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Sample records for rate wood decay

  1. Detection and assessment of wood decay in glulam beams using a decay rate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senalik, Adam; Beall, Frank C.; Reis, Henrique

    2010-04-01

    A glulam beam retired from the field and without visible indications of wood decay was used. Towards detection and assessing wood decay, X-ray computer tomography and ultrasonic measurements were carried out. It was observed that decrease in mass density with increasing levels of wood decay affects x-rays attenuation and allows radioscopy to detect and assess wood decay. To detect and assess decay when only one lateral side of the beam is available, a modified impulse-echo is presented. The modified impulse-echo approach is based on observing the dynamic response of each lamina in the glulam beam to the drop of a steel sphere onto a steel plate coupled to the glulam beam lamina and upon a decay rate analysis of the corresponding time domain signal in a frequency band of interest. The selection of the frequency band of interest only requires knowledge of the nominal transverse dimensions of each lamina in the beam and of the corresponding wood species. It was observed that decay rate analysis allows detection and assessment of wood decay. The decay rate approach leads to an overall rate of false calls of 7.2%. Considering the variability that exists in wood including the presence of splits, orientation and thickness of growth rings, etc., this relative low rate of false calls makes this approach very attractive. Results show that results from both X-ray computer tomography and impulse-echo decay-rated based measurements are consistent with each other and can be used to detect and assess wood decay in structural lumber.

  2. Detection and Assessment of Wood Decay in Glulam Beams Using a Decay Rate Approach: A Review

    Treesearch

    C. Adam Senalik

    2013-01-01

    A glulam beam is subjected to X-ray computer tomography and acousto-ultrasonic measurements to detect and assess wood decay. A glulam beam without visible indications of wood decay was taken from field use. A modified impulse-echo technique is employed as an inspection method requiring access to only one side of the beam. It is observed that decay-rate analysis of the...

  3. Tracing nitrogen accumulation in decaying wood and examining its impact on wood decomposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Krista; Chen, Janet; Smolander, Aino; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    Decomposition of dead wood, which is controlled primarily by fungi is important for ecosystem carbon cycle and has potentially a significant role in nitrogen fixation via diazotrophs. Nitrogen content has been found to increase with advancing wood decay in several studies; however, the importance of this increase to decay rate and the sources of external nitrogen remain unclear. Improved knowledge of the temporal dynamics of wood decomposition rate and nitrogen accumulation in wood as well as the drivers of the two processes would be important for carbon and nitrogen models dealing with ecosystem responses to climate change. To tackle these questions we applied several analytical methods on Norway spruce logs from Lapinjärvi, Finland. We incubated wood samples (density classes from I to V, n=49) in different temperatures (from 8.5oC to 41oC, n=7). After a common seven day pre-incubation period at 14.5oC, the bottles were incubated six days in their designated temperature prior to CO2 flux measurements with GC to determine the decomposition rate. N2 fixation was measured with acetylene reduction assay after further 48 hour incubation. In addition, fungal DNA, (MiSeq Illumina) δ15N and N% composition of wood for samples incubated at 14.5oC were determined. Radiocarbon method was applied to obtain age distribution for the density classes. The asymbiotic N2 fixation rate was clearly dependent on the stage of wood decay and increased from stage I to stage IV but was substantially reduced in stage V. CO2 production was highest in the intermediate decay stage (classes II-IV). Both N2 fixation and CO2 production were highly temperature sensitive having optima in temperature 25oC and 31oC, respectively. We calculated the variation of annual levels of respiration and N2 fixation per hectare for the study site, and used the latter data together with the 14C results to determine the amount of N2 accumulated in wood in time. The proportion of total nitrogen in wood

  4. Elevated tropospheric CO2 and O3 may not alter initial wood decomposition rate or wood-decaying fungal community composition of Northern hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Emmanuel Ebanyenle; Andrew J. Burton; Andrew J. Storer; Dana L. Richter; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of elevated CO2 and/or O3 on the wood-decaying basidiomycete fungal community and wood decomposition rates at the Aspen Free-Air CO2 and O3 Enrichment (Aspen FACE) project. Mass loss rates were determined after one year of log decomposition on the soil...

  5. Wood decay at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, François; Coston-Guarini, Jennifer; Guarini, Jean-Marc; Fanfard, Sandrine

    2016-08-01

    The oceans and seas receive coarse woody debris since the Devonian, but the kinetics of wood degradation remains one of many unanswered questions about the fate of driftwood in the marine environment. A simple gravimetric experiment was carried out at a monitoring station located at the exit of a steep, forested Mediterranean watershed in the Eastern Pyrenees. The objective was to describe and quantify, with standardized logs (in shape, structure and constitution), natural degradation of wood in the sea. Results show that the mass decrease of wood logs over time can be described by a sigmoidal curve. The primary process of wood decay observed at the monitoring station was due to the arrival and installation of wood-boring species that consumed more than half of the total wood mass in six months. Surprisingly, in a region where there is little remaining wood marine infrastructure, "shipworms", i.e. xylophagous bivalves, are responsible for an important part of this wood decay. This suggests that these communities are maintained probably by a frequent supply of a large quantity of riparian wood entering the marine environment adjacent to the watershed. By exploring this direct link between terrestrial and marine ecosystems, our long term objective is to determine how these supplies of terrestrial organic carbon can sustain wood-based marine communities as it is observed in the Mediterranean Sea.

  6. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  7. Strength loss in decayed wood

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Patricia K. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Wood is a durable engineering material when used in an appropriate manner, but it is susceptible to biological decay when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Even before the biological decay of wood becomes visually apparent, the decay can cause the wood to become structurally unsound. The progression of decay to that...

  8. Bacterial associations with decaying wood : a review

    Treesearch

    C. A. Clausen

    1996-01-01

    Wood-inhabiting bacteria are associated with wood decay and may have an indirect influence on the decay process. Bacteria are able to affect wood permeability, attack wood structure, or work synergistically with other bacteria and soft-rot fungi to predispose wood to fungal attack. Bacteria that can inhabit chemically treated wood are recognized. The natural ability of...

  9. Quantifying arthropod contributions to wood decay

    Treesearch

    Michael Ulyshen; Terry Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Termites carry large amounts of soil into dead wood, and this behaviour complicates efforts to measure their contributions to wood decay. A novel method for isolating termite soil by burning the wood is described, and some preliminary results are presented.

  10. Detecting decay in wood components

    Treesearch

    R.J. Ross; X. Wang; B.K. Brashaw

    2005-01-01

    This chapter presents a summary of the Wood and Timber Condition Assessment Manual. It focuses on current inspection techniques for decay detection and provides guidelines on the use of various non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods in locating and defining areas of deterioration in timber bridge components and other civil structures.

  11. Ecosystem processes related to wood decay

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Marcot

    2017-01-01

    Wood decay elements include snags, down wood, root wads, tree stumps, litter, duff, broomed or diseased branches, and partially dead trees, all of which contribute to ecological processes and biodiversity of the forest ecosystem. Down wood can serve as reservoirs for moisture and mycorrhizal fungi beneficial to the health and growth of commercial tree species. Decaying...

  12. Oxalate analysis methodology for decayed wood

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; William Kenealy; Patricia K. Lebow

    2008-01-01

    Oxalate from partially decayed southern pine wood was analyzed by HPLC or colorimetric assay. Oxalate extraction efficiency, assessed by comparing analysis of whole wood cubes with ground wood, showed that both wood geometries could be extracted with comparable efficiency. To differentiate soluble oxalate from total oxalate, three extraction methods were assessed,...

  13. Mesostigmatid mites in four classes of wood decay.

    PubMed

    Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J; Kamczyc, Jacek; Rakowski, Radosław

    2011-10-01

    We studied the mesostigmatid mite community in four classes of wood decay in mixed (pine-oak) forest stands in the Wielkopolska region, Cental-West Poland. A total of 80 samples, including bark, phloem and rotten wood of coniferous and deciduous species logs, were taken in August 2006 and 2007. Decay classes were a qualitative, categorical index based on visual assessment of decomposition in coarse woody debris. A total of 3621 mesostigmatid mites were counted and identified to 91 species. In general the total number of species was diverse in the decay classes and ranged from 35 (classes I and II) to 58 (class IV). The average number of species did not differ significantly among wood decay classes. Also the abundance of mesostigmatids did not differ significantly among wood decay classes, but the highest abundance was observed in the last class (IV). Cluster analysis of the species identity index showed that the microhabitats were divided into two main clusters: relatively undecayed wood and decayed wood. Species accumulation curves showed that relatively decayed wood (class IV) had a greater rate of species accumulation than undecayed wood from the class I decomposition.

  14. Wood decay and the cleanup crew

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2017-01-01

    Arborists are encouraged to recognize the wood-decay process as an important factor in tree health and public safety. Technical experts who develop training materials to recognize wood-decay processes in living trees are frequently forest pathologists. Much of the history of forest pathology was to support production of sound, high-quality timber. That heritage is...

  15. Wood decay in desert riverine environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas; Stricker, Craig A.; Nelson, S. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Floodplain forests and the woody debris they produce are major components of riverine ecosystems in many arid and semiarid regions (drylands). We monitored breakdown and nitrogen dynamics in wood and bark from a native riparian tree, Fremont cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. wislizeni), along four North American desert streams. We placed locally-obtained, fresh, coarse material [disks or cylinders (∼500–2000 cm3)] along two cold-desert and two warm-desert rivers in the Colorado River Basin. Material was placed in both floodplain and aquatic environments, and left in situ for up to 12 years. We tested the hypothesis that breakdown would be fastest in relatively warm and moist aerobic environments by comparing the time required for 50% loss of initial ash-free dry matter (T50) calculated using exponential decay models incorporating a lag term. In cold-desert sites (Green and Yampa rivers, Colorado), disks of wood with bark attached exposed for up to 12 years in locations rarely inundated lost mass at a slower rate (T50 = 34 yr) than in locations inundated during most spring floods (T50 = 12 yr). At the latter locations, bark alone loss mass at a rate initially similar to whole disks (T50 = 13 yr), but which subsequently slowed. In warm-desert sites monitored for 3 years, cylinders of wood with bark removed lost mass very slowly (T50 = 60 yr) at a location never inundated (Bill Williams River, Arizona), whereas decay rate varied among aquatic locations (T50 = 20 yr in Bill Williams River; T50 = 3 yr in Las Vegas Wash, an effluent-dominated stream warmed by treated wastewater inflows). Invertebrates had a minor role in wood breakdown except at in-stream locations in Las Vegas Wash. The presence and form of change in nitrogen content during exposure varied among riverine environments. Our results suggest woody debris breakdown in desert riverine ecosystems is primarily a microbial process with rates determined by landscape position

  16. Limiting conditions for decay in wood systems

    Treesearch

    Paul I. Morris; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2002-01-01

    Hygrothermal models can predict temperature and moisture conditions in wall components subjected to real weather data, but specific data and a fundamental understanding of how temperature and wood moisture content dictate the progression of decay under these conditions is required for modellers to predict consequences of decay on building performance. It is well...

  17. The effect of CaCl2 on growth rate, wood decay and oxalic acid accumulation in Serpula lacrymans and related brown-rot fungi

    Treesearch

    Anne Christine Steenkjaer Hastrup; Bo Jensen; Carol Clausen; Frederick Green

    2006-01-01

    The dry rot fungus, Serpula lacrymans, is one of the most destructive copper-tolerant fungi causing timber decay in buildings in temperate regions. Calcium and oxalic acid have been shown to play important roles in the mechanism of wood decay. The effect of calcium on growth and decay was evaluated for 12 strains of S. lacrymans and compared to five brown-rot fungi....

  18. [The influence of oil heat treatment on wood decay resistance by Fourier infrared spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Ma, Shu-Ling; Feng, Li-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Wood preservative treatment can improve defects of plantation wood such as easy to corrupt and moth eaten. Among them heat-treatment is not only environmental and no pollution, also can improve the corrosion resistance and dimension stability of wood. In this test Poplar and Mongolian Seoteh Pine was treated by soybean oil as heat-conducting medium, and the heat treatment wood was studied for indoor decay resistance; wood chemical components before and after treatment, the effect of heat treatment on wood decay resistance performance and main mechanism of action were analysed by Fourier infrared spectrometric. Results showed that the mass loss rate of poplar fell from 19.37% to 5% and Mongolian Seoteh Pine's fell from 8.23% to 3.15%, so oil heat treatment can effectively improve the decay resistance. Infrared spectrum analysis shows that the heat treatment made wood's hydrophilic groups such as hydroxyl groups in largely reduced, absorbing capacity decreased and the moisture of wood rotting fungi necessary was reduced; during the heat treatment wood chemical components such as cellulose, hemicellu lose were degraded, and the nutrient source of wood rotting fungi growth necessary was reduced. Wood decay fungi can grow in the wood to discredit wood is because of that wood can provide better living conditions for wood decay fungi, such as nutrients, water, oxygen, and so on. The cellulose and hemicellulose in wood is the main nutrition source of wood decay fungi. So the oil heat-treatment can reduce the cellulose, hemicellulose nutrition source of wood decay fungi so as to improve the decay resistance of wood.

  19. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    DOEpatents

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  20. Relative in vitro wood decay resistance of sapwood from landscape trees of southern temperate regions

    Treesearch

    Manuela Baietto; A. Dan. Wilson

    2010-01-01

    The development of wood decay caused by 12 major root-rot and trunk-rot fungi was investigated in vitro with sapwood extracted from nine ornamental and landscape hardwood and conifer species native to southern temperate regions of North America, Europe, and the lower Mississippi Delta. Wood decay rates based on dry weight loss for 108 host tree–wood decay fungi...

  1. Chapter 4: Genetic Identification of Fungi Involved in Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Grant Kirker

    2014-01-01

    Wood decay is a complex process that involves contributions from molds, bacteria, decay fungi, and often insects. The first step in the accurate diagnosis of decay is identification of the causal agents, but wood decay in the strictest sense (white and brown rot) is caused by cryptic fungal species that are very difficult to identify using traditional methods. Genetic...

  2. Common wood decay fungi found in the Caribbean Basin

    Treesearch

    D. Jean. Lodge

    2016-01-01

    There are hundreds of wood-decay fungi in the Caribbean Basin, but relatively few of these are likely to grow on manmade structures built of wood or wood-composites. The wood-decay fungi of greatest concern are those that cause brown-rot, and especially brown-rot fungi that are resistant to copper-based wood preservatives. Some fungi that grow in the Caribbean and...

  3. The decay of wood in landfills in contrasting climates in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Ximenes, Fabiano; Björdal, Charlotte; Cowie, Annette; Barlaz, Morton

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We examine decay in wood from landfills in contrasting environments in Australia. • Analysis is based on changes in chemical composition and microscopy. • Climate did not influence levels of decay observed. • Microscopy of retrieved samples revealed most of the decay was aerobic in nature. • Current default factors for wood decay in landfills overestimate methane emissions. - Abstract: Wood products in landfill are commonly assumed to decay within several decades, returning the carbon contained therein to the atmosphere, with about half the carbon released as methane. However, the rate and extent of decay is not well known, as very few studies have examined the decay of wood products in landfills. This study reports on the findings from landfill excavations conducted in the Australian cities of Sydney and Cairns located in temperate and tropical environments, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine whether burial of the wood in warmer, more tropical conditions in Cairns would result in greater levels of decay than occurs in the temperate environment of Sydney. Wood samples recovered after 16–44 years in landfill were examined through physical, chemical and microscopic analyses, and compared with control samples to determine the carbon loss. There was typically little or no decay in the wood samples analysed from the landfill in Sydney. Although there was significant decay in rainforest wood species excavated from Cairns, decay levels for wood types that were common to both Cairns and Sydney landfills were similar. The current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2006) default decay factor for organic materials in landfills is 50%. In contrast, the carbon loss determined for Pinus radiata recovered from Sydney and Cairns landfills was 7.9% and 4.4%, respectively, and 0% for Agathis sp. This suggests that climate did not influence decay, and that the more extensive levels of decay observed for some wood samples

  4. Five New Wood Decay Fungi (Polyporales and Hymenochaetales) in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Kyu; Park, Jae Young; Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Hyun; Cho, Hae Jin; Eimes, John A.; Kim, Changmu

    2016-01-01

    The wood decay fungi are a diverse taxonomic group that plays a pivotal role in forest carbon cycling. Wood decay fungi use various enzymatic pathways to digest dead or living wood in order to obtain carbon and other nutrients and these enzymatic systems have been exploited for both industrial and medical applications. Over 600 wood decay fungi species have been described in Korea; however, the recent application of molecular markers has dramatically altered the taxonomy of many of these wood decay fungi at both the genus and species levels. By combining molecular methods, specifically sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region, with traditional morphological characters, this study identified five new species records for Korea in five genera: Aurantiporus, Favolus, Neofavolus, Loweomyces, and Hymenochaetopsis. Three of these genera (Aurantiporus, Favolus, and Loweomyces) were previously unknown in Korea. The relatively simple morphology of the wood decay fungi often leads to ambiguous taxonomic assignment. Therefore, molecular markers are a necessary component of any taxonomic or evolutionary study of wood decay fungi. Our study highlights the need for a more robust and multifaceted approach in investigating new wood decay fungi in Korea. PMID:27790065

  5. Five New Wood Decay Fungi (Polyporales and Hymenochaetales) in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyu; Park, Jae Young; Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Hyun; Cho, Hae Jin; Eimes, John A; Kim, Changmu; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-09-01

    The wood decay fungi are a diverse taxonomic group that plays a pivotal role in forest carbon cycling. Wood decay fungi use various enzymatic pathways to digest dead or living wood in order to obtain carbon and other nutrients and these enzymatic systems have been exploited for both industrial and medical applications. Over 600 wood decay fungi species have been described in Korea; however, the recent application of molecular markers has dramatically altered the taxonomy of many of these wood decay fungi at both the genus and species levels. By combining molecular methods, specifically sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region, with traditional morphological characters, this study identified five new species records for Korea in five genera: Aurantiporus, Favolus, Neofavolus, Loweomyces, and Hymenochaetopsis. Three of these genera (Aurantiporus, Favolus, and Loweomyces) were previously unknown in Korea. The relatively simple morphology of the wood decay fungi often leads to ambiguous taxonomic assignment. Therefore, molecular markers are a necessary component of any taxonomic or evolutionary study of wood decay fungi. Our study highlights the need for a more robust and multifaceted approach in investigating new wood decay fungi in Korea.

  6. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera.

  7. Fungal and bacterial community succession differs for three wood types during decay in a forest soil.

    PubMed

    Prewitt, Lynn; Kang, Youngmin; Kakumanu, Madhavi L; Williams, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Wood decomposition by soil microorganisms is vital to carbon and nutrient cycles of forested ecosystems. Different wood types decompose at different rates; however, it is not known if there are differences in microbial community succession associated with the decay of different wood types. In this study, the microbial community associated with the decay of pine (decay-susceptible wood), western red cedar (decay resistant) and ACQ-treated pine (Ammoniacal Copper Quaternary, preservative-treated pine for decay resistance) in forest soil was characterized using DNA sequencing, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, and microbial activity over a 26-month period. Bray-Curtis ordination using an internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence and PLFA data indicated that fungal communities changed during succession and that wood type altered the pattern of succession. Nondecay fungi decreased over the 26 months of succession; however, by 18 months of decay, there was a major shift in the fungal communities. By this time, Trametes elegans dominated cedar and Phlebia radiata dominated pine and ACQ-treated pine. The description of PLFA associated with ACQ-treated pine resembled cedar more than pine; however, both PLFA and ITS descriptions indicated that fungal communities associated with ACQ-treated pine were less dynamic, perhaps a result of the inhibition by the ACQ preservative, compared with pine and cedar. Overall, fungal community composition and succession were associated with wood type. Further research into the differences in community composition will help to discern their functional importance to wood decay.

  8. Decay of wood and wood-based products above ground in buildings

    Treesearch

    Charles G. Carll; Terry L. Highley

    1999-01-01

    This paper is an overview of what we know about occurrence of wood decay above ground within buildings. It presents information concerning under what conditions decay may become established. In laboratory tests involving optimum moisture and temperature conditions for decay fungi, and direct contact with large quantities of specific well-developed decay...

  9. Assemblage composition of fungal wood-decay species has a major influence on how climate and wood quality modify decomposition.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Parvathy; Junninen, Kaisa; Edman, Mattias; Kouki, Jari

    2017-03-01

    The interactions among saprotrophic fungal species, as well as their interactions with environmental factors, may have a major influence on wood decay and carbon release in ecosystems. We studied the effect that decomposer diversity (species richness and assemblage composition) has on wood decomposition when the climatic variables and substrate quality vary simultaneously. We used two temperatures (16 and 21°C) and two humidity levels (70% and 90%) with two wood qualities (wood from managed and old-growth forests) of Pinus sylvestris. In a 9-month experiment, the effects of fungal diversity were tested using four wood-decaying fungi (Antrodia xantha, Dichomitus squalens, Fomitopsis pinicola and Gloeophyllum protractum) at assemblage levels of one, two and four species. Wood quality and assemblage composition affected the influence of climatic factors on decomposition rates. Fungal assemblage composition was found to be more important than fungal species richness, indicating that species-specific fungal traits are of paramount importance in driving decomposition. We conclude that models containing fungal wood-decay species (and wood-based carbon) need to take into account species-specific and assemblage composition-specific properties to improve predictive capacity in regard to decomposition-related carbon dynamics. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Extracellular oxidative metabolism of wood decay fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Cullen

    2010-04-21

    Substantial progress has been made toward understanding the fundamental physiology and genetics of wood decay fungi, microbes that are capable of degrading all major components of plant cell walls. Efficient utilization of lignocellulosic biomass has been hampered in part by limitations in our understanding of enzymatic mechanisms of plant cell wall degradation. This is particularly true of woody substrates where accessibility and high lignin content substantially complicate enzymatic 'deconstruction'. The interdisciplinary research has illuminated enzymatic mechanisms essential for the conversion of lignocellulosics to simple carbohydrates and other small molecular weight products. Progress was in large part dependent on substantial collaborations with the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI) in Walnut Creek and Los Alamos, as well as the Catholic University, Santiago, Chile, the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, the University of Minnesota, St. Paul, and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin and the Forest Products Laboratory. Early accomplishments focused on the development of experimental tools (2, 7, 22, 24-26, 32) and characterization of individual genes and enzymes (1, 3-5, 8, 9, 11, 14, 15, 17, 18, 23, 27, 33). In 2004, the genome of the most intensively studied lignin-degrading fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was published (21). This milestone lead to additional progress on this important model system (6, 10, 12, 13, 16, 28-31) and was further complemented by genome analysis of other important cellulose-degrading fungi (19, 20). These accomplishments have been highly cited and have paved the way for whole new research areas.

  11. The decay of wood in landfills in contrasting climates in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Fabiano; Björdal, Charlotte; Cowie, Annette; Barlaz, Morton

    2015-07-01

    Wood products in landfill are commonly assumed to decay within several decades, returning the carbon contained therein to the atmosphere, with about half the carbon released as methane. However, the rate and extent of decay is not well known, as very few studies have examined the decay of wood products in landfills. This study reports on the findings from landfill excavations conducted in the Australian cities of Sydney and Cairns located in temperate and tropical environments, respectively. The objective of this study was to determine whether burial of the wood in warmer, more tropical conditions in Cairns would result in greater levels of decay than occurs in the temperate environment of Sydney. Wood samples recovered after 16-44years in landfill were examined through physical, chemical and microscopic analyses, and compared with control samples to determine the carbon loss. There was typically little or no decay in the wood samples analysed from the landfill in Sydney. Although there was significant decay in rainforest wood species excavated from Cairns, decay levels for wood types that were common to both Cairns and Sydney landfills were similar. The current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2006) default decay factor for organic materials in landfills is 50%. In contrast, the carbon loss determined for Pinus radiata recovered from Sydney and Cairns landfills was 7.9% and 4.4%, respectively, and 0% for Agathis sp. This suggests that climate did not influence decay, and that the more extensive levels of decay observed for some wood samples from Cairns indicates that those wood types were more susceptible to biodegradation. Microscopic analyses revealed that most decay patterns observed in samples analysed from Sydney were consistent with aerobic fungal decay. Only a minor portion of the microbial decay was due to erosion bacteria active in anaerobic/near anaerobic environments. The findings of this study strongly suggest that models that adopt

  12. Chapter 5: Organopollutant Degradation by Wood Decay Basidiomycetes

    Treesearch

    Yitzhak Hadar; Daniel Cullen

    2013-01-01

    Wood decay fungi are obligate aerobes, deriving nutrients from the biological ‘combustion’ of wood, using molecular oxygen as terminal electron acceptor (Kirk and Farrell 1987; Blanchette 1991). Non-specific extracellular enzymes are generally viewed as key components in lignin depolymerization. The major enzymes implicated in lignin degradation are lignin peroxidase (...

  13. Wood decay in living and dead trees: A pictorial overview

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kenneth R. Dudzik

    2012-01-01

    Pioneering research by Alex L. Shigo and his associates has produced a series of pictorial guidelines to provide a better understanding of how trees respond to wounding and subsequent microbial infections that lead to wood decay. The purpose of this paper is to visually summarize through the use of 96 color photographs and illustrations, the varied patterns of wood...

  14. Bacteria in decomposing wood and their interactions with wood-decay fungi.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sarah R; Boddy, Lynne; Weightman, Andrew J

    2016-11-01

    The fungal community within dead wood has received considerable study, but far less attention has been paid to bacteria in the same habitat. Bacteria have long been known to inhabit decomposing wood, but much remains underexplored about their identity and ecology. Bacteria within the dead wood environment must interact with wood-decay fungi, but again, very little is known about the form this takes; there are indications of both antagonistic and beneficial interactions within this fungal microbiome. Fungi are hypothesised to play an important role in shaping bacterial communities in wood, and conversely, bacteria may affect wood-decay fungi in a variety of ways. This minireview considers what is currently known about bacteria in wood and their interactions with fungi, and proposes possible associations based on examples from other habitats. It aims to identify key knowledge gaps and pressing questions for future research. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. How spectroscopy and microspectroscopy of degraded wood contribute to understand fungal wood decay.

    PubMed

    Fackler, Karin; Schwanninger, Manfred

    2012-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, mid and near infrared, and ultra violet (UV) spectra of wood contain information on its chemistry and composition. When solid wood samples are analysed, information on the molecular structure of the lignocellulose complex of wood e.g. crystallinity of polysaccharides and the orientation of the polymers in wood cell walls can also be gained. UV and infrared spectroscopy allow also for spatially resolved spectroscopy, and state-of-the-art mapping and imaging systems have been able to provide local information on wood chemistry and structure at the level of wood cells (with IR) or cell wall layers (with UV). During the last decades, these methods have also proven useful to follow alterations of the composition, chemistry and physics of the substrate wood after fungi had grown on it as well as changes of the interactions between the wood polymers within the lignocellulose complex caused by decay fungi. This review provides an overview on how molecular spectroscopic methods could contribute to understand these degradation processes and were able to characterise and localise fungal wood decay in its various stages starting from the incipient and early ones even if the major share of research focussed on advanced decay. Practical issues such as requirements in terms of sample preparation and sample form and present examples of optimised data analysis will also be addressed to be able to detect and characterise the generally highly variable microbial degradation processes within their highly variable substrate wood.

  16. Decaying wood is a sodium source for mountain gorillas.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Jessica M; Van Soest, Peter J; Pell, Alice N

    2006-09-22

    Like several other non-human primates, mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda consume decaying wood, an interesting but puzzling behaviour. This wood has little obvious nutritional value; it is low in protein and sugar, and high in lignin compared to other foods. We collected pieces of wood eaten and avoided by gorillas, and other foods consumed by gorillas, and measured their sodium content. Wood was substantially higher in sodium than other dietary items, and wood pieces from stumps eaten contained more sodium than those that were avoided. Wood represented only 3.9% of the wet weight food intake of gorillas, but contributed over 95% of dietary sodium, leading us to conclude that decaying wood is an important sodium source for Bwindi gorillas. Because sodium has been leached from the weathered soils characteristic of the subhumid and humid tropics, and because terrestrial plants generally do not require sodium, tropical herbivores, including gorillas, often encounter problems locating the sodium essential for their well-being. Decaying wood is an unexpected sodium source.

  17. Competitive outcomes between wood-decaying fungi are altered in burnt wood.

    PubMed

    Edman, Mattias; Eriksson, Anna-Maria

    2016-06-01

    Fire is an important disturbance agent in boreal forests where it creates a wide variety of charred and other types of heat-modified dead wood substrates, yet how these substrates affect fungal community structure and development within wood is poorly understood. We allowed six species of wood-decaying basidiomycetes to compete in pairs in wood-discs that were experimentally burnt before fungal inoculation. The outcomes of interactions in burnt wood differed from those in unburnt control wood for two species:Antrodia sinuosanever lost on burnt wood and won over its competitor in 67% of the trials compared to 40% losses and 20% wins on unburnt wood. In contrast, Ischnoderma benzoinumwon all interactions on unburnt wood compared to 33% on burnt wood. However, the responses differed depending on the identity of the competing species, suggesting an interaction between competitor and substrate type. The observed shift in competitive balance between fungal species probably results from chemical changes in burnt wood, but the underlying mechanism needs further investigation. Nevertheless, the results indicate that forest fires indirectly structure fungal communities by modifying dead wood, and highlight the importance of fire-affected dead wood substrates in boreal forests. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Decay resistance of wood-plastic composites reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Yao Chen; Nicole M. Stark; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Yongming Fan; Jianmin Gao

    2014-01-01

    The moisture and decay resistance of wood-plastic composites (WPCs) reinforced with extracted or delignified wood flour (WF) was investigated. Three different extractions were preformed: toluene/ethanol (TE), acetone/water (AW), and hot water (HW). Delignification (DL) was performed using a sodium chlorite/acetic acid solution. All WPCs specimens were made with 50% by...

  19. Soil organic matter dynamics under decaying wood in a subtropical wet forest: effect of tree species and decay stage.

    Treesearch

    Marcela Zalamea; Grizelle Gonzalez; Chien-Lu Ping; Gary Michaelson

    2007-01-01

    Decaying wood is an important structural and functional component of forests: it contributes to generate habitat diversity, acts as either sink or source of nutrients, and plays a preponderant role in soil formation. Thus, decaying wood might likely have measurable effects on chemical properties of the underlying soil.We hypothesized that decaying wood would have a...

  20. Evaluation of Three Electronic Noses for Detecting Incipient Wood Decay

    PubMed Central

    Baietto, Manuela; Wilson, Alphus D.; Bassi, Daniele; Ferrini, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Tree assessment methodologies, currently used to evaluate the structural stability of individual urban trees, usually involve a visual analysis followed by measurements of the internal soundness of wood using various instruments that are often invasive, expensive, or inadequate for use within the urban environment. Moreover, most conventional instruments do not provide an adequate evaluation of decay that occurs in the root system. The intent of this research was to evaluate the possibility of integrating conventional tools, currently used for assessments of decay in urban trees, with the electronic nose–a new innovative tool used in diverse fields and industries for various applications such as quality control in manufacturing, environmental monitoring, medical diagnoses, and perfumery. Electronic-nose (e-nose) technologies were tested for the capability of detecting differences in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by wood decay fungi and wood from healthy and decayed trees. Three e-noses, based on different types of operational technologies and analytical methods, were evaluated independently (not directly compared) to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient decays in artificially-inoculated wood. All three e-nose devices were capable of discriminating between healthy and artificially-inoculated, decayed wood with high levels of precision and confidence. The LibraNose quartz microbalance (QMB) e-nose generally provided higher levels of discrimination of sample unknowns, but not necessarily more accurate or effective detection than the AromaScan A32S conducting polymer and PEN3 metal-oxide (MOS) gas sensor e-noses for identifying and distinguishing woody samples containing different agents of wood decay. However, the conducting polymer e-nose had the greater advantage for identifying unknowns from diverse woody sample types due to the associated software capability of utilizing prior-developed, application-specific reference libraries with

  1. RNA extraction from decaying wood for (meta)transcriptomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Martino; Voyron, Samuele; Girlanda, Mariangela; Marmeisse, Roland

    2017-10-01

    Wood decomposition is a key step of the terrestrial carbon cycle and is of economic importance. It is essentially a microbiological process performed by fungi and to an unknown extent by bacteria. To gain access to the genes expressed by the diverse microbial communities participating in wood decay, we developed an RNA extraction protocol from this recalcitrant material rich in polysaccharides and phenolic compounds. This protocol was implemented on 22 wood samples representing as many tree species from 11 plant families in the Angiosperms and Gymnosperms. RNA was successfully extracted from all samples and converted into cDNAs from which were amplified both fungal and bacterial protein coding genes, including genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes participating in lignocellulose hydrolysis. This protocol applicable to a wide range of decomposing wood types represents a first step towards a metatranscriptomic analysis of wood degradation under natural conditions.

  2. Wood decay fungi of subalpine conifer forests

    Treesearch

    Jessie A. Glaeser; Kevin T. Smith

    2016-01-01

    One of the fundamental skills needed for hazard tree assessment is the evaluation of decay. This may be a difficult task as we usually only use external symptoms (wounds, basal swellings, decayed branch stubs), signs (mushrooms, fungal crusts or brackets) or mechanical/indirect sampling methods (drilling, electrical or sonic resistance) to estimate the amount of sound...

  3. Evaluating wood-based composites for incipient fungal decay with the immunodiagnostic wood decay test.

    Treesearch

    C.A. Clausen; L. Haughton; C. Murphy

    2003-01-01

    Early and accurate detection of the extent of fungal deterioration during forensic inspection of the building envelope would eliminate excessive or unnecessary replacement of wood-based building materials. Areas of water infiltration in wood-framed building envelopes in the Pacific Northwest were evaluated visually and sampled for moisture content. Wood samples were...

  4. Laboratory evaluation of borate:amine:copper derivatives In wood for fungal decay protection

    Treesearch

    George Chen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate borate:amine:copper derivatives in wood for fungal decay protection as well as the permanence of copper and boron in wood. Each of four derivatives of borate:amine:copper prevented fungal decay in wood. Disodium tetraborate decahydrate (borax):amine:copper derivatives with 0.61-0.63% retention after water leaching prevented decay by...

  5. Superior wood for violins--wood decay fungi as a substitute for cold climate.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Francis W M R; Spycher, Melanie; Fink, Siegfried

    2008-01-01

    Violins produced by Antonio Stradivari during the late 17th and early 18th centuries are reputed to have superior tonal qualities. Dendrochronological studies show that Stradivari used Norway spruce that had grown mostly during the Maunder Minimum, a period of reduced solar activity when relatively low temperatures caused trees to lay down wood with narrow annual rings, resulting in a high modulus of elasticity and low density. The main objective was to determine whether wood can be processed using selected decay fungi so that it becomes acoustically similar to the wood of trees that have grown in a cold climate (i.e. reduced density and unchanged modulus of elasticity). This was investigated by incubating resonance wood specimens of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) with fungal species that can reduce wood density, but lack the ability to degrade the compound middle lamellae, at least in the earlier stages of decay. Microscopic assessment of the incubated specimens and measurement of five physical properties (density, modulus of elasticity, speed of sound, radiation ratio, and the damping factor) using resonance frequency revealed that in the wood of both species there was a reduction in density, accompanied by relatively little change in the speed of sound. Thus, radiation ratio was increased from 'poor' to 'good', on a par with 'superior' resonance wood grown in a cold climate.

  6. Exploring glycoside hydrolases and accessory proteins from wood decay fungi to enhance sugarcane bagasse saccharification.

    PubMed

    Valadares, Fernanda; Gonçalves, Thiago A; Gonçalves, Dayelle S P O; Segato, Fernando; Romanel, Elisson; Milagres, Adriane M F; Squina, Fabio M; Ferraz, André

    2016-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and accessory proteins are key components for efficient and cost-effective enzymatic hydrolysis of polysaccharides in modern, biochemically based biorefineries. Currently, commercialized GHs and accessory proteins are produced by ascomycetes. However, the role of wood decay basidiomycetes proteins in biomass saccharification has not been extensively pursued. Wood decay fungi degrade polysaccharides in highly lignified tissues in natural environments, and are a promising enzyme source for improving enzymatic cocktails that are designed for in vitro lignocellulose conversion. GHs and accessory proteins were produced by representative brown- and white-rot fungi, Laetiporus sulphureus and Pleurotus ostreatus, respectively. Concentrated protein extracts were then used to amend commercial enzymatic cocktails for saccharification of alkaline-sulfite pretreated sugarcane bagasse. The main enzymatic activities found in the wood decay fungal protein extracts were attributed to endoglucanases, xylanases and β-glucosidases. Cellobiohydrolase (CBH) activities in the L. sulphureus and P. ostreatus extracts were low and nonexistent, respectively. The initial glucan conversion rates were boosted when the wood decay fungal proteins were used to replace half of the enzymes from the commercial cocktails. L. sulphureus proteins increased the glucan conversion levels, with values above those observed for the full load of commercial enzymes. Wood decay fungal proteins also enhanced the xylan conversion efficiency due to their high xylanase activities. Proteomic studies revealed 104 and 45 different proteins in the P. ostreatus and L. sulphureus extracts, respectively. The enhancement of the saccharification of alkaline-pretreated substrates by the modified enzymatic cocktails was attributed to the following protein families: GH5- and GH45-endoglucanases, GH3-β-glucosidases, and GH10-xylanases. The extracellular proteins produced by wood decay fungi provide

  7. Detection and assessment of wood decay in glulam beams using a through-transmission ultrasonic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senalik, Adam; Beall, Frank C.; O'Dell, Kristen; Reis, Henrique

    2008-03-01

    A glulam beam retired from the field and without visible indications of wood decay was used. Towards detection and assessing wood decay, X-ray computer tomography and ultrasonic measurements were carried out. It was observed that decrease in mass density with increasing levels of wood decay affects x-rays attenuation and allows radioscopy to detect and assess wood decay. Furthermore, it was also observed that the decrease in mass density and stiffness caused by wood decay affects ultrasonics measurements. It was observed that ultrasonic velocity and stress wave features such as time of arrival, area under the power spectral density curve, energy, and frequency of maximum amplitude allows detection and assessment of wood decay. Results show that results from both X-ray computer tomography and ultrasonic measurements are consistent with each other and can be used to detect and assess wood decay in structural lumber.

  8. Cluster decay investigation within a modified Woods-Saxon potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, F.; Oudih, M. R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.

    2015-08-01

    The cluster decay process is studied in the WKB approximation based on the unified fission model. The cluster is considered to be emitted by tunneling through a potential barrier taken as the sum of the Coulomb potential, the centrifugal potential and the modified Woods-Saxon (MWS) nuclear potential. The results of our calculations are compared to those obtained by other theoretical models as well as experimental data. It is shown that the unified fission model with the MWS nuclear potential can be successfully used to evaluate the cluster decay half-lives of heavy nuclei.

  9. Xenomic networks variability and adaptation traits in wood decaying fungi

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Mélanie; Meux, Edgar; Mathieu, Yann; Thuillier, Anne; Chibani, Kamel; Harvengt, Luc; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Gelhaye, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Fungal degradation of wood is mainly restricted to basidiomycetes, these organisms having developed complex oxidative and hydrolytic enzymatic systems. Besides these systems, wood-decaying fungi possess intracellular networks allowing them to deal with the myriad of potential toxic compounds resulting at least in part from wood degradation but also more generally from recalcitrant organic matter degradation. The members of the detoxification pathways constitute the xenome. Generally, they belong to multigenic families such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and the glutathione transferases. Taking advantage of the recent release of numerous genomes of basidiomycetes, we show here that these multigenic families are extended and functionally related in wood-decaying fungi. Furthermore, we postulate that these rapidly evolving multigenic families could reflect the adaptation of these fungi to the diversity of their substrate and provide keys to understand their ecology. This is of particular importance for white biotechnology, this xenome being a putative target for improving degradation properties of these fungi in biomass valorization purposes. PMID:23279857

  10. Xenomic networks variability and adaptation traits in wood decaying fungi.

    PubMed

    Morel, Mélanie; Meux, Edgar; Mathieu, Yann; Thuillier, Anne; Chibani, Kamel; Harvengt, Luc; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Gelhaye, Eric

    2013-05-01

    Fungal degradation of wood is mainly restricted to basidiomycetes, these organisms having developed complex oxidative and hydrolytic enzymatic systems. Besides these systems, wood-decaying fungi possess intracellular networks allowing them to deal with the myriad of potential toxic compounds resulting at least in part from wood degradation but also more generally from recalcitrant organic matter degradation. The members of the detoxification pathways constitute the xenome. Generally, they belong to multigenic families such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and the glutathione transferases. Taking advantage of the recent release of numerous genomes of basidiomycetes, we show here that these multigenic families are extended and functionally related in wood-decaying fungi. Furthermore, we postulate that these rapidly evolving multigenic families could reflect the adaptation of these fungi to the diversity of their substrate and provide keys to understand their ecology. This is of particular importance for white biotechnology, this xenome being a putative target for improving degradation properties of these fungi in biomass valorization purposes.

  11. Decay and termite resistance, water absorption and swelling of thermally compressed wood panels

    Treesearch

    Oner Unsal; S. Nami Kartal; Zeki Candan; Rachel A. Arango; Carol A. Clausen; Frederick Green

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated decay and termite resistance of thermally compressed pine wood panels under pressure at either 5 or 7 MPa and either 120 or 150 °C for 1 h. Wood specimens from the panels were exposed to laboratory decay resistance by using the wood degrading fungi, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Trametes versicolor. The thermal compression process caused increases in...

  12. Controlling moisture content of wood samples using a modified soil-pan decay method

    Treesearch

    Jerrold E. Winandy; Simon F. Curling; Patricia K. Lebow

    2005-01-01

    In wood, the threshold level below which decay cannot occur varies with species or type of wood product and other factors such as temperature, humidity, and propensity of exposure or service-use to allow rain-induced wetting and subsequent drying. The ability to control wood moisture content (MC) during laboratory decay testing could allow research on the moisture...

  13. Inhibitory effect of essential oils on decay fungi and mold growth on wood

    Treesearch

    Vina W. Yang; Carol A. Clausen

    2007-01-01

    Structural damage and potential health risks caused by wood decay and mold fungi in residential structures have been a major concern for homeowners, building contractors and insurance companies alike. The combined damage from decay fungi and mold claims exceeds several billion US dollars annually. Protection against decay and mold growth on wood is a critical economic...

  14. Exploring the hypothesis that limiting diffusion of fungal oxidants underlies decay resistance in acetylated wood

    Treesearch

    Christopher G. Hunt; Steven Lacher; Kolby Hirth; Linda Lorenz; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms by which chemical modifications, specifically acetylation, improve the decay resistance of wood are a topic of active research. In the early stages of decay, fungi secrete lowmolecular- weight oxidants or oxidant precursors. These oxidants diffuse through the wet wood cell wall and oxidize cell wall polymers, which enable the decay process to proceed....

  15. The role of chemical transport in the brown-rot decay resistance of modified wood

    Treesearch

    Samuel Zelinka; R. Ringman; A. Pilgard; E. E. Thybring; Joseph Jakes; K. Richter

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modification of wood increases decay resistance but the exact mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, Ringman and coauthors examined established theories addressing why modified wood has increased decay resistance and concluded that the most probable cause of inhibition and/or delay of initiation of brown-rot decay is lowering the equilibrium moisture...

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of phosphortriamidates in wood for thermal and fungal decay protection

    Treesearch

    George C. Chen

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the possibility of simplification of the process. The question in focus was simply whether phosphortriamidates impregnated wood would be as effective concerning fire resistance and fungal decay as phosphoramidate bonded wood.

  17. How to Make a Beetle Out of Wood: Multi-Elemental Stoichiometry of Wood Decay, Xylophagy and Fungivory

    PubMed Central

    Filipiak, Michał; Weiner, January

    2014-01-01

    The majority of terrestrial biomass is wood, but the elemental composition of its potential consumers, xylophages, differs hugely from that of wood. This causes a severe nutritional imbalance. We studied the stoichiometric relationships of 11 elements (C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Na) in three species of pine-xylem-feeding insects, Stictoleptura rubra, Arhopalus rusticus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) and Chalcophora mariana (Coleoptera, Buprestidae), to elucidate their mechanisms of tissue growth and to match their life histories to their dietary constraints. These beetles do not differ from other Coleoptera in their absolute elemental compositions, which are approximately 1000 (N), 100 (P, Cu) and 50 (K, Na) times higher than in dead but undecayed pine wood. This discrepancy diminishes along the wood decay gradient, but the elemental concentrations remain higher by an order of magnitude in beetles than in highly decayed wood. Numerical simulation of the life history of S. rubra shows that feeding on nutrient-poor undecayed wood would extend its development time to implausible values, whereas feeding on highly decomposed wood (heavily infected with fungi) would barely balance its nutritional budget during the long development period of this species. The changes in stoichiometry indicate that the relative change in the nutrient levels in decaying wood cannot be attributed solely to carbon loss resulting from decomposer respiration: the action of fungi substantially enriches the decaying wood with nutritional elements imported from the outside of the system, making it a suitable food for wood-eating invertebrates. PMID:25536334

  18. Wood Decay Fungi in South Korea: Polypores from Seoul

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yeongseon; Jang, Seokyoon; Lee, Jaejung; Lee, Hwanhwi; Lee, Hanbyul; Lee, Young Min; Hong, Joo-Hyun; Min, Mihee; Lim, Young Woon; Kim, Changmu

    2014-01-01

    In Seoul, a majority of plant communities have undergone significant changes over the last few decades; however, how wood decay fungi have responded and adapted to the changes in vegetation remains unknown. Through an ongoing investigation of Korean indigenous fungi, ca. 300 specimens with poroid basidiocarp were collected in Seoul during 2008~2012. Morphological examination and molecular analysis using the internal transcribed spacer and nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA region sequences helped identify 38 species belonging to 28 genera, 10 families, and 5 orders in this area. Among them, three polypores, Abundisporus pubertatis, Coriolopsis strumosa, and Perenniporia maackiae were found to be new to South Korea. PMID:25071382

  19. Detection and assessment of wood decay in glulam beams using a modified impulse-echo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senalik, Adam; McGovern, Megan E.; Beall, Frank C.; Reis, Henrique

    2009-03-01

    A glulam beam retired from the field and without visible indications of wood decay was used. Towards detection and assessing wood decay, X-ray computer tomography and ultrasonic measurements were carried out. It was observed that decrease in mass density with increasing levels of wood decay affects x-rays attenuation and allows radioscopy to detect and assess wood decay. To detect and assess decay when only one lateral side of the beam is available, a modified impulse-echo was developed. The modified impulse-echo approach is based on observing the dynamic response of the glulam beams to the drop of a steel sphere onto a steel plate coupled to the glulam beam lamina. It was observed that monitoring certain frequency bands allows detection and assessment of wood decay. The selection of these frequency bands requires knowledge of the nominal beam transverse dimensions. Because of the high ultrasonic material attenuation values of decayed wood as compared with those of sound wood, the area under the power spectral density in these frequency bands is smaller in regions of decayed wood. Results show that results from both X-ray computer tomography and impulse-echo measurements are consistent with each other and can be used to detect and assess wood decay in structural lumber.

