparative measures of turn-initial priming (the proportion of occurrences of a form that are turn-initial). Using a benchmark corpus of casual conversation as a point of comparison, six frequent items which have a particularly strong affinity…

  1. Underwater turning movement during foraging in Hydromedusa maximiliani (Testudines, Chelidae) from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Barbosa, O; Hohl, L S L; Novelli, I A; Sousa, B M; Gomides, S C; Loguercio, M F C

    2014-11-01

    A type of locomotor behavior observed in animals with rigid bodies, that can be found in many animals with exoskeletons, shells, or other forms of body armor, to change direction, is the turning behavior. Aquatic floated-turning behavior among rigid bodies animals have been studied in whirligig beetles, boxfish, and more recently in freshwater turtle, Chrysemys picta. In the laboratory we observed a different kind of turning movement that consists in an underwater turning movement during foraging, wherein the animal pivoted its body, using one of the hindlimbs as the fixed-point support in the substratum. We describe, analyze and quantify this movement during foraging in Hydromedusa maximiliani, using observations made in the laboratory. We studied 3 adult specimens (2 males, 1 female) and 2 non-sexed juveniles of H. maximiliani. They were kept individually in an aquarium filled with water and small fish. They were filmed, in dorsal view, at 30 frames per second. Sequences were analyzed frame by frame and points were marked on limbs and shell to enable analysis of variation in limb flexion and extension, as well as rotation movements. While foraging, turtles frequently turned their bodies, using one hind leg as the pivot point. This underwater turning movement, in addition to slow movements with the neck stretched, or staying nearly immobile and scanning the surroundings with lateral movements of the neck (in arcs up to 180°), and fast attacks of neck, may increase prey capture rates.

  2. Underwater turning movement during foraging in Hydromedusa maximiliani (Testudines, Chelidae) from southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Barbosa, O; Hohl, L S L; Novelli, I A; Sousa, B M; Gomides, S C; Loguercio, M F C

    2014-11-01

    A type of locomotor behavior observed in animals with rigid bodies, that can be found in many animals with exoskeletons, shells, or other forms of body armor, to change direction, is the turning behavior. Aquatic floated-turning behavior among rigid bodies animals have been studied in whirligig beetles, boxfish, and more recently in freshwater turtle, Chrysemys picta. In the laboratory we observed a different kind of turning movement that consists in an underwater turning movement during foraging, wherein the animal pivoted its body, using one of the hindlimbs as the fixed-point support in the substratum. We describe, analyze and quantify this movement during foraging in Hydromedusa maximiliani, using observations made in the laboratory. We studied 3 adult specimens (2 males, 1 female) and 2 non-sexed juveniles of H. maximiliani. They were kept individually in an aquarium filled with water and small fish. They were filmed, in dorsal view, at 30 frames per second. Sequences were analyzed frame by frame and points were marked on limbs and shell to enable analysis of variation in limb flexion and extension, as well as rotation movements. While foraging, turtles frequently turned their bodies, using one hind leg as the pivot point. This underwater turning movement, in addition to slow movements with the neck stretched, or staying nearly immobile and scanning the surroundings with lateral movements of the neck (in arcs up to 180°), and fast attacks of neck, may increase prey capture rates. PMID:25627611

  3. 75 FR 1363 - Dynegy Services Plum Point LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Dynegy Services Plum Point LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Dynegy Services Plum Point LLC's application...

  4. Development of beryllium mirror turning technology

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.B.

    1991-04-01

    Because of the unique properties of beryllium (Be) and the advantages of single point turning, a development program has been instituted to single point turn beryllium as a means to produce optics. Initial effort to diamond turn beryllium resulted in less than desirable results and development efforts were directed at finding a more suitable tool material. Both single and polycrystalline tool materials were evaluated and cubic boron nitride (CBN) was found to produce the better results. Tool wear has been the primary limitation in precision machining beryllium and advances have allowed a two order-of-magnitude reduction in this problem. After considerable efforts, results with CBN appear to be approaching a limit, and diamond, as tool material, was re-evaluated with promising results. A development program is now under way to determine if diamond may be used to machine larger and more complex beryllium parts.

  5. Lattice Calibration with Turn-By-Turn BPM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Sebek, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data from multiple BPMs are fitted with a tracking code to calibrate magnet strengths in a manner similar to the well known LOCO code. Simulation shows that this turn-by-turn method can be a quick and efficient way for optics calibration. The method is applicable to both linacs and ring accelerators. Experimental results for a section of the SPEAR3 ring is also shown.

  6. Bodily-visual practices and turn continuation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Cecilia E; Thompson, Sandra A; Drake, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers points in turn construction where conversation researchers have shown that talk routinely continues beyond possible turn completion, but where we find bodily-visual behavior doing such turn extension work. The bodily-visual behaviors we examine share many features with verbal turn extensions, but we argue that embodied movements have distinct properties that make them well-suited for specific kinds of social action, including stance display and by-play in sequences framed as subsidiary to a simultaneous and related verbal exchange. Our study is in line with a research agenda taking seriously the point made by Goodwin (2000a, b, 2003), Hayashi (2003, 2005), Iwasaki (2009), and others that scholars seeking to account for practices in language and social interaction do themselves a disservice if they privilege the verbal dimension; rather, as suggested in Stivers/Sidnell (2005), each semiotic system/modality, while coordinated with others, has its own organization. With the current exploration of bodily-visual turn extensions, we hope to contribute to a growing understanding of how these different modes of organization are managed concurrently and in concert by interactants in carrying out their everyday social actions. PMID:23526861

  7. Assessment of the point-source method for estimating dose rates to members of the public from exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim; Bellamy, Michael B.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Sherbini, Sami; Saba, Mohammad S.; Eckerman, Keith F.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate radiation dose rates to members of the public that may result from exposure to patients recently administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy. The main purpose was to compare dose rate estimates based on a point source and target with values derived from more realistic simulations that considered the time-dependent distribution of 131I in the patient and attenuation of emitted photons by the patient’s tissues. The external dose rate estimates were derived using Monte Carlo methods and two representations of the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs, previously developed by ORNL and the USNRC, to model the patient and a nearby member of the public. Dose rates to tissues and effective dose rates were calculated for distances ranging from 10 to 300 cm between the phantoms and compared to estimates based on the point-source method, as well as to results of previous studies that estimated exposure from 131I patients. The point-source method overestimates dose rates to members of the public in very close proximity to an 131I patient but is a broadly accurate method of dose rate estimation at separation distances of 300 cm or more at times closer to administration.

  8. Assessment of the point-source method for estimating dose rates to members of the public from exposure to patients with 131I thyroid treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim; Bellamy, Michael B.; Hertel, Nolan E.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Sherbini, Sami; Saba, Mohammad S.; Eckerman, Keith F.

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a contract with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate radiation dose rates to members of the public that may result from exposure to patients recently administered iodine-131 (131I) as part of medical therapy. The main purpose was to compare dose rate estimates based on a point source and target with values derived from more realistic simulations that considered the time-dependent distribution of 131I in the patient and attenuation of emitted photons by the patient’s tissues. The external dose rate estimates were derived using Monte Carlo methods and two representations of the Phantommore » with Movable Arms and Legs, previously developed by ORNL and the USNRC, to model the patient and a nearby member of the public. Dose rates to tissues and effective dose rates were calculated for distances ranging from 10 to 300 cm between the phantoms and compared to estimates based on the point-source method, as well as to results of previous studies that estimated exposure from 131I patients. The point-source method overestimates dose rates to members of the public in very close proximity to an 131I patient but is a broadly accurate method of dose rate estimation at separation distances of 300 cm or more at times closer to administration.« less

  9. Page turning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J. (Inventor); Eklund, Wayne D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A device for holding reading materials for use by readers without arm mobility is presented. The device is adapted to hold the reading materials in position for reading with the pages displayed to enable turning by use of a rubber tipped stick that is held in the mouth and has a pair of rectangular frames. The frames are for holding and positioning the reading materials opened in reading posture with the pages displayed at a substantially unobstructed sighting position for reading. The pair of rectangular frames are connected to one another by a hinge so the angle between the frames may be varied thereby varying the inclination of the reading material. A pair of bent spring mounted wires for holding opposing pages of the reading material open for reading without substantial visual interference of the pages is mounted to the base. The wires are also adjustable to the thickness of the reading material and have a variable friction adjustment. This enables the force of the wires against the pages to be varied and permits the reader to manipulate the pages with the stick.

  10. IASI is turning ten!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerbaux, Cathy; George, Maya; Bauduin, Sophie; Boynard, Anne; Coheur, Pierre-François; Clarisse, Lieven; Crevoisier, Cyril; Doniki, Stamatia; Hadji-Lazaro, Juliette; Hurtmans, Daniel; Lacour, Jean-Lionel; Ronsmans, Gaétane; Safieddine, Sarah; Van Damme, Martin; Wespes, Catherine; Whitburn, Simon

    2016-04-01

    The IASI mission is a versatile mission that fulfills the needs of three different communities: numerical weather prediction, climate research and atmospheric composition monitoring. In order to converge on the design of such an instrument all three communities had to make "reasonable accommodations" 20 years ago, and it turns out that this mission is now recognized as essential for weather forecasting, and for tracking pollutants/greenhouse gases from space. With the launch of MetOp-B and -C and the continuity and new challenges offered by IASI-NG, an exceptional data record will be available in the next few years. The presentation (movie) illustrates some of the major findings related to atmospheric composition changes as monitored by IASI during the last 10 years. It relies on accurate data available in near real time along with an excellent horizontal coverage. We will show the global scale mapping of gases, along with the detection of dust and ash particles, as well as the potential of the mission to catch special events such as volcanic eruptions, large fires and pollution peaks.

  11. Reshape of the bunch-by-bunch BPM signal to turn-by-turn matrix during the fast rf frequency sweeping time in Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; Ankenbrandt, Charles M.; Lackey, James; Scarpine, Vic; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    The bunch-by-bunch BPM signal array has to be reshaped into a turn-by-turn (TBT) matrix in order to make the TBT beam position information of a single bunch available for further data analysis, such as via the Fourier transform to obtain the synchrotron tune and betatron tune, etc. Since the RF frequency sweeps more than 10 MHz in the first 8 ms of a Booster cycle, the revolution time decreases more than 20%. The number of data points for each Booster turn (BT) should be varied in the same pace with the revolution time since the sampling rate of a digital oscilloscope is usually fixed. And this can be done by pre-determining the relationship between the RF frequency and the time in a cycle via the curve fit.

  12. [inverted exclamation point]Si se Puede en Colaboracion! Increasing College Placement Rates of Low-Income Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Militello, Matthew; Schweid, Jason; Carey, John

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Today we have moved from the debate of student opportunity to postsecondary educational setting to 100% access. That is, today's high school settings have been charged with preparing "college ready" graduates. Educational policy has leveraged mandates and sanctions as a mechanism to improve college placement rates, especially…

  13. Analytical Evaluation of Bit Error Rate Performance of a Free-Space Optical Communication System with Receive Diversity Impaired by Pointing Error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazrul Islam, A. K. M.; Majumder, S. P.

    2015-06-01

    Analysis is carried out to evaluate the conditional bit error rate conditioned on a given value of pointing error for a Free Space Optical (FSO) link with multiple receivers using Equal Gain Combining (EGC). The probability density function (pdf) of output signal to noise ratio (SNR) is also derived in presence of pointing error with EGC. The average BER of a SISO and SIMO FSO links are analytically evaluated by averaging the conditional BER over the pdf of the output SNR. The BER performance results are evaluated for several values of pointing jitter parameters and number of IM/DD receivers. The results show that, the FSO system suffers significant power penalty due to pointing error and can be reduced by increasing in the number of receivers at a given value of pointing error. The improvement of receiver sensitivity over SISO is about 4 dB and 9 dB when the number of photodetector is 2 and 4 at a BER of 10-10. It is also noticed that, system with receive diversity can tolerate higher value of pointing error at a given BER and transmit power.

  14. Turn-Continuation by Self and by Other

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidnell, Jack

    2012-01-01

    At the possible completion of a turn constructional unit (TCU) that has not selected a next speaker, a speaker has two available options: either begin a new TCU or continue the one that has just come to a point of possible completion. This article describes some of the complex turns that result from exercising the second option. These can be seen…

  15. Patient pathway for breast cancer: turning points and future aspirations.

    PubMed

    Parks, Ruth Mary; Cheung, Kwok-Leung

    2015-01-01

    Improved survival from breast cancer can be attributed to a number of advances in the patient pathway from screening to advanced disease. The benefit of population screening has been established with national programs implemented. There has been improvement in the methodology of diagnostic assessment, relating to imaging techniques, methods of obtaining histological evidence and evaluation of lymph node status. Sentinel node biopsy is now routine, as is oncoplastic surgery. New forms and improved adjuvant systemic therapies are being explored. The prognosis of breast cancer can be more reliably evaluated to provide individualized information and to personalize treatments. Developments have also been seen in other areas improving the treatment and care of patients with advanced disease.

  16. The Voyages of Columbus: A Turning Point in World History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Alfred W.; Nader, Helen

    The far-reaching and transforming interactions of the Old World and the New are known today as "the Columbian Exchange." Part 1 of this booklet is an introduction by John J. Patrick dealing with teaching about the voyages of Christopher Columbus. Part 2, "Columbus and Ecological Imperialism," by Alfred W. Crosby, provides an ecological perspective…

  17. The PTV Satellite System: Turning Point or High Anxiety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Richard

    1978-01-01

    The Westar I satellite communications system for public television is discussed, and rationale for the original construction of the system, programming capabilities utilizing multichannel distribution, and additional communications services are reviewed. (RAO)

  18. [The pharmaceutical industry in France: the turning point of 1915].

    PubMed

    Bonnemain, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    For several convergent reasons, 1915 was a key period for the pharmaceutical industry in France. The overall realization that France was dependent on Germany for chemical and pharmaceutical products came from shortages of key drugs but also from massive use of poison gas for which France was not able to face this unexpected event. France's shortage for chemists properly trained to answer the needs of industry, the weak relationship between industry and faculty, the uncomfortable situation of specialty drugs, the regulations on patents and trademarks were many subjects of controversies which will contribute to the analysis of the source of this French dependence to Germany. It will be at the origin of new orientations after the war for the pharmaceutical industry and the French society. The objective was to be independent for drugs and consequently to resolve the identified issues, as well as to have a dynamic industrial research. The creation and development of several pharmaceutical companies after the war was a more or less direct benefit from the considerations starting in 1915.

  19. Guide to Curriculum Development. Turning Points: Transforming Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lummis, Ben

    2001-01-01

    The educational needs of middle school students are truly unique. In no other period of PreK-12 education can one find such a wide range of physical, social, and cognitive development among students. For students, the middle school years can be a time of both great vulnerability and great responsiveness to change. These years are highly formative…

  20. Wind Power: A Turning Point. Worldwatch Paper 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavin, Christopher

    Recent studies have shown wind power to be an eminently practical and potentially substantial source of electricity and direct mechanical power. Wind machines range from simple water-pumping devices made of wood and cloth to large electricity producing turbines with fiberglass blades nearly 300 feet long. Wind is in effect a form of solar…

  1. Food Irradiation-A Technology at a Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1986-01-01

    Food irradiation has been studied for years, but now with new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of low-dose radiation, it may become a popular method to retard food spoilage. Radiolytic products, feeding studies, and nuclear issues are among the areas addressed. (JN)

  2. Task Engagement: A Turning Point in Foreign Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Elizabeth J.; Brooks, Frank B.

    2002-01-01

    Uses a sociocultural framework to suggest task engagement as a viable construct in second language learning research. Examines second language learner data to identify task engagement as it emerges, unfolds in dialogic activity, and becomes associated with he transformation of task, self, and group. (Author/VWL)

  3. The Legacy of Earth Day: Reflections at a Turning Point.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Riordan, Timothy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates the environmental accomplishments of the last several decades, the predicted state of the environment in 2020, and the future of the environmental movement. Provides a "health report" for the Earth, and discusses the evolution of environmental science and interactions between policy, economics, and environment. (LZ)

  4. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  5. Youth Labor Force Marked Turning Point in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Anne McDougall

    1983-01-01

    Documents the sharp decrease in the percentage of 16- to 24-year-olds in the labor force between October 1981 and October 1982 as the last of the post-World War II baby-boom generation completed high school. States that this trend will probably continue through the 1980s as enrollments continue to decline. (NJ)

  6. Mycogen magically turns around agrigenetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, G.

    1995-05-01

    This short article describes how Mycogen, which acquired Agrigenetics/Lubrizol`s seed industry in the 1993, finally turned a profit after drastic sales and brand consolidation updates. Lubrizol is a supplier of lubricant additives to the energy industry. Until Mycogen turned it around, Agrigenetics stood as a stark example of the unfulfilled dreams plaguing agbiotech.

  7. Modification of a Hydrophobic Layer by a Point Mutation in Syntaxin 1A Regulates the Rate of Synaptic Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lagow, Robert D; Bao, Hong; Cohen, Evan N; Daniels, Richard W; Zuzek, Aleksej; Williams, Wade H; Macleod, Gregory T; Sutton, R. Bryan; Zhang, Bing

    2007-01-01

    Both constitutive secretion and Ca2+-regulated exocytosis require the assembly of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes. At present, little is known about how the SNARE complexes mediating these two distinct pathways differ in structure. Using the Drosophila neuromuscular synapse as a model, we show that a mutation modifying a hydrophobic layer in syntaxin 1A regulates the rate of vesicle fusion. Syntaxin 1A molecules share a highly conserved threonine in the C-terminal +7 layer near the transmembrane domain. Mutation of this threonine to isoleucine results in a structural change that more closely resembles those found in syntaxins ascribed to the constitutive secretory pathway. Flies carrying the I254 mutant protein have increased levels of SNARE complexes and dramatically enhanced rate of both constitutive and evoked vesicle fusion. In contrast, overexpression of the T254 wild-type protein in neurons reduces vesicle fusion only in the I254 mutant background. These results are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations of the SNARE core complex, suggesting that T254 serves as an internal brake to dampen SNARE zippering and impede vesicle fusion, whereas I254 favors fusion by enhancing intermolecular interaction within the SNARE core complex. PMID:17341138

  8. Analysis of dynamic stall using unsteady boundary-layer theory. [effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scruggs, R. M.; Nash, J. F.; Singleton, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The unsteady turbulent boundary layer and potential flow about a pitching airfoil are analyzed using numerical methods to determine the effect of pitch rate on the delay in forward movement of the rear flow reversal point. An explicit finite difference scheme is used to integrate the unsteady boundary layer equations, which are coupled at each instant of time to a fully unsteady and nonlinear potential flow analysis. A substantial delay in forward movement of the reversal point is demonstrated with increasing pitch rate, and it is shown that the delay results partly from the alleviation of the gradients in the potential flow, and partly from the effects of unsteadiness in the boundary layer itself. The predicted delay in flow-reversal onset, and its variation with pitch rate, are shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data relating to the delay in dynamic stall. From the comparisons it can be concluded (a) that the effects of time-dependence are sufficient to explain the failure of the boundary layer to separate during the dynamic overshoot, and (b) that there may be some link between forward movement of the reversal point and dynamic stall.

  9. Tune Evaluation From Phased BPM Turn-By-Turn Data

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Marsh, W.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-18

    In fast ramping synchrotrons like the Fermilab Booster the conventional methods of betatron tune evaluation from the turn-by-turn data may not work due to rapid changes of the tunes (sometimes in a course of a few dozens of turns) and a high level of noise. We propose a technique based on phasing of signals from a large number of BPMs which significantly increases the signal to noise ratio. Implementation of the method in the Fermilab Booster control system is described and some measurement results are presented.

  10. Effect of farmyard manure rate on water erosion of a Mediterranean soil: determination of the critical point of inefficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annabi, Mohamed; Bahri, Haithem; Cheick M'Hamed, Hatem; Hermessi, Taoufik

    2016-04-01

    Intensive cultivation of soils, using multiple soil tillage, led to the decrease of their organic matter content and structural stability in several cultivated area of the Mediterranean countries. In these degraded soils, the addition of organic products, traditionally the animal manure, should improve soil health among them the resistance of soil to water erosion. The aim of this study was to evaluate after 1 year of the addition to a cambisoil different doses of farmyard manure on soil organic matter content, on microbial activity and on aggregate stability (proxy to soil resistance to water erosion). The statistical process (bilinear model) was used to found a point at which the addition of the organic product no longer influences the soil resistance to erosion. The farmyard manure issued from a cow breeding was composted passively during 4 months and used to amend a small plots of a cultivated cambisol (silty-clay texture, 0.9% TOC) located in the northeast of Tunisia (Morneg region). The manure was intimately incorporate to the soil. The manure organic matter content was 31%, and its isohumic coefficient was 49%. Twelve dose of manure were tested: from 0 to 220 t C.ha-1. The experiment was started on September 2011. In November 2012, soil sampling was done and soil organic carbon content (Walkley-Black method) and soil aggregate stability (wet method of Le Bissonnais) were assessed. A laboratory incubations of soil+manure mixtures, with the same proportions as tested in the field conditions, was carried at 28°C and at 75% of the mixture field capacity water retention. Carbon mineralization was monitored during three months incubation. Results show that the addition of farmyard manure stimulated the microbial activity proportionally to the added dose. This activation is due to the presence of easily biodegradable carbon in the manure, which increases with increasing manure dose. On the other hand, the addition of manure increased the aggregate stability with

  11. Turning collectors for solar radiation

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Amitzur Z.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for turning a solar collector about the polar axis so that the collector is directed toward the sun as the sun tracks the sky each day. It includes two heat-expansive elements and a shadow plate. In the morning a first expansive element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the second expansive element is shaded by the plate. In the afternoon the second element is heated, expands to turn the collector to face the sun, while the first is shaded by the plate.

  12. MHD plant turn down considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, J.T.; Chapman, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    The topic of part load operation of the MHD power plant is assessed. Current and future planned MHD research is reviewed in terms of addressing topping and bottoming cycle integration needs. The response of the MHD generator to turn up and down scenarios is reviewed. The concept of turning the MHD power to met changes in plant load is discussed. The need for new ideas and focused research to study MHD plant integration and problems of plant turn down and up is cited. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Diamond turning of Si and Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, P.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Single-point diamond turning studies have been completed on Si and Ge crystals. A new process model was developed for diamond turning which is based on a critical depth of cut for plastic flow-to-brittle fracture transitions. This concept, when combined with the actual machining geometry for single-point turning, predicts that {open_quotes}ductile{close_quotes} machining is a combined action of plasticity and fracture. Interrupted cutting experiments also provide a meant to directly measure the critical depth parameter for given machining conditions.

  14. Turning around Newton's Second Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goff, John Eric

    2004-01-01

    Conceptual and quantitative difficulties surrounding Newton's second law often arise among introductory physics students. Simply turning around how one expresses Newton's second law may assist students in their understanding of a deceptively simple-looking equation.

  15. What 'empirical turn in bioethics'?

    PubMed

    Hurst, Samia

    2010-10-01

    Uncertainty as to how we should articulate empirical data and normative reasoning seems to underlie most difficulties regarding the 'empirical turn' in bioethics. This article examines three different ways in which we could understand 'empirical turn'. Using real facts in normative reasoning is trivial and would not represent a 'turn'. Becoming an empirical discipline through a shift to the social and neurosciences would be a turn away from normative thinking, which we should not take. Conducting empirical research to inform normative reasoning is the usual meaning given to the term 'empirical turn'. In this sense, however, the turn is incomplete. Bioethics has imported methodological tools from empirical disciplines, but too often it has not imported the standards to which researchers in these disciplines are held. Integrating empirical and normative approaches also represents true added difficulties. Addressing these issues from the standpoint of debates on the fact-value distinction can cloud very real methodological concerns by displacing the debate to a level of abstraction where they need not be apparent. Ideally, empirical research in bioethics should meet standards for empirical and normative validity similar to those used in the source disciplines for these methods, and articulate these aspects clearly and appropriately. More modestly, criteria to ensure that none of these standards are completely left aside would improve the quality of empirical bioethics research and partly clear the air of critiques addressing its theoretical justification, when its rigour in the particularly difficult context of interdisciplinarity is what should be at stake.

  16. Simple and Fast Continuous Estimation Method of Respiratory Frequency During Sleep using the Number of Extreme Points of Heart Rate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is reported that frequency component of approximately 0.25Hz of heart rate time series (RSA) is corresponding to the respiratory frequency. In this paper, we proposed that continuous estimation method of respiratory fequency during sleep using the number of extreme points of heart rate time series in real time. Equation for calculation of the method is very simple and the method can continuously calculate frequency by window width of about 18 beats. To evaluate accuracy of proposal method, RSA frequency was calculated using proposal method from the heart rate time series during supine rest. Result, minimum error rate was observed when RSA had time lag for about 11s and error rate was about 13.8%. Result of estimating RSA frequency time series during sleep, it varied regularly during non-REM and varied irregularly during REM. This result is similar as report of previous study about respiratory variability during sleep. Therefore, it is considered that proposal method possible to apply respiratory monitoring system during sleep.

  17. Data that describe at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload; East Fork River, Wyoming, and Fall River, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, Basil; Emmett, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the East Fork River, Wyoming, and the Fall River, Colorado, that document at-a-point temporal variations in the transport rate and particle-size distribution of bedload, associated with the downstream migration of dunes, are presented. Bedload sampling was undertaken, using a 76.2 x 76.2 mm Helley-Smith sampler, on three separate occasions at each site in June 1988. In each instance, the sampling time was 30 seconds and the sampling intervals 5 minutes. The sampling period ranged from 4.92 to 8.25 hours. Water stage did not vary appreciably during any of the sampling periods. (USGS)

  18. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  19. Walking along curved paths of different angles: the relationship between head and trunk turning.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasa, Manish N; Frissen, Ilja; Souman, Jan L; Ernst, Marc O

    2008-11-01

    Walking along a curved path requires coordinated motor actions of the entire body. Here, we investigate the relationship between head and trunk movements during walking. Previous studies have found that the head systematically turns into turns before the trunk does. This has been found to occur at a constant distance rather than at a constant time before a turn. We tested whether this anticipatory head behavior is spatially invariant for turns of different angles. Head and trunk positions and orientations were measured while participants walked around obstacles in 45 degrees, 90 degrees, 135 degrees or 180 degrees turns. The radius of the turns was either imposed or left free. We found that the head started to turn into the direction of the turn at a constant distance before the obstacle (approximately 1.1 m) for turn angles up to 135 degrees . During turns, the head was consistently oriented more into the direction of the turn than the trunk. This difference increased for larger turning angles and reached its maximum later in the turn for larger turns. Walking speeds decreased monotonically for increasing turn angles. Imposing fixed turn radii only affected the point at which the trunk started to turn into a turn. Our results support the view that anticipatory head movements during turns occur in order to gather advance visual information about the trajectory and potential obstacles.

  20. 14 CFR 23.203 - Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... landing configuration at maximum landing weight and a speed of 1.4 VSO, except that the power may not be... a 30 degree bank. Reduce speed by steadily and progressively tightening the turn with the elevator until the airplane is stalled, as defined in § 23.201(b). The rate of speed reduction must be...

  1. Multilevel spatiotemporal change-point models for evaluating the effect of an alcohol outlet control policy on changes in neighborhood assaultive violence rates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanjun; Yu, Qingzhao; Scribner, Richard; Theall, Katherine; Scribner, Scott; Simonsen, Neal

    2012-06-01

    Many previous studies have suggested a link between alcohol outlets and assaultive violence rates. In 1997 the City of New Orleans adopted a series of policies, e.g., increased license fee, additional enforcement staff, and expanded powers for the alcohol license board. The policies were specifically enacted to address the proliferation of problem alcohol outlets believed to be the source of a variety of social problems including assaultive violence. In this research, we evaluate the impact of a city level policy in New Orleans to address the problem alcohol outlets and their influence on assaultive violence. The spatial association between rates of assaultive violence at the census tract level (n=170) over a ten year period raises a challenge in statistical analysis. To meet this challenge we developed a hierarchical change-point model that controls for important covariates of assaultive violence and accounts for unexplained spatial and temporal variability. While our model is somewhat complex, its hierarchical Bayesian analysis is accessible via the WinBUGS software program. Keeping other effects fixed, the implementation of the new city level policy was associated with a decrease in the positive association between census tract level rates of assaultive violence and alcohol outlet density. Comparing several candidate change-point models using the DIC criterion, the positive association began decreasing the year of the policy implementation. The magnitude of the association continued to decrease for roughly two years and then stabilized. We also created maps of the fitted assaultive violence rates in New Orleans, as well as spatial residual maps which, together with Moran's I's, suggest that the spatial variation of the data is well accounted for by our model. We reach the conclusion that the implementation of the policy is associated with a significant decrease in the positive relationship between assaultive violence and the off-sale alcohol outlet density.

  2. Optimal descending, hypersonic turn to heading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, G. R.; Hull, D. G.

    Approximations are made to the point-mass equations of motion for flight within the atmosphere. Optimal controls are formulated for a reentry vehicle to execute a maximum-terminal-velocity turn to a specified heading while executing steep, descent trajectories. A Newton scheme is used repetitively to solve a nonlinear algebraic system for two parameters in the control equations to provide the on-line guidance. Trajectory comparisons from the repetitive solution of the optimal control problem, pure numerical optimization, and simulation of sample-data guidance show good agreement, if the atmospheric model is accurate.

  3. Optimal descending, hypersonic turn to heading

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, G.R.; Hull, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Approximations are made to the point-mass equations of motion for flight within the atmosphere. Optimal controls are formulated for a reentry vehicle to execute a maximum-terminal-velocity turn to a specified heading while executing steep, descent trajectories. A Newton scheme is used repetitively to solve a nonlinear algebraic system for two parameters in the control equations to provide the on-line guidance. Trajectory comparisons from the repetitive solution of the optimal control problem, pure numerical optimization, and simulation of sample-data guidance show good agreement, if the atmospheric model is accurate.

  4. Generation of standard gas mixtures of halogenated, aliphatic, and aromatic compounds and prediction of the individual output rates based on molecular formula and boiling point.

    PubMed

    Thorenz, Ute R; Kundel, Michael; Müller, Lars; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we describe a simple diffusion capillary device for the generation of various organic test gases. Using a set of basic equations the output rate of the test gas devices can easily be predicted only based on the molecular formula and the boiling point of the compounds of interest. Since these parameters are easily accessible for a large number of potential analytes, even for those compounds which are typically not listed in physico-chemical handbooks or internet databases, the adjustment of the test gas source to the concentration range required for the individual analytical application is straightforward. The agreement of the predicted and measured values is shown to be valid for different groups of chemicals, such as halocarbons, alkanes, alkenes, and aromatic compounds and for different dimensions of the diffusion capillaries. The limits of the predictability of the output rates are explored and observed to result in an underprediction of the output rates when very thin capillaries are used. It is demonstrated that pressure variations are responsible for the observed deviation of the output rates. To overcome the influence of pressure variations and at the same time to establish a suitable test gas source for highly volatile compounds, also the usability of permeation sources is explored, for example for the generation of molecular bromine test gases.

  5. Asymptotic error-rate analysis of FSO links using transmit laser selection over gamma-gamma atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors.

    PubMed

    García-Zambrana, Antonio; Castillo-Vázquez, Beatriz; Castillo-Vázquez, Carmen

    2012-01-30

    Since free-space optical (FSO) systems are usually installed on high buildings and building sway may cause vibrations in the transmitted beam, an unsuitable alignment between transmitter and receiver together with fluctuations in the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam due to the atmospheric turbulence can severely degrade the performance of optical wireless communication systems. In this paper, asymptotic bit error-rate (BER) performance for FSO communication systems using transmit laser selection over atmospheric turbulence channels with pointing errors is analyzed. Novel closed-form asymptotic expressions are derived when the irradiance of the transmitted optical beam is susceptible to either a wide range of turbulence conditions (weak to strong), following a gamma-gamma distribution of parameters α and β, or pointing errors, following a misalignment fading model where the effect of beam width, detector size and jitter variance is considered. Obtained results provide significant insight into the impact of various system and channel parameters, showing that the diversity order is independent of the pointing error when the equivalent beam radius at the receiver is at least 2(min{α,β})(1/2) times the value of the pointing error displacement standard deviation at the receiver. Moreover, since proper FSO transmission requires transmitters with accurate control of their beamwidth, asymptotic expressions are used to find the optimum beamwidth that minimizes the BER at different turbulence conditions. Simulation results are further demonstrated to confirm the accuracy and usefulness of the derived results, showing that asymptotic expressions here obtained lead to simple bounds on the bit error probability that get tighter over a wider range of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as the turbulence strength increases.