  20. Relative importance of breakage and decay as processes depleting large wood from streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Eric C.; Vaz, Pedro G.; Decker-Fritz, Jo A.; Finlay, Jacques C.; Stefan, Heinz G.

    2013-05-01

    Large wood pieces affect virtually every physical, chemical, and biological process in fluvial systems, including hydraulics, transport of materials, algal biomass accrual, nutrient uptake, and trophic interactions. The processes that deplete wood are thus of broad importance to stream ecosystems. We assessed the relative contributions for breakage-induced mobilization (where pieces are more prone to transport as a result of breakage into shorter parts) and gradual biochemical decay to wood depletion rates in a field study on 12 northern Minnesota, USA, streams. Wood pieces > 0.05 m in diameter for a portion > 1 m in length were individually tagged (n = 651), measured, and remeasured a year later. Pieces showed significant reductions in density and branching complexity (i.e., branches and twigs) and 22% of pieces broke (i.e., lost 10% or more of length). Processes related to breakage and decay were examined using Bayesian structural equation modeling and multiple regression. Breakage was more likely for pieces that were thin in diameter, long, deeply submerged, braced, buried, and traveled long distances. Pieces lost more density if they were initially dense, traveled a long distance, were not deeply submerged, lacked bark, were thin in diameter, were steeply pitched, were long, and were not buried. Pieces lost more branching complexity if they were complex with little gap between them and the streambed. Actual mass losses related to breakage and decay were 7.3% and 1.9% (respectively), both less than the 36% observed for total fluvial export. In contrast to the associations of breakage and decay with structural properties of the wood pieces and their position, hydraulic and geomorphic variables (stream power, slope, velocity, width) had little effect.

  1. An experimental method to simulate incipient decay of wood basidiomycete fungi

    Treesearch

    Simon. Curling; Jerrold E. Winandy; Carol A. Clausen

    2000-01-01

    At very early stages of decay of wood by basidiomycete fungi, strength loss can be measured from wood before any measurable weight loss. Therefore, strength loss is a more efficient measure of incipient decay than weight loss. However, common standard decay tests (e.g. EN 113 or ASTM D2017) use weight loss as the measure of decay. A method was developed that allowed...

  2. If a tree falls in the woods, who will measure it? DecAID decayed wood advisor.

    Treesearch

    Jonathan. Thompson

    2006-01-01

    Decayed wood plays many critical roles in forest ecosystems. Standing dead trees, called snags, provide habitat for a suite of wildlife, including several species of birds, insects, bats, and other mammals. Down wood provides wildlife habitat and performs ecosystem services such as releasing humus, nitrogen, and phosphorus into the forest soil, storing pockets of...

  3. Development of naphthenic acid fractionation with supercritical fluid extraction for use in wood decay testing

    Treesearch

    Brett Niemi; Wayne St. John; Bessie Woodward; Rodney DeGroot; Gary McGinnis

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the performance of copper naphthenate as a wood preservative has been in question. To understand the varying results of copper naphthenate in preventing wood decay, a closer look at eight naphthenic acid (NA) supplies was undertaken. Initial studies of NA samples from individual suppliers revealed large differences in chemical composition and wood...

  4. Insight into tradeoff between wood decay and parasitism from the genome of a fungal forest pathogen

    Treesearch

    Ake Olson; Andrea Aerts; Fred Asiegbu; Lassaad Belbahri; Ourdia Bouzid; Anders Broberg; Bjorn Canback; Pedro M. Coutinho; Dan Cullen; Kerstin Dalman; Giuliana Deflorio; Linda T.A. van Diepen; Christophe Dunand; Sebastien Duplessis; Mikael Durling; Paolo Gonthier; Jane Grimwood; Carl Gunnar Fossdal; David Hansson; Bernard Henrissat; Ari Hietala; Kajsa Himmelsrand; Dirk Hoffmeister; Nils Hogberg; Timothy Y. James; Magnus Karlsson; Annegret Kohler; Ursula Kues; Yong-Hwan Lee; Yao-Cheng Lin; Marten Lind; Erika Lindquist; Vincent Lombard; Susan Lucas; Karl Lunden; Emmanuelle Morin; Claude Murat; Jongsun Park; Tommaso Raffaello; Pierre Rouze; Asaf Salamov; Jeremy Schmutz; Halvor Solheim; Jerry Stahlberg; Heriberto Velez; Ronald P. deVries; Ad Wiebenga; Steve Woodward; Igor Yakovlev; Matteo Garbelotto; Francis Martin; Igor V. Grigoriev; Jan. Stenlid

    2012-01-01

    • Parasitism and saprotrophic wood decay are two fungal strategies fundamental for succession and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. An opportunity to assess the trade-off between these strategies is provided by the forest pathogen and wood decayer Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato. • We report the annotated genome sequence and transcript...

  5. Online resources for the identification of North American wood decay fungi

    Treesearch

    Jessie A. Glaeser

    2012-01-01

    The ability to identify wood decay fungi is an important skill for an arborist. Knowing which fungus is colonizing a tree can be used to better assess the type, amount, and position of decay in the tree, and its subsequent effects on wood strength. Distinguishing species of fungi that colonize sapwood, heartwood, or roots can provide information to improve the quality...

  6. Production of Dissolved Organic Matter During Fungal Wood Rot Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Jellison, J.; Goodell, B.; Kelley, S.; Davis, M.

    2002-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter mediates numerous biogeochemical processes in soil systems impacting subsurface microbial activity, redox chemistry, soil structure, and carbon and nitrogen sequestration. The structure and chemistry of DOM is a function of the inherited chemistry of the source material, the type of microbial action that has occurred, and selective interaction with mineral substrates. The type of fungal decomposition imparted to woody tissue is a major factor in determining the nature of DOM in forest soils. In order to investigate the relationship between fungal decomposition and the nature of DOM in coniferous forest soils we conducted 32-week inoculation studies on spruce sapwood with basidiomycete brown-rot wood decay fungi where leachable dissolved and colloidal organic matter was separated from decayed residue. A detailed examination of the organic fractions was conducted using 13C-labeled tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis, solid-state 13C-NMR, and electrospray mass spectrometry. The progressive stages of microbial decay (cellulolytic and ligninolytic) were manifested in the chemical composition of the DOM which showed an evolution from a composition initially polysaccharide rich to one dominated by mildly oxidized and demethylated lignin. Upon removal of all polysaccharides at 16 weeks the DOM (up to 10% by weight of the original tissue) looked chemically distinct from the degraded residue

  7. Dual protection of wood surface treated with melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resin mixed with ammonium polyphosphate against both fire and decay

    Treesearch

    Xing-xia Ma; Grant T. Kirker; Ming-liang Jiang; Yu-zhang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Surface coatings of melamine-modified urea-formaldehyde resins (MUFs) containing ammonium polyphosphate (APP) have been shown to significantly improve the fire retardancy of wood by prolonging the ignition time and reducing the heat release rate, total heat released, and mass loss rate. Dual protection of wood against both decay and fire has been proposed for remedial...

  8. Research on biodeterioration of wood, 1987-1992. 1. Decay mechanisms and biocontrol. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Highley, T.L.; Clausen, C.A.; Croan, S.C.; Green, F.; Illman, B.L.

    1994-03-01

    Growing concerns about the environment present an urgent need for new approaches to preserving wood. Some commonly used preservatives have been banned or restricted in several countries. The research paper first describes current knowledge about how white-and-brown rot fungi decay wood and then delineates research in to problem areas: (1) control of wood decay through targeting biosynthetic and degradative pathways, and (2) biological control (biocontrol) of wood decay through non-decay micro-organisms.

  9. Improved ganoderic acids production in Ganoderma lucidum by wood decaying components

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanru; Ahmed, Shakeel; Li, Jiawei; Luo, Biaobiao; Gao, Zengyan; Zhang, Qiyun; Li, Xiaohua; Hu, Xuebo

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a legendary Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) over a few thousands of years and one kind of its major active components are Ganoderic acids (GAs). GAs are largely produced in the mushroom primordium and fruiting body but much less in mycelium stage. However, little is known on the underlying regulatory mechanism. As a saprophytic fungus, G. lucidum solely obtains nutrients by wood decaying. Wood in general contains sophisticated chemical components with diverse structural units. To explore a strategy that extensively leads to GAs induction in the submerged liquid fermentation, all chemical components that might be possibly from the wood decaying were tested individually as GAs inducers. It was found that GAs production increased 85.96% by 1.5% microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and 63.90% by 0.5% D-galactose. The transcription level of a few rate-limiting or chemically diverting enzymes responsible for GAs biosynthesis was greatly induced by MCC and D-galactose. The concentration and time-course titration study indicated that these two chemicals might not be utilized as carbon sources but they played a comprehensive role in the secondary metabolites synthesis. Our data indicated that MCC and D-galactose might be further industrialized for higher GAs production in G. lucidum in submerged fermentation. PMID:28422185

  10. EFFECTS OF BURN RATE, WOOD SPECIES, MOISTURE CONTENT AND WEIGHT OF WOOD LOADED ON WOODSTOVE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of four woodstove operating parameters (burn rate, wood moisture, wood load, and wood species) at two levels each using a half factorial experimental test design to determine statistically significant effects on the emission components CO, CO2, p...

  11. EFFECTS OF BURN RATE, WOOD SPECIES, MOISTURE CONTENT AND WEIGHT OF WOOD LOADED ON WOODSTOVE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of four woodstove operating parameters (burn rate, wood moisture, wood load, and wood species) at two levels each using a half factorial experimental test design to determine statistically significant effects on the emission components CO, CO2, p...

  12. Causes and control of wood decay, degradation & stain

    Treesearch

    Todd Shupe; Stan Lebow; Dennis Ring

    2008-01-01

    Our society depends on wood for a variety of uses. As population increases, so does our need for wood. Steel, concrete and aluminum are some alternatives to treated wood in certain applications, but they have higher material costs, higher energy requirements in the production process, greater air and water pollution or environmental protection costs, and greater...

  13. Planting sitka spruce and Douglas-fir on decayed wood in coastal Oregon.

    Treesearch

    Carl M. Berntsen

    1960-01-01

    When overmature conifers die and deteriorate gradually while standing, a mound of decayed wood builds up about the base of the stem. When such trees fall to the ground, similar material is laid down along the path where the tree fell. Further deterioration results in low mounds or ridges of decayed wood in a state of semi-incorporation with the soil. Depending on the...

  14. Decaying wood and tree regeneration in the Acadian Forest of Maine, USA

    Treesearch

    Jamie K. Weaver; Laura S. Kenefic; Robert S. Seymour; John C. Brissette

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effect of management history on the availability of decayed downed wood and the use of downed wood as a regeneration substrate in mixed-species stands in the Acadian Forest of Maine. Regeneration of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea L. Mill), and red maple (Acer rubrum L.) was...

  15. DecAID: a decaying wood advisory model for Oregon and Washington.

    Treesearch

    Kim Mellen; Bruce G. Marcot; Janet L. Ohmann; Karen L. Waddell; Elizabeth A. Willhite; Bruce B. Hostetler; Susan A. Livingston; Cay. Ogden

    2002-01-01

    DecAID is a knowledge-based advisory model that provides guidance to managers in determining the size, amount, and distribution of dead and decaying wood (dead and partially dead trees and down wood) necessary to maintain wildlife habitat and ecosystem functions. The intent of the model is to update and replace existing snag-wildlife models in Washington and Oregon....

  16. Understanding decay resistance, dimensional stability and strength changes in heat treated and acetylated wood

    Treesearch

    Roger M. Rowell; Rebecca E. Ibach; James McSweeny; Thomas Nilsson

    2009-01-01

    Reductions in hygroscopicity, increased dimensional stability and decay resistance of heat-treated wood depend on decomposition of a large portion of the hemicelluloses in the wood cell wall. In theory, these hemicelluloses are converted to small organic molecules, water and volatile furan-type intermediates that can polymerize in the cell wall. Reductions in...

  17. Wood decay by Chlorociboria aeruginascens (Nyl.) Kanouse (Helotiales, Leotiaceae) and associated basidiomycete fungi

    Treesearch

    Dana L. Richter; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2015-01-01

    Two isolates of Chlorociboria aeruginascens (Nyl.) Kanouse incubated axenically on aspen wood blocks resulted in 18% and 32% mass loss after 134 wks (2 yrs 8 mo). Aspen wood decayed by C. aeruginascens contained cavities in the S2 layer of the secondary cell wall, similar to Type I soft rot attack, as well as erosion troughs and...

  18. Concepts in the development of new accelerated test methods for wood decay

    Treesearch

    Darrel D. Nicholas; Douglas Crawford

    2003-01-01

    Efforts to develop new environmentally friendly wood preservatives are seriously handicapped by the extended time period required to carry out the evaluation needed to establish confidence in the long term performance of new preservative systems. Studies in our laboratory have shown that using strength loss as a measure of the extent of wood decay makes it possible to...

  19. Production of New Unsaturated Lipids during Wood Decay by Ligninolytic Basidiomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ana; del Río, José C.; Martínez-Íñigo, María J.; Martínez, María J.; Martínez, Ángel T.

    2002-01-01

    Lipids were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for a 7-week in vitro decay of eucalypt wood by four ligninolytic basidiomycetes. The sound wood contained up to 75 mg of lipophilic compounds per 100 g of wood. Hydrolysis of sterol esters, which represented 38% of total wood lipids, occurred during the fungal decay. The initial increase of linoleic and other free unsaturated fatty acids paralleled the decrease of sterol esters. Moreover, new lipid compounds were found at advanced stages of wood decay that were identified from their mass spectra as unsaturated dicarboxylic acids consisting of a long aliphatic chain attached to the C-3 position of itaconic acid. These dicarboxylic acids were especially abundant in the wood treated with Ceriporiopsis subvermispora (up to 24 mg per 100 g of wood) but also were produced by Phlebia radiata, Pleurotus pulmonarius, and Bjerkandera adusta. We hypothesize that three main alkylitaconic acids (tetradecylitaconic, cis-7-hexadecenylitaconic, and hexadecylitaconic acids) are synthesized by fungi in condensation reactions involving palmitic, oleic, and stearic acids. We suggest that both wood unsaturated fatty acids (present in free form or released from esters during natural decay) and unsaturated metabolites synthesized by fungi could serve as a source for peroxidizable lipids in lignin degradation by white rot basidiomycetes. PMID:11872486

  20. Changes in the Chemical Composition and Decay Resistance of Thermally-Modified Hevea brasiliensis Wood

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of thermal treatment on the equilibrium moisture content, chemical composition and biological resistance to decay fungi of juvenile and mature Hevea brasiliensis wood (rubber wood) was evaluated. Samples were taken from a 53-year-old rubber wood plantation located in Tabapuã, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The samples were thermally-modified at 180°C, 200°C and 220°C. Results indicate that the thermal modification caused: (1) a significant increase in the extractive content and proportional increase in the lignin content at 220°C; (2) a significant decrease in the equilibrium moisture content, holocelluloses, arabinose, galactose and xylose content, but no change in glucose content; and (3) a significant increase in wood decay resistance against both Pycnoporus sanguineus (L.) Murrill and Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers.) Murrill decay fungi. The greatest decay resistance was achieved from treatment at 220°C which resulted in a change in wood decay resistance class from moderately resistant to resistant. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the influence of thermal treatment in mature wood was lower than in juvenile wood. PMID:26986200

  1. Changes in the Chemical Composition and Decay Resistance of Thermally-Modified Hevea brasiliensis Wood.

    PubMed

    Severo, Elias Taylor Durgante; Calonego, Fred Willians; Sansígolo, Cláudio Angeli; Bond, Brian

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of thermal treatment on the equilibrium moisture content, chemical composition and biological resistance to decay fungi of juvenile and mature Hevea brasiliensis wood (rubber wood) was evaluated. Samples were taken from a 53-year-old rubber wood plantation located in Tabapuã, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The samples were thermally-modified at 180°C, 200°C and 220°C. Results indicate that the thermal modification caused: (1) a significant increase in the extractive content and proportional increase in the lignin content at 220°C; (2) a significant decrease in the equilibrium moisture content, holocelluloses, arabinose, galactose and xylose content, but no change in glucose content; and (3) a significant increase in wood decay resistance against both Pycnoporus sanguineus (L.) Murrill and Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers.) Murrill decay fungi. The greatest decay resistance was achieved from treatment at 220°C which resulted in a change in wood decay resistance class from moderately resistant to resistant. Finally, this study also demonstrated that the influence of thermal treatment in mature wood was lower than in juvenile wood.

  2. Whole-cell biosensor of cellobiose and application to wood decay detection.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Maxime; Bontemps, Cyril; Besserer, Arnaud; Hotel, Laurence; Gérardin, Philippe; Leblond, Pierre

    2016-12-10

    Fungal biodegradation of wood is one of the main threats regarding its use as a material. So far, the detection of this decaying process is empirically assessed by loss of mass, when the fungal attack is advanced and woody structure already damaged. Being able to detect fungal attack on wood in earlier steps is thus of special interest for the wood economy. In this aim, we designed here a new diagnostic tool for wood degradation detection based on the bacterial whole-cell biosensor technology. It was designed in diverting the soil bacteria Streptomyces CebR sensor system devoted to cellobiose detection, a cellulolytic degradation by-product emitted by lignolytic fungi since the onset of wood decaying process. The conserved regulation scheme of the CebR system among Streptomyces allowed constructing a molecular tool easily transferable in different strains or species and enabling the screen for optimal host strains for cellobiose detection. Assays are performed in microplates using one-day culture lysates. Diagnostic is performed within one hour by a spectrophotometric measuring of the cathecol deshydrogenase activity. The selected biosensor was able to detect specifically cellobiose at concentrations similar to those measured in decaying wood and in a spruce leachate attacked by a lignolytic fungus, indicating a high potential of applicability to detect ongoing wood decay process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Role of Chemical Transport in the Decay Resistance of Modified Wood. In: M

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecka Ringman; Annica Pulgard; Emil Engelund Thybring; Joseph E. Jakes; Klaus Richter

    2015-01-01

    A 2014 review by Ringman et al. examined established theories addressing why modified wood has increased decay resistance and concluded that the most probable cause of inhibition and/or delay of the initiation of brown rot decay is lowering the equilibrium moisture content for given environmental conditions. A 2013 paper by Jakes et al...

  4. Compartmentalization of decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea in several tree species

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo; Joanna T. Tippett

    1981-01-01

    Decayed wood associated with Armillaria mellea was compartmentalized according to the CODIT (Compartmentalization Of Decay In Trees) model. Compartmentalization in the sapwood began after the tree walled off the area of dead cambium associated with the inflection of the fungus. The fungus spread into dying sapwood beneath and beyond the area of...

  5. Wood decay fungi restore essential calcium to acidic soils in northern New England

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith

    2015-01-01

    The depletion of root-available calcium in northern forests soils exposed to decades of increased acid deposition adversely affects forest health and productivity. Laboratory studies indicated the potential of wood-decay fungi to restore lost calcium to the rooting zone of trees. This study reports changes in concentrations of Ca, Mg, and K during decay of sapwood of...

  6. Syringyl-Rich Lignin Renders Poplars More Resistant to Degradation by Wood Decay Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Skyba, Oleksandr; Douglas, Carl J.

    2013-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effects of lignin composition on the resistance of wood to degradation by decay fungi, wood specimens from two transgenic poplar lines expressing an Arabidopsis gene encoding ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) driven by the cinnimate-4-hydroxylase promoter (C4H::F5H) that increased syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) monolignol ratios relative to those in the untransformed control wood were incubated with six different wood decay fungi. Alterations in wood weight and chemical composition were monitored over the incubation period. The results showed that transgenic poplar lines extremely rich in syringyl lignin exhibited a drastically improved resistance to degradation by all decay fungi evaluated. Lignin monomer composition and its distribution among cell types and within different cell layers were the sole wood chemistry parameters determining wood durability. Since transgenic poplars with exceedingly high syringyl contents were recalcitrant to degradation, where wood durability is a critical factor, these genotypes may offer improved performance. PMID:23396333

  7. Interactions between soil- and dead wood-inhabiting fungal communities during the decay of Norway spruce logs

    PubMed Central

    Mäkipää, Raisa; Rajala, Tiina; Schigel, Dmitry; Rinne, Katja T; Pennanen, Taina; Abrego, Nerea; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the interaction between fungal communities of soil and dead wood substrates. For this, we applied molecular species identification and stable isotope tracking to both soil and decaying wood in an unmanaged boreal Norway spruce-dominated stand. Altogether, we recorded 1990 operational taxonomic units, out of which more than 600 were shared by both substrates and 589 were found to exclusively inhabit wood. On average the soil was more species-rich than the decaying wood, but the species richness in dead wood increased monotonically along the decay gradient, reaching the same species richness and community composition as soil in the late stages. Decaying logs at all decay stages locally influenced the fungal communities from soil, some fungal species occurring in soil only under decaying wood. Stable isotope analyses suggest that mycorrhizal species colonising dead wood in the late decay stages actively transfer nitrogen and carbon between soil and host plants. Most importantly, Piloderma sphaerosporum and Tylospora sp. mycorrhizal species were highly abundant in decayed wood. Soil- and wood-inhabiting fungal communities interact at all decay phases of wood that has important implications in fungal community dynamics and thus nutrient transportation. PMID:28430188

  8. Ratios of heavy hadron semileptonic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2011-02-01

    Ratios of charmed meson and baryon semileptonic decay rates appear to be satisfactorily described by considering only the lowest-lying (S-wave) hadronic final states and assuming the kinematic factor describing phase space suppression is the same as that for free quarks. For example, the rate for D{sub s} semileptonic decay is known to be (17.0{+-}5.3)% lower than those for D{sup 0} or D{sup +}, and the model accounts for this difference. When applied to hadrons containing b quarks, this method implies that the B{sub s} semileptonic decay rate is about 1% higher than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This small difference thus suggests surprisingly good local quark-hadron duality for B semileptonic decays, complementing the expectation based on inclusive quark-hadron duality that these differences in rates should not exceed a few tenths of a percent. For {Lambda}{sub b} semileptonic decay, however, the inclusive rate is predicted to be about 13% greater than that of the nonstrange B mesons. This value, representing a considerable departure from a calculation using a heavy-quark expansion, is close to the corresponding experimental ratio {Gamma}({Lambda}{sub b})/{Gamma}(B)=1.13{+-}0.03 of total decay rates.

  9. On the decay rate of sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Dobias, J. J.; Preminger, D. G.; Walton, S. R.

    2003-02-01

    We have analyzed the decay of 32 sunspots observed during the years 1988 through 2001 at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO). The data are from digital images obtained in the red (672 nm) with the Cartesian Full Disk Telescope No.1 (CFDT1). We find that the rate of decay is strongly correlated with the total sunspot area and the umbral to total area ratio. The multiple correlation coefficient is 0.93. Thus, the unexplained variance from this simple model is (1-0.87). We find that for the sunspots of this study, the decay rate is not a constant and that there is no significant correlation between the decay rate and the square root of the total spot area.

  10. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f0(1500) and f0(1710).

  11. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-22

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710)

  12. Fungal accumulation of metals from building materials during brown rot wood decay.

    PubMed

    Hastrup, Anne Christine Steenkjær; Jensen, Bo; Jellison, Jody

    2014-08-01

    This study analyzes the accumulation and translocation of metal ions in wood during the degradation performed by one strain of each of the three brown rot fungi; Serpula lacrymans, Meruliporia incrassata and Coniophora puteana. These fungi species are inhabitants of the built environment where the prevention and understanding of fungal decay is of high priority. This study focuses on the influence of various building materials in relation to fungal growth and metal uptake. Changes in the concentration of iron, manganese, calcium and copper ions in the decayed wood were analyzed by induced coupled plasma spectroscopy and related to wood weight loss and oxalic acid accumulation. Metal transport into the fungal inoculated wood was found to be dependent on the individual strain/species. The S. lacrymans strain caused a significant increase in total iron whereas the concentration of copper ions in the wood appeared decreased after 10 weeks of decay. Wood inoculated with the M. incrassata isolate showed the contrary tendency with high copper accumulation and low iron increase despite similar weight losses for the two strains. However, significantly lower oxalic acid accumulation was recorded in M. incrassata degraded wood. The addition of a building material resulted in increased weight loss in wood degraded by C. puteana in the soil-block test; however, this could not be directly linked specifically to the accumulation of any of the four metals recorded. The accumulation of oxalic acid seemed to influence the iron uptake. The study assessing the influence of the presence of soil and glass in the soil-block test revealed that soil contributed the majority of the metals for uptake by the fungi and contributed to increased weight loss. The varying uptake observed among the three brown rot fungi strains toward the four metals analyzed may be related to the specific non-enzymatic and enzymatic properties including bio-chelators employed by each of the species during wood

  13. Heat release rate of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    N. M. Stark; R. H. White; C. M. Clemons

    1997-01-01

    Wood-plastic composites are becoming more important as a material that fulfills recycling needs. In this study, fire performance tests were conducted on several compositions of wood and plastic materials using the Ohio State University rate of heat release apparatus. Test results included five-minute average heat release rate in kW/m2 (HRR avg) and maximum heat release...

  14. Biological control of wood decay against fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Susi, Petri; Aktuganov, Gleb; Himanen, Juha; Korpela, Timo

    2011-07-01

    Wood (timber) is an important raw material for various purposes, and having biological composition it is susceptible to deterioration by various agents. The history of wood protection by impregnation with synthetic chemicals is almost two hundred years old. However, the ever-increasing public concern and the new environmental regulations on the use of chemicals have created the need for the development and the use of alternative methods for wood protection. Biological wood protection by antagonistic microbes alone or in combination with (bio)chemicals, is one of the most promising ways for the environmentally sound wood protection. The most effective biocontrol antagonists belong to genera Trichoderma, Gliocladium, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Streptomyces. They compete for an ecological niche by consuming available nutrients as well as by secreting a spectrum of biochemicals effective against various fungal pathogens. The biochemicals include cell wall-degrading enzymes, siderophores, chelating iron and a wide variety of volatile and non-volatile antibiotics. In this review, the nature and the function of the antagonistic microbes in wood protection are discussed.

  15. Network Analysis Reveals Ecological Links between N-Fixing Bacteria and Wood-Decaying Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Björn; Kahl, Tiemo; Karasch, Peter; Wubet, Tesfaye; Bauhus, Jürgen; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen availability in dead wood is highly restricted and associations with N-fixing bacteria are thought to enable wood-decaying fungi to meet their nitrogen requirements for vegetative and generative growth. We assessed the diversity of nifH (dinitrogenase reductase) genes in dead wood of the common temperate tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies from differently managed forest plots in Germany using molecular tools. By incorporating these genes into a large compilation of published nifH sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of deduced proteins we verified the presence of diverse pools corresponding to functional nifH, almost all of which are new to science. The distribution of nifH genes strongly correlated with tree species and decay class, but not with forest management, while higher fungal fructification was correlated with decreasing nitrogen content of the dead wood and positively correlated with nifH diversity, especially during the intermediate stage of wood decay. Network analyses based on non-random species co-occurrence patterns revealed interactions among fungi and N-fixing bacteria in the dead wood and strongly indicate the occurrence of at least commensal relationships between these taxa. PMID:24505405

  16. Network analysis reveals ecological links between N-fixing bacteria and wood-decaying fungi.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Björn; Kahl, Tiemo; Karasch, Peter; Wubet, Tesfaye; Bauhus, Jürgen; Buscot, François; Krüger, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen availability in dead wood is highly restricted and associations with N-fixing bacteria are thought to enable wood-decaying fungi to meet their nitrogen requirements for vegetative and generative growth. We assessed the diversity of nifH (dinitrogenase reductase) genes in dead wood of the common temperate tree species Fagus sylvatica and Picea abies from differently managed forest plots in Germany using molecular tools. By incorporating these genes into a large compilation of published nifH sequences and subsequent phylogenetic analyses of deduced proteins we verified the presence of diverse pools corresponding to functional nifH, almost all of which are new to science. The distribution of nifH genes strongly correlated with tree species and decay class, but not with forest management, while higher fungal fructification was correlated with decreasing nitrogen content of the dead wood and positively correlated with nifH diversity, especially during the intermediate stage of wood decay. Network analyses based on non-random species co-occurrence patterns revealed interactions among fungi and N-fixing bacteria in the dead wood and strongly indicate the occurrence of at least commensal relationships between these taxa.

  17. Screening Wood Decayed by White Rot Fungi for Preferential Lignin Degradation †

    PubMed Central

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    A screening procedure in which scanning electron microscopy was used indicated that 26 white rot fungi selectively removed lignin from various coniferous and hardwood tree species. Delignified wood from field collections had distinct micromorphological characteristics that were easily differentiated from other types of decay. The middle lamella was degraded, and the cells were separated from one another. Secondary cell wall layers that remained had a fibrillar appearance. Chemical analyses of delignified wood indicated that the cells were composed primarily of cellulose. Only small percentages of lignin and hemicellulose were evident. Delignified wood was not uniformly distributed throughout the decayed wood samples. White-pocket and white-mottled areas of the various decayed wood examined contained delignified cells, but adjacent wood had a nonselective removal of lignin where all cell wall components had been degraded simultaneously. This investigation demonstrates that selective delignification among white rot fungi is more prevalent than previously realized and identifies a large number of fungi for use in studies of preferential lignin degradation. Images PMID:16346631

  18. Power spectrum analyses of nuclear decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P. A.; Lasenby, R. N.; Lasenby, A. N.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Hoft, A. W.; Horan, T. J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Kerford, J. L.; Lee, R. H.; Longman, A.; Mattes, J. J.; Morreale, B. L.; Morris, D. B.; Mudry, R. N.; Newport, J. R.; O'Keefe, D.; Petrelli, M. A.; Silver, M. A.; Stewart, C. A.; Terry, B.

    2010-10-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are not a direct synchronous modulation. We conclude that the annual periodicity in these data sets is a real effect, but that further study involving additional carefully controlled experiments will be needed to establish its origin.

  19. Development of wood decay in wound-initiated discolored wood of eastern red cedar

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kenneth R. Dudzik; Kevin T. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Logs of eastern red cedar, Juniperus virginiana L., with well-developed bands of light-colored wood ("included sapwood") within heartwood can be unsuitable for sawn wood products. This finding is in contrast to published information that the "included sapwood" is (1) a heartwood anomaly rather than sapwood and (2) its occurrence...

  20. Current Research on Wood Decay in the USDA Forest Service

    Treesearch

    Harold H. Burdsall Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Forest Service's research on decay fungi and decay caused by fungi is done mainly in two research work units at the Forest Products Laboratory. One unit, the Center for Forest Mycology Research, performs biosystematic research on root-rot and products-rot fungi in the genera Armillaria, Phellinus, and Phlebia and maintains the culture collection supporting...

  1. The effect of wind on burning rate of wood cribs

    Treesearch

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney

    2016-01-01

    Wood cribs are often used as ignition sources for room fire tests. A wood crib may also apply to studies of burning rate in wildland fires, because wildland fuel beds are porous and three dimensional. A unique aspect of wildland fires is the ubiquitous presence of wind. However, very little is known about what effect the increased ventilation has on the...

  2. Use of sonic tomography to detect and quantify wood decay in living trees1

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregory S.; Ballesteros, Javier O.; Barrios-Rodriguez, Cesar A.; Bonadies, Ernesto F.; Cedeño-Sánchez, Marjorie L.; Fossatti-Caballero, Nohely J.; Trejos-Rodríguez, Mariam M.; Pérez-Suñiga, José Moises; Holub-Young, Katharine S.; Henn, Laura A. W.; Thompson, Jennifer B.; García-López, Cesar G.; Romo, Amanda C.; Johnston, Daniel C.; Barrick, Pablo P.; Jordan, Fulvia A.; Hershcovich, Shiran; Russo, Natalie; Sánchez, Juan David; Fábrega, Juan Pablo; Lumpkin, Raleigh; McWilliams, Hunter A.; Chester, Kathleen N.; Burgos, Alana C.; Wong, E. Beatriz; Diab, Jonathan H.; Renteria, Sonia A.; Harrower, Jennifer T.; Hooton, Douglas A.; Glenn, Travis C.; Faircloth, Brant C.; Hubbell, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Field methodology and image analysis protocols using acoustic tomography were developed and evaluated as a tool to estimate the amount of internal decay and damage of living trees, with special attention to tropical rainforest trees with irregular trunk shapes. Methods and Results: Living trunks of a diversity of tree species in tropical rainforests in the Republic of Panama were scanned using an Argus Electronic PiCUS 3 Sonic Tomograph and evaluated for the amount and patterns of internal decay. A protocol using ImageJ analysis software was used to quantify the proportions of intact and compromised wood. The protocols provide replicable estimates of internal decay and cavities for trees of varying shapes, wood density, and bark thickness. Conclusions: Sonic tomography, coupled with image analysis, provides an efficient, noninvasive approach to evaluate decay patterns and structural integrity of even irregularly shaped living trees. PMID:28101433

  3. Use of sonic tomography to detect and quantify wood decay in living trees.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gregory S; Ballesteros, Javier O; Barrios-Rodriguez, Cesar A; Bonadies, Ernesto F; Cedeño-Sánchez, Marjorie L; Fossatti-Caballero, Nohely J; Trejos-Rodríguez, Mariam M; Pérez-Suñiga, José Moises; Holub-Young, Katharine S; Henn, Laura A W; Thompson, Jennifer B; García-López, Cesar G; Romo, Amanda C; Johnston, Daniel C; Barrick, Pablo P; Jordan, Fulvia A; Hershcovich, Shiran; Russo, Natalie; Sánchez, Juan David; Fábrega, Juan Pablo; Lumpkin, Raleigh; McWilliams, Hunter A; Chester, Kathleen N; Burgos, Alana C; Wong, E Beatriz; Diab, Jonathan H; Renteria, Sonia A; Harrower, Jennifer T; Hooton, Douglas A; Glenn, Travis C; Faircloth, Brant C; Hubbell, Stephen P

    2016-12-01

    Field methodology and image analysis protocols using acoustic tomography were developed and evaluated as a tool to estimate the amount of internal decay and damage of living trees, with special attention to tropical rainforest trees with irregular trunk shapes. Living trunks of a diversity of tree species in tropical rainforests in the Republic of Panama were scanned using an Argus Electronic PiCUS 3 Sonic Tomograph and evaluated for the amount and patterns of internal decay. A protocol using ImageJ analysis software was used to quantify the proportions of intact and compromised wood. The protocols provide replicable estimates of internal decay and cavities for trees of varying shapes, wood density, and bark thickness. Sonic tomography, coupled with image analysis, provides an efficient, noninvasive approach to evaluate decay patterns and structural integrity of even irregularly shaped living trees.

  4. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    Treesearch

    Robert Riley; Asaf A. Salamov; Daren W. Brown; Laszlo G. Nagy; Dimitrios Floudas; Benjamin W. Held; Anthony Levasseur; Vincent Lombard; Emmanuelle Morin; Robert Otillar; Erika A. Lindquist; Hui Sun; Kurt M. LaButti; Jeremy Schmutz; Dina Jabbour; Hong Luo; Scott E. Baker; Antonio G. Pisabarro; Jonathan D. Walton; Robert A. Blanchette; Bernard Henrissat; Francis Martin; Daniel Cullen; David S. Hibbett; Igor V. Grigoriev

    2014-01-01

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic...

  5. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade ...

  6. Principles for Protecting Wood Buildings from Decay. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    Spray treated with a water-will be greater wherte sourainfall Ts u ually In o utrfae oen just ove o the idoing. als bespay rea dbefre t s istale oraftr...it. These preservatives are used mainly for cows - mercial pressure treating. Vapors from wood treatedwith pentachlorophenol may beS..injurious to

  7. Field and Laboratory Decay Evaluations of wood-plastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Marek Gnatowski; Grace Sun

    2013-01-01

    Experimental wood–plastic composites (WPCs) were made so that they matched the manufacturing process, dimensions, and water absorption of some commercial decking boards. WPC samples from selected formulations were divided into two identical groups. The first group was exposed in exterior conditions in Vancouver, British Columbia, and Hilo, Hawaii, at sun and shadow...

  8. Evaluation of three electronic noses for detecting incipient wood decay

    Treesearch

    Manuela Baietto; Alphus D. Wilson; Daniele Bassi; Francesco . Ferrini

    2010-01-01

    Tree assessment methodologies, currently used to evaluate the structural stability of individual urban trees, usually involve a visual analysis followed by measurements of the internal soundness of wood using various instruments that are often invasive, expensive, or inadequate for use within the urban environment. Moreover, most conventional instruments do not provide...

  9. Efficacy of copper borax preservative against wood decay

    Treesearch

    William Abbott; Bessie Woodward; Michael West

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a wood preservative containing active ingredients of 43.5% borax and 3.1% copper hydroxide was evaluated in soil-block tests in accordance with AWPA E10. Results suggested thatthe copper hydroxide was not contributing to fungal toxicity at preservative threshold levels. Thresholds determined for this preservative were very close to those previously...

  10. Wood decay by brown-rot fungi : changes in pore structure and cell wall volume

    Treesearch

    Douglas S. Flournoy; T. Kent Kirk; T.L. Highley

    1991-01-01

    Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) wood blocks were decayed by Postia (= Poria) placenta in soilblock cultures. Decay was terminated at various weight losses, and the pore volumes available to four low molecular weight molecules, (water, 4 Å,; glucose, 8 Å,; maltose, 10 Å; and raffinose, 128,) and three dextrans (Mr 6,000, 38 Å; 11,200, 51 Å; nd 17,500, 61 Å) were...

  11. Chelating efficiency and thermal, mechanical and decay resistance performances of chitosan copper complex in wood-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Lu, John Z; Duan, Xinfang; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun

    2008-09-01

    Wood-polymer composites (WPC) have been extensively used for building products, outdoor decking, automotive, packaging materials, and other applications. WPC is subject to fungal and termite attacks due to wood components enveloped in the thermoplastic matrix. Much effort has been made to improve decay resistance of WPC using zinc borate and other chemicals. In this study, chitosan copper complex (CCC) compounds were used as a potential preservative for wood-HDPE composites. CCC was formulated by reacting chitosan with copper salts under controlled conditions. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analytical results indicated that chitosan had high chelating efficiency with copper cations. CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites had a thermal behavior similar to untreated and zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites. Incorporation of CCC in wood-HDPE composites did not significantly influence board density of the resultant composites, but had a negative effect on tensile strength at high CCC concentration. In comparison with solid wood and the untreated wood-HDPE composites, 3% CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites significantly improved the decay resistance against white rot fungus Trametes versicolor and brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum. Especially, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites were more effectively against the brown rot than the untreated and chitosan-treated wood-HDPE composites. Moreover, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites performed well as zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites on fungal decay resistance. Accordingly, CCC can be effectively used as a preservative for WPC.

  12. Edge effects on moisture reduce wood decomposition rate in a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Crockatt, Martha E; Bebber, Daniel P

    2015-02-01

    Forests around the world are increasingly fragmented, and edge effects on forest microclimates have the potential to affect ecosystem functions such as carbon and nutrient cycling. Edges tend to be drier and warmer due to the effects of insolation, wind, and evapotranspiration and these gradients can penetrate hundreds of metres into the forest. Litter decomposition is a key component of the carbon cycle, which is largely controlled by saprotrophic fungi that respond to variation in temperature and moisture. However, the impact of forest fragmentation on litter decay is poorly understood. Here, we investigate edge effects on the decay of wood in a temperate forest using an experimental approach, whereby mass loss in wood blocks placed along 100 m transects from the forest edge to core was monitored over 2 years. Decomposition rate increased with distance from the edge, and was correlated with increasing humidity and moisture content of the decaying wood, such that the decay constant at 100 m was nearly twice that at the edge. Mean air temperature decreased slightly with distance from the edge. The variation in decay constant due to edge effects was larger than that expected from any reasonable estimates of climatic variation, based on a published regional model. We modelled the influence of edge effects on the decay constant at the landscape scale using functions for forest area within different distances from edge across the UK. We found that taking edge effects into account would decrease the decay rate by nearly one quarter, compared with estimates that assumed no edge effect. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of Decay on Ultrasonic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements in Wood

    Treesearch

    Megan McGovern; Adam Senalik; George Chen; Frank C. Beall; Henrique Reis

    2013-01-01

    The percentage mass loss of loblolly pine (pinus taeda) wood cube specimens exposed to Gloeophyllum fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum) for increasing periods of time ranging from 1 to 12 weeks was recorded after being subjected to controlled decay following ASTM International standard ASTM D 1423-99. The specimens’ corresponding volume...

  14. Modern Instrumental Methods to Investigate the Mechanism of Biological Decay in Wood Plastic Composites

    Treesearch

    Grace Sun; Rebecca Ibach; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie Glaeser; Mathew Leung; John. Haight

    2014-01-01

    Various instrumental techniques were used to study the fungal decay process in wood plastic composite (WPC) boards. Commercial boards exposed near Hilo, Hawaii (HI) for eight years in both sun and shadow locations were inspected and tested periodically. After eight years of exposure, both boards were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while a selected...

  15. Potential of decaying wood to restore root-available base cations in depleted forest soils

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith; Jody Jellison; Jonathan S. Schilling

    2012-01-01

    The depletion of root-available Ca in northern forest soils exposed to decades of increased acid deposition adversely affects forest health and productivity. Laboratory studies indicated the potential of wood-decay fungi to restore lost Ca. This study presents changes in concentration of Ca, Mg, and K in sapwood of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.),...

  16. Exterior Decay of Wood-Plastic Composite Boards: Characterization and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Treesearch

    Rebecca Ibach; Grace Sun; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie Glaeser; Mathew Leung; John Haight

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate free water content and distribution in wood-plastic composite (WPC) materials decayed during exterior exposure near Hilo, Hawaii. Two segments of the same board blend were selected from 6 commercial decking boards that had fungal fruiting bodies. One of the two board segments was exposed in sun, the other in shadow...

  17. Copper radical oxidases and related extracellular oxidoreductases of wood-decay Agaricomycetes

    Treesearch

    Phil Kersten; Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular peroxide generation, a key component of oxidative lignocellulose degradation, has been attributed to various enzymes including the copper radical oxidases. Encoded by a family of structurally related sequences, the genes are widely distributed among wood decay fungi including three recently completed polypore genomes. In all cases, core catalytic residues...

  18. A review of the role of fungi in wood decay of forest ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Marcot

    2017-01-01

    Fungi are key players in the health, diversity, and productivity of forest ecosystems in Pacific Northwest forests, as mycorrhizal associations, pathogens, decomposers, nontimber resources, and food resources for wildlife. A number of invertebrate species are associated with wood decay fungi, serve as vectors for fungal pathogens, or are fungivorous (consume fungi) and...

  19. Molecular polymorphism and phenotypic diversity in the generalist, wood-decay fungus Eutypa lata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogen adaptation to different ecological niches can lead to host specialization and, when coupled with reproductive isolation, ecological speciation. We tested the hypothesis of host specialization in northern California populations of the fungus Eutypa lata, which causes a soft-rot wood decay in...

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of dioctylaminoborate in wood for brown rot decay protection

    Treesearch

    George C. Chen; Rebecca E. Ibach

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated dioctylaminoborate in wood for fungal decay protection Dioctylaminoborate was synthesized by refluxing dioctylamine and boric acid in 1:1 molar ratio in ethanol for 4 h. The product was characterized by proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrophotometry (1H-NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIR)....

  1. Control of wood decay by Trichoderma (Gliocladium virens. I, Antagonistic properties

    Treesearch

    T. L. Highley

    1997-01-01

    Antagonistic characteristics of a commercial biofungicide, Trichoderma (Gliocladiurn) virens (GL-21, W. R. Grace and Co., CT), were evaluated against three white-rot fungi, Trametes versicolor, Phlebia brevispora, Irpex lacteus, and three brown-rot fungi, Postia placenta, Neolentinus lepideus, and Gloeophyllum trabeum. In dual cultures of T. virens and wood decay fungi...

  2. Comparative transcriptome and secretome analysis of wood decay fungi Postia placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Treesearch

    Amber J. Vanden Wymelenberg; Jill Gaskell; Michael Mozuch; Grzegorz Sabat; John Ralph; Oleksandr Skyba; Shawn D Mansfield; Robert A. Blanchette; Diego Martinez; Igor Grigoriev; Philip J Kersten; Daniel Cullen

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose degradation by brown rot fungi, such as Postia placenta, is poorly understood relative to the phylogenetically related white rot basidiomycete, Phanerochaete chrysosporium. To elucidate the number, structure, and regulation of genes involved in lignocellulosic cell wall attack, secretome and transcriptome analyses were performed on both wood decay fungi...

  3. Changes in wood microstructure through progressive stages of decay

    Treesearch

    W. Wayne Wilcox

    1968-01-01

    Successive stages of decay in the sapwood of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), a hardwood, and of southern pine (Pinus sp.), a softwood, were observed microscopically. The white-rot fungus. Polyporus versicolor L., and the brown-rot fungus, Poria monticola Murr., were the fungi used or the observations, light microscopy, plus the techniques of polarization and...

  4. Identification and characterisation of xylanolytic yeasts isolated from decaying wood and sugarcane bagasse in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lara, Carla A; Santos, Renata O; Cadete, Raquel M; Ferreira, Carla; Marques, Susana; Gírio, Francisco; Oliveira, Evelyn S; Rosa, Carlos A; Fonseca, César

    2014-06-01

    In this study, yeasts associated with lignocellulosic materials in Brazil, including decaying wood and sugarcane bagasse, were isolated, and their ability to produce xylanolytic enzymes was investigated. A total of 358 yeast isolates were obtained, with 198 strains isolated from decaying wood and 160 strains isolated from decaying sugarcane bagasse samples. Seventy-five isolates possessed xylanase activity in solid medium and were identified as belonging to nine species: Candida intermedia, C. tropicalis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Scheffersomyces shehatae, Sugiyamaella smithiae, Cryptococcus diffluens, Cr. heveanensis, Cr. laurentii and Trichosporon mycotoxinivorans. Twenty-one isolates were further screened for total xylanase activity in liquid medium with xylan, and five xylanolytic yeasts were selected for further characterization, which included quantitative analysis of growth in xylan and xylose and xylanase and β-D-xylosidase activities. The yeasts showing the highest growth rate and cell density in xylan, Cr. laurentii UFMG-HB-48, Su. smithiae UFMG-HM-80.1 and Sc. shehatae UFMG-HM-9.1a, were, simultaneously, those exhibiting higher xylanase activity. Xylan induced the highest level of (extracellular) xylanase activity in Cr. laurentii UFMG-HB-48 and the highest level of (intracellular, extracellular and membrane-associated) β-D-xylosidase activity in Su. smithiae UFMG-HM-80.1. Also, significant β-D-xylosidase levels were detected in xylan-induced cultures of Cr. laurentii UFMG-HB-48 and Sc. shehatae UFMG-HM-9.1a, mainly in extracellular and intracellular spaces, respectively. Under xylose induction, Cr. laurentii UFMG-HB-48 showed the highest intracellular β-D-xylosidase activity among all the yeast tested. C. tropicalis UFMG-HB 93a showed its higher (intracellular) β-D-xylosidase activity under xylose induction and higher at 30 °C than at 50 °C. This study revealed different xylanolytic abilities and strategies in yeasts to metabolise xylan and

  5. Molecular diversity of myxomycetes associated with decaying wood and forest floor leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Ko, Thida Win Ko; Stephenson, Steven L; Jeewon, Rajesh; Lumyong, Saisamorn; Hyde, Kevin D

    2009-01-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting was used to assess the molecular diversity of myxomycetes from environmental samples (decaying wood and forest floor litter) collected at the Mushroom Research Centre in northern Thailand. Total genomic DNA was extracted directly from environmental samples on which myxomycetes were not apparent. Part of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rDNA) was amplified and DNA sequences analyzed. DGGE gels revealed up to 17 operational taxonomic units (OTU) from decaying wood and 10 OTU from forest floor litter samples, but only seven (wood) and six (litter) OTU could be re-amplified and/or sequenced. Based on results obtained with the BLAST analysis program, the species involved appeared to correspond most closely to Diderma saundersii, Didymium iridis, Stemonitis flavogenita and Hyperamoeba sp. strain W2i on decaying wood and to Diderma saundersii and Physarum didermoides on forest floor litter. Our results suggest that then PCR-DGGE can be used to obtain data on the presence of myxomycetes in their primary microhabitats without the need to observe the sporocarps of these organisms. As such the technique would seem to have considerable potential for contributing to a more complete understanding of myxomycete diversity and ecology in terrestrial ecosystems.