  6. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  7. Quixote's Visor: A Rhetorical Turn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses "Quixote's visor," a rhetorical turn that conceals a logical gap, an appeal to frustration or necessity. Suggests that the form of Quixote's visor, the testing of a series of possibilities, is a way of deriving logical and rhetorical inferences in response to acts of questioning. Discusses two "cousins"--Sherlock's visor and Darwin's…

  8. The Physics of Ski Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shonle, John I.; Nordick, Douglas L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the application of basic dynamics of rotations to the case of turning on skis, first without and then with external torques. Various elements are combined in different techniques and suggestions for further extensions and a list of laboratory exercises based on skiing are included. (DF)

  9. Chatter detection in turning using persistent homology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasawneh, Firas A.; Munch, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a new approach for ascertaining the stability of stochastic dynamical systems in their parameter space by examining their time series using topological data analysis (TDA). We illustrate the approach using a nonlinear delayed model that describes the tool oscillations due to self-excited vibrations in turning. Each time series is generated using the Euler-Maruyama method and a corresponding point cloud is obtained using the Takens embedding. The point cloud can then be analyzed using a tool from TDA known as persistent homology. The results of this study show that the described approach can be used for analyzing datasets of delay dynamical systems generated both from numerical simulation and experimental data. The contributions of this paper include presenting for the first time a topological approach for investigating the stability of a class of nonlinear stochastic delay equations, and introducing a new application of TDA to machining processes.

  10. Human non-visual discrimination of gradual turning is poor.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Edward H; Bourassa, Charles M

    2007-05-01

    We report three measures of the ability of normally sighted adults to discriminate turning while walking blindfolded outdoors. Constant error in selecting line drawings of paths indicated that participants under represent the amount of turning along more curved paths and over represent the amount of turning on less curved paths. Constant error in the direction of pointing to the origin of paths indicated a bias consistent with the direction of turning along more curved paths. Participants produced more accurate drawings of paths as the amount of turning increased. The results suggest that non-visual cues that accompany self movement are not sufficient for accurate representation of large radius curves in geographic scale travel.

  11. Bit error rate analysis of free-space optical system with spatial diversity over strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Prabu; Sriram Kumar, D.

    2014-12-01

    Free-space optical communication (FSO) is emerging as a captivating alternative to work out the hindrances in the connectivity problems. It can be used for transmitting signals over common lands and properties that the sender or receiver may not own. The performance of an FSO system depends on the random environmental conditions. The bit error rate (BER) performance of differential phase shift keying FSO system is investigated. A distributed strong atmospheric turbulence channel with pointing error is considered for the BER analysis. Here, the system models are developed for single-input, single-output-FSO (SISO-FSO) and single-input, multiple-output-FSO (SIMO-FSO) systems. The closed-form mathematical expressions are derived for the average BER with various combining schemes in terms of the Meijer's G function.

  12. A Validation Framework for Non-Point Source Simulation Models: Application to the Southern California Central Valley with Spatio-Temporally Heterogenous Source Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakos, G.; Harter, T.

    2013-12-01

    Non-point source pollution on groundwater of agricultural regions is an alarming issue of global importance. The very large response times of contaminants which may vary from decades to centuries, require mitigation measures to be based on reliable modeling. Here we present a novel computational framework to assess and evaluate the dynamic, spatio-temporally distributed linkages between non-point sources above a groundwater basin and groundwater discharges to wells, streams, or other compliance discharge surfaces (CDSs) within a groundwater basin. The modeling framework allows for efficient evaluation of NPS pollution scenarios and of their short- and long-term effects on pollutant exceedance probabilities in CDSs. We apply the model to simulate 100 years of nitrate pollution at high resolution in a 2 million hectare semi-arid, irrigated agricultural region with a large diversity of crops, but also natural lands and urban areas, and highly heterogeneous, temporally variable loading landscape in the Southern California Central Valley. Results show that the timing of nitrate breakthrough in wells is significantly controlled by aquifer recharge and pumping rates in NPS areas and by the effective porosity of the aquifer system. MLast the model predictions are compared against a highly heterogeneous, spatio-temporally varying in space and time database of historic nitrate records and an attempt is made to compute the spatial distribution of nitrate half-life due to denitrification.

  13. Separation of the lapse rate and the cold point tropopauses in the tropics and the resulting impact on cloud top-tropopause relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munchak, Leigh A.; Pan, Laura L.

    2014-07-01

    Four years of temperature profiles from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate GPS satellite retrievals are used to examine the difference between the World Meteorological Organization lapse rate definition and the cold point definition of the tropopause in the tropics. The separation between the cold point tropopause (CPT) and lapse rate tropopause (LRT) heights is quantified in seasonal averages and with the frequency of occurrence. In seasonal averages, small separations, <0.5 km, are found in the deep tropics, increasing to ~1 km toward higher latitudes and maximizing at ~1.5 km near the jet streams. The seasonal average separations show significant longitudinal structures in the December-January-February (DJF) and June-July-August (JJA) seasons. Case studies indicate that breaking Rossby waves and their effects extending into the equatorial region are responsible for the longitudinal structure in the DJF season. The seasonal average CPT-LRT separation therefore identifies the regions of the tropical upper troposphere-lower stratosphere that are controlled by extratropical forcing. Examination of individual profiles shows that a small yet significant fraction (~12%) of temperature profiles has CPT-LRT separations of 1 km or larger in the region of small seasonal average separation. These large separations are produced by wave perturbations of the upper tropospheric temperature structure. The impact of tropopause separation on the cloud top-tropopause relationship is examined using colocated CALIPSO cloud top data. We find that the frequency of clouds above the tropopause is reduced by approximately 50% if the CPT is used instead of LRT. The occurrence of clouds above the CPT is nevertheless significant, especially over the western Pacific in the DJF season and over the Asian monsoon region in the JJA season.

  14. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  15. Bacteria turn a tiny gear

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Thousands of tiny Bacillus subtillis bacteria turn a single gear, just 380 microns across. (A human hair is about 100 microns across.) The method could be used to create micro-machines. Argonne National Laboratory scientist Igor Aronson pioneered this technique. Read more at the New York Times: http://ow.ly/ODfI or at Argonne: http://ow.ly/ODfa Video courtesy Igor Aronson.

  16. A non-rigid point matching method with local topology preservation for accurate bladder dose summation in high dose rate cervical brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haibin; Zhong, Zichun; Liao, Yuliang; Pompoš, Arnold; Hrycushko, Brian; Albuquerque, Kevin; Zhen, Xin; Zhou, Linghong; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-02-01

    GEC-ESTRO guidelines for high dose rate cervical brachytherapy advocate the reporting of the D2cc (the minimum dose received by the maximally exposed 2cc volume) to organs at risk. Due to large interfractional organ motion, reporting of accurate cumulative D2cc over a multifractional course is a non-trivial task requiring deformable image registration and deformable dose summation. To efficiently and accurately describe the point-to-point correspondence of the bladder wall over all treatment fractions while preserving local topologies, we propose a novel graphic processing unit (GPU)-based non-rigid point matching algorithm. This is achieved by introducing local anatomic information into the iterative update of correspondence matrix computation in the ‘thin plate splines-robust point matching’ (TPS-RPM) scheme. The performance of the GPU-based TPS-RPM with local topology preservation algorithm (TPS-RPM-LTP) was evaluated using four numerically simulated synthetic bladders having known deformations, a custom-made porcine bladder phantom embedded with twenty one fiducial markers, and 29 fractional computed tomography (CT) images from seven cervical cancer patients. Results show that TPS-RPM-LTP achieved excellent geometric accuracy with landmark residual distance error (RDE) of 0.7  ±  0.3 mm for the numerical synthetic data with different scales of bladder deformation and structure complexity, and 3.7  ±  1.8 mm and 1.6  ±  0.8 mm for the porcine bladder phantom with large and small deformation, respectively. The RDE accuracy of the urethral orifice landmarks in patient bladders was 3.7  ±  2.1 mm. When compared to the original TPS-RPM, the TPS-RPM-LTP improved landmark matching by reducing landmark RDE by 50  ±  19%, 37  ±  11% and 28  ±  11% for the synthetic, porcine phantom and the patient bladders, respectively. This was achieved with a computational time of less than 15 s in all cases

  17. Solid-state turn coordinator display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, B. D.; Crouch, R. K.; Kelly, W. L., IV

    1975-01-01

    A solid state turn coordinator display which employs light emitting diodes (LED's) as the display medium was developed to demonstrate the feasibility of such displays for aircraft applications. The input to the display is supplied by a fluidic inertial rate sensor used in an aircraft wing leveler system. The display is composed of the LED radial display face and the electronics necessary to address and drive the individual lines of LED's. Three levels of brightness are provided to compensate for the different amounts of ambient light present in the cockpit.

  18. Estimated times to exhaustion and power outputs at the gas exchange threshold, physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold, and respiratory compensation point.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Zuniga, Jorge M; Camic, Clayton L; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O

    2012-10-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the power outputs and estimated times to exhaustion (T(lim)) at the gas exchange threshold (GET), physical working capacity at the rating of perceived exertion threshold (PWC(RPE)), and respiratory compensation point (RCP). Three male and 5 female subjects (mean ± SD: age, 22.4 ± 2.8 years) performed an incremental test to exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer to determine peak oxygen consumption rate, GET, and RCP. The PWC(RPE) was determined from ratings of perceived exertion data recorded during 3 continuous workbouts to exhaustion. The estimated T(lim) values for each subject at GET, PWC(RPE), and RCP were determined from power curve analyses (T(lim) = ax(b)). The results indicated that the PWC(RPE) (176 ± 55 W) was not significantly different from RCP (181 ± 54 W); however, GET (155 ± 42 W) was significantly less than PWC(RPE) and RCP. The estimated T(lim) for the GET (26.1 ± 9.8 min) was significantly greater than PWC(RPE) (14.6 ± 5.6 min) and RCP (11.2 ± 3.1 min). The PWC(RPE) occurred at a mean power output that was 13.5% greater than the GET and, therefore, it is likely that the perception of effort is not driven by the same mechanism that underlies the GET (i.e., lactate buffering). Furthermore, the PWC(RPE) and RCP were not significantly different and, therefore, these thresholds may be associated with the same mechanisms of fatigue, such as increased levels of interstitial and (or) arterial [K⁺]. PMID:22716291

  19. Optimisation of clarifier-thickeners processing stable suspensions for turn-up/turn-down.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alastair D

    2004-03-01

    Solid-liquid separation equipment operating on wastewater duties seldom functions at steady state and may be expected to perform over a wide range of feed loads. Satisfactory control of the solids residence time in these clarifiers and thickeners is critical to their successful operation. High solids residence times can lead to hydrolysis and rising sludge. This paper addresses the design of clarifiers and thickeners with minimum solids residence times. A one-dimensional force balance theory of sedimentation is used as the basis for the optimal design. Turn-up and turn-down are considered directly within the optimisation. A robust algorithm is presented for the repeated solution of the design equations and the constrained optimisation of the solids residence time. Three types controlling phenomena are identified and illustrated with design cases. The designs are found to be taller with smaller plan areas than their point optimised equivalents.

  20. Mapped interpolation scheme for single-point energy corrections in reaction rate calculations and a critical evaluation of dual-level reaction path dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Y.Y.; Truhlar, D.G.; Corchado, J.C.

    1999-02-25

    Three procedures for incorporating higher level electronic structure data into reaction path dynamics calculations are tested. In one procedure, variational transition state theory with interpolated single-point energies, which is denoted VTST-ISPE, a few extra energies calculated with a higher level theory along the lower level reaction path are used to correct the classical energetic profile of the reaction. In the second procedure, denoted variational transition state theory with interpolated optimized corrections (VTST-IOC), which the authors introduced earlier, higher level corrections to energies, frequencies, and moments of inertia are based on stationary-point geometries reoptimized at a higher level than the reaction path was calculated. The third procedure, called interpolated optimized energies (IOE), is like IOC except it omits the frequency correction. Three hydrogen-transfer reactions, CH{sub 3} + H{prime}H {r_arrow} CH{sub 3}H{prime} + H (R1), OH + H{prime}H {r_arrow} HOH{prime} + H (R2), and OH + H{prime}CH{sub 3} {r_arrow} HOH{prime} + CH{sub 3} (R3), are used to test and validate the procedures by comparing their predictions to the reaction rate evaluated with a full variational transition state theory calculation including multidimensional tunneling (VTST/MT) at the higher level. The authors present a very efficient scheme for carrying out VTST-ISPE calculations, which are popular due to their lower computational cost. They also show, on the basis of calculations of the reactions R1--R3 with eight pairs of higher and lower levels, that VTST-IOC with higher level data only at stationary points is a more reliable dual-level procedure than VTST-ISPE with higher level energies all along the reaction path. Although the frequencies along the reaction path are not corrected in the IOE scheme, the results are still better than those from VTST-ISPE; this indicates the importance of optimizing the geometry at the highest possible level.

  1. When Is It My Turn To Speak?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orestrom, Bengt

    A study analyzed four dyadic conversations for evidence of the signals operating in the turn-taking process and facilitating the smooth exchange of turns. It found over 20 syntactic, prosodic, and semantic features occurring frequently with turn-taking. The five most significant factors correlating with turn-taking were a prosodically completed…

  2. Turn nucleation perturbs amyloid β self-assembly and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Doran, Todd M; Anderson, Elizabeth A; Latchney, Sarah E; Opanashuk, Lisa A; Nilsson, Bradley L

    2012-08-10

    The accumulation of senile plaques composed of amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, although prefibrillar oligomeric species are believed to be the primary neurotoxic congeners in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Uncertainty regarding the mechanistic relationship between Aβ oligomer and fibril formation and the cytotoxicity of these aggregate species persists. β-Turn formation has been proposed to be a potential rate-limiting step during Aβ fibrillogenesis. The effect of turn nucleation on Aβ self-assembly was probed by systematically replacing amino acid pairs in the putative turn region of Aβ (residues 24-27) with d-ProGly ((D)PG), an effective turn-nucleating motif. The kinetic, thermodynamic, and cytotoxic effects of these mutations were characterized. It was found that turn formation dramatically accelerated Aβ fibril self-assembly dependent on the site of turn nucleation. The cytotoxicity of the three (D)PG-containing Aβ variants was significantly lower than that of wild-type Aβ40, presumably due to decreased oligomer populations as a function of a more rapid progression to mature fibrils; oligomer populations were not eliminated, however, suggesting that turn formation is also a feature of oligomer structures. These results indicate that turn nucleation is a critical step in Aβ40 fibril formation.

  3. Turn-directed folding dynamics of β-hairpin-forming de novo decapeptide Chignolin.

    PubMed

    Enemark, Søren; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2012-09-28

    Realistic mechanistic pictures of β-hairpin formation, offering valuable insights into some of the key early events in protein folding, are accessible through short designed polypeptides as they allow atomic-level scrutiny through simulations. Here, we present a detailed picture of the dynamics and mechanism of β-hairpin formation of Chignolin, a de novo decapeptide, using extensive, unbiased molecular dynamics simulations. The results provide clear evidence for turn-directed broken-zipper folding and reveal details of turn nucleation and cooperative progression of turn growth, hydrogen-bond formations, and eventual packing of the hydrophobic core. Further, we show that, rather than driving folding through hydrophobic collapse, cross-strand side-chain packing could in fact be rate-limiting as packing frustrations can delay formation of the native hydrophobic core prior to or during folding and even cause relatively long-living misfolded or partially folded states that may nucleate aggregative events in more complex situations. The results support the increasing evidence for turn-centric folding mechanisms for β-hairpin formation suggested recently for GB1 and Peptide 1 based on experiments and simulations but also point to the need for similar examinations of polypeptides with larger numbers of cross-strand hydrophobic residues.

  4. Curve fits of predicted inviscid stagnation-point radiative heating rates, cooling factors, and shock standoff distances for hyperbolic earth entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Sullivan, E. M.; Margolis, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Curve-fit formulas are presented for the stagnation-point radiative heating rate, cooling factor, and shock standoff distance for inviscid flow over blunt bodies at conditions corresponding to high-speed earth entry. The data which were curve fitted were calculated by using a technique which utilizes a one-strip integral method and a detailed nongray radiation model to generate a radiatively coupled flow-field solution for air in chemical and local thermodynamic equilibrium. The range of free-stream parameters considered were altitudes from about 55 to 70 km and velocities from about 11 to 16 km.sec. Spherical bodies with nose radii from 30 to 450 cm and elliptical bodies with major-to-minor axis ratios of 2, 4, and 6 were treated. Powerlaw formulas are proposed and a least-squares logarithmic fit is used to evaluate the constants. It is shown that the data can be described in this manner with an average deviation of about 3 percent (or less) and a maximum deviation of about 10 percent (or less). The curve-fit formulas provide an effective and economic means for making preliminary design studies for situations involving high-speed earth entry.

  5. Effects of the turn-back primer on intermediate product generation in isothermal DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Kimura, Yasumasa; Mitani, Yasumasa; Kawai, Yuki; Lezhava, Alexander; Noma, Shohei; Tagami, Michihira; Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Usui, Kengo

    2010-12-01

    In DNA amplification, the initial step of copying a target sequence from the template DNA--the so-called intermediate product generation step--is very important. In examining the turn-back primer (TP)-dependent isothermal DNA amplification (TIA) method, we determined the actual time point of intermediate product generation by extrapolating dsDNA amplification curves. Our results indicate that intermediate product creation is the rate-limiting step in TIA, and good TP design is advantageous for improving the intermediate production process.

  6. The Aesthetic Turn and the Rhetorical Perspective on Argumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ronald Walter

    1998-01-01

    Argues that Robert Scott's landmark 1967 essay sets in motion a constitutive model of rhetorical effectivity. States Scott's essay belongs to a disciplinary history that brings forth a central preoccupation with the ethical problematization of rhetorical practices from an aesthetic point of view. Discusses how this aesthetic turn transforms the…

  7. Analysis of forces in ultrasonically assisted turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, N.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Babitsky, V. I.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2007-12-01

    Many modern engineering materials are very difficult to process with conventional machining methods. Ultrasonically assisted turning (UAT) is a new technology, where high frequency vibration (frequency f≈20 kHz, amplitude a≈15 μm) is superimposed on the movement of the cutting tool. Compared to conventional turning (CT), UAT allows significant improvements in processing many intractable materials, such as high-strength aerospace alloys and composites, by producing a noticeable decrease in cutting forces and a superior surface finish. Vibro-impact interaction between the tool and workpiece in UAT during the chip formation leads to a dynamically changing cutting force in the process zone as compared to the quasistatic one in CT. The paper presents an experimental study and computational (finite-element) model of both CT and UAT. Forces acting on the cutting tool in UAT are studied, and their dependence on vibration amplitude, frequency and vibration direction as well as on cutting parameters, such as feed rate and cutting speed, are investigated.

  8. LX-17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H; Cook III, C F; Garza, R; Pastrone, R; Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Molitoris, J

    2004-03-11

    We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the side and back edges is measured with streak cameras. Three high-resolution X-ray images were taken on each experiment to examine the details of the detonation. We have concluded that the detonation cannot turn the corner and subsequently fails, but the shock wave continues to propagate in the unreacted explosive, leaving behind a dead zone. The detonation front farther out from the corner slowly turns and eventually reaches the air well edge 180{sup o} from its original direction. The dead zone is stable and persists 7.7 {micro}s after the corner-turn, although it has drifted into the original air well area. Our regular reactive flow computer models sometimes show temporary failure but they recover quickly and are unable to model the dead zones. We present a failure model that cuts off the reaction rate below certain detonation velocities and reproduces the qualitative features of the corner-turning failure.

  9. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND CODE Motor Vehicle Code § 935.135 Turns. (a) Each person making a right turn in a motor vehicle shall make the approach and turn as close...

  10. Polishing and testing of aspheric diamond-turned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, R. E.

    The techniques used for polishing and testing optical components fabricated on single-point diamond turning machines are reviewed. Optical polishing techniques in the past have employed cerium oxide based and aluminum oxide based polishing compounds for polishing crystals and metals, whereas diamond compounds have currently replaced the aluminum materials. A slurry with a water medium was most common, except for X ray microscope and telescope components, which required a silicon oil. Endless belt laps have been employed to eliminate the microripple left by diamond turning. Further studies have indicated that ripple with a spatial frequency greater than 1 mm cannot be removed. Further work to characterize polishing materials with a higher melting point than high-melting point mirror surfaces is suggested, together with defining a suitable lap design for a large work surface area. Finally, surface metrology techniques are discussed.

  11. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Turning basins. 401.48 Section... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.48 Turning basins. No vessel... the locations set out in the table to this section. Table 1. South Shore Canal: (a) Turning Basin...

  12. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Turning basins. 401.48 Section... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Seaway Navigation § 401.48 Turning basins. No vessel... the locations set out in the table to this section. Table 1. South Shore Canal: (a) Turning Basin...

  13. As the Third World turns.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, E

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the 3rd World, family planners have turned to television in order to spread their message. Combining education and entertainment in the form of advertisements and soap operas, television offers a way to provide clear and memorable information about an otherwise sensitive issue. In 1977, Mexico's Miguel Sabido developed the idea of using television as a means of social instruction. His initial soap opera dealt with adult literacy, and the success of that program led him to develop a show focusing on family planning called "Come Along with Me." Following the airing of this soap opera, attendance to family planning clinics increased by 32%. Since then, Mexico has produced a series of soap operas dealing with sex education, women's status, and the treatment of children. Soon, Mexican viewers will see a soap opera addressing the issue of AIDS. Family planners in other countries have also begun employing television. Conventional communication methods require trained counselors travelling villages, and most often, those most in need of family planning are the most difficult to reach. But over the last 10 years, the number of televisions in the Third World has doubled, and there is now approximately 1 television for every 12 people in the developing nations. In Turkey, advertisements have been used to promote modern methods of contraception. In Brazil, vasectomy has been one of the topics of ad campaigns. Mexico, the Philippines, and Nigeria have also experimented with the use of music videos. Nigeria has already had great success in integrating family planning themes to an already existing variety show. Family planning visits have increased by 47%. International agencies have recognized the value of television and have provided financial support.

  14. Gasdynamic evaluation of choking cascade turns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, D. R.

    1984-12-01

    Uses for ram air in airborne vehicles are increasing along with the need for sophisticated ducting of the compressed air. Inlets operating supercritically, a normal shock in the subsonic diffuser, and use an aerodynamic grid to control the normal shock position to a region of low total pressure losses are discussed. Turning of the flow requires long radius curves to maintain the total pressure. This study combines the internal shock positioning and flow turning into a flow choking cascade turn with a short radius. Several sets of 90 degree turning sections, for turning compressed air, were selected, designed, and tested gas dynamically. Two of the turn sections were totally subsonic and only turned the air flow. Two other sections turned and choked the flow during supercritical inlet operation. These flow controllers perform the same function as an aerodynamic grid and flow turning vanes used in current internal compressible airflow designs. These tests correlated the suitability of using a water table versus a gas dynamic apparatus for determining the flow control capabilities and pressure recovery of the cascades. The subsonic only turning section gave the best pressure recovery and total pressure distribution along the turning axis, but allowed the supercritical internal shock to move towards large shock/boundary layer interaction. The two shock positioning cascades provided good internal shock control with only slightly lower pressure recovery. Further investigation is needed for the effects of back pressure fluctuations on the flow dynamics.

  15. Turning the tide for birth.

    PubMed

    Budin, Wendy C

    2010-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education discusses the escalating cesarean surgery rate and the need for evidence-based practice changes that support vaginal birth after cesarean. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote natural, safe, and healthy birth practices.

  16. Congress turns cold on fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1984-06-22

    A 5% cut in fusion research budgets will force some programs to be dropped in order to keep the large machinery running unless US and European scientists collaborate instead of competing. Legislators became uneasy about the escalating costs of the new devices. The 1984 budget of $470 million for magnetic fusion research is only half the projected cost of the Tokomak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) planned to ignite, for the first time, a self-sustaining burn. Planning for the TCFX continued despite the message from Congress. Work at the large institutions at Princeton, MIT, etc. may survive at the expense of other programs, some of which will lose academic programs as well. Scientists point to the loss of new ideas and approaches when projects are cancelled. Enthusiasm is growing for international collaboration.

  17. Turning Bacteria Suspensions into Superfluids.

    PubMed

    López, Héctor Matías; Gachelin, Jérémie; Douarche, Carine; Auradou, Harold; Clément, Eric

    2015-07-10

    The rheological response under simple shear of an active suspension of Escherichia coli is determined in a large range of shear rates and concentrations. The effective viscosity and the time scales characterizing the bacterial organization under shear are obtained. In the dilute regime, we bring evidence for a low-shear Newtonian plateau characterized by a shear viscosity decreasing with concentration. In the semidilute regime, for particularly active bacteria, the suspension displays a "superfluidlike" transition where the viscous resistance to shear vanishes, thus showing that, macroscopically, the activity of pusher swimmers organized by shear is able to fully overcome the dissipative effects due to viscous loss.

  18. Breath holding during the turn in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Craig, A B

    1986-08-01

    Breath holding times were measured during competition and averaged 5.0 sec in the breaststroke events, 4.3 sec in freestyle, 3.7 sec in butterfly, and 3.3 sec in backstroke. These times represented approximately 30% of the total time of swimming breaststroke and freestyle races but only 20% of the time of backstroke and butterfly events. Pulmonary gas exchanges of O2 and CO2 were studied in eight male swimmers during the first turn after the start of a swim and during the third turn after continuous swimming. It was concluded that biomechanical considerations of optimizing a turn are in most circumstances not limited by the increased PCO2 and the decreased PO2 in the alveoli related to the brief period of breath holding. In turns which last longer than about 5.5 s, the swimmers may experience a strong urge to breathe. This "breaking point" sensation is brief and need not compromise the conclusion of a well-executed turn. PMID:3747799

  19. Realistic page-turning of electronic books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chaoran; Li, Haisheng; Bai, Yannan

    2014-01-01

    The booming electronic books (e-books), as an extension to the paper book, are popular with readers. Recently, many efforts are put into the realistic page-turning simulation o f e-book to improve its reading experience. This paper presents a new 3D page-turning simulation approach, which employs piecewise time-dependent cylindrical surfaces to describe the turning page and constructs smooth transition method between time-dependent cylinders. The page-turning animation is produced by sequentially mapping the turning page into the cylinders with different radii and positions. Compared to the previous approaches, our method is able to imitate various effects efficiently and obtains more natural animation of turning page.

  20. Multiple Stochastic Point Processes in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2008-04-01

    We generalize the idea of multiple-stochasticity in chemical reaction systems to gene expression. Using Chemical Langevin Equation approach we investigate how this multiple-stochasticity can influence the overall molecular number fluctuations. We show that the main sources of this multiple-stochasticity in gene expression could be the randomness in transcription and translation initiation times which in turn originates from the underlying bio-macromolecular recognition processes such as the site-specific DNA-protein interactions and therefore can be internally regulated by the supra-molecular structural factors such as the condensation/super-coiling of DNA. Our theory predicts that (1) in case of gene expression system, the variances ( φ) introduced by the randomness in transcription and translation initiation-times approximately scales with the degree of condensation ( s) of DNA or mRNA as φ ∝ s -6. From the theoretical analysis of the Fano factor as well as coefficient of variation associated with the protein number fluctuations we predict that (2) unlike the singly-stochastic case where the Fano factor has been shown to be a monotonous function of translation rate, in case of multiple-stochastic gene expression the Fano factor is a turn over function with a definite minimum. This in turn suggests that the multiple-stochastic processes can also be well tuned to behave like a singly-stochastic point processes by adjusting the rate parameters.

  1. When Bad Masks Turn Good

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Roberto G.

    In keeping with the spirit of a meeting on ‘masks,' this talk presents two short stories on the theme of dust. In the first, dust plays the familiar role of the evil obscurer, the enemy to bedefeated by the cunning observer in order to allow a key future technology (adaptive optics) to be exploited fully by heroic astronomers. In the second story, dust itself emerges as the improbable hero, in the form of a circumstellar debris disks. I will present evidence of a puzzling near-infrared excess in the continuum of high-redshift galaxies and will argue that the seemingly improbable origin of this IR excess is a population of young circumstellar disks formed around high-mass stars in distant galaxies. Assuming circumstellar disks extend down to lower masses,as they do in our own Galaxy, the excess emission presents us with an exciting opportunity to measure the formation rate of planetary systems in distant galaxies at cosmic epochs before our own solar system formed.

  2. A jump persistent turning walker to model zebrafish locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Mwaffo, Violet; Anderson, Ross P.; Butail, Sachit; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish are gaining momentum as a laboratory animal species for the investigation of several functional and dysfunctional biological processes. Mathematical models of zebrafish behaviour are expected to considerably aid in the design of hypothesis-driven studies by enabling preliminary in silico tests that can be used to infer possible experimental outcomes without the use of zebrafish. This study is motivated by observations of sudden, drastic changes in zebrafish locomotion in the form of large deviations in turn rate. We demonstrate that such deviations can be captured through a stochastic mean reverting jump diffusion model, a process that is commonly used in financial engineering to describe large changes in the price of an asset. The jump process-based model is validated on trajectory data of adult subjects swimming in a shallow circular tank obtained from an overhead camera. Through statistical comparison of the empirical distribution of the turn rate against theoretical predictions, we demonstrate the feasibility of describing zebrafish as a jump persistent turning walker. The critical role of the jump term is assessed through comparison with a simplified mean reversion diffusion model, which does not allow for describing the heavy-tailed distributions observed in the fish turn rate. PMID:25392396

  3. Plagiarism and the Internet: Turning the Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Thomas; Nelson, Gene

    2001-01-01

    Notes the problem of Net-based plagiarism in student papers. Describes a solution that turns the tables by using the Internet: TurnItIn.com, an Internet scanner that annotates/marks unattributed material in student papers and compiles a report for the teacher overnight. (SR)

  4. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 1—Opposite Brossard. (b) Turning Basin No. 2—Between Lock 7 and the Guard Gate Cut for vessels up to... vessels up to 107 m in overall length. (b) Turning Basin No. 2—Between Lock 7 and the Guard Gate Cut...

  5. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 1—Opposite Brossard. (b) Turning Basin No. 2—Between Lock 7 and the Guard Gate Cut for vessels up to... vessels up to 107 m in overall length. (b) Turning Basin No. 2—Between Lock 7 and the Guard Gate Cut...

  6. 33 CFR 401.48 - Turning basins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 1—Opposite Brossard. (b) Turning Basin No. 2—Between Lock 7 and the Guard Gate Cut for vessels up to... vessels up to 107 m in overall length. (b) Turning Basin No. 2—Between Lock 7 and the Guard Gate Cut...

  7. Ictal body turning in focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mercan, Metin; Yıldırım, İrem; Akdemir, Özgür; Bilir, Erhan

    2015-03-01

    Despite the explanations of many lateralization findings, body turning in focal epilepsy has been rarely investigated. One of the aims of this study was to evaluate the role of ictal body turning in the lateralization of focal epilepsies. The records of 263 patients with focal epilepsy (temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), n=178; extratemporal lobe epilepsy (ETLE), n=85) who underwent prolonged video-EEG monitoring during presurgical epilepsy evaluation were reviewed. Preoperative findings (TLE, n=16; ETLE, n=6) and postoperative outcomes (TLE, n=7) of patients with focal epilepsy with ictal body turning were assessed. For the evaluation of ictal body turning, two definitions were proposed. Nonversive body turning (NVBT) was used to denote at least a 90° nonforced (without tonic or clonic component) rotation of the upper (shoulder) and lower (hip) parts of the body around the body axis for a minimum of 3s. Versive body turning (VBT) was used to denote at least a 90° forced (with tonic or clonic component) rotation of the upper (shoulder) and lower (hip) parts of the body around the body axis for a minimum of 3s. Nonversive body turning was observed in 6% (n=11) of patients with TLE and 2% (n=2) of patients with ETLE. For VBT, these ratios were 5% (n=8) and 7% (n=6) for patients with TLE and ETLE, respectively. Nonversive body turning was frequently oriented to the same side as the epileptogenic zone (EZ) in TLE and ETLE seizures (76% and 80%, respectively). If the amount of NVBT was greater than 180°, then it was 80% to the same side in TLE seizures. Versive body turning was observed in 86% of the TLE seizures, and 55% of the ETLE seizures were found to be contralateral to the EZ. When present with head turning, NVBT ipsilateral to the EZ and VBT contralateral to the EZ were more valuable for lateralization. In TLE seizures, a significant correlation was found between the head turning and body turning onsets and durations. Our study demonstrated that ictal body turning

  8. The Third Turn toward the Social: Nancy Welch's "Living Room," Tony Scott's "Dangerous Writing," and Rhetoric and Composition's Turn toward Grassroots Political Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Kelly; Girshin, Thomas; Bowlin, Barrett

    2013-01-01

    This review essay examines recent texts by Nancy Welch and Tony Scott, both of which use embodied activism as a starting point for their inquiries. Taken together, these works point to a distinct shift in composition studies' turn toward the social, one that calls on workers both within and outside the academy to actively engage in grassroots…

  9. Maneuverability by the sea lion Zalophus californianus: turning performance of an unstable body design.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Hurley, Jenifer; Costa, Daniel P

    2003-02-01

    Maneuverability is critical to the performance of fast-swimming marine mammals that use rapid turns to catch prey. Overhead video recordings were analyzed for two sea lions (Zalophus californianus) turning in the horizontal plane. Unpowered turns were executed by body flexion in conjunction with use of the pectoral and pelvic flippers, which were used as control surfaces. A 90 degree bank angle was used in the turns to vertically orient the control surfaces. Turning radius was dependent on body mass and swimming velocity. Relative minimum radii were 9-17% of body length and were equivalent for pinnipeds and cetaceans. However, Zalophus had smaller turning radii at higher speeds than cetaceans. Rate of turn was inversely related to turn radius. The highest turn rate observed in Zalophus was 690 degrees s(-1). Centripetal acceleration measured up to 5.1 g for Zalophus. Comparison with other marine mammals indicates that Zalophus has a morphology that enhances instability, thus providing enhanced turning performance. Enhanced turning performance is necessary for sea lions to forage after highly elusive prey in structurally complex environments. PMID:12517984

  10. Maneuverability by the sea lion Zalophus californianus: turning performance of an unstable body design.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Hurley, Jenifer; Costa, Daniel P

    2003-02-01

    Maneuverability is critical to the performance of fast-swimming marine mammals that use rapid turns to catch prey. Overhead video recordings were analyzed for two sea lions (Zalophus californianus) turning in the horizontal plane. Unpowered turns were executed by body flexion in conjunction with use of the pectoral and pelvic flippers, which were used as control surfaces. A 90 degree bank angle was used in the turns to vertically orient the control surfaces. Turning radius was dependent on body mass and swimming velocity. Relative minimum radii were 9-17% of body length and were equivalent for pinnipeds and cetaceans. However, Zalophus had smaller turning radii at higher speeds than cetaceans. Rate of turn was inversely related to turn radius. The highest turn rate observed in Zalophus was 690 degrees s(-1). Centripetal acceleration measured up to 5.1 g for Zalophus. Comparison with other marine mammals indicates that Zalophus has a morphology that enhances instability, thus providing enhanced turning performance. Enhanced turning performance is necessary for sea lions to forage after highly elusive prey in structurally complex environments.

  11. Kinematical Comparison of the 200 m Backstroke Turns between National and Regional Level Swimmers.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Santiago; Cala, Antonio; Frutos, Pablo González; Navarro, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to determine the evolution of selected turn variables during competitive backstroke races and to compare these kinematic variables between two different levels of swimmers. Sixteen national and regional level male swimmers participant in the 200 m backstroke event at the Spanish Swimming Championships in short course (25 m) were selected to analyze their turn performances. The individual distances method with two-dimensional Direct Linear Transformation (2D-DLT) algorithms was used to perform race analyses. National level swimmers presented a shorter "turn time", a longer "distance in", a faster "underwater velocity" and "normalized underwater velocity", and a faster "stroking velocity" than regional level swimmers, whereas no significant differences were detected between levels for the "underwater distance". National level swimmers maintained similar "turn times" over the event and increased "underwater velocity" and "normalized underwater velocity" in the last (seventh) turn segment, whereas regional level swimmers increased "turn time" in the last half of the race. For both national and regional level swimmers, turn "underwater distance" during the last three turns of the race was significantly shorter while no significant differences in distance into the wall occurred throughout the race. The skill level of the swimmers has an impact on the competitive backstroke turn segments. In a 200 m event, the underwater velocity should be maximized to maintain turn proficiency, whereas turn distance must be subordinated to the average velocity. Key PointsThe underwater turn velocity is as a critical variable related to the swimmers' level of skill in a 200 m backstroke event.Best swimmers perform faster but no longer turn segments during a 200 m backstroke event.Best swimmers maintain their turn performance throughout the 200 m backstroke event by increasing the underwater velocity during the final part of the race.The turn distance

  12. Polarization (ellipsometric) measurements of liquid condensate deposition and evaporation rates and dew points in flowing salt/ash-containing combustion gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, K.; Rosner, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    An application of an optical polarization technique in a combustion environment is demonstrated by following, in real-time, growth rates of boric oxide condensate on heated platinum ribbons exposed to seeded propane-air combustion gases. The results obtained agree with the results of earlier interference measurements and also with theoretical chemical vapor deposition predictions. In comparison with the interference method, the polarization technique places less stringent requirements on surface quality, which may justify the added optical components needed for such measurements.

  13. Point of care experience with pneumococcal and influenza vaccine documentation among persons aged ≥65 years: high refusal rates and missing information.

    PubMed

    Brownfield, Elisha; Marsden, Justin E; Iverson, Patty J; Zhao, Yumin; Mauldin, Patrick D; Moran, William P

    2012-09-01

    Missed opportunities to vaccinate and refusal of vaccine by patients have hindered the achievement of national health care goals. The meaningful use of electronic medical records should improve vaccination rates, but few studies have examined the content of these records. In our vaccine intervention program using an electronic record with physician prompts, paper prompts, and nursing standing orders, we were unable to achieve national vaccine goals, due in large part to missing information and patient refusal.

  14. Nucleation rate in monotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, F.

    Cooling a melt of a monotectic system into the miscibility gap results in nucleation of fluid droplets in a fluid matrix prior to solidification. For homogeneous nucleation the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate is calculated. As material parameters the chemical potential of the species involved, the diffusion constant of the fluid, and the surface tension between adjacent phases are important. Since their temperature dependence is not well known from experiments, different theoretical models are used and their influence is discussed. The surface tension turns out to be the most crucial parameter in determining the nucleation rate. For AlIn numerical results are presented. In this system the undercooling with respect to homogeneous nucleation increases from zero at the critical point to 100 K at a composition near the monotectic point.

  15. Optimization of turn position of tokamak inductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristov, Yu. A.; Vorobev, G. M.; Kuznetsov, A. V.

    Statement and methods of solution of the problem of optimizing turn position of tokamak induction are considered. Optimization is aimed at determination of inductor turn position, providing the minimal scattering of magnetic field in the region of chamber at any assigned value of volt-seconds. Algorithms of problem solution are described, and results of calculations for STX tokamak are presented. It is shown that development methods can be used for determining optimal position of turns of any coils of poloidal magnetic field, providing the assigned configuration and level of magnetic field.

  16. gamma-Turn types prediction in proteins using the support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Jahandideh, Samad; Sarvestani, Amir Sabet; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Jahandideh, Mina; Barfeie, Mahdyar

    2007-12-21

    Recently, two different models have been developed for predicting gamma-turns in proteins by Kaur and Raghava [2002. An evaluation of beta-turn prediction methods. Bioinformatics 18, 1508-1514; 2003. A neural-network based method for prediction of gamma-turns in proteins from multiple sequence alignment. Protein Sci. 12, 923-929]. However, the major limitation of previous methods is inability in predicting gamma-turns types. Thus, there is a need to predict gamma-turn types using an approach which will be useful in overall tertiary structure prediction. In this work, support vector machines (SVMs), a powerful model is proposed for predicting gamma-turn types in proteins. The high rates of prediction accuracy showed that the formation of gamma-turn types is evidently correlated with the sequence of tripeptides, and hence can be approximately predicted based on the sequence information of the tripeptides alone. PMID:17936305

  17. Page turning solutions for musicians: a survey.

    PubMed

    Wolberg, George; Schipper, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Musicians have long been hampered by the challenge in turning sheet music while their hands are occupied playing an instrument. The sight of a human page turner assisting a pianist during a performance, for instance, is not uncommon. This need for a page turning solution is no less acute during practice sessions, which account for the vast majority of playing time. Despite widespread appreciation of the problem, there have been virtually no robust and affordable products to assist the musician. Recent progress in assistive technology and electronic reading devices offers promising solutions to this long-standing problem. The objective of this paper is to survey the technology landscape and assess the benefits and drawbacks of page turning solutions for musicians. A full range of mechanical and digital page turning products are reviewed. PMID:22246302

  18. MedlinePlus.gov Turns 10!

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH NIH MedlinePlus Advisory Group celebrates 10 years of success. Photo courtesy of Michael Spencer, NIH NIH's MedlinePlus.gov , the popular, consumer- ...

  19. Turn analysis of the EMG: the amplitude definition of a turn.

    PubMed

    Yaar, I

    1994-12-01

    Traditionally and arbitrarily an EMG interference signal (EMGIP) "turn" is defined as any 100 microV signal amplitude change. There have not been planned studies challenging this definition. Here, EMGIPs, recorded by coaxial needle electrodes, in MVC, from biceps brachii muscles of 143 subjects, in three diagnostic groups (Normals, Neuropathics, Myopathics), were analyzed in search of the effects of different turn definition amplitude values (TDEF) on the EMGIP number of turns, average turn amplitude, their ratio, and on the cumulative turn amplitude. This study shows significant differences between the diagnostic-groups. It shows that TDEF has significant effect on the number of turns, the average turn amplitude, their ratio, the cumulative amplitude, and that certain TDEFs are significantly better than others in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. Also, it shows that the number of turns and the turns to average amplitude ratio are better measurements than the average turn amplitude and than the cumulative turn amplitude in showing differences between the EMGIPs of the various diagnostic-groups. As such, some of the smaller TDEFs are significantly better diagnostically than the traditional 100 microV value. Also, it shows that better discrimination between the diagnostic-groups may be achieved by applying more than one TDEF value onto the same data. This study leaves the question of the best TDEF or best TDEF sets open for further research in similar and in different paradigms and technical settings.

  20. Development of high speed power thyristor: The gate assisted turn-off thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. R.; Brewster, J.; Frobenius, D.; Desmond, T.

    1972-01-01

    A high speed power switch with unique turn-off capability was developed. This gate-assisted turn-off thyristor was rated at 609 V and 50 A with turn-off times of 2 microsec. Twenty-two units were delivered for evaluation in a series inverter circuit. In addition, test circuits designed to relate to the series inverter application were built and demonstrated.

  1. Support vector machines for the classification and prediction of beta-turn types.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Xue-Biao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2002-07-01

    The support vector machines (SVMs) method is proposed because it can reflect the sequence-coupling effect for a tetrapeptide in not only a beta-turn or non-beta-turn, but also in different types of beta-turn. The results of the model for 6022 tetrapeptides indicate that the rates of self-consistency for beta-turn types I, I', II, II', VI and VIII and non-beta-turns are 99.92%, 96.8%, 98.02%, 97.75%, 100%, 97.19% and 100%, respectively. Using these training data, the rate of correct prediction by the SVMs for a given protein: rubredoxin (54 residues. 51 tetrapeptides) which includes 12 beta-turn type I tetrapeptides, 1 beta-turn type II tetrapeptide and 38 non-beta-turns reached 82.4%. The high quality of prediction of the SVMs implies that the formation of different beta-turn types or non-beta-turns is considerably correlated with the sequence of a tetrapeptide. The SVMs can save CPU time and avoid the overfitting problem compared with the neural network method.

  2. Kinetic analysis of ski turns based on measured ground reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Vaverka, Frantisek; Vodickova, Sona; Elfmark, Milan

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to devise a method of kinetic analysis of the ground reaction force that enables the durations and magnitudes of forces acting during the individual phases of ski turns to be described exactly. The method is based on a theoretical analysis of physical forces acting during the ski turn. Two elementary phases were defined: (1) preparing to turn (initiation) and (2) actual turning, during which the center of gravity of the skier-ski system moves along a curvilinear trajectory (steering). The starting point of the turn analysis is a dynamometric record of the resultant acting ground reaction force applied perpendicularly on the ski surface. The method was applied to six expert skiers. They completed a slalom course comprising five gates arranged on the fall line of a 26° slope at a competition speed using symmetrical carving turns (30 evaluated turns). A dynamometric measurement system was placed on the carving skis (168 cm long, radius 16 m, data were recorded at 100 Hz). MATLAB procedures were used to evaluate eight variables during each turn: five time variables and three force variables. Comparison of the turn analysis results between individuals showed that the method is useful for answering various research questions associated with ski turns.

  3. Reference Point Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  4. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  5. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income.

  6. Meta-Analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Strain 195 Transcriptomic Profiles Identify a Respiration Rate-Related Gene Expression Transition Point and Interoperon Recruitment of a Key Oxidoreductase Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Rowe, Annette R.; Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6 ± 0.6 μM Cl−/h)- and fast (22.9 ± 9.6 μM Cl−/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n = 53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID

  7. Aquatic turning performance by the whirligig beetle: constraints on maneuverability by a rigid biological system.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Nicastro, Anthony J

    2003-05-01

    Turning performance is constrained by morphology, where the flexibility of the body and the mobility and position of the control surfaces determine the level of performance. The use of paddling appendages in conjunction with the rigid bodies of aquatic arthropods could potentially limit their turning performance. Whirligig beetles (Coleoptera: Gyrinidae) are rigid-bodied, but these aquatic insects can swim rapidly in circular patterns. Turning performance of swimming whirligig beetles (Dineutes horni) was assessed by videotaping beetles in a small (115 mm diameter) arena at 500 frames s(-1) and 1000 frames s(-1). Curved trajectories were executed as continuous powered turns. Asymmetrical paddling of the outboard legs was used to power the turn. Turns were produced also by abduction of the inboard elytra and vectored thrust generated from sculling of the wing at 47.14 Hz. The abducted elytra increased drag and acted as a pivot. Swimming speeds varied from 0.06 m s(-1) to 0.55 m s(-1) (4.7-44.5 L s(-1)). Relative minimum radius was 24% of body length. Maximum rate of turn was 4428 degrees s(-1) with maximum centripetal acceleration of 2.86 g. Turning radius was weakly associated with swimming velocity, although minimum values of the radius showed no correlation with velocity. Turning rate was also related indirectly to radius and directly to centripetal acceleration. Compared to vertebrates with flexible bodies, the relative turning radius of whirligig beetles is constrained by a rigid body and use of drag-based propulsive mechanisms. However, these mechanisms permit continuous turning, and the size of the beetle permits higher turn rates with lower centripetal accelerations.

  8. Tipping Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.

    2007-12-01

    A climate tipping point, at least as I have used the phrase, refers to a situation in which a changing climate forcing has reached a point such that little additional forcing (or global temperature change) is needed to cause large, relatively rapid, climate change. Present examples include potential loss of all Arctic sea ice and instability of the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Tipping points are characterized by ready feedbacks that amplify the effect of forcings. The notion that these may be runaway feedbacks is a misconception. However, present "unrealized" global warming, due to the climate system's thermal inertia, exacerbates the difficulty of avoiding global warming tipping points. I argue that prompt efforts to slow CO2 emissions and absolutely reduce non-CO2 forcings are both essential if we are to avoid tipping points that would be disastrous for humanity and creation, the planet as civilization knows it.

  9. Tipping point leadership.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Chan; Mauborgne, Renée

    2003-04-01

    When William Bratton was appointed police commissioner of New York City in 1994, turf wars over jurisdiction and funding were rife and crime was out of control. Yet in less than two years, and without an increase in his budget, Bratton turned New York into the safest large city in the nation. And the NYPD was only the latest of five law-enforcement agencies Bratton had turned around. In each case, he succeeded in record time despite limited resources, a demotivated staff, opposition from powerful vested interests, and an organization wedded to the status quo. Bratton's turnarounds demonstrate what the authors call tipping point leadership. The theory of tipping points hinges on the insight that in any organization, fundamental changes can occur quickly when the beliefs and energies of a critical mass of people create an epidemic movement toward an idea. Bratton begins by overcoming the cognitive hurdles that block organizations from recognizing the need for change. He does this by putting managers face-to-face with operational problems. Next, he manages around limitations on funds, staff, or equipment by concentrating resources on the areas that are most in need of change and that have the biggest payoffs. He meanwhile solves the motivation problem by singling out key influencers--people with disproportionate power due to their connections or persuasive abilities. Finally, he closes off resistance from powerful opponents. Not every CEO has the personality to be a Bill Bratton, but his successes are due to much more than his personality. He relies on a remarkably consistent method that any manager looking to turn around an organization can use to overcome the forces of inertia and reach the tipping point. PMID:12687920

  10. Reconceptualizing Autonomy: A Relational Turn in Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    History's judgment on the success of bioethics will not depend solely on the conceptual creativity and innovation in the field at the level of ethical and political theory, but this intellectual work is not insignificant. One important new development is what I shall refer to as the relational turn in bioethics. This development represents a renewed emphasis on the ideographic approach, which interprets the meaning of right and wrong in human actions as they are inscribed in social and cultural practices and in structures of lived meaning and interdependence; in an ideographic approach, the task of bioethics is to bring practice into theory, not the other way around. The relational turn in bioethics may profoundly affect the critical questions that the field asks and the ethical guidance it offers society, politics, and policy. The relational turn provides a way of correcting the excessive atomism of many individualistic perspectives that have been, and continue to be, influential in bioethics. Nonetheless, I would argue that most of the work reflecting the relational turn remains distinctively liberal in its respect for the ethical significance of the human individual. It moves away from individualism, but not from the value of individuality.In this review essay, I shall focus on how the relational turn has manifested itself in work on core concepts in bioethics, especially liberty and autonomy. Following a general review, I conclude with a brief consideration of two important recent books in this area: Jennifer Nedelsky's Law's Relations and Rachel Haliburton's Autonomy and the Situated Self. PMID:26847836

  11. Aquatic turning performance of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and functional consequences of a rigid body design.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel; Rivera, Angela R V; Dougherty, Erin E; Blob, Richard W

    2006-11-01

    The ability to capture prey and avoid predation in aquatic habitats depends strongly on the ability to perform unsteady maneuvers (e.g. turns), which itself depends strongly on body flexibility. Two previous studies of turning performance in rigid-bodied taxa have found either high maneuverability or high agility, but not both. However, examinations of aquatic turning performance in rigid-bodied animals have had limited taxonomic scope and, as such, the effects of many body shapes and designs on aquatic maneuverability and agility have yet to be examined. Turtles represent the oldest extant lineage of rigid-bodied vertebrates and the only aquatic rigid-bodied tetrapods. We evaluated the aquatic turning performance of painted turtles, Chrysemys picta (Schneider, 1783) using the minimum length-specific radius of the turning path (R/L) and the average turning rate (omega(avg)) as measures of maneuverability and agility, respectively. We filmed turtles conducting forward and backward turns in an aquatic arena. Each type of turn was executed using a different pattern of limb movements. During forward turns, turtles consistently protracted the inboard forelimb and held it stationary into the flow, while continuing to move the outboard forelimb and both hindlimbs as in rectilinear swimming. The limb movements of backward turns were more complex than those of forward turns, but involved near simultaneous retraction and protraction of contralateral fore- and hindlimbs, respectively. Forward turns had a minimum R/L of 0.0018 (the second single lowest value reported from any animal) and a maximum omega(avg) of 247.1 degrees. Values of R/L for backward turns (0.0091-0.0950 L) were much less variable than that of forward turns (0.0018-1.0442 L). The maneuverability of turtles is similar to that recorded previously for rigid-bodied boxfish. However, several morphological features of turtles (e.g. shell morphology and limb position) appear to increase agility relative to the body

  12. The Opportunities and Threats of Turning Airports into Hubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, Andreas; Koch, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the opportunities and threats which arise when turning origin/destination airports into hubs. The analysis focuses on market development trends, competitive structures, especially in the light of airline network strategies and the growing rivalry between airports, and finally the potential financial impacts for the airport, including both investment efforts and the financial results from hub operations. We argue that in most cases a decision against converting a traditional origin/destination airport into a major transfer point is preferable to the transformation into a hub.

  13. Magnetic substorms and northward IMF turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    To determine the relation of the northward IMF turnings to substorm sudden onsets, we separated all events with sharp northward IMF turnings observed in years of solar maximum (1999-2002) and solar minimum (2007-2008). The events (N=261) have been classified in 5 groups in accordance with average magnetic activity in auroral zone (low, moderate or high levels of AL index) at unchanged or slightly changed PC index and with dynamics of PC (steady distinct growth or distinct decline) at arbitrary values of AL index. Statistical analysis of relationships between the IMF turning and changes of PC and AL indices has been fulfilled separately for each of 5 classes. Results of the analysis showed that, irrespective of geophysical conditions and solar activity epoch, the magnetic activity in the polar caps and in the auroral zone demonstrate no response to the sudden northward IMF turning, if the moment of northward turning is taken as a key date. Sharp increases of magnetic disturbance in the auroral zone are observed only under conditions of the growing PC index and statistically they are related to moment of the PC index exceeding the threshold level (~1.5 mV/m), not to northward turnings timed, as a rule, after the moment of sudden onset. Magnetic disturbances observed in these cases in the auroral zone (magnetic substorms) are guided by behavior of the PC index, like to ordinary magnetic substorms or substorms developed under conditions of the prolonged northward IMF impact on the magnetosphere. The evident inconsistency between the sharp IMF changes measured outside of the magnetosphere and behavior of the ground-based PC index, the latter determining the substorm development, provides an additional argument in favor of the PC index as a ground-based proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into magnetosphere.

  14. Tipping Point

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash format. Almost weekly, we see ...

  15. Turn-timing in signed conversations: coordinating stroke-to-stroke turn boundaries

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Connie; Torreira, Francisco; Levinson, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    In spoken interactions, interlocutors carefully plan, and time their utterances, minimizing gaps and overlaps between consecutive turns. Cross-linguistic comparison has indicated that spoken languages vary only minimally in terms of turn-timing, and language acquisition research has shown pre-linguistic vocal turn-taking in the first half year of life. These observations suggest that the turn-taking system may provide a fundamental basis for our linguistic capacities. The question remains, however, to what extent our capacity for rapid turn-taking is determined by modality constraints. The avoidance of overlapping turns could be motivated by the difficulty of hearing and speaking at the same time. If so, turn-taking in sign might show greater toleration for overlap. Alternatively, signed conversations may show a similar distribution of turn-timing as spoken languages, thus avoiding both gaps and overlaps. To address this question we look at turn-timing in question–answer sequences in spontaneous conversations of Sign Language of the Netherlands. The findings indicate that although there is considerable overlap in two or more signers’ articulators in conversation, when proper allowance is made for onset preparation, post-utterance retraction and the intentional holding of signs for response, turn-taking latencies in sign look remarkably like those reported for spoken language. This is consistent with the possibility that, at least with regard to responses to questions, speakers and signers follow similar time courses in planning and producing their utterances in on-going conversation. This suggests that turn-taking systems may well be a shared cognitive infrastructure underlying all modern human languages, both spoken and signed. PMID:25852593

  16. Turn Allocation Patterns and Learning Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Xiaoyan

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on data from three English classrooms at two Chinese universities, this paper documents the turn-taking patterns that the teachers and students developed over time and explores how these patterns affected students' opportunities to participate in classroom discourse. The data were collected through observations, audio- and video-taping,…

  17. Saccadic body turns in walking Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Geurten, Bart R. H.; Jähde, Philipp; Corthals, Kristina; Göpfert, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster structures its optic flow during flight by interspersing translational movements with abrupt body rotations. Whether these “body saccades” are accompanied by steering movements of the head is a matter of debate. By tracking single flies moving freely in an arena, we now discovered that walking Drosophila also perform saccades. Movement analysis revealed that the flies separate rotational from translational movements by quickly turning their bodies by 15 degrees within a tenth of a second. Although walking flies moved their heads by up to 20 degrees about their bodies, their heads moved with the bodies during saccadic turns. This saccadic strategy contrasts with the head saccades reported for e.g., blowflies and honeybees, presumably reflecting optical constraints: modeling revealed that head saccades as described for these latter insects would hardly affect the retinal input in Drosophila because of the lower acuity of its compound eye. The absence of head saccades in Drosophila was associated with the absence of haltere oscillations, which seem to guide head movements in other flies. In addition to adding new twists to Drosophila walking behavior, our analysis shows that Drosophila does not turn its head relative to its body when turning during walking. PMID:25386124

  18. Turning Parents from Critics to Allies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagarese, Margaret M.; Giannetti, Charlene C.

    1998-01-01

    Authors of "The Roller Coaster Years" (1997) advise how middle-level educators can turn wary, disinterested parents into allies. Teachers should welcome parents, advertise their own expertise, implement an early-warning system, portray children positively, convey shared values, reassure parents about children's safety, demonstrate insider…

  19. Circuit Controls Turn-On Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    Single choke used in primary circuit with diode arrangement, maintaining dc current flow through choke and setting up a unidirectional magnetic field, limits turn-on current of transformer-rectifier power supply. Technique reduces number and weight of components and minimizes effect of initial inrush surge current on source.

  20. Turning the Page with Preconference Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowledge Quest, 2011

    2011-01-01

    For those who are experiencing a lack of creative inspiration within their school library program but are ready to "turn a page" in their career or school library program, they may head to Minneapolis to attend one of the many great preconference workshops. This article presents and describes preconference workshops design to rid librarians of the…

  1. Turning Practitioners into Professors: Exploring Effective Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Steven R.; Gustafson, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents results of focus interviews with 25 "practitioners turned professors" regarding their transition from industry to academia. Finds a general consensus that all advertising and public relations programs should implement a formal mentoring process to include teacher training and inservice, greater explanation of and assistance with promotion…

  2. Turning movement estimation in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.T.

    1997-08-01

    Fast processors offer exciting opportunities for real-time traffic monitoring. Conventional transportation planning models that assume stable and predictable travel patterns do not lend themselves to on-line traffic forecasting. This paper describes how a new traffic flow inference model has the potential to determine comprehensive flow information in real time. Its philosophical basis is borrowed from the field of operational research, where it has been used for optimizing water and electricity flows. This paper shows how road traffic turning movement flows can be estimated from link detected flows at small recurrent intervals, in real time. The paper details the formulation of the problem, outlines the structure of the data set that provides the detector data for the model input and observed turning flows for the model evaluation. The theoretical principles that define the model are described briefly. Turning movement flow estimates, at 5-min intervals, from two independent surveys are presented and analyzed. The results show an overall mean coefficient of determination (r{sup 2}) of 79--82% between observed and modeled turning movement flows.

  3. Leadership Helps Turn around a Troubled School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Von

    2013-01-01

    The author tells how he employed leadership skills to help turn around a failing school loaded with at-risk students. Dayton's Bluff Elementary School was one of the worst in St. Paul when Von Sheppard took over as principal in 2001. Changing the staff and attitudes at the largely low-income, minority majority school in a tough neighborhood…

  4. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND... motion from a stopped position, or change from or merge into a lane of traffic, until he can safely...

  5. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND... motion from a stopped position, or change from or merge into a lane of traffic, until he can safely...

  6. 32 CFR 636.23 - Turning movements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Turning movements. 636.23 Section 636.23 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION (SPECIFIC INSTALLATIONS) Fort Stewart, Georgia § 636.23...

  7. The Linguistic Turn within Curriculum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englund, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    If, as the linguistic turn has taught us, there is no representational knowledge, but more agreements and/or struggles over how to talk and learn about what we call reality, we need to address and analyse the consequences of different vocabularies of educational phenomena and schooling, in order to better understand and make use of both the…

  8. Primordial spectra from sudden turning trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Noumi, Toshifumi; Yamaguchi, Masahide E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2013-12-01

    Effects of heavy fields on primordial spectra of curvature perturbations are discussed in inflationary models with a sudden turning trajectory. When heavy fields are excited after the sudden turn and oscillate around the bottom of the potential, the following two effects are generically induced: deformation of the inflationary background spacetime and conversion interactions between adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations, both of which can affect the primordial density perturbations. In this paper, we calculate primordial spectra in inflationary models with sudden turning potentials taking into account both of the two effects appropriately. We find that there are some non-trivial correlations between the two effects in the power spectrum and, as a consequence, the primordial scalar power spectrum has a peak around the scale exiting the horizon at the turn. Though both effects can induce parametric resonance amplifications, they are shown to be canceled out for the case with the canonical kinetic terms. The peak feature and the scale dependence of bispectra are also discussed.

  9. Business Intelligence: Turning Knowledge into Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endsley, Krista

    2009-01-01

    Today, many school districts are turning to business intelligence tools to retrieve, organize, and share knowledge for faster analysis and more effective, guided decision making. Business intelligence (BI) tools are the technologies and applications that gather and report information to help an organization's leaders make better decisions. BI…

  10. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND... motion from a stopped position, or change from or merge into a lane of traffic, until he can safely...

  11. 32 CFR 935.135 - Turns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Turns. 935.135 Section 935.135 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE TERRITORIAL AND INSULAR REGULATIONS WAKE ISLAND... motion from a stopped position, or change from or merge into a lane of traffic, until he can safely...

  12. Can Language Classrooms Take the Multilingual Turn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquet-Gauthier, Myriam; Beaulieu, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    For the past three decades, momentum has gathered in favour of a multilingual turn in second language acquisition research and teaching. "Multicompetence" has been proposed to replace "nativeness" and "monolingualism" to measure L2 learners' success. This proposed shift has not made its way into L2 teaching settings.…

  13. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Gangyao; Li, Jun; Huang, Alex Q.; Melcher, Jerry; Atcitty, Stan

    2008-01-01

    A novel MOS-conmore » trolled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO) is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA) and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5  A / cm 2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100  W / cm 2 conduction and the 100  W / cm 2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV) and higher frequency (10 kHz) are needed.« less

  14. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... turn curves that are smooth and continuous. (7) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity vector turn angle from the nominal launch vehicle velocity vector. (8) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to...

  15. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... turn curves that are smooth and continuous. (7) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity vector turn angle from the nominal launch vehicle velocity vector. (8) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to...

  16. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... turn curves that are smooth and continuous. (7) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity vector turn angle from the nominal launch vehicle velocity vector. (8) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to...

  17. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... turn curves that are smooth and continuous. (7) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity vector turn angle from the nominal launch vehicle velocity vector. (8) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to...

  18. 14 CFR 417.209 - Malfunction turn analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... turn curves that are smooth and continuous. (7) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity vector turn angle from the nominal launch vehicle velocity vector. (8) For each malfunction turn, the launch vehicle velocity turn magnitude from the nominal velocity magnitude that corresponds to...

  19. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Köke, Albère J. A.; Oosterwijk, René F. A.; Swaan, Jeannette L.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients’ catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6–7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4–6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  20. Eye Gaze Behavior at Turn Transition: How Aphasic Patients Process Speakers' Turns during Video Observation.