  6. Burning rate of solid wood measured in a heat release rate calorimeter

    Treesearch

    H. C. Tran; R. H. White

    1992-01-01

    Burning rate is a key factor in modeling fire growth and fire endurance of wood structures. This study investigated the burning rate of selected wood materials as determined by heat release, mass loss and charring rates. Thick samples of redwood, southern pine, red oak and basswood were tested in a heat release rate calorimeter. Results on ignitability and average beat...

  7. Effect of debarking water from Norway spruce (Picea abies) on the growth of five species of wood-decaying fungi.

    PubMed

    Edfeldt, Amelie Fagerlund; Hedenström, Erik; Edman, Mattias; Jonsson, Bengt Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) debarking water is an aqueous extract obtained as waste from the debarking of logs at paper mills. The debarking water contains a mixture of natural compounds that can exhibit diverse biological activities, potentially including fungicidal activity on some species of wood-decaying fungi. Thus, we investigated the growth rates of such fungi on agar plates to which debarking water extracts had been added. The experiment included five wood-decaying fungi, viz. Gloeophyllum sepiarium, Oligoporus lateritius, Ischnoderma benzoinum, Junghuhnia luteoalba, and Phlebia sp. Growth reduction was observed for all species at the highest tested concentrations of freeze-dried and ethanol-extracted debarking water, the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction and the diethyl ether-soluble fraction. However, the magnitude of the effect varied between different species and strains of individual species. The brown-rot fungi G. sepiarium and O. lateritius were generally the most sensitive species, with the growth of all tested strains being completely inhibited by the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction. These results indicate that development of antifungal wood-protecting agents from debarking water could potentially be a way to make use of a low-value industrial waste.

  8. Fast wood decay in a mountain Mediterranean area having Fagus sylvatica forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fravolini, Giulia; Egli, Markus; Cherubini, Paolo; Tognetti, Roberto; Lombardi, Fabio; Marchetti, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Deadwood and litter act as important linkages between recent productivity and current community, and ecosystem processes. The increasing interest in the quantity and properties of coarse woody debris (CWD) and litter is relevant both to maintaining biodiversity and to global C dynamics. Mountain and Mediterranean areas, furthermore, are considered to be especially sensitive to changing environmental conditions. Consequently, a need exists to understand more in detail the interplay between soils, forests, deadwood and climate in general and in particular in mountain Mediterranean areas such as the Appenine. Due to the fact that linkages between climate, coarse woody decay and soils in mountain Mediterranean areas are only poorly understood, we aimed at investigating the decay mechanism of Fagus silvatica as a function of altitude and exposure. Furthermore, the effects of exposure on the decay dynamics of dead wood and soils were compared along a altitudinal sequence in an Appenine mountain forest (Majella Mountain). Ten sites, five of which having north and the other 5 having south exposure, were investigated, ranging from 1000 m to 1650 m asl. All sites have a Fagus sylvatica forest. In addition to this, experimental plots were installed at each site. In May 2014 standardised wood blocks (5 x 5 x 2 cm) of local Fagus sylvatica were placed at each site inside PVC tubes ('mesocosms') that was filled with undisturbed soil material. The sampling design foresees that three replicates of such mesocosms per site will be sampled after 8 , 16, 52 and 104 weeks. After 8 weeks three tubes were removed from the sites (sampled soil and dead wood blocks) and the wood blocks analysed for cellulose, lignin and density. At each site, three cores were taken to analyse soil properties. The soil cores were subdivided in 0 - 5, 5 - 10 and 10 - 15 cm depth and measured for organic carbon, carbonates and pH. In addition, the humus forms at each site were determined. Already after 8 weeks

  9. Decaying toxic wood as sodium supplement for herbivorous mammals in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yuji; Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Tsuchida, Sayaka; Nguema, Pierre Philippe Mbehang; Ando, Chieko; Ushida, Kazunari; Yamagiwa, Juichi

    2015-10-01

    African rainforest harbors herbivores at high density. However, because plants and soils typically lack in some essential minerals, rainforest is not always a suitable habitat for herbivores. How they fulfill the mineral requirements is therefore an important question to animal ecology and conservation. Although large marshes, called 'bais', are often mentioned as efficient mineral-resource, little information on other sodium resources has still been available. Our laboratory works and field surveys found that a peculiar item, decaying wood stumps of Anthostema aubryanum, played as a major sodium resource for herbivores in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park, Gabon. When A. aubryanum is alive, the sodium content of its bark is low and its latex is toxic. Sodium is accumulated in decaying stumps (mean=1,343 mg/kg dry matter). Eight herbivores visited stumps to ingest the dead wood. Fecal sample analysis revealed that western lowland gorillas, a species most-frequently using the stumps, consumed large amount of the dead wood as regular food. Our findings suggest that decaying A. aubryanum is critical sodium-resources and is a key species for herbivores in our study area. Importance of the A. aubryanum may be particularly large there, because it is a limited sodium-rich material that is available year round. Our study site is known as the site where the densities of several herbivores are among the highest at Central Africa. The relatively high herbivores density in our study site may partly depend on decaying A. aubryanum as sodium resources.

  10. Bioprospecting metagenomics of decaying wood: mining for new glycoside hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant plant biomass to fermentable sugars in industrial processes, biocatalysts of higher performance and lower cost are required. The genetic diversity found in the metagenomes of natural microbial biomass decay communities may harbor such enzymes. Our goal was to discover and characterize new glycoside hydrolases (GHases) from microbial biomass decay communities, especially those from unknown or never previously cultivated microorganisms. Results From the metagenome sequences of an anaerobic microbial community actively decaying poplar biomass, we identified approximately 4,000 GHase homologs. Based on homology to GHase families/activities of interest and the quality of the sequences, candidates were selected for full-length cloning and subsequent expression. As an alternative strategy, a metagenome expression library was constructed and screened for GHase activities. These combined efforts resulted in the cloning of four novel GHases that could be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Further characterization showed that two enzymes showed significant activity on p-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinofuranoside, one enzyme had significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, and one enzyme showed significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-β-D-xylopyranoside. Enzymes were also tested in the presence of ionic liquids. Conclusions Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes and for screening of cellulolytic enzyme activities. The four GHases that were cloned may have potential application for deconstruction of biomass pretreated with ionic liquids, as they remain active in the presence of up to 20% ionic liquid (except for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate). Alternatively, ionic liquids might be used to immobilize or stabilize these enzymes for minimal solvent processing of biomass. PMID:21816041

  11. Bioprospecting metagenomics of decaying wood: mining for new glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Li L. L.; van der Lelie D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Zhang, Y.-B.; Blewitt, M. G.; Brunecky, R.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Brumm, P.; Drinkwater, C.; Mead, D. A.; Tringe, S. G.

    2011-08-01

    To efficiently deconstruct recalcitrant plant biomass to fermentable sugars in industrial processes, biocatalysts of higher performance and lower cost are required. The genetic diversity found in the metagenomes of natural microbial biomass decay communities may harbor such enzymes. Our goal was to discover and characterize new glycoside hydrolases (GHases) from microbial biomass decay communities, especially those from unknown or never previously cultivated microorganisms. From the metagenome sequences of an anaerobic microbial community actively decaying poplar biomass, we identified approximately 4,000 GHase homologs. Based on homology to GHase families/activities of interest and the quality of the sequences, candidates were selected for full-length cloning and subsequent expression. As an alternative strategy, a metagenome expression library was constructed and screened for GHase activities. These combined efforts resulted in the cloning of four novel GHases that could be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. Further characterization showed that two enzymes showed significant activity on p-nitrophenyl-{alpha}-L-arabinofuranoside, one enzyme had significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, and one enzyme showed significant activity against p-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-xylopyranoside. Enzymes were also tested in the presence of ionic liquids. Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes and for screening of cellulolytic enzyme activities. The four GHases that were cloned may have potential application for deconstruction of biomass pretreated with ionic liquids, as they remain active in the presence of up to 20% ionic liquid (except for 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate). Alternatively, ionic liquids might be used to immobilize or stabilize these enzymes for minimal solvent processing of biomass.

  12. Effect of Fungal Competition on Decay Rates in Bicultured Soil Bottle Assays

    Treesearch

    Grant T. Kirker; Amy Blodgett; Patricia K. Lebow; Carol A. Clausen

    2016-01-01

    For decades, wood scientists and preservative formulators have employed the monocultured soil bottle assay to test efficacy of wood treatment in the laboratory as a rapid predictor of field performance. This study examines the effects of bicultured soil bottle assays on the decay by common wood decay fungi. Mycelial interactions were noted in early stages of...

  13. Impact of Phanerochaete chrysosporium on the Functional Diversity of Bacterial Communities Associated with Decaying Wood

    PubMed Central

    Hervé, Vincent; Ketter, Elodie; Pierrat, Jean-Claude; Gelhaye, Eric; Frey-Klett, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi naturally coexist in various environments including forest ecosystems. While the role of saprotrophic basidiomycetes in wood decomposition is well established, the influence of these fungi on the functional diversity of the wood-associated bacterial communities has received much less attention. Based on a microcosm experiment, we tested the hypothesis that both the presence of the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium and the wood, as a growth substrate, impacted the functional diversity of these bacterial communities. Microcosms containing sterile sawdust were inoculated with a microbial inoculum extracted from a forest soil, in presence or in absence of P. chrysosporium and subsequently, three enrichment steps were performed. First, bacterial strains were isolated from different microcosms previously analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. Strains isolated from P. chrysosporium mycosphere showed less antagonism against this fungus compared to the strains isolated from the initial forest soil inoculum, suggesting a selection by the fungus of less inhibitory bacterial communities. Moreover, the presence of the fungus in wood resulted in a selection of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacterial strains, highlighting the role of mycospheric bacteria in wood decomposition. Additionally, the proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria increased along the enrichment steps, suggesting an important role of bacteria in iron mobilization in decaying-wood. Finally, taxonomic identification of 311 bacterial isolates revealed, at the family level, strong similarities with the high-throughput sequencing data as well as with other studies in terms of taxonomic composition of the wood-associated bacterial community, highlighting that the isolated strains are representative of the wood-associated bacterial communities. PMID:26824755

  14. Impact of Phanerochaete chrysosporium on the Functional Diversity of Bacterial Communities Associated with Decaying Wood.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Vincent; Ketter, Elodie; Pierrat, Jean-Claude; Gelhaye, Eric; Frey-Klett, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria and fungi naturally coexist in various environments including forest ecosystems. While the role of saprotrophic basidiomycetes in wood decomposition is well established, the influence of these fungi on the functional diversity of the wood-associated bacterial communities has received much less attention. Based on a microcosm experiment, we tested the hypothesis that both the presence of the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium and the wood, as a growth substrate, impacted the functional diversity of these bacterial communities. Microcosms containing sterile sawdust were inoculated with a microbial inoculum extracted from a forest soil, in presence or in absence of P. chrysosporium and subsequently, three enrichment steps were performed. First, bacterial strains were isolated from different microcosms previously analyzed by 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing. Strains isolated from P. chrysosporium mycosphere showed less antagonism against this fungus compared to the strains isolated from the initial forest soil inoculum, suggesting a selection by the fungus of less inhibitory bacterial communities. Moreover, the presence of the fungus in wood resulted in a selection of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacterial strains, highlighting the role of mycospheric bacteria in wood decomposition. Additionally, the proportion of siderophore-producing bacteria increased along the enrichment steps, suggesting an important role of bacteria in iron mobilization in decaying-wood. Finally, taxonomic identification of 311 bacterial isolates revealed, at the family level, strong similarities with the high-throughput sequencing data as well as with other studies in terms of taxonomic composition of the wood-associated bacterial community, highlighting that the isolated strains are representative of the wood-associated bacterial communities.

  15. Growth inhibition and antioxidative response of wood decay fungi exposed to plant extracts of Casearia species.

    PubMed

    Bento, T S; Torres, L M B; Fialho, M B; Bononi, V L R

    2014-01-01

    Ligninolytic fungi take part in critical processes in ecosystems such as nutrient recycling; however, some fungal species can be pathogenic to forest and urban trees and deteriorate wood products. The tropical flora is an important source of antimicrobial compounds environmentally safer than traditional wood preservatives. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the inhibitory activity of ethanol plant extracts of Casearia sylvestris and Casearia decandra on the white-rot wood decay basidiomycetes Trametes villosa and Pycnoporus sanguineus. In addition, the effect of the extracts on the fungal antioxidative metabolism was studied. Among the different substances present in the extracts, the phytochemical analyses identified a clerodane diterpenoid (C. sylvestris) and cinnamic acid, hydroquinone and β-sitosterol (C. decandra). The extracts inhibited the fungi up to 70% and caused hyphal morphology changes. The extracts triggered oxidative stress process as indicated by the increased levels of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and glutathione reductase. Therefore, the Casearia extracts are a potential source of natural biocides to control wood decay fungi, and one of the mechanisms of action is the oxidative stress. The Casearia plant extracts exhibited important antifungal activity on wood decay fungi and triggered oxidative stress process, an inhibitory mechanism rarely studied in filamentous fungi exposed to plant extracts. Therefore, a starting point was provided for the development of natural compounds-based products as an alternative to chemical fungicides. In addition, subsidies were given to further studies in order to elucidate in more detail how compounds present in extracts of native tropical plants affect the physiology of fungi. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. [Discrimination of wood biological decay by soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition based on principal component analysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong; Jiang, Ze-Hui; Fei, Ben-Hua; Qin, Dao-Chun

    2007-04-01

    Wood, as a biomass materials, tends to be attacked by microorganisms, and its structure could be rapidly destroyed by biological decay. Therefore, it's significant to rapidly and accurately detect or identify biological decay in wood. Recently, extensive research has demonstrated that near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) can be used to discriminate or detect a wide variety of food, medicine and agricultural products. The use of NIR coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and SIMCA pattern recognition to detect wood biological decay was investigated in the present paper. The results showed that NIR spectroscopy coupled with SIMCA pattern recognition could be used to rapidly detect the biological decay in wood. The discrimination accuracy by the SIMCA model based on the training set for the non-decay, white-rot and brown-rot decay samples were 100%, 82. 5% and 100%, respectively; and that for the samples for the test set were 100%, 85% and 100%, respectively. However, some white-rot decay samples were mis-discriminated as brown-rot decay, for which the main reasons might be that the training set does not have enough typical samples, and there's a slight difference between white-rot and brown-rot decay during the early stage of decay.

  17. Linking fungal communities to wood density loss after 12 years of log decay.

    PubMed

    Kubartová, Ariana; Ottosson, Elisabet; Stenlid, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Changes in biodiversity might alter decomposition processes and, consequently, carbon and nutrient cycling. We examined fungal diversity and density loss in experimental Norway spruce logs after 12 years of decay in a hemiboreal forest. Between 28 and 50% of the original wood biomass remained, depending on the fungal community composition in the log, operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness had only a minor effect on the log biomass. Although the communities were OTU rich (190-340 OTUs per log), the majority of OTUs were infrequent or rare; wood degradation therefore depended mostly on the most abundant OTUs and their decomposing abilities. The least decayed logs were characterized by continuous dominance of an earlier colonizer and by high within-log community diversity, which was significantly related to sample variables (position in log, density and moisture). In the most decayed logs, the earlier colonizers were generally replaced by white-rot species able to exploit the highly decomposed wood. The communities were relatively spatially uniform within whole logs, independent of the sample variables, whereas among-log diversity was high. Importance of fungal community composition in decomposition processes should be taken into account when studying and modeling carbon dynamics in forest ecosystems.

  18. Burning rates of wood cribs with implications for wildland fires

    Treesearch

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney

    2016-01-01

    Wood cribs are often used as ignition sources for room fire tests and the well characterized burning rates may also have applications to wildland fires. The burning rate of wildland fuel structures, whether the needle layer on the ground or trees and shrubs themselves, is not addressed in any operational fire model and no simple model exists. Several relations...

  19. Charring rate of wood exposed to a constant heat flux

    Treesearch

    R. H. White; H. C. Tran

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the fire endurance of a wood member is its rate of charring. Most available charring rate data have been obtained using the time-temperature curves of the standard fire resistance tests (ASTM E 119 and ISO 834) to define the fire exposure. The increased use of heat release calorimeters using exposures of constant heat flux levels has broadened the...

  20. In situ thermal condensation of glucose-diammonium phosphate in wood for fire and fungal decay protection

    Treesearch

    George Chen

    2009-01-01

    Thermal condensation of glucose-diammonium phosphate in wood at 160 and 190[degrees]C will protect wood against fire and decay in one treatment using an aqueous system. For fire protection, treatments at 160 or 190[degrees]C led to low flammability as evidenced by fire-tube tests. For nonleached wood, weight losses were 1.9, 2.0, and 2.0% with chemical retentions of 56...

  1. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    PubMed Central

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S.; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A.; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Minto, Robert E.; Hibbett, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. Cylindrobasidium torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. Fistulina hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition towards a brown rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited. PMID:25683379

  2. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    DOE PAGES

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; ...

    2015-02-12

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. In this paper, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot andmore » brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Finally, our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited.« less

  3. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

    SciTech Connect

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S.; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A.; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Minto, Robert E.; Hibbett, David S.

    2015-02-12

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. In this paper, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Finally, our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited.

  4. Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii.

    PubMed

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W; Riley, Robert; Nagy, Laszlo G; Koehler, Gage; Ransdell, Anthony S; Younus, Hina; Chow, Julianna; Chiniquy, Jennifer; Lipzen, Anna; Tritt, Andrew; Sun, Hui; Haridas, Sajeet; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A; Kües, Ursula; Blanchette, Robert A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Minto, Robert E; Hibbett, David S

    2015-03-01

    Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white-rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown-rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. C. torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related to Schizophyllum commune, which has been reported to cause white rot. Our results suggest that C. torrendii and S. commune are intermediate between white-rot and brown-rot fungi, but at the same time they show characteristics of decay that resembles soft rot. Both species cause weak wood decay and degrade all wood components but leave the middle lamella intact. Their gene content related to lignin degradation is reduced, similar to brown-rot fungi, but both have maintained a rich array of genes related to carbohydrate degradation, similar to white-rot fungi. These characteristics appear to have evolved from white-rot ancestors with stronger ligninolytic ability. F. hepatica shows characteristics of brown rot both in terms of wood decay genes found in its genome and the decay that it causes. However, genes related to cellulose degradation are still present, which is a plesiomorphic characteristic shared with its white-rot ancestors. Four wood degradation-related genes, homologs of which are frequently lost in brown-rot fungi, show signs of pseudogenization in the genome of F. hepatica. These results suggest that transition toward a brown-rot lifestyle could be an ongoing process in F. hepatica. Our results reinforce the idea that wood decay mechanisms are more diverse than initially thought and that the dichotomous separation of wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina into white rot and brown rot should be revisited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Differences between standing and downed dead tree wood density reduction factors: A comparison across decay classes and tree species

    Treesearch

    Mark E. Harmon; Christopher W. Woodall; Becky Fasth; Jay Sexton; Misha. Yatkov

    2011-01-01

    Woody detritus or dead wood is an important part of forest ecosystems and has become a routine facet of forest monitoring and inventory. Biomass and carbon estimates of dead wood depend on knowledge of species- and decay class-specifi c density or density reduction factors. While some progress has been made in determining these parameters for dead and downed trees (DD...

  6. [FTIR studies of masson pine wood decayed by brown-rot fungi].

    PubMed

    Li, Gai-yun; Huang, An-min; Qin, Te-fu; Huang, Luo-hua

    2010-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the chemical changes of masson pine (pinus massoniana lamb.) decayed by the brown-rot fungus Wolfiporia cocos (Schwein.) Ryvarden & Gilbn. for different durations up to 23 weeks. The ratios of height of the lignin/holocellulose and holocellulose/lignin IR peaks were measured, and the klason lignin content and holocellulose content of the sound wood and brown-rotted wood with different level of decay were analyzed by wet chemical methods. The relationship between the two chemical components and the ratios of IR peak height was also established. FTIR spectra showed that, during the first 15 weeks of decay, the intensity of absorption bands at 1 736 and 1 372 cm(-1) ascribed to holocellulose decreased gradually, accompanied by a successive increase in the intensity of band at 1 510 and 1 225 cm(-1) ascribed to lignin. However, the intensities of holocellulose bands at 1736 and 1372 cm(-1) had a little increase, and the intensities of lignin bands at 1 510 and 1 225 cm(-1) had a very slight decrease after 15 weeks of decay. There was a very good correlation between the ratios of height of the lignin/holocellulose (I1510/1736, I1510/I1372, I1225/I736 and I1225/I1372) and the klason lignin content or holocellulose content. The coefficients of determination for the klason lignin content and the holocellulose content were 0.97-0.99 and 0.96-0.97, respectively. High coeffieients of determination were also obtained between the holocellulose/ lignin peak height ratios and the holocellulose content (R2 = 0.96). The above results suggest that, in the system studied, the klason lignin content and holocellulose content of wood decayed to differnent levels could be determined with reasonable accuracy by the FTIR technology.

  7. [Discrimination of wood biological decay by NIR and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA)].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong; Ren, Hai-Qing; Jiang, Ze-Hui

    2008-04-01

    Extensive research has demonstrated that near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) can be used to rapidly discriminate or detect a wide variety of food, medicine and agricultural products. The use of NIR coupled with PLS-DA to detect wood biological decay was investigated in the present paper. The results showed that the correlation between the predicted category variable of calibration and validation and the measured category variable is significant with a correlation coefficient (r) over 0.94 and low SEC and SEP (< 0.17); the discriminant accuracy for the non-decay, white-rot and brown-rot decay samples are 100% (deviation < 0.5) by the PLS-DA model based on the test set of samples; the discriminant accuracy by PLS-DA model is better than that by SIMCA model. It's suggested that NIR spectroscopy coupled with PLS-DA could be used to rapidly detect wood biological decay.

  8. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  9. Decaying toxic wood as sodium supplement for herbivorous mammals in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    IWATA, Yuji; NAKASHIMA, Yoshihiro; TSUCHIDA, Sayaka; NGUEMA, Pierre Philippe Mbehang; ANDO, Chieko; USHIDA, Kazunari; YAMAGIWA, Juichi

    2015-01-01

    African rainforest harbors herbivores at high density. However, because plants and soils typically lack in some essential minerals, rainforest is not always a suitable habitat for herbivores. How they fulfill the mineral requirements is therefore an important question to animal ecology and conservation. Although large marshes, called ‘bais’, are often mentioned as efficient mineral-resource, little information on other sodium resources has still been available. Our laboratory works and field surveys found that a peculiar item, decaying wood stumps of Anthostema aubryanum, played as a major sodium resource for herbivores in Moukalaba-Doudou National Park, Gabon. When A. aubryanum is alive, the sodium content of its bark is low and its latex is toxic. Sodium is accumulated in decaying stumps (mean=1,343 mg/kg dry matter). Eight herbivores visited stumps to ingest the dead wood. Fecal sample analysis revealed that western lowland gorillas, a species most-frequently using the stumps, consumed large amount of the dead wood as regular food. Our findings suggest that decaying A. aubryanum is critical sodium-resources and is a key species for herbivores in our study area. Importance of the A. aubryanum may be particularly large there, because it is a limited sodium-rich material that is available year round. Our study site is known as the site where the densities of several herbivores are among the highest at Central Africa. The relatively high herbivores density in our study site may partly depend on decaying A. aubryanum as sodium resources. PMID:25994487

  10. Inhibition of decay fungi using cotton cellulose hydrolysis as a model for wood decay

    Treesearch

    Frederick. Green

    2000-01-01

    Environmental pressures to replace chromium and arsenic in fixed waterborne preservatives have been increasing. Potential inhibitors of brown-, white- and soft-rot fungi need to be evaluated as alternative preservatives by screening and testing in, in vitro model systems. This paper reports the inhibition of cellulose depolymerization and weight loss of selected decay...

  11. Extraordinary Genetic Diversity in a Wood Decay Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Maria A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B.; Safonova, Yana Y.; Naumenko, Sergey A.; Klepikova, Anna V.; Gerasimov, Evgeny S.; Bazykin, Georgii A.; James, Timothy Y.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of different species vary in the amounts of genetic diversity they possess. Nucleotide diversity π, the fraction of nucleotides that are different between two randomly chosen genotypes, has been known to range in eukaryotes between 0.0001 in Lynx lynx and 0.16 in Caenorhabditis brenneri. Here, we report the results of a comparative analysis of 24 haploid genotypes (12 from the United States and 12 from European Russia) of a split-gill fungus Schizophyllum commune. The diversity at synonymous sites is 0.20 in the American population of S. commune and 0.13 in the Russian population. This exceptionally high level of nucleotide diversity also leads to extreme amino acid diversity of protein-coding genes. Using whole-genome resequencing of 2 parental and 17 offspring haploid genotypes, we estimate that the mutation rate in S. commune is high, at 2.0 × 10−8 (95% CI: 1.1 × 10−8 to 4.1 × 10−8) per nucleotide per generation. Therefore, the high diversity of S. commune is primarily determined by its elevated mutation rate, although high effective population size likely also plays a role. Small genome size, ease of cultivation and completion of the life cycle in the laboratory, free-living haploid life stages and exceptionally high variability of S. commune make it a promising model organism for population, quantitative, and evolutionary genetics. PMID:26163667

  12. [Bacterium Arthrobacter agilis UMCV2 and diverse amines inhibit in vitro growth of wood-decay fungi].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Mosqueda, M Del Carmen; Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; López-Albarrán, Pablo; Martínez-Pacheco, Mauro; Velázquez-Becerra, Crisanto

    2015-01-01

    The kingdom Fungi is represented by a large number of organisms, including pathogens that deteriorate the main structural components of wood, such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. The aim of our work was to characterize the antifungal activity in Arthrobacter agilis UMCV2 and diverse amines against wood-decaying fungi. Four fungal organisms (designated as UMTM) were isolated from decaying wood samples obtained from a forest in Cuanajo-Michoacán, México. Two of them showed a clear enzymatic activity of cellulases, xylanases and oxido-reducing enzymes and were identified as Hypocrea (UMTM3 isolate) and Fusarium (UMTM13 isolate). In vitro, the amines showed inhibitory effect against UMTM growth and one of the amines, dimethylhexadecylamine (DMA16), exhibited strong potential as wood preventive treatment, against the attack of decaying fungi. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene Expression Patterns of Wood Decay Fungi Postia placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium Are Influenced by Wood Substrate Composition during Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Skyba, Oleksandr; Cullen, Dan; Douglas, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification of the specific genes and enzymes involved in the fungal degradation of lignocellulosic biomass derived from feedstocks with various compositions is essential to the development of improved bioenergy processes. In order to elucidate the effect of substrate composition on gene expression in wood-rotting fungi, we employed microarrays based on the annotated genomes of the brown- and white-rot fungi, Rhodonia placenta (formerly Postia placenta) and Phanerochaete chrysosporium, respectively. We monitored the expression of genes involved in the enzymatic deconstruction of the cell walls of three 4-year-old Populus trichocarpa (poplar) trees of genotypes with distinct cell wall chemistries, selected from a population of several hundred trees grown in a common garden. The woody substrates were incubated with wood decay fungi for 10, 20, and 30 days. An analysis of transcript abundance in all pairwise comparisons highlighted 64 and 84 differentially expressed genes (>2-fold, P < 0.05) in P. chrysosporium and P. placenta, respectively. Cross-fungal comparisons also revealed an array of highly differentially expressed genes (>4-fold, P < 0.01) across different substrates and time points. These results clearly demonstrate that gene expression profiles of P. chrysosporium and P. placenta are influenced by wood substrate composition and the duration of incubation. Many of the significantly expressed genes encode “proteins of unknown function,” and determining their role in lignocellulose degradation presents opportunities and challenges for future research. IMPORTANCE This study describes the variation in expression patterns of two wood-degrading fungi (brown- and white-rot fungi) during colonization and incubation on three different naturally occurring poplar substrates of differing chemical compositions, over time. The results clearly show that the two fungi respond differentially to their substrates and that several known and, more interestingly

  14. Physical, Chemical, and Biological Properties of Soil under Decaying Wood in a Tropical Wet Forest in Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Marcela Zalamea; Grizelle Gonzalez; D. Jean Lodge

    2016-01-01

    Decaying wood is related to nutrient cycling through its role as either a sink or source of nutrients. However, at micro scales, what is the effect of decaying logs on the physical, chemical,and biotic characteristics of the soil underneath? We took samples from a 0 to 5 cm depth under and a 50 cm distance away from decaying logs (Dacryodes excelsa and Swietenia...

  15. Decay resistance of wood treated with boric acid and tall oil derivates.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Ali; Alfredsen, Gry; Eikenes, Morten; Terziev, Nasko

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the effect of two boric acid concentrations (1% and 2%) and four derivates of tall oil with varying chemical composition were tested separately and in combination. The tall oil derivates were chosen in a way that they consist of different amounts of free fatty, resin acids and neutral compounds. Decay tests using two brown rot fungi (Postia placenta and Coniophora puteana) were performed on both unleached and leached test samples. Boric acid showed a low weight loss in test samples when exposed to fungal decay before leaching, but no effect after leaching. The tall oil derivates gave better efficacy against decay fungi compared to control, but are not within the range of the efficacy needed for a wood preservative. Double impregnation with boric acid and tall oil derivates gave synergistic effects for several of the double treatments both in unleached and leached samples. In the unleached samples the double treatment gave a better efficacy against decay fungi than tall oil alone. In leached samples a better efficacy against brown rot fungi were achieved than in samples with boron alone and a nearly similar or better efficacy than for tall oil alone. Boric acid at 2% concentration combined with the tall oil derivate consisting of 90% free resin acids (TO-III) showed the best performance against the two decay fungi with a weight loss less than 3% after a modified pure culture test.

  16. Gene Expression Analysis of Copper Tolerance and Wood Decay in the Brown Rot Fungus Fibroporia radiculosa

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Leslie A.; Perkins, Andy D.; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Schroeder, Steven G.; Nicholas, Darrel D.; Diehl, Susan V.

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput transcriptomics was used to identify Fibroporia radiculosa genes that were differentially regulated during colonization of wood treated with a copper-based preservative. The transcriptome was profiled at two time points while the fungus was growing on wood treated with micronized copper quat (MCQ). A total of 917 transcripts were differentially expressed. Fifty-eight of these genes were more highly expressed when the MCQ was protecting the wood from strength loss and had putative functions related to oxalate production/degradation, laccase activity, quinone biosynthesis, pectin degradation, ATP production, cytochrome P450 activity, signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation. Sixty-one genes were more highly expressed when the MCQ lost its effectiveness (>50% strength loss) and had functions related to oxalate degradation; cytochrome P450 activity; H2O2 production and degradation; degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin; hexose transport; membrane glycerophospholipid metabolism; and cell wall chemistry. Ten of these differentially regulated genes were quantified by reverse transcriptase PCR for a more in-depth study (4 time points on wood with or without MCQ treatment). Our results showed that MCQ induced higher than normal levels of expression for four genes (putative annotations for isocitrate lyase, glyoxylate dehydrogenase, laccase, and oxalate decarboxylase 1), while four other genes (putative annotations for oxalate decarboxylase 2, aryl alcohol oxidase, glycoside hydrolase 5, and glycoside hydrolase 10) were repressed. The significance of these results is that we have identified several genes that appear to be coregulated, with putative functions related to copper tolerance and/or wood decay. PMID:23263965

  17. Strength reduction in slash pine (Pinus elliotii) wood caused by decay fungi

    Treesearch

    Zhong Yang; Zhehui Jiang; Chung Y. Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2009-01-01

    Small wood specimens selected from slash pine (Pinus elliotii )trees at three growth rates (fast, medium, and slow) were inoculated with brown-rot and white-rot fungi and then evaluated for work to maximum load (WML), modulus of rupture (MOR), and modulus of elasticity (MOE). The experimental variables studied included a brown-rot fungus (Gloeophyllum trabeum...

  18. Spore sensitivity to sunlight and freezing can restrict dispersal in wood-decay fungi.

    PubMed

    Norros, Veera; Karhu, Elina; Nordén, Jenni; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2015-08-01

    Assessment of the costs and benefits of dispersal is central to understanding species' life-history strategies as well as explaining and predicting spatial population dynamics in the changing world. While mortality during active movement has received much attention, few have studied the costs of passive movement such as the airborne transport of fungal spores. Here, we examine the potential of extreme environmental conditions to cause dispersal mortality in wood-decay fungi. These fungi play a key role as decomposers and habitat creators in forest ecosystems and the populations of many species have declined due to habitat loss and fragmentation. We measured the effect of simulated solar radiation (including ultraviolet A and B) and freezing at -25°C on the spore germinability of 17 species. Both treatments but especially sunlight markedly reduced spore germinability in most species, and species with thin-walled spores were particularly light sensitive. Extrapolating the species' laboratory responses to natural irradiance conditions, we predict that sunlight is a relevant source of dispersal mortality at least at larger spatial scales. In addition, we found a positive effect of spore size on spore germinability, suggesting a trade-off between dispersal distance and establishment. We conclude that freezing and particularly sunlight can be important sources of dispersal mortality in wood-decay fungi which can make it difficult for some species to colonize isolated habitat patches and habitat edges.

  19. Spore sensitivity to sunlight and freezing can restrict dispersal in wood-decay fungi

    PubMed Central

    Norros, Veera; Karhu, Elina; Nordén, Jenni; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of the costs and benefits of dispersal is central to understanding species' life-history strategies as well as explaining and predicting spatial population dynamics in the changing world. While mortality during active movement has received much attention, few have studied the costs of passive movement such as the airborne transport of fungal spores. Here, we examine the potential of extreme environmental conditions to cause dispersal mortality in wood-decay fungi. These fungi play a key role as decomposers and habitat creators in forest ecosystems and the populations of many species have declined due to habitat loss and fragmentation. We measured the effect of simulated solar radiation (including ultraviolet A and B) and freezing at −25°C on the spore germinability of 17 species. Both treatments but especially sunlight markedly reduced spore germinability in most species, and species with thin-walled spores were particularly light sensitive. Extrapolating the species' laboratory responses to natural irradiance conditions, we predict that sunlight is a relevant source of dispersal mortality at least at larger spatial scales. In addition, we found a positive effect of spore size on spore germinability, suggesting a trade-off between dispersal distance and establishment. We conclude that freezing and particularly sunlight can be important sources of dispersal mortality in wood-decay fungi which can make it difficult for some species to colonize isolated habitat patches and habitat edges. PMID:26380666

  20. Heritable variation of mRNA decay rates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Andrie, Jennifer M; Wakefield, Jon; Akey, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression levels are determined by the balance between rates of mRNA transcription and decay, and genetic variation in either of these processes can result in heritable differences in transcript abundance. Although the genetics of gene expression has been a subject of intense interest, the contribution of heritable variation in mRNA decay rates to gene expression variation has received far less attention. To this end, we developed a novel statistical framework and measured allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates in a diploid yeast hybrid created by mating two genetically diverse parental strains. We estimate that 31% of genes exhibit allelic differences in mRNA decay rates, of which 350 can be identified at a false discovery rate of 10%. Genes with significant allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates have higher levels of polymorphism compared to other genes, with all gene regions contributing to allelic differences in mRNA decay rates. Strikingly, we find widespread evidence for compensatory evolution, such that variants influencing transcriptional initiation and decay have opposite effects, suggesting that steady-state gene expression levels are subject to pervasive stabilizing selection. Our results demonstrate that heritable differences in mRNA decay rates are widespread and are an important target for natural selection to maintain or fine-tune steady-state gene expression levels. © 2014 Andrie et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Heritable variation of mRNA decay rates in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Andrie, Jennifer M.; Wakefield, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression levels are determined by the balance between rates of mRNA transcription and decay, and genetic variation in either of these processes can result in heritable differences in transcript abundance. Although the genetics of gene expression has been a subject of intense interest, the contribution of heritable variation in mRNA decay rates to gene expression variation has received far less attention. To this end, we developed a novel statistical framework and measured allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates in a diploid yeast hybrid created by mating two genetically diverse parental strains. We estimate that 31% of genes exhibit allelic differences in mRNA decay rates, of which 350 can be identified at a false discovery rate of 10%. Genes with significant allele-specific differences in mRNA decay rates have higher levels of polymorphism compared to other genes, with all gene regions contributing to allelic differences in mRNA decay rates. Strikingly, we find widespread evidence for compensatory evolution, such that variants influencing transcriptional initiation and decay have opposite effects, suggesting that steady-state gene expression levels are subject to pervasive stabilizing selection. Our results demonstrate that heritable differences in mRNA decay rates are widespread and are an important target for natural selection to maintain or fine-tune steady-state gene expression levels. PMID:25258386

  2. The effect of density and thermal diffusivity of wood on the rate of burning of wood cribs

    Treesearch

    H.D. Bruce; W.Y. Pong; W.L. Fons

    1961-01-01

    A program of research on free-burning wood fires is being conducted by the Forest Service to build up experimental data on the properties of such fires, with the iltimate objective of describing the physical phenomena in terms of fundamental laws. Density was the first wood property investigated. This report gives data on the rate of burning of cribs of five species...

  3. Decay extent evaluation of wood degraded by a fungal community using NIRS: application for ecological engineering structures used for natural hazard mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptiste Barré, Jean; Bourrier, Franck; Bertrand, David; Rey, Freddy

    2015-04-01

    Ecological engineering corresponds to the design of efficient solutions for protection against natural hazards such as shallow landslides and soil erosion. In particular, bioengineering structures can be composed of a living part, made of plants, cuttings or seeds, and an inert part, a timber logs structure. As wood is not treated by preservatives, fungal degradation can occur from the start of the construction. It results in wood strength loss, which practitioners try to evaluate with non-destructive tools (NDT). Classical NDT are mainly based on density measurements. However, the fungal activity reduces the mechanical properties (modulus of elasticity - MOE) well before well before a density change could be measured. In this context, it would be useful to provide a tool for assessing the residual mechanical strength at different decay stages due to a fungal community. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used for that purpose, as it can allow evaluating wood mechanical properties as well as wood chemical changes due to brown and white rots. We monitored 160 silver fir samples (30x30x6000mm) from green state to different levels of decay. The degradation process took place in a greenhouse and samples were inoculated with silver fir decayed debris in order to accelerate the process. For each sample, we calculated the normalized bending modulus of elasticity loss (Dw moe) and defined it as decay extent. Near infrared spectra collected from both green and decayed ground samples were corrected by the subtraction of baseline offset. Spectra of green samples were averaged into one mean spectrum and decayed spectra were subtracted from the mean spectrum to calculate the absorption loss. Partial least square regression (PLSR) has been performed between the normalized MOE loss Dw moe (0 < Dw moe < 1) and the absorption loss, with a correlation coefficient R² equal to 0.85. Finally, the prediction of silver fir biodegradation rate by NIRS was significant (RMSEP = 0

  4. Detection and Identification of Decay Fungi in Spruce Wood by Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of Amplified Genes Encoding rRNA†

    PubMed Central

    Jasalavich, Claudia A.; Ostrofsky, Andrea; Jellison, Jody

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a DNA-based assay to reliably detect brown rot and white rot fungi in wood at different stages of decay. DNA, isolated by a series of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) and organic extractions, was amplified by the PCR using published universal primers and basidiomycete-specific primers derived from ribosomal DNA sequences. We surveyed 14 species of wood-decaying basidiomycetes (brown-rot and white-rot fungi), as well as 25 species of wood-inhabiting ascomycetes (pathogens, endophytes, and saprophytes). DNA was isolated from pure cultures of these fungi and also from spruce wood blocks colonized by individual isolates of wood decay basidiomycetes or wood-inhabiting ascomycetes. The primer pair ITS1-F (specific for higher fungi) and ITS4 (universal primer) amplified the internal transcribed spacer region from both ascomycetes and basidiomycetes from both pure culture and wood, as expected. The primer pair ITS1-F (specific for higher fungi) and ITS4-B (specific for basidiomycetes) was shown to reliably detect the presence of wood decay basidiomycetes in both pure culture and wood; ascomycetes were not detected by this primer pair. We detected the presence of decay fungi in wood by PCR before measurable weight loss had occurred to the wood. Basidiomycetes were identified to the species level by restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the internal transcribed spacer region. PMID:11055916

  5. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf A.; Brown, Daren W.; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W.; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika A.; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt M.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E.; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Blanchette, Robert A.; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David S.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-01-01

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white-rot/brown-rot classification paradigm, we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically informed principal-components analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white-rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown-rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white-rot and brown-rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay. PMID:24958869

  6. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi.

    PubMed

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf A; Brown, Daren W; Nagy, Laszlo G; Floudas, Dimitrios; Held, Benjamin W; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika A; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt M; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Walton, Jonathan D; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David S; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2014-07-08

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32% of the described fungi and include most wood-decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white-rot/brown-rot classification paradigm, we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically informed principal-components analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white-rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown-rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white-rot and brown-rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay.

  7. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white rot/ brown rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Brown, Daren W.; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Floudas, Dimitris; Held, Benjamin; Levasseur, Anthony; Lombard, Vincent; Morin, Emmanuelle; Otillar, Robert; Lindquist, Erika; Sun, Hui; LaButti, Kurt; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jabbour, Dina; Luo, Hong; Baker, Scott E.; Pisabarro, Antonio; Walton, Jonathan D.; Blanchette, Robert; Henrissat, Bernard; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2014-03-14

    Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up 32percent of the described fungi and include most wood decaying species, as well as pathogens and mutualistic symbionts. Wood-decaying basidiomycetes have typically been classified as either white rot or brown rot, based on the ability (in white rot only) to degrade lignin along with cellulose and hemicellulose. Prior genomic comparisons suggested that the two decay modes can be distinguished based on the presence or absence of ligninolytic class II peroxidases (PODs), as well as the abundance of enzymes acting directly on crystalline cellulose (reduced in brown rot). To assess the generality of the white rot/brown rot classification paradigm we compared the genomes of 33 basidiomycetes, including four newly sequenced wood decayers, and performed phylogenetically-informed Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of a broad range of gene families encoding plant biomass-degrading enzymes. The newly sequenced Botryobasidium botryosum and Jaapia argillacea genomes lack PODs, but possess diverse enzymes acting on crystalline cellulose, and they group close to the model white rot species Phanerochaete chrysosporium in the PCA. Furthermore, laboratory assays showed that both B. botryosum and J. argillacea can degrade all polymeric components of woody plant cell walls, a characteristic of white rot. We also found expansions in reducing polyketide synthase genes specific to the brown rot fungi. Our results suggest a continuum rather than a dichotomy between the white rot and brown rot modes of wood decay. A more nuanced categorization of rot types is needed, based on an improved understanding of the genomics and biochemistry of wood decay.

  8. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  13. Decay rates of the magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Xueke; Xu, Xiuli

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas. We prove the optimal decay rates for the solution to the constant state in the whole space in the Lp-norm with 2≤ p≤ 6 and its first derivatives in L2-norm. The proof is based on the optimal decay of the linearized equation and nonlinear energy estimates.

  14. Drying rates of wood chips during compression drying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Haygreen, J.G.

    1985-04-01

    Compression drying is basically a process of forcing the free water in wood to move under high hydrostatic pressure through a solid structure. Fundamental information regarding the time- dependent characteristic of compression drying is necessary to develop efficient commercial processes. The purpose of this study is to provide an initial evaluation of the effect of some factors - pressure, wood density, and particle (chip) size - on free water extraction. Five species - aspen, balsam fir, jack pine, red maple, and red oak - were tested in this study. For each species both typical pulp size chips and particles from hammermilled chips were used. Drying rates were determined under constant ram face pressures at 500 psi, 1000 psi, 1500 psi, and 2000 psi, respectively. The concept of drying rate is one of the important factors in dealing with compression drying, especially in designing dewatering pressure cycles. The most efficient compression drying is achieved during the first two minutes. Drying rates are negligible after 3 to 4 minutes of constant pressure in the 500 to 2000 psi range. The analysis of variance for species shows highly significant differences in final moisture contents. Size of chips had a significant effect on final moisture contents. Compressed density of hammermilled chips is slightly higher than that of unrefined chips. High density chips require higher pressure to initiate effective drying rates. 8 references.

  15. Modern Measurements of Uranium Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons-Moss, T.; Faye, S. A.; Williams, R. W.; Wang, T. F.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.; Harrison, M.; Bandong, B. B.; Moody, K.; Knight, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely recognized that accurate and precise decay constants (λ) are critical to geochronology as highlighted by the EARTHTIME initiative, particularly the calibration benchmarks λ235U and λ238U. [1] Alpha counting experiments in 1971[2] measured λ235U and λ238U with ~0.1% precision, but have never been independently validated. We are embarking on new direct measurements of λ235U, λ238U, λ234Th, and λ234U using independent approaches for each nuclide. For the measurement of λ235U, highly enriched 235U samples will be chemically purified and analyzed for U concentration and isotopic composition by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Thin films will be electrodeposited from these solutions and the α activity will be measured in an α-γ coincidence counting apparatus, which allows reduced uncertainty in counting efficiency while achieving adequate counting statistics. For λ238U measurement we will measure ingrowth of 234Th in chemically purified, isotopically enriched 238U solutions, by quantitatively separating the Th and allowing complete decay to 234U. All of the measurements will be done using MC-ICP-MS aiming at 0.05% precision. This approach is expected to result in values of λ238U with less than 0.1% uncertainty, if combined with improved λ234Th measements. These will be achieved using direct decay measurements with an E-∆E charged particle telescope in coincidence with a gamma detector. This system allows measurement of 234Th β-decay and simultaneous detection and identification of α particles emitted by the 234U daughter, thus observing λ234U at the same time. The high-precision λ234U obtained by the direct activity measurements can independently verify the commonly used values obtained by indirect methods.[3] An overarching goal of the project is to ensure the quality of results including metrological traceability in order to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. [1] T

  16. The trait contribution to wood decomposition rates of 15 Neotropical tree species.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Koert G; Poorter, Lourens; Sass-Klaassen, Ute; van Logtestijn, Richard S P; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2010-12-01

    The decomposition of dead wood is a critical uncertainty in models of the global carbon cycle. Despite this, relatively few studies have focused on dead wood decomposition, with a strong bias to higher latitudes. Especially the effect of interspecific variation in species traits on differences in wood decomposition rates remains unknown. In order to fill these gaps, we applied a novel method to study long-term wood decomposition of 15 tree species in a Bolivian semi-evergreen tropical moist forest. We hypothesized that interspecific differences in species traits are important drivers of variation in wood decomposition rates. Wood decomposition rates (fractional mass loss) varied between 0.01 and 0.31 yr(-1). We measured 10 different chemical, anatomical, and morphological traits for all species. The species' average traits were useful predictors of wood decomposition rates, particularly the average diameter (dbh) of the tree species (R2 = 0.41). Lignin concentration further increased the proportion of explained inter-specific variation in wood decomposition (both negative relations, cumulative R2 = 0.55), although it did not significantly explain variation in wood decomposition rates if considered alone. When dbh values of the actual dead trees sampled for decomposition rate determination were used as a predictor variable, the final model (including dead tree dbh and lignin concentration) explained even more variation in wood decomposition rates (R2 = 0.71), underlining the importance of dbh in wood decomposition. Other traits, including wood density, wood anatomical traits, macronutrient concentrations, and the amount of phenolic extractives could not significantly explain the variation in wood decomposition rates. The surprising results of this multi-species study, in which for the first time a large set of traits is explicitly linked to wood decomposition rates, merits further testing in other forest ecosystems.

  17. Phenolics and their antifungal role in grapevine wood decay: focus on the Botryosphaeriaceae family.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carole; Bisson, Jonathan; Waffo-Téguo, Pierre; Papastamoulis, Yorgos; Richard, Tristan; Corio-Costet, Marie-France; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Cluzet, Stéphanie

    2012-12-05

    The interaction between Vitis vinifera and trunk disease fungi requires better understanding. We studied the role of phenolics as possible plant defense compounds in this context. The impact of 24 grapevine phenolic compounds was determined on 6 major wood decay fungi by an in vitro agar plate assay. Hydroxystilbenoids, especially oligomers such as miyabenol C, isohopeaphenol, and vitisin A and B, greatly reduced the growth of the fungi, except that of Phaeoacremonium aleophilum . A detailed investigation in 10 Botryosphaeriaceae strains revealed that all of the studied members of this family display a common susceptibility to phenolics that is more or less significant. Then we undertook a quantitative analysis of stilbenoid content in grapevine plantlets inoculated with Botryosphaeriaceae to investigate whether in planta these fungi have to counteract the most active phenolics. On the basis of our results, the possible role of phenolics in grapevine defense against trunk disease agents is discussed.

  18. Mimicking the Fenton reaction-induced wood decay by fungi for pretreatment of lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Hyun Min; Park, Yong-Cheol; Park, Kyungmoon; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the Fenton reaction, which is naturally used by fungi for wood decay, was employed to pretreat rice straw and increase the enzymatic digestibility for the saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass. Using an optimized Fenton's reagent (FeCl3 and H2O2) for pretreatment, an enzymatic digestibility that was 93.2% of the theoretical glucose yield was obtained. This is the first report of the application of the Fenton reaction to lignocellulose pretreatment at a moderate temperature (i.e., 25°C) and with a relatively high loading of biomass (i.e., 10% (w/v)). Substantial improvement in the process economics of cellulosic fuel and chemical production can be achieved by replacing the conventional pretreatment with this Fenton-mimicking process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Observation and identification of wood decay fungi from the heartwood of peach tree limbs in central Georgia, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peach tree health, longevity, and limb strength can be affected by wood decay fungi, but the extent of the colonization and their identities have not been characterized in Georgia, the United States of America. In an incubation experiment, dense white fungal mycelium grew on the cross-cut faces of a...

  20. Hurricane Andrew Damage in Relation to Wood Decay Fungi and Insects in Bottomland Hardwoods of the Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana

    Treesearch

    Theodor D. Leininger; A. Dan Wilson; Donald G. Lester

    1997-01-01

    Hurricane Andrew caused damage to more than 780 sq.km of bottomland hardwood and cypress-tupelo forests in the Atchafalaya Basin of Louisiana in August 1992. Trees in bottomland hardwood sites were examined, in early May 1994, for signs and symptoms of wood decay fungi, and for insect damage, ostensibly present before the hurricane, which may have predisposed trees to...

  1. Extensive sampling of basidiomycete genomes demonstrates inadequacy of the white-rot/brown-rot paradigm for wood decay fungi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota (basidiomycetes) make up some 37% of the described fungi and are important in forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes symbionts, pathogens, and saprotrophs including the majority of wood decaying and ectomycorrhizal species. To b...

  2. Assessment of biodeterioration for the screening of new wood preservatives : calculation of stiffness loss in rapid decay testing

    Treesearch

    Simon R. Przewloka; Douglas M. Crawford; Douglas R. Rammer; Donald L. Buckner; Bessie M. Woodward; Gan Li; Darrel D. Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Demand for the development of environmentally benign wood preservatives has increased significantly. To reduce the evaluation time of prospective candidates, reliable accelerated decay methodologies are necessary for laboratory screening of potential preservatives. Ongoing research at Mississippi State University has focused upon utilizing custom built equipment to...

  3. Translocation and incorporation of strontium carbonate derived strontium into calcium oxalate crystals by the wood decay fungus Resinicium bicolor

    Treesearch

    Jon H. Connolly; Walter C. Shortle; Jody Jellison

    1999-01-01

    The white-rot wood decay fungus Resinicium bicolor (Abertini & Schwein.: Fr.) Parmasto was studied for its ability to solubilize and translocate ions from the naturally occurring mineral strontianite. Resinicium bicolor colonized a soil mixture culture medium containing strontianite sand, solubilized strontium ions from this...

  4. Characterization of wood decay enzymes by MALDI-MS for post-translational modification and gene identification.

    Treesearch

    Theodorus H. de Koker; Philip J. Kersten

    2002-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium genome presents many opportunities, including the possibility of rapidly correlating specific wood decay proteins of the fungus with the corresponding gene sequences. Here we compare mass fragments of trypsin digests, determined by MALDI-MS (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Mass Spectrometry), with...

  5. Significant alteration of gene expression in wood decay fungi Postia placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium by plant species

    Treesearch

    Amber Vanden Wymelenberg; Jill Gaskell; Michael Mozuch; Sandra Splinter BonDurant; Grzegorz Sabat; John Ralph; Oleksandr Skyba; Shawn D. Mansfield; Robert A. Blanchette; Igor Grigoriev; Philip J. Kersten; Daniel Cullen

    2011-01-01

    Identification of specific genes and enzymes involved in conversion of lignocellulosics from an expanding number of potential feedstocks is of growing interest to bioenergy process development. The basidiomycetous wood decay fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Postia placenta are promising in this regard because they are able to utilize a wide range of simple and...

  6. Synthesis of ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer containing fungicides and evaluation of their effect for wood decay resistance

    Treesearch

    George C. Chen

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to combat wood decay based on the approach controlled-release biocides from polymers. The possibility of introducing polymer-bonded fungicides into the cell lumens was investigated. The synthesis of ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer containing pentachlorophenol (penta) and 8-hydroxy quinoline (8HQ) in N, N dimethyl formamide is...

  7. Insight into trade-off between wood decay and parasitism from the genome of a fungal forest pathogen

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Ake; Aerts, Andrea; Asiegbu, Fred; Belbahri, Lassaad; Bouzid, Ourdia; Broberg, Anders; Canback, Bjorn; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Cullen, Dan; Dalman, Kerstin; Deflorio, Giuliana; van Diepen, Linda T. A.; Dunand, Christophe; Duplessis, Sebastien; Durling, Mikael; Gonthier, Paolo; Grimwood, Jane; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Hansson, David; Henrissat, Bernard; Hietala, Ari; Himmelstrand, Kajsa; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Hogberg, Nils; James, Timothy Y.; Karlsson, Magnus; Kohler, Annegret; Lucas, Susan; Lunden, Karl; Morin, Emmanuelle; Murat, Claude; Park, Jongsun; Raffaello, Tommaso; Rouze, Pierre; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Solheim, Halvor; Stahlberg, Jerry; Velez, Heriberto; de Vries, Ronald P.; Wiebenga, Ad; Woodward, Steve; Yakovlev, Igor; Garbelotto, Matteo; Martin, Francis; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Stenlid, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Parasitism and saprotrophic wood decay are two fungal strategies fundamental for succession and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. An opportunity to assess the trade-off between these strategies is provided by the forest pathogen and wood decayer Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato. We report the annotated genome sequence and transcript profiling, as well as the quantitative trait loci mapping, of one member of the species complex: H. irregulare. Quantitative trait loci critical for pathogenicity, and rich in transposable elements, orphan and secreted genes, were identified. A wide range of cellulose-degrading enzymes are expressed during wood decay. By contrast, pathogenic interaction between H. irregulare and pine engages fewer carbohydrate-active enzymes, but involves an increase in pectinolytic enzymes, transcription modules for oxidative stress and secondary metabolite production. Our results show a trade-off in terms of constrained carbohydrate decomposition and membrane transport capacity during interaction with living hosts. Our findings establish that saprotrophic wood decay and necrotrophic parasitism involve two distinct, yet overlapping, processes.

  8. Decay of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) wood in moist and dry boreal, temperate, and tropical forest fragments

    Treesearch

    Grizelle Gonzalez; William Gould; Andrew T. Hudak; Teresa Nettleton Hollingsworth

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we set up a wood decomposition experiment to i) quantify the percent of mass remaining, decay constant and performance strength of aspen stakes (Populus tremuloides) in dry and moist boreal (Alaska and Minnesota, USA), temperate (Washington and Idaho, USA), and tropical (Puerto Rico) forest types, and ii) determine the effects of...

  9. Fire performance and decay resistance of solid wood and plywood treated with quaternary ammonia compounds and common fire retardants

    Treesearch

    Evren Terzi; S. Nami Kartal; Robert White; Katsumi Shinoda; Yuji Imamura

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the fire performance and decay resistance of solid wood and plywood treated with quaternary ammonia compounds (didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC) and didecyl dimethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DBF)) were compared with the performance of untreated control specimens and specimens treated with common fire retardants ((monoammonium phosphate (MAP),...

  10. Transcriptome and secretome analyses of the wood decay fungus Wolfiporia cocos support alternative mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Treesearch

    Jill Gaskell; Robert A. Blanchette; Philip E. Stewart; Sandra Splinter BonDurant; Marie Adams; Grzegorz Sabat; Philip Kersten; Daniel Cullen

    2016-01-01

    Certain wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as brown rot fungi, rapidly depolymerize cellulose while leaving behind the bulk of cell wall lignin as a modified residue. The mechanism(s) employed is unclear, but considerable evidence implicates the involvement of diffusible oxidants generated via Fenton-like chemistry. Toward a better understanding of...

  11. Erosion rates of wood during natural weathering. Part II, Earlywood and latewood erosion rates

    Treesearch

    R. Sam Williams; Mark T. Knaebe; William C. Feist

    2001-01-01

    This is the second in a series of reports on the erosion rates of wood exposed outdoors near Madison, Wisconsin. In the work reported here, the erosion rates of earlywood and latewood were determined for smooth-planed vertical-grained lumber for an exposure period of 14 years. The specimens were oriented vertically, facing south; erosion was measured annually for the...

  12. Erosion rates of wood during natural weathering. Part III, Effect of exposure angle on erosion rate

    Treesearch

    R. Sam Williams; Mark T. Knaebe; James W. Evans; William C. Feist

    2001-01-01

    This is the third in a series of reports on the erosion rates of wood exposed outdoors near Madison, Wisconsin. The specimens were exposed at an orientation of 90* or 45* facing south or horizontally (0*) for 10 years. Erosion was measured annually for the first 8 years and after 10 years. The erosion rates of earlywood (springwood) and latewood (summerwood) were...

  13. Localisation and characterisation of incipient brown-rot decay within spruce wood cell walls using FT-IR imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, Karin; Stevanic, Jasna S.; Ters, Thomas; Hinterstoisser, Barbara; Schwanninger, Manfred; Salmén, Lennart

    2010-01-01

    Spruce wood that had been degraded by brown-rot fungi (Gloeophyllum trabeum or Poria placenta) exhibiting mass losses up to 16% was investigated by transmission Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) imaging microscopy. Here the first work on the application of FT-IR imaging microscopy and multivariate image analysis of fungal degraded wood is presented and the first report on the spatial distribution of polysaccharide degradation during incipient brown-rot of wood. Brown-rot starts to become significant in the outer cell wall regions (middle lamellae, primary cell walls, and the outer layer of the secondary cell wall S1). This pattern was detected even in a sample with non-detectable mass loss. Most significant during incipient decay was the cleavage of glycosidic bonds, i.e. depolymerisation of wood polysaccharides and the degradation of pectic substances. Accordingly, intramolecular hydrogen bonding within cellulose was reduced, while the presence of phenolic groups increased. PMID:21052475

  14. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood : gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Rebecca J. Sichel; Donald S. Stone

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The...

  15. DecAID advisor: a tool for managing snags, down wood and wood decay in PNW forests.

    Treesearch

    Bruce G. Marcot; Grant Gunderson; Kim Mellen; Janet L. Ohmann

    2004-01-01

    Past tools for modeling and setting guidelines for snag and down wood management have been based on theory, professional judgment, models of wildlife species use as habitat and empirical data. However, recent studies reveal that guidelines for amounts of snags and down wood on national forests of Washington and Oregon may have been lower than the new field data on use...

  16. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-09-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates, which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters: a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  17. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-03-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters; a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  18. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  19. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  20. Decay rate of the second radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Robbins, D E

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  1. Wood source and pyrolysis temperature interact to control PyOM degradation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, J. A.; Hatton, P. J.; Filley, T. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Auclerc, A.; Gormley, M.; Dastmalchi, K.; Stark, R. E.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    Surprisingly little is known about how shifts in tree species composition and increased forest fire frequency and intensity will affect one of the most stable pools of soil organic matter, i.e. the pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM or char). In a previous study, we showed that wood source and pyrolysis temperature interact to control PyOM structure and potential reactivity for two tree species common in high-latitude forests, jack pine (JP) and red maple (RM). Here, we investigate whether these differences affect PyOM turnover by examining the fates of 13C/15N-enriched JP wood and PyOM pyrolyzed at 300 (JP300) and 450 °C (JP450) and RM pyrolyzed at 450 °C (RM450). The substrates were applied 1-3 cm below the O/A interface of a well-drained Spodosol in a long-term forest fire study located at the University of Michigan Biological Station (Pellston, MI, USA). 13C-CO2effluxes from the first 996 days of decay showed a significant wood source by pyrolysis temperature interaction on PyOM field mineralisation rates, with RM450 mineralising twice faster than JP450 during the first 90 days. Increasing pyrolysis temperature substantially decreased field mineralization rates during the first 996 days, with mineralisation rates 24 and 80 times slower for JP300 and JP450 compared with JP wood. After 1 year, (i) bacterial groups were large sinks for PyOM-derived C as pyrolysis temperature increased and as substrate use efficiency decreased; (ii) potential phenol oxidase and net peroxidase activities were unaffected by the PyOM addition, although net peroxidase activities measured tended to lesser for soils amended with JP450 and RM450; and (iii) Collembola detritivores appeared less likely to be found for soils amended with JP450 and RM450. PyOM-derived C and N recoveries did not differ after 1 year; we will present 3-y recovery data. Our results suggest that the composition of angiosperms (e.g. RM) and gymnosperms (e.g. JP) in high-latitude forests is an underappreciated but

  2. Residence times and decay rates of downed woody debris biomass/carbon in eastern US forests

    Treesearch

    Matthew B. Russell; Christopher W. Woodall; Shawn Fraver; Anthony W. D' Amato; Grant M. Domke; Kenneth E. Skog

    2014-01-01

    A key component in describing forest carbon (C) dynamics is the change in downed dead wood biomass through time. Specifically, there is a dearth of information regarding the residence time of downed woody debris (DWD), which may be reflected in the diversity of wood (for example, species, size, and stage of decay) and site attributes (for example, climate) across the...

  3. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Stan T. Lebow

    2010-01-01

    Many commonly used wood species can deteriorate if exposed to conditions that support growth of wood-degrading organisms (see Chap. 14). Wood products can be protected from the attack of decay fungi, harmful insects, or marine borers by applying chemical preservatives. Preservative treatments greatly increase the life of wood structures, thus reducing replacement costs...

  4. Effects of vacuum fluctuation suppression on atomic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Excited atoms are shot through a cavity containing an electromagnetic field. > Cavity is in the lowest mode in a non-classical state. > Such a state can suppress the decay rate of the atoms in certain situations. > We show that this effect can be correlated with periods of negative energy density. - Abstract: The use of atomic decay rates as a probe of sub-vacuum phenomena will be studied. Because electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations are essential for radiative decay of excited atomic states, decay rates can serve as a measure of the suppression of vacuum fluctuations in non-classical states, such as squeezed vacua. In such states, the renormalized expectation value of the square of the electric field or the energy density can be periodically negative, representing suppression of vacuum fluctuations. We explore the extent to which atomic decays can be used to measure the mean squared electric field or energy density. We consider a scheme in which atoms in an excited state transit a closed cavity whose lowest mode contains photons in a non-classical state. A crucial feature of our analysis is that we do not employ the rotating wave approximation. The change in the decay probability of the atom in the cavity due to the non-classical state can, under certain circumstances, serve as a measure of the mean squared electric field or energy density in the cavity. We make some estimates of the magnitude of this effect, which indicate that an experimental test might be possible, although very challenging.

  5. Little evidence for niche partitioning among ectomycorrhizal fungi on spruce seedlings planted in decayed wood versus mineral soil microsites.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer K M; Jones, Melanie D

    2013-12-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) communities vary among microhabitats, supporting a dominant role for deterministic processes in EMF community assemblage. EMF communities also differ between forest and clearcut environments, responding to this disturbance in a directional manner over time by returning to the species composition of the original forest. Accordingly, we examined EMF community composition on roots of spruce seedlings planted in three different microhabitats in forest and clearcut plots: decayed wood, mineral soil adjacent to downed wood, or control mineral soil, to determine the effect of retained downed wood on EMF communities over the medium and long term. If downed and decayed wood provide refuge habitat distinct from that of mineral soil, we would expect EMF communities on seedlings in woody habitats in clearcuts to be similar to those on seedlings planted in the adjacent forest. As expected, we found EMF species richness to be higher in forests than clearcuts (P ≤ 0.01), even though soil nutrient status did not differ greatly between the two plot types (P ≥ 0.05). Communities on forest seedlings were dominated by Tylospora spp., whereas those in clearcuts were dominated by Amphinema byssoides and Thelephora terrestris. Surprisingly, while substrate conditions varied among microsites (P ≤ 0.03), especially between decayed wood and mineral soil, EMF communities were not distinctly different among microhabitats. Our data suggest that niche partitioning by substrate does not occur among EMF species on very young seedlings in high elevation spruce-fir forests. Further, dispersal limitations shape EMF community assembly in clearcuts in these forests.

  6. Treatment of wood with glucose-diammonium phosphate for fire and fungal decay protection

    Treesearch

    George C. Chen

    2002-01-01

    This study describes a method for dual protection of wood against fungal and fire degradation in one treatment. The method consists of impregnating wood with aqueous solution of glucose-diammonium phosphate at pH 9, followed by heating the treated wood at temperatures of 160 °C and 190 °C for various lengths of time to form water insoluble products in wood.

  7. Generation rate and particle size distribution of wood dust by handheld sanding operation.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Jun

    2016-11-29

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and Japan Society for Occupational Health (JSOH) classified wood dust as a human carcinogen. Former studies have suggested that sanding with a portable sander is one of the processes that are liable to cause highest exposure to wood dust. However, the wood dust by sanding operation has not been investigated sufficiently. In this study, the generation rate and the particle size distribution of the wood dust produced by handheld sanding operation were observed by laboratory experiments. Beech and cypress were taken as typical hard and soft wood specimen respectively, and sanded with a portable sander. Three grades of sand paper (coarse, medium, fine) were attached to the sander in turn to be tested. The quantity of the wood dust produced by the sander was measured by weighing the specimen before and after the sanding and then the generation rate of the dust was calculated. Soft wood generated more dust than hard wood due to the difference in abrasion durability. A coarse sand paper produced more dust than a fine sand paper. The particles of less than 1 μm diameter were scarcely observed in the wood dust. When the specimens were sanded with a fine sand paper, the mass median aerodynamic diameters of beech dust and cypress dust were 9.0 μm and 9.8 μm, respectively. Respirable wood dust is able to be controlled by general ventilation with more than 0.7-4.2 m(3)/min ventilation rate.

  8. Glueball decay rates in the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünner, Frederic; Parganlija, Denis; Rebhan, Anton

    2015-05-01

    We revisit and extend previous calculations of glueball decay rates in the Sakai-Sugimoto model, a holographic top-down approach for QCD with chiral quarks based on D 8 -D 8 ¯ probe branes in Witten's holographic model of nonsupersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The rates for decays into two pions, two vector mesons, four pions, and the strongly suppressed decay into four π0 are worked out quantitatively, using a range of the 't Hooft coupling which closely reproduces the decay rate of ρ and ω mesons and also leads to a gluon condensate consistent with QCD sum rule calculations. The lowest holographic glueball, which arises from a rather exotic polarization of gravitons in the supergravity background, turns out to have a significantly lower mass and larger width than the two widely discussed glueball candidates f0(1500 ) and f0(1710 ) . The lowest nonexotic and predominantly dilatonic scalar mode, which has a mass of 1487 MeV in the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model, instead provides a narrow glueball state, and we conjecture that only this nonexotic mode should be identified with a scalar glueball component of f0(1500 ) or f0(1710 ). Moreover the decay pattern of the tensor glueball is determined, which is found to have a comparatively broad total width when its mass is adjusted to around or above 2 GeV.

  9. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  10. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, W. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  11. Fungal decay resistance of wood reacted with phosphorus pentoxide-amine system

    Treesearch

    Hong-Lin Lee; George C. Chen; Roger M. Rowell

    2004-01-01

    Resistance of wood reacted in situ with phosphorus pentoxide-amine to the brown-rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum and white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor was examined. Wood reacted with either octyl, tribromo, or nitro derivatives were more resistant to both fungi. Threshold retention values of phosphoramide-reacted wood to white-rot fungus T. versicolor ranged from 2.9...

  12. Transferable Durability: Enhancing decay resistance of non-durable species with extractives from durable wood species

    Treesearch

    G.T. Kirker; A.B. Blodgett; S. Lebow; C.A. Clausen

    2013-01-01

    Extractive content and composition is a vital component of naturally durable woods; however, variability in extractives can limit their usefulness in the field. Two extractive-free, non-durable wood species were pressure treated with ethanol-toluene extractives from 8 durable wood species. Extracted Southern pine, Paulownia and unextracted Southern pine blocks were...

  13. Gene expression patterns of wood decay fungi Postia placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium are influenced by wood substrate composition during degradation

    Treesearch

    Oleksandr Skyba; Daniel Cullen; Carl J. Douglas; Shawn D. Mansfield

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the specific genes and enzymes involved in the fungal degradation of lignocellulosic biomass derived from feedstocks with various compositions is essential to the development of improved bioenergy processes. In order to elucidate the effect of substrate composition on gene expression in wood-rotting fungi, we employed microarrays based on the...

  14. Time decay rates of non-Newtonian flows in RN+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bo-Qing; Chen, Zhi-Min

    2006-12-01

    This paper is concerned with time decay rates of the weak solutions of an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid motion model in half spaces for n[greater-or-equal, slanted]3. With the use of the spectral decomposition of the Stokes operator and Lp-Lq estimates, it is shown that the weak solutions decay in L2 norm like when the initial velocity u0[set membership, variant]L2[intersection]Lr for 1[less-than-or-equals, slant]r<2. The higher decay rates are obtained, if u0 satisfies the additional moment condition Moreover, the error estimates between the non-Newtonian flow and the Navier-Stokes flow are discussed.

  15. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  16. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-15

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  17. Litter decay rates are determined by lignin chemistry

    Treesearch

    Jennifer M. Talbot; Daniel J. Yelle; James Nowick; Kathleen K. Treseder

    2011-01-01

    Litter decay rates are often correlated with the initial lignin:N or lignin:cellulose content of litter, suggesting that interactions between lignin and more labile compounds are important controls over litter decomposition. The chemical composition of lignin may influence these interactions, if lignin physically or chemically protects labile components from microbial...

  18. Influences of the astrophysical environment on nuclear decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that nuclear decay rates can be significantly altered from their laboratory values. Such effects are relevant to a number of current problems in nuclear astrophysics. Experiments related to these problems are now being pursued, and will be described in this talk. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Beta-decay rates: towards a self-consistent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Borzov, I. N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    1998-02-15

    An approximation to a self-consistent model of the ground state properties and spin-isospin excitations of neutron-rich nuclides is outlined. The structure of the Gamow-Teller strength functions in stable nuclei and short-lived nuclides undergoing high-energy {beta}-decay is discussed. The results of large-scale calculations of the {beta}-decay rates for spherical and slightly deformed nuclides of relevance to the r-process are analysed and compared with the results of existing global calculations.

  20. Uncertainties in Astrophysical β-decay Rates from the FRDM

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolli, M.G.; Möller, P.; Jones, S.

    2014-06-15

    β{sup −}-decay rates are of crucial importance in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, as they are a key component in stellar processes. Tabulated values of the decay rates as functions of both temperature T and density ρ are necessary input to stellar evolution codes such as MESA, or largescale nucleosynthesis simulations such as those performed by the NuGrid collaboration. Therefore, it is interesting to know the uncertainties in these rates and the effects of these uncertainties on stellar structure and isotopic yields. We have calculated β-strength functions and reaction rates for nuclei ranging from {sup 16}O to {sup 339}136, extending from the proton drip line to the neutron drip line based on a quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) in a deformed folded-Yukawa single-particle model. Q values are determined from the finite-range droplet mass model (FRDM). We have investigated the effect of model uncertainty on astrophysical β{sup −}-decay rates calculated by the FRDM. The sources of uncertainty considered are Q values and deformation. The rates and their uncertainties are generated for a variety of temperature and density ranges, corresponding to key stellar processes. We demonstrate the effects of these rate uncertainties on isotopic abundances using the NuGrid network calculations.

  1. Wood

    Treesearch

    David W. Green; Robert H. White; Antoni TenWolde; William Simpson; Joseph Murphy; Robert J. Ross; Roland Hernandez; Stan T. Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood is a naturally formed organic material consisting essentially of elongated tubular elements called cells arranged in a parallel manner for the most part. These cells vary in dimensions and wall thickness with position in the tree, age, conditions of growth, and kind of tree. The walls of the cells are formed principally of chain molecules of cellulose, polymerized...

  2. Materials Outgassing Rate Decay in Vacuum at Isothermal Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Alvin Y.; Kastanas, George N.; Kramer, Leonard; Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    As a laboratory for scientific research, the International Space Station has been in Low Earth Orbit for nearly 20 years and is expected to be on-orbit for another 10 years. The ISS has been maintaining a relatively pristine contamination environment for science payloads. Materials outgassing induced contamination is currently the dominant source for sensitive surfaces on ISS and modeling the outgassing rate decay over a 20 to 30 year period is challenging. Materials outgassing is described herein as a diffusion-reaction process using ASTM E 1559 rate data. The observation of -1/2 (diffusion) or non-integers (reaction limited) as rate decay exponents for common ISS materials indicate classical reaction kinetics is unsatisfactory in modeling materials outgassing. Non-randomness of reactant concentrations at the interface is the source of this deviation from classical reaction kinetics. A diffusion limited decay was adopted as the result of the correlation of the contaminant layer thicknesses on returned ISS hardware, the existence of high outgassing silicone exhibiting near diffusion limited decay, and the confirmation of non-depleted material after ten years in the Low Earth Orbit.Keywords: Materials Outgassing, ASTM E 1559, Reaction Kinetics, Diffusion, Space Environments Effects, Contamination

  3. Materials outgassing rate decay in vacuum at isothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Alvin Y.; Kastanas, George N.; Kramer, Leonard; Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.

    2016-09-01

    As a laboratory for scientific research, the International Space Station has been in Low Earth Orbit for over 17 years and is planned to be on-orbit for another 10 years. The ISS has been maintaining a relatively pristine contamination environment for science payloads. Materials outgassing induced contamination is currently the dominant source for sensitive surfaces on ISS and modelling the outgassing rate decay over a 20 to 30 year period is challenging. Using ASTM E 1559 rate data, materials outgassing is described herein as a diffusion-reaction process with the interface playing a key role. The observation of -1/2 (diffusion) or non-integers (reaction limited) as rate decay exponents for common ISS materials indicate classical reaction kinetics is unsatisfactory in modelling materials outgassing. Nonrandomness of reactant concentrations at the interface is the source of this deviation from classical reaction kinetics. A t-1/2 decay is adopted as the result of the correlation of the contaminant layer thicknesses and composition on returned ISS hardware, the existence of high outgassing silicone exhibiting near diffusion limited decay, the confirmation of nondepleted material after ten years in Low Earth Orbit, and a potential slowdown of long term materials outgassing kinetics due to silicone contaminants at the interface.

  4. Power Spectrum Analysis of BNL Decay-Rate Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    93524, USA d Department of Physics, United States Air Force Academy, CO 80920, USA Keywords: Sun, Neutrinos • Corresponding author. Tel +1...irradiance data have been found to be closely related to rotation rate estimates derived from low-energy solar- neutrino data, this result supports the...recent conjecture that solar neutrinos may be responsible for variations in nuclear decay rates. We also carry out a similar comparison with local

  5. Delignification of Wood Chips and Pulps by Using Natural and Synthetic Porphyrins: Models of Fungal Decay

    PubMed Central

    Paszczyński, Andrzej; Crawford, Ronald L.; Blanchette, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Kraft pulps, prepared from softwoods, and small chips of birch wood were treated with heme and tert-butyl hydroperoxide in aqueous solutions at reflux temperature. Analyses of treated pulps showed decreases in kappa number (a measure of lignin content) from about 36 to less than 2, with concomitant increases in brightness (80% increase in the better samples). Analyses of treated wood chips revealed selective delignification and removal of hemicelluloses. After 48 h of treatment, lignin losses from the wood chips approached 40%, and xylose/mannose (hemicellulose) losses approached 70%, while glucose (cellulose) losses were less than 10%. Examination of delignified chips by transmission electron microscopy showed that the removal of lignin occurred in a manner virtually indistinguishable from that seen after decay by white rot fungi. Various metalloporphyrins, which act as biomimetic catalysts, were compared to horseradish peroxidase and fungal manganese peroxidase in their abilities to oxidize syringaldazine in an organic solvent, dioxane. The metalloporphyrins and peroxidases behaved similarly, and it appeared that the activities of the peroxidases resulted from the extraction of heme into the organic phase, rather than from the activities of the enzymes themselves. We concluded that heme-tert-butyl hydroperoxide systems in the absence of a protein carrier mimic the decay of lignified tissues by white rot fungi. Images PMID:16347540

  6. Trichoderma species occurring on wood with decay symptoms in mountain forests in Central Europe: genetic and enzymatic characterization.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Lidia; Strakowska, Judyta; Chełkowski, Jerzy; Gąbka-Buszek, Agnieszka; Kaczmarek, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the species diversity of Trichoderma obtained from samples of wood collected in the forests of the Gorce Mountains (location A), Karkonosze Mountains (location B) and Tatra Mountains (location C) in Central Europe and to examine the cellulolytic and xylanolytic activity of these species as an expression of their probable role in wood decay processes. The present study has led to the identification of the following species and species complex: Trichoderma atroviride P. Karst., Trichoderma citrinoviride Bissett, Trichoderma cremeum P. Chaverri & Samuels, Trichoderma gamsii Samuels & Druzhin., Trichoderma harzianum complex, Trichoderma koningii Oudem., Trichoderma koningiopsis Samuels, C. Suárez & H.C. Evans, Trichoderma longibrachiatum Rifai, Trichoderma longipile Bissett, Trichoderma sp. (Hypocrea parapilulifera B.S. Lu, Druzhin. & Samuels), Trichoderma viride Schumach. and Trichoderma viridescens complex. Among them, T. viride was observed as the most abundant species (53 % of all isolates) in all the investigated locations. The Shannon's biodiversity index (H), evenness (E), and the Simpson's biodiversity index (D) calculations for each location showed that the highest species diversity and evenness were recorded for location A-Gorce Mountains (H' = 1.71, E = 0.82, D = 0.79). The preliminary screening of 119 Trichoderma strains for cellulolytic and xylanolytic activity showed the real potential of all Trichoderma species originating from wood with decay symptoms to produce cellulases and xylanases-the key enzymes in plant cell wall degradation.

  7. Precision Measurement of the Singlet Positronium Decay Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ramadhan, Ali Hassan

    This is a new measurement of the annihilation decay rate, lambda_{S}, of parapositronium (p-Ps) as a test of quantum electrodynamics (QED). The measured value is lambda_ {S} = (7991.5 +/- 1.7) mu s^{-1}. At 210 ppm accuracy this result is 6.5 times more accurate than the previous measurement and is the first measurement sensitive enough to test the relative order alpha ^2lnalpha term in the QED calculation of lambda_{S}. This measurement, which is in agreement with theory, is particularly interesting in light of the 1500 ppm discrepancy between theory and experiment that still exists in the decay rate, lambda_{T}, of orthopositronium (o-Ps). This measurement is made using beta -decay positrons from a ^{68 }Ge-^{68}Ga source which form positronium in a variety of gas mixtures. The time interval between the emission of a positron and the detection of the annihilation gamma -ray is measured with a time-to-digital converter. The distribution of the time intervals is collected as an annihilation lifetime spectrum. lambda_{S } is measured indirectly by using magnetic mixing. In a magnetic field the m = 0 ground states mix to produce a state, o-Ps^', which has a faster decay rate, lambda_sp {T}{'}. Hence, at any gas density, rho, the histogram is fitted to two exponential components with decay rates, lambda_{T}(rho) and lambda_sp{T}{' }(rho). A quantity, Lambda( rho), linear in the gas density and equal to lambda_{S} at zero density, is calculated from the two measured decay rates and the value of the magnetic field. It is found that Lambda(rho) has a small slope due to spin exchange quenching in the gas. This slope is measured in a separate experiment and a correction is made for this. The quantity lambda_{S } is separately measured in N_2 and CO_2 (each mixed with various small percentages of isobutane) over a wide range of pressures and at two values of the magnetic field. The measured values of lambda_{S } are in agreement. The measurement in CO _2 is considered as a

  8. A Cytochemical Study of Extracellular Sheaths Associated with Rigidoporus lignosus during Wood Decay

    PubMed Central

    Nicole, M.; Chamberland, H.; Rioux, D.; Lecours, N.; Rio, B.; Geiger, J. P.; Ouellette, G. B.

    1993-01-01

    An ultrastructural and cytochemical investigation of the development of Rigidoporus lignosus, a white-rot fungus inoculated into wood blocks, was carried out to gain better insight into the structure and role of the extracellular sheaths produced by this fungus during wood degradation. Fungal sheaths had a dense or loose fibrillar appearance and were differentiated from the fungal cell wall early after wood inoculation. Close association between extracellular fibrils and wood cell walls was observed at both early and advanced stages of wood alteration. Fungal sheaths were often seen deep in host cell walls, sometimes enclosing residual wood fragments. Specific gold probes were used to investigate the chemical nature of R. lignosus sheaths. While labeling of chitin, pectin, β-1,4- and β-1,3-glucans, β-glucosides, galactosamine, mannose, sialic acid, RNA, fucose, and fimbrial proteins over fungal sheaths did not succeed, galactose residues and laccase (a fungal phenoloxidase) were found to be present. The positive reaction of sheaths with the PATAg test indicates that polysaccharides such as β-1,6-glucans are important components. Our data suggest that extracellular sheaths produced by R. lignosus during host cell colonization play an important role in wood degradation. Transportation of lignin-degrading enzymes by extracellular fibrils indicates that alteration of plant polymers may occur within fungal sheaths. It is also proposed that R. lignosus sheaths may be involved in recognition mechanisms in fungal cell-wood surface interactions. Images PMID:16349017

  9. Sarcoporia polyspora (Basidiomycota, Polyporales): a rare wood-decay fungus newly recorded from South America

    Treesearch

    Daiana Bortoluzzi Baldoni; Beatriz Ortiz-Santana; Gilberto Coelho; Zaida I. Antoniolli; Rodrigo J.S. Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi degrade almost exclusively wood cellulosic materials participating in the, carbon cycle and soil formation of many forest regions, these are especially important on boreal and cultivated coniferous forests. These fungi and forests may have a common co-evolutionary history. Studying wood-inhabiting fungi in cultivated pine forests in Southern Brazil, we...

  10. Consumer willingness to pay for a naturally decay-resistant wood product.

    Treesearch

    Geoffrey Donovan; Hayley. Hesseln

    2004-01-01

    Chromated copper arsenate (CCA) is the most widely used chemical wood preservative in the United States. Concerns about the safety of CCA led to an agreement between the Environmental Protection Agency and the wood treatment industry to withdraw CCA for nonindustrial uses by the end of 2003. In light of the publicity surrounding the withdrawal of CCA, this article...

  11. Changes in cation concentrations in red spruce wood decayed by brown rot and white rot fungi

    Treesearch

    A. Ostrofsky; J. Jellison; K.T. Smith; W.C. Shortle

    1997-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) wood blocks were incubated in modified soil block jars and inoculated with one of nine white rot or brown rot basidiomycetes. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, and aluminum were determined using inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy in wood incubated 0, 1.5, 4, and 8 months after...

  12. Gene Expression Analysis of Copper Tolerance and Wood Decay in the Brown Rot Fungus Fibroporia radiculosa

    Treesearch

    J. D. Tang; L. A. Parker; A. D. Perkins; T. S. Sonstegard; S. G. Schroeder; D. D. Nicholas; S. V. Diehl

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput transcriptomics was used to identify Fibroporia radiculosa genes that were differentially regulated during colonization of wood treated with a copper-based preservative. The transcriptome was profiled at two time points while the fungus was growing on wood treated with micronized copper quat (MCQ). A total of 917 transcripts were...

  13. Gene expression analysis of copper tolerance and wood decay in the brown rot fungus Fibroporia radiculosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many brown rot fungi are capable of rapidly degrading wood and are copper-tolerant. To better understand the genes that control these processes, we examined gene expression of Fibroporia radiculosa growing on wood treated with a copper-based preservative that combined copper carbonate with dimethyld...

  14. Effects of fog droplets on wake vortex decay rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulden, T. H.; Frost, W.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model for the motion of particles in a laminar line vortex is discussed. The energy required to accelerate a set of these particles was determined and shown to be only a small fraction of the energy content of the vortex flow. It is shown that this energy transfer is unlikely to be sufficient to significantly modify the vortex decay rate. It is further argued that the effect of the particle on the viscous properties of the resulting two phase fluid leads to a slower decay rate than in single phase air flow. However, this conclusion may not necessarily follow for turbulence flows. Results show that the migration of particles to the outer flow results in a redistribution of the velocity profile in the vortex and in a non-uniform two phase viscosity across the core. It is suggested that these effects may accelerate vortex bursting.

  15. [Isolation of wood-decaying fungi and evaluation of their enzymatic activity (Quindío, Colombia)].

    PubMed

    Chaparro, Deisy Fernanda; Rosas, Diana Carolina; Varela, Amanda

    2009-12-31

    White rot fungi (Ascomycota and Basidiomycota) were collected on fallen trunks with different decay stages, in a subandean forest (La Montaña del Ocaso nature reserve), and it was evaluated their ligninolitic activity. They were cultured on malt extract agar. Then it was performed semiquantitative tests for laccase and cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) activity using ABTS and DCPIP as enzymatic inducers. Based on the results of these tests, the fungi with higher activities from trunks with different decay stages were selected: Cookeina sulcipes (for stage 1), a fungus from the family Corticiaceae (for stage 2), Xylaria polymorpha (for stage 3) and Earliella sp. (for stage 4). A fermentation was performed at 28 degrees C, during 11 days, in a rotatory shaker at 150 rpm. Biomass, glucose, proteins and enzyme activities measurements were performed daily. The fungi that were in the trunks with decay states from 1 to 3, showed higher laccase activity as the state of decay increased. A higher DCH activity was also associated with a higher. Also, there was a positive relationship between both enzymes' activities. Erliella was the fungus which presented the highest biomass production (1140,19 g/l), laccase activity (157 UL(-1)) and CDH activity (43,50 UL(-1)). This work is the first report of laccase and CDH activity for Cookeina sulcipes and Earliella sp. Moreover, it gives basis for the use of these native fungi in biotechnological applications and the acknowledgment of their function in the wood decay process in native forest.

  16. Wood preservation

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach

    1999-01-01

    When left untreated in many outdoor applications, wood becomes subject to degradation by a variety of natural causes. Although some trees possess naturally occurring resistance to decay (Ch. 3, Decay Resistance), many are in short supply or are not grown in ready proximity to markets. Because most commonly used wood species, such as Southern Pine, ponderosa pine, and...

  17. Analytical pyrolysis vs. classical wet chemical analysis to assess the decay of archaeological waterlogged wood.

    PubMed

    Lucejko, Jeannette J; Zborowska, Magdalena; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria P; Prądzyński, Włodzimierz

    2012-10-01

    The macromolecular complexity of wood limits the possibility of obtaining complete chemical information on its alteration in archaeological objects. This paper compares the results obtained in the characterisation of the components of archaeological wood by a classical wet chemical method and by an instrumental method based on pyrolysis in presence of hexamethyldisilazane coupled with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, Py(HMDS)-GC/MS. We compare the results obtained with the two methods quantitatively. This enables us to evaluate the efficiency of Py(HMDS)-GC/MS in assessing the chemical composition and the state of conservation of degraded wood. The material analysed consisted of reference sound wood and waterlogged wood from the Żółte historical site, located on a small island on Lake Zarańskie in Poland. The samples are from the remains of settlements dating to a period between the 9th and the 12th centuries AD. The results obtained by Py(HMDS)-GC/MS analysis are consistent in the determination of the level of degradation of archaeological wood with the results obtained using traditional techniques. The pyrolysis method is faster, reproducible, and reveals not only the amount but also the quality of the wood constituents, needing a much smaller sample. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactions affect hyphal growth and enzyme profiles in combinations of coniferous wood-decaying fungi of Agaricomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Tuulia; Kuuskeri, Jaana; Shah, Firoz

    2017-01-01

    Fomitopsis pinicola is a species of Polyporales frequently encountered in Nordic temperate and boreal forests. In nature, the fungus causes destructive brown rot in wood, colonizing tree trunks often occupied by other Basidiomycota species. We mimicked these species-species interactions by introducing F. pinicola to five white rot species, all common saprotrophs of Norway spruce. Hyphal interactions and mycelial growth in various combinations were recorded, while activities of lignocellulose-acting CAZymes and oxidoreductases were followed in co-cultures on two different carbon-source media. Of the species, Phlebia radiata and Trichaptum abietinum were the strongest producers of lignin-modifying oxidoreductases (laccase, manganese peroxidase) when evaluated alone, as well as in co-cultures, on the two different growth media (low-nitrogen liquid medium containing ground coniferous wood, and malt extract broth). F. pinicola was an outstanding producer of oxalic acid (up to 61 mM), whereas presence of P. radiata prevented acidification of the growth environment in the liquid malt-extract cultures. When enzyme profiles of the species combinations were clustered, time-dependent changes were observed on wood-supplemented medium during the eight weeks of growth. End-point acidity and production of mycelium, oxalic acid and oxidoreductase activities, in turn clustered the fungal combinations into three distinct functional groups, determined by the presence of F. pinicola and P. radiata, by principal component analysis. Our findings indicate that combinations of wood-decay fungi have dramatic dynamic effects on the production of lignocellulose-active enzymes, which may lead to divergent degradative processes of dead wood and forest litter. PMID:28953947

  19. Interactions affect hyphal growth and enzyme profiles in combinations of coniferous wood-decaying fungi of Agaricomycetes.

    PubMed

    Mali, Tuulia; Kuuskeri, Jaana; Shah, Firoz; Lundell, Taina Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Fomitopsis pinicola is a species of Polyporales frequently encountered in Nordic temperate and boreal forests. In nature, the fungus causes destructive brown rot in wood, colonizing tree trunks often occupied by other Basidiomycota species. We mimicked these species-species interactions by introducing F. pinicola to five white rot species, all common saprotrophs of Norway spruce. Hyphal interactions and mycelial growth in various combinations were recorded, while activities of lignocellulose-acting CAZymes and oxidoreductases were followed in co-cultures on two different carbon-source media. Of the species, Phlebia radiata and Trichaptum abietinum were the strongest producers of lignin-modifying oxidoreductases (laccase, manganese peroxidase) when evaluated alone, as well as in co-cultures, on the two different growth media (low-nitrogen liquid medium containing ground coniferous wood, and malt extract broth). F. pinicola was an outstanding producer of oxalic acid (up to 61 mM), whereas presence of P. radiata prevented acidification of the growth environment in the liquid malt-extract cultures. When enzyme profiles of the species combinations were clustered, time-dependent changes were observed on wood-supplemented medium during the eight weeks of growth. End-point acidity and production of mycelium, oxalic acid and oxidoreductase activities, in turn clustered the fungal combinations into three distinct functional groups, determined by the presence of F. pinicola and P. radiata, by principal component analysis. Our findings indicate that combinations of wood-decay fungi have dramatic dynamic effects on the production of lignocellulose-active enzymes, which may lead to divergent degradative processes of dead wood and forest litter.

  20. The composition, anti-mildew and anti-wood-decay fungal activities of the leaf and fruit oils of Juniperus formosana from Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chang; Hsu, Kuan-Ping; Wang, Eugene I-Chen; Ho, Chen-Lung

    2013-09-01

    In this study, anti-mildew and anti-wood-decay fungal activities of the leaf and fruits essential oil and its constituents from Juniperus formosana were evaluated in vitro against seven mildew fungi and four wood decay fungi, respectively. The main compounds responsible for the anti-mildew and anti-wood-decay fungal activities were also identified. The essential oil from the fresh leaves and fruits of J. formosana were isolated using hydrodistillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus, and characterized by GC-FID and GC-MS, respectively. The leaf oil mainly consisted of alpha-pinene (41.0%), limonene (11.5%), alpha-cadinol (11.0%), elemol (6.3%), and beta-myrcene (5.8%); the fruit oil was mostly alpha-pinene (40.9%), beta-myrcene (32.4%), alpha-thujene (5.9%) and limonene (5.9%). Comparing the anti-mildew and anti-wood-decay fungal activities of the oils suggested that the leaf oil was the most effective. For the anti-mildew and anti-wood-decay fungal activities of the leaf oil, the active source compounds were determined to be alpha-cadinol and elemol.