    PubMed

    Preisig, Basil C; Eggenberger, Noëmi; Zito, Giuseppe; Vanbellingen, Tim; Schumacher, Rahel; Hopfner, Simone; Gutbrod, Klemens; Nyffeler, Thomas; Cazzoli, Dario; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Müri, René M

    2016-10-01

    The human turn-taking system regulates the smooth and precise exchange of speaking turns during face-to-face interaction. Recent studies investigated the processing of ongoing turns during conversation by measuring the eye movements of noninvolved observers. The findings suggest that humans shift their gaze in anticipation to the next speaker before the start of the next turn. Moreover, there is evidence that the ability to timely detect turn transitions mainly relies on the lexico-syntactic content provided by the conversation. Consequently, patients with aphasia, who often experience deficits in both semantic and syntactic processing, might encounter difficulties to detect and timely shift their gaze at turn transitions. To test this assumption, we presented video vignettes of natural conversations to aphasic patients and healthy controls, while their eye movements were measured. The frequency and latency of event-related gaze shifts, with respect to the end of the current turn in the videos, were compared between the two groups. Our results suggest that, compared with healthy controls, aphasic patients have a reduced probability to shift their gaze at turn transitions but do not show significantly increased gaze shift latencies. In healthy controls, but not in aphasic patients, the probability to shift the gaze at turn transition was increased when the video content of the current turn had a higher lexico-syntactic complexity. Furthermore, the results from voxel-based lesion symptom mapping indicate that the association between lexico-syntactic complexity and gaze shift latency in aphasic patients is predicted by brain lesions located in the posterior branch of the left arcuate fasciculus. Higher lexico-syntactic processing demands seem to lead to a reduced gaze shift probability in aphasic patients. This finding may represent missed opportunities for patients to place their contributions during everyday conversation. PMID:27243612

  1. Bank-to-turn control technology survey for homing missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedel, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    The potential advantages of bank-to-turn control are summarized. Recent and current programs actively investigating bank-to-turn steering are reviewed and critical technology areas concerned with bank-to-turn control are assessed.

  2. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  3. An investigation into magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdy, M. A. M.; Ismaeial, A. L.; Aly, F. F.

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic electrolytic abrasive turning (MEAT) process as a non-traditional machining is used to obtain surface finishing like mirror. MEAT provides one of the best alternatives for producing complex shapes with good finish in advanced materials used in aircraft and aerospace industries. The improvement of machining accuracy of MEAT continues to be a major challenge for modern industry. MEAT is a hybrid machining which combines two or more processes to remove material. The present research focuses on the development of precision electrochemical turning (ECT) under the effects of magnetic field and abrasives. The effect of magnetic flux density, electrochemical conditions and abrasive parameters on finishing efficiency and surface roughness are investigated. An empirical relationship is deduced.

  4. Maximum terminal velocity turns at constant altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, G. Richard; Hull, David G.

    An optimal control problem is formulated for a maneuvering reentry vehicle to execute a maximum terminal velocity turn at constant altitude to a fixed final position. A control solution technique is devised which uses a Newton scheme to repetitively solve a nonlinear algebraic system for two parameters to provide the on-line guidance. The turn control takes advantage of the high dynamic pressure at the beginning of the flight path; the lift solution acts to null deviations from the prescribed altitude. Control solutions are compared for a continuously updated, approximate physical model, for a simulation of the approximate optimal guidance in a true physical model, and for a parameter optimization solution for the true model. End constraint satisfaction is excellent. Overall trajectory agreement is good, if the assumed atmospheric model is reasonably accurate.

  5. Maximum terminal velocity turns at constant altitude

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, G.R.; Hull, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    An optimal control problem is formulated for a maneuvering reentry vehicle to execute a maximum terminal velocity turn at constant altitude to a fixed final position. A control solution technique is devised which uses a Newton scheme to repetitively solve a nonlinear algebraic system for two parameters to provide the on-line guidance. The turn control takes advantage of the high dynamic pressure at the beginning of the flight path; the lift solution acts to null deviations from the prescribed altitude. Control solutions are compared for a continuously updated, approximate physical model, for a simulation of the approximate optimal guidance in a true physical model, and for a parameter optimization solution for the true model. End constraint satisfaction is excellent. Overall trajectory agreement is good, if the assumed atmospheric model is reasonably accurate.

  6. When attempts at robbing prey turn fatal.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Azémar, Frédéric; Carpenter, James M

    2012-07-01

    Because group-hunting arboreal ants spread-eagle insect prey for a long time before retrieving them, these prey can be coveted by predatory flying insects. Yet, attempting to rob these prey is risky if the ant species is also an effective predator. Here, we show that trying to rob prey from Azteca andreae workers is a fatal error as 268 out of 276 potential cleptobionts (97.1 %) were captured in turn. The ant workers hunt in a group and use the "Velcro®" principle to cling firmly to the leaves of their host tree, permitting them to capture very large prey. Exceptions were one social wasp, plus some Trigona spp. workers and flies that landed directly on the prey and were able to take off immediately when attacked. We conclude that in this situation, previously captured prey attract potential cleptobionts that are captured in turn in most of the cases.

  7. When attempts at robbing prey turn fatal.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Azémar, Frédéric; Carpenter, James M

    2012-07-01

    Because group-hunting arboreal ants spread-eagle insect prey for a long time before retrieving them, these prey can be coveted by predatory flying insects. Yet, attempting to rob these prey is risky if the ant species is also an effective predator. Here, we show that trying to rob prey from Azteca andreae workers is a fatal error as 268 out of 276 potential cleptobionts (97.1 %) were captured in turn. The ant workers hunt in a group and use the "Velcro®" principle to cling firmly to the leaves of their host tree, permitting them to capture very large prey. Exceptions were one social wasp, plus some Trigona spp. workers and flies that landed directly on the prey and were able to take off immediately when attacked. We conclude that in this situation, previously captured prey attract potential cleptobionts that are captured in turn in most of the cases. PMID:22710934

  8. Spirit Takes a Turn for Adirondack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This rear hazard-identification camera image looks back at the circular tracks made in the martian soil when the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove about 3 meters (10 feet) toward the mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack, Spirit's first rock target. Spirit made a series of arcing turns totaling approximately 1 meter (3 feet). It then turned in place and made a series of short, straightforward movements totaling approximately 2 meters (6.5 feet). The drive took about 30 minutes to complete, including time stopped to take images. The two rocks in the upper left corner of the image are called 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi.' In the upper right corner is a portion of the lander, now known as the Columbia Memorial Station.

  9. Downhill turn techniques and associated physical characteristics in cross-country skiers.

    PubMed

    Sandbakk, S Bucher; Supej, M; Sandbakk, Ø; Holmberg, H-C

    2014-08-01

    Three dominant techniques are used for downhill turning in cross-country skiing. In this study, kinematic, kinetic, and temporal characteristics of these techniques are described and related to skier strength and power. Twelve elite female cross-country skiers performed six consecutive turns of standardized geometry while being monitored by a Global Navigation Satellite System. Overall time was used as an indicator of performance. Skiing and turning parameters were determined from skier trajectories; the proportional use of each technique was determined from video analysis. Leg strength and power were determined by isometric squats and countermovement jumps on a force plate. Snow plowing, parallel skidding, and step turning were utilized for all turns. Faster skiers employed less snow plowing and more step turning, more rapid deceleration and earlier initiation of step turning at higher speed (r = 0.80-0.93; all P < 0.01). Better performance was significantly correlated to higher mean speed and shorter trajectory (r = 0.99/0.65; both P < 0.05) and to countermovement jump characteristics of peak force, time to peak force, and rate of force development (r = -0.71/0.78/-0.83; all P < 0.05). In conclusion, faster skiers used step turning to a greater extent and exhibited higher maximal leg power, which enabled them to combine high speeds with shorter trajectories during turns.

  10. Crack Turning in Integrally Stiffened Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard Glen

    2000-01-01

    Current emphasis in the aircraft industry toward reducing manufacturing cost has created a renewed interest in integrally stiffened structures. Crack turning has been identified as an approach to improve the damage tolerance and fail-safety of this class of structures. A desired behavior is for skin cracks to turn before reaching a stiffener, instead of growing straight through. A crack in a pressurized fuselage encounters high T-stress as it nears the stiffener--a condition favorable to crack turning. Also, the tear resistance of aluminum alloys typically varies with crack orientation, a form of anisotropy that can influence the crack path. The present work addresses these issues with a study of crack turning in two-dimensions, including the effects of both T-stress and fracture anisotropy. Both effects are shown to have relation to the process zone size, an interaction that is central to this study. Following an introduction to the problem, the T-stress effect is studied for a slightly curved semi-infinite crack with a cohesive process zone, yielding a closed form expression for the future crack path in an infinite medium. For a given initial crack tip curvature and tensile T-stress, the crack path instability is found to increase with process zone size. Fracture orthotropy is treated using a simple function to interpolate between the two principal fracture resistance values in two-dimensions. An extension to three-dimensions interpolates between the six principal values of fracture resistance. Also discussed is the transition between mode I and mode II fracture in metals. For isotropic materials, there is evidence that the crack seeks out a direction of either local symmetry (pure mode I) or local asymmetry (pure mode II) growth. For orthotropic materials the favored states are not pure modal, and have mode mixity that is a function of crack orientation.

  11. Individual muscle contributions to circular turning mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jessica D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2015-04-13

    Turning is an activity of daily living that involves both the acceleration of the body center-of-mass (COM) towards the center of curvature and rotation of the pelvis towards the new heading. The purpose of this study was to understand which muscles contribute to turning using experimentation, musculoskeletal modeling and simulation. Ten healthy adults consented to walk around a 1-m radius circular path at their self-selected walking speed and then along a straight line at the same speed. Forward dynamics simulations of the individual subjects during the turning and straight-line walking tasks were generated to identify the contributions of individual muscle groups to the body mediolateral and anterior-posterior COM acceleration impulse and to the pelvis angular acceleration impulse. The stance leg gluteus medius and ankle plantarflexor muscles and the swing leg adductor muscles were the primary contributors to redirect the body's COM relative to straight-line walking. In some cases, contributions to mediolateral COM acceleration were modulated through changes in leg orientation rather than through changes in muscle force. While modulation of the muscle contributions generally occurred in both the inner and outer legs, greater changes were observed during inner single-leg support than during outer single-leg support. Total pelvis angular acceleration was minimal during the single-support phase, but the swing leg muscles contributed significantly to balancing the internal and external rotation of the pelvis. The understanding of which muscles contribute to turning the body during walking may help guide the development of more effective locomotor therapies for those with movement impairments.

  12. Lattice Modeling and Calibration with Turn-by-Turn Orbit Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Sebek, J.; Martin, D.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    A new method that explores turn-by-turn BPM data to calibrate lattice models of accelerators is proposed. The turn-by-turn phase space coordinates at one location of the ring are first established using data from two BPMs separated by a simple section with a known transfer matrix, such as a drift space. The phase space coordinates are then tracked with the model to predict positions at other BPMs, which can be compared to measurements. The model is adjusted to minimize the difference between the measured and predicted orbit data. BPM gains and rolls are included as fitting variables. This technique can be applied to either the entire or a section of the ring. We have tested the method experimentally on a part of the SPEAR3 ring.

  13. Turn-Taking Organization for Korean Conversation: With a Conversation Analytic Proposal for the Research and Teaching of Korean Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jae-Eun

    2009-01-01

    From a conversation analytic perspective, this dissertation investigates how talk-in-turns in conversation are constructed and organized in a way that minimizes gaps and overlaps between speakers. Based on an informed assumption that turns are built out of turn units that allow the projection of their possible end points, I first characterize…

  14. Kinematical Comparison of the 200 m Backstroke Turns between National and Regional Level Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Veiga, Santiago; Cala, Antonio; Frutos, Pablo González; Navarro, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were to determine the evolution of selected turn variables during competitive backstroke races and to compare these kinematic variables between two different levels of swimmers. Sixteen national and regional level male swimmers participant in the 200 m backstroke event at the Spanish Swimming Championships in short course (25 m) were selected to analyze their turn performances. The individual distances method with two-dimensional Direct Linear Transformation (2D-DLT) algorithms was used to perform race analyses. National level swimmers presented a shorter “turn time”, a longer “distance in”, a faster “underwater velocity” and “normalized underwater velocity”, and a faster “stroking velocity” than regional level swimmers, whereas no significant differences were detected between levels for the “underwater distance”. National level swimmers maintained similar “turn times” over the event and increased “underwater velocity” and “normalized underwater velocity” in the last (seventh) turn segment, whereas regional level swimmers increased “turn time” in the last half of the race. For both national and regional level swimmers, turn “underwater distance” during the last three turns of the race was significantly shorter while no significant differences in distance into the wall occurred throughout the race. The skill level of the swimmers has an impact on the competitive backstroke turn segments. In a 200 m event, the underwater velocity should be maximized to maintain turn proficiency, whereas turn distance must be subordinated to the average velocity. Key Points The underwater turn velocity is as a critical variable related to the swimmers’ level of skill in a 200 m backstroke event. Best swimmers perform faster but no longer turn segments during a 200 m backstroke event. Best swimmers maintain their turn performance throughout the 200 m backstroke event by increasing the underwater velocity

  15. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics.

    PubMed

    Read, Tyson J G; Segre, Paolo S; Middleton, Kevin M; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2016-03-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left-right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius.

  16. Influence of turn-to-turn resistivity and coil geometrical size on charging characteristics of no-electrical-insulation REBCO pancake coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Song, H.

    2016-07-01

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) no-electrical-insulation (NEI) coils demonstrate great advantages in thermal stability and self-protection features. However, an intrinsic delay is observed in the charging process and as a result there maybe a possible settle-out problem. It becomes more critical for large HTS coils with more turns, such as the magnets for the accelerator system and DC induction heater applications. This paper presents detailed studies on the charging characteristics of NEI coils. Firstly, two different no-electrical-insulation coils are wound: the first is directly wound using only REBCO tapes with brass lamination, which is called a no-insulation (NI) coil. The other one is co-wound with stainless steel (SS) strips and REBCO tapes whose copper stabilizer is electroplated, which is called a metallic insulation (MI) coil. Fast discharging tests are performed on the two coils and their equivalent turn-to-turn resistivity is calculated. A similar discharging delay is observed on both coils, but the turn-to-turn resistivity of the SS co-wound coil is much higher than that of the first coil. Then the resistivity data is directly applied to an equivalent circuit network model which is developed to predict the charging behaviours. The model calculates coil voltage, currents along the azimuthal and radial directions, as well as the induced magnetic field. A practical charging time is defined to characterize the field ramping process considering the charging delay between field ramping and current charging. The charging behaviours are extensively analyzed and compared in terms of three primary factors: equivalent turn-to-turn resistivity, coil size and ramping rate. The results show that the charging time increases dramatically with the coil size and may be too long to be practical for large-scale applications using HTS coils with low turn-to-turn resistivity. Increasing the turn-to-turn resistivity enables one to accelerate the charging process

  17. Genesis of a flexible turning center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanclemente, Paul; French, Robert D.

    GE - Aircraft Engines has designed, built, and is operating a flexible turning center for jet engine hardware. Although the plant is in the forefront of manufacturing technology development, it was intended from the start to be a production facility. So while there was much to learn from being involved in all phases of the project, meeting production schedules was, and is, key to its success. This paper reviews the early history of the project and ends with a view of its recent production status.

  18. Corning and Kroger turn whey to yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-16

    It is reported that Corning and Kroger intend to build a 35,000 sq. ft. plant in Winchester, Ky., that will turn whey into bakers' yeast. The plant will convert whey from Kroger's dairies into bakers' yeast, supplying about 60% of the yeast needed for nine Kroger bakeries. It will also produce syrups and whey protein concentrate for use in other food processing activities. In addition to making useful products, the project will convert the whey to glucose and galactose. The protein component of the whey will be concentrated and used in various foods and feeds.

  19. The postmodern turn in group therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, J V

    2001-10-01

    The postmodern critique, often referred to as social constructionism, has influenced nearly all disciplines, including recently the domain of psychology--and most particularly psychoanalysis. This article presents an exposition of the "postmodern turn," including some historical perspective, a description of its theoretical elements as related to psychological practice, as well as standard objections to its theories. This author believes that many of the concepts inherent to a social constructionist approach are compelling for theory and practice in group therapy. Clinical case studies are cited in describing how postmodern theories present a natural fit for group therapy. Furthermore, specific implications of this model are delineated for the arduous task of leading groups.

  20. Alchemical inflation: inflaton turns into Higgs

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Kazunori; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2012-11-01

    We propose a new inflation model in which a gauge singlet inflaton turns into the Higgs condensate after inflation. The inflationary path is characterized by a moduli space of supersymmetric vacua spanned by the inflaton and Higgs field. The inflation energy scale is related to the soft supersymmetry breaking, and the Hubble parameter during inflation is smaller than the gravitino mass. The initial condition for the successful inflation is naturally realized by the pre-inflation in which the Higgs plays a role of the waterfall field.

  1. The management of turn transition in signed interaction through the lens of overlaps

    PubMed Central

    Girard-Groeber, Simone

    2015-01-01

    There have been relatively few studies on sign language interaction carried out within the framework of conversation analysis (CA). Therefore, questions remain open about how the basic building blocks of social interaction such as turn, turn construction unit (TCU) and turn transition relevance place (TRP) can be understood and analyzed in sign language interaction. Recent studies have shown that signers regularly fine-tune their turn-beginnings to potential completion points of turns (Groeber, 2014; Groeber and Pochon-Berger, 2014; De Vos et al., 2015). Moreover, signers deploy practices for overlap resolution as in spoken interaction (McCleary and Leite, 2013). While these studies have highlighted the signers' orientation to the “one-at-a-time” principle described by Sacks et al. (1974), the present article adds to this line of research by investigating in more detail those sequential environments where overlaps occur. The contribution provides an overview of different types of overlap with a focus of the overlap's onset with regard to a current signer's turn. On the basis of a 33-min video-recording of a multi-party interaction between 4 female signers in Swiss German Sign Language (DSGS), the paper provides evidence for the orderliness of overlapping signing. Furthermore, the contribution demonstrates how participants collaborate in the situated construction of turns as a dynamic and emergent gestalt and how they interactionally achieve turn transition. Thereby the study adds to recent research in spoken and in signed interaction that proposes to rethink turn boundaries and turn transition as flexible and interactionally achieved. PMID:26150792

  2. Surface roughness when diamond turning RSA 905 optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otieno, T.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Hsu, W. Y.; Cheng, Y. C.; Mkoko, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-high precision machining is used intensively in the photonics industry for the production of various optical components. Aluminium alloys have proven to be advantageous and are most commonly used over other materials to make various optical components. Recently, the increasing demand from optical systems for optical aluminium with consistent material properties has led to the development of newly modified grades of aluminium alloys produced by rapid solidification in the foundry process. These new aluminium grades are characterised by their finer microstructures and refined mechanical and physical properties. However the machining database of these new optical aluminium grades is limited and more research is still required to investigate their machinability performance when they are diamond turned in ultrahigh precision manufacturing environment. This work investigates the machinability of rapidly solidified aluminium RSA 905 by varying a number of diamond-turning cutting parameters and measuring the surface roughness over a cutting distance of 4 km. The machining parameters varied in this study were the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. The results showed a common trend of decrease in surface roughness with increasing cutting distance. The lowest surface roughness Ra result obtained after 4 km in this study was 3.2 nm. This roughness values was achieved using a cutting speed of 1750 rpm, feed rate of 5 mm/min and depth of cut equal to 25 μm.

  3. Turn-taking: From perception to speech preparation.

    PubMed

    Wesselmeier, Hendrik; Müller, Horst M

    2015-11-16

    We investigated the preparation of a spoken answer response to interrogative sentences by measuring response time (RT) and the response-related readiness potential (RP). By comparing the RT and RP results we aimed to identify whether the RP-onset is more related to the actual speech preparation process or the pure intention to speak after turn-anticipation. Additionally, we investigated if the RP-onset can be influenced by the syntactic structure (one or two completion points). Therefore, the EEG data were sorted based on two variables: the cognitive load required for the response and the syntactic structure of the stimulus questions. The results of the response utterance preparation associated event-related potential (ERP) and the RT suggest that the RP-onset is more related to the actual speech preparation process rather than the pure intention to speak after turn-anticipation. However, the RP-onset can be influenced by the syntactic structure of the question leading to an early response preparation. PMID:26483323

  4. Early development of turn-taking with parents shapes vocal acoustics in infant marmoset monkeys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daniel Y; Fenley, Alicia R; Ghazanfar, Asif A

    2016-05-01

    In humans, vocal turn-taking is a ubiquitous form of social interaction. It is a communication system that exhibits the properties of a dynamical system: two individuals become coupled to each other via acoustic exchanges and mutually affect each other. Human turn-taking develops during the first year of life. We investigated the development of vocal turn-taking in infant marmoset monkeys, a New World species whose adult vocal behaviour exhibits the same universal features of human turn-taking. We find that marmoset infants undergo the same trajectory of change for vocal turn-taking as humans, and do so during the same life-history stage. Our data show that turn-taking by marmoset infants depends on the development of self-monitoring, and that contingent parental calls elicit more mature-sounding calls from infants. As in humans, there was no evidence that parental feedback affects the rate of turn-taking maturation. We conclude that vocal turn-taking by marmoset monkeys and humans is an instance of convergent evolution, possibly as a result of pressures on both species to adopt a cooperative breeding strategy and increase volubility. PMID:27069047

  5. Early development of turn-taking with parents shapes vocal acoustics in infant marmoset monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daniel Y.; Fenley, Alicia R.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, vocal turn-taking is a ubiquitous form of social interaction. It is a communication system that exhibits the properties of a dynamical system: two individuals become coupled to each other via acoustic exchanges and mutually affect each other. Human turn-taking develops during the first year of life. We investigated the development of vocal turn-taking in infant marmoset monkeys, a New World species whose adult vocal behaviour exhibits the same universal features of human turn-taking. We find that marmoset infants undergo the same trajectory of change for vocal turn-taking as humans, and do so during the same life-history stage. Our data show that turn-taking by marmoset infants depends on the development of self-monitoring, and that contingent parental calls elicit more mature-sounding calls from infants. As in humans, there was no evidence that parental feedback affects the rate of turn-taking maturation. We conclude that vocal turn-taking by marmoset monkeys and humans is an instance of convergent evolution, possibly as a result of pressures on both species to adopt a cooperative breeding strategy and increase volubility. PMID:27069047

  6. Measurement of signal use and vehicle turns as indication of driver cognition.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Bruce; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses data analytics to provide a method for the measurement of a key driving task, turn signal usage as a measure of an automatic over-learned cognitive function drivers. The paper augments previously reported more complex executive function cognition measures by proposing an algorithm that analyzes dashboard video to detect turn indicator use with 100% accuracy without any false positives. The paper proposes two algorithms that determine the actual turns made on a trip. The first through analysis of GPS location traces for the vehicle, locating 73% of the turns made with a very low false positive rate of 3%. A second algorithm uses GIS tools to retroactively create turn by turn directions. Fusion of GIS and GPS information raises performance to 77%. The paper presents the algorithm required to measure signal use for actual turns by realigning the 0.2Hz GPS data, 30fps video and GIS turn events. The result is a measure that can be tracked over time and changes in the driver's performance can result in alerts to the driver, caregivers or clinicians as indication of cognitive change. A lack of decline can also be shared as reassurance.

  7. Turning toward dissonance: lessons from art, music, and literature.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Suzana K E; Epstein, Ronald M

    2012-02-01

    Conflict and chaos are prevalent in health care, and perhaps especially in palliative care. Typically, our point of entry into our patients' lives is often at the moment of conflict, discord, or intense suffering. Despite this, little in our formal training as clinicians teaches us how to be present for this suffering. Much has been written about the process of communication with regard to giving bad news, handling family meeting conflicts, and negotiating shifting goals of care, but little has been addressed about how to train the clinician to be present with the dissonance and suffering. In this paper, we explore how music, art, and literature teach us how to stay in moments of tension. In turn, lessons on how to learn to lean into the dissonance of many palliative care encounters are extrapolated.

  8. Pressure loss through sharp 180 deg turns in smooth rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, D. E.; Plevich, C. W.; Fan, C. S.

    1984-07-01

    Measured pressure distributions, pressure loss coefficients, and surface streamline visualizations are presented for 180-deg turns in smooth, rectangular cross-section channels. The flow geometry models situations that exist in multipass internal cooling of gas turbine engine airfoils. The turn geometry is characterized by parameters that include the ratio of upstream and downstream channel widths, the nondimensional channel depth, the nondimensional clearance height at the tip of the turn, and the nondimensional corner fillet radius. The present results cover a range of combinations of geometry parameters and Reynolds numbers to aid in prediction of coolant flow rates in present and future cooled airfoil designs.

  9. Canine viral vaccines at a turning point--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, L E

    1999-01-01

    The most important canine viral infections are distemper and CPV-2. Problems of variable CD vaccine safety and efficacy persist, but CD vaccines have greatly reduced the prevalence of disease and cases in vaccinated dogs are now rare. Canine hepatitis (ICH, CAV-1 infection) also has been controlled well by vaccines for more than 35 years and it is now rare; the sporadic cases seen in the 1990s have usually occurred in unvaccinated dogs. CAV-2 vaccines should, therefore, continue to be given since they have proved to be safe and effective, and prevent hepatitis as well as adenoviral tracheobronchitis. Failure to vaccinate would likely result in increase in cases of ICH, a serious disease, but never as significant as distemper and CPV infection. "Are we vaccinating too often?" The question is complex, but the dominant opinion is "yes" (Smith, 1995). The question cannot be responded to unequivocally, however, since manufacturers employ different strains that vary in their immunizing capacity and, probably, duration of immunity. This question was frequent with distemper in the 1960s. At that time, many veterinarians tested batches of the vaccine they used by providing pre- and postvaccinal sera to competent diagnostic laboratories. That practice appeared to benefit veterinarians and dogs, as well as the quality of vaccines. Unfortunately, many owners and some veterinarians seem to hold the view that infectious diseases such as parvovirus infection can be controlled by frequent vaccination alone. The common practice of dog breeders of vaccinating their animals several times each year is senseless. Revaccination for distemper and parvovirus infection is suggested at 1 year of age, but recommendations regarding the frequency of most vaccinations given after that time are unclear. Since most distemper and CPV-2 vaccines probably provide immunity that endures several years, vaccination at 3- to 5-year intervals, after the first year, seems a reasonable practice until more data on duration of immunity become available. "Are too many kinds of vaccines being promoted for dogs?" Distemper and parvovirus vaccines are essential; canine adenovirus vaccines are recommended since the few cases brought to our attention in recent years have been in unvaccinated dogs. Vaccination against respiratory infections is recommended for most dogs, especially those in kennels, or if they are to be boarded. Need has not been clearly established for coronavirus vaccines; Lyme disease vaccines (see below) are useful in preventing illness in areas where the disease exists, but are unnecessary elsewhere since dogs respond rapidly to appropriate antibiotics; current Leptospira bacterins are without benefit since they contain serovars that fail to protect in most areas (noted below). Lyme disease (LD) was not considered here, but newer recombinant (OspA) vaccines are now available that appear to be safe and effective for at least 1 year and they have not caused vaccine-induced postvaccinal lameness, which has been documented with certain whole-cell Lyme disease bacterins. Lyme disease vaccines should be restricted to dogs in, or entering, endemic areas where infested ticks reside. More than 85% of LD cases occur in the mid-Atlantic and Northeastern States, about 10% in six Midwestern states (Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin), and a smaller percentage in restricted areas of northern California and the Pacific Northwest. Leptospirosis also was not discussed here, but vaccines are commonly reported as a cause of anaphylaxis and current vaccines do not contain the serovars prevalent in most regions. The vast majority of cases diagnosed at the New York State Diagnostic Lab at Cornell are grippotyphosa and pomona serovars and there have been no recent cases caused by canicola or icterohemorrhagiae serovars. Because leptospirosis is an important disease of dogs, there is an urgent need for more research and the development of safer vaccines that contain the prevalent PMID:9890023

  10. Alterations of Neocortical Pyramidal Neurons: Turning Points in the Genesis of Mental Retardation

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Alberto; De Giorgio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons (PNs) represent the majority of neocortical cells and their involvement in cognitive functions is decisive. Therefore, they are the most obvious target of developmental disorders characterized by mental retardation. Genetic and non-genetic forms of intellectual disability share a few basic pathogenetic signatures that result in the anomalous function of PNs. Here, we review the key mechanisms impairing these neurons and their participation in the cortical network, with special focus on experimental models of fetal exposure to alcohol. Due to the heterogeneity of PNs, some alterations affect selectively a given cell population, which may also differ depending on the considered pathology. These specific features open new possibilities for the interpretation of cognitive defects observed in mental retardation syndromes, as well as for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:25157343

  11. The 2015 Paris Climate Conference: A turning point in the world's energy history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Mikushina, O. V.; Tereshin, A. G.

    2016-06-01

    It has been established that the consistent implementation of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference implies the quick retire of coal from the global energy balance and its replacement with the energy from unconventional and renewable sources. It is shown that even the full-scale implementation of the agreement will not keep global warming within 2°C.

  12. Examining the Turning Points Comprehensive Middle School Reform Model: The Role of Local Context and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Jay; Ouimette, Monique

    2004-01-01

    For the past decade, the federal government has supported comprehensive school reform as a way to improve under-performing schools (US Department of Education 1998). Thousands of schools across the country are now implementing scores of different whole school reform models with the hopes of improving school culture and raising student performance.…

  13. A Turning-Point or a Backward Slide: The Challenge Facing the Swedish Preschool Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pramling Samuelsson, Ingrid; Sheridan, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Thirty years or more of striving for a coherent theme in the educational system from preschool to gymnasium might now be at an end. Millions of Swedish kronor have been spent on projects concerning cooperation between pre- and primary school. The curricula for preschool and the gymnasium are similar in structure, and they are connected with each…

  14. "Turning Points": The Personal and Professional Circumstances That Lead Academics to Become Middle Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Alan

    2012-01-01

    In the current higher education climate, there is a growing perception that the pressures associated with being an academic middle manager outweigh the perceived rewards of the position. This article investigates the personal and professional circumstances that lead academics to become middle managers by drawing on data from life history…

  15. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  16. The still point of the turning world? Building on Balint: A personal view.

    PubMed

    Elder, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I will respond to the conference title "Building on Balint" by briefly considering some of the inherent obstacles to Balint work, before describing the current state of play in the UK. I will argue that Balint work might benefit from exploring its relationship with attachment theory more fully. In particular, I emphasize an important new role for Balint groups within contemporary health-care organizations-one that enhances a feeling of emotional security for the professional within the organization and also benefits the teamwork and morale of the organization itself. I will give an example of a Balint group in a health-care organization for vulnerable doctors and finish by giving a report on the development of Balint groups for medical students in the UK. PMID:25757847

  17. A Difficult Turning Point: A Review of Educational Reform in China's Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Zaixin

    1990-01-01

    Claims scientific and technical education is the key factor in further development of village enterprises and notes that present "one-directional" education causes migration of rural youth to urban areas. Opposes this system's emphasis on providing students with goals of higher education rather than of agricultural or vocational education.…

  18. European Union Policies in Education and Training: The Lisbon Agenda as a Turning Point?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertl, Hubert

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates European Union (EU) education and training policies in the light of the evolving Lisbon agenda on improving the competitiveness of the EU. It examines the ways in which EU policies have developed over time, focusing on their legal basis, underlying principles, main forms of implementation and their impact on national…

  19. The optic chiasm: a turning point in the evolution of eye/hand coordination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The primate visual system has a uniquely high proportion of ipsilateral retinal projections, retinal ganglial cells that do not cross the midline in the optic chiasm. The general assumption is that this developed due to the selective advantage of accurate depth perception through stereopsis. Here, the hypothesis that the need for accurate eye-forelimb coordination substantially influenced the evolution of the primate visual system is presented. Evolutionary processes may change the direction of retinal ganglial cells. Crossing, or non-crossing, in the optic chiasm determines which hemisphere receives visual feedback in reaching tasks. Each hemisphere receives little tactile and proprioceptive information about the ipsilateral hand. The eye-forelimb hypothesis proposes that abundant ipsilateral retinal projections developed in the primate brain to synthesize, in a single hemisphere, visual, tactile, proprioceptive, and motor information about a given hand, and that this improved eye-hand coordination and optimized the size of the brain. If accurate eye-hand coordination was a major factor in the evolution of stereopsis, stereopsis is likely to be highly developed for activity in the area where the hands most often operate. The primate visual system is ideally suited for tasks within arm’s length and in the inferior visual field, where most manual activity takes place. Altering of ocular dominance in reaching tasks, reduced cross-modal cuing effects when arms are crossed, response of neurons in the primary motor cortex to viewed actions of a hand, multimodal neuron response to tactile as well as visual events, and extensive use of multimodal sensory information in reaching maneuvers support the premise that benefits of accurate limb control influenced the evolution of the primate visual system. The eye-forelimb hypothesis implies that evolutionary change toward hemidecussation in the optic chiasm provided parsimonious neural pathways in animals developing frontal vision and visually guided forelimbs, and also suggests a new perspective on vision convergence in prey and predatory animals. PMID:23866932

  20. Is the GAIN Act a turning point in new antibiotic discovery?

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D

    2013-03-01

    The United States GAIN (Generating Antibiotic Incentives Now) Act is a call to action for new antibiotic discovery and development that arises from a ground swell of concern over declining activity in this therapeutic area in the pharmaceutical sector. The GAIN Act aims to provide economic incentives for antibiotic drug discovery in the form of market exclusivity and accelerated drug approval processes. The legislation comes on the heels of nearly two decades of failure using the tools of modern drug discovery to find new antibiotic drugs. The lessons of failure are examined herein as are the prospects for a renewed effort in antibiotic drug discovery and development stimulated by new investments in both the public and private sector.

  1. Turning Points in Qualitative Research: Tying Knots in a Handkerchief. Crossroads in Qualitative Inquiry Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Yvonna S., Ed.; Denzin, Norman K., Ed.

    The chapters of this volume traces the changes in the discipline of qualitative inquiry over the last five decades. The collection serves as a textbook for training scholars in the history and trajectory of qualitative research. The chapters of part 1, The Revolution of Representation: Feminist and Race/Ethnic Studies Discourses, are: (1) Situated…

  2. Transitions and Turning Points: Examining the Links between Child Maltreatment and Juvenile Offending

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Anna; Livingston, Michael; Dennison, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The links between child maltreatment and juvenile offending are well established. However, the majority of maltreated children do not offend. The research presented in this paper examines the impact that timing and chronicity of child maltreatment have on juvenile offending. Methods: Administrative data were obtained on all children who…

  3. Turning Points in the Lives of Two Pioneer Arab Women Principals in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arar, Khalid Husny; Abu-Rabia-Queder, Sarab

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the managerial career development of two Arab women, pioneer principals within the Arab education system in Israel. Using in-depth interviews relating to the characteristics of the different stages leading up to and within their careers as school principals (childhood and academic studies; the struggle to achieve the…

  4. Autobiographical Memory and Depression in the Later Age: The Bump Is a Turning Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidron, Yori; Alon, Shirly

    2007-01-01

    This preliminary study integrated previous findings of the distribution of autobiographical memories in the later age according to their age of occurrence, with the overgeneral memory bias predictive of depression. Twenty-five non-demented, Israeli participants between 65-89 years of age provided autobiographical memories to 4 groups of word cues…

  5. Diagnosis of osteopetrosis in bilateral congenital aural atresia: Turning point in treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Jana, Manisha; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Kumar, Arvind; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-05-01

    Aural atresia is a rare congenital malformation of the external and middle ear. There are several syndromic associations of this anomaly with those involving the first and second branchial arches. Occurrence of aural atresia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia is unknown and has never been reported. The co-existence of a sclerosing dysplasia can make the surgical treatment in aural atresia difficult and risky; and the auditory improvement may not be as expected. Moreover, internal auditory canal narrowing and hence sensorineural hearing loss in sclerosing dysplasia might add to the already existing conductive hearing loss in such patients. In this case report we have described an unknown association of bilateral microtia with sclerosing skeletal dysplasia (autosomal dominant osteopetrosis) and clinical implications of these two conditions occurring together leading to a change in the management plan. PMID:27170934

  6. Teenage Turning Point. Does Adolescence Herald the Twilight of Girls' Self-Esteem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is research related to the self-esteem of adolescents in the United States. Studies conducted by the American Association of University Women (AAUW), Carol Gilligan, and others are highlighted. (CW)

  7. Stressors and Turning Points in High School and Dropout: A Stress Process, Life Course Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupéré, Véronique; Leventhal, Tama; Dion, Eric; Crosnoe, Robert; Archambault, Isabelle; Janosz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    High school dropout is commonly seen as the result of a long-term process of failure and disengagement. As useful as it is, this view has obscured the heterogeneity of pathways leading to dropout. Research suggests, for instance, that some students leave school not as a result of protracted difficulties but in response to situations that emerge…

  8. The still point of the turning world? Building on Balint: A personal view.

    PubMed

    Elder, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I will respond to the conference title "Building on Balint" by briefly considering some of the inherent obstacles to Balint work, before describing the current state of play in the UK. I will argue that Balint work might benefit from exploring its relationship with attachment theory more fully. In particular, I emphasize an important new role for Balint groups within contemporary health-care organizations-one that enhances a feeling of emotional security for the professional within the organization and also benefits the teamwork and morale of the organization itself. I will give an example of a Balint group in a health-care organization for vulnerable doctors and finish by giving a report on the development of Balint groups for medical students in the UK.

  9. A Turning Point: Embodied Meanings of Early Childbearing among American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Janelle; Chesla, Catherine; Kennedy, Holly; Strickland, June

    2012-01-01

    Introduction American Indian women have poor perinatal outcomes and are at risk for early childbearing. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the experience and meaning of early childbearing among American Indian women. Methods Employing interpretive phenomenology and a semi-structured interview guide, 30 adult American Indian women residing in a Northwestern American Indian Reservation were interviewed about their experience and meaning of early childbearing. Results Three overarching themes were tied to their eventual positive evaluation of the experience: 1) mourning a lost childhood, 2) seeking fulfillment, and 3) embodying responsibility. Discussion Women indicated that despite their tumultuous childhoods, early childbearing presented an opportunity to effect positive change in their lives. Midwives and nurses are positioned to help women change their lives; thereby, improving health outcomes. PMID:22909397

  10. Turning Points: A Resource Guide on Teenagers, Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Other Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankston, Karen; Strong, Sherrill

    This resource guide was written for teachers; school counselors and nurses; principals and school administrators; other professionals in health care, family planning, alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) prevention and treatment; and community agencies who work with pregnant teenagers and their partners. It is designed to help these practitioners…

  11. A study of the turning points of a nems shuttle using td-scc-dftb

    SciTech Connect

    Huldt, C.; Kinaret, J.; Koskinen, P.

    2009-01-21

    Nanoelectromechanical systems, of which the shuttle is one of the most fundamental, have theoretically been described mainly with phenomenological models with simplified interactions between the mobile part and the electrodes. Many microscopic methods, which in principle can give a more realistic picture of the shuttling process, are poorly suited for the dynamic non-equilibrium problem at hand. This is primarily due to the presence of several timescales associated with the mechanical motion, electronic relaxation within subsystems, and charge transfer between the mobile shuttle and the electrodes. The last timescale varies by many orders of magnitude during a shuttling cycle, which complicates many of the standard approaches. To overcome these difficulties, we use a TD-SCC-DFTB code developed in the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials (IWM) in Freiburg. The method, which is a well-tested approximation to TDDFT, couples the reliability of DFT with the efficiency of the TB approach.

  12. Influence of diamond turning and surface cleaning processes on the degradation of KDP crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, Mark R.; Thomas, Ian M.; Edwards, Gary J.; Stanion, Kenneth A.; Fuchs, Baruch A.; Latanich, L.

    1991-12-01

    One factor influencing the efficiency of KDP frequency conversion arrays on the Nova laser system at LLNL has been environmental degradation, or `fogging,' of the crystal surfaces. Decreases in array transmission by as much as 20% have been attributed to crystal fogging. The surfaces of the 27 cm square Nova array crystals are prepared by a wet diamond-turning process. The rate of surface fogging has been associated with several parameters of the diamond turning and subsequent cleaning processes. High humidity during diamond turning, storage, and use on the laser tends to accelerate the fogging. We suspect that some of the additives present in the diamond turning oil increase the fogging rate and have found a machining oil which minimizes this surface degradation. Efficient removal of the machining oils from the crystal surface also minimizes the fogging problem. Care must be taken to use cleaning solvents which do not cause additional surface degradation. The fogging rate is sensitive to the crystallographic orientation of the material as well as to surface roughness related to the diamond turning process. Accelerated fogging at diamond turning artifacts may increase crystal surface roughness causing increased beam modulation and scattering losses.

  13. Influence of diamond turning and surface cleaning processes on the degradation of KDP crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, M.R.; Thomas, I.; Edwards, G.; Stanion, K.; Fuchs, B.

    1991-06-24

    One factor influencing the efficiency of KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate) frequency conversion arrays on the Nova laser system at LLNL has been environmental degradation, or fogging'', of the crystal surfaces. Decreases in array transmission by as much as 20% have been attributed to crystal fogging. The surfaces of the 27-cm square Nova array crystals are prepared by a wet diamond-turning process. The rate of surface fogging has been associated with several parameters of the diamond turning and subsequent cleaning processes. High humidity during diamond turning, storage, and use on the laser tends to accelerate the fogging. We suspect that some of the additives present in the diamond turning oil increase the fogging rate and have found a machining oil which minimizes this surface degradation. Efficient removal of the machining oils from the crystal surface also minimizes the fogging problem. Care must be taken to use cleaning solvents which do not cause additional surface degradation. The fogging rate is sensitive to the crystallographic orientation of the material as well as to surface roughness related to the diamond turning process. Accelerated fogging at diamond turning artifacts may increase crystal surface roughness causing increased beam modulation and scattering losses. 5 refs. 5 figs.

  14. Beam diagnostics via model independent analysis of the turn-by-turn BPM data

    SciTech Connect

    Xi Yang

    2004-08-11

    Model independent analysis (MIA) can be used to obtain all the eigen modes included in the turn-by-turn BPM data. Not only the synchrotron tune and betatron tune can be obtained from the fast Fourier transforms (FFT) of the temporal eigen vector of the corresponding mode, but also the error mode, which could be caused by the different gain of a BPM, can be observed in both the temporal and spatial eigen vectors of the error mode. It can be applied as a diagnostic tool for Booster.

  15. Utilizing the N beam position monitor method for turn-by-turn optics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langner, A.; Benedetti, G.; Carlà, M.; Iriso, U.; Martí, Z.; de Portugal, J. Coello; Tomás, R.

    2016-09-01

    The N beam position monitor method (N -BPM) which was recently developed for the LHC has significantly improved the precision of optics measurements that are based on BPM turn-by-turn data. The main improvement is due to the consideration of correlations for statistical and systematic error sources, as well as increasing the amount of BPM combinations which are used to derive the β -function at one location. We present how this technique can be applied at light sources like ALBA, and compare the results with other methods.

  16. Hard turning micro-machine tool

    DOEpatents

    DeVor, Richard E; Adair, Kurt; Kapoor, Shiv G

    2013-10-22

    A micro-scale apparatus for supporting a tool for hard turning comprises a base, a pivot coupled to the base, an actuator coupled to the base, and at least one member coupled to the actuator at one end and rotatably coupled to the pivot at another end. A tool mount is disposed on the at least one member. The at least one member defines a first lever arm between the pivot and the tool mount, and a second lever arm between the pivot and the actuator. The first lever arm has a length that is less than a length of the second lever arm. The actuator moves the tool mount along an arc.

  17. Research on silicon rotor turned gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huiliang; Li, Hongsheng; Yang, Bo; Wang, Shourong; Li, Kunyu

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces a novel thin silicon rotor turned gyroscope (SRTG). With a micro motor driving the rotor and two pairs of torsion bars and a gimbal ring realizing dynamical tuning, this gyroscope inherits the structure and working principle of the dynamically tuned gyroscope (DTG). The torsion bars, gimbal ring, rotor, annunciator and torquer are processed by micro-mechanical technology. The declination of rotor is sensed by differential capacitances. The rotor is rebalanced by electrostatic forces. In this paper, the details about the structure and working principle of SRTG is presented, the block diagram of the circuit in SRTG is discussed. Experiments are done on one sensitive direction of SRTG, and the curve is given, proved the feasibility.

  18. Turning assistive machines into assistive robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argall, Brenna D.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, the potential for automation in particular, in the form of smart wheelchairs to aid those with motor, or cognitive, impairments has been recognized. It is a paradox that often the more severe a person's motor impairment, the more challenging it is for them to operate the very assistive machines which might enhance their quality of life. A primary aim of my lab is to address this confound by incorporating robotics autonomy and intelligence into assistive machines turning the machine into a kind of robot, and offloading some of the control burden from the user. Robots already synthetically sense, act in and reason about the world, and these technologies can be leveraged to help bridge the gap left by sensory, motor or cognitive impairments in the users of assistive machines. This paper overviews some of the ongoing projects in my lab, which strives to advance human ability through robotics autonomy.

  19. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    ScienceCinema

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2016-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  20. Turning Algae into Energy in New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard; Olivares, Jose; Lammers, Peter

    2013-07-29

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, as part of the New Mexico Consortium - comprised of New Mexico's major research universities, the Lab, and key industry partners - is conducting research into using algae as a feed stock for a renewable source of fuels, and other products. There are hundreds of thousands of different algae species on Earth. They account for approximately half of the net photosynthesis on the planet, yet they have not been used in any kind of a large scale by humanity, with just a few exceptions. And yet, the biomass is easy to transform into useful products, including fuels, and they contain many other natural products that have high value. In this video Los Alamos and New Mexico State University scientists outline the opportunities and challenges of using science to turn algae into energy.

  1. Turned versus anodised dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL)and post-operative infection for patients being rehabilitated by turned versus anodised-surface implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in November 2015. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. Thirty-eight publications were included. The results suggest a risk ratio of 2·82 (95% CI 1·95-4·06, P < 0·00001) for failure of turned implants, when compared to anodised-surface implants. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results when only the studies inserting implants in maxillae or mandibles were pooled. There were no statistically significant effects of turned implants on the MBL (mean difference-MD 0·02, 95%CI -0·16-0·20; P = 0·82) in comparison to anodised implants. The results of a meta-regression considering the follow-up period as a covariate suggested an increase of the MD with the increase in the follow-up time (MD increase 0·012 mm year(-1) ), however, without a statistical significance (P = 0·813). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  2. Governing by Partnerships: Dilemmas in Swedish Education Policy at the Turn of the Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstedt, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, governing through partnerships has become more and more common and is today reflected in a range of policy areas. In the following article, governing through partnerships is analysed in Swedish education policy around the turn of the millennium, where the notion of partnership has had a large impact. Using as its point of…

  3. Aquatic turning performance of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) and functional consequences of a rigid body design.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel; Rivera, Angela R V; Dougherty, Erin E; Blob, Richard W

    2006-11-01

    The ability to capture prey and avoid predation in aquatic habitats depends strongly on the ability to perform unsteady maneuvers (e.g. turns), which itself depends strongly on body flexibility. Two previous studies of turning performance in rigid-bodied taxa have found either high maneuverability or high agility, but not both. However, examinations of aquatic turning performance in rigid-bodied animals have had limited taxonomic scope and, as such, the effects of many body shapes and designs on aquatic maneuverability and agility have yet to be examined. Turtles represent the oldest extant lineage of rigid-bodied vertebrates and the only aquatic rigid-bodied tetrapods. We evaluated the aquatic turning performance of painted turtles, Chrysemys picta (Schneider, 1783) using the minimum length-specific radius of the turning path (R/L) and the average turning rate (omega(avg)) as measures of maneuverability and agility, respectively. We filmed turtles conducting forward and backward turns in an aquatic arena. Each type of turn was executed using a different pattern of limb movements. During forward turns, turtles consistently protracted the inboard forelimb and held it stationary into the flow, while continuing to move the outboard forelimb and both hindlimbs as in rectilinear swimming. The limb movements of backward turns were more complex than those of forward turns, but involved near simultaneous retraction and protraction of contralateral fore- and hindlimbs, respectively. Forward turns had a minimum R/L of 0.0018 (the second single lowest value reported from any animal) and a maximum omega(avg) of 247.1 degrees. Values of R/L for backward turns (0.0091-0.0950 L) were much less variable than that of forward turns (0.0018-1.0442 L). The maneuverability of turtles is similar to that recorded previously for rigid-bodied boxfish. However, several morphological features of turtles (e.g. shell morphology and limb position) appear to increase agility relative to the body

  4. A Logical OR Redundancy within the Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly Type 1 {Beta}-Turn Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jihun; Dubey, Vikash Kumar; Longo, Lian M.; Blaber, Michael

    2008-04-19

    Turn secondary structure is essential to the formation of globular protein architecture. Turn structures are, however, much more complex than either {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet, and the thermodynamics and folding kinetics are poorly understood. Type I {beta}-turns are the most common type of reverse turn, and they exhibit a statistical consensus sequence of Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly (where Asx is Asp or Asn). A comprehensive series of individual and combined Asx mutations has been constructed within three separate type I 3:5 G1 bulge {beta}-turns in human fibroblast growth factor-1, and their effects on structure, stability, and folding have been determined. The results show a fundamental logical OR relationship between the Asx residues in the motif, involving H-bond interactions with main-chain amides within the turn. These interactions can be modulated by additional interactions with residues adjacent to the turn at positions i + 4 and i + 6. The results show that the Asx residues in the turn motif make a substantial contribution to the overall stability of the protein, and the Asx logical OR relationship defines a redundant system that can compensate for deleterious point mutations. The results also show that the stability of the turn is unlikely to be the prime determinant of formation of turn structure in the folding transition state.

  5. A Logical OR Redundancy Within the Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly Type I beta-Turn Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,J.; Dubey, V.; Longo, L.; Blaber, M.

    2008-01-01

    Turn secondary structure is essential to the formation of globular protein architecture. Turn structures are, however, much more complex than either ?-helix or ?-sheet, and the thermodynamics and folding kinetics are poorly understood. Type I ?-turns are the most common type of reverse turn, and they exhibit a statistical consensus sequence of Asx-Pro-Asx-Gly (where Asx is Asp or Asn). A comprehensive series of individual and combined Asx mutations has been constructed within three separate type I 3:5 G1 bulge ?-turns in human fibroblast growth factor-1, and their effects on structure, stability, and folding have been determined. The results show a fundamental logical OR relationship between the Asx residues in the motif, involving H-bond interactions with main-chain amides within the turn. These interactions can be modulated by additional interactions with residues adjacent to the turn at positions i + 4 and i + 6. The results show that the Asx residues in the turn motif make a substantial contribution to the overall stability of the protein, and the Asx logical OR relationship defines a redundant system that can compensate for deleterious point mutations. The results also show that the stability of the turn is unlikely to be the prime determinant of formation of turn structure in the folding transition state.

  6. 14 CFR 23.203 - Turning flight and accelerated turning stalls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the power required for level flight in the landing configuration at maximum landing weight and a speed... maximum landing weight and a speed of 1.4 VSO, except that the power may not be less than 50 percent of... tests as follows: (a) Establish and maintain a coordinated turn in a 30 degree bank. Reduce speed...

  7. Turn-by-Turn Imaging of the Transverse Beam Profile in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan A.; Petree, Mark; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    During injection or instability, the transverse profile of an individual bunch in a storage ring can change significantly in a few turns. However, most synchrotron-light imaging techniques are not designed for this time scale. We have developed a novel diagnostic that enhances the utility of a fast gated camera by adding, inexpensively, some features of a dual-axis streak camera, in order to watch the turn-by-turn evolution of the transverse profile, in both x and y. The beam's elliptical profile is reshaped using cylindrical lenses to form a tall and narrow ellipse--essentially the projection of the full ellipse onto one transverse axis. We do this projection twice, by splitting the beam into two paths at different heights, and rotating the ellipse by 90{sup o} on one path. A rapidly rotating mirror scans these vertical ''pencils'' of light horizontally across the photocathode of the camera, which is gated for 3 ns on every Nth ring turn. A single readout of the camera captures 100 images, looking like a stroboscopic photograph of a moving object. We have observed the capture of injected charge into a bunch and the rapid change of beam size at the onset of a fast instability.

  8. Why Critical Literacy Should Turn to "The Affective Turn": Making a Case for Critical Affective Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwaruddin, Sardar M.

    2016-01-01

    The central argument of this essay is that critical literacy with a rationalistic bent may not enable us to cope with ethical dilemmas in our responsiveness to human sufferings. I argue that critical literacy education would benefit from turning to the recent scholarship on affect/emotion studies. I draw upon the works of Sara Ahmed--one of the…

  9. Squeezed light from a diamond-turned monolithic cavity.

    PubMed

    Brieussel, A; Shen, Y; Campbell, G; Guccione, G; Janousek, J; Hage, B; Buchler, B C; Treps, N; Fabre, C; Fang, F Z; Li, X Y; Symul, T; Lam, P K

    2016-02-22

    For some crystalline materials, a regime can be found where continuous ductile cutting is feasible. Using precision diamond turning, such materials can be cut into complex optical components with high surface quality and form accuracy. In this work we use diamond-turning to machine a monolithic, square-shaped, doubly-resonant LiNbO3 cavity with two flat and two convex facets. When additional mild polishing is implemented, the Q-factor of the resonator is found to be limited only by the material absorption loss. We show how our monolithic square resonator may be operated as an optical parametric oscillator that is evanescently coupled to free-space beams via birefringent prisms. The prism arrangement allows for independent and large tuning of the fundamental and second harmonic coupling rates. We measure 2.6 ± 0.5 dB of vacuum squeezing at 1064 nm using our system. Potential improvements to obtain higher degrees of squeezing are discussed. PMID:26907056

  10. As the egg turns: monitoring egg attendance behavior in wild birds using novel data logging technology.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Scott A; Clatterbuck, Corey A; Kelsey, Emma C; Naiman, Alex D; Young, Lindsay C; VanderWerf, Eric A; Warzybok, Pete; Bradley, Russell; Jahncke, Jaime; Bower, Geoff C

    2014-01-01

    Egg turning is unique to birds and critical for embryonic development in most avian species. Technology that can measure changes in egg orientation and temperature at fine temporal scales (1 Hz) was neither readily available nor small enough to fit into artificial eggs until recently. Here we show the utility of novel miniature data loggers equipped with 3-axis (i.e., triaxial) accelerometers, magnetometers, and a temperature thermistor to study egg turning behavior in free-ranging birds. Artificial eggs containing egg loggers were deployed in the nests of three seabird species for 1-7 days of continuous monitoring. These species (1) turned their eggs more frequently (up to 6.5 turns h(-1)) than previously reported for other species, but angular changes were often small (1-10° most common), (2) displayed similar mean turning rates (ca. 2 turns h(-1)) despite major differences in reproductive ecology, and (3) demonstrated distinct diurnal cycling in egg temperatures that varied between 1.4 and 2.4 °C. These novel egg loggers revealed high-resolution, three-dimensional egg turning behavior heretofore never measured in wild birds. This new form of biotechnology has broad applicability for addressing fundamental questions in avian breeding ecology, life history, and development, and can be used as a tool to monitor birds that are sensitive to disturbance while breeding.

  11. As the Egg Turns: Monitoring Egg Attendance Behavior in Wild Birds Using Novel Data Logging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Scott A.; Clatterbuck, Corey A.; Kelsey, Emma C.; Naiman, Alex D.; Young, Lindsay C.; VanderWerf, Eric A.; Warzybok, Pete; Bradley, Russell; Jahncke, Jaime; Bower, Geoff C.

    2014-01-01

    Egg turning is unique to birds and critical for embryonic development in most avian species. Technology that can measure changes in egg orientation and temperature at fine temporal scales (1 Hz) was neither readily available nor small enough to fit into artificial eggs until recently. Here we show the utility of novel miniature data loggers equipped with 3-axis (i.e., triaxial) accelerometers, magnetometers, and a temperature thermistor to study egg turning behavior in free-ranging birds. Artificial eggs containing egg loggers were deployed in the nests of three seabird species for 1–7 days of continuous monitoring. These species (1) turned their eggs more frequently (up to 6.5 turns h−1) than previously reported for other species, but angular changes were often small (1–10° most common), (2) displayed similar mean turning rates (ca. 2 turns h−1) despite major differences in reproductive ecology, and (3) demonstrated distinct diurnal cycling in egg temperatures that varied between 1.4 and 2.4°C. These novel egg loggers revealed high-resolution, three-dimensional egg turning behavior heretofore never measured in wild birds. This new form of biotechnology has broad applicability for addressing fundamental questions in avian breeding ecology, life history, and development, and can be used as a tool to monitor birds that are sensitive to disturbance while breeding. PMID:24887441

  12. [TURNING THE PYRAMID IN PRENATAL CARE].

    PubMed

    Ohel-Shani, Iris; Daniel-Spiegel, Etty

    2015-10-01

    Most complications of pregnancy manifest towards the latter part of pregnancy. Nevertheless, present day diagnostic techniques, such as sonography, Doppler, biochemical screening tests, and the newly developed ability to study free fetal DNA in maternal blood, enables early identification of high risk groups for maternal and fetal morbidity, as well as fetal genetic and anatomical pathology. Dr. Nicolaides has coined this changing trend with the term "Turning the Pyramid". Early screening enables earlier and more directed follow-up with the application of relevant diagnostic tests. Obvious advantages include the potential to reduce maternal-fetal morbidity before it becomes apparent clinically. Additionally, the earlier diagnosis of fetal pathology, allows more time for parents and medical staff to assess the situation, and reach a decision regarding the continuation of the pregnancy. A possible drawback of such an approach, of early identification of high risk groups, is the uncertainty it arouses, sometimes for a long duration, with the accompanying apprehension and stress parents have to endure. A multidisciplinary team, consisting of specialists in fetal-maternal medicine, genetics, ultrasound, and perinatology, will be needed in order to best deal with the often complex information, which is becoming increasingly available at a very early stage of pregnancy.

  13. THE NEOLIBERAL TURN IN AMERICAN HEALTH CARE.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Leaving millions both uninsured and underinsured, the Affordable Care Act does not create a system of universal health care in the United States. To understand its shortcomings, we have to understand it as part of a historic shift in the political economy of American health care. This "neoliberal turn" began as a reaction against the welfare state as it expanded during the New Deal and post-World War II period. What began as a movement associated with philosophers like Friedrich Hayek ultimately had a powerful impact via the attraction of powerful corporate sponsors and political supporters, and it was to historically transform American health care thought and organization. In health policy circles, for example, it can be seen in a rising emphasis on "moral hazard," overuse, and cost sharing above a concern with universalism and equity. It was likewise manifested by the corporatization of the health maintenance organization and the rise of the "consumer-driven" health care movement. By the time of the health care reform debate, the influence of corporate "stakeholders" was to prove predominant. These developments, however, must be construed as connected parts of a much larger political transformation, reflected in rising inequality and privatization, occurring both domestically and internationally. PMID:26460446

  14. Maize Leaves Turn Away from Neighbors1

    PubMed Central

    Maddonni, Gustavo Angel; Otegui, María Elena; Andrieu, Bruno; Chelle, Michael; Casal, Jorge J.

    2002-01-01

    In commercial crops, maize (Zea mays) plants are typically grown at a larger distance between rows (70 cm) than within the same row (16–23 cm). This rectangular arrangement creates a heterogeneous environment in which the plants receive higher red light (R) to far-red light (FR) ratios from the interrow spaces. In field crops, the hybrid Dekalb 696 (DK696) showed an increased proportion of leaves toward interrow spaces, whereas the experimental hybrid 980 (Exp980) retained random leaf orientation. Mirrors reflecting FR were placed close to isolated plants to simulate the presence of neighbors in the field. In addition, localized FR was applied to target leaves in a growth chamber. During their expansion, the leaves of DK696 turned away from the low R to FR ratio signals, whereas Exp980 leaves remained unaffected. On the contrary, tillering was reduced and plant height was increased by low R to FR ratios in Exp980 but not in DK696. Isolated plants preconditioned with low R/FR-simulating neighbors in a North-South row showed reduced mutual shading among leaves when the plants were actually grouped in North-South rows. These observations contradict the current view that phytochrome-mediated responses to low R/FR are a relic from wild conditions, detrimental for crop yield. PMID:12427985

  15. THE NEOLIBERAL TURN IN AMERICAN HEALTH CARE.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Leaving millions both uninsured and underinsured, the Affordable Care Act does not create a system of universal health care in the United States. To understand its shortcomings, we have to understand it as part of a historic shift in the political economy of American health care. This "neoliberal turn" began as a reaction against the welfare state as it expanded during the New Deal and post-World War II period. What began as a movement associated with philosophers like Friedrich Hayek ultimately had a powerful impact via the attraction of powerful corporate sponsors and political supporters, and it was to historically transform American health care thought and organization. In health policy circles, for example, it can be seen in a rising emphasis on "moral hazard," overuse, and cost sharing above a concern with universalism and equity. It was likewise manifested by the corporatization of the health maintenance organization and the rise of the "consumer-driven" health care movement. By the time of the health care reform debate, the influence of corporate "stakeholders" was to prove predominant. These developments, however, must be construed as connected parts of a much larger political transformation, reflected in rising inequality and privatization, occurring both domestically and internationally.

  16. Turning and maneuverability during sidewinding locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, Henry; Goldman, Daniel; Hu, David

    2014-03-01

    Sidewinding is an unusual form of snake locomotion used to move rapidly on yielding substrates such as desert sands. Posteriorly propagating waves alternate between static contact with the substrate and elevated motion, resulting in a ``stepping'' motion of body segments. Unlike lateral undulation, the direction of travel is not collinear with the axis of the body wave, and posterior body segments do not follow the path of anterior segments. Field observations indicate that sidewinding snakes are highly maneuverable, but the mechanisms by which these snakes change direction during this complex movement are unknown. Motion capture data from three Colorado Desert sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes laterorepens) shows a variety of turn magnitudes and behaviors. Additionally, sidewinders are capable of ``reversals'' in which the snakes halts forward progress and begins locomotion in the opposite direction without rotation of the body. Because the head is re-oriented with respect to the body during these reversals, the snake is able to reverse direction without rotation yet continue moving in the new direction without impediment to perception or mechanics, a rare level of maneuverability in animals.

  17. Turning Oscillations Into Opportunities: Lessons from a Bacterial Decision Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Daniel; Lu, Mingyang; Stavropoulos, Trevor; Onuchic, Jose'; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-04-01

    Sporulation vs. competence provides a prototypic example of collective cell fate determination. The decision is performed by the action of three modules: 1) A stochastic competence switch whose transition probability is regulated by population density, population stress and cell stress. 2) A sporulation timer whose clock rate is regulated by cell stress and population stress. 3) A decision gate that is coupled to the timer via a special repressilator-like loop. We show that the distinct circuit architecture of this gate leads to special dynamics and noise management characteristics: The gate opens a time-window of opportunity for competence transitions during which it generates oscillations that are turned into a chain of transition opportunities - each oscillation opens a short interval with high transition probability. The special architecture of the gate also leads to filtering of external noise and robustness against internal noise and variations in the circuit parameters.

  18. Turn prediction in proteins using a pattern-matching approach.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F E; Abarbanel, R M; Kuntz, I D; Fletterick, R J

    1986-01-14

    We extend the use of amino acid sequence patterns [Cohen, F.E., Abarbanel, R. M., Kuntz, I. D., & Fletterick, R. J. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 4894-4904] to the identification of turns in globular proteins. The approach uses a conservative strategy, combined with a hierarchical search (strongest patterns first) and length-dependent masking, to achieve high accuracy (95%) on a test set of proteins of known structure. Applying the same procedure to homologous families gives a 90% success rate. Straightforward changes are suggested to improve the predictive power. The computer program, written in Lisp, provides a general pattern-recognition language well suited for a number of investigations of protein and nucleic acid sequences. PMID:3754149

  19. Redesigning the type II' β-turn in green fluorescent protein to type I': implications for folding kinetics and stability.

    PubMed

    Madan, Bharat; Sokalingam, Sriram; Raghunathan, Govindan; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2014-10-01

    Both Type I' and Type II' β-turns have the same sense of the β-turn twist that is compatible with the β-sheet twist. They occur predominantly in two residue β-hairpins, but the occurrence of Type I' β-turns is two times higher than Type II' β-turns. This suggests that Type I' β-turns may be more stable than Type II' β-turns, and Type I' β-turn sequence and structure can be more favorable for protein folding than Type II' β-turns. Here, we redesigned the native Type II' β-turn in GFP to Type I' β-turn, and investigated its effect on protein folding and stability. The Type I' β-turns were designed based on the statistical analysis of residues in natural Type I' β-turns. The substitution of the native "GD" sequence of i+1 and i+2 residues with Type I' preferred "(N/D)G" sequence motif increased the folding rate by 50% and slightly improved the thermodynamic stability. Despite the enhancement of in vitro refolding kinetics and stability of the redesigned mutants, they showed poor soluble expression level compared to wild type. To overcome this problem, i and i + 3 residues of the designed Type I' β-turn were further engineered. The mutation of Thr to Lys at i + 3 could restore the in vivo soluble expression of the Type I' mutant. This study indicates that Type II' β-turns in natural β-hairpins can be further optimized by converting the sequence to Type I'.