  1. Biodegradation behavior and modelling of soil burial effect on degradation rate of PLA blended with starch and wood flour.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shanshan; Zhang, Yanhua; Gu, Jiyou; Tan, Haiyan

    2017-08-30

    The biodegradation behavior of Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) blended with starch and wood flour in outdoor soil was investigated comprehensively. As a result, starch provided a biological fuel for the growth of microorganisms in the soil which accelerated the degradation rate of PLA more obviously than wood flour. With the increase of starch content, the weight loss increased and the morphology exhibited more gullies and cavities. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicated that the variation of O/C ratio was controlled by starch biodegradation and PLA hydrolysis and they were a concomitant process. The mechanical strengths of all the blends showed similar trend and fitted a first-order exponential decay model. The model is shown in good agreement with experimental results as the correlation coefficient is higher than 0.99, and the model can support an efficient method to estimate the durability of starch/wood flour/PLA blends. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Techniques for the detection of pathogenic Cryptococcus species in wood decay substrata and the evaluation of viability in stored samples.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Christian; Barbosa, Glaucia Gonçalves; Oliveira, Raquel de Vasconcellos Carvalhaes de; Morales, Bernardina Penarrieta; Wanke, Bodo; Lazéra, Márcia dos Santos

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated several techniques for the detection of the yeast form of Cryptococcus in decaying wood and measured the viability of these fungi in environmental samples stored in the laboratory. Samples were collected from a tree known to be positive for Cryptococcus and were each inoculated on 10 Niger seed agar (NSA) plates. The conventional technique (CT) yielded a greater number of positive samples and indicated a higher fungal density [in colony forming units per gram of wood (CFU x g(-1))] compared to the humid swab technique (ST). However, the difference in positive and false negative results between the CT-ST was not significant. The threshold of detection for the CT was 0.05.10³ CFU x g(-1), while the threshold for the ST was greater than 0.1.10³ CFU(-1). No colonies were recovered using the dry swab technique. We also determined the viability of Cryptococcus in wood samples stored for 45 days at 25ºC using the CT and ST and found that samples not only continued to yield a positive response, but also exhibited an increase in CFU x g(-1), suggesting that Cryptococcus is able to grow in stored environmental samples. The ST.1, in which samples collected with swabs were immediately plated on NSA medium, was more efficient and less laborious than either the CT or ST and required approximately 10 min to perform; however, additional studies are needed to validate this technique.

  3. Growing evidence for facultative biotrophy in saprotrophic fungi: data from microcosm tests with 201 species of wood-decay basidiomycetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gabriel R; Finlay, Roger D; Stenlid, Jan; Vasaitis, Rimvydas; Menkis, Audrius

    2017-04-06

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbioses have evolved a minimum of 78 times independently from saprotrophic lineages, indicating the potential for functional overlap between ECM and saprotrophic fungi. ECM fungi have the capacity to decompose organic matter, and although there is increasing evidence that some saprotrophic fungi exhibit the capacity to enter into facultative biotrophic relationships with plant roots without causing disease symptoms, this subject is still not well studied. In order to determine the extent of biotrophic capacity in saprotrophic wood-decay fungi and which systems may be useful models, we investigated the colonization of conifer seedling roots in vitro using an array of 201 basidiomycete wood-decay fungi. Microtome sectioning, differential staining and fluorescence microscopy were used to visualize patterns of root colonization in microcosm systems containing Picea abies or Pinus sylvestris seedlings and each saprotrophic fungus. Thirty-four (16.9%) of the tested fungal species colonized the roots of at least one tree species. Two fungal species showed formation of a mantle and one showed Hartig net-like structures. These features suggest the possibility of an active functional symbiosis between fungus and plant. The data indicate that the capacity for facultative biotrophic relationships in free-living saprotrophic basidiomycetes may be greater than previously supposed.

  4. Decay resistance of thermally-modified Eucalyptus grandis wood at 140 degrees C, 160 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 220 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Calonego, Fred Willians; Severo, Elias Taylor Durgante; Furtado, Edson Luiz

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on the biological resistance of Eucalyptus grandis wood to the decay fungus Picnoporus sanguineus. Boards from 5 years and 11 months old E. grandis trees, taken from the stock possessed by the Duratex-SA company, were thermally-modified at 140 degrees C, 160 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 220 degrees C in the Laboratory of Wood Drying and Preservation from UNESP, Botucatu, SP, Brazil. Samples of each treatment were treated according to ASTM D-2017 (1994). The experiment tested the accelerated decay caused by the decay fungus P. sanguineus on a system of soil-block wood. The results of thermal treatment showed that an increase of temperature of 180-220 degrees C caused reductions of between 15.7% and 82.4% in the weight loss in the samples from E. grandis incubated with P. sanguineus.

  5. Genome analysis of Daldinia eschscholtzii strains UM 1400 and UM 1020, wood-decaying fungi isolated from human hosts

    DOE PAGES

    Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Ngeow, Yun Fong; ...

    2015-11-18

    Background: Daldinia eschscholtzii is a wood-inhabiting fungus that causes wood decay under certain conditions. It has a broad host range and produces a large repertoire of potentially bioactive compounds. However, there is no extensive genome analysis on this fungal species. Results: Two fungal isolates (UM 1400 and UM 1020) from human specimens were identified as Daldinia eschscholtzii by morphological features and ITS-based phylogenetic analysis. Both genomes were similar in size with 10,822 predicted genes in UM 1400 (35.8 Mb) and 11,120 predicted genes in UM 1020 (35.5 Mb). A total of 751 gene families were shared among both UM isolates,more » including gene families associated with fungus-host interactions. In the CAZyme comparative analysis, both genomes were found to contain arrays of CAZyme related to plant cell wall degradation. Genes encoding secreted peptidases were found in the genomes, which encode for the peptidases involved in the degradation of structural proteins in plant cell wall. In addition, arrays of secondary metabolite backbone genes were identified in both genomes, indicating of their potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Both genomes also contained an abundance of gene encoding signaling components, with three proposed MAPK cascades involved in cell wall integrity, osmoregulation, and mating/filamentation. Besides genomic evidence for degrading capability, both isolates also harbored an array of genes encoding stress response proteins that are potentially significant for adaptation to living in the hostile environments. In conclusion: Our genomic studies provide further information for the biological understanding of the D. eschscholtzii and suggest that these wood-decaying fungi are also equipped for adaptation to adverse environments in the human host.« less

  6. Genome analysis of Daldinia eschscholtzii strains UM 1400 and UM 1020, wood-decaying fungi isolated from human hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Na, Shiang Ling; Lee, Kok Wei; Hoh, Chee-Choong; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-11-18

    Background: Daldinia eschscholtzii is a wood-inhabiting fungus that causes wood decay under certain conditions. It has a broad host range and produces a large repertoire of potentially bioactive compounds. However, there is no extensive genome analysis on this fungal species. Results: Two fungal isolates (UM 1400 and UM 1020) from human specimens were identified as Daldinia eschscholtzii by morphological features and ITS-based phylogenetic analysis. Both genomes were similar in size with 10,822 predicted genes in UM 1400 (35.8 Mb) and 11,120 predicted genes in UM 1020 (35.5 Mb). A total of 751 gene families were shared among both UM isolates, including gene families associated with fungus-host interactions. In the CAZyme comparative analysis, both genomes were found to contain arrays of CAZyme related to plant cell wall degradation. Genes encoding secreted peptidases were found in the genomes, which encode for the peptidases involved in the degradation of structural proteins in plant cell wall. In addition, arrays of secondary metabolite backbone genes were identified in both genomes, indicating of their potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Both genomes also contained an abundance of gene encoding signaling components, with three proposed MAPK cascades involved in cell wall integrity, osmoregulation, and mating/filamentation. Besides genomic evidence for degrading capability, both isolates also harbored an array of genes encoding stress response proteins that are potentially significant for adaptation to living in the hostile environments. In conclusion: Our genomic studies provide further information for the biological understanding of the D. eschscholtzii and suggest that these wood-decaying fungi are also equipped for adaptation to adverse environments in the human host.

  7. Trunk decays

    Treesearch

    Alex L. Shigo

    1989-01-01

    Trunk decays are major causes of low quality wood-wood with little or no economic value. As a forest practitioner you should be able to recognize trees at high risk for decay and remove them if timber production is your primary objective. Remember, however, that decayed trees often develop into den trees or nesting sites and provide essential habitat for wildlife....

  8. Uncertainties in corrosion rate measurements of fasteners exposed to treated wood at 100% relative humidity

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effect that uncertainties in measurements of time, weight, and surface area have on the determination of the corrosion rate of metal fasteners in contact with wood. Three different types of nails were driven into alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ)-treated wood and exposed to 26.7°C (80°C) at 100 % relative humidity environment for up to 1 year....

  9. Linking charring temperature and wood source to the structure and degradation rates of pyrogenic organic matter in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, P.; Dastmalchi, K.; Chatterjee, S.; Auclerc, A.; Le Moine, J.; Filley, T. R.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.; Stark, R.; Bird, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Fire is a major controller of forest C cycling by releasing CO2 to the atmosphere and by contributing pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM or biochar) to soils. Recent studies have shown that much of fire-derived PyOM may turn over in soils at century time scales. Two likely controllers of the chemical structure of PyOM and its resulting decay rate are pyrolysis temperature and the source biomass. However, we know little of how these two factors determine the chemical structure and bioreactivity of the resulting PyOM. To gain further insight into controls on the structure and fate of PyOM, we examined two species of dual-labeled (13C/15N), wood-based PyOM (Pinus banksiana and Acer rubrum) made with 5 pyrolysis temperatures (0, 200, 300, 450, 600 °C) using solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, isotopic and elemental composition (C, H, O, and N), and differential scanning calorimetry. In addition, we are investigating the fate of a subset of these PyOM materials applied to forest soils in a long-term field study located at the University of Michigan Biological Station in Pellston, MI, USA. We will present data of the loss of PyOM C as CO2 and DOC during the first year in situ. We found complementary lines of evidence for a facile removal of cellulose and hemicellulose and a progressive alteration of nitrogenous moieties across the charring gradient for wood-derived PyOM of both tree species as temperature was increased from 0 to 600 °C. Our NMR results show a significant species by pyrolysis temperature interaction on PyOM chemical structure with considerably less condensation for Acer- than Pinus-derived PyOM at 300 °C. In the first year after addition to soil, Acer-derived PyOM pyrolyzed at 450 °C mineralized faster than Pinus-derived PyOM pyrolyzed at 450 °C. Increasing pyrolysis temperatures for Pinus-derived PyOM also resulted in slower CO2 mineralization rates during the first year of field decay. These results relate pyrolysis temperature to the resulting Py

  10. Solvent Polarity Effect on Nonradiative Decay Rate of Thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Stsiapura, Vitali I; Kurhuzenkau, Siarhei A; Kuzmitsky, Valery A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Tikhomirov, Sergey A

    2016-07-21

    It has been established earlier that fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T (ThT)-a probe widely used for amyloid fibrils detection-is viscosity-dependent, and photophysical properties of ThT can be well-described by the fluorescent molecular rotor model, which associates twisted internal charge transfer (TICT) reaction with the main nonradiative decay process in the excited state of the dye. Solutions of ThT in a range of polar solvents were studied using steady-state fluorescence and sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy methods, and we showed that solvent effect on nonradiative transition rate knr cannot be reduced to the dependence on viscosity only and that ∼3 times change of knr can be observed for ThT in aprotic solvents and water, which correlates with solvent polarity. Different behavior was observed in alcohol solutions, particularly in longer n-alcohols, where TICT rate was mainly determined by rotational diffusion of ThT fragments. Quantum-chemical calculations of S0 → S1 transition energy were performed to get insight of polar solvent contribution to the excited-state energy stabilization. Effect of polar solvent on electronic energy levels of ThT was simulated by applying homogeneous electric field according to the Onsager cavity model. Static solvent effect on the excited-state potential energy surface, where charge transfer reaction takes place, was not essential to account for experimentally observed TICT rate differences in water and aprotic solvents. From the other side, nonradiative decay rate of ThT in water, ethylene glycol, and aprotic solvents was found to follow dynamics of polar solvation knr ∼ τS(-1), which can explain dependence of the TICT rate on both polarity and viscosity of the solvents.

  11. Decay Rates and Semi-stable Fraction Formation after 12 years of Foliar Litter Decomposition in Canadian Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Smyth, C.; Moore, T.; Prescott, C.; Titus, B.; Siltanen, M.; Visser, S.; Preston, C. M.; Nault, J.

    2009-12-01

    Litter decay in early and midphases of decomposition have been shown to highly influenced by climate and substrate quality, however factors affecting decay during the late semi-stable phase are less well understood. The Canadian Intersite Decomposition Experiment (CIDET) was established in 1992 with the objective of providing data on the long-term rates of litter decomposition and nutrient mineralization for a range of forested ecoclimatic regions in Canada. Such data were needed to help verify models used for national C accounting, as well as aid in the development of other soil C models. CIDET examined the annual decay, over a 12-year period, of 10 standard foliar litters and 2 wood substrates at 18 forested upland and 3 wetland sites ranging from the cool temperate to subarctic regions, a nearly 20oC span in temperature. On a subset of sites and litter types, changes in litter C chemistry over time were also determined. Over the first 6 years, C/N ratio and iron increased, NMR showed an overall decline in O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) and increase in alkyl, aromatic, phenolic, and carboxyl C. Proximate analysis showed the acid unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) increases, but true lignin did not accumulate, in contrast to the conceptual ligno-cellulose model of decomposition. Litter decay during first phase was related to initial litter quality (AUR and water soluble extract), winter precipitation, but not temperature, suggesting the importance of leaching during this phase. Decay rate “k” during the mid phase was related to temperature, initial litter quality (AUR and AUR/N), summer precipitation, but not soil N. In most cases decay had approached an asymptote before end of experiment. Although annual temperature was the best single predictor for 12-year asymptotes, summer precipitation and forest floor pH and C/N ratio were the best set of combined predictors. The changes in the decay factors during different phases may explain some of the discrepancies in the

  12. Laboratory and exterior decay of wood plastic composite boards: voids analysis and computed tomography

    Treesearch

    Grace Sun; Rebecca E. Ibach; Meghan Faillace; Marek Gnatowski; Jessie A. Glaeser; John Haight

    2016-01-01

    After exposure in the field and laboratory soil block culture testing, the void content of wood–plastic composite (WPC) decking boards was compared to unexposed samples. A void volume analysis was conducted based on calculations of sample density and from micro-computed tomography (microCT) data. It was found that reference WPC contains voids of different sizes from...

  13. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    Treesearch

    Jiwei Zhang; Gerald N. Presley; Kenneth E. Hammel; Jae-San Ryu; Jon R. Menke; Melania Figueroa; Dehong Hu; Galya Orr; Jonathan S. Schilling

    2016-01-01

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside...

  14. Decay and termite resistance of medium density fiberboard (MDF) made from different wood species

    Treesearch

    S. Nami Kartal; Frederick Green

    2003-01-01

    Medium density fiberboard (MDF) production worldwide is increasing due to the development of new manufacturing technologies. As a result, MDF products are increasingly utilized in traditional wood applications that require fungal and insect resistance. This study evaluated the ability of white and brown rot fungi and termites to decompose MDF consisting of different...

  15. Protecting wood from mould, decay, and termites with multi-component biocide systems

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    2007-01-01

    Biocides must be developed for controlling mould establishment on cellulose-based building materials. Accordingly, biocides intended for indoor applications must be non- toxic, non-volatile, odourless, hypoallergenic, and able to provide long-term protection under conditions of high humidity. Multi-component biocide systems were tested in American Wood-Preservers’...

  16. Multicomponent biocide systems protect wood from decay fungi, mold fungi, and termites for interior applications

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; Vina W. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Concerns about indoor air quality due to mold growth have increased dramatically in the United States. In the absence of proper moisture management, fungicides need to be developed for indoor use to control mold establishment. An ideal fungicide for prevention of indoor mold growth on wood-based materials needs to specifically prevent spore germination and provide long...

  17. New insights into the ligninolytic capability of a wood decay ascomycete

    Treesearch

    Semarjit Shary; Sally A. Ralph; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2007-01-01

    Wood-grown cultures of Daldinia concentrica oxidized a permethylated [beta]-14C- labeled synthetic lignin to 14CO2 and also cleaved a permethylated [alpha]-13C-labeled synthetic lignin to give C[alpha]-C[beta] cleavage products that were detected by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Therefore, this ascomycete resembles white-rot basidiomycetes in attacking...

  18. Characterization of the Oxygen Transmission Rate of Oak Wood Species Used in Cooperage.

    PubMed

    Del Alamo-Sanza, María; Cárcel, Luis Miguel; Nevares, Ignacio

    2017-01-25

    The oxygen that wine receives while aged in barrels is of interest because it defines the reactions that occur during aging and, therefore, the final properties of the wine. This study is intended to make up for the lack of information concerning the oxygen permeability of eight different woods of Quercus alba L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. commonly used. In addition, it shows how oxygen transfer evolves with the liquid contact time during testing under similar aging conditions to those in wine barrels. French oak woods permitted a higher oxygenation rate than American ones in all cases. A decrease in the oxygen entry caused by impregnation of the wood during the process was observed in all of the species studied. This process is determined by the thickness of the flooded wood layer containing free water, although differently in the two species, possibly due to the anatomical structure and the logging process for each.

  19. Distribution of Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans in decayed trunk wood of Syzygium cumini trees in north-western India.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H S; Kowshik, T; Preeti Sinha, K; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Khan, Z U; Yan, Zhun; Xu, Jianping; Kumar, Amit

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study is to report the regional distribution of Cryptococcus. gattii and Cryptococcus. neoformans in decayed wood inside trunk hollows of Syzygium cumini trees (Java plum, Indian black berry) investigated in Amritsar (Panjab), Meerut Cantt. and Bulandshahr (Uttar Pradesh) and Delhi, in north-western India. Two hundred and seventeen wood samples collected from 74 S. cumini trees were investigated. This includes 7 known positive S. cumini trees in Delhi subjected to a mycological surveillance for perennial colonization by C. gattii and C. neoformans. Cryptococcus gattii showed the highest prevalence (89%) in S. cumini trees in Delhi, followed by 27%, 12.5% and 9% prevalence in Bulandshahr, Amritsar City and Meerut Cantt., respectively. In contrast, C. neoformans had the highest prevalence (54%) in Amritsar, followed by 44% in Delhi, 9% in Bulandshahr and 0% in Meerut Cantt. Furthermore, 44% of the S. cumini trees in Delhi, 9% in Bulandshahr and 8% in Amritsar were concomitantly colonized by both C. gattii and C. neoformans. A mycological surveillance over 4.8-5.2 years of 7 selected S. cumini trees in Delhi revealed perennial colonization by both the Cryptococcus species. In addition, air samples taken close to the decayed trunk hollows of 4 of the perennially colonized S. cumini trees contained strains of the C. neoformans species complex. Of a random sample of 48 isolates serotyped, 26 (54%) were C. neoformans, serotype A, and 22 (46%) C. gattii, serotype B. Determination of mating type alleles was done in 44 of the isolates, comprising 31 of C. neoformans, serotype A and 13 of C.gattii, serotype B. All of them proved to be mating type alpha (MATalpha). The data on high prevalence, fungal population density, perennial colonization and aerial isolations indicate that decayed wood in trunk hollows of S. cumini trees is to-date the main well documented primary environmental niche of C. gattii and C. neoformans in north-western India. Attention is drawn

  20. Search for Environmental Influences on the ^7Be Decay Rate*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, E. B.; Rech, G. A.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Perillo Isaac, M. C.; Larimer, R.-M.

    1998-10-01

    ^7Be plays an important role in the generation of solar neutrinos. Because ^7Be decays via electron capture, its half life depends on the electron density at the nucleus. Two groups have recently reported observations of variations on the order of 1 percent in the decay rate of ^7Be as a function of the physical environment in which the ^7Be is located.^1,2 In order to test this idea, we measured the half life of ^7Be in four different materials. Samples of ^7Be in graphite, boron nitride, tantalum, and gold were produced at LBNL's 88" Cyclotron. Each ^7Be sample was packaged together with a ^133Ba reference source and then counted in 1-day time bins periodically over a 4-month period using a germanium detector. In order to reduce systematic effects from variations in detector or electronics performance, the ^7Be half life was determined by comparing the numbers of 478-keV ^7Be and 356-keV ^133Ba gamma rays from each sample. Results from analysis of this data will be presented. *Work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract Nos. DE-AC03-76SF00098 and DE-FG03-98ER41060. 1. D. Souza et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 42, 1679 (1997). 2. A. Ray et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (1998).

  1. Laccase and its role in production of extracellular reactive oxygen species during wood decay by the brown rot basidiomycete Postia placenta

    Treesearch

    Dongsheng Wei; Carl J. Houtman; Alexander N. Kapich; Christopher G. Hunt; Daniel Cullen; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2010-01-01

    Brown rot basidiomycetes initiate wood decay by producing extracellular reactive oxygen species that depolymerize the structural polysaccharides of lignocellulose. Secreted fungal hydroquinones are considered one contributor because they have been shown to reduce Fe3+, thus generating perhydroxyl radicals and Fe2+, which...

  2. Genomewide analysis of polysaccharides degrading enzymes in 11 white- and brown-rot Polyporales provides insight into mechanisms of wood decay

    Treesearch

    Chiaki Hori; Jill Gaskell; Kiyohiko Igarashi; Masahiro Samejima; David Hibbett; Bernard Henrissat; Dan Cullen

    2013-01-01

    To degrade the polysaccharides, wood-decay fungi secrete a variety of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs) classified into various sequence-based families of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZys) and their appended carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM). Oxidative enzymes, such as cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (...

  3. Analysis of D-glucose metabolism of wood decay fungi using 13C-NMR and 13C-labeled substrates

    Treesearch

    Theodorus H. de Koker; Michael D. Mozuch; Philip J. Kersten

    2003-01-01

    D-Glucose metabolism is thought to be important during wood decay by fungi, not only for anabolic and catabolic purposes of central metabolism, but also as a potential source of peroxide required by extracellular peroxidases. There has been some confusion in the literature as to whether this peroxide-generating activity is of the glucose 1-oxidase or pyranose 2-oxidase...

  4. Precision measurements of positronium decay rate and energy level

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Namba, T.; Suehara, T.; Akimoto, G.; Ishida, A.; Hashimoto, M. M.; Saito, H.; Idehara, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2008-08-08

    Positronium is an ideal system for the research of the bound state QED. New precise measurement of orthopositronium decay rate has been performed with an accuracy of 150 ppm, and the result combined with the last three is 7.0401{+-}0.0007 {mu}s{sup -1}. It is the first result to validate the 2nd order correction. The Hyper Fine Splitting of positronium is sensitive to the higher order corrections of the QED prediction and also to the new physics beyond Standard Model via the quantum oscillation into virtual photon. The discrepancy of 3.5{sigma} is found recently between the measured values and the QED prediction (O({alpha}{sup 3})). It might be due to the contribution of the new physics or the systematic problems in the previous measurements: (non-thermalized Ps and non-uniformity of the magnetic field). We propose new methods to measure HFS precisely without the these uncertainties.

  5. Fine root decay rates vary widely among lowland tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Raich, James W; Russell, Ann E; Valverde-Barrantes, Oscar

    2009-08-01

    Prolific fine root growth coupled with small accumulations of dead fine roots indicate rapid rates of fine root production, mortality and decay in young tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica. However, published studies indicate that fine roots decay relatively slowly in tropical forests. To resolve this discrepancy, we used the intact-core technique to quantify first-year decay rates of fine roots in four single-species plantations of native tree species. We tested three hypotheses: first, that fine roots from different tree species would decay at different rates; second, that species having rapid fine root growth rates would also have rapid rates of fine root decay; and third, that differences in fine root decay among species could be explained by fine root chemistry variables previously identified as influencing decay rates. Fine roots in Virola koschnyi plantations decayed very slowly (k = 0.29 +/- 0.15 year(-1)); those of Vochysia guatemalensis decayed seven times faster (k = 2.00 +/- 0.13 year(-1)). Decay rates of the remaining two species, Hieronyma alchorneoides and Pentaclethra macroloba, were 1.36 and 1.28 year(-1), respectively. We found a positive, marginally significant correlation between fine root decay rates and the relative growth rates of live fine roots (R = 0.93, n = 4, P = 0.072). There was a highly significant negative correlation between fine root decay and fine root lignin:N (R = 0.99, P = 0.01), which supports the use of lignin:N as a decay-controlling factor within terrestrial ecosystem models. The decay rates that we observed in this single study location encompassed the entire range of fine root decay rates previously observed in moist tropical forests, and thus suggest great potential for individual tree species to alter belowground organic matter and nutrient dynamics within a biotically rich rainforest environment.

  6. Erosion rates of wood during natural weathering. Part I, Effects of grain angle and surface texture

    Treesearch

    R. Sam Williams; Mark T. Knaebe; Peter G. Sotos; William C. Feist

    2001-01-01

    This is the first in a series of reports on the erosion rates of wood exposed outdoors near Madison, Wisconsin. The specimens were oriented vertically, facing south; erosion was measured annually for the first several years and biannually for the remainder of the exposure. In the work reported here, the erosion rates of earlywood and latewood were determined for smooth...

  7. Transcriptome and Secretome Analyses of the Wood Decay Fungus Wolfiporia cocos Support Alternative Mechanisms of Lignocellulose Conversion.

    PubMed

    Gaskell, Jill; Blanchette, Robert A; Stewart, Philip E; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Adams, Marie; Sabat, Grzegorz; Kersten, Phil; Cullen, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Certain wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as brown rot fungi, rapidly depolymerize cellulose while leaving behind the bulk of cell wall lignin as a modified residue. The mechanism(s) employed is unclear, but considerable evidence implicates the involvement of diffusible oxidants generated via Fenton-like chemistry. Toward a better understanding of this process, we have examined the transcriptome and secretome of Wolfiporia cocos when cultivated on media containing glucose, purified crystalline cellulose, aspen (Populus grandidentata), or lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) as the sole carbon source. Compared to the results obtained with glucose, 30, 183, and 207 genes exhibited 4-fold increases in transcript levels in cellulose, aspen, and lodgepole pine, respectively. Mass spectrometry identified peptides corresponding to 64 glycoside hydrolase (GH) proteins, and of these, 17 corresponded to transcripts upregulated on one or both woody substrates. Most of these genes were broadly categorized as hemicellulases or chitinases. Consistent with an important role for hydroxyl radical in cellulose depolymerization, high transcript levels and upregulation were observed for genes involved in iron homeostasis, iron reduction, and extracellular peroxide generation. These patterns of regulation differ markedly from those of the closely related brown rot fungus Postia placenta and expand the number of enzymes potentially involved in the oxidative depolymerization of cellulose. The decomposition of wood is an essential component of nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. Few microbes have the capacity to efficiently degrade woody substrates, and the mechanism(s) is poorly understood. Toward a better understanding of these processes, we show that when grown on wood as a sole carbon source the brown rot fungus W. cocos expresses a unique repertoire of genes involved in oxidative and hydrolytic conversions of cell walls. Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  8. Transcriptome and Secretome Analyses of the Wood Decay Fungus Wolfiporia cocos Support Alternative Mechanisms of Lignocellulose Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Jill; Blanchette, Robert A.; Stewart, Philip E.; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Adams, Marie; Sabat, Grzegorz; Kersten, Phil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain wood decay basidiomycetes, collectively referred to as brown rot fungi, rapidly depolymerize cellulose while leaving behind the bulk of cell wall lignin as a modified residue. The mechanism(s) employed is unclear, but considerable evidence implicates the involvement of diffusible oxidants generated via Fenton-like chemistry. Toward a better understanding of this process, we have examined the transcriptome and secretome of Wolfiporia cocos when cultivated on media containing glucose, purified crystalline cellulose, aspen (Populus grandidentata), or lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) as the sole carbon source. Compared to the results obtained with glucose, 30, 183, and 207 genes exhibited 4-fold increases in transcript levels in cellulose, aspen, and lodgepole pine, respectively. Mass spectrometry identified peptides corresponding to 64 glycoside hydrolase (GH) proteins, and of these, 17 corresponded to transcripts upregulated on one or both woody substrates. Most of these genes were broadly categorized as hemicellulases or chitinases. Consistent with an important role for hydroxyl radical in cellulose depolymerization, high transcript levels and upregulation were observed for genes involved in iron homeostasis, iron reduction, and extracellular peroxide generation. These patterns of regulation differ markedly from those of the closely related brown rot fungus Postia placenta and expand the number of enzymes potentially involved in the oxidative depolymerization of cellulose. IMPORTANCE The decomposition of wood is an essential component of nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems. Few microbes have the capacity to efficiently degrade woody substrates, and the mechanism(s) is poorly understood. Toward a better understanding of these processes, we show that when grown on wood as a sole carbon source the brown rot fungus W. cocos expresses a unique repertoire of genes involved in oxidative and hydrolytic conversions of cell walls. PMID:27107121

  9. First insight into dead wood protistan diversity: a molecular sampling of bright-spored Myxomycetes (Amoebozoa, slime-moulds) in decaying beech logs.

    PubMed

    Clissmann, Fionn; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Hoppe, Björn; Krüger, Dirk; Kahl, Tiemo; Unterseher, Martin; Schnittler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Decaying wood hosts a large diversity of seldom investigated protists. Environmental sequencing offers novel insights into communities, but has rarely been applied to saproxylic protists. We investigated the diversity of bright-spored wood-inhabiting Myxomycetes by environmental sequencing. Myxomycetes have a complex life cycle culminating in the formation of mainly macroscopic fruiting bodies, highly variable in shape and colour that are often found on decaying logs. Our hypothesis was that diversity of bright-spored Myxomycetes would increase with decay. DNA was extracted from wood chips collected from 17 beech logs of varying decay stages from the Hainich-Dün region in Central Germany. We obtained 260 partial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences of bright-spored Myxomycetes that were assembled into 29 OTUs, of which 65% were less than 98% similar to those in the existing database. The OTU richness revealed by molecular analysis surpassed that of a parallel inventory of fruiting bodies. We tested several environmental variables and identified pH, rather than decay stage, as the main structuring factor of myxomycete distribution.

  10. Decay rates of human remains in an arid environment.

    PubMed

    Galloway, A; Birkby, W H; Jones, A M; Henry, T E; Parks, B O

    1989-05-01

    The environment of southern Arizona with mild winters and hot, dry summers produces great variability in decay rates of human remains. Summer temperatures, which range well over 38 degrees C (100 degrees F), induce rapid bloating as a result of the accumulation of decompositional gases. However, in certain circumstances, the aridity can lead to extensive mummification, allowing preservation of remains for hundreds of years. A retrospective study of 189 cases, concentrating on remains found on the desert floor or in the surrounding mountains and on remains found within closed structures, outlines the time frame and sequences of the decay process. Remains can retain a fresh appearance for a considerable time in the winter, but the onset of marked decomposition is rapid in the summer months. Bloating of the body usually is present two to seven days following death. Following this, within structures, there is frequently rapid decomposition and skeletonization. With outdoor exposure, remains are more likely to pass through a long period of dehydration of outer tissues, mummification, and reduction of desiccated tissue. Exposure of large portions of the skeleton usually does not occur until four to six months after death. Bleaching and exfoliation of bone--the beginning stages of destruction of the skeletal elements--begins at about nine months' exposure. Insect activity, including that of maggot and beetle varieties, may accelerate decomposition, but this process is greatly affected by location of the body, seasonal weather, and accessibility of the soft tissues. Carnivores and other scavengers also are contributing factors, as are clothing or covering of the body, substrate, elevation, and latitude.

  11. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N.; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R.; Figueroa, Melania; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Given that ROS are strongly oxidizing and nonselective, these two steps are likely segregated. A common hypothesis has been that brown rot fungi use a concentration gradient of chelated metal ions to confine ROS generation inside wood cell walls before enzymes can infiltrate. We examined an alternative: that LOX components involved in ROS production are differentially expressed by brown rot fungi ahead of GH components. We used spatial mapping to resolve a temporal sequence in Postia placenta, sectioning thin wood wafers colonized directionally. Among sections, we measured gene expression by whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) and assayed relevant enzyme activities. We found a marked pattern of LOX up-regulation in a narrow (5-mm, 48-h) zone at the hyphal front, which included many genes likely involved in ROS generation. Up-regulation of GH5 endoglucanases and many other GHs clearly occurred later, behind the hyphal front, with the notable exceptions of two likely expansins and a GH28 pectinase. Our results support a staggered mechanism for brown rot that is controlled by differential expression rather than microenvironmental gradients. This mechanism likely results in an oxidative pretreatment of lignocellulose, possibly facilitated by expansin- and pectinase-assisted cell wall swelling, before cellulases and hemicellulases are deployed for polysaccharide depolymerization. PMID:27621450

  12. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N; Hammel, Kenneth E; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R; Figueroa, Melania; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S

    2016-09-27

    Wood-degrading brown rot fungi are essential recyclers of plant biomass in forest ecosystems. Their efficient cellulolytic systems, which have potential biotechnological applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: lignocellulose oxidation (LOX) by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and polysaccharide hydrolysis by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Given that ROS are strongly oxidizing and nonselective, these two steps are likely segregated. A common hypothesis has been that brown rot fungi use a concentration gradient of chelated metal ions to confine ROS generation inside wood cell walls before enzymes can infiltrate. We examined an alternative: that LOX components involved in ROS production are differentially expressed by brown rot fungi ahead of GH components. We used spatial mapping to resolve a temporal sequence in Postia placenta, sectioning thin wood wafers colonized directionally. Among sections, we measured gene expression by whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) and assayed relevant enzyme activities. We found a marked pattern of LOX up-regulation in a narrow (5-mm, 48-h) zone at the hyphal front, which included many genes likely involved in ROS generation. Up-regulation of GH5 endoglucanases and many other GHs clearly occurred later, behind the hyphal front, with the notable exceptions of two likely expansins and a GH28 pectinase. Our results support a staggered mechanism for brown rot that is controlled by differential expression rather than microenvironmental gradients. This mechanism likely results in an oxidative pretreatment of lignocellulose, possibly facilitated by expansin- and pectinase-assisted cell wall swelling, before cellulases and hemicellulases are deployed for polysaccharide depolymerization.

  13. Water content measurement in forest soils and decayed wood using time domain reflectometry

    Treesearch

    Andrew Gray; Thomas Spies

    1995-01-01

    The use of time domain reflectometry to measure moisture content in forest soils and woody debris was evaluated. Calibrations were developed on undisturbed soil cores from four forest stands and on point samples from decayed logs. An algorithm for interpreting irregularly shaped traces generated by the reflectometer was also developed. Two different calibration...

  14. Resistance of 22 southern hardwoods to wood-decay fungi and subterranean termites

    Treesearch

    F.Y. Carter; T.L. Amburgey; F.G. Manwiller

    1976-01-01

    Of 22 hardwood species growing on southern pine sites, blackjack, white, and post oaks proved most resistant to attack by the brown-rot fungus, Lenzites trabea. The amount of decay ranged from 8 percent for blackjack and white oak to 67 percent for red maple. Winged elm, yellow-poplar, and post, black, white, and southern red oaks were the most...

  15. Wood-inhabiting fungi in southern Italy forest stands: morphogroups, vegetation types and decay classes.

    PubMed

    Granito, Vito Mario; Lunghini, Dario; Maggi, Oriana; Persiani, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted an ecological study of forests subjected to varying management. The aim of the study was to extend and integrate, within a multivariate context, knowledge of how saproxylic fungal communities behave along altitudinal/vegetational gradients in response to the varying features and quality of coarse woody debris (CWD). The intra-annual seasonal monitoring of saproxylic fungi, based on sporocarp inventories, was used to investigate saproxylic fungi in relation to vegetation types and management categories. We analyzed fungal species occurrence, recorded according to the presence/absence and frequency of sporocarps, on the basis of the harvest season, of coarse woody debris decay classes as well as other environmental and ecological variables. Two-way cluster analysis, DCA and Spearman's rank correlations, for indirect gradient analysis, were performed to identify any patterns of seasonality and decay. Most of the species were found on CWD in an intermediate decay stage. The first DCA axis revealed the vegetational/microclimate gradient as the main driver of fungal community composition, while the second axis corresponded to a strong gradient of CWD decay classes. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  16. Genome sequence of a white rot fungus Schizopora paradoxa KUC8140 for wood decay and mycoremediation.

    PubMed

    Min, Byoungnam; Park, Hongjae; Jang, Yeongseon; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Lipzen, Anna; Riley, Robert; Grigoriev, Igor V; Spatafora, Joseph W; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-10-10

    Schizopora paradoxa KUC8140 is a white rot wood degrader commonly found in Korea. Tolerance to heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dye decolorization activity make this strain a potential candidate for mycoremediation. We report the genome sequence of S. paradoxa KUC8140 containing 44.4Mbp. Based on ab initio gene prediction, homology search and RNA-seq, total 17,098 gene models were annotated. We identified 17 lignin-modifying peroxidases and other 377 carbohydrate-active enzymes for modeling lignocellulose deconstruction and mycoremediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cadophora species associated with wood-decay of grapevine in North America.

    PubMed

    Travadon, Renaud; Lawrence, Daniel P; Rooney-Latham, Suzanne; Gubler, Walter D; Wilcox, Wayne F; Rolshausen, Philippe E; Baumgartner, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    Cadophora species are reported from grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) in California, South Africa, Spain, Uruguay, and Canada. Frequent isolation from vines co-infected with the Esca pathogens (Togninia minima and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora), and confirmation of its ability to cause wood lesions/discoloration in pathogenicity tests, suggest that C. luteo-olivacea is part of the trunk pathogen complex. In North America, little is known regarding the diversity, geographic distribution, and roles of Cadophora species as trunk pathogens. Accordingly, we characterized 37 Cadophora isolates from ten US states and two Canadian provinces, based on molecular and morphological comparisons, and pathogenicity. Phylogenetic analysis of three loci (ITS, translation elongation factor 1-alpha (TEF1-α) and beta-tubulin (BT)) distinguished two known species (C. luteo-olivacea and Cadophora melinii) and three newly-described species (Cadophora orientoamericana, Cadophora novi-eboraci, and Cadophora spadicis). C. orientoamericana, C. novi-eboraci, and C. spadicis were restricted to the northeastern US, whereas C. luteo-olivacea was only recovered from California. C. melinii was present in California and Ontario, Canada. Morphological characterization was less informative, due to significant overlap in dimensions of conidia, hyphae, conidiophores, and conidiogenous cells. Pathogenicity tests confirmed the presence of wood lesions after 24 m, suggesting that Cadophora species may have a role as grapevine trunk pathogens.

  18. Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emissions from biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and are estimated to cause millions of premature deaths worldwide annually. Whilst adverse respiratory health effects of biomass exposure are well established, less is known about its effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we assessed the effect of exposure to wood smoke on heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in otherwise healthy persons. Methods Fourteen healthy non-smoking subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Subjects were exposed to dilute wood smoke (mean particle concentration of 314±38 μg/m3) or filtered air for three hours during intermittent exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability were measured at baseline and for one hour post-exposure. Results Central arterial stiffness, measured as augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse wave velocity, was higher after wood smoke exposure as compared to filtered air (p < 0.01 for all), and heart rate was increased (p < 0.01) although there was no effect on blood pressure. Heart rate variability (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively) was decreased one hour following exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Conclusions Acute exposure to wood smoke as a model of exposure to biomass combustion is associated with an immediate increase in central arterial stiffness and a simultaneous reduction in heart rate variability. As biomass is used for cooking and heating by a large fraction of the global population and is currently advocated as a sustainable alternative energy source, further studies are required to establish its likely impact on cardiovascular disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01488500 PMID:23742058

  19. Decay rates of spherical and deformed proton emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C. N.; Esbensen, H.

    1999-11-23

    Using Green's function techniques, the authors derive expressions for the width of a proton decaying state in spherical and deformed nuclei. The authors show that the proton decay widths calculated by the exact expressions of Maglione et al. are equivalent to the distorted wave expressions of Bugrov et al., and that of {angstrom} berg et al. in the spherical case.

  20. Mechanism of rate enhancement of wood fiber saccharification by cationic polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Mora, Sandeep; Lu, Jian; Banerjee, Sujit

    2011-09-01

    Cationic polyelectrolytes can increase the cellulase-induced hydrolysis rates of bleached wood fiber. We show that the polymer associates mainly with the amorphous region of fiber and acts principally on endoglucanase. Fiber/water partitioning of the enzyme follows a Langmuir isotherm for the untreated fiber but a Freundlich isotherm is obeyed for the polymer-treated fiber.

  1. Production rates and costs of cable yarding wood residue from clearcut units

    Treesearch

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1984-01-01

    Wood residue is a little used source of fiber, chips, and fuel because harvest costs are largely unknown. This study calculates incremental production rates and costs for yarding and loading logging residue in clearcut old-growth Douglas-fir/western hemlock forests. Harvest operations were observed for two timber sales in western Oregon. Three different cable yarding...

  2. Evaluating orangutan census techniques using nest decay rates: implications for population estimates.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, P D; Spehar, S N; Meijaard, E; Nardiyono; Purnomo; Sasmirul, A; Sudiyanto; Oman; Sulhnudin; Jasary; Jumali; Marshall, A J

    2008-01-01

    An accurate estimate for orangutan nest decay time is a crucial factor in commonly used methods for estimating orangutan population size. Decay rates are known to vary, but the decay process and, thus, the temporal and spatial variation in decay time are poorly understood. We used established line-transect methodology to survey orangutan nests in a lowland forest in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, and monitored the decay of 663 nests over 20 months. Using Markov chain analysis we calculated a decay time of 602 days, which is significantly longer than times found in other studies. Based on this, we recalculated the orangutan density estimate for a site in East Kalimantan; the resulting density is much lower than previous estimates (previous estimates were 3-8 times higher than our recalculated density). Our data suggest that short-term studies where decay times are determined using matrix mathematics may produce unreliable decay times. Our findings have implications for other parts of the orangutan range where population estimates are based on potentially unreliable nest decay rate estimates, and we recommend that for various parts of the orangutan range census estimates be reexamined. Considering the high variation in decay rates there is a need to move away from using single-number decay time estimates and, preferably, to test methods that do not rely on nest decay times as alternatives for rapid assessments of orangutan habitat for conservation in Borneo.

  3. Monitoring decay of black gum wood (Nyssa sylvatica) during growth of the shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes) using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vane, Christopher H

    2003-05-01

    Abstract diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT) and elemental analysis were employed to monitor biodegradation of black gum wood (Nyssa sylvatica) during growth of the shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes). Black gum was decayed for up to 4.3 years by L. edodes, during which time it was sampled at 19, 31, and 52 months. Biodegraded woods displayed increased % O (w/w) and decreased % C (w/w) relative to the undecayed control. The DRIFT spectra of decayed black gum showed a decrease in relative intensity of absorption bands at 1735 cm(-1) assigned to carboxyl functional groups from xylans and an increase in the absorption band at 1640 cm(-1) assigned to conjugated carbonyl groups originating from lignin. Xylan decay was rapid initially but slowed after 19 months; however, oxidative decay of the lignin side chains occurred throughout the 52-month decay period. Overall elemental and DRIFT data show that both polysaccharides and lignin were decayed during cultivation of the edible white-rot fungus.

  4. How to calculate α-decay rates in the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, B. Gillis; Ward, Daniel E.; Åberg, Sven

    2016-12-01

    New elements discovered during past decades have been created in fusion reactions where a lighter nucleus is collided with a heavier one. The new elements created often decay by emitting α particles. From the half-lives of the decays and the energies of the emitted particles one may extract some properties of the new elements. In this talk the recent work performed by the Lund group to model α decay starting from nuclear density-functional theory is reviewed and a possible extension is mentioned.

  5. Significant Alteration of Gene Expression in Wood Decay Fungi Postia placenta and Phanerochaete chrysosporium by Plant Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Gaskell, Jill; Mozuch, Michael; Splinter BonDurant, Sandra; Sabat, Grzegorz; Ralph, John; Skyba, Oleksandr; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Blanchette, Robert A.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kersten, Philip J.; Cullen, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Identification of specific genes and enzymes involved in conversion of lignocellulosics from an expanding number of potential feedstocks is of growing interest to bioenergy process development. The basidiomycetous wood decay fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Postia placenta are promising in this regard because they are able to utilize a wide range of simple and complex carbon compounds. However, systematic comparative studies with different woody substrates have not been reported. To address this issue, we examined gene expression of these fungi colonizing aspen (Populus grandidentata) and pine (Pinus strobus). Transcript levels of genes encoding extracellular glycoside hydrolases, thought to be important for hydrolytic cleavage of hemicelluloses and cellulose, showed little difference for P. placenta colonizing pine versus aspen as the sole carbon source. However, 164 genes exhibited significant differences in transcript accumulation for these substrates. Among these, 15 cytochrome P450s were upregulated in pine relative to aspen. Of 72 P. placenta extracellular proteins identified unambiguously by mass spectrometry, 52 were detected while colonizing both substrates and 10 were identified in pine but not aspen cultures. Most of the 178 P. chrysosporium glycoside hydrolase genes showed similar transcript levels on both substrates, but 13 accumulated >2-fold higher levels on aspen than on pine. Of 118 confidently identified proteins, 31 were identified in both substrates and 57 were identified in pine but not aspen cultures. Thus, P. placenta and P. chrysosporium gene expression patterns are influenced substantially by wood species. Such adaptations to the carbon source may also reflect fundamental differences in the mechanisms by which these fungi attack plant cell walls. PMID:21551287

  6. Complex Degradation Processes Lead to Non-Exponential Decay Patterns and Age-Dependent Decay Rates of Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies on mRNA stability have established several, qualitatively distinct decay patterns for the amount of mRNA within the living cell. Furthermore, a variety of different and complex biochemical pathways for mRNA degradation have been identified. The central aim of this paper is to bring together both the experimental evidence about the decay patterns and the biochemical knowledge about the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation in a coherent mathematical theory. We first introduce a mathematical relationship between the mRNA decay pattern and the lifetime distribution of individual mRNA molecules. This relationship reveals that the mRNA decay patterns at steady state expression level must obey a general convexity condition, which applies to any degradation mechanism. Next, we develop a theory, formulated as a Markov chain model, that recapitulates some aspects of the multi-step nature of mRNA degradation. We apply our theory to experimental data for yeast and explicitly derive the lifetime distribution of the corresponding mRNAs. Thereby, we show how to extract single-molecule properties of an mRNA, such as the age-dependent decay rate and the residual lifetime. Finally, we analyze the decay patterns of the whole translatome of yeast cells and show that yeast mRNAs can be grouped into three broad classes that exhibit three distinct decay patterns. This paper provides both a method to accurately analyze non-exponential mRNA decay patterns and a tool to validate different models of degradation using decay data. PMID:23408982

  7. Environmental Controls on Cumulative and Yearly Litter Decay Rates Over Four Years in Forested and Harvested Sites Across Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Thompson, E.; Cameron, A.; Pare, D.; Amiro, B. D.; Lavigne, M.; Smyth, C.; Black, T. A.; Barr, A. G.; Margolis, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    Decomposition of plant detritus and heterotrophic respiration have been demonstrated to be affected by climate, litter type and soil biota. Clearcut harvest affects site temperature and water balance and theoretically in situ measurements of soil microenvironment and models which include them should better account for variation in soil C fluxes among sites and with disturbance than just aboveground climate. Detrital C fluxes were studied at 16 sites at 7 stations of the Fluxnet Canada Research Network, including paired closed canopy and clearcut forest sites at 5 upland stations (BC, SK, ON, QC, NB). All sites were instrumented for climate and in situ measurements of soil moisture and temperature. Cumulative litter decay was measured using surface placed litterbags with one of four standard material types (aspen leaves AL, black spruce needles BS, Douglas fir needles DF, and birch wood sticks BW). Six replicate plots were located at each site, each plot contained sufficient numbers of surface litterbags of each material to allow for four annual collections. As well unconfined birch chopsticks were placed at three depths down the soil profile (surface, 5cm, 15cm) and replaced annually to examine interannual variability in early phase annual decay. After four years of cumulative decay, litter rank by %mass remaining had AL< BSdecayed more rapidly in forests than clearcuts. Within a site annual decay of surface birch sticks was similar with interannual variability less than variability down the soil profile. The effects of clearcut varied with forest site type, on wetter sites surface BW decayed faster in clearcuts than closed forest, however this was reversed in drier forest site types. At lower soil depths on drier sites, decay was more rapid in clearcuts than in the closed forest. Interannual variation in soil moisture accounted for more variability in the annual mass loss than did soil temperature, however the relationship was

  8. On the gauge invariance of the decay rate of false vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Moroi, Takeo; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Shoji, Yutaro

    2017-08-01

    We study the gauge invariance of the decay rate of the false vacuum for the model in which the scalar field responsible for the false vacuum decay has gauge quantum number. In order to calculate the decay rate, one should integrate out the field fluctuations around the classical path connecting the false and true vacua (i.e., so-called bounce). Concentrating on the case where the gauge symmetry is broken in the false vacuum, we show a systematic way to perform such an integration and present a manifestly gauge-invariant formula of the decay rate of the false vacuum.