  20. History of Education in Canada: Historiographic "Turns" and Widening Horizons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno-Jofré, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores major historiographic "turns" in history of education with a focus, although not exclusively, on English-speaking Canada. It addresses the transformative intellectual impact of the turn toward social history on the history of education, the impact of cultural history and the linguistic turn, the reception of Michel…

  1. Turning the tide of corneal blindness.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Matthew S; Schottman, Tim; Gulati, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Corneal diseases represent the second leading cause of blindness in most developing world countries. Worldwide, major investments in public health infrastructure and primary eye care services have built a strong foundation for preventing future corneal blindness. However, there are an estimated 4.9 million bilaterally corneal blind persons worldwide who could potentially have their sight restored through corneal transplantation. Traditionally, barriers to increased corneal transplantation have been daunting, with limited tissue availability and lack of trained corneal surgeons making widespread keratoplasty services cost prohibitive and logistically unfeasible. The ascendancy of cataract surgical rates and more robust eye care infrastructure of several Asian and African countries now provide a solid base from which to dramatically expand corneal transplantation rates. India emerges as a clear global priority as it has the world's largest corneal blind population and strong infrastructural readiness to rapidly scale its keratoplasty numbers. Technological modernization of the eye bank infrastructure must follow suit. Two key factors are the development of professional eye bank managers and the establishment of Hospital Cornea Recovery Programs. Recent adaptation of these modern eye banking models in India have led to corresponding high growth rates in the procurement of transplantable tissues, improved utilization rates, operating efficiency realization, and increased financial sustainability. The widespread adaptation of lamellar keratoplasty techniques also holds promise to improve corneal transplant success rates. The global ophthalmic community is now poised to scale up widespread access to corneal transplantation to meet the needs of the millions who are currently blind. PMID:22944753

  2. Turning the tide of corneal blindness.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Matthew S; Schottman, Tim; Gulati, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    Corneal diseases represent the second leading cause of blindness in most developing world countries. Worldwide, major investments in public health infrastructure and primary eye care services have built a strong foundation for preventing future corneal blindness. However, there are an estimated 4.9 million bilaterally corneal blind persons worldwide who could potentially have their sight restored through corneal transplantation. Traditionally, barriers to increased corneal transplantation have been daunting, with limited tissue availability and lack of trained corneal surgeons making widespread keratoplasty services cost prohibitive and logistically unfeasible. The ascendancy of cataract surgical rates and more robust eye care infrastructure of several Asian and African countries now provide a solid base from which to dramatically expand corneal transplantation rates. India emerges as a clear global priority as it has the world's largest corneal blind population and strong infrastructural readiness to rapidly scale its keratoplasty numbers. Technological modernization of the eye bank infrastructure must follow suit. Two key factors are the development of professional eye bank managers and the establishment of Hospital Cornea Recovery Programs. Recent adaptation of these modern eye banking models in India have led to corresponding high growth rates in the procurement of transplantable tissues, improved utilization rates, operating efficiency realization, and increased financial sustainability. The widespread adaptation of lamellar keratoplasty techniques also holds promise to improve corneal transplant success rates. The global ophthalmic community is now poised to scale up widespread access to corneal transplantation to meet the needs of the millions who are currently blind.

  3. Application of the lie-transform perturbation theory for the turn-by-turn data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    Harmonic analysis of turn-by-turn BPM data is a rich source of information on linear and nonlinear optics in circular machines. In the present report the normal form approach first introduced by R. Bartolini and F. Schmidt is extended on the basis of the Lie-transform perturbation theory to provide direct relation between the sources of perturbation and observable spectra of betatron oscillations. The goal is to localize strong perturbing elements, find the resonance driving terms--both absolute value and phase--that are necessary for calculation of the required adjustments in correction magnet circuits: e.g. skew-quadrupoles for linear coupling correction. The theory is nonlinear and permits to analyze higher order effects, such as coupling contribution to beta-beating and nonlinear sum resonances.

  4. Validation of PEP-II Resonantly Excited Turn-by-Turn BPM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yiton T.; Cai, Yunhai; Colocho, William.; Decker, Franz-Josef; /SLAC

    2007-06-28

    For optics measurement and modeling of the PEP-II electron (HER) and position (LER) storage rings, we have been doing well with MIA [1] which requires analyzing turn-by-turn Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data that are resonantly excited at the horizontal, vertical, and longitudinal tunes. However, in anticipation that certain BPM buttons and even pins in the PEP-II IR region would be missing for the run starting in January 2007, we had been developing a data validation process to reduce the effect due to the reduced BPM data accuracy on PEP-II optics measurement and modeling. Besides the routine process for ranking BPM noise level through data correlation among BPMs with a singular-value decomposition (SVD), we could also check BPM data symplecticity by comparing the invariant ratios. Results from PEP-II measurement will be presented.

  5. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, A.V.; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  6. Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate ground control is required to georeferenced airborne and spaceborne images. The production of ortho-photogrammetric data requires ground control that is traditionally provided as Ground Control Points (GCPs) by GNSS measurements in the field. However, it can be difficult to acquire accurate ground control points due to required turn-around time, high costs or impossible access. CompassData, Inc. a specialist in ground control, has expanded its service to deliver Remotely Sensed Ground Control Points (RSGCPs®). TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X are two satellites with such high accuracy of their orbital positions and SAR data that RSGCPs® can be produced to a sub-meter quality depending on certain parameters and circumstances. The technology and required parameters are discussed in this paper as well as the resulting accuracies.

  7. Vivid Motor Imagery as an Adaptation Method for Head Turns on a Short-Arm Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newby, N. J.; Mast, F. W.; Natapoff, A.; Paloski, W. H.

    2006-01-01

    Artificial gravity (AG) has been proposed as a potential countermeasure to the debilitating physiological effects of long duration space flight. The most economical means of implementing AG may be through the use of a short-radius (2m or less) centrifuge. For such a device to produce gravitational forces comparable to those on earth requires rotation rates in excess of 20 revolutions per minute (rpm). Head turns made out of the plane of rotation at these rates, as may be necessary if exercise is combined with AG, result in cross-coupled stimuli (CCS) that cause adverse side effects including motion sickness, illusory sensations of motion, and inappropriate eye movements. Recent studies indicate that people can adapt to CCS and reduce these side effects by making multiple head turns during centrifuge sessions conducted over consecutive days. However, about 25% of the volunteers for these studies have difficulty tolerating the CCS adaptation paradigm and often drop out due to motion sickness symptoms. The goal of this investigation was to determine whether vivid motor imagery could be used as a pseudostimulus for adapting subjects to this unique environment. Twenty four healthy human subjects (14 males, 10 females), ranging in age from 21 to 48 years (mean 33, sd 7 years) took part in this study. The experimental stimuli were produced using the NASA JSC short-arm centrifuge (SAC). Subjects were oriented supinely on this device with the nose pointed toward the ceiling and head centered on the axis of rotation. Thus, centrifuge rotation was in the body roll plane. After ramp-up the SAC rotated clockwise at a constant rate of 23 rpm, producing a centrifugal force of approximately 1 g at the feet. Semicircular canal CCS were produced by having subjects make yaw head turns from the nose up (NU) position to the right ear down (RED) position and from RED to NU. Each head turn was completed in about one second, and a 30 second recovery period separated consecutive head

  8. Turn-Initial versus Turn-Final Laughter: Two Techniques for Initiating Remedy in English/Italian Bookshop Service Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gavioli, Laura

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes patterns of laughter in bookshop service encounters in England and Italy. Finds that in the English corpus, laughter is recurrently turn-initial, anticipating an account by the assistant in the same turn, whereas in the Italian corpus it is recurrently turn-final, leaving to the customer the possibility of eliciting an account and/or an…

  9. Extension of the classical classification of β-turns.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2016-01-01

    The functional properties of a protein primarily depend on its three-dimensional (3D) structure. These properties have classically been assigned, visualized and analysed on the basis of protein secondary structures. The β-turn is the third most important secondary structure after helices and β-strands. β-turns have been classified according to the values of the dihedral angles φ and ψ of the central residue. Conventionally, eight different types of β-turns have been defined, whereas those that cannot be defined are classified as type IV β-turns. This classification remains the most widely used. Nonetheless, the miscellaneous type IV β-turns represent 1/3(rd) of β-turn residues. An unsupervised specific clustering approach was designed to search for recurrent new turns in the type IV category. The classical rules of β-turn type assignment were central to the approach. The four most frequently occurring clusters defined the new β-turn types. Unexpectedly, these types, designated IV1, IV2, IV3 and IV4, represent half of the type IV β-turns and occur more frequently than many of the previously established types. These types show convincing particularities, in terms of both structures and sequences that allow for the classical β-turn classification to be extended for the first time in 25 years. PMID:27627963

  10. Extension of the classical classification of β-turns

    PubMed Central

    de Brevern, Alexandre G.

    2016-01-01

    The functional properties of a protein primarily depend on its three-dimensional (3D) structure. These properties have classically been assigned, visualized and analysed on the basis of protein secondary structures. The β-turn is the third most important secondary structure after helices and β-strands. β-turns have been classified according to the values of the dihedral angles φ and ψ of the central residue. Conventionally, eight different types of β-turns have been defined, whereas those that cannot be defined are classified as type IV β-turns. This classification remains the most widely used. Nonetheless, the miscellaneous type IV β-turns represent 1/3rd of β-turn residues. An unsupervised specific clustering approach was designed to search for recurrent new turns in the type IV category. The classical rules of β-turn type assignment were central to the approach. The four most frequently occurring clusters defined the new β-turn types. Unexpectedly, these types, designated IV1, IV2, IV3 and IV4, represent half of the type IV β-turns and occur more frequently than many of the previously established types. These types show convincing particularities, in terms of both structures and sequences that allow for the classical β-turn classification to be extended for the first time in 25 years. PMID:27627963

  11. Extension of the classical classification of β-turns.

    PubMed

    de Brevern, Alexandre G

    2016-09-15

    The functional properties of a protein primarily depend on its three-dimensional (3D) structure. These properties have classically been assigned, visualized and analysed on the basis of protein secondary structures. The β-turn is the third most important secondary structure after helices and β-strands. β-turns have been classified according to the values of the dihedral angles φ and ψ of the central residue. Conventionally, eight different types of β-turns have been defined, whereas those that cannot be defined are classified as type IV β-turns. This classification remains the most widely used. Nonetheless, the miscellaneous type IV β-turns represent 1/3(rd) of β-turn residues. An unsupervised specific clustering approach was designed to search for recurrent new turns in the type IV category. The classical rules of β-turn type assignment were central to the approach. The four most frequently occurring clusters defined the new β-turn types. Unexpectedly, these types, designated IV1, IV2, IV3 and IV4, represent half of the type IV β-turns and occur more frequently than many of the previously established types. These types show convincing particularities, in terms of both structures and sequences that allow for the classical β-turn classification to be extended for the first time in 25 years.

  12. In Vivo Dosimetry of High-Dose-Rate Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Pelvic Region: Use of a Radiophotoluminescence Glass Dosimeter for Measurement of 1004 Points in 66 Patients With Pelvic Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Nose, Takayuki Koizumi, Masahiko; Yoshida, Ken; Nishiyama, Kinji; Sasaki, Junichi; Ohnishi, Takeshi; Kozuka, Takuyo; Gomi, Kotaro; Oguchi, Masahiko; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ito, Akira; Yamashita, Takashi

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To perform the largest in vivo dosimetry study for interstitial brachytherapy yet to be undertaken using a new radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD) in patients with pelvic malignancy and to study the limits of contemporary planning software based on the results. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six patients with pelvic malignancy were treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy, including prostate (n = 26), gynecological (n = 35), and miscellaneous (n = 5). Doses for a total of 1004 points were measured by RPLGDs and calculated with planning software in the following locations: rectum (n = 549), urethra (n = 415), vagina (n = 25), and perineum (n = 15). Compatibility (measured dose/calculated dose) was analyzed according to dosimeter location. Results: The compatibility for all dosimeters was 0.98 {+-} 0.23, stratified by location: rectum, 0.99 {+-} 0.20; urethra, 0.96 {+-} 0.26; vagina, 0.91 {+-} 0.08; and perineum, 1.25 {+-} 0.32. Conclusions: Deviations between measured and calculated doses for the rectum and urethra were greater than 20%, which is attributable to the independent movements of these organs and the applicators. Missing corrections for inhomogeneity are responsible for the 9% negative shift near the vaginal cylinder (specific gravity = 1.24), whereas neglect of transit dose contributes to the 25% positive shift in the perineal dose. Dose deviation of >20% for nontarget organs should be taken into account in the planning process. Further development of planning software and a real-time dosimetry system are necessary to use the current findings and to achieve adaptive dose delivery.

  13. Influence of body morphology on turning behavior in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Eilam, D

    1994-03-01

    The present work illustrates how three carnivore species with different body morphologies differ in the performance of a basic motor component-turning. Marbled polecats, which have an elongated and slender trunk, turn while sharply bending the trunk laterally. Grey wolves possess elongated legs and turn by maneuvering with their legs while slightly bending the trunk laterally and lowering the head to contact the ground. Honey badgers feature a wide and massive bear-like shape and rarely bend the trunk, but rather turn either by maneuvering with their legs or while elevating parts of the trunk in the vertical domain. It is suggested that these strategies shorten the radius of turning and thus reduce the moment of inertia. A lower moment of inertia may optimize turning behavior in terms of speed, energy cost, and the smoothness of transition between turning and bouts of forward progression or arrest. PMID:15757828

  14. Influence of body morphology on turning behavior in carnivores.

    PubMed

    Eilam, D

    1994-03-01

    The present work illustrates how three carnivore species with different body morphologies differ in the performance of a basic motor component-turning. Marbled polecats, which have an elongated and slender trunk, turn while sharply bending the trunk laterally. Grey wolves possess elongated legs and turn by maneuvering with their legs while slightly bending the trunk laterally and lowering the head to contact the ground. Honey badgers feature a wide and massive bear-like shape and rarely bend the trunk, but rather turn either by maneuvering with their legs or while elevating parts of the trunk in the vertical domain. It is suggested that these strategies shorten the radius of turning and thus reduce the moment of inertia. A lower moment of inertia may optimize turning behavior in terms of speed, energy cost, and the smoothness of transition between turning and bouts of forward progression or arrest.

  15. Effect of Furniture Weight on Carrying, Lifting, and Turning of Chairs and Desks among Elementary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Funatsu, Kyotaro; Xiong, Jinghong; Rosyidi, Cucuk Nur

    2015-01-01

    Rearranging furniture in elementary school classrooms encourages classroom activities. In elementary schools in Indonesia and some other developing countries, usually only one style of furniture is used for all children, and the furniture is heavy and oversized for younger children. This affects their ability to carry it. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of elementary school furniture weight and children’s age on performance of three carrying tasks (carrying a chair, lifting and turning a chair on a desk, and carrying both a chair and a desk together), from the ergonomics point of view. A total of 42 schoolchildren (ages 6–9; 17 Indonesian, 25 Japanese) participated in this study. Two types of Japanese chairs (Chair A and B, weight: 3.2 kg and 3.9 kg), one type of Indonesian chair (Chair C, weight: 5.0 kg), and two types of desks (height: 58 cm and 68 cm) were used. Indonesian chairs took significantly longer time to carry than the two Japanese chairs, and there was a significant negative relationship between age and task time for Chairs B and C, but not Chair A. Success rates for lifting and turning the chair declined as age decreased and chair weight increased, but were not significantly influenced by desk height. Success rates for carrying a chair and desk together significantly decreased with heavier furniture. Children aged six showed an extremely low success rate in almost all conditions. In conclusion, children’s ability to carry furniture is affected by their age and furniture characteristics, especially weight. In order to encourage classroom activities in elementary school, school furniture should be of appropriate weight. Supervision for younger children is required during classroom furniture arrangement. PMID:26053154

  16. Effect of Furniture Weight on Carrying, Lifting, and Turning of Chairs and Desks among Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Purwaningrum, Lu'lu'; Funatsu, Kyotaro; Xiong, Jinghong; Rosyidi, Cucuk Nur; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Rearranging furniture in elementary school classrooms encourages classroom activities. In elementary schools in Indonesia and some other developing countries, usually only one style of furniture is used for all children, and the furniture is heavy and oversized for younger children. This affects their ability to carry it. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of elementary school furniture weight and children's age on performance of three carrying tasks (carrying a chair, lifting and turning a chair on a desk, and carrying both a chair and a desk together), from the ergonomics point of view. A total of 42 schoolchildren (ages 6-9; 17 Indonesian, 25 Japanese) participated in this study. Two types of Japanese chairs (Chair A and B, weight: 3.2 kg and 3.9 kg), one type of Indonesian chair (Chair C, weight: 5.0 kg), and two types of desks (height: 58 cm and 68 cm) were used. Indonesian chairs took significantly longer time to carry than the two Japanese chairs, and there was a significant negative relationship between age and task time for Chairs B and C, but not Chair A. Success rates for lifting and turning the chair declined as age decreased and chair weight increased, but were not significantly influenced by desk height. Success rates for carrying a chair and desk together significantly decreased with heavier furniture. Children aged six showed an extremely low success rate in almost all conditions. In conclusion, children's ability to carry furniture is affected by their age and furniture characteristics, especially weight. In order to encourage classroom activities in elementary school, school furniture should be of appropriate weight. Supervision for younger children is required during classroom furniture arrangement.

  17. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips

    PubMed Central

    Leliaert, Jonathan; Van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-01-01

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media. PMID:26843125

  18. Crack Turning Mechanics of Composite Wing Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.; Reeder, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The safety of future composite wing skin integral stiffener panels requires a full understanding of failure mechanisms of these damage tolerance critical structures under both in-plane and bending loads. Of primary interest is to derive mathematical models using fracture mechanics in anisotropic cracked plate structures, to assess the crack turning mechanisms, and thereby to enhance the residual strength in the integral stiffener composite structures. The use of fracture mechanics to assess the failure behavior in a cracked structure requires the identification of critical fracture parameters which govern the severity of stress and deformation field ahead of the flaw, and which can be evaluated using information obtained from the flaw tip. In the three-year grant, the crack-tip fields under plane deformation, crack-tip fields for anisotropic plates and anisotropic shells have been obtained. In addition, methods for determining the stress intensity factors, energy release rate, and the T-stresses have been proposed and verified. The research accomplishments can be summarized as follows: (1) Under plane deformation in anisotropic solids, the asymptotic crack-tip fields have been obtained using Stroh formalism; (2) The T-stress and the coefficient of the second term for sigma(sub y), g(sub 32), have been obtained using path-independent integral, the J-integral and Betti's reciprocal theorem together with auxiliary fields; (3) With experimental data performed by NASA, analyses indicated that the mode-I critical stress intensity factor K(sub Q) provides a satisfactory characterization of fracture initiation for a given laminate thickness, provided the failure is fiber-dominated and crack extends in a self-similar manner; (4) The high constraint specimens, especially for CT specimens, due to large T-stress and large magnitude of negative g(sub 32) term may be expected to inhibit the crack extension in the same plane and promote crack turning; (5) Crack turning out of

  19. Design and fabrication of a diamond-turned hybrid diffractive/refractive singlet for visible applications at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.

    1995-02-01

    Hybrid diffractive/refractive optics can be fabricated using traditional lithographic methods involving masks or holographic techniques as well as direct-write approaches that include electron-beam lithography, single-point diamond turning, and laser beam lithography. Only the direct-write methods have proven to be practical in producing continuous-form diffractive surfaces, or kinoforms, and among these methods, only diamond turning can easily produce large kinoforms on curved base surfaces. In this paper, we describe design and fabrication issues for a hybrid singlet produced by single-point diamond turning that functions in the visible portion of the spectrum and takes advantage of all of the degrees of freedom available from diamond turning: aspheric front surface to control spherical aberration, curved rear surface for elimination of coma, and kinoform surface placed on either curved base surface for control of primary chromatic aberration.

  20. Plasticity of the RNA Kink Turn Structural Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, A.; Cochrane, J; Lipchock, S; Strobel, S

    2010-01-01

    The kink turn (K-turn) is an RNA structural motif found in many biologically significant RNAs. While most examples of the K-turn have a similar fold, the crystal structure of the Azoarcus group I intron revealed a novel RNA conformation, a reverse kink turn bent in the direction opposite that of a consensus K-turn. The reverse K-turn is bent toward the major grooves rather than the minor grooves of the flanking helices, yet the sequence differs from the K-turn consensus by only a single nucleotide. Here we demonstrate that the reverse bend direction is not solely defined by internal sequence elements, but is instead affected by structural elements external to the K-turn. It bends toward the major groove under the direction of a tetraloop-tetraloop receptor. The ability of one sequence to form two distinct structures demonstrates the inherent plasticity of the K-turn sequence. Such plasticity suggests that the K-turn is not a primary element in RNA folding, but instead is shaped by other structural elements within the RNA or ribonucleoprotein assembly.

  1. Complement in disease: a defence system turning offensive.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Daniel; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2016-07-01

    Although the complement system is primarily perceived as a host defence system, a more versatile, yet potentially more harmful side of this innate immune pathway as an inflammatory mediator also exists. The activities that define the ability of the complement system to control microbial threats and eliminate cellular debris - such as sensing molecular danger patterns, generating immediate effectors, and extensively coordinating with other defence pathways - can quickly turn complement from a defence system to an aggressor that drives immune and inflammatory diseases. These host-offensive actions become more pronounced with age and are exacerbated by a variety of genetic factors and autoimmune responses. Complement can also be activated inappropriately, for example in response to biomaterials or transplants. A wealth of research over the past two decades has led to an increasingly finely tuned understanding of complement activation, identified tipping points between physiological and pathological behaviour, and revealed avenues for therapeutic intervention. This Review summarizes our current view of the key activating, regulatory, and effector mechanisms of the complement system, highlighting important crosstalk connections, and, with an emphasis on kidney disease and transplantation, discusses the involvement of complement in clinical conditions and promising therapeutic approaches.

  2. Sonography in Hypotension and Cardiac Arrest (SHoC): Rates of Abnormal Findings in Undifferentiated Hypotension and During Cardiac Arrest as a Basis for Consensus on a Hierarchical Point of Care Ultrasound Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Milne, James; Lewis, David; Fraser, Jacqueline; Diegelmann, Laura; Olszynski, Paul; Stander, Melanie; Lamprecht, Hein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) has become an established tool in the initial management of patients with undifferentiated hypotension. Current established protocols (RUSH and ACES) were developed by expert user opinion, rather than objective, prospective data. PoCUS also provides invaluable information during resuscitation efforts in cardiac arrest by determining presence/absence of cardiac activity and identifying reversible causes such as pericardial tamponade. There is no agreed guideline on how to safely and effectively incorporate PoCUS into the advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) algorithm. We wished to report disease incidence as a basis to develop a hierarchical approach to PoCUS in hypotension and during cardiac arrest. Methods We summarized the recorded incidence of PoCUS findings from the initial cohort during the interim analysis of two prospective studies. We propose that this will form the basis for developing a modified Delphi approach incorporating this data to obtain the input of a panel of international experts associated with five professional organizations led by the International Federation of Emergency Medicine (IFEM). The modified Delphi tool will be developed to reach an international consensus on how to integrate PoCUS for hypotensive emergency department patients as well as into cardiac arrest algorithms. Results Rates of abnormal PoCUS findings from 151 patients with undifferentiated hypotension included left ventricular dynamic changes (43%), IVC abnormalities (27%), pericardial effusion (16%), and pleural fluid (8%). Abdominal pathology was rare (fluid 5%, AAA 2%). During cardiac arrest there were no pericardial effusions, however abnormalities of ventricular contraction (45%) and valvular motion (39%) were common among the 43 patients included. Conclusions A prospectively collected disease incidence-based hierarchy of scanning can be developed based on the reported findings. This will inform an international consensus

  3. Effects of Right-Turn Vehicles on Traffic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Hua-Yan; Huang, Hai-Jun; Wu, Wen-Xiang

    In real traffic, the right-turn vehicles at intersections are not controlled by signal lights and their effects are neglected. In this paper, we develop a cellular automaton model to formulate the complicated turning behaviors of vehicles at intersections. Simulation results are quite in accord with the observation on the Beijing's 4th ring road. It is found that the right-turn vehicles may produce queue near the intersection, a short lane designed for right-turn has prominent effect in improving traffic flow, but, a too long lane for right-turn cannot further decrease the stop ratio as expected. These findings deepen our understanding on the effects of right-turn vehicles and may help the design and management of intersections.

  4. [Effect of ski tapering on turning radius and stress].

    PubMed

    Mössner, M; Nachbauer, W; Schindelwig, K

    1997-12-01

    The first part of this paper deals with the influence of the side cut on the turn radius, which was examined by measuring the turn radius of a self-running sledge-like construction and by comparing it to Howe's prediction. The turn radius at the beginning of the turn has proved to be between 65 and 85% of the theoretically expected result. In the second part a carvers turn radius was determined and the reaction force acting on the skier was calculated. The result shows a strong reduction of the turn radius along the path which increases the load on the skier. The effect of side cut and velocity on the load was examined. Using carver skis even small changes in velocity resulted in considerable load changes.

  5. Anticipation in turn-taking: mechanisms and information sources

    PubMed Central

    Riest, Carina; Jorschick, Annett B.; de Ruiter, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    During conversations participants alternate smoothly between speaker and hearer roles with only brief pauses and overlaps. There are two competing types of accounts about how conversationalists accomplish this: (a) the signaling approach and (b) the anticipatory (‘projection’) approach. We wanted to investigate, first, the relative merits of these two accounts, and second, the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to the timing of next turn initiation. We performed three button-press experiments using turn fragments taken from natural conversations to address the following questions: (a) Is turn-taking predominantly based on anticipation or on reaction, and (b) what is the relative contribution of semantic and syntactic information to accurate turn-taking. In our first experiment we gradually manipulated the information available for anticipation of the turn end (providing information about the turn end in advance to completely removing linguistic information). The results of our first experiment show that the distribution of the participants’ estimation of turn-endings for natural turns is very similar to the distribution for pure anticipation. We conclude that listeners are indeed able to anticipate a turn-end and that this strategy is predominantly used in turn-taking. In Experiment 2 we collected purely reacted responses. We used the distributions from Experiments 1 and 2 together to estimate a new dependent variable called Reaction Anticipation Proportion. We used this variable in our third experiment where we manipulated the presence vs. absence of semantic and syntactic information by low-pass filtering open-class and closed class words in the turn. The results suggest that for turn-end anticipation, both semantic and syntactic information are needed, but that the semantic information is a more important anticipation cue than syntactic information. PMID:25699004

  6. Automation: Turning mixed cullet into cash

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, R.

    1994-01-01

    Ask any glass processor or recycler about the principal reason prices for their cullet can falter and the second most popular response probably will be material quality.'' No matter how well-educated the customers, no matter how well-trained the line pickers, there are always some unnoticed contaminants that fool the eye and get into the recycling bins, slip past on the conveyor belts, and ruin a load. In addition, glass has the tendency to break -- especially in the growing number of high-compaction co-collection vehicles -- leaving unusable, mixed cullet behind that is difficult and dangerous to sort by had. Most work on automated separation of whole glass containers in this country remains in the research and development stage. So far, this work has had few enthusiastic supporters, and has ground nearly to a halt. Right now, it just doesn't make economic sense.'' With most processors sticking to manual sorting of whole bottles, MSS and several other companies are focusing, instead, of beneficiating nearly marketless mixed broken cullet. From that stream new contaminant-detection technology can pick out bits of unwanted window glass, bottle caps, plastics, labels, ceramics, and porcelain, which have different melting points and can cause impurities and structural weaknesses in recycled glass. Other units can detect colored cullet from clear and automatically eject it. To date, applications of these machines have been limited, but news from field tests in the US and commercial operations in Europe -- considered by many to be the birthplace of automated sorting technology -- is encouraging.

  7. Role of different β-turns in β-hairpin conformation and stability studied by optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; McElheny, Dan; Setnicka, Vladimír; Hilario, Jovencio; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    Model β-hairpin peptides based on variations in the turn sequence of Cochran's tryptophan zipper peptide, SWTWENGKWTWK, were studied using electronic circular dichroism (ECD), fluorescence, and infrared (IR) spectroscopies. The trpzip2 Asn-Gly turn sequence was substituted with Thr-Gly, Aib-Gly, (D)Pro-Gly, and Gly-Asn (trpzip1) to study the impact of turn stability on β-hairpin formation. Stability and conformational changes of these hairpins were monitored by thermodynamic analyses of the temperature variation of both FTIR (amide I') and ECD spectral intensities. These changes were fit to a two-state model which yielded different T(m) values, representing the folding/unfolding process, for hairpins with different β-turns. Different β-turns show systematic contributions to hairpin structure formation, and their inclusion in hairpin design can modify the folding pathways. Aib-Gly or (D)Pro-Gly sequences stabilize the turn resulting in residual Trp-Trp interaction at high temperatures, but at the same time the β-structure (cross strand H-bonds) can become less stable due to constraints of the turn, as seen for (D)Pro-Gly. The structure of the Aib-Gly turn containing hairpin was determined by NMR and was shown to be like trpzip2 (Asn-Gly turn) as regards turn and strand geometries, but to differ from trpzip1 (Gly-Asn turn). The Munoz and Eaton statistical mechanically derived multistate model, tested as an alternate point of view, represented contributions from H-bonds and hydrophobic interactions as well as conformational change as interdependent. Use of different spectral methods that vary in dependence on these physical interactions along with the structural variations provided insight to the complex folding pathways of these small, well-folded peptides.

  8. Crack Turning and Arrest Mechanisms for Integral Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettit, Richard; Ingraffea, Anthony

    1999-01-01

    In the course of several years of research efforts to predict crack turning and flapping in aircraft fuselage structures and other problems related to crack turning, the 2nd order maximum tangential stress theory has been identified as the theory most capable of predicting the observed test results. This theory requires knowledge of a material specific characteristic length, and also a computation of the stress intensity factors and the T-stress, or second order term in the asymptotic stress field in the vicinity of the crack tip. A characteristic length, r(sub c), is proposed for ductile materials pertaining to the onset of plastic instability, as opposed to the void spacing theories espoused by previous investigators. For the plane stress case, an approximate estimate of r(sub c), is obtained from the asymptotic field for strain hardening materials given by Hutchinson, Rice and Rosengren (HRR). A previous study using of high order finite element methods to calculate T-stresses by contour integrals resulted in extremely high accuracy values obtained for selected test specimen geometries, and a theoretical error estimation parameter was defined. In the present study, it is shown that a large portion of the error in finite element computations of both K and T are systematic, and can be corrected after the initial solution if the finite element implementation utilizes a similar crack tip discretization scheme for all problems. This scheme is applied for two-dimensional problems to a both a p-version finite element code, showing that sufficiently accurate values of both K(sub I) and T can be obtained with fairly low order elements if correction is used. T-stress correction coefficients are also developed for the singular crack tip rosette utilized in the adaptive mesh finite element code FRANC2D, and shown to reduce the error in the computed T-stress significantly. Stress intensity factor correction was not attempted for FRANC2D because it employs a highly accurate

  9. Turning the tables: language and spatial reasoning.

    PubMed

    Li, Peggy; Gleitman, Lila

    2002-04-01

    This paper investigates possible influences of the lexical resources of individual languages on the spatial organization and reasoning styles of their users. That there are such powerful and pervasive influences of language on thought is the thesis of the Whorf-Sapir linguistic relativity hypothesis which, after a lengthy period in intellectual limbo, has recently returned to prominence in the anthropological, linguistic, and psycholinguistic literatures. Our point of departure is an influential group of cross-linguistic studies that appear to show that spatial reasoning is strongly affected by the spatial lexicon in everyday use in a community (e.g. Brown, P., & Levinson, S. C. (1993). Linguistic and nonlinguistic coding of spatial arrays: explorations in Mayan cognition (Working Paper No. 24). Nijmegen: Cognitive Anthropology Research Group, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics; Cognitive Linguistics 6 (1995) 33). Specifically, certain groups customarily use an externally referenced spatial-coordinate system to refer to nearby directions and positions ("to the north") whereas English speakers usually employ a viewer-perspective system ("to the left"). Prior findings and interpretations have been to the effect that users of these two types of spatial system solve rotation problems in different ways, reasoning strategies imposed by habitual use of the language-particular lexicons themselves. The present studies reproduce these different problem-solving strategies in speakers of a single language (English) by manipulating landmark cues, suggesting that language itself may not be the key causal factor in choice of spatial perspective. Prior evidence on rotation problem solution from infants (e.g. Acredolo, L.P. (1979). Laboratory versus home: the effect of environment on the 9-month-old infant's choice of spatial reference system. Developmental Psychology, 15 (6), 666-667) and from laboratory animals (e.g. Restle, F. (1975). Discrimination of cues in mazes: a

  10. Atomic migration of carbon in hard turned layers of carburized bearing steel

    DOE PAGES

    Bedekar, Vikram; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei; Shivpuri, Rajiv; Scott Hyde, R.