  9. Genetic Bases of Fungal White Rot Wood Decay Predicted by Phylogenomic Analysis of Correlated Gene-Phenotype Evolution.

    PubMed

    Nagy, László G; Riley, Robert; Bergmann, Philip J; Krizsán, Krisztina; Martin, Francis M; Grigoriev, Igor V; Cullen, Dan; Hibbett, David S

    2017-01-01

    Fungal decomposition of plant cell walls (PCW) is a complex process that has diverse industrial applications and huge impacts on the carbon cycle. White rot (WR) is a powerful mode of PCW decay in which lignin and carbohydrates are both degraded. Mechanistic studies of decay coupled with comparative genomic analyses have provided clues to the enzymatic components of WR systems and their evolutionary origins, but the complete suite of genes necessary for WR remains undetermined. Here, we use phylogenomic comparative methods, which we validate through simulations, to identify shifts in gene family diversification rates that are correlated with evolution of WR, using data from 62 fungal genomes. We detected 409 gene families that appear to be evolutionarily correlated with WR. The identified gene families encode well-characterized decay enzymes, e.g., fungal class II peroxidases and cellobiohydrolases, and enzymes involved in import and detoxification pathways, as well as 73 gene families that have no functional annotation. About 310 of the 409 identified gene families are present in the genome of the model WR fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium and 192 of these (62%) have been shown to be upregulated under ligninolytic culture conditions, which corroborates the phylogeny-based functional inferences. These results illuminate the complexity of WR and suggest that its evolution has involved a general elaboration of the decay apparatus, including numerous gene families with as-yet unknown exact functions.

  10. A two end-member model of wood dynamics in headwater neotropical rivers

    Treesearch

    Ellen Wohl; Susan Bolton; Daniel Cadol; Francesco Comiti; Jaime R. Goode; Luca Mao

    2012-01-01

    Geomorphic and ecological effects of instream wood have been documented primarily along rivers in the temperate zones. Instream wood loads in tropical rivers might be expected to differ from those in analogous temperate rivers because of the higher transport capacity and higher rates of wood decay in the tropics. We use data from four field sites in Costa Rica and...

  11. Predicting the Rate of River Bank Erosion Caused by Large Wood Log

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Rutherfurd, I.; Ghisalberti, M.

    2016-12-01

    When a single tree falls into a river channel, flow is deflected and accelerated between the tree roots and the bank face, increasing shear stress and scouring the bank. The scallop shaped erosion increases the diversity of the channel morphology, but also causes concern for adjacent landholders. Concern about increased bank erosion is one of the main reasons for large wood to still be removed from channels in SE Australia. Further, the hydraulic effect of many logs in the channel can reduce overall bank erosion rates. Although both phenomena have been described before, this research develops a hydraulic model that estimates their magnitude, and tests and calibrates this model with flume and field measurements, with logs with various configurations and sizes. Specifically, the model estimates the change in excess shear stress on the bank associated . The model addresses the effect of the log angle, distance from bank, and log size and flow condition by solving the mass continuity and energy conservation between the cross section at the approaching flow and contracted flow. Then, we evaluate our model against flume experiment preformed with semi-realistic log models to represent logs in different sizes and decay stages by comparing the measured and simulated velocity increase in the gap between the log and the bank. The log angle, distance from bank, and flow condition are systemically varied for each log model during the experiment. Final, the calibrated model is compared with the field data collected in anabranching channels of Murray River in SE Australia where there are abundant instream logs and regulated and consistent high flow for irrigation. Preliminary results suggest that a log can significantly increase the shear stress on the bank, especially when it positions perpendicular to the flow. The shear stress increases with the log angle in a rising curve (The log angle is the angle between log trunk and flow direction. 0o means log is parallel to flow with

  12. Feeding rates, double brooding, nest reuse, and seasonal fecundity of eastern wood-pewees in the Missouri Ozarks

    Treesearch

    Sarah W. Kendrick; Frank R. III Thompson; Jennifer L. Reidy

    2014-01-01

    Despite being widespread and abundant, little is known about the breeding ecology and natural history of the Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens), in part because nests are often high in the canopy, difficult to view, and adults are monomorphic. We monitored nests of Eastern Wood-Pewees and recorded the feeding rate of nestlings by adults as part of...

  13. Renormalization-scale uncertainty in the decay rate of false vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Moroi, Takeo; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Shoji, Yutaro

    2016-01-01

    We study radiative corrections to the decay rate of false vacua, paying particular attention to the renormalization-scale dependence of the decay rate. The decay rate exponentially depends on the bounce action. The bounce action itself is renormalization-scale dependent. To make the decay rate scale-independent, radiative corrections, which are due to the field fluctuations around the bounce, have to be included. We show quantitatively that the inclusion of the fluctuations suppresses the scale dependence, and hence is important for the precise calculation of the decay rate. We also apply our analysis to a supersymmetric model and show that the radiative corrections are important for the Higgs-stau system with charge breaking minima.

  14. The 2νβ-β- decay rates within Pyatov's restoration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Serdar; Çakmak, Neçla; Selam, Cevad

    2017-01-01

    We try to give a detailed analysis of the 2 νβ-β- decay rates to the final ground states for decay emitters: 70Zn, 80Se, 86Kr, 94Zr, 104Ru, 110Pd, 114Cd and 124Sn. The nucleon-nucleon residual interaction potential is defined according to Pyatov's restoration method. The nuclear matrix element for 2 νβ-β- decay is obtained by including the virtual contributions coming from the isobar analogue excitations within the framework of proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pnQRPA). The calculated decay rates are compared with mean field, schematic model and other calculations.

  15. Phenolic Responses to Esca-Associated Fungi in Differently Decayed Grapevine Woods from Different Trunk Parts of 'Cabernet Sauvignon'.

    PubMed

    Rusjan, Denis; Persic, Martina; Likar, Matevž; Biniari, Katerina; Mikulic-Petkovsek, Maja

    2017-08-09

    Alterations in phenolic contents were studied in Esca symptomatic (Sym) and asymptomatic (Asym) vines of 'Cabernet Sauvignon' based on wood conditions (healthy, HLT; necrotic, Nec; and rotten, Rot) and vine parts (head, trunk, and rootstock). In Asym vines, only Alternaria alternate was identified in Nec wood, while the HLT wood of Sym vines was colonized by Botryospaeriaceae sp. and Aureobasidium pullulans, Nec wood by Fomitiporia mediterranea, and Rot wood by Fomitiporia mediterranea and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora. Esca infection caused a significant accumulation of gallic acid, total flavanols, stilbenes (STB), and total analyzed phenolics (TAP) in all studied woods, especially in Nec wood. In Asym vines, TAP in the head increased with necrosis, but in Sym it decreased, while TAP in the trunk and rootstock of Sym showed an opposite response. The significantly highest contents of procyanidins (Pcys), catechin, epicatechin, epicatechin gallates, and Pcys dimers and tetramers were measured in HLT wood in the head and in Nec wood in the trunk of Sym vines. The significant increase of STB content was not caused only by Esca infection in HLT wood but also by necrosis in Asym vines, especially of ε-viniferin glucoside, resveratrol glycosides, and astringin. The obtained results suggest that the alteration in phenolics differed not only due to Esca infection but also due to the wood conditions and vine part, which might reflect the impact of the duration of the presence of the pathogen in different parts of the vine.

  16. Estimation of waste component-specific landfill decay rates using laboratory-scale decomposition data.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-06-15

    The current methane generation model used by the U.S. EPA (Landfill Gas Emissions Model) treats municipal solid waste (MSW) as a homogeneous waste with one decay rate. However, component-specific decay rates are required to evaluate the effects of changes in waste composition on methane generation. Laboratory-scale rate constants, k(lab), for the major biodegradable MSW components were used to derive field-scale decay rates (k(field)) for each waste component using the assumption that the average of the field-scale decay rates for each waste component, weighted by its composition, is equal to the bulk MSW decay rate. For an assumed bulk MSW decay rate of 0.04 yr(-1), k(field) was estimated to be 0.298, 0.171, 0.015, 0.144, 0.033, 0.02, 0.122, and 0.029 yr(-1), for grass, leaves, branches, food waste, newsprint, corrugated containers, coated paper, and office paper, respectively. The effect of landfill waste diversion programs on methane production was explored to illustrate the use of component-specific decay rates. One hundred percent diversion of yard waste and food waste reduced the year 20 methane production rate by 45%. When a landfill gas collection schedule was introduced, collectable methane was most influenced by food waste diversion at years 10 and 20 and paper diversion at year 40.

  17. Acidicapsa borealis gen. nov., sp. nov. and Acidicapsa ligni sp. nov., subdivision 1 Acidobacteria from Sphagnum peat and decaying wood.

    PubMed

    Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Kostina, Lilia A; Valásková, Vendula; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; de Boer, Wietse; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2012-07-01

    Two strains of subdivision 1 Acidobacteria, a pink-pigmented bacterium KA1(T) and a colourless isolate WH120(T), were obtained from acidic Sphagnum peat and wood under decay by the white-rot fungus Hyploma fasciculare, respectively. Cells of these isolates were Gram-negative-staining, non-motile, short rods, which were covered by large polysaccharide capsules and occurred singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Strains KA1(T) and WH120(T) were strictly aerobic mesophiles that grew between 10 and 33 °C, with an optimum at 22-28 °C. Both isolates developed under acidic conditions, but strain WH120(T) was more acidophilic (pH growth range 3.5-6.4; optimum, 4.0-4.5) than strain KA1(T) (pH growth range 3.5-7.3; optimum , 5.0-5.5). The preferred growth substrates were sugars. In addition, the wood-derived isolate WH120(T) grew on oxalate, lactate and xylan, while the peat-inhabiting acidobacterium strain KA1(T) utilized galacturonate, glucuronate and pectin. The major fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(17:1)ω8c; the cells also contained significant amounts of 13,16-dimethyl octacosanedioic acid. The quinone was MK-8. The DNA G+C contents of strains KA1(T) and WH120(T) were 54.1 and 51.7 mol%, respectively. Strains KA1(T) and WH120(T) displayed 97.8% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to each other. The closest recognized relatives were Acidobacterium capsulatum and Telmatobacter bradus (93.4-94.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). These species differed from strains KA1(T) and WH120(T) by their ability to grow under anoxic conditions, the absence of capsules, presence of cell motility and differing fatty acid composition. Based on these differences, the two new isolates are proposed as representing a novel genus, Acidicapsa gen. nov., and two novel species. Acidicapsa borealis gen. nov., sp. nov. is the type species for the new genus with strain KA1(T) (=DSM 23886(T)=LMG 25897(T)=VKM B-2678(T)) as the type strain. The name Acidicapsa ligni sp. nov. is proposed for

  18. Long-term measurements of 36Cl to investigate potential solar influence on the decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossert, Karsten; Nähle, Ole J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, Jenkins et al. [6] reported on fluctuations in the detected decay events of 36Cl which were measured with a Geiger-Müller counter. Experimental data of 32Si measured by means of an end-window gas-flow proportional counter at the Brookhaven National Laboratory show similar periodicity, albeit a different amplitude. Jenkins et al. interpret the fluctuations as evidence of solar influence on the decay rates of beta-decaying radionuclides.

  19. Mechanisms and Rates of Decay of Marine Viruses in Seawater †

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Curtis A.; Chen, Feng

    1992-01-01

    Loss rates and loss processes for viruses in coastal seawater from the Gulf of Mexico were estimated with three different marine bacteriophages. Decay rates in the absence of sunlight ranged from 0.009 to 0.028 h-1, with different viruses decaying at different rates. In part, decay was attributed to adsorption by heat-labile particles, since viruses did not decay or decayed very slowly in seawater filtered through a 0.2-μm-pore-size filter (0.2-μm-filtered seawater) and in autoclaved or ultracentrifuged seawater but continued to decay in cyanide-treated seawater. Cyanide did cause decay rates to decrease, however, indicating that biological processes were also involved. The observations that decay rates were often greatly reduced in 0.8- or 1.0-μm-filtered seawater, whereas bacterial numbers were not, suggested that most bacteria were not responsible for the decay. Decay rates were also reduced in 3-μm-filtered or cycloheximide-treated seawater but not in 8-μm-filtered seawater, implying that flagellates consumed viruses. Viruses added to flagellate cultures decayed at 0.15 h-1, corresponding to 3.3 viruses ingested flagellate-1 h-1. Infectivity was very sensitive to solar radiation and, in full sunlight, decay rates were 0.4 to 0.8 h-1. Even when UV-B radiation was blocked, rates were as high as 0.17 h-1. Calculations suggest that in clear oceanic waters exposed to full sunlight, most of the virus decay, averaged over a depth of 200 m, would be attributable to solar radiation. When decay rates were averaged over 24 h for a 10-m coastal water column, loss rates of infectivity attributable to sunlight were similar to those resulting from all other processes combined. Consequently, there should be a strong diel signal in the concentration of infectious viruses. In addition, since sunlight destroys infectivity more quickly than virus particles, a large proportion of the viruses in seawater is probably not infective. Images PMID:16348812

  20. The use of decay rates to analyse the performance of railway track in rolling noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Diehl, R. J.

    2006-06-01

    Through the development and testing of theoretical models for rolling noise in the past, it has been well demonstrated that the rate of decay of vibration along the rail is closely linked to the noise performance of the track, since it controls the effective radiating length of the rail. The decay rates of vibration along the rail have long been used by researchers as an intermediate, measurable parameter by which to test and improve the accuracy of prediction models. Recently, it has been suggested that the decay rates should be used as a criterion for the selection of track for noise measurements that are part of the acceptance testing of interoperable trains in Europe. In this context, a more detailed understanding of the factors that affect the measurement of decay rates and a consistent approach to the data processing have become important topics. Here, a method is suggested for the calculation of decay rates from frequency response measurements. Different effects are shown in the measured decay rates of a ballasted track with mono-bloc sleepers, a slab track and a ballasted track with bi-bloc sleepers. In the last case, a model for a periodically supported track is used to study the effects observed. It is shown that a peak in the decay rate just above the pinned-pinned frequency may be overestimated because of the measurement procedure that has been used.

  1. The microscopic approach to the rates of radioactive decay by emission of heavy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, M.; Silişteanu, I.

    1988-08-01

    We have applied a simple microscopic decay theory to the analysis of the rare decay modes. The absolute decay rates are estimated by using the shell model and resonance formation factors and optical model penetrabilities. The resonance formation factors are deduced from the strong interaction form of the theory where the wave function in the internal region is represented in terms of compound nucleus decay. In order to account fully for the data, the implication of internal degrees of freedom was found to be necessary, but no adjustment of Gamow factor was needed. The results have been discussed in the light of the previously reported results and data.

  2. Submicrosecond isomer in 45117Rh72 and the role of triaxiality in its electromagnetic decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalkovski, S.; Bruce, A. M.; Denis Bacelar, A. M.; Górska, M.; Pietri, S.; Podolyák, Zs.; Bednarczyk, P.; Caceres, L.; Casarejos, E.; Cullen, I. J.; Doornenbal, P.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Geissel, H.; Gelletly, W.; Gerl, J.; Grębosz, J.; Hinke, C.; Ilie, G.; Ivanova, D.; Jaworski, G.; Kisyov, S.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Minkov, N.; Myalski, S.; Palacz, M.; Petkov, P.; Prokopowicz, W.; Regan, P. H.; Schaffner, H.; Steer, S.; Tashenov, S.; Walker, P. M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2013-08-01

    The neutron-rich nucleus 117Rh was synthesized in the fission of a relativistic 238U beam produced at the GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, Germany. An isomeric state with t1/2=138(17) ns decaying by a single γ ray was observed, providing the first information on the excited states in this nucleus. The experimental data are discussed in terms of systematics and interpreted by using the Woods-Saxon deformed shell model and triaxial-rotor-plus-particle calculations. The origin of the isomer is explained as being due to a hindered E2 transition to the ground state.

  3. Stability and decay rates of nonisotropic attractive Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Huepe, C.; Tuckerman, L. S.; Metens, S.; Brachet, M. E.

    2003-08-01

    Nonisotropic attractive Bose-Einstein condensates are investigated numerically with Newton and inverse Arnoldi methods. The stationary solutions of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and their linear stability are computed. Bifurcation diagrams are calculated and used to find the condensate decay rates corresponding to macroscopic quantum tunneling, two-three-body inelastic collisions, and thermally induced collapse. Isotropic and nonisotropic condensates are compared. The effect of anisotropy on the bifurcation diagram and the decay rates is discussed. Spontaneous isotropization of the condensates is found to occur. The influence of isotropization on the decay rates is characterized near the critical point.

  4. Energy decay rate of transmission problem between thermoelasticity of type I and type II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Han, Zhong-Jie; Xu, Gen-Qi

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the energy decay rate of a 1-d mixed type I and type II thermoelastic system is considered. The system consists of two kinds of thermoelastic components. One is the classical thermoelasticity (so-called type I), another one is nonclassical thermoelasticity without dissipation (named type II). These two components are coupled at the interface satisfying certain transmission condition. We prove that the system is lack of uniform exponential decay rate and further obtain the sharp polynomial decay rate by resolvent estimates together with the diagonalization argument in linear algebra. Moreover, we present some numerical simulations to support these theoretical results.

  5. Tailoring the characteristics of carbonized wood charcoal by using different heating rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Gu-Joong; Kim, Dae-Young; Oh, Choong-Hyeon; Park, Byung-Ho; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the characteristics of charcoals generated from White Lauan ( Pentacmecontorta) and Punah ( Tetrameristaglabra) by using different carbonization temperatures and heating rates. The scanning electron micrographs showed vestured pits in the White Lauan and raphide crystals in Punah as their respective anatomical characteristics. A slower heating rate resulted in a lower temperature to obtain the same amount of weight loss, regardless of the species being tested. A greater charcoal yield was obtained at a higher heating rate. The specific surface area was smaller in the charcoal produced at a higher carbonization temperature, but the heating rate had little effected. For both wood species, the axial compressive strength of the charcoal increased as the carbonization temperature was increased. The X-ray diffractograms of White Lauan and Punah woods heated at 1200°C indicated thermal decomposition of the crystal structure of cellulose, but no appreciable structural changes occurred under the tested heating rate conditions. Overall, the heating rate affected the charcoal yield but not the specific surface area, compressive strength, and crystal structure.

  6. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  7. The anharmonic phonon decay rate in group-III nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, G. P.

    2009-04-01

    Measured lifetimes of hot phonons in group-III nitrides have been explained theoretically by considering three-phonon anharmonic interaction processes. The basic ingredients of the theory include full phonon dispersion relations obtained from the application of an adiabatic bond charge model and crystal anharmonic potential within the isotropic elastic continuum model. The role of various decay routes, such as Klemens, Ridley, Vallée-Bogani and Barman-Srivastava channels, in determining the lifetimes of the Raman active zone-centre longitudinal optical (LO) modes in BN (zincblende structure) and A1(LO) modes in AlN, GaN and InN (wurtzite structure) has been quantified.

  8. Woody debris volume depletion through decay: Implications for biomass and carbon accounting

    Treesearch

    Shawn Fraver; Amy M. Milo; John B. Bradford; Anthony W. D’Amato; Laura Kenefic; Brian J. Palik; Christopher W. Woodall; John. Brissette

    2013-01-01

    Woody debris decay rates have recently received much attention because of the need to quantify temporal changes in forest carbon stocks. Published decay rates, available for many species, are commonly used to characterize deadwood biomass and carbon depletion. However, decay rates are often derived from reductions in wood density through time, which when used to model...

  9. Calculations on decay rates of various proton emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-03-01

    Proton radioactivity of neutron-deficient nuclei around the dripline has been systematically studied within the deformed density-dependent model. The crucial proton-nucleus potential is constructed via the single-folding integral of the density distribution of daughter nuclei and the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction or the proton-proton Coulomb interaction. After the decay width is obtained by the modified two-potential approach, the final decay half-lives can be achieved by involving the spectroscopic factors from the relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory combined with the BCS method. Moreover, a simple formula along with only one adjusted parameter is tentatively proposed to evaluate the half-lives of proton emitters, where the introduction of nuclear deformation is somewhat discussed as well. It is found that the calculated results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental values and consistent with other theoretical studies, indicating that the present approach can be applied to the case of proton emission. Predictions on half-lives are made for possible proton emitters, which may be useful for future experiments.

  10. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h(-1). Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks.

  11. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond

    PubMed Central

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h−1. Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks. PMID:26943625

  12. Wood decomposition following clearcutting at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory

    Treesearch

    Kim G. Mattson; Wayne T. Swank

    2014-01-01

    Most of the forest on Watershed (WS) 7 was cut and ledt on site to decompose. This Chapter describes the rate and manner of wood decomposition and also quantifies the fluxes from decaying wood to the forest floor on WS 7. In doing so, we make the case that wood and its process of decomposition contributes to ecosystem stability. We also review some of the history of...

  13. Multidimensional NMR analysis reveals truncated lignin structures in wood decayed by the brown rot basidiomycete Postia placenta

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Yelle; Dongsheng Wei; John Ralph; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2011-01-01

    Lignocellulose biodegradation, an essential step in terrestrial carbon cycling, generally involves removal of the recalcitrant lignin barrier that otherwise prevents infiltration by microbial polysaccharide hydrolases. However, fungi that cause brown rot of wood, a major route for biomass recycling in coniferous forests, utilize wood polysaccharides efficiently while...

  14. Continuum-state and bound-state β--decay rates of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, M.; Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanova, V. A.; Marton, J.; Pitschmann, M.; Serebrov, A. P.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2009-09-01

    For the β--decay of the neutron we analyze the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. We calculate the decay rates, the electron energy spectrum for the continuum-state decay mode, and angular distributions of the decay probabilities for the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. The theoretical results are obtained for the new value for the axial coupling constant gA=1.2750(9), obtained recently by H. Abele [Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 60, 1 (2008)] from the fit of the experimental data on the coefficient of the correlation of the neutron spin and the electron momentum of the electron energy spectrum of the continuum-state decay mode. We take into account the contribution of radiative corrections and the scalar and tensor weak couplings. The calculated angular distributions of the probabilities of the bound-state decay modes of the polarized neutron can be used for the experimental measurements of the bound-state β--decays into the hyperfine states with total angular momentum F=1 and scalar and tensor weak coupling constants.

  15. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2015-10-15

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei.

  16. Mode of coniferous wood decay by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete carnosa as elucidated by FTIR and ToF-SIMS.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Sonam; Jeremic, Dragica; Goacher, Robyn E; Master, Emma R

    2012-06-01

    The softwood degrading white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete carnosa, was investigated for its ability to degrade two coniferous woods: balsam fir and lodgepole pine. P. carnosa grew similarly on these wood species, and like the hardwood-degrading white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, P. carnosa demonstrated selective degradation of lignin, as observed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Lignin degradation across cell walls of decayed pine samples was also evaluated by ToF-SIMS and was shown to be uniform. This study illustrates softwood lignin utilization by a white-rot fungus and reveals the industrial potential of the lignocellulolytic activity elicited by this fungus.

  17. Effectiveness of the International Phytosanitary Standard ISPM No. 15 on reducing wood borer infestation rates in wood packaging material entering the United States.

    PubMed

    Haack, Robert A; Britton, Kerry O; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G; Cavey, Joseph F; Garrett, Lynn J; Kimberley, Mark; Lowenstein, Frank; Nuding, Amelia; Olson, Lars J; Turner, James; Vasilaky, Kathryn N

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bark- and wood-infesting insects have been introduced to new countries by international trade where some have caused severe environmental and economic damage. Wood packaging material (WPM), such as pallets, is one of the high risk pathways for the introduction of wood pests. International recognition of this risk resulted in adoption of International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures No. 15 (ISPM15) in 2002, which provides treatment standards for WPM used in international trade. ISPM15 was originally developed by members of the International Plant Protection Convention to "practically eliminate" the risk of international transport of most bark and wood pests via WPM. The United States (US) implemented ISPM15 in three phases during 2005-2006. We compared pest interception rates of WPM inspected at US ports before and after US implementation of ISPM15 using the US Department of Agriculture AQIM (Agriculture Quarantine Inspection Monitoring) database. Analyses of records from 2003-2009 indicated that WPM infestation rates declined 36-52% following ISPM15 implementation, with results varying in statistical significance depending on the selected starting parameters. Power analyses of the AQIM data indicated there was at least a 95% chance of detecting a statistically significant reduction in infestation rates if they dropped by 90% post-ISPM15, but the probability fell as the impact of ISPM15 lessened. We discuss several factors that could have reduced the apparent impact of ISPM15 on lowering WPM infestation levels, and suggest ways that ISPM15 could be improved. The paucity of international interception data impeded our ability to conduct more thorough analyses of the impact of ISPM15, and demonstrates the need for well-planned sampling programs before and after implementation of major phytosanitary policies so that their effectiveness can be assessed. We also present summary data for bark- and wood-boring insects intercepted on WPM at US ports during 1984-2008.

  18. Effectiveness of the International Phytosanitary Standard ISPM No. 15 on Reducing Wood Borer Infestation Rates in Wood Packaging Material Entering the United States

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Robert A.; Britton, Kerry O.; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G.; Cavey, Joseph F.; Garrett, Lynn J.; Kimberley, Mark; Lowenstein, Frank; Nuding, Amelia; Olson, Lars J.; Turner, James; Vasilaky, Kathryn N.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bark- and wood-infesting insects have been introduced to new countries by international trade where some have caused severe environmental and economic damage. Wood packaging material (WPM), such as pallets, is one of the high risk pathways for the introduction of wood pests. International recognition of this risk resulted in adoption of International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures No. 15 (ISPM15) in 2002, which provides treatment standards for WPM used in international trade. ISPM15 was originally developed by members of the International Plant Protection Convention to “practically eliminate” the risk of international transport of most bark and wood pests via WPM. The United States (US) implemented ISPM15 in three phases during 2005–2006. We compared pest interception rates of WPM inspected at US ports before and after US implementation of ISPM15 using the US Department of Agriculture AQIM (Agriculture Quarantine Inspection Monitoring) database. Analyses of records from 2003–2009 indicated that WPM infestation rates declined 36–52% following ISPM15 implementation, with results varying in statistical significance depending on the selected starting parameters. Power analyses of the AQIM data indicated there was at least a 95% chance of detecting a statistically significant reduction in infestation rates if they dropped by 90% post-ISPM15, but the probability fell as the impact of ISPM15 lessened. We discuss several factors that could have reduced the apparent impact of ISPM15 on lowering WPM infestation levels, and suggest ways that ISPM15 could be improved. The paucity of international interception data impeded our ability to conduct more thorough analyses of the impact of ISPM15, and demonstrates the need for well-planned sampling programs before and after implementation of major phytosanitary policies so that their effectiveness can be assessed. We also present summary data for bark- and wood-boring insects intercepted on WPM at US ports

  19. A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Kentaro; Roh, Seon-Ah; Min, Tai-Jin; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2010-06-01

    A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam is proposed. Large char samples were gasified under steam atmosphere using a thermo-balance reactor. The apparent reaction rate was expressed as the product of the intrinsic rate and the effective factor. The effective factor was modified to include the effect of change in char diameter and intrinsic reaction rate during the reaction. Assuming uniform conversion ratio throughout a particle, the simplified reaction scheme was divided into three stages. In the initial stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. In the middle stage, the particle shrinks following the shrinking core model without change in the local conversion ratio. In the final stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. The validity of the modified effective value was confirmed by comparison with experimental results.

  20. Constraining spacetime variations of nuclear decay rates from light curves of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpikov, Ivan; Piskunov, Maxim; Sokolov, Anton; Troitsky, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    The luminosity of fading type Ia supernovae is governed by radioactive decays of Ni 56 and Co 56 . The decay rates are proportional to the Fermi coupling constant GF and, therefore, are determined by the vacuum expectation value v of the Brout-Englert-Higgs field. We use publicly available sets of light curves of type Ia supernova at various redshifts to constrain possible spacetime variations of the Ni 56 decay rate. The resulting constraint is not very tight; however, it is the only direct bound on the variation of the decay rate for redshifts up to z ˜1 . We discuss potential applications of the result to searches for nonconstancy of GF and v .

  1. STUDIES IN WOOD DECAY

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Henry

    1921-01-01

    Circumstantial evidence is presented which indicates that Polyporus volvatus is parasitic. Cultures of Polyporus volvatus and Fomes igniarius may be obtained from the young sporophores by the tissue method. In Polyporus volvatus the presence of the following enzymes was demonstrated: esterase, maltase, lactase, sucrase, raffinase, diastase, inulase, cellulase, hemicellulase, glucosidase, rennet, and catalase. In Fomes igniarius the presence of the following enzymes was demonstrated: esterase, maltase, lactase, sucrase, raffinase, diastase, inulase, cellulase, hemicellulase, glucosidase, urease, rennet, and catalase. PMID:19871905

  2. Biodeterioration of wood

    Treesearch

    Terry L. Highley

    1999-01-01

    Under proper conditions, wood will give centuries of service. However, if conditions exist that permit the development of wood-degrading organisms, protection must be provided during processing, merchandising, and use. The principal organisms that can degrade wood are fungi, insects, bacteria, and marine borers. Molds, most sapwood stains, and decay are caused by fungi...

  3. WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODY DECAY RATE IN FREE-RANGING BIRDS.

    PubMed

    McKee, Eileen M; Walker, Edward D; Anderson, Tavis K; Kitron, Uriel D; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Krebs, Bethany L; Newman, Christina; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Levine, Rebecca S; Carrington, Mary E; McLean, Robert G; Goldberg, Tony L; Hamer, Gabriel L

    2015-07-01

    Antibody duration, following a humoral immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) infection, is poorly understood in free-ranging avian hosts. Quantifying antibody decay rate is important for interpreting serologic results and for understanding the potential for birds to serorevert and become susceptible again. We sampled free-ranging birds in Chicago, Illinois, US, from 2005 to 2011 and Atlanta, Georgia, US, from 2010 to 2012 to examine the dynamics of antibody decay following natural WNV infection. Using serial dilutions in a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we quantified WNV antibody titer in repeated blood samples from individual birds over time. We quantified a rate of antibody decay for 23 Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) of 0.198 natural log units per month and 24 individuals of other bird species of 0.178 natural log units per month. Our results suggest that juveniles had a higher rate of antibody decay than adults, which is consistent with nonlinear antibody decay at different times postexposure. Overall, most birds had undetectable titers 2 yr postexposure. Nonuniform WNV antibody decay rates in free-ranging birds underscore the need for cautious interpretation of avian serology results in the context of arbovirus surveillance and epidemiology.

  4. Effects of subcutaneous transmitters on reproduction, incubation behavior, and annual return rates of female wood ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hepp, G.R.; Folk, T.H.; Hartke, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    Radiotransmitters attached externally to breeding waterfowl can have a variety of negative effects. Implanted transmitters can reduce potential deleterious effects; abdominal implants are used most commonly in waterfowl. Methods also have been developed to implant transmitters subcutaneously, but effects of subcutaneous implants on adult ducks have not been evaluated. In this study, we subcutaneously implanted radiotransmitters in pre-laying female wood ducks (Aix sponsa, n = 62) and compared nest initiation date, incubation behavior, body mass, and annual return rates of radiomarked females to a group of females that were not radiomarked. Ninety-six percent (50 of 52) of radiomarked females that were monitored for the entire breeding season initiated nests. Nesting date of radiomarked adult females did not differ from that of adult females without radios, but radiomarked yearling females nested earlier than yearlings not receiving transmitters. We found no differences in early- and late-incubation body mass, incubation constancy, recess frequency, and incubation period between radiomarked females and those without radios. Annual return rates of females that initiated nests did not differ between radiomarked females and those not receiving radios. Data suggest that implanting radiotransmitters subcutaneously in pre-laying female wood ducks did not negatively impact subsequent reproduction, incubation behavior, and survival.

  5. Probing CP violation with time integrated decay rates into non-CP eigenstates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, João P.

    1998-07-01

    Many of the experiments proposed to look for interference CP violation in neutral B mesons concentrate on tagged decay into CP eigenstates. Aleksan, Dunietz, Kayser and Le Diberder have shown that one can also look for interference CP violation using tagged decays into non-CP eigenstates. In all these methods, one must trace the time dependence of the decays. In this article we discuss a new method to search for interference CP violation by using only time integrated rates into non-CP eigenstates. The method hinges on the comparison between the decays of Υ(4S) into ff, f¯f¯, and ff¯, and also uses the rates for l+f and l-f. This method does not depend on how the Υ(4S) is produced; provided enough statistics, one can use both symmetric and asymmetric colliders.

  6. A measurement of the gluon splitting rate into /cc¯ pairs in hadronic Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2003-05-01

    The rate of gluon splitting into /cc¯ pairs in hadronic Z decays is measured using the data sample collected by ALEPH from 1991 to 1995. The selection is based on the identification of leptons (electrons and muons) originating from semileptonic charm decays, and on the topological properties of signal events. The result derived from the selected sample is gcc¯=(3.26+/-0.23(stat)+/-0.42(syst))%.

  7. Hawking-Moss Bounces and Vacuum Decay Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Erick J.

    2007-06-22

    The conventional interpretation of the Hawking-Moss (HM) solution implies a transition rate between vacua that depends only on the values of the potential in the initial vacuum and at the top of a potential barrier, leading to the implausible conclusion that transitions to distant vacua can be as likely as those to a nearby one. I analyze this issue using a nongravitational example with analogous properties. I show that such HM bounces do not give reliable rate calculations, but are instead related to the probability of finding a quasistable configuration at a local potential maximum.

  8. Processes and rates of sediment and wood accumulation in headwater streams of the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was used to estimate the time since the previous debris flow and the time since the last stand-replacement fire in unlogged basins in the central Coast Range of Oregon. Debris flow activity increased 42 per cent above the background rate in the decades immediately following the last wildfire. Changes in wood and sediment storage were quantified for 13 streams that ranged from 4 to 144 years since the previous debris flow. The volume of wood and sediment in the channel, and the length of channel with exposed bedrock, were strongly correlated with the time since the previous debris flow. Wood increased the storage capacity of the channel and trapped the majority of the sediment in these steep headwater streams. In the absence of wood, channels that have been scoured to bedrock by a debris flow may lack the capacity to store sediment and could persist in a bedrock state for an extended period of time. With an adequate supply of wood, low-order channels have the potential of storing large volumes of sediment in the interval between debris flows and can function as one of the dominant storage reservoirs for sediment in mountainous terrain.

  9. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Eugen

    2010-12-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482-488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263-267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced.

  10. Geometrical scaling and modal decay rates in periodic arrays of deeply subwavelength Terahertz resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Isić, Goran Gajić, Radoš

    2014-12-21

    It is well known that due to the high conductivity of noble metals at terahertz frequencies and scalability of macroscopic Maxwell equations, a geometrical downscaling of a terahertz resonator results in the linear upscaling of its resonance frequency. However, the scaling laws of modal decay rates, important for the resonator excitation efficiency, are much less known. Here, we investigate the extent to which the scale-invariance of decay rates is violated due to the finite conductivity of the metal. We find that the resonance quality factor or the excitation efficiency may be substantially affected by scaling and show that this happens as a result of the scale-dependence of the metal absorption rate, while the radiative decay and the dielectric cavity absorption rates are approximately scale-invariant. In particular, we find that by downscaling overcoupled resonators, their excitation efficiency increases, while the opposite happens with undercoupled resonators.

  11. Decayed wood of Syzygium cumini and Ficus religiosa living trees in Delhi/New Delhi metropolitan area as natural habitat of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, H S; Kowshik, T; Khan, Z U

    2003-06-01

    The isolation is reported of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii and C. n. var. neoformans from decayed wood inside trunk hollows of Syzygium cumini and of C. n. var. neoformans from Ficus religiosa trees in the Delhi/New Delhi metropolitan area. Fourteen of sixty-six (21%) S. cumini trees investigated proved to be positive, seven for each variety. The two varieties never co-occurred in the same hollow. C. n. var. neoformans was also isolated from three of seventeen Ficus religiosa-trees. Two of these isolates originated from decayed wood and one from bark. The C. n. var. gattii and C. n. var. neoformans isolates belonged to serotype B and serotype A, respectively. The data strongly supported colonization of S. cumini by both varieties and of F. religiosa trees by C. n. var. neoformans. Evidence of this was found by repeated isolations. For example, in 36/44 (82%) samples for C. n. var. gattii and 22/27 (81%) samples for C. n. var. neoformans, and by a high population density in the tested wood debris (maximally 6 x 10(5) colony-forming units per gram [c.f.u./g] for C. n. var. gattii and 8 x 10(4) c.f.u./g for C. n. var. neoformans). No eucalypt trees were seen near the positive S. cumini and F. religiosa trees. The densities of C. neoformans in these trees exceeded those found previously in Eucalyptus camaldulensis and in other tree species more rarely reported to be sources of C. neoformans in India. S. cumini and F. religiosa appear not to have been reported to date as sources for either C. n. var. gattii or C n. var. neoformans. Our results add to the recently emerging evidence that the natural habitat of C. n. var. gattii and C. n. var. neoformans is not specific to woody or other debris of particular tree species, but instead is more generalized.

  12. Above Ground Field Evaluation and GC-MS Analysis of Naturally Durable Wood Species

    Treesearch

    G.T. Kirker; A.B. Blodgett; S.T. Lebow; C.A. Clausen

    2012-01-01

    Nine wood species are being evaluated in above ground field studies in Mississippi and Wisconsin. Candidate naturally durable wood (NDW) species are being rated at yearly intervals for resistance to decay, cupping, and checking. Field ratings after 12 months exposure are presented. To date, Paulownia tomentosa (PAW) and southern yellow pine (SYP)...

  13. Beyond the bucket: testing the effect of experimental design on rate and sequence of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Experimental decay has revealed the potential for profound biases in our interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils, with non-random sequences of character loss distorting the position of fossil taxa in phylogenetic trees. By characterising these sequences we can rewind this distortion and make better-informed interpretations of the affinity of enigmatic fossil taxa. Equally, rate of character loss is crucial for estimating the preservation potential of phylogentically informative characters, and revealing the mechanisms of preservation themselves. However, experimental decay has been criticised for poorly modeling 'real' conditions, and dismissed as unsophisticated 'bucket science'. Here we test the effect of a differing experimental parameters on the rate and sequence of decay. By doing so, we can test the assumption that the results of decay experiments are applicable to informing interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils from diverse preservational settings. The results of our experiments demonstrate the validity of using the sequence of character loss as a phylogenetic tool, and sheds light on the extent to which environment must be considered before making decay-informed interpretations, or reconstructing taphonomic pathways. With careful consideration of experimental design, driven by testable hypotheses, decay experiments are robust and informative - experimental taphonomy needn't kick the bucket just yet.

  14. Ash content of loblolly pine wood as related to specific gravity, growth rate, and distance from pith

    Treesearch

    Charles W. McMillin

    1968-01-01

    In earlywood of Pinus taeda L. grown in central Louisiana, ash content generally decreased with increasing distance from the pith and icnreased with increases in rate of tree growth (as measured in rings per inch). Latewood ash content was unrelated to the gross wood factors of distance, from the pith, specific gravity, and growth rate. The ash...

  15. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ)-(γ, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  16. Precision decay rate calculations in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Anders; Farhi, David; Frost, William; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2017-04-01

    Tunneling in quantum field theory is worth understanding properly, not least because it controls the long-term fate of our Universe. There are, however, a number of features of tunneling rate calculations which lack a desirable transparency, such as the necessity of analytic continuation, the appropriateness of using an effective instead of classical potential, and the sensitivity to short-distance physics. This paper attempts to review in pedagogical detail the physical origin of tunneling and its connection to the path integral. Both the traditional potential-deformation method and a recent, more direct, propagator-based method are discussed. Some new insights from using approximate semiclassical solutions are presented. In addition, we explore the sensitivity of the lifetime of our Universe to short-distance physics, such as quantum gravity, emphasizing a number of important subtleties.

  17. Coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficients: Decay rate in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a master equation for the reduced density matrix of an open quantum collective system, the influence of coordinate-dependent microscopical diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a metastable state is treated. For various frictions and temperatures larger than a crossover temperature, the quasistationary decay rates obtained with the coordinate-dependent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients are compared with those obtained with the coordinate-independent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients and coordinate-independent and -dependent phenomenological sets of diffusion coefficients. Neglecting the coordinate dependence of diffusion coefficients, one can strongly overestimate or underestimate the decay rate at low temperature. The coordinate-dependent phenomenological diffusion coefficient in momentum are shown to be suitable for applications.

  18. Best rates of decay for coupled waves with different propagation speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquendo, Higidio Portillo; Raya, Raul Prado

    2017-08-01

    We consider an abstract system of two coupled evolution equations. One of these equations has an internal damping, and the other is simply elastic. When both equations have the same propagation speed, Alabau et al. (J Evol Equ 2:127-150, 2002) showed that the semigroup of this system decays polynomially in time with the rate t^{-1/2}. In this work, we consider this coupled system when the propagation speeds of the equations are different, and we study the asymptotic behavior of the semigroup. For this case, we show that the semigroup still decays polynomially with a slower rate as t^{-1/4}. Moreover, we prove that this rate of decay is the best.

  19. Bioprocessing preservative-treated waste wood

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang; Les. Ferge

    2000-01-01

    Disposal of preservative-treated waste wood is a growing problem worldwide. Bioprocessing the treated wood offers one approach to waste management under certain conditions. One goal is to use wood decay fungi to reduce the volume of waste with an easily managed system in a cost-effective manner. Wood decay fungi were obtained from culture collections in the Mycology...

  20. Genetic bases of fungal white rot wood decay predicted by phylogenomic analysis of correlated gene-phenotype evolution

    Treesearch

    László G. Nagy; Robert Riley; Philip J. Bergmann; Krisztina Krizsán; Francis M. Martin; Igor V. Grigoriev; Dan Cullen; David S. Hibbett

    2016-01-01

    Fungal decomposition of plant cell walls (PCW) is a complex process that has diverse industrial applications and huge impacts on the carbon cycle. White rot (WR) is a powerful mode of PCW decay in which lignin and carbohydrates are both degraded. Mechanistic studies of decay coupled with comparative genomic analyses have provided clues to the enzymatic components of WR...

  1. Change in decay rates of dioxin-like compounds in Yusho patients.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinya; Akahane, Manabu; Kanagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kajiwara, Jumboku; Mitoma, Chikage; Uchi, Hiroshi; Furue, Masutaka; Imamura, Tomoaki

    2016-09-07

    Once ingested, dioxins and dioxin-like compounds are excreted extremely slowly. Excretion can be evaluated by its half-life. Half-lives estimated from observed concentrations are affected by excretion and ongoing exposure. We investigated the change in apparent half-life using a theoretical model based on exposure to dioxin and dioxin-like compounds. We carried out longitudinal measurements of the blood concentration of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in a Yusho cohort during 2002 to 2010. We estimated the change in decay rates of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF and octachlorodibenzodioxin (OCDD) using a second-order equation. We found that the decay rate of OCDD increased, whereas the decay rate of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF of patients with a relatively high concentration of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF decreased. OCDD results were in accordance with decreasing levels of dioxin and dioxin-like compounds in the environment. The decay rate of OCDD in the body was affected by the decay rate of OCDD in the environment by ingestion because it was near the steady-state. In contrast, the decay rate of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF in the body was affected less by ingestion from the environment because it was far higher than in the steady-state. We demonstrated that the level of 2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF in the environment is decreasing. The excretion half-life is longer than the environmental half-life, thus the excretion half-life in a Yusho patient is increased.

  2. Variation in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux rates among species and canopy layers in a wet tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Asao, Shinichi; Bedoya-Arrieta, Ricardo; Ryan, Michael G

    2015-02-01

    As tropical forests respond to environmental change, autotrophic respiration may consume a greater proportion of carbon fixed in photosynthesis at the expense of growth, potentially turning the forests into a carbon source. Predicting such a response requires that we measure and place autotrophic respiration in a complete carbon budget, but extrapolating measurements of autotrophic respiration from chambers to ecosystem remains a challenge. High plant species diversity and complex canopy structure may cause respiration rates to vary and measurements that do not account for this complexity may introduce bias in extrapolation more detrimental than uncertainty. Using experimental plantations of four native tree species with two canopy layers, we examined whether species and canopy layers vary in foliar respiration and wood CO2 efflux and whether the variation relates to commonly used scalars of mass, nitrogen (N), photosynthetic capacity and wood size. Foliar respiration rate varied threefold between canopy layers, ∼0.74 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the overstory and ∼0.25 μmol m(-2) s(-1) in the understory, but little among species. Leaf mass per area, N and photosynthetic capacity explained some of the variation, but height explained more. Chamber measurements of foliar respiration thus can be extrapolated to the canopy with rates and leaf area specific to each canopy layer or height class. If area-based rates are sampled across canopy layers, the area-based rate may be regressed against leaf mass per area to derive the slope (per mass rate) to extrapolate to the canopy using the total leaf mass. Wood CO2 efflux varied 1.0-1.6 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for overstory trees and 0.6-0.9 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for understory species. The variation in wood CO2 efflux rate was mostly related to wood size, and little to species, canopy layer or height. Mean wood CO2 efflux rate per surface area, derived by regressing CO2 efflux per mass against the ratio of surface

  3. Pyrolysis polygeneration of poplar wood: Effect of heating rate and pyrolysis temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Li, Yanjun; Cen, Kehui; Luo, Min; Li, Hongyan; Lu, Bin

    2016-10-01

    The pyrolysis of poplar wood were comprehensively investigated at different pyrolysis temperatures (400, 450, 500, 550, and 600°C) and at different heating rates (10, 30, and 50°C/min). The results showed that BET surface area of biochar, the HHV of non-condensable gas and bio-oil reached the maximum values of 411.06m(2)/g, 14.56MJ/m(3), and 14.39MJ/kg, under the condition of 600°C and 30°C/min, 600°C and 50°C/min, and 550°C and 50°C/min, respectively. It was conducive to obtain high mass and energy yield of bio-oil at 500°C and higher heating rate, while lower pyrolysis temperature and heating rate contributed towards obtaining both higher mass yield and energy yield of biochar. However, higher pyrolysis temperature and heating rate contributed to obtain both higher mass yield and energy yield of the non-condensable gas. In general, compared to the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature had more effect on the product properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Backstepping approach to the arbitrary decay rate for Euler-Bernoulli beam under boundary feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Jin, Feng-Fei

    2010-10-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the boundary stabilisation of the Euler-Bernoulli beam equation for which all eigenvalues of the (control) free system are located on the imaginary axis of the complex plane. The fourth-order system in spacial variable is transformed into a coupled heat-like system. This enables us to make a natural backstepping transformation in vector form to transform the system into a target system which has arbitrary decay rate. The state feedback is thus designed. It is shown that the original closed-loop system is exponentially stable with the given arbitrary decay rate.

  5. Fluorescence decay rate statistics of a single molecule in a disordered cluster of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Carminati, R.; Saenz, J. J.

    2007-07-15

    The statistical properties of the fluorescence lifetime of single emitters in disordered systems are discussed. The contribution of radiative and nonradiative processes to the spontaneous decay rate is analyzed using a simple analytical model, in full agreement with exact numerical simulations. The relative fluctuations of the decay rate are shown to exhibit two well-defined regimes dominated either by near-field scattering or by absorption processes. In both regimes, the averaged apparent quantum yield remains high enough to permit practical measurements. Lifetime fluctuations could thus be used a probe of the local environment in complex systems at the nanometer scale.

  6. Biological degradation of wood-plastic composites (WPC) and strategies for improving the resistance of WPC against biological decay

    Treesearch

    Anke Schirp; Rebecca E. Ibach; David E. Pendleton; Michael P. Wolcott

    2008-01-01

    Much of the research on wood-plastic composites (WPC) has focused on formulation development and processing while high biological durability of the material was assumed. The gap between assumption and knowledge in biodeterioration of WPC needs to be reduced. Although some information on the short-term resistance of WPC against biological degradation is available, long-...

  7. Wood-decay abilities of grapevine trunk pathogens Diaporthe ampelina, Diplodia seriata, Eutypa lata, and Neofusicoccum parvum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Trunk pathogens are fungi that infect grapevine wood through pruning wounds and destroy fruiting positions, thereby impacting grape production. Neofusicoccum parvum (causal fungus of Botryosphaeria dieback) and Eutypa lata (causal fungus of Eutypa dieback) cause chronic infections (cankers) of the t...

  8. Loss of diversity in wood-inhabiting fungal communities affects decomposition activity in Norway spruce wood

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, Lara; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Pennanen, Taina; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of wood-inhabiting fungal species are now threatened, principally due to a lack of dead wood in intensively managed forests, but the consequences of reduced fungal diversity on ecosystem functioning are not known. Several experiments have shown that primary productivity is negatively affected by a loss of species, but the effects of microbial diversity on decomposition are less studied. We studied the relationship between fungal diversity and the in vitro decomposition rate of slightly, moderately and heavily decayed Picea abies wood with indigenous fungal communities that were diluted to examine the influence of diversity. Respiration rate, wood-degrading hydrolytic enzymes and fungal community structure were assessed during a 16-week incubation. The number of observed OTUs in DGGE was used as a measure of fungal diversity. Respiration rate increased between early- and late-decay stages. Reduced fungal diversity was associated with lower respiration rates during intermediate stages of decay, but no effects were detected at later stages. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes varied among decay stages and fungal dilutions. Our results suggest that functioning of highly diverse communities of the late-decay stage were more resistant to the loss of diversity than less diverse communities of early decomposers. This indicates the accumulation of functional redundancy during the succession of the fungal community in decomposing substrates. PMID:24904544

  9. The effect of enzyme and substrate levels on the specific hydrolysis rate of pretreated poplar wood

    SciTech Connect

    Nutor, J.R.K.; Converse, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    The hydrolysis of pretreated poplar wood was carried out with initial concentrations of 1.26, 2.52, 5.04 mg protein/mL of GC123 Trichoderma reesei cellulose and substrate concentrations of 2.5% w/v, 5% w/v, and 10% w/v at pH 4.8 and 40{degrees}C. The concentration of enzyme protein remaining in solution, the glucose concentration, and the total potential glucose concentrations were measured as a function of time during the hydrolysis. The enzyme rapidly adsorbed initially, reaching a maximum in about 30 min. About 55-75% of the cellulose returned to solution as the remaining cellulose was hydrolyzed. Dilution of the unhydrolyzed residue, largely lignin, did not cause additional desorption of the cellulose. The specific hydrolysis rate (i.e., the rate/amount of adsorbed enzyme) declined significantly with increased conversion, even when corrected for glucose inhibition. At a given initial substrate concentration, the specific rate was found to be largely independent of the total enzyme concentration. However, at a given fractional conversion, the specific rate was found to be reduced by increased substrate concentration.

  10. Constraints on the η η' decay rate of a scalar glueball from gauge/gravity duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünner, Frederic; Rebhan, Anton

    2015-12-01

    Predictions of glueball decay rates in the holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model for low-energy QCD can be uniquely extended to include finite quark masses up to an as-yet-undetermined parameter in the coupling of glueballs to the nonanomalous part of the pseudoscalar mass terms. The assumption of a universal coupling of glueballs to mass terms of the full nonet of pseudoscalar mesons leads to flavor asymmetries in the decay rates of scalar glueballs that agree well with experimental data for the glueball candidate f0(1710 ) and implies a vanishing decay rate into η η' pairs, for which only upper bounds for the f0(1710 ) meson are known at present from experiment. Relaxing this assumption, the holographic model gives a tight correlation between the decay rates into pairs of pseudo-Goldstone bosons of the same type and η η' pairs. If Γ (G →K K )/Γ (G →π π ) is kept within the range reported currently by the Particle Data Group for the f0(1710 ) meson, the rate Γ (G →η η')/Γ (G →π π ) is predicted to be ≲0.04 . The corresponding situation for f0(1500 ) is also discussed; however, this is found to be much less compatible with the interpretation of a largely unmixed glueball.

  11. Evidence for correlations between fluctuations in 54Mn decay rates and solar storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsinally, T.; Fancher, S.; Czerny, M.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Heim, J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Nistor, J.; O'Keefe, D.

    2016-02-01

    Following recent indications that several radioactive isotopes show fluctuating decay rates which may be influenced by solar activity, we present findings from a 2 year period of data collection on 54Mn. Measurements were recorded hourly from a 1 μCi sample of 54Mn monitored from January 2010-December 2011. A series of signal-detection algorithms determine regions of statistically significant fluctuations in decay behaviour from the expected exponential form. The 239 decay flags identified during this interval were compared to daily distributions of multiple solar indices, generated by NOAA, which are associated with heightened solar activity. The indices were filtered to provide a list of the 413 strongest events during a coincident period. We find that 49% of the strongest solar events are preceded by at least 1 decay flag within a 48 h interval, and 37% of decay flags are followed by a reported solar event within 48 h. These results are significant at the 0.9σ and 2.8σ levels respectively, based on a comparison to results obtained from a shuffle test, in which the decay measurements were randomly shuffled in time 10,000 times. We also present results from a simulation combining constructed data reflecting 10 sites which compared and filtered decay flags generated from all sites. The results indicate a potential 35% reduction in the false positive rate in going from 1 to 10 sites. By implication, the improved statistics attest to the benefit of analysing data from a larger number of geographically distributed sites in parallel.

  12. Blackbody-induced decay, excitation and ionization rates for Rydberg states in hydrogen and helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, I. L.; Nekipelov, E. A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    New features of the blackbody-induced radiation processes on Rydberg atoms were discovered on the basis of numerical data for the blackbody-induced decay Pdnl(T), excitation Penl(T) and ionization Pionnl(T) rates of nS, nP and nD Rydberg states calculated together with the spontaneous decay rates Pspnl in neutral hydrogen, and singlet and triplet helium atoms for some values of the principal quantum number n from 10 to 500 at temperatures from T = 100 K to 2000 K. The fractional rates Rd(e, ion)nl(T) = Pnld(e, ion)(T)/Pspnl equal to the ratio of the induced decay (excitation, ionization) rates to the rate of spontaneous decay were determined as functions of T and n in every series of states with a given angular momentum l = 0, 1, 2. The calculated data reveal an essential difference between the asymptotic dependence of the ionization rate Pionnl(T) and the rates of decay and excitation Pd(e)nl(T)~T/n2. The departures appear in each Rydberg series for n > 100 and introduce appreciable corrections to the formula of Cooke and Gallagher. Two different approximation formulae are proposed on the basis of the numerical data, one for Rd(e)nl(T) and another one for Rionnl(T), which reproduce the calculated values in wide ranges of principal quantum number from n = 10 to 1000 and temperatures between T = 100 K and T = 2000 K with an accuracy of 2% or better. Modified Fues' model potential approach was used for calculating matrix elements of bound-bound and bound-free radiation transitions in helium.

  13. False vacuum transitions —Analytical solutions and decay rate values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, R. A. C.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-08-01

    In this work we show a class of oscillating configurations for the evolution of the domain walls in Euclidean space. The solutions are obtained analytically. Phase transitions are achieved from the associated fluctuation determinant, by the decay rates of the false vacuum.

  14. Stochastic stability of a class of unbounded delay neutral stochastic differential equations with general decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangzi; Wu, Fuke; Huang, Chengming

    2012-02-01

    Without the linear growth condition on the drift coefficient, this article examines the existence and uniqueness of global solutions of a class of neutral stochastic differential equations with unbounded delay and their asymptotic stabilities with general decay rate. To illustrate the application of our results, this article gives a two-dimensional system as an example.

  15. O(alpha{sup 3} ln alpha) Corrections to Positronium Decay Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2001-07-25

    We compute O ({alpha}{sup 3} ln {alpha}) corrections to the decay rates of para- and orthopositronium into two and three photons, respectively. For this calculation we employ the nonrelativistic QED regularized dimensionally and we explain how in this framework the logarithms of the fine structure constant can be extracted.

  16. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  17. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  18. Morphological characteristics of loblolly pine wood as related to specific gravity, growth rate and distance from pith

    Treesearch

    Charles W. McMillin

    1968-01-01

    Earlywood and latewood tracheid length and transverse cellular dimensions of wood removed from stems of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and factorially aegregated by specific gravity, rings from the pith, and growth rate were determined from sample chips. The independent relationships of each factor with fiber morphology are described.

  19. Fibril angle of loblolly pine wood as related to specific gravity, growth rate, and distance from pith

    Treesearch

    Charles W. McMillin

    1972-01-01

    Fibril angles were greater for earlywood (avg. 33.4o) than for latewood tracheids (avg. 26.9o). For earlywood, fibril angle did not differ between growth rates when the specific gravity was low (avg. 33.3o). When the specific gravity was high, wood of fast growth had a higher fibril angle (avg. 35.1...

  20. Comparison of the Heat Release Rate from the Mass Loss Calorimeter to the Cone Calorimeter for Wood-based Materials

    Treesearch

    Laura E. Hasburgh; Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for material properties to be used as inputs in fi re behavior models designed to address building fire safety. This comparative study evaluates using the mass loss calorimeter as an alternative to the cone calorimeter for obtaining heat release rates of wood-based materials. For this study, a modified mass loss calorimeter utilized an...

  1. X-ray initiated polymerization of wood impregnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Galloway, Richard A.; Berejka, Anthony J.; Montoney, Daniel; Driscoll, Mark; Smith, Leonard; Scott Larsen, L.

    2009-07-01

    X-rays, derived from a high energy, high-current electron beam (EB), initiated in-situ polymerization of a unique class of monomers that were found to penetrate the cell walls of wood. X-rays initiated an auto-catalytic acrylic polymerization and penetrated through thick pieces of wood. The final cured product having the polymerizate, a polymer, both in the wood cell lumens and in the cell walls is called wood impregnated with a wood-polymer penetrant (WPP). The controlled lower dose rate of X-rays overcame disproportionation encountered when using higher dose-rate electron beam initiation. With X-rays, the in-situ polymerization took place in one exposure of modest dose. With EB, multiple passes were needed to avoid excessive heat build-up and monomer volatilization. Having entered the cell walls of the wood and then being polymerized within the cell walls, these radiation-cured unique monomers imparted outstanding dimensional stability upon exposure of the impregnated wood to humidity cycling. The preferred monomer system was also chemically modified prior to impregnation with agents that would remain in the wood and prevent the growth of fungi and other microbials. This technique differs from historic uses of monomers that merely filled the lumens of the wood (historic wood-polymer composites), which are only suitable for indoor use. The WPP impregnated wood that was either X-ray cured or EB cured demonstrated enhanced structural properties, dimensional stability, and decay resistance.

  2. Fibril angle of loblolly pine wood as related to specific gravity, growth rate, and distance from pith

    Treesearch

    C.W. McMillin

    1973-01-01

    Fibril angles were greater for earlywood (avg. 33.4°) than for latewood tracheida (avg. 26.9°). For earlywood, fibril angle did not differ between growth rates when the specific gravity was low (avg. 33.3°). When the specific gravity was high, wood of fast growth had a higher fibril angle (avg. 35.1.°) than wood of slow growth (avg. 32.0°). No differences were detected...

  3. Characteristics of Gloeophyllum trabeum alcohol oxidase, an extracellular source of H2O2 in brown rot decay of wood.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Geoffrey; Volc, Jindrich; Filonova, Lada; Plíhal, Ondrej; Kubátová, Elena; Halada, Petr

    2007-10-01

    A novel alcohol oxidase (AOX) has been purified from mycelial pellets of the wood-degrading basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum and characterized as a homooctameric nonglycosylated protein with native and subunit molecular masses of 628 and 72.4 kDa, containing noncovalently bonded flavin adenine dinucleotide. The isolated AOX cDNA contained an open reading frame of 1,953 bp translating into a polypeptide of 651 amino acids displaying 51 to 53% identity with other published fungal AOX amino acid sequences. The enzyme catalyzed the oxidation of short-chain primary aliphatic alcohols with a preference for methanol (K(m) = 2.3 mM, k(cat) = 15.6 s(-1)). Using polyclonal antibodies and immunofluorescence staining, AOX was localized on liquid culture hyphae and extracellular slime in sections from degraded wood and on cotton fibers. Transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling localized the enzyme in the hyphal periplasmic space and wall and on extracellular tripartite membranes and slime, while there was no labeling of hyphal peroxisomes. AOX was further shown to be associated with membranous or slime structures secreted by hyphae in wood fiber lumina and within the secondary cell walls of degraded wood fibers. The differences in AOX targeting compared to the known yeast peroxisomal localization were traced to a unique C-terminal sequence of the G. trabeum oxidase, which is apparently responsible for the protein's different translocation. The extracellular distribution and the enzyme's abundance and preference for methanol, potentially available from the demethylation of lignin, all point to a possible role for AOX as a major source of H(2)O(2), a component of Fenton's reagent implicated in the generally accepted mechanisms for brown rot through the production of highly destructive hydroxyl radicals.

  4. Configuration splitting and gamma-decay transition rates in the two-group shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, V. I.

    2015-09-15

    Expressions for reduced gamma-decay transition rates were obtained on the basis of the twogroup configuration model for the case of transitions between particles belonging to identical groups of nucleons. In practical applications, the present treatment is the most appropriate for describing decays for odd–odd nuclei in the vicinity of magic nuclei or for nuclei where the corresponding subshells stand out in energy. Also, a simple approximation is applicable to describing configuration splitting in those cases. The present calculations were performed for nuclei whose mass numbers are close to A ∼ 90, including N = 51 odd—odd isotones.

  5. The rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, David J.

    Determining the rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor is complex because of the number of isotopes involved, different types of decay, half-lives of the isotopes, and some isotopes decay into other radioactive isotopes. Traditionally, a simplified rule of 7s and 10s is used to determine the dose rate from nuclear weapons and can be to estimate the dose rate from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. An experiment was designed to determine the dose rate with respect to time from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. The experiment exposed 0.5 grams of unenriched Uranium to a fast and thermal neutron flux from a TRIGA Research Reactor (Lakewood, CO) for ten minutes. The dose rate from the fission products was measured by four Mirion DMC 2000XB electronic personal dosimeters over a period of six days. The resulting dose rate following a rule of 10s: the dose rate of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor decreases by a factor of 10 for every 10 units of time.

  6. Localizing gene regulation reveals a staggered wood decay mechanism for the brown rot fungus Postia placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiwei; Presley, Gerald N.; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Ryu, Jae-San; Menke, Jon R.; Figueroa, Melania; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Schilling, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-12

    The fungi that cause brown rot of wood are essential contributors to biomass recycling in forest ecosystems. Their highly efficient cellulolytic systems, which may have practical applications, apparently depend on a combination of two mechanisms: nonselective oxidation of the lignocellulose by reactive oxygen species (ROS) coupled with hydrolysis of the polysaccharide components by a limited set of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). Since the production of strongly oxidizing ROS appears incompatible with the operation of GHs, it has been proposed that the fungi regulate ROS production by maintaining concentration gradients of the chelated metal ions they use to generate extracellular oxidants. However, calculations have indicated that this protective mechanism is physically infeasible. We examined a different hypothesis, that expression of ROS and GH components is temporally staggered by brown rot fungi in wood. We sectioned thin wafers of spruce and aspen that had been colonized directionally by Postia placenta and measured expression of relevant genes and some of the encoded enzymes, thus using the spatial distribution of fungal hyphae to resolve a fine-scale temporal sequence. Hierarchical clustering of gene expression for eight oxidoreductases thought to have a role in ROS production and of eight GHs revealed a zone of oxidoreductase upregulation at the hyphal front that persisted about 48 h before upregulation of the GHs. Additional evidence for differential expression was provided by localization of endoglucanase, xylanase, mannanase, and laccase activities in the colonized wood. Our results support a two-step mechanism for brown rot, in which substrate oxidation precedes enzymatic hydrolysis.

  7. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  8. Measurement of the decay rate of the SiH feature as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Kraus, George F.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the SiH fundamental stretch could serve as a diagnostic indicator of the oxidation state of silicate surfaces exposed to the solar wind for prolonged periods. We have now measured the primary decay rate of SiH in vacuo as a function of temperature and find that the primary rate constant for the decay can be characterized by the following equation: k(min(exp -1)) approximately equals 0.186 exp(-9/RT) min(exp -1), where R = 2 x 10(exp -3) kcal deg(exp -1) mole(exp -1). This means that the half-life for the decay of the SiH feature at room temperature is approximately 20 yrs, whereas the half-life at a peak lunar regolith temperature of approximately 500K would be only approximately 20 days. At the somewhat lower temperature of approximately 400K the half-life for the decay is on the order of 200 days. The rate of loss of SiH as a function of temperature provides an upper limit to the quantity of H implanted by the solar wind which can be retained by a silicate grain in a planetary regolith. This will be discussed in more detail here.

  9. Note on intrinsic decay rates for abstract wave equations with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasiecka, Irena; Messaoudi, Salim A.; Mustafa, Muhammad I.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we consider a viscoelastic abstract wave equation with memory kernel satisfying the inequality g' + H(g) ⩽ 0, s ⩾ 0 where H(s) is a given continuous, positive, increasing, and convex function such that H(0) = 0. We shall develop an intrinsic method, based on the main idea introduced by Lasiecka and Tataru ["Uniform boundary stabilization of semilinear wave equation with nonlinear boundary dissipation," Differential and Integral Equations 6, 507-533 (1993)], for determining decay rates of the energy given in terms of the function H(s). This will be accomplished by expressing the decay rates as a solution to a given nonlinear dissipative ODE. We shall show that the obtained result, while generalizing previous results obtained in the literature, is also capable of proving optimal decay rates for polynomially decaying memory kernels (H(s) ˜ sp) and for the full range of admissible parameters p ∈ [1, 2). While such result has been known for certain restrictive ranges of the parameters p ∈ [1, 3/2), the methods introduced previously break down when p ⩾ 3/2. The present paper develops a new and general tool that is applicable to all admissible parameters.

  10. Characterization of decay and emission rates of ultrafine particles in indoor ice rink.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Lee, K

    2013-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine indoor ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter <100 nm) levels in ice rinks and to characterize UFP decay and emission rates. All 15 public ice rinks in Seoul were investigated for UFP and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. Three ice rinks did not show peaks in UFP concentrations, and one ice rink used two resurfacers simultaneously. High peaks of UFP and CO concentrations were observed when the resurfacer was operated. The average air change rate in the 11 ice rinks was 0.21 ± 0.13/h. The average decay rates of UFP number concentrations measured by the P-Trak and DiSCmini were 0.54 ± 0.21/h and 0.85 ± 0.34/h, respectively. The average decay rate of UFP surface area concentration was 0.33 ± 0.15/h. The average emission rates of UFP number concentrations measured by P-Trak and DiSCmini were 1.2 × 10(14) ± 6.5 × 10(13) particles/min and 3.3 × 10(14) ± 2.4 × 10(14) particles/min, respectively. The average emission rate of UFP surface area concentration was 3.1 × 10(11) ± 2.0 × 10(11) μm(2)/min. UFP emission rate was associated with resurfacer age. DiSCmini measured higher decay and emission rates than P-Trak due to their different measuring mechanisms and size ranges.

  11. A comprehensive study of Interatomic Coulombic Decay in argon dimers: Extracting R-dependent absolute decay rates from the experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rist, J.; Miteva, T.; Gaire, B.; Sann, H.; Trinter, F.; Keiling, M.; Gehrken, N.; Moradmand, A.; Berry, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Kunitski, M.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, T.; Landers, A. L.; Schöffler, M.; Williams, J. B.; Kolorenč, P.; Gokhberg, K.; Jahnke, T.; Dörner, R.

    2016-09-15

    In this paper we present a comprehensive and detailed study of Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD) occurring after irradiating argon dimers with XUV-synchrotron radiation. A manifold of different decay channels is observed and the corresponding initial and final states are assigned. Additionally, the effect of nuclear dynamics on the ICD electron spectrum is examined for one specific decay channel. The internuclear distance-dependent width Γ(R) of the decay is obtained from the measured kinetic energy release distribution of the ions employing a classical nuclear dynamics model.

  12. Metal accumulation without enhanced oxalate secretion in wood degraded by brown rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Jonathan S; Jellison, Jody

    2006-08-01

    Brown rot fungi were incubated in agar and agar-wood microcosms containing metallic or hydroxide forms of Al, Cu, and Fe. Metal dissolution was associated with elevated oxalate concentrations in agar, but metals translocated into wood did not affect oxalate accumulation, crystal production, or decay rate, demonstrating a substrate-dependent oxalate dynamic.

  13. Radioactive decay speedup at T=5 K: electron-capture decay rate of (7)Be encapsulated in C(60).

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, T; Ohno, K; Morisato, T; Mitsugashira, T; Hirose, K; Yuki, H; Kasagi, J

    2007-06-22

    The electron-capture (EC) decay rate of (7)Be in C(60) at the temperature of liquid helium (T=5 K) was measured and compared with the rate in Be metal at T=293 K. We found that the half-life of (7)Be in endohedral C(60) ((7)Be@C(60)) at a temperature close to T=5 K is 52.47+/-0.04 d, a value that is 0.34% faster than that at T=293 K. In this environment, the half-life of (7)Be is nearly 1.5% faster than that inside Be metal at room temperature (T=293 K). We then interpreted our observations in terms of calculations of the electron density at the (7)Be nucleus position inside the C(60); further, we estimate theoretically the temperature dependence (at T=0 K and 293 K) of the electron density at the Be nucleus position in the stable center inside C(60). The theoretical estimates were almost in agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Well hydraulics in pumping tests with exponentially decayed rates of abstraction in confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Zhang; Zhan, Hongbin; Wang, Quanrong; Liang, Xing; Ma, Teng; Chen, Chen

    2017-05-01

    Actual field pumping tests often involve variable pumping rates which cannot be handled by the classical constant-rate or constant-head test models, and often require a convolution process to interpret the test data. In this study, we proposed a semi-analytical model considering an exponentially decreasing pumping rate started at a certain (higher) rate and eventually stabilized at a certain (lower) rate for cases with or without wellbore storage. A striking new feature of the pumping test with an exponentially decayed rate is that the drawdowns will decrease over a certain period of time during intermediate pumping stage, which has never been seen before in constant-rate or constant-head pumping tests. It was found that the drawdown-time curve associated with an exponentially decayed pumping rate function was bounded by two asymptotic curves of the constant-rate tests with rates equaling to the starting and stabilizing rates, respectively. The wellbore storage must be considered for a pumping test without an observation well (single-well test). Based on such characteristics of the time-drawdown curve, we developed a new method to estimate the aquifer parameters by using the genetic algorithm.

  15. Wood : adhesives

    Treesearch

    A.H. Conner

    2001-01-01

    This chapter on wood adhesives includes: 1) Classification of wood adhesives 2) Thermosetting wood adhesives 3) Thermoplastic adhesives, 4) Wood adhesives based on natural sources 5) Nonconventional bonding of wood 6) Wood bonding.

  16. Core hole screening and decay rates of double core ionized first row hydrides.

    PubMed

    Inhester, L; Groenhof, G; Grubmüller, H

    2013-04-28

    Because of the high intensity, X-ray free electron lasers allow one to create and probe double core ionized states in molecules. The decay of these multiple core ionized states crucially determines the evolution of radiation damage in single molecule diffractive imaging experiments. Here we have studied the Auger decay in hydrides of first row elements after single and double core ionization by quantum mechanical ab initio calculations. In our approach the continuum wave function of the emitted Auger electron is expanded into spherical harmonics on a radial grid. The obtained decay rates of double K-shell vacancies were found to be systematically larger than those for the respective single K-shell vacancies, markedly exceeding the expected factor of two. This enhancement is attributed to the screening effects induced by the core hole. We propose a simple model, which is able to predict core hole decay rates in molecules with low Z elements based on the electron density in the vicinity of the core hole.

  17. Polynomial decay rate of a thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen, Marié

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with the polynomial stabilization of a two-dimensional thermoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko plate model with no mechanical damping. The model is subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic as well as the thermal variables. The work complements our earlier work in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 64:1305-1325, 2013) on the polynomial stabilization of a Mindlin-Timoshenko model in a radially symmetric domain under Dirichlet boundary conditions on the displacement and thermal variables and free boundary conditions on the shear angle variables. In particular, our aim is to investigate the effect of the Dirichlet boundary conditions on all the variables on the polynomial decay rate of the model. By once more applying a frequency domain method in which we make critical use of an inequality for the trace of Sobolev functions on the boundary of a bounded, open connected set we show that the decay is slower than in the model considered in the cited work. A comparison of our result with our polynomial decay result for a magnetoelastic Mindlin-Timoshenko model subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions on the elastic variables in Grobbelaar-Van Dalsen (Z Angew Math Phys 63:1047-1065, 2012) also indicates a correlation between the robustness of the coupling between parabolic and hyperbolic dynamics and the polynomial decay rate in the two models.

  18. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus Postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    Treesearch

    Diego Martinez; Jean Challacombe; Ingo Morgenstern; David Hibbett; Monika Schmoll; Christian P. Kubicek; Patricia Ferreira; Francisco J. Ruiz-Duenas; Angel T. Martinez; Philip J. Kersten; Kenneth E. Hammel; Jill A. Gaskell; Daniel Cullen

    2009-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome,...

  19. Effectiveness of the International Phytosanitary Standard ISPM No. 15 on reducing wood borer infestation rates in wood packaging material entering the United States

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Haack; Kerry O. Britton; Eckelhard G. Brockerhoff; Joseph F. Cavey; Lynn J. Garrett; Mark Kimberley; Frank Lowenstein; Amelia Nuding; Lars J. Olson; James Tumer; Kathryn N. Vasilaky

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bark- and wood-infesting insects have been introduced to new countries by international trade where some have caused severe environmental and economic damage. Wood packaging material (WPM), such as pallets, is one of the high risk pathways for the introduction of wood pests. International recognition of this risk resulted in adoption of International Standards...

  20. A study of the fully differential inclusive semileptonic B meson decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipeles, Elliot

    2004-12-01

    We present a study of the fully differential inclusive semileptonic B meson decay rate. Using a maximum likelihood fit, we extract the fractional contributions from the B → X clnu processes with Xc = D, D*, D**, and nonresonant Xc, and the process B → Xulnu. From the fit results, we extract moments of B → Xclnu differential decay rate and the partial branching fraction of the B → Xulnu decay in a restricted region of phase space. The region in which the B → Xulnu partial branching fraction is measured is MX < 1.5 GeV/c2, q2 > 11 GeV2/c4. This measurement is used to extract CKM parameter |Vub| = (4.73 +/- 0.23 +/- 0.82 +/- 0.18 +/- 0.56 +/- 0.66) x 10-3, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, detector systematics, B → Xcl nu model dependence, B → Xulnu model dependence, and theoretical uncertainties. From the < M2X-M2D > moment, the first moment of the photon energy spectrum in B → Xsgamma, and the semileptonic B branching fraction, we extract the CKM parameter |V cb| = (4.12 +/- .10 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.16) x 10-2, where the uncertainties are due to the measurement of the semileptonic B decay rate, the moments measurements, and theoretical uncertainties. Both CKM parameter extractions use Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) predictions for inclusive semileptonic B decay. The measured moments are also used to test related predictions.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of borates derived from boric acid for fire and decay protections

    Treesearch

    George Chen

    1999-01-01

    The degradation of wood by decay, fire and UV constitutes the three major losses of wood products in use. Commercial wood preservatives including chromated copper arsenate(CCA) and pentachlorophenol(penta) can only protect wood from decay. Dual protections of wood against decay and fire or decay and UV if acheivable are more desirable. Many phosphorus and boron...

  2. Rates of development in male and female Wood Frogs and patterns of parasitism by lung nematodes.

    PubMed

    Dare, O K; Forbes, M R

    2008-03-01

    Researchers are becoming interested in testing whether investment in growth and/or development trades off against investment in parasite defence. We tested this idea by examining relations between development of Wood Frogs (Rana sylvatica) and susceptibility to lung nematodes (Rhabdias ranae). Male and female frogs reared in outdoor mesocosms were the same length and mass at metamorphosis. However, males metamorphosed sooner than females. Lung nematodes were no more likely to penetrate male versus female metamorphs following controlled exposures, but males had higher intensities of adult female worms and the largest worms per host were, on average, of larger size in male metamorphs. Males that took longer to metamorphose carried higher numbers of worms in their lungs than males that metamorphosed early. In comparison, females that developed faster harboured more worms in their lungs than females that took longer to reach metamorphosis. Our results suggest that variation in susceptibility to lung nematodes is influenced by host sex and possibly also by sex-specific relations with developmental rate. Further, male hosts might prove to be a more important source of infective stages of worms than female hosts.

  3. Analytic heating rate of neutron star merger ejecta derived from Fermi's theory of beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Sari, Re'em; Piran, Tsvi

    2017-06-01

    Macronovae (kilonovae) that arise in binary neutron star mergers are powered by radioactive beta decay of hundreds of r-process nuclides. We derive, using Fermi's theory of beta decay, an analytic estimate of the nuclear heating rate. We show that the heating rate evolves as a power law ranging between t-6/5 and t-4/3. The overall magnitude of the heating rate is determined by the mean values of nuclear quantities, e.g. the nuclear matrix elements of beta decay. These values are specified by using nuclear experimental data. We discuss the role of higher order beta transitions and the robustness of the power law. The robust and simple form of the heating rate suggests that observations of the late-time bolometric light curve ∝ t-4/3 would be direct evidence of a r-process driven macronova. Such observations could also enable us to estimate the total amount of r-process nuclei produced in the merger.

  4. Short term memory bowing effect is consistent with presentation rate dependent decay

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    I reanalyze the free recall data of Murdock, J Exp Psychol 64(5):482–488 (1962) and Murdock and Okada, J Verbal Learn and Verbal Behav 86:263–267 (1970) which show the famous bowing effect in which initial and recent items are recalled better than intermediate items (primacy and recency effects). Recent item recall probabilities follow a logarithmic decay with time of recall consistent with the tagging/retagging theory. The slope of the decay increases with increasing presentation rate. The initial items, with an effectively low presentation rate, decay with the slowest logarithmic slope, explaining the primacy effect. The finding that presentation rate limits the duration of short term memory suggests a basis for memory loss in busy adults, for the importance of slow music practice, for long term memory deficiencies for people with attention deficits who may be artificially increasing the presentation rates of their surroundings. A well-defined, quantitative measure of the primacy effect is introduced. PMID:22132046

  5. Rates and C P asymmetries of charmless two-body baryonic Bu ,d ,s decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2017-05-01

    With the experimental evidences of B¯ 0→p p ¯ and B-→Λ p ¯ decays, it is now possible to extract both tree and penguin amplitudes of the charmless two-body baryonic B decays for the first time. The extracted penguin-tree ratio agrees with the expectation. Using the topological amplitude approach with the experimental results on B¯ 0→p p ¯ and B-→Λ p ¯ decay rates as input, predictions on all other B¯ q→B B ¯ , B D ¯ , D B ¯ and D D ¯ decay rates, where B and D are the low lying octet and decuplet baryons, respectively, are given. It is nontrivial that the results do not violate any existing experimental upper limit. From the analysis it is understandable that why B¯ 0→p p ¯ and B-→Λ p ¯ modes are the first two modes with experimental evidences. Relations on rates are verified using the numerical results. We note that the predicted B-→p Δ++ ¯ rate is close to the experimental bound, which has not been updated in the last ten years. Direct C P asymmetries of all B¯q→B B ¯, B D ¯, D B ¯ and D D ¯ modes are explored. Relations on C P asymmetries are examined using the numerical results. The direct C P asymmetry of B¯ 0→p p ¯ decay can be as large as ±50 %. Some of the C P asymmetries can serve as tests of the Standard Model. Most of them are pure penguin modes, which are expected to be sensitive to new physics contributions. In particular, B¯s 0→Ξ-Ξ- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ξ-Σ*- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ω-Ξ- ¯ , B¯s 0→Σ*-Σ*- ¯ , B¯s 0→Ω-Ω- ¯ , B¯s 0→Ξ-Ξ*- ¯ , B¯s 0→Ξ*-Ξ- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ξ*-Σ*- ¯ , B¯ 0→Ω-Ξ*- ¯ and B¯s 0→Ξ*-Ξ*- ¯ decays are Δ S =-1 pure penguin modes with unsuppressed rates, which can be searched in the near future. Their C P asymmetries are constrained to be of few % and are good candidates to be added to the list of the tests of the Standard Model.

  6. Bayesian meta-analysis to synthesize decay rate constant estimates for common fecal indicator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Lauren E; Field, Katharine G

    2016-11-01

    For decades, fecal indicator bacteria have been used as proxies to quantitatively estimate fecal loading into water bodies. Widely used cultured indicators (e.g. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp.) and more recently developed genetic markers are well studied, but their decay in the environment is still poorly understood. We used Hierarchical Bayesian Linear Modeling to conduct a series of meta-analyses using published decay rate constant estimates, to synthesize findings into pooled estimates and identify gaps in the data preventing reliable estimates. In addition to the meta-analysis assuming all estimates come from the same population, meta-regressions including covariates believed to contribute to decay were fit and used to provided synthesized estimates for specific combinations of significant variables. Additionally, statements regarding the significance of variables across studies were made using the 95% confidence interval for meta-regression coefficients. These models were used to construct a mean decay rate constant estimate as well as credible intervals for the mean and the distribution of all likely data points. While synthesized estimates for each targeted indicator bacteria were developed, the amount of data available varied widely for each target, as did the predictive power of the models as determined by testing with additional data not included in the modeling. Temperature was found to be significant for all selected indicators, while light was found to be significant only for culturable indicators. Results from the models must be interpreted with caution, as they are based only on the data available, which may not be representative of decay in other scenarios. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal decay rates of classical solutions for the full compressible MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jincheng; Tao, Qiang; Yao, Zheng-an

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with optimal decay rates for higher-order spatial derivatives of classical solutions to the full compressible MHD equations in three-dimensional whole space. If the initial perturbation is small in {H^3}-norm and bounded in {L^q(qin [1, 6/5 ))}-norm, we apply the Fourier splitting method by Schonbek (Arch Ration Mech Anal 88:209-222, 1985) to establish optimal decay rates for the second-order spatial derivatives of solutions and the third-order spatial derivatives of magnetic field in {L^2}-norm. These results improve the work of Pu and Guo (Z Angew Math Phys 64:519-538, 2013).

  8. Relativistic two-photon decay rates of 2s12 hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, S. P.; Drake, G. W. F.

    1981-07-01

    Rates are calculated for the decay of metastable 2s12 ions to the ground state by the simultaneous emission of two photons. The calculation includes all relativistic and retardation effects, and all combinations of photon multipoles which make significant contributions up to Z=100. Summations over intermediate states are performed by constructing a finite-basis-set representation of the Dirac Green's function. The estimated accuracy of the results is +/- 10 ppm for all Z up to 100. The decay rates are about 20 (αZ)2% larger than an earlier calculation by Johnson owing to the inclusion of higher-order retardation effects. The general question of gauge invariance in two-photon transitions is discussed.

  9. Casimir-Polder shift and decay rate in the presence of nonreciprocal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Crosse, J. A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Casimir-Polder frequency shift and decay rate for an atom in front of a nonreciprocal medium by using macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The results are a generalization of the respective quantities for matter with broken time-reversal symmetry which does not fulfill the Lorentz reciprocity principle. As examples, we contrast the decay rates, the resonant and nonresonant frequency shifts of a perfectly conducting (reciprocal) mirror with those of a perfectly reflecting nonreciprocal mirror. We find different power laws for the distance dependence of all quantities in the retarded and nonretarded limits. As an example of a more realistic nonreciprocal medium, we investigate a topological insulator subject to a time-symmetry-breaking perturbation.

  10. The electron temperature and 44Ti decay rate in Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    2001-11-01

    The effects of plasma elemental composition and ionization state on the effective decay rate of 44Ti are investigated. We essentially follow the methods of the first authors to treat this topic, Mochizuki et al., but use more realistic plasma models, including radiative cooling, to compute the evolution of the charge state distribution behind the reverse shock. For uniform density ejecta (i.e., no clumps or bubbles) we find a negligible change to the decay rate of 44Ti. We discuss the effects of non-uniform ejecta. We also briefly consider the effects on these calculations of collisionless electron heating associated with weak secondary shocks propagating throughout the Cas A shell as a result of foward or reverse shock encounters with density inhomogeneities, recently suggested as an explanation for the hard X-ray tail seen in BeppoSAX and RXTE/OSSE spectra. .

  11. Concentrations and decay rates of ozone in indoor air in dependence on building and surface materials.

    PubMed

    Moriske, H J; Ebert, G; Konieczny, L; Menk, G; Schöndube, M

    1998-08-01

    The decay of ozone in indoor air was measured in a closed chamber after contact with different building materials and residential surfaces. The tested materials were: vinyl wall paper, woodchip paper, plywood, latex paint, fitted carpet, and plaster. In the summer of 1996, the entry of ozone from ambient air into indoor air during ventilation and the ozone decay in indoor air, after windows had been closed again, were studied. Measurements were done in a residential house on the outskirts of Berlin. The following results were gained: the chamber measurements showed a decay of ozone after contact with most of the materials put inside the chamber. Higher decay rates have been obtained for wall papers, plywood, fitted carpet and plaster. As described in the literature, ozone is able to react with olefines inside the materials and is able to form formaldehyde and other components. This formation of formaldehyde could also be confirmed in our investigations. Thus, in most cases, the formaldehyde concentrations were lower than the German guideline value of 0.1 ppm. The formation of formaldehyde could be prevented when a special wall paper that was coated with activated carbon was used. In the house, a complete ozone diffusion into indoor air took place during ventilation within 30 min. After closing the windows, the ozone concentrations decreased to the basic level before ventilation within 60-90 min.

  12. Absorption cross-section and decay rate of rotating linear dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Aslan, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We analytically study the scalar perturbation of non-asymptotically flat (NAF) rotating linear dilaton black holes (RLDBHs) in 4-dimensions. We show that both radial and angular wave equations can be solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. The exact greybody factor (GF), the absorption cross-section (ACS), and the decay rate (DR) for the massless scalar waves are computed for these black holes (BHs). The results obtained for ACS and DR are discussed through graphs.

  13. Optimal decay rate for the wave equation on a square with constant damping on a strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    We consider the damped wave equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the unit square parametrized by Cartesian coordinates x and y. We assume the damping a to be strictly positive and constant for x<σ and zero for x>σ . We prove the exact t^{-4/3}-decay rate for the energy of classical solutions. Our main result (Theorem 1) answers question (1) of Anantharaman and Léautaud (Anal PDE 7(1):159-214, 2014, Section 2C).

  14. Initial cooperative decay rate and cooperative Lamb shift of resonant atoms in an infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2011-08-15

    We obtain in both the scalar and vector photon models the analytical expressions for the initial cooperative decay rate and the cooperative Lamb shift for an ensemble of resonant atoms distributed uniformly in an infinite cylindrical geometry for the case that the initial state of the system is prepared in a phased state modulated in the direction of the cylindrical axis. We find that qualitatively the scalar and vector theories give different results.

  15. Measurement of HOx• production rate due to radon decay in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce (•OH and HO2 •) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HOx• production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HOx• production rate was found to be (4.31±0.07) x 105 HOx• per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G(HOx•)-value, 7.86±0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HOx•] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HOx• produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HOx• production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for •OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial •OH produced from the photolysis of O3/H2O.

  16. Measurement of the decay rate of single-frequency perturbations on blast waves.

    PubMed

    Edens, A D; Ditmire, T; Hansen, J F; Edwards, M J; Adams, R G; Rambo, P K; Ruggles, L; Smith, I C; Porter, J L

    2005-12-09

    To explore the validity of theories forwarded to explain the dynamics of hydrodynamic perturbations on high Mach number blast waves, we have studied the decay rate of perturbations on blast waves traveling through nitrogen gas. In our experiments, 1 kJ pulses from the Z-Beamlet laser at Sandia National Laboratories illuminated solid targets immersed in gas and created blast waves. The polytropic index implied by comparing experiment to theoretical predictions is compared to simulation results.

  17. Excitonic coupling effect on the nonradiative decay rate in molecular aggregates: Formalism and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenqiang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang; Ren, Jiajun; Peng, Qian; Shuai, Zhigang

    2017-09-01

    We present here an analytical thermal vibration correlation function formalism to calculate the nonradiative decay rate constant (knr) considering excitonic coupling effect (ECE) for molecular aggregates based on split-operator approximation. Combining with first-principles calculations, we found that knr is enhanced by ECE for both H- and J-aggregates. In addition, ECE is found to be minor for the AIEgens (aggregation-induced emission luminogens).

  18. Estimation of HF artificial ionospheric turbulence characteristics using comparison of calculated plasma wave decay rates with the measured decay rates of the stimulated electromagnetic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareev, D. D.; Gavrilenko, V. G.; Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown experimentally that the relaxation time of the stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE) after the pump wave turn off decreases when frequency of the electromagnetic wave, responsible for the SEE generation (pump wave f0 or diagnostic wave fdw) approaches 4th harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency fce . Since the SEE relaxation is determined by the damping rate of plasma waves with the same frequency, responsible for the SEE generation, we calculated damping rates of plasma waves with ω ∼ωuh (ω is the plasma wave frequency, ωuh is the upper hybrid frequency) for frequencies close to and distant from the double resonance where ωuh ∼ 4ωce (ωce = 2 πfce). The calculations were performed numerically on the base of linear plasma wave dispersion relation at arbitrary ratio between | Δ | = ω - 4ωce and |k‖ |VTe (VTe is the electron thermal speed and k‖ is the projection of the wave vector onto the magnetic field direction. A comparison of calculation and experimental results has shown that obtained frequency dependence of the SEE decay rate is similar to the damping rate frequency dependence for plasma waves with wave vectors directed at the angles 60-70° to the magnetic field, and gives a strong hint that oblique upper hybrid plasma waves should be responsible for the SEE generation.

  19. Radiative decay rate of excitons in square quantum wells: Microscopic modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Khramtsov, E. S.; Grigoryev, P. S.; Ignatiev, I. V.; Verbin, S. Yu.; Belov, P. A. Efimov, Yu. P.; Eliseev, S. A.; Lovtcius, V. A.; Petrov, V. V.; Yakovlev, S. L.

    2016-05-14

    The binding energy and the corresponding wave function of excitons in GaAs-based finite square quantum wells (QWs) are calculated by the direct numerical solution of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The precise results for the lowest exciton state are obtained by the Hamiltonian discretization using the high-order finite-difference scheme. The microscopic calculations are compared with the results obtained by the standard variational approach. The exciton binding energies found by two methods coincide within 0.1 meV for the wide range of QW widths. The radiative decay rate is calculated for QWs of various widths using the exciton wave functions obtained by direct and variational methods. The radiative decay rates are confronted with the experimental data measured for high-quality GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs QW heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The calculated and measured values are in good agreement, though slight differences with earlier calculations of the radiative decay rate are observed.

  20. 31Cl beta decay and the 30P31S reaction rate in nova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Michael; Wrede, C.; Brown, B. A.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; NSCL e12028 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The 30P31S reaction rate is critical for modeling the final isotopic abundances of ONe nova nucleosynthesis, identifying the origin of presolar nova grains, and calibrating proposed nova thermometers. Unfortunately, this rate is essentially experimentally unconstrained because the strengths of key 31S proton capture resonances are not known, due to uncertainties in their spins and parities. Using a 31Cl beam produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, we have populated several 31S states for study via beta decay and devised a new decay scheme which includes updated beta feedings and gamma branchings as well as multiple states previously unobserved in 31Cl beta decay. Results of this study, including the unambiguous identification due to isospin mixing of a new l = 0 , Jπ = 3 /2+ 31S resonance directly in the middle of the Gamow Window, will be presented, and significance to the evaluation of the 30P31S reaction rate will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. Natl. Sci. Foundation (Grants No. PHY-1102511, PHY-1404442, PHY-1419765, and PHY-1431052); U.S. Dept. of Energy, Natl. Nucl. Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0000979); Nat. Sci. and Eng. Research Council of Canada.