    2016-01-01

    In grain finement and non-equilibrium there is carbon segregation within grain boundaries alters the mechanical performance of hard turning layers in carburized bearing steel. Moreover, an atom probe tomography (APT) study on the nanostructured hard turning layers reveals carbon migration to grain boundaries as a result of carbide decomposition during severe plastic deformation. In addition, samples exposed to different cutting speeds show that the carbon migration rate increases with the cutting speed. For these two effects lead to an ultrafine carbon network structure resulting in increased hardness and thermal stability in the severely deformed surface layer.

  11. Dose-volume histogram parameters of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4cm) arising from a small-sized uterus treated with a point A dose-reduced plan.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Noda, Shin-ei; Kubo, Nobuteru; Kuwako, Keiko; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the rectal dose-sparing effect and tumor control of a point A dose-reduced plan in patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) arising from a small-sized uterus. Between October 2008 and August 2011, 19 patients with Stage I-II cervical cancer (≤4 cm) were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for the pelvis and CT-guided brachytherapy. Seven patients were treated with brachytherapy with standard loading of source-dwell positions and a fraction dose of 6 Gy at point A (conventional brachy-plan). The other 12 patients with a small uterus close to the rectum or small intestine were treated with brachytherapy with a point A dose-reduction to match D2cc of the rectum and <6 Gy as the dose constraint ('point A dose-reduced plan') instead of the 6-Gy plan at point A ('tentative 6-Gy plan'). The total doses from EBRT and brachytherapy were added up and normalized to a biological equivalent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2). The median doses to the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) D90 in the conventional brachy-plan, tentative 6-Gy plan and point A dose-reduced plan were 62 GyEQD2, 80 GyEQD2 and 64 GyEQD2, respectively. The median doses of rectal D2cc in the corresponding three plans were 42 GyEQD2, 62 GyEQD2 and 51 GyEQD2, respectively. With a median follow-up period of 35 months, three patients developed Grade-1 late rectal complications and no patients developed local recurrence. Our preliminary results suggested that CT-guided brachytherapy using an individualized point A dose-reduced plan might be useful for reducing late rectal complications while maintaining primary tumor control.

  12. Optimization of process parameters in CNC turning of aluminium alloy using hybrid RSM cum TLBO approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudrapati, R.; Sahoo, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.

    2016-09-01

    The main aim of the present work is to analyse the significance of turning parameters on surface roughness in computer numerically controlled (CNC) turning operation while machining of aluminium alloy material. Spindle speed, feed rate and depth of cut have been considered as machining parameters. Experimental runs have been conducted as per Box-Behnken design method. After experimentation, surface roughness is measured by using stylus profile meter. Factor effects have been studied through analysis of variance. Mathematical modelling has been done by response surface methodology, to made relationships between the input parameters and output response. Finally, process optimization has been made by teaching learning based optimization (TLBO) algorithm. Predicted turning condition has been validated through confirmatory experiment.

  13. Case Study Using Ultrasound to Treat /[turned r]/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modha, Geetanjalee; Bernhardt, B. May; Church, Robyn; Bacsfalvi, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    Background: Ultrasound has shown promise as visual feedback in remediation of /[turned r]/.Aims: To compare treatment for [turned r] with and without ultrasound.Methods & Procedures: A Canadian English-speaking adolescent participated in a case study with a no treatment baseline, alternating treatment blocks with and without ultrasound and a final…

  14. Compensatory mechanisms of transtibial amputees during circular turning.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Jessica D; Segal, Ava D; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2011-07-01

    Turning plays a prominent role in daily living activities and requires the modulation of the ground reaction forces to accelerate the body's center-of-mass along the path of the turn. With the ankle plantarflexors being prominent contributors to the propulsive ground reaction forces, it is not clear how transtibial amputees perform turning tasks without these important muscles. The purpose of this study was to identify the compensatory mechanisms used by transtibial amputees during a simple turning task by analyzing the radial and anterior-posterior ground reaction impulses and sagittal, transverse and coronal joint work of the residual and intact legs. These quantities were analyzed with the residual leg on both the inside and outside of the turn and compared to non-amputees. The analysis showed that amputees and non-amputees use different joint strategies to turn. Amputees rely primarily on sagittal plane hip joint work to turn while non-amputees rely primarily on ankle work in the sagittal plane and hip joint work in the coronal plane. Differences in strategies are most likely due to the minimal power output provided by the passive prosthetic feet used by amputees and perhaps a desire to minimize the risk of falling. Understanding these differences in turning strategies will aid in developing effective rehabilitation therapies and prosthetic devices that improve amputee mobility.

  15. Turn and Control in Puerto Rican Spanish Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Paul

    An investigation of Puerto Rican Spanish conversational strategies involved analysis of recorded conversations for the amount of simultaneous speech, its context, and the turn-taking used. Overlapping and interruption were distinguished from cooperative (supportive) simultaneity of speech, and a "turn" was defined as a recognized utterance. The…

  16. High explosive corner turning performance and the LANL mushroom test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Forest, C.A.; Harry, H.H.

    1998-07-01

    The Mushroom test is designed to characterize the corner turning performance of a new generation of less sensitive booster explosives. The test is described in detail, and three corner turning figures-of-merit are examined using pure TATB (both Livermore{close_quote}s Ultrafine and a Los Alamos research blend) and PBX9504 as examples. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. High explosive corner turning performance and the LANL Mushroom test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Forest, C.A.; Harry, H.H.

    1997-09-01

    The Mushroom test is designed to characterize the corner turning performance of a new generation of less insensitive booster explosives. The test is described in detail, and three corner turning figures-of-merit are examined using pure TATB (both Livermore`s Ultrafine and a Los Alamos research blend) and PBX9504 as examples.

  18. Human Rights Education and the Post Secular Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowie, Bob

    2012-01-01

    This article questions whether human rights education (HRE) scholarship is responding adequately to the post secular turn in thinking about the place and nature of religion in society. Here the post secular turn is used to describe the discrediting of secularisation theory, the recognition of religion as an enduring and pervasive global cultural…

  19. Interaction of the body, head, and eyes during walking and turning.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Moore, S T; Raphan, T; Cohen, B

    2001-01-01

    Body, head, and eye movements were measured in five subjects during straight walking and while turning corners. The purpose was to determine how well the head and eyes followed the linear trajectory of the body in space and whether head orientation followed changes in the gravito-inertial acceleration vector (GIA). Head and body movements were measured with a video-based motion analysis system and horizontal, vertical, and torsional eye movements with video-oculography. During straight walking, there was lateral body motion at the stride frequency, which was at half the frequency of stepping. The GIA oscillated about the direction of heading, according to the acceleration and deceleration associated with heel strike and toe flexion, and the body yawed in concert with stepping. Despite the linear and rotatory motions of the head and body, the head pointed along the forward motion of the body during straight walking. The head pitch/roll component appeared to compensate for vertical and horizontal acceleration of the head rather than orienting to the tilt of the GIA or anticipating it. When turning corners, subjects walked on a 50-cm radius over two steps or on a 200-cm radius in five to seven steps. Maximum centripetal accelerations in sharp turns were ca.0.4 g, which tilted the GIA ca.21 degrees with regard to the heading. This was anticipated by a roll tilt of the head of up to 8 degrees. The eyes rolled 1-1.5 degrees and moved down into the direction of linear acceleration during the tilts of the GIA. Yaw head deviations moved smoothly through the turn, anticipating the shift in lateral body trajectory by as much as 25 degrees. The trunk did not anticipate the change in trajectory. Thus, in contrast to straight walking, the tilt axes of the head and the GIA tended to align during turns. Gaze was stable in space during the slow phases and jumped forward in saccades along the trajectory, leading it by larger angles when the angular velocity of turning was greater

  20. An azobenzene photoswitch sheds light on turn nucleation in amyloid-β self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Doran, Todd M; Anderson, Elizabeth A; Latchney, Sarah E; Opanashuk, Lisa A; Nilsson, Bradley L

    2012-03-21

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) self-assembly into cross-β amyloid fibrils is implicated in a causative role in Alzheimer's disease pathology. Uncertainties persist regarding the mechanisms of amyloid self-assembly and the role of metastable prefibrillar aggregates. Aβ fibrils feature a sheet-turn-sheet motif in the constituent β-strands; as such, turn nucleation has been proposed as a rate-limiting step in the self-assembly pathway. Herein, we report the use of an azobenzene β-hairpin mimetic to study the role turn nucleation plays on Aβ self-assembly. [3-(3-Aminomethyl)phenylazo]phenylacetic acid (AMPP) was incorporated into the putative turn region of Aβ42 to elicit temporal control over Aβ42 turn nucleation; it was hypothesized that self-assembly would be favored in the cis-AMPP conformation if β-hairpin formation occurs during Aβ self-assembly and that the trans-AMPP conformer would display attenuated fibrillization propensity. It was unexpectedly observed that the trans-AMPP Aβ42 conformer forms fibrillar constructs that are similar in almost all characteristics, including cytotoxicity, to wild-type Aβ42. Conversely, the cis-AMPP Aβ42 congeners formed nonfibrillar, amorphous aggregates that exhibited no cytotoxicity. Additionally, cis-trans photoisomerization resulted in rapid formation of native-like amyloid fibrils and trans-cis conversion in the fibril state reduced the population of native-like fibrils. Thus, temporal photocontrol over Aβ turn conformation provides significant insight into Aβ self-assembly. Specifically, Aβ mutants that adopt stable β-turns form aggregate structures that are unable to enter folding pathways leading to cross-β fibrils and cytotoxic prefibrillar intermediates.

  1. Experience sharing, emotional reciprocity, and turn-taking

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Melisa; Peräkylä, Anssi

    2015-01-01

    In this perspective article, we consider the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking. There is much evidence suggesting that human social interaction is permeated by two temporal organizations: (1) the sequential framework of turn-taking and (2) the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity. From this perspective, we introduce two alternative hypotheses about how the relationship between experience sharing and turn-taking could be viewed. According to the first hypothesis, the home environment of experience sharing is in the concurrent framework of emotional reciprocity, while the motivation to share experiences is in tension with the sequential framework of turn-taking. According to the second hypothesis, people’s inclination to coordinate their actions in terms of turn-taking is motivated precisely by their propensity to share experiences. We consider theoretical and empirical ideas in favor of both of these hypotheses and discuss their implications for future research. PMID:25926811

  2. Turn costs change the value of animal search paths.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R P; Griffiths, I W; Legg, P A; Friswell, M I; Bidder, O R; Halsey, L G; Lambertucci, S A; Shepard, E L C

    2013-09-01

    The tortuosity of the track taken by an animal searching for food profoundly affects search efficiency, which should be optimised to maximise net energy gain. Models examining this generally describe movement as a series of straight steps interspaced by turns, and implicitly assume no turn costs. We used both empirical- and modelling-based approaches to show that the energetic costs for turns in both terrestrial and aerial locomotion are substantial, which calls into question the value of conventional movement models such as correlated random walk or Lévy walk for assessing optimum path types. We show how, because straight-line travel is energetically most efficient, search strategies should favour constrained turn angles, with uninformed foragers continuing in straight lines unless the potential benefits of turning offset the cost.

  3. Turn-by-Turn and Bunch-by-Bunch Transverse Profiles of a Single Bunch in a Full Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, R.; Fisher, A.S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The apparatus described in this paper can image the evolution of the transverse profile of a single bunch, isolated from a full PEP-II ring of 1500 bunches. Using this apparatus there are two methods of single bunch imaging; bunch-by-bunch beam profiling can image every bunch in the ring a single bunch at a time with the images of sequential bunches being in order, allowing one to see variations in beam size along a train. Turn-by-turn beam profiling images a single bunch on each successive turn it makes around the ring. This method will be useful in determining the effect that an injected bunch has on a stable bunch as the oscillations of the injected bunch damp out. Turn-by-turn imaging of the synchrotron light uses a system of lenses and mirrors to image many turns of both the major and minor axis of a single bunch across the photocathode of a gateable camera. The bunch-by-bunch method is simpler: because of a focusing mirror used in porting the light from the ring, the synchrotron light from the orbiting electrons becomes an image at a certain distance from the mirror; and since the camera does not use a lens, the photocathode is set exactly at this image distance. Bunch-by-bunch profiling has shown that in the Low Energy Ring (LER) horizontal bunch size decreases along a train. Turn-by-turn profiling has been able to image 100 turns of a single bunch on one exposure of the camera. The turn-by-turn setup has also been able to image 50 turns of the minor axis showing part of the damping process of an oscillating injected charge during a LER fill. The goal is to image the damping of oscillations of injected charge for 100 turns of both the major and minor axis throughout the damping process during trickle injection. With some changes to the apparatus this goal is within reach and will make turn-by-turn imaging a very useful tool in beam diagnostics.

  4. β-Turn sequences promote stability of peptide substrates for kinases within the cytosolic environment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Proctor, Angela; Cline, Lauren L; Houston, Kaiulani M; Waters, Marcey L; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2013-08-01

    A strategy was developed to extend the lifetime of an peptide-based substrate for Abl kinase in the cytosolic environment. Small β-turn structures were added to the peptide's N-terminus to block entry into peptidase catalytic sites. The influence of the size of the β-turn and two covalent cross-linking strategies on the rate of hydrolysis was assessed. The most peptidase-resistant substrate was degraded at a rate of 0.6 pmol mg(-1) s(-1) and possessed a half-life of 20.3 ± 1.7 min in a Baf/BCR-ABL cytosolic lysate, representing 16- and 40-fold improvements, respectively, over that of a control peptide lacking the β-turn structure. Furthermore, the kcat/KM value of this peptide was 432 μM(-1) min(-1), a 1.25× increase over the unmodified control, verifying that the added β-turn did not hinder the substrate properties of the peptide. This improved peptide was microinjected into single Baf/BCR-ABL cells and substrate phosphorylation measured. Zero to forty percent of the peptide was phosphorylated in the single cells. In contrast, when the control peptide without a β-turn was loaded into cells, the peptide was too rapidly degraded to detect phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that small β-turn structures can render peptides more resistant to hydrolysis while retaining substrate efficacy and shows that these stabilized peptides have the potential to be of high utility in single-cell enzyme assays.

  5. Influence of bus stop with left-turn lines between two adjacent signalized intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ming-Bao; Ye, Lan-Hang; Pei, Ya-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Based on the symmetric two-lane Nagel-Schreckenberg (STNS) model, a three-lane cellular automaton model between two intersections containing a bus stop with left-turning buses is established in which model the occurrences of vehicle accidents are taken into account. The characteristics of traffic flows with different ratios of left-turn lines are discussed via the simulation experiments. The results indicate that the left-turn lines have more negative effects on capacity, accident rate as well as delay if the stop is located close to the intersections, where the negative effect in a near-side stop is more severe than that in a far-side one. The range of appropriate position for a bus stop without the bottleneck effect becomes more and more narrow with the increase of the ratio of left-turn bus lines. When the inflow is small, a short signal cycle and a reasonable offset are beneficial. When the inflow reaches or exceeds the capacity, a longer signal cycle is helpful. But if the stop position is inappropriate, the increase of cycle fails in reducing the negative effect of left-turning buses and the effectiveness of offset is weakened. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50478088) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2015202266).

  6. Influence of bus stop with left-turn lines between two adjacent signalized intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ming-Bao; Ye, Lan-Hang; Pei, Ya-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Based on the symmetric two-lane Nagel–Schreckenberg (STNS) model, a three-lane cellular automaton model between two intersections containing a bus stop with left-turning buses is established in which model the occurrences of vehicle accidents are taken into account. The characteristics of traffic flows with different ratios of left-turn lines are discussed via the simulation experiments. The results indicate that the left-turn lines have more negative effects on capacity, accident rate as well as delay if the stop is located close to the intersections, where the negative effect in a near-side stop is more severe than that in a far-side one. The range of appropriate position for a bus stop without the bottleneck effect becomes more and more narrow with the increase of the ratio of left-turn bus lines. When the inflow is small, a short signal cycle and a reasonable offset are beneficial. When the inflow reaches or exceeds the capacity, a longer signal cycle is helpful. But if the stop position is inappropriate, the increase of cycle fails in reducing the negative effect of left-turning buses and the effectiveness of offset is weakened. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50478088) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2015202266).

  7. Misalignment of the Desired and Measured Center of Pressure Describes Falls Caused by Slip during Turning

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Hironari; Onodera, Hiroshi; Hokkirigawa, Kazuo; Masani, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, desired center of pressure (dCOP) was introduced to evaluate dynamic postural stability. The dCOP is defined as a virtual point on the ground, where the moment around the body center of mass (COM) becomes zero when dCOP and the measured COP (mCOP) coincide. We hypothesized that, when the misalignment of the dCOP and mCOP (dCOP-mCOP) increases up to a certain value due to a large perturbation during walking, it becomes difficult to make a compensatory step and to recover balance of COM and to continue gait. Here we tested this hypothesis in slipping during turning. The study involved twelve healthy young adult males with an average age of 21.5±1.9 yrs. The subjects were asked to (1) walk straight and turn 60 degrees to the right with the right foot (spin turn) on a dry floor surface, and (2) walk straight and 60 degrees spin turn to the right on a slippery lubricated surface. The dCOP-mCOP during turning in the slip trial with fall were significantly larger, particularly in x-direction (i.e., the medial-lateral direction during straight walk), than that in no-slip trial and slip trial without fall. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that the dCOP-mCOP in x-direction is good indicator of falling (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.93) and the threshold in the dCOP-mCOP in x-direction to distinguish for fall or no-fall was 0.55 m. These results support our hypothesis in slipping during turning. PMID:27166954

  8. Measurement and Comparison of Taekwondo and Yongmudo Turning Kick Impact Force for Two Target Heights

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, David; Chung, Chulsoo; Lee, Kikwang; Kim, Euihwan; Kang, Sungchul; Kim, Taewhan; Shin, Insik

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to compare the impact characteristics of Taekwondo (TKD) and Yongmudo (YMD) player’s turning kick according to the target height. 5 highly skilled YMD and 5 TKD players participated in this study. To measure the impact force, two accelerometers were fixed to a PVC pipe in a sandbag. Each participant performed 10 turning kicks trunk and face height in random order. Only the trial with the most accurate (most central impact) measurement was used in the statistical analysis (p < 0.05).There was a significant difference for impact force according to the target height approximately 6400 ± 898 N, 6393 ± 1382 N for the mid section and 5419 ± 659 N, 5475 ± 1293 N for the high section of TKD and YMD groups, but not between groups. The swing phase for the TKD group was significantly shorter than the YMD group’s. The TKD groups’ recovery phase of the trunk height turning kick was significantly shorter. There was a difference in the players’ center of mass (COM) movement as the TKD players’ moved significantly more forward, suggesting that the TKD players tended to slide towards the target during the execution of the kick. In conclusion, as the turning kick was performed quicker by the TKD players with a similar impact force and more forward motion, it is evaluated to be a better technique of turning kicking. Key Points This impact force measuring device had a significantly smaller standard deviation then that of impact force measuring devices. There was a significant difference between the impact forces according to the height approximately 6400 ± 898N, 6393 ± 1382N for the mid section and 5419 ± 659N, 5475 ± 1293N for the high section of TKD and YMD groups. The turning kick was performed quicker by the TKD players with a similar impact force and more forward motion. PMID:24474880

  9. Melting point, boiling point, and symmetry.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, R; Yalkowsky, S H

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between the melting point of a compound and its chemical structure remains poorly understood. The melting point of a compound can be related to certain of its other physical chemical properties. The boiling point of a compound can be determined from additive constitutive properties, but the melting point can be estimated only with the aid of nonadditive constitutive parameters. The melting point of some non-hydrogen-bonding, rigid compounds can be estimated by the equation MP = 0.772 * BP + 110.8 * SIGMAL + 11.56 * ORTHO + 31.9 * EXPAN - 240.7 where MP is the melting point of the compound in Kelvin, BP is the boiling point, SIGMAL is the logarithm of the symmetry number, EXPAN is the cube of the eccentricity of the compound, and ORTHO indicates the number of groups that are ortho to another group.

  10. BolA Is a Transcriptional Switch That Turns Off Motility and Turns On Biofilm Development

    PubMed Central

    Dressaire, Clémentine; Moreira, Ricardo Neves; Barahona, Susana; Alves de Matos, António Pedro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria are extremely versatile organisms that rapidly adapt to changing environments. When bacterial cells switch from planktonic growth to biofilm, flagellum formation is turned off and the production of fimbriae and extracellular polysaccharides is switched on. BolA is present in most Gram-negative bacteria, and homologues can be found from proteobacteria to eukaryotes. Here, we show that BolA is a new bacterial transcription factor that modulates the switch from a planktonic to a sessile lifestyle. It negatively modulates flagellar biosynthesis and swimming capacity in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, BolA overexpression favors biofilm formation, involving the production of fimbria-like adhesins and curli. Our results also demonstrate that BolA is a protein with high affinity to DNA and is able to regulate many genes on a genome-wide scale. Moreover, we show that the most significant targets of this protein involve a complex network of genes encoding proteins related to biofilm development. Herein, we propose that BolA is a motile/adhesive transcriptional switch, specifically involved in the transition between the planktonic and the attachment stage of biofilm formation. PMID:25691594

  11. Generation of vertical angular momentum in single, double, and triple-turn pirouette en dehors in ballet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jemin; Wilson, Margaret A; Singhal, Kunal; Gamblin, Sarah; Suh, Cha-Young; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical angular momentum generation strategies used by skilled ballet dancers in pirouette en dehors. Select kinematic parameters of the pirouette preparation (stance depth, vertical center-of-mass motion range, initial shoulder line position, shoulder line angular displacement, and maximum trunk twist angle) along with vertical angular momentum parameters during the turn (maximum momentums of the whole body and body parts, and duration and rate of generation) were obtained from nine skilled collegiate ballet dancers through a three-dimensional motion analysis and compared among three turn conditions (single, double, and triple). A one-way ('turn') multivariate analysis of variance of the kinematic parameters and angular momentum parameters of the whole body and a two-way analysis of variance ('turn' × 'body') of the maximum angular momentums of the body parts were conducted. Significant 'turn' effects were observed in the kinematic/angular momentum parameters (both the preparation and the turn) (p <  0.05). As the number of turns increased, skilled dancers generated larger vertical angular momentums by predominantly increasing the rate of momentum generation using rotation of the upper trunk and arms. The trail (closing) arm showed the largest contribution to whole-body angular momentum followed by the lead arm. PMID:25325768

  12. Generation of vertical angular momentum in single, double, and triple-turn pirouette en dehors in ballet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jemin; Wilson, Margaret A; Singhal, Kunal; Gamblin, Sarah; Suh, Cha-Young; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical angular momentum generation strategies used by skilled ballet dancers in pirouette en dehors. Select kinematic parameters of the pirouette preparation (stance depth, vertical center-of-mass motion range, initial shoulder line position, shoulder line angular displacement, and maximum trunk twist angle) along with vertical angular momentum parameters during the turn (maximum momentums of the whole body and body parts, and duration and rate of generation) were obtained from nine skilled collegiate ballet dancers through a three-dimensional motion analysis and compared among three turn conditions (single, double, and triple). A one-way ('turn') multivariate analysis of variance of the kinematic parameters and angular momentum parameters of the whole body and a two-way analysis of variance ('turn' × 'body') of the maximum angular momentums of the body parts were conducted. Significant 'turn' effects were observed in the kinematic/angular momentum parameters (both the preparation and the turn) (p <  0.05). As the number of turns increased, skilled dancers generated larger vertical angular momentums by predominantly increasing the rate of momentum generation using rotation of the upper trunk and arms. The trail (closing) arm showed the largest contribution to whole-body angular momentum followed by the lead arm.

  13. How many hydrogen-bonded α-turns are possible?

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Anette; Schramm, Peter; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg

    2011-06-01

    The formation of α-turns is a possibility to reverse the direction of peptide sequences via five amino acids. In this paper, a systematic conformational analysis was performed to find the possible isolated α-turns with a hydrogen bond between the first and fifth amino acid employing the methods of ab initio MO theory in vacuum (HF/6-31G*, B3LYP/6-311 + G*) and in solution (CPCM/HF/6-31G*). Only few α-turn structures with glycine and alanine backbones fulfill the geometry criteria for the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond satisfactorily. The most stable representatives agree with structures found in the Protein Data Bank. There is a general tendency to form additional hydrogen bonds for smaller pseudocycles corresponding to β- and γ-turns with better hydrogen bond geometries. Sometimes, this competition weakens or even destroys the i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond leading to very stable double β-turn structures. This is also the reason why an "ideal" α-turn with three central amino acids having the perfect backbone angle values of an α-helix could not be localized. There are numerous hints for stable α-turns with a distance between the C(α)-atoms of the first and fifth amino acid smaller than 6-7 Å, but without an i←(i + 4) hydrogen bond. PMID:20842396

  14. U-turn alternative to the large aperture switch

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.

    1994-03-09

    The primary alternative laser architecture is the U-turn design. The U-turn has significantly different cost and performance risks than the full-aperture switch, which makes it a highly desirable alternative. The U-turn was conceived at LLNL in 1992. A similar concept, the L-turn had already been discovered by the French at CEL-V. Both concepts are based on the multipass glass amplifier design, but the full-aperture Pockels cell and polarizer are replaced with smaller and less expensive optics. Eliminating the large switch and polarizer not only reduces component costs, it also provides options for shortening the laser which, in turn, could reduce the size and cost of the laser building. Efficient use of the amplifier aperture (small vignetting allowance) requires that the U-turn have a long transport spatial filter; however, this is not a disadvantage if a long spatial filter is already required for image relaying to the frequency converter. Given a long spatial filter, the U-turn is potentially more efficient because losses in the switch and polarizer are avoided.

  15. Exceptional running and turning performance in a mite.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Samuel; Young, Maria Ho-Yan; Wright, Jonathan C; Whitaker, Dwight L; Ahn, Anna N

    2016-03-01

    The Southern California endemic mite Paratarsotomus macropalpis was filmed in the field on a concrete substrate and in the lab to analyze stride frequency, gait and running speed under different temperature conditions and during turning. At ground temperatures ranging from 45 to 60 °C, mites ran at a mean relative speed of 192.4 ± 2.1 body lengths (BL) s(-1), exceeding the highest previously documented value for a land animal by 12.5%. Stride frequencies were also exceptionally high (up to 135 Hz), and increased with substrate temperature. Juveniles exhibited higher relative speeds than adults and possess proportionally longer legs, which allow for greater relative stride lengths. Although mites accelerated and decelerated rapidly during straight running (7.2 ± 1.2 and -10.1 ± 2.1 m s(-2), respectively), the forces involved were comparable to those found in other animals. Paratarsotomus macropalpis employs an alternating tetrapod gait during steady running. Shallow turns were accomplished by a simple asymmetry in stride length. During tight turns, mites pivoted around the tarsus of the inside third leg (L3), which thus behaved like a grappling hook. Pivot turns were characterized by a 42% decrease in turning radius and a 40% increase in angular velocity compared with non-pivot turns. The joint angle amplitudes of the inner L2 and L3 were negligible during a pivot turn. While exceptional, running speeds in P. macropalpis approximate values predicted from inter-specific scaling relationships.

  16. Exceptional running and turning performance in a mite.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Samuel; Young, Maria Ho-Yan; Wright, Jonathan C; Whitaker, Dwight L; Ahn, Anna N

    2016-03-01

    The Southern California endemic mite Paratarsotomus macropalpis was filmed in the field on a concrete substrate and in the lab to analyze stride frequency, gait and running speed under different temperature conditions and during turning. At ground temperatures ranging from 45 to 60 °C, mites ran at a mean relative speed of 192.4 ± 2.1 body lengths (BL) s(-1), exceeding the highest previously documented value for a land animal by 12.5%. Stride frequencies were also exceptionally high (up to 135 Hz), and increased with substrate temperature. Juveniles exhibited higher relative speeds than adults and possess proportionally longer legs, which allow for greater relative stride lengths. Although mites accelerated and decelerated rapidly during straight running (7.2 ± 1.2 and -10.1 ± 2.1 m s(-2), respectively), the forces involved were comparable to those found in other animals. Paratarsotomus macropalpis employs an alternating tetrapod gait during steady running. Shallow turns were accomplished by a simple asymmetry in stride length. During tight turns, mites pivoted around the tarsus of the inside third leg (L3), which thus behaved like a grappling hook. Pivot turns were characterized by a 42% decrease in turning radius and a 40% increase in angular velocity compared with non-pivot turns. The joint angle amplitudes of the inner L2 and L3 were negligible during a pivot turn. While exceptional, running speeds in P. macropalpis approximate values predicted from inter-specific scaling relationships. PMID:26787481

  17. Example of quality assurance and optimization system for super hard materials turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, R.; Zebala, W.

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces an example of automated intelligent system for super hard materials turning process that works according to a designed algorithm. Main task of the proposed system is to supervise the super hard materials turning process (acronym: ISSSHMT - Intelligent Supervision System of Super Hard Materials Turning) with the maximal metal removal rate Qvmax, the amplitude of natural tool wear and the measurement of values that define the state of the turning process (e.g. magnitude of cutting force, surface quality, temperature in workspace). Based on the measured values it is possible to select the optimal machining parameters (vc, ap, f), for which desired surface quality and dimensional precision can be achieved for the maximal metal removal rate Qvmax. Presented system (ISSSHMT) can be used for any CNC machine - accommodation for workspace and construction of the machine. An example of NC-code program that allows using the data acquired from the ISSSHMT system by a CNC machine control unit is presented. Optimization of the process and cost cutting can be achieved with the usage of proper target functions, for products machined with required precision class.

  18. INCREASING PROTEIN STABILITY BY IMPROVING BETA-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Grimsley, Gerald R.; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick

    2009-01-01

    Our goal was to gain a better understanding of how protein stability can be increased by improving β-turns. We studied 22 β-turns in nine proteins with 66 to 370 residues by replacing other residues with proline and glycine and measuring the stability. These two residues are statistically preferred in some β-turn positions. We studied: Cold shock protein B (CspB), Histidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr), Ubiquitin, Ribonucleases Sa2, Sa3, T1, and HI, Tryptophan synthetase α-subunit (TSα), and Maltose binding protein (MBP). Of the fifteen single proline mutations, 11increased stability (Average = 0.8 ± 0.3; Range = 0.3 – 1.5 kcal/mol), and the stabilizing effect of double proline mutants was additive. Based on this and our previous work, we conclude that proteins can generally be stabilized by replacing non-proline residues with proline residues at the i + 1 position of Type I and II β-turns and at the i position in Type II β-turns. Other turn positions can sometimes be used if the φ angle is near −60° for the residue replaced. It is important that the side chain of the residue replaced is less than 50% buried. Identical substitutions in β-turns in related proteins give similar results. Proline substitutions increase stability mainly by decreasing the entropy of the denatured state. In contrast, the large, diverse group of proteins considered here had almost no residues in β-turns that could be replaced by Gly to increase protein stability. Improving β-turns by substituting Pro residues is a generally useful way of increasing protein stability. PMID:19626709

  19. Is there U-turn from insulin back to pills in diabetes?

    PubMed

    Ertek, Sibel; Cetinkalp, Sevki

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance together with progressive loss of beta-cell function. After recognition of gluco- and lipo-toxicity, attention was focused on the preservation and/or restoration of beta cell function, especially at the early stages of the diabetes, with better beta-cell reserve and in the absence of complications. Early treatment of glucotoxicity with insulin was searched by early insulin treatment studies, and these studies have some promising results, pointing the possibility of "remission" of diabetes in some patients. According to the results of these studies, patients with early diagnosis of diabetes, the ones with better beta cell reserve, patients with low tendency for "insulin-abuse" could make "U"-turn from insulin to pills or even drug-free life. Criteria to turn back to pills could be listed as disappearance of diabetic symptoms, daily insulin need < 0.25 unit/kg, euglycemia in both fasting and postprandial state, and better beta cell function. The main problems in early insulin treatment are the ''insulin resistance'' of both patients and doctors, hypoglycemia, weight gain and increased appetite. Meanwhile, hyperinsulinemia desensitizes receptors and causes worsening of situation in a vicious cycle of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Therefore, patients should be selected properly and U-turn could be performed in relevant conditions explained in the text. It could be possible to see early insulin treatment and U-turn strategies in future guidelines for type 2 diabetes.