  1. Direct Measurement of the Unimolecular Decay Rate of Criegee Intermediates to OH Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Fang, Yi; Klippenstein, Stephen; McCoy, Anne; Lester, Marsha

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important non-photolytic source of OH radicals in the troposphere. The production of OH radicals proceeds though formation and unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates such as syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO. These alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates can undergo a 1,4-H transfer reaction to form an energized vinyl hydroperoxide species, which breaks apart to OH and vinoxy products. Recently, this laboratory used IR excitation in the C-H stretch overtone region to initiate the unimolecular decay of syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO Criegee intermediates, leading to OH formation. Here, direct time-domain measurements are performed to observe the rate of appearance of OH products under collision-free conditions utilizing UV laser-induced fluorescence for detection. The experimental rates are in excellent agreement with statistical RRKM calculations using barrier heights predicted from high-level electronic structure calculations. Accurate determination of the rates and barrier heights for unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates is essential for modeling the kinetics of alkene ozonolysis reactions, a significant OH radical source in atmospheric chemistry, as well as the steady-state concentration of Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. This research was supported through the National Science Foundation under grant CHE-1362835.

  2. Lignocellulosic polysaccharides and lignin degradation by wood decay fungi: the relevance of nonenzymatic Fenton-based reactions.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Valdeir; Milagres, Adriane M F; Filley, Timothy R; Goodell, Barry

    2011-04-01

    The brown rot fungus Wolfiporia cocos and the selective white rot fungus Perenniporia medulla-panis produce peptides and phenolate-derivative compounds as low molecular weight Fe³+-reductants. Phenolates were the major compounds with Fe³+-reducing activity in both fungi and displayed Fe³+-reducing activity at pH 2.0 and 4.5 in the absence and presence of oxalic acid. The chemical structures of these compounds were identified. Together with Fe³+ and H₂O₂ (mediated Fenton reaction) they produced oxygen radicals that oxidized lignocellulosic polysaccharides and lignin extensively in vitro under conditions similar to those found in vivo. These results indicate that, in addition to the extensively studied Gloeophyllum trabeum--a model brown rot fungus--other brown rot fungi as well as selective white rot fungi, possess the means to promote Fenton chemistry to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, and to modify lignin. Moreover, new information is provided, particularly regarding how lignin is attacked, and either repolymerized or solubilized depending on the type of fungal attack, and suggests a new pathway for selective white rot degradation of wood. The importance of Fenton reactions mediated by phenolates operating separately or synergistically with carbohydrate-degrading enzymes in brown rot fungi, and lignin-modifying enzymes in white rot fungi is discussed. This research improves our understanding of natural processes in carbon cycling in the environment, which may enable the exploration of novel methods for bioconversion of lignocellulose in the production of biofuels or polymers, in addition to the development of new and better ways to protect wood from degradation by microorganisms.

  3. Radionuclide mass inventory, activity, decay heat, and dose rate parametric data for TRIGA spent nuclear fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, J.W.

    1997-03-01

    Parametric burnup calculations are performed to estimate radionuclide isotopic mass and activity concentrations for four different Training, Research, and Isotope General Atomics (TRIGA) nuclear reactor fuel element types: (1) Aluminum-clad standard, (2) Stainless Steel-clad standard, (3) High-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP), and (4) Low-enrichment Fuel Life Improvement Program (FLIP-LEU-1). Parametric activity data are tabulated for 145 important radionuclides that can be used to generate gamma-ray emission source terms or provide mass quantity estimates as a function of decay time. Fuel element decay heats and dose rates are also presented parametrically as a function of burnup and decay time. Dose rates are given at the fuel element midplane for contact, 3.0-feet, and 3.0-meter detector locations in air. The data herein are estimates based on specially derived Beginning-of-Life (BOL) neutron cross sections using geometrically-explicit TRIGA reactor core models. The calculated parametric data should represent good estimates relative to actual values, although no experimental data were available for direct comparison and validation. However, because the cross sections were not updated as a function of burnup, the actinide concentrations may deviate from the actual values at the higher burnups.

  4. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

  5. A realistic model of neutrino masses with a large neutrinoless double beta decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Aguila, Francisco; Aparici, Alberto; Bhattacharya, Subhaditya; Santamaria, Arcadi; Wudka, Jose

    2012-05-01

    The minimal Standard Model extension with the Weinberg operator does accommodate the observed neutrino masses and mixing, but predicts a neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay rate proportional to the effective electron neutrino mass, which can be then arbitrarily small within present experimental limits. However, in general 0 νββ decay can have an independent origin and be near its present experimental bound; whereas neutrino masses are generated radiatively, contributing negligibly to 0 νββ decay. We provide a realization of this scenario in a simple, well defined and testable model, with potential LHC effects and calculable neutrino masses, whose two-loop expression we derive exactly. We also discuss the connection of this model to others that have appeared in the literature, and remark on the significant differences that result from various choices of quantum number assignments and symmetry assumptions. In this type of models lepton flavor violating rates are also preferred to be relatively large, at the reach of foreseen experiments. Interestingly enough, in our model this stands for a large third mixing angle, {{si}}{{{n}}^{{2}}}{θ_{{{13}}}}{˜}}}{ > }}0.00{8} , when μ→ eee is required to lie below its present experimental limit.

  6. Combined Results on b-Hadron Production Rates and Decay Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2002-09-11

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates, B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, the average number of c and {bar c} quarks in b-hadron decays, and searches for CP violation in the B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} system are presented. They have been obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 2000 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations. These results have been used to determine the parameters of the CKM unitarity triangle.

  7. Variation in radical decay rates in epoxy as a function of crosslink density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. M.; Memory, J. M.; Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the behavior of radicals generated by Co-60 gamma radiation in the epoxy system tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The molar ratio of TGDDM to DDS was varied in the epoxy samples, and they were prepared under the same curing conditions to obtain various extents of crosslinking. ESR spectrometry data suggest that the rate of decay of radicals is related to inhomogeneities in the resin, with radicals in the highly crosslinked regions having long decay times. The inhomogeneities are thought to be due to statistical variation associated with the complex crosslinking reactions or to difficulties in mixing the reactants.

  8. Nucleation rates of Lennard-Jones clusters from growth and decay simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehkamäki, Hanna; Ford, Ian J.

    2000-08-01

    We have studied singles clusters of Lennard-Jones atoms using a novel Monte Carlo simulation technique. We computed canonical ensemble averages of the grand canonical growth and decay probabilities of the cluster as a function of the cluster size. The critical size is identified as the one for which growth and decay are equally probable. The size and average internal energy the critical cluster was found for different temperatures and vapor chemical potentials. We used this information together with nucleation theorems to predict the behavior of the nucleation rate as function of the two external parameters. Our results are in line with the results found in the literature, and roughly correspond to the predictions of classical theory.

  9. Wood formation from the base to the crown in Pinus radiata: gradients of tracheid wall thickness, wood density, radial growth rate and gene expression

    Treesearch

    Sheree Cato; Lisa McMillan; Lloyd Donaldson; Thomas Richardson; Craig Echt; Richard Gardner

    2006-01-01

    Wood formation was investigated at five heights along the bole for two unrelated trees of Pinus radiataBoth trees showed clear gradients in wood properties from the base to the crown. Cambial cells at the base of the tree were dividing 3.3-fold slower than those at the crown, while the average thickness of cell walls in wood was highest at the base....

  10. Build Green: Wood Can Last for Centuries

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; Samuel V. Glass

    2012-01-01

    This report updates and revises information from the 1976 Forest Service publication by Rodney C. DeGroot, “Your Wood Can Last for Centuries.” It explains why wood decays, alerts the homeowner to conditions that can result in decay in buildings, and describes measures to prevent moisture-related damage to wood.

  11. Initial colonization, community assembly and ecosystem function: fungal colonist traits and litter biochemistry mediate decay rate.

    PubMed

    Cline, Lauren C; Zak, Donald R

    2015-10-01

    Priority effects are an important ecological force shaping biotic communities and ecosystem processes, in which the establishment of early colonists alters the colonization success of later-arriving organisms via competitive exclusion and habitat modification. However, we do not understand which biotic and abiotic conditions lead to strong priority effects and lasting historical contingencies. Using saprotrophic fungi in a model leaf decomposition system, we investigated whether compositional and functional consequences of initial colonization were dependent on initial colonizer traits, resource availability or a combination thereof. To test these ideas, we factorially manipulated leaf litter biochemistry and initial fungal colonist identity, quantifying subsequent community composition, using neutral genetic markers, and community functional characteristics, including enzyme potential and leaf decay rates. During the first 3 months, initial colonist respiration rate and physiological capacity to degrade plant detritus were significant determinants of fungal community composition and leaf decay, indicating that rapid growth and lignolytic potential of early colonists contributed to altered trajectories of community assembly. Further, initial colonization on oak leaves generated increasingly divergent trajectories of fungal community composition and enzyme potential, indicating stronger initial colonizer effects on energy-poor substrates. Together, these observations provide evidence that initial colonization effects, and subsequent consequences on litter decay, are dependent upon substrate biochemistry and physiological traits within a regional species pool. Because microbial decay of plant detritus is important to global C storage, our results demonstrate that understanding the mechanisms by which initial conditions alter priority effects during community assembly may be key to understanding the drivers of ecosystem-level processes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, M. J. Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-15

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of {sup 22}Na, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  13. Precision long-term measurements of beta-decay-rate ratios in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, S. D.; Peatross, J.; Ware, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    We report on measurements of relative beta-decay rates of Na-22, Cl-36, Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-137 monitored for more than one year. The radioactive samples are mounted in an automated sample changer that sequentially positions the five samples in turn, with high spatial precision, in front of each of four Geiger-Müller tubes. The sample wheel, detectors, and associated electronics are housed inside a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate approaches a few times 0.01% with two weeks of averaging. Other sources of error are on a similar scale. The data are analyzed in variety of ways, comparing count rates of the various samples on one or more detectors, and comparing count rates of a particular sample across multiple detectors. We observe no statistically significant variations in the ratios of decay rates, either annual or at higher-frequency, at a level above 0.01%.

  14. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Ware, M J; Bergeson, S D; Ellsworth, J E; Groesbeck, M; Hansen, J E; Pace, D; Peatross, J

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of (22)Na, (36)Cl, (54)Mn, (60)Co, (90)Sr, (133)Ba, (137)Cs, (152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  15. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, M. J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of 22Na, 36Cl, 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 133Ba, 137Cs, 152Eu, and 154Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  16. Aftershock decay, productivity, and stress rates in Hawaii: Indicators of temperature and stress from magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Fred W.; Wright, Tom; Nakata, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    We examined dozens of aftershock sequences in Hawaii in terms of Gutenberg-Richter and modified Omori law parameters. We studied p, the rate of aftershock decay; Ap, the aftershock productivity, defined as the observed divided by the expected number of aftershocks; and c, the time delay when aftershock rates begin to fall. We found that for earthquakes shallower than 20 km, p values >1.2 are near active magma centers. We associate this high decay rate with higher temperatures and faster stress relaxation near magma reservoirs. Deep earthquakes near Kilauea's inferred magma transport path show a range of p values, suggesting the absence of a large, deep magma reservoir. Aftershock productivity is >4.0 for flank earthquakes known to be triggered by intrusions but is normal (0.25 to 4.0) for isolated main shocks. We infer that continuing, post-main shock stress from the intrusion adds to the main shock's stress step and causes higher Ap. High Ap in other zones suggests less obvious intrusions and pulsing magma pressure near Kilauea's feeding conduit. We calculate stress rates and stress rate changes from pre-main shock and aftershock rates. Stress rate increased after many intrusions but decreased after large M7–8 earthquakes. Stress rates are highest in the seismically active volcano flanks and lowest in areas far from volcanic centers. We found sequences triggered by intrusions tend to have high Ap, high (>0.10 day) c values, a stress rate increase, and sometimes a peak in aftershock rate hours after the main shock. We interpret these values as indicating continuing intrusive stress after the main shock.

  17. Radiative and nonradiative spontaneous decay rates for an electric quadrupole source in the vicinity of a spherical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Guzatov, D. V.

    2016-04-15

    Analytic expressions for the radiative and nonradiative decay rates for an electric quadrupole source (atom, molecule) in the vicinity of a spherical particle (dielectric, metal) have been derived and analyzed within the classical electrodynamics. It has been shown that the highest increase in the decay rates appears in the quasi-static case, when the wavelength of the transition in question is much larger than the characteristic size of the system formed by the particle and the quadrupole. Asymptotic expressions for the decay rates have been derived for this case.

  18. Decay rate of critical fluctuations in ethane+carbon dioxide mixtures near the critical line including the critical azeotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.F.; Doiron, T.; Pegg, I.L.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Using the technique of photon correlation spectroscopy we have measured the decay rate of critical fluctuations in mixtures of ethane and carbon dioxide of various compositions including a near-azeotropic mixture. Our experimental data indicate that there is only one dominant mode of fluctuations and the decay rate is well described by the predictions of the mode-coupling theory with the exponent v=0.63 for all compositions. The decay rate, its background contributions, the shear viscosity, and the correlation length for the mixtures appear to interpolate simply between those of ethane and carbon dioxide.

  19. Magnetic Flux Emergence and Decay Rates for Preceder and Follower Sunspots Observed with HMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, A. A.; Jones, E. H.; Linton, M. G.; Leake, J. E.

    2017-06-01

    We quantify the emergence and decay rates of preceder (p) and follower (f) sunspots within 10 active regions from 2010 to 2014 using Space-weather Helioseismic Magnetic Imager Active Region Patch data. The sunspots are small to mid-sized regions and contain a signed flux within a single polarity sunspot of (1.1{--}6.5)× {10}21 {Mx}. The net unsigned flux within the regions, including plage, ranges from (5.1{--}20)× {10}21 {Mx}. Rates are calculated with and without intensity contours to differentiate between sunspot formation and flux emergence. Signed flux emergence rates, calculated with intensity contours, for the p (f) spots average 6.8(4.9)× {10}19 {Mx} hr-1, while decay rates are -1.9(-3.4)× {10}19 {Mx} hr-1. The mean, signed flux emergence rate of the regions, including plage, is 7.1× {10}19 {Mx} hr-1, for a mean peak flux of 5.9× {10}21 {Mx}. Using a synthesis of these results and others reported previously, there is a clear trend for larger flux regions to emerge faster than smaller ones. Observed emergence rates (dφ /{dt}, Mx hr-1) scale with total signed peak flux, {\\tilde{φ }}\\max , as a power law with an exponent of 0.36, i.e., dφ /{dt}=A{\\tilde{φ }}\\max 0.36. The observed rates may assist in constraining the boundary and initial conditions in simulations which already demonstrate increased rates for flux tubes with higher buoyancy and twist, or in the presence of a strong upflow. Overall, the observed emergence rates are smaller than those in simulations, which may indicate a slower rise of the flux in the interior than what is captured in simulations.

  20. Optimal Decay Rate of the Compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson System in {mathbb {R}^3}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Liang; Matsumura, Akitaka; Zhang, Guojing

    2010-05-01

    The compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson (NSP) system is considered in {mathbb {R}^3} in the present paper, and the influences of the electric field of the internal electrostatic potential force governed by the self-consistent Poisson equation on the qualitative behaviors of solutions is analyzed. It is observed that the rotating effect of electric field affects the dispersion of fluids and reduces the time decay rate of solutions. Indeed, we show that the density of the NSP system converges to its equilibrium state at the same L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {3}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-3/2 respectively as the compressible Navier-Stokes system, but the momentum of the NSP system decays at the L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {1}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-1 respectively, which is slower than the L 2-rate {(1+t)^{-frac {3}{4}}} or L ∞-rate (1 + t)-3/2 for compressible Navier-Stokes system [Duan et al., in Math Models Methods Appl Sci 17:737-758, 2007; Liu and Wang, in Comm Math Phys 196:145-173, 1998; Matsumura and Nishida, in J Math Kyoto Univ 20:67-104, 1980] and the L ∞-rate (1 + t)- p with {p in (1, 3/2)} for irrotational Euler-Poisson system [Guo, in Comm Math Phys 195:249-265, 1998]. These convergence rates are shown to be optimal for the compressible NSP system.

  1. Corrosion rates of fasteners in treated wood exposed to 100% relative humidity

    Treesearch

    Samuel L. Zelinka; Douglas R. Rammer

    2009-01-01

    In the past, gravimetric corrosion data for fasteners exposed to treated wood has been reported as a percent weight loss. Although percent weight loss is a valid measure of corrosion for comparing identical fasteners, it can distort the corrosion performance of fasteners with different geometries and densities. This report reevaluates a key report on the corrosiveness...

  2. V sup 0 r arrow P sup 0 P sup 0. gamma. decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S. ); Oakes, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    The radiative decay processes of the type {ital V}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital P}{sup 0}{ital P}{sup 0}{gamma} are described by the gauged Wess-Zumino terms in a low-energy effective Lagrangian, there being no bremsstrahlung contributions. Using such an effective Lagrangian, describing pseudoscalar and vector mesons, we have calculated the branching ratios for the decays {omega}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, {omega}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{gamma}, {rho}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, {rho}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{gamma}, {phi}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, {phi}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{gamma}, and {phi}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup 0}{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{gamma}. Since scalar mesons have been neglected, these rates provide estimates of the expected backgrounds in searches for {ital J}{sup {pi}}=0{sup +} resonances, particularly the possible four-quark states in {phi} decays.

  3. The impact of sea-level rise on organic matter decay rates in Chesapeake Bay brackish tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwanm, M.L.; Langley, J.A.; Guntenspergen, Gleen R.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The balance between organic matter production and decay determines how fast coastal wetlands accumulate soil organic matter. Despite the importance of soil organic matter accumulation rates in influencing marsh elevation and resistance to sea-level rise, relatively little is known about how decomposition rates will respond to sea-level rise. Here, we estimate the sensitivity of decomposition to flooding by measuring rates of decay in 87 bags filled with milled sedge peat, including soil organic matter, roots and rhizomes. Experiments were located in field-based mesocosms along 3 mesohaline tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Mesocosm elevations were manipulated to influence the duration of tidal inundation. Although we found no significant influence of inundation on decay rate when bags from all study sites were analyzed together, decay rates at two of the sites increased with greater flooding. These findings suggest that flooding may enhance organic matter decay rates even in water-logged soils, but that the overall influence of flooding is minor. Our experiments suggest that sea-level rise will not accelerate rates of peat accumulation by slowing the rate of soil organic matter decay. Consequently, marshes will require enhanced organic matter productivity or mineral sediment deposition to survive accelerating sea-level rise.

  4. Effect of fungal decay on the hygroscopic thickness swelling rate of lignocellulosic filler-polyolefin biocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kord, B.; Hosseinihashemi, S. Kh.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of fungal decay on the hygroscopic thickness swelling rate of lignocellulosic filler-polyolefin biocomposites has been investigated. Composites based on polypropylene (PP), bagasse fiber (BF), and a coupling agent (PP-g-MA) were made by melt compounding and injection molding. The weigt ratio of BF to PP was controlled at 60/40 for all blends. The amount of coupling agent was fixed at 2% for all formulations. The samples obtained were exposed to the action of brown-rot (Coniophora puteana) and white-rot (Trametes versicolor) fungi for 8, 12, and 16 weeks according to the Kolle-flask method. The thickness swelling of the samples was evaluated by immersing them in water at room temperature for several weeks. The morphology of the composites was characterized using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the fungal decay had an adverse affect on the dimensional stability of BF/PP composites due to an increase in the thickness swelling rate. The thickness swelling of white-rotted samples was higher than that of brown-rotted ones and control samples. Also, the thickness swelling of BF/PP composites increased with increasing time of fungal decay. In addition, after 16 weeks of exposure to white-rot fungi, the composites exhibited a higher parameter of swelling rate K SR than control samples. The K SR of the composites was influenced both by the type of rooting and the exposure time. Furthermore, the SEM micrographs showed that the extent of degradation increased with growing exposure time to fungi.

  5. Comparison of nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates computed in laboratory and center-of-mass coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    De Conti, C.; Barbero, C.; Galeão, A. P.; Krmpotić, F.

    2014-11-11

    In this work we compute the one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates of {sub Λ}{sup 5}He, {sub Λ}{sup 12}C and {sub Λ}{sup 13}C using a formalism based on the independent particle shell model in terms of laboratory coordinates. To ascertain the correctness and precision of the method, these results are compared with those obtained using a formalism in terms of center-of-mass coordinates, which has been previously reported in the literature. The formalism in terms of laboratory coordinates will be useful in the shell-model approach to two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  6. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NA62 Collaboration; Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K±→e±ν and K±→μ±ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ˜150000 reconstructed K±→e±ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK=(2.488±0.010)×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  7. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K± →e± ν and K± →μ± ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ∼ 150 000 reconstructed K± →e± ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK = (2.488 ± 0.010) ×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  8. An Examination of Sunspot Number Rates of Growth and Decay in Relation to the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of annual sunspot number averages, sunspot number rates of growth and decay are examined relative to both minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences using cycles 12 through present, the most reliably determined sunspot cycles. Indeed, strong correlations are found for predicting the minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences years in advance. As applied to predicting sunspot minimum for cycle 24, the next cycle, its minimum appears likely to occur in 2006, especially if it is a robust cycle similar in nature to cycles 17-23.

  9. Experimental Investigations of Changes in β-Decay Rate of 60Co and 137Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baurov, Yu. A.; Konradov, A. A.; Kushniruk, V. F.; Kuznetsov, E. A.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Ryabov, Yu. V.; Senkevich, A. P.; Zadorozsny, S. V.

    Results of simultaneous measurements of β-decay rate with the aid of Ge(Li)-detectors performed at two laboratories 140 km apart (INR RAS, Troitsk, 60Co, and JINR, Dubna, 137Cs) from 15 March 2000 to 10 April 2000 are presented. Regular deviations of the count rate of γ-quanta following the β-decay of ~0.7% (INR RAS, 60Co) and ~0.2% (JINR, 137Cs) from the statistical average, are observed. The analysis of extremum deviations of γ--quanta count rate shows that the set of directions of tangents to the Earth's parallels of latitude at the extremum points of trajectories of motion in the space of each laboratory clearly forms three separate compact subsets of directions which agree, for two laboratories, to an accuracy of +/-10°. This phenomenon is shown not to be explained on the basis of traditional notion. A possible explanation is suggested based on the hypothesis that there exists a new anisotropic interaction caused by the cosmological vectorial potential Ag, a new fundamental constant having, according to the experiments carried out, the coordinate of right ascension α ~ 285° in the second equatorial system. This is in agreement with earlier experiments.

  10. Ex vivo radioactive counts and decay rates of tissues resected during radioguided parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jordan; Repplinger, Dan; Bianco, Jesus; Chen, Herbert

    2006-12-01

    Radioguided parathyroidectomy using TC-99m-sestamibi injection and the handheld gamma probe allows more precise and rapid intraoperative localization of abnormal parathyroid glands. This technique is based on the principle that hypercellular parathyroid tissues have markedly higher in vivo radiotracer counts than surrounding tissue including thyroid and lymph nodes. While in vivo radioactivity after TC-99m-sestamibi administration in various tissues has been documented, there is a lack of data regarding ex vivo radioactive properties after surgical resection. During a 6-week period in June/July 2005, 21 patients underwent radioguided parathyroidectomy by a single surgeon. Fifty-four tissue samples (39 parathyroid, 15 nonparathyroid) from these patients were collected and analyzed for ex vivo radioactive counts over a 30-min period. These data were then compared with the pathologic results. There is a significant difference in ex vivo counts between parathyroid adenomas, hyperplastic glands, and nonparathyroid tissue immediately after resection. However, radioactive decay/slope rates do not differ between the tissues. Importantly, an ex vivo count of >20% of background is 100% specific for parathyroid tissue. These differences persisted for up to 30 min. This is the first comprehensive study of ex vivo radioactive properties after TC-99m-sestamibi injection during radioguided parathyroidectomy. Parathyroids have a greater rate of uptake compared to nonparathyroid tissue, allowing ex vivo counts to predict tissue type. These tissues have similar decay rates, allowing these predictions to be made anytime up to 30 min after gland resection.

  11. Global observation of Omori-law decay in the rate of triggered earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, T.

    2001-12-01

    Triggered earthquakes can be large, damaging, and lethal as evidenced by the 1999 shocks in Turkey and the 2001 events in El Salvador. In this study, earthquakes with M greater than 7.0 from the Harvard CMT catalog are modeled as dislocations to calculate shear stress changes on subsequent earthquake rupture planes near enough to be affected. About 61% of earthquakes that occurred near the main shocks are associated with calculated shear stress increases, while ~39% are associated with shear stress decreases. If earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases are interpreted as triggered, then such events make up at least 8% of the CMT catalog. Globally, triggered earthquakes obey an Omori-law rate decay that lasts between ~7-11 years after the main shock. Earthquakes associated with calculated shear stress increases occur at higher rates than background up to 240 km away from the main-shock centroid. Earthquakes triggered by smaller quakes (foreshocks) also obey Omori's law, which is one of the few time-predictable patterns evident in the global occurrence of earthquakes. These observations indicate that earthquake probability calculations which include interactions from previous shocks should incorporate a transient Omori-law decay with time. In addition, a very simple model using the observed global rate change with time and spatial distribution of triggered earthquakes can be applied to immediately assess the likelihood of triggered earthquakes following large events, and can be in place until more sophisticated analyses are conducted.

  12. Thermal decay analysis of fiber Bragg gratings at different temperature annealing rates using demarcation energy approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardena, Dinusha Serandi; Lai, Man-Hong; Lim, Kok-Sing; Ahmad, Harith

    2017-03-01

    In this study the thermal degradation of gratings inscribed in three types of fiber namely, PS 1250/1500, SM 1500 and zero water peak single mode fiber is demonstrated. A comparative investigation is carried out on the aging characteristics of the gratings at three different temperature ramping rates of 3 °C/min, 6 °C/min and 9 °C/min. During the thermal annealing treatment, a significant enhancement in the grating reflectivity is observed for PS 1250/1500 fiber from ∼1.2 eV until 1.4 eV which indicates a thermal induced reversible effect. Higher temperature ramping rates lead to a higher regeneration temperature. In addition, the investigation also reflects that regardless of the temperature ramping rate the thermal decay behavior of a specific fiber can be successfully characterized when represented in a demarcation energy domain. Moreover, this technique can be accommodated when predicting the thermal decay characteristics of a specific fiber.

  13. Protecting wood fences for yard and garden

    Treesearch

    R. C. De Groot; W. C. Feist; W. E. Eslyn; L. R. Gjovik

    For maximum protection against wood decay and termites, use posts that have an in-depth preservative treatment, preferably a pressure treatment for below ground use. When selecting posts of naturally decay-resistant woods, choose posts with mostly heartwood. Horizontal rails require more protection from decay than do vertical boards. In regions of high and moderate...

  14. Additional experimental evidence for a solar influence on nuclear decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jere H.; Herminghuysen, Kevin R.; Blue, Thomas E.; Fischbach, Ephraim; Javorsek, Daniel; Kauffman, Andrew C.; Mundy, Daniel W.; Sturrock, Peter A.; Talnagi, Joseph W.

    2012-09-01

    Additional experimental evidence is presented in support of the recent hypothesis that a possible solar influence could explain fluctuations observed in the measured decay rates of some isotopes. These data were obtained during routine weekly calibrations of an instrument used for radiological safety at The Ohio State University Research Reactor using 36Cl. The detector system used was based on a Geiger-Müller gas detector, which is a robust detector system with very low susceptibility to environmental changes. A clear annual variation is evident in the data, with a maximum relative count rate observed in January/February, and a minimum relative count rate observed in July/August, for seven successive years from July 2005 to June 2011. This annual variation is not likely to have arisen from changes in the detector surroundings, as we show here.

  15. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  16. Some contributions to the high strain rate deformation of solids and the thermally activated deformation of wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, W. George

    2009-08-01

    The behaviour of metals as a function of rate of loading, strain rate, and temperature is discussed in terms of previous work by the author. Strain rates range from 10-3 s-1, obtained in a standard tensile testing machine, to 102 s-1 obtained in a hydraulic piston driven machine and up to 104 s-1, very high strain rates with a Kolsky split Hopkinson bar using shear type loading. At rates less 103 s-1 the strength is a function of strain rate and temperature, is thermally activated and governed by the stress-assisted thermal activation of dislocations across short-range barriers in the crystal. At very high strain rates however the behaviour is controlled by interaction of dislocations with either phonons or electrons, giving a strength proportional to strain rate. The compressive strength of small clear samples of wood, Pinus radiata and Kahikatea, determined over the strain rate range 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1 as a function of strain rate, temperature and moisture content shows the behaviour to again be thermally activated with the strength a function of stain rate, temperature and moisture content. A rate theory of deformation is developed where the yield behaviour of wood is assumed to result from the stress-assisted thermally activated motion of elementary fibrils over short-range barriers. The moisture is assumed to affect the bond energy between elementary fibrils and the barrier energy is taken to be a linear decreasing function of increasing moisture content and the moisture to act like a plasticiser in separating the elementary fibrils. The theory more than adequately explains the observed behaviour.

  17. Viral decay and viral production rates in continental-shelf and deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Magagnini, Mirko; Danovaro, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Here, for the first time, we have carried out synoptic measurements of viral production and decay rates in continental-shelf and deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea to explore the viral balance. The net viral production and decay rates (1.1-61.2 and 0.6-13.5 x 10(7) viruses g(-1) h(-1), respectively) were significantly correlated, and were also related to prokaryotic heterotrophic production. The addition of enzymes increased the decay rates in the surface sediments, but not in the subsurface sediments. Both the viral production and the decay rates decreased significantly in the deeper sediment layers, while the virus-to-prokaryote abundance ratio increased, suggesting a high preservation of viruses in the subsurface sediments. Viral decay did not balance viral production at any of the sites investigated, accounting on average for c. 32% of the gross viral production in the marine sediments. We estimate that the carbon (C) released by viral decay contributed 6-23% to the total C released by the viral shunt. Because only c. 2% of the viruses produced can infect other prokaryotes, the majority is not subjected to direct lysis and potentially remains as a food source for benthic consumers. The results reported here suggest that viral decay can play an important role in biogeochemical cycles and benthic trophodynamics.

  18. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus.

  19. Isolation of Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. strains from decaying woods and characterization of their potential for cellulose deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Silvina; Lorenzo, Gonzalo Sabarís Di; Lia, Verónica; Talia, Paola; Cataldi, Angel; Grasso, Daniel; Campos, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Prospection of cellulose-degrading bacteria in natural environments allows the identification of novel cellulases and hemicellulases that could be useful in second-generation bioethanol production. In this work, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from decaying native forest soils by enrichment on cellulose as sole carbon source. There was a predominance of Gram positive isolates that belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Many primary isolates with cellulolytic activity were not pure cultures. From these consortia, isolation of pure constituents was attempted in order to test the hypothesis whether microbial consortia are needed for full degradation of complex substrates. Two isolates, CB1-2-A-5 and VG-4-A-2, were obtained as the pure constituents of CB1-2 and VG-4 consortia, respectively. Based on 16S RNA sequence, they could be classified as Variovorax paradoxus and Paenibacillus alvei. Noteworthy, only VG-4 consortium showed measurable xylan degrading capacity and signs of filter paper degradation. However, no xylan or filter paper degrading capacities were observed for the pure cultures isolated from it, suggesting that other members of this consortium were necessary for these hydrolyzing activities. Our results indicated that Paenibacillus sp. and Variovorax sp. as well as VG-4 consortium, might be a useful source of hydrolytic enzymes. Moreover, although Variovorax sp. had been previously identified in metagenomic studies of cellulolytic communities, this is the first report on the isolation and characterization of this microorganism as a cellulolytic genus. PMID:23301200

  20. Flavobacterium akiainvivens sp. nov., from decaying wood of Wikstroemia oahuensis, Hawai'i, and emended description of the genus Flavobacterium.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Iris; Saw, Jimmy; Kapan, Durrell D; Christensen, Stephanie; Kaneshiro, Kenneth Y; Donachie, Stuart P

    2013-09-01

    Strain IK-1(T) was isolated from decaying tissues of the shrub Wikstroemia oahuensis collected on O'ahu, Hawai'i. Cells were rods that stained Gram-negative. Gliding motility was not observed. The strain was oxidase-negative and catalase-positive. Zeaxanthin was the major carotenoid. Flexirubin-type pigments were not detected. The most abundant fatty acids in whole cells of IK-1(T) grown on R2A were iso-C(15:0) and one or both of C(16:1)ω7c and C(16:1)ω6c. Based on comparisons of the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene, the closest neighbouring type strains were Flavobacterium rivuli WB 3.3-2(T) and Flavobacterium subsaxonicum WB 4.1-42(T), with which IK-1(T) shares 93.84 and 93.67% identity, respectively. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.2 mol%. On the basis of distance from its nearest phylogenetic neighbours and phenotypic differences, the species Flavobacterium akiainvivens sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strain IK-1(T) ( =ATCC BAA-2412(T) =CIP 110358(T)) as the type strain. The description of the genus Flavobacterium is emended to reflect the DNA G+C contents of Flavobacterium akiainvivens IK-1(T) and other species of the genus Flavobacterium described since the original description of the genus.

  1. Search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay rate in D0-->Kpi decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dorsten, M P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Ernst, J A; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Lodovico, F Di; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-10-24

    We present results of a search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of R(D), the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays to Cabibbo-favored decays, using D0-->K+pi- decays from 57.1 fb(-1) of data collected near sqrt[s]=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. At the 95% confidence level, allowing for CP violation, we find the mixing parameters x('2)<0.0022 and -0.056rate R(M)<0.16%. In the limit of no mixing, R(D)=[0.357+/-0.022(stat)+/-0.027(syst)]% and the CP-violating asymmetry A(D)=0.095+/-0.061(stat)+/-0.083(syst).

  2. Search for D0-D¯0 Mixing and a Measurement of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate in D0→Kπ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Ernst, J. A.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-10-01

    We present results of a search for D0-D¯0 mixing and a measurement of RD, the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays to Cabibbo-favored decays, using D0→K+π- decays from 57.1 fb-1 of data collected near (s)=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. At the 95% confidence level, allowing for CP violation, we find the mixing parameters x'2<0.0022 and -0.056rate RM<0.16%. In the limit of no mixing, RD=[0.357±0.022(stat)±0.027(syst)]% and the CP-violating asymmetry AD=0.095±0.061(stat)±0.083(syst).

  3. Genome, transcriptome, and secretome analysis of wood decay fungus postia placenta supports unique mechanisms of lignocellulose conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Diego; Challacombe, Jean F; Misra, Monica; Xie, Gary; Brettin, Thomas; Morgenstern, Ingo; Hibbett, David; Schmoll, Monika; Kubicek, Christian P; Ferreira, Patricia; Ruiz - Duenase, Francisco J; Martinez, Angel T; Kersten, Phil; Hammel, Kenneth E; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber; Gaskell, Jill; Lindquist, Erika; Sabati, Grzegorz; Bondurant, Sandra S; Larrondo, Luis F; Canessa, Paulo; Vicunna, Rafael; Yadavk, Jagiit; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Subramaniank, Venkataramanan; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Lavin, Jose L; Oguiza, Jose A; Master, Emma; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Harris, Paul; Magnuson, Jon K; Baker, Scott; Bruno, Kenneth; Kenealy, William; Hoegger, Patrik J; Kues, Ursula; Ramaiva, Preethi; Lucas, Susan; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Tuh, Hank; Chee, Christine L; Teter, Sarah; Yaver, Debbie; James, Tim; Mokrejs, Martin; Pospisek, Martin; Grigoriev, Igor; Rokhsar, Dan; Berka, Randy; Cullen, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Brown-rot fungi such as Postia placenta are common inhabitants of forest ecosystems and are also largely responsible for the destructive decay of wooden structures. Rapid depolymerization of cellulose is a distinguishing feature of brown-rot, but the biochemical mechanisms and underlying genetics are poorly understood. Systematic examination of the P. placenta genome, transcriptome and secretome revealed unique extracellular enzyme systems, including an unusual repertoire of extracellular glycoside hydrolases. Genes encoding exocellobiohydrolases and cellulose-binding domains, typical of cellulolytic microbes, are absent in this efficient cellulose-degrading fungus. When P. placenta was grown in medium containing cellulose as sole carbon source, transcripts corresponding to many hemicellulases and to a single putative {beta}-1-4 endoglucanase were expressed at high levels relative to glucose grown cultures. These transcript profiles were confirmed by direct identification of peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC{center_dot}MSIMS). Also upregulated during growth on cellulose medium were putative iron reductases, quinone reductase, and structurally divergent oxidases potentially involved in extracellular generation of Fe(II) and H202. These observations are consistent with a biodegradative role for Fenton chemistry in which Fe(II) and H202 react to form hydroxyl radicals, highly reactive oxidants capable of depolymerizing cellulose. The P. placenta genome resources provide unparalleled opportunities for investigating such unusual mechanisms of cellulose conversion. More broadly, the genome offers insight into the diversification of lignocellulose degrading mechanisms in fungi. Comparisons to the closely related white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium support an evolutionary shift from white-rot to brown-rot during which the capacity for efficient depolymerization of lignin was lost.

  4. No evidence for a decrease of nuclear decay rates with increasing heliocentric distance based on radiochronology of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Wieler, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    It has been argued that the decay rates of several radioactive nuclides are slightly lower at Earth's aphelion than at perihelion, and that this effect might depend on heliocentric distance. It might then be expected that nuclear decay rates be considerably lower at larger distances from the sun, e.g., in the asteroid belt at 2-3 AU from where most meteorites originate. If so, ages of meteorites obtained by analyses of radioactive nuclides and their stable daughter isotopes might be in error, since these ages are based on decay rates determined on Earth. Here we evaluate whether the large data base on nuclear cosmochronology offers any hint for discrepancies which might be due to radially variable decay rates. Chlorine-36 (t1/2 = 301,000 a) is produced in meteorites by interactions with cosmic rays and is the nuclide for which a decay rate dependence from heliocentric distance has been proposed, which, in principle, can be tested with our approach and the current data base. We show that compilations of 36Cl concentrations measured in meteorites offer no support for a spatially variable 36Cl decay rate. For very short-lived cosmic-ray produced radionuclides (half-lives < 10-100 days), the concentration should be different for meteorites hitting the Earth on the incoming vs. outgoing part of their orbit. However, the current data base of very short-lived radionuclides in freshly fallen meteorites is far from sufficient to deduce solid constraints. Constraints on the age of the Earth and the oldest meteorite phases obtained by the U-Pb dating technique give no hints for radially variable decay rates of the α-decaying nuclides 235U or 238U. Similarly, some of the oldest phases in meteorites have U-Pb ages whose differences agree almost perfectly with respective age differences obtained with "short-lived" radionuclides present in the early solar system, again indicating no variability of uranium decay rates in different meteorite parent bodies in the asteroid belt

  5. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fussell, D.P.; McPhedran, R.C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment - the 2D LDOS in a finite PC - with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  6. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Fussell, D P; McPhedran, R C; Martijn de Sterke, C

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment--the 2D LDOS in a finite PC--with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  7. Size and shape dependent photoluminescence and excited state decay rates of diamondoids.

    PubMed

    Richter, Robert; Wolter, David; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Knecht, Andre; Heidrich, Christoph; Merli, Andrea; Dopfer, Otto; Reiss, Philipp; Ehresmann, Arno; Petersen, Jens; Dahl, Jeremy E; Carlson, Robert M K; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas; Mitric, Roland; Rander, Torbjörn

    2014-02-21

    We present photoluminescence spectra and excited state decay rates of a series of diamondoids, which represent molecular structural analogues to hydrogen-passivated bulk diamond. Specific isomers of the five smallest diamondoids (adamantane-pentamantane) have been brought into the gas phase and irradiated with synchrotron radiation. All investigated compounds show intrinsic photoluminescence in the ultraviolet spectral region. The emission spectra exhibit pronounced vibrational fine structure which is analyzed using quantum chemical calculations. We show that the geometrical relaxation of the first excited state of adamantane, exhibiting Rydberg character, leads to the loss of Td symmetry. The luminescence of adamantane is attributed to a transition from the delocalized first excited state into different vibrational modes of the electronic ground state. Similar geometrical changes of the excited state structure have also been identified in the other investigated diamondoids. The excited state decay rates show a clear dependence on the size of the diamondoid, but are independent of the particle geometry, further indicating a loss of particle symmetry upon electronic excitation.

  8. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussell, D. P.; McPhedran, R. C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment—the 2D LDOS in a finite PC—with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC’s. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  9. Sensitivity of β -decay rates to the radial dependence of the nucleon effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Margueron, J.; Borzov, I. N.; Van Giai, N.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of β -decay rates in 78Ni and Sn,132100 to a correction term in Skyrme energy-density functionals (EDFs) which modifies the radial shape of the nucleon effective mass. This correction is added on top of several Skyrme parametrizations which are selected from their effective mass properties and predictions about the stability properties of 132Sn . The impact of the correction on high-energy collective modes is shown to be moderate. From the comparison of the effects induced by the surface-peaked effective mass in the three doubly magic nuclei, it is found that 132Sn is largely impacted by the correction, while 78Ni and 100Sn are only moderately affected. We conclude that β -decay rates in these nuclei can be used as a test of different parts of the nuclear EDF: 78Ni and 100Sn are mostly sensitive to the particle-hole interaction through the B (GT) values, while 132Sn is sensitive to the radial shape of the effective mass. Possible improvements of these different parts could therefore be better constrained in the future.

  10. Time Modulation of the {beta}{sup +}-Decay Rate of H-Like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kryshen, E. L.; Pitschmann, M.; Kienle, P.

    2008-10-31

    Recent experimental data at GSI on the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K-shell electron capture (EC) decays of the H-like ions {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} and {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, suggest that they are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC}{approx_equal}7 sec and amplitudes a{sub EC}{approx_equal}0.20. Since it is known that these ions are unstable also under the nuclear positron ({beta}{sup +}) decays, we study a possible time dependence of the nuclear {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion. We show that the time dependence of the {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion as well as any H-like heavy ions cannot be observed.

  11. Selective Delignification of Aspen Wood Blocks In Vitro by Three White Rot Basidiomycetes †

    PubMed Central

    Otjen, Lewis; Blanchette, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Aspen wood blocks were selectively delignified in the laboratory by Ischnoderma resinosum, Poria medulla-panis, and Xylobolus frustulatus. After 8 weeks only the outer surfaces of wood blocks were selectively delignified. The percentages of weight loss obtained after 4, 8, and 12 weeks showed that decay occurred at a relatively constant rate. Selectively delignified wood could be identified by using scanning electron microscopy only when lignin had been extensively removed from cell walls. X. frustulatus was able to form pockets of delignified wood throughout blocks after 12 weeks. Images PMID:16346875

  12. Biomass and decay rates of roots and detritus in sediments of intermittent coastal plain streams

    Treesearch

    Ken M. Fritz; Jack W. Feminella; Chris Colson; B. Graeme Lockaby; Robin Governo; Robert B. Rummer

    2006-01-01

    Biomass and breakdown of tree roots within streambed sediments were compared with leaf and wood detritus in three Coastal Plain headwater intermittent streams. Three separate riparian forest treatments were applied: thinned, clearcut, and reference. Biomass of roots (live and dead) and leaf/wood was significantly higher in stream banks than in the channel and declined...

  13. Can a first-order exponential decay model fit heart rate recovery after resistance exercise?

    PubMed

    Bartels-Ferreira, Rhenan; de Sousa, Élder D; Trevizani, Gabriela A; Silva, Lilian P; Nakamura, Fábio Y; Forjaz, Cláudia L M; Lima, Jorge Roberto P; Peçanha, Tiago

    2015-03-01

    The time-constant of postexercise heart rate recovery (HRRτ ) obtained by fitting heart rate decay curve by a first-order exponential fitting has being used to assess cardiac autonomic recovery after endurance exercise. The feasibility of this model was not tested after resistance exercise (RE). The aim of this study was to test the goodness of fit of the first-order exponential decay model to fit heart rate recovery (HRR) after RE. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. The experimental sessions occurred in two separated days and consisted of performance of 1 set of 10 repetitions at 50% or 80% of the load achieved on the one-repetition maximum test [low-intensity (LI) and high-intensity (HI) sessions, respectively]. Heart rate (HR) was continuously registered before and during exercise and also for 10 min of recovery. A monoexponential equation was used to fit the HRR curve during the postexercise period using different time windows (i.e. 30, 60, 90, … 600 s). For each time window, (i) HRRτ was calculated and (ii) variation of HR explained by the model (R(2) goodness of fit index) was assessed. The HRRτ showed stabilization from 360 and 420 s on LI and HI, respectively. Acceptable R(2) values were observed from the 360 s on LI (R(2) > 0.65) and at all tested time windows on HI (R(2) > 0.75). In conclusion, this study showed that using a minimum length of monitoring (~420 s) HRR after RE can be adequately modelled by a first-order exponential fitting. © 2014 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3–4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5–6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. Key Points We report initial observations of ring current ions We show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theory We show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly PMID:26167435

  15. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-11-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3-4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5-6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. We report initial observations of ring current ionsWe show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theoryWe show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly.

  16. The minimum energy decay rate in quasi-isotropic grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    We consider high Reynolds number, freely-decaying, isotropic turbulence in which the large scales evolve in a self-similar manner when normalized by the integral scales, u and ℓ. As it is well known, a range of possible behaviors may be observed depending on the form of the longitudinal velocity correlation at large separation, uf∞=u 2f(r →∞). We consider the cases u2f∞=cmr-m,2≤m ≤6, whose spectral counterpart is E(k →0)~cmkm -1 for m <6, with or without a lnk correction, and E(k →0)~I k4 for m =6. (I is Loitsyansky's integral.) It has long been known that the cmm=constant during the decay. This, in turn, sets the energy decay rate as u2~t-(1-p)2m /(m+2), where p is the power-law exponent for the normalized dissipation rate, εℓ/εℓu3u3~t-p, observed empirically to be a small positive number in grid turbulence. We systematically explore the properties of these different classes of turbulence and arrive at the following conclusions. (i) The invariance of cm is a direct consequence of linear momentum conservation for m ≤4, and angular momentum conservation for m =5. (ii) The classical spectra of Saffman, E(k →0)~c3k2, and Batchelor, E(k →0)~Ik4, are robust in the sense that they emerge from a broad class of initial conditions. In particular, it is necessary only that <ωi ω'j >∞ ≤O(r-8) at t =0. The non-classical spectra (m =2,4,5), on the other hand, require very specific initial conditions in order to be realized, of the form <ωiω'j>∞=O(r-(m +2)). (Note the equality rather than the inequality here.) This makes the non-classical spectra less likely to be observed in practice. (iii) The case of m =2, which is usually associated with the u2~t-1 decay law, is pathological in a number of respects. For example, its spectral tensor diverges as k →0, and the long-range correlations ∞=O(r-2) are too strong to be a consequence of the Biot-Savart law. (It is the Biot-Savart law that lies behind the long-range correlations in the

  17. Comparative analysis of the secretomes of Schizophyllum commune and other wood-decay basidiomycetes during solid-state fermentation reveals its unique lignocellulose-degrading enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ning; Liu, Jiawen; Yang