  20. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  1. MULTI - MILLION - TURN BEAM POSITION MONITORS FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.CAMERON,P.CERNIGLIA,P.CUPOLO,J.DAWSON,CDEGEN,CMEAD,JVETTER,K

    2003-05-12

    During the RHIC 2003 run, two beam position monitors (BPMs) in each transverse plane in the RHIC blue ring were upgraded with high-capacity mezzanine cards. This upgrade provided these planes with the capability to digitize up to 128 million consecutive turns of RHIC beam, or almost 30 minutes of continuous beam centroid phase space evolution for a single RHIC bunch. This paper describes necessary hardware and software changes and initial system performance. We discuss early uses and results for diagnosis of coherent beam oscillations, turn-by-turn (TBT) acquisition through a RHIC acceleration ramp, and ac-dipole nonlinear dynamics studies.

  2. Influences of semantic and syntactic incongruence on readiness potential in turn-end anticipation.

    PubMed

    Wesselmeier, Hendrik; Jansen, Stefanie; Müller, Horst M

    2014-01-01

    Knowing when it is convenient to take a turn in a conversation is an important task for dialog partners. As it appears that this decision is made before the transition point has been reached, it seems to involve anticipation. There are a variety of studies in the literature that provide possible explanations for turn-end anticipation. This study particularly focuses on how turn-end anticipation relies on syntactic and/or semantic information during utterance processing, as tested with syntactically and semantically violated sentences. With a combination reaction time and EEG experiment, we used the onset latencies of the readiness potential (RP) to uncover possible differences in response preparation. Although the mean anticipation timing accuracy (ATA) values of the behavioral test were all within a similar time range (control sentences: 108 ms, syntactically violated sentences: 93 ms and semantically violated sentences: 116 ms), we found evidence that response preparation is indeed different for syntactically and semantically violated sentences in comparison with control sentences. Our preconscious EEG data, in the form of RP results, indicated a response preparation onset to sentence end interval of 1452 ms in normal sentences, 937 ms in sentences with syntactic violations and 944 ms in sentences with semantic violations. Compared with control sentences, these intervals resulted in a significant RP interruption for both sentence types and indicate an interruption of preconscious response preparation. However, the behavioral response to sentence types occurred at comparable time points. PMID:24904349

  3. Influences of semantic and syntactic incongruence on readiness potential in turn-end anticipation

    PubMed Central

    Wesselmeier, Hendrik; Jansen, Stefanie; Müller, Horst M.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing when it is convenient to take a turn in a conversation is an important task for dialog partners. As it appears that this decision is made before the transition point has been reached, it seems to involve anticipation. There are a variety of studies in the literature that provide possible explanations for turn-end anticipation. This study particularly focuses on how turn-end anticipation relies on syntactic and/or semantic information during utterance processing, as tested with syntactically and semantically violated sentences. With a combination reaction time and EEG experiment, we used the onset latencies of the readiness potential (RP) to uncover possible differences in response preparation. Although the mean anticipation timing accuracy (ATA) values of the behavioral test were all within a similar time range (control sentences: 108 ms, syntactically violated sentences: 93 ms and semantically violated sentences: 116 ms), we found evidence that response preparation is indeed different for syntactically and semantically violated sentences in comparison with control sentences. Our preconscious EEG data, in the form of RP results, indicated a response preparation onset to sentence end interval of 1452 ms in normal sentences, 937 ms in sentences with syntactic violations and 944 ms in sentences with semantic violations. Compared with control sentences, these intervals resulted in a significant RP interruption for both sentence types and indicate an interruption of preconscious response preparation. However, the behavioral response to sentence types occurred at comparable time points. PMID:24904349

  4. Improving the secrecy rate by turning foes to allies: An auction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ya-Yan; Wang, Bao-Yun

    2015-09-01

    Security against eavesdroppers is a critical issue in cognitive radio networks (CRNs). In this paper, a scenario consisting of one primary pair and multiple secondary pairs is considered. The secondary transmitters (STs) work in half-duplex mode and they are potential eavesdroppers on the primary transmission unless they are allowed to simultaneously transmit with the primary transmitter (PT). A modified second-price sealed-bid auction scheme is employed to model the interaction between the PT and STs. With the proposed auction scheme, the hostile relationship between the PT and STs is transformed into a cooperative relationship. An iterative algorithm based on the max-min criteria is proposed to find the optimal bidding power of the STs for an access chance in the presence of multiple eavesdroppers. Numerical results show that the proposed auction scheme not only improves the PT’s security but also increases the access opportunities of the STs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271232 and 61372126) and the University Postgraduate Research and Innovation Project in Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. CXZZ12-0472).

  5. View of turbine showing gears which turned the motion of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of turbine showing gears which turned the motion of the vertical turbine shafts to the horizontal for distribution to the mill and increased the speed. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  6. When the Stakes Turn Toxic: Learn about Problem Gambling

    MedlinePlus

    ... When the Stakes Turn Toxic Learn About Problem Gambling Anyone who’s bought a lottery ticket or played ... Recognizing Schizophrenia Wise Choices Links Signs of Problem Gambling Are you troubled by gambling? Seek help if: ...

  7. Tropical Storm Gordon Makes a U-Turn

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite observations from August 14-17, 2012, shows the birth and strengthening of the Atlantic Ocean's Tropical Storm Gordon making a U-turn and heading back to the east. This vi...

  8. Application considerations for variable volts per turn power transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, J.A. )

    1994-01-01

    Power transformer tap changing, either under load or when the transformer is de-energized, can be achieved by tapping the winding other than that which is experiencing the voltage change to be compensated. Thus the transformer has a variable volts per turn or variable excitation. The design technique is well known to transformer manufacturers but the author's experience is that it is not widely understood, nor are its advantages appreciated by transformer users. A search for papers revealed a surprising lack of material on this subject. The intent of this tutorial paper is to familiarize transformer users with the principles of designing variable volts per turn transformers and with performance differences from the usual constant volts per turn design, and with the economic advantages of reduced losses and reduced initial cost that is often possible with a variable volts per turn transformer design.

  9. 1. DETAIL BELOW ROASTER, SOUTHEAST VIEW (SHAFT, TURNING GEAR MECHANISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DETAIL BELOW ROASTER, SOUTHEAST VIEW (SHAFT, TURNING GEAR MECHANISM AND FURNACE). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Steel Skimmer Salt Roaster, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  10. Protein prosthesis: β-peptides as reverse-turn surrogates.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Ulrich; Huck, Bayard R; Gellman, Samuel H; Raines, Ronald T

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of non-natural modules could provide unprecedented control over folding/unfolding behavior, conformational stability, and biological function of proteins. Success requires the interrogation of candidate modules in natural contexts. Here, expressed protein ligation is used to replace a reverse turn in bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) with a synthetic β-dipeptide: β²-homoalanine-β³-homoalanine. This segment is known to adopt an unnatural reverse-turn conformation that contains a 10-membered ring hydrogen bond, but one with a donor-acceptor pattern opposite to that in the 10-membered rings of natural reverse turns. The RNase A variant has intact enzymatic activity, but unfolds more quickly and has diminished conformational stability relative to native RNase A. These data indicate that hydrogen-bonding pattern merits careful consideration in the selection of beneficial reverse-turn surrogates.

  11. Focus on Marshall: The Marshall Center Turns 50! (Part 2)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This month, the Focus on Marshall team invites you to a very special ceremony -- the NASA verison of a "birthday party" as the Marshall Space Flight Center turns 50 years old. Join them for the unv...

  12. Steady properly-banked turns of turbojet-propelled airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miele, Angelo

    1955-01-01

    The problem of a jet-propelled airplane held in a steady turn is treated both in the very general case and also in the particular case when the polar curve can be approximated by a parabola. Once the general solution has been obtained, some typical maneuvers are next studied such as, the turn of maximum bank, of maximum angular velocity, and of minimum radius of curvature. After a brief comparison is made between the turning characteristics of conventional airplanes and jet airplanes, and after the effect of compressibility upon the turn is examined, the effects of the salient aerodynamic and structural parameters upon the behavior of the plane in curvilinear flight are summarized in the conclusions.

  13. Printed Multi-Turn Loop Antennas for RF Biotelemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Hall, David G.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    Printed multi-turn loop antennas have been designed for contactless powering of, and reception of radio signals transmitted by, surgically implantable biotelemetric sensor units operating at frequencies in the vicinity of 300 MHz.

  14. Turning water into rock: The inverted waves effect.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Jukka; Gröhn, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Humans perceive shape in two-dimensional shaded images, and turning such an image upside down can result in inversion of the relief of this image. Previous research indicates that this inversion is caused by assumptions related to overhead illumination, global convexity and viewpoint above the surface. In our article, we describe the inverted waves effect, in which turning an image of waves upside down changes its relief and also its perceived material properties.

  15. Turning water into rock: The inverted waves effect

    PubMed Central

    Gröhn, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Humans perceive shape in two-dimensional shaded images, and turning such an image upside down can result in inversion of the relief of this image. Previous research indicates that this inversion is caused by assumptions related to overhead illumination, global convexity and viewpoint above the surface. In our article, we describe the inverted waves effect, in which turning an image of waves upside down changes its relief and also its perceived material properties. PMID:27482371

  16. The Effect on the Sperry Directional Gyro in Turning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    RosselliDelTurco, Rossello

    1946-01-01

    The present report is concerned with an analytical treatment of the effects of the transverse inclination of an airplane in a turn on the indication of the directional gyro. It is found that the extreme inclinations which the airplane must necessarily assume for a correct turn in the approaches executed at high speed and small radius of curvature, renders the indications of the instrument worthless during such maneuvers.

  17. Experimental Investigation of White Layer formation in Hard Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbrello, D.; Rotella, G.; Crea, F.

    2011-05-01

    Hard turning with super hard cutting tools, like PCBN or Ceramics inserts, represents an interesting advance in the manufacturing industry, regarding the finishing of hardened steels. This innovative machining technique is considered an attractive alternative to traditional finish grinding operations because of the high flexibility, the ability to achieve higher metal removal rates, the possibility to operate without the use of coolants, and the capability to achieve comparable workpiece quality. However, the surface integrity effects of hard machining need to be taken into account due to their influence on the life of machined components. In particular, the formation of a usually undesirable white layer at the surface needs further investigation. Three different mechanisms have been proposed as main responsible of the white layer genesis: (i) microstructural phase transformation due to a rapid heating and quenching, (ii) severe plastic deformation resulting in a homogenous structure and/or a very fine grain size microstructure; (iii) surface reaction with the environment. In this research, an experimental campaign was carried out and several experimental techniques were used in order to analyzed the machined surface and to understand which of the above mentioned theories is the main cause of the white layer formation when AISI 52100 hardened steel is machined by PCBN inserts. In particular, the topography characterization has obtained by means of optical and scanning electron microscope (SEM) while microstructural phase composition and chemical characterization have been respectively detected using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) techniques. The results prove that the white layer is the result of microstructural alteration, i.e. the generation of a martensitic structure.

  18. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief.

    PubMed

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time were measured, and comfort grade was evaluated during sessions of continuous lateral turning at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. We quantified the pressure-relieving effect using peak pressure, mean pressure, and pressure time integration. [Results] Participants demonstrated pressure time integration values below the pressure-time threshold at 15°, 30°, and 45° at all the common pressure ulcer sites. Moreover, the most effective angles for pressure relief at the common pressure ulcer sites were 30° at the occiput, 15° at the left scapula, 45° at the right scapula, 45° at the sacrum, 15° at the right heel, and 30° at the left heel. However, angles greater than 30° induced discomfort. [Conclusion] Continuous lateral turning with our specially designed device effectively relieved the pressure of targeted sites. Moreover, the suggested angles of continuous lateral turning can be used to relieve pressure at targeted sites. PMID:27065531

  19. Compensations for increased rotational inertia during human cutting turns.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mu; Brown, Brian; Jindrich, Devin L

    2014-02-01

    Locomotion in a complex environment is often not steady state, but unsteady locomotion (stability and maneuverability) is not well understood. We investigated the strategies used by humans to perform sidestep cutting turns when running. Previous studies have argued that because humans have small yaw rotational moments of inertia relative to body mass, deceleratory forces in the initial velocity direction that occur during the turning step, or 'braking' forces, could function to prevent body over-rotation during turns. We tested this hypothesis by increasing body rotational inertia and testing whether braking forces during stance decreased. We recorded ground reaction force and body kinematics from seven participants performing 45 deg sidestep cutting turns and straight running at five levels of body rotational inertia, with increases up to fourfold. Contrary to our prediction, braking forces remained consistent at different rotational inertias, facilitated by anticipatory changes to body rotational speed. Increasing inertia revealed that the opposing effects of several turning parameters, including rotation due to symmetrical anterior-posterior forces, result in a system that can compensate for fourfold changes in rotational inertia with less than 50% changes to rotational velocity. These results suggest that in submaximal effort turning, legged systems may be robust to changes in morphological parameters, and that compensations can involve relatively minor adjustments between steps to change initial stance conditions.

  20. Position- and quantity-dependent responses in zebrafish turning behavior

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Keiko; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu; Shoji, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Neural reflexes are stereotypical automatic responses often modulated by both intrinsic and environmental factors. We report herein that zebrafish larval C-shaped turning is modulated by the stimulated position of Rohon-Beard (RB) neurons. Targeted stimulation of more anterior RB neurons produces larger trunk flexion, which anticipates adult escape behavior by coordinated turning toward the appropriate direction. We also demonstrated that turning laterality varies with the numbers of stimulated neurons. Multi-cell stimulation of RB neurons elicits contralateral turning, as seen in the touch response to physical contact, while minimum input from single-cell stimulation induces ipsilateral turning, a phenomenon not previously reported. This ipsilateral response, but not the contralateral one, is impaired by transecting the ascending neural tract known as the dorsolateral fascicule (DLF), indicating that two, distinct neural circuits trigger these two responses. Our results suggest that RB neurons transmit the position and quantity of sensory information, which are then processed separately to modulate behavioral strength and to select turning laterality. PMID:27292818

  1. Effects of a continuous lateral turning device on pressure relief

    PubMed Central

    Do, Nam Ho; Kim, Deog Young; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Joo, So Young; Kang, Na Kyung; Baek, Yoon Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the pressure-relieving effects of a continuous lateral turning device on common pressure ulcer sites. [Subjects] Twenty-four healthy adults participated. [Methods] The design of our continuous lateral turning device was motivated by the need for an adequate pressure-relieving device for immobile and/or elderly people. The procedure of manual repositioning is embodied in our continuous lateral turning device. The interface pressure and time were measured, and comfort grade was evaluated during sessions of continuous lateral turning at 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45°. We quantified the pressure-relieving effect using peak pressure, mean pressure, and pressure time integration. [Results] Participants demonstrated pressure time integration values below the pressure-time threshold at 15°, 30°, and 45° at all the common pressure ulcer sites. Moreover, the most effective angles for pressure relief at the common pressure ulcer sites were 30° at the occiput, 15° at the left scapula, 45° at the right scapula, 45° at the sacrum, 15° at the right heel, and 30° at the left heel. However, angles greater than 30° induced discomfort. [Conclusion] Continuous lateral turning with our specially designed device effectively relieved the pressure of targeted sites. Moreover, the suggested angles of continuous lateral turning can be used to relieve pressure at targeted sites. PMID:27065531

  2. Convergence of a Fourier-spline representation for the full-turn map generator

    SciTech Connect

    Warnock, R.L.; Ellison, J.A.

    1997-04-01

    Single-turn data from a symplectic tracking code can be used to construct a canonical generator for a full-turn symplectic map. This construction has been carried out numerically in canonical polar coordinates, the generator being obtained as a Fourier series in angle coordinates with coefficients that are spline functions of action coordinates. Here the authors provide a mathematical basis for the procedure, finding sufficient conditions for the existence of the generator and convergence of the Fourier-spline expansion. The analysis gives insight concerning analytic properties of the generator, showing that in general there are branch points as a function of angle and inverse square root singularities at the origin as a function of action.

  3. Signal turn-on probe for nucleic acid detection based on (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Yu-ki; Sasaki, Jun; Hayakawa, Hikaru; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2011-01-01

    To image gene expression in vivo, we designed and synthesized a novel signal turn-on probe for (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement. The stem-loop structured oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) having a molecular beacon sequence for point mutated K-ras mRNA was doubly labeled with bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene moiety and Gd-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid chelate moiety at the each termini of the ODN probe, respectively. We found that the (19)F MR signal of the bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene moiety tethered at the 5' termini of the probe turned on by the addition of complementary ODN. The probe has the potential to image gene expressions in vivo.

  4. The mathematical analysis of the heart rate and blood lactate curves during incremental exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Rosic, Mirko; Ilic, V; Obradovic, Z; Pantovic, S; Rosic, G

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a new mathematical approach for the analysis of HR (heart rate) and BL (blood lactate) curves during incremental exercise testing using a HR/BL curve and its derivatives, taking into account the native shape of all curves, without any linear approximation. Using this approach the results indicate the appearance of three characteristic points (A, B and C) on the HR/BL curve. The point A on the HR/BL curve which is the value that corresponds to the load (12.73 ± 0.46 km h-1) at which BL starts to increase above the resting levels (0.9 ± 0.06 mM), and is analogous to Lactate Turn Point 1 (LTP1). The point C on the HR/BL curve which corresponds to a BL of approximately 4mM, and is analogous to LTP2. The point B on the HR/BL curve, which corresponds to the load (16.32 ± 0.49 km h-1) at which the moderate increase turns into a more pronounced increase in BL. This point has not been previously recognized in literature. We speculate this point represents attenuation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increase, accompanied by the decrease in diastolic time duration during incremental exercise testing. Proposed mathematical approach allows precise determination of lactate turnpoints during incremental exercise testing.

  5. Turn-ons and turn-offs: Causes and mechanisms of the initiation and termination of coral reef growth

    SciTech Connect

    Buddemeier, R.W.; Hopley, D.

    1988-04-26

    The objective of this review is to develop and organize a conceptual framework for the discussion of the mechanisms of reef growth turn-on and turn-off. An improved understanding of the causes, mechanisms and short-term symptoms of reef turn-on/turn-off is essential if we are to deal with the challenge of understanding and managing reef resources under conditions of both immediate anthropogenic impacts and long-term climatic changes. The discussion attempts to provide a basis for identifying the future research and conceptual synthesis that can best improve both our understanding of the causes of past transitions in reef development and our abiltiy to predict with confidence the future outcome of presently changing conditions.

  6. Fast Turn-Off Times Observed in Experimental 4H SiC Thyristors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Room temperature measurements of the turn-off time (t(sub q)) are reported for several packaged, npnp developmental power thyristors based on 4H-type SiC and rated 400 V, 2 A. Turn-off is effected by a 50 V pulse of applied reverse voltage, from a state of a steady 1 A forward current. Plots of t(sub q) against the ramp rate (dV(sub AK)/dt) of reapplied forward voltage are presented for preset values of limiting anode-to-cathode voltage (V(sub AK,max)). The lowest t(sub q) measured was about 180 ns. A rapid rise of these t(sub q) curves was observed for values of V(sub AK,max) that are only about a fifth of the rated voltage, whereas comparative t(sub q) plots for a commercial, fast turn-off, Si-based thyristor at a proportionately reduced V(sub AK,max) showed no such behavior. Hence these SiC thyristors may have problems arising from material defects or surface passivation. The influence the R-C-D gate bypass circuit that was used is briefly discussed.

  7. Suppression of Low Strain Rate Nonpremixed Flames by an Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Sandra L. (Technical Monitor); Hamins, A.; Bundy, M.; Oh, C. B.; Park, J.; Puri, I. K.

    2004-01-01

    The extinction and structure of non-premixed methane/air flames were investigated in normal gravity and microgravity through the comparison of experiments and calculations using a counterflow configuration. From a fire safety perspective, low strain rate conditions are important for several reasons. In normal gravity, many fires start from small ignition sources where the convective flow and strain rates are weak. Fires in microgravity conditions, such as a manned spacecraft, may also occur in near quiescent conditions where strain rates are very low. When designing a fire suppression system, worst-case conditions should be considered. Most diffusion flames become more robust as the strain rate is decreased. The goal of this project is to investigate the extinction limits of non-premixed flames using various agents and to compare reduced gravity and normal gravity conditions. Experiments at the NASA Glenn Research Center's 2.2-second drop tower were conducted to attain extinction and temperature measurements in low-strain non-premixed flames. Extinction measurements using nitrogen added to the fuel stream were performed for global strain rates from 7/s to 50/s. The results confirmed the "turning point" behavior observed previously by Maruta et al. in a 10 s drop tower. The maximum nitrogen volume fraction in the fuel stream needed to assure extinction for all strain rates was measured to be 0.855+/-0.016, associated with the turning point determined to occur at a strain rate of 15/s. The critical nitrogen volume fraction in the fuel stream needed for extinction of 0-g flames was measured to be higher than that of 1-g flames.

  8. Novel polychromatic measurement technique for determining the dissolution rate of very thin resist films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Stewart A.; Kang, Doris; Scheer, Steven A.; Brodsky, Colin J.

    2002-07-01

    Conventional optical development rate measurement techniques are generally unsuitable for monitoring the dissolution very tin resist films. Monochromatic systems have inadequate thickness resolution to capture the details of surface and standing wave effects, while traditional polychromatic techniques are generally unable to measure thicknesses below 250 nm. The failure of polychromatic analysis methods occurs when there is an absence of turning points int eh relative reflection spectrum. The exact thickness at which this happens is a function of the wavelength range utilized and the resist material's optical characteristics. A novel measurement method is introduced which allows a polychromatic DRM system to measure any resist thickness. Rather than placing the film under analysis directly on a reflecting substrate, it is spun on a wafer that has a relatively thick transparent film on its surface. The transparent film induces turning points in the relative reflection spectrum. The position of these turning points is modified by the presence of thin resist films in a predictable way, allowing accurate measurement of the resist film, providing the optical and thickness details of the intermediate film are known. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the capability of the technique to measure the dissolution rates of films with initial thickness ranging from 56 nm to 4400 nm. The ability of the method to resolve fine dissolution detail, such as standing waves and surface effects is also presented.

  9. Floating Point Control Library

    2007-08-02

    Floating Point Control is a Library that allows for the manipulation of floating point unit exception masking funtions control exceptions in both the Streaming "Single Instruction, Multiple Data" Extension 2 (SSE2) unit and the floating point unit simultaneously. FPC also provides macros to set floating point rounding and precision control.

  10. SPS antenna pointing control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The pointing control of a microwave antenna of the Satellite Power System was investigated emphasizing: (1) the SPS antenna pointing error sensing method; (2) a rigid body pointing control design; and (3) approaches for modeling the flexible body characteristics of the solar collector. Accuracy requirements for the antenna pointing control consist of a mechanical pointing control accuracy of three arc-minutes and an electronic phased array pointing accuracy of three arc-seconds. Results based on the factors considered in current analysis, show that the three arc-minute overall pointing control accuracy can be achieved in practice.

  11. Diesel cloud point determination needs uniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, C.Y.; Liew, V.; Miranda, R.

    1986-10-20

    Cloud point values for diesel fuels, measured by the existing ASTM method, can vary by as much as 8/sup 0/C. depending on the apparatus and technique used. These variations have an important effect on diesel-blending formulations. Research conducted at NOVA/Husky reveals cloud point discrepancies in results obtained by different laboratories testing the same fuel, and the impact of the discrepancies on blend ratios of distillates which, in turn, affect refinery economics. The major causes for the discrepancies, and recommended changes in test equipment specifications and test procedures to test the discrepancies, are presented in this article.

  12. Diminished social motivation negatively impacts reputation management: autism spectrum disorders as a case in point.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Coralie; Molesworth, Catherine; Happé, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Human beings are endowed with a unique motivation to be included in social interactions. This natural social motivation, in turn, is thought to encourage behaviours such as flattery or self-deprecation aimed to ease interaction and to enhance the reputation of the individual who produces them. If this is the case, diminished social interest should affect reputation management. Here, we use Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs)--primarily characterised by pervasive social disinterest--as a model to investigate the effect of social motivation on reputation management. Children first rated a set of pictures and were then given the opportunity to inflate their initial ratings in front of an experimenter who declared that she had drawn the picture. Contrary to the controls, children with ASD did not enhance their ratings in the drawer's presence. Moreover, participants' flattery behaviour correlated with self-reports of social enjoyment. Our findings point to a link between diminished social interest and reputation management. PMID:22303483

  13. A novel hybrid method of beta-turn identification in protein using binary logistic regression and neural network.

    PubMed

    Asghari, Mehdi Poursheikhali; Hayatshahi, Sayyed Hamed Sadat; Abdolmaleki, Parviz

    2012-01-01

    From both the structural and functional points of view, β-turns play important biological roles in proteins. In the present study, a novel two-stage hybrid procedure has been developed to identify β-turns in proteins. Binary logistic regression was initially used for the first time to select significant sequence parameters in identification of β-turns due to a re-substitution test procedure. Sequence parameters were consisted of 80 amino acid positional occurrences and 20 amino acid percentages in sequence. Among these parameters, the most significant ones which were selected by binary logistic regression model, were percentages of Gly, Ser and the occurrence of Asn in position i+2, respectively, in sequence. These significant parameters have the highest effect on the constitution of a β-turn sequence. A neural network model was then constructed and fed by the parameters selected by binary logistic regression to build a hybrid predictor. The networks have been trained and tested on a non-homologous dataset of 565 protein chains. With applying a nine fold cross-validation test on the dataset, the network reached an overall accuracy (Qtotal) of 74, which is comparable with results of the other β-turn prediction methods. In conclusion, this study proves that the parameter selection ability of binary logistic regression together with the prediction capability of neural networks lead to the development of more precise models for identifying β-turns in proteins.

  14. Hybrid optics for the visible produced by bulk casting of sol-gel glass using diamond-turned molds

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.; Cunningham, J.P.; Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R.

    1995-07-01

    Recent combinations of diffractive and refractive functions in the same optical component allow designers additional opportunities to make systems more compact and enhance performance. This paper describes a research program for fabricating hybrid refractive/diffractive components from diamond-turned molds using the bulk casting of sol-gel silica glass. The authors use the complementary dispersive nature of refractive and diffractive optics to render two-color correction in a single hybrid optical element. Since diamond turning has matured as a deterministic manufacturing technology, techniques previously suitable only in the infrared are now being applied to components used at visible wavelengths. Thus, the marriage of diamond turning and sol-gel processes offers a cost-effective method for producing highly customized and specialized optical components in high quality silica glass. With the sol-gel casting method of replication, diamond-turned mold costs can be shared over many pieces. Diamond turning takes advantage of all of the available degrees of freedom in a single hybrid optical element: aspheric surface to eliminate spherical aberration, kinoform surface for control of primary chromatic aberration, and the flexibility to place the kinoform on non-planar surfaces for maximum design flexibility. The authors discuss the critical issues involved in designing the hybrid element, single point diamond-turning the mold, and fabrication in glass using the sol-gel process.

  15. Semiautomatic machine for turning inside out industrial leather gloves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-Gonzalez, G.; Cano-Blanco, M.; León-Galicia, A.; Medrano-Sierra, L. F.; Morales-Gómez, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The last step in the industrial leather gloves manufacturing is to turn the inside out so that the sewing be in the inside of the glove. This work presents the design and testing of a machine for that purpose. In order to quantify the relevant variables, testing was performed with a prototype glove. The employed devices and the testing proceeding were developed experimentally. The obtained information was used to build the turning inside out machine. This machine works with pneumatic power to carry the inside out turning by means of double effect lineal actuators. It has two independent work stations that could be operated simultaneously by two persons, one in each station or in single mode operating one station by one person. The turning inside out cycle is started by means of directional control valves operated with pedals. The velocity and developed force by the actuators is controlled with typical pneumatic resources. The geometrical dimensions of the machine are: 1.15 m length; 0.71 m width and 2.15 m high. Its approximated weight is 120 kg. The air consumption is 5.4 fps by each working station with 60 psig work pressure. The turning inside out operation is 40 s for each industrial leather glove.

  16. Flow and heat transfer in 180-degree turn square ducts: Effects of turning configuration and system rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Chyu, Ming-King

    1993-07-01

    Forced flow through channels connected by sharp bends is frequently encountered in various rocket and gas turbine engines. For example, the transfer ducts, the coolant channels surround the combustion chamber, the internal cooling passage in a blade or vane, the flow path in the fuel element of a nuclear rocket engine, the flow around a pressure relieve valve piston, and the recirculated base flow of multiple engine clustered nozzles. Transport phenomena involved in such a flow passage are complex and considered to be very different from those of conventional turning flow with relatively mild radii of curvature. While previous research pertaining to this subject has been focused primarily on the experimental heat transfer, very little analytical work is directed to understanding the flowfield and energy transport in the passage. Therefore, the primary goal of this paper is to benchmark the predicted wall heat fluxes using a state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) formulation against those of measurement for a rectangular turn duct. Other secondary goals include studying the effects of turning configurations, e.g., the semi-circular turn, and the rounded-corner turn, and the effect of system rotation. The computed heat fluxes for the rectangular turn duct compared favorably with those of the experimental data. The results show that the flow pattern, pressure drop, and heat transfer characteristics are different among the three turning configurations, and are substantially different with system rotation. Also demonstrated in this work is that the present computational approach is quite effective and efficient and will be suitable for flow and thermal modeling in rocket and turbine engine applications.

  17. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  18. Non-Poissonian run-and-turn motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detcheverry, Francois

    Swimming bacteria exhibit a variety of motion patterns (run-and-tumble, run-reverse, run-reverse-flick), in which persistent runs are punctuated by sudden turning events. What are the properties of such random motions? If a complete answer has been given when the turning events follow a Poisson process, it has remained elusive outside this particular case. We present a generic framework for such non-Poissonian run-and-turn random motions. We obtain the generating function of moments by building on the framework of continuous time random walks and using non-commutative calculus. The approach is applied to a bimodal model of persistent motion that is directly applicable to swimming patterns and cell motility.

  19. Eye and head motion during head turns in spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Uri, John J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1988-01-01

    Eye-head motion was studied pre-, in- and postflight during single voluntary head turns. A transient increase in vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain occurred early in the flight, but later trended toward normal. This increased gain was produced by a relative increase in eye counterrotation velocity. Asymmetries in gain with right and left turns also occurred, caused by asymmetries in eye counterrotation velocities. These findings were remarkably similar to those from Soviet primate studies using gaze fixation targets, except the human study trended more rapidly toward normal. These findings differ substantially from those measuring VOR gain by head oscillation, in which no significant changes were found inflight. No visual disturbances were noted in either test condition or in normal activities. These head turn studies are the only ones to date documenting any functional change in VOR in weightlessness.

  20. Flow rate logging seepage meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reay, William G. (Inventor); Walthall, Harry G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely measuring and logging the flow rate of groundwater seepage into surface water bodies. As groundwater seeps into a cavity created by a bottomless housing, it displaces water through an inlet and into a waterproof sealed upper compartment, at which point, the water is collected by a collection bag, which is contained in a bag chamber. A magnet on the collection bag approaches a proximity switch as the collection bag fills, and eventually enables the proximity switch to activate a control circuit. The control circuit then rotates a three-way valve from the collection path to a discharge path, enables a data logger to record the time, and enables a pump, which discharges the water from the collection bag, through the three-way valve and pump, and into the sea. As the collection bag empties, the magnet leaves the proximity of the proximity switch, and the control circuit turns off the pump, resets the valve to provide a collection path, and restarts the collection cycle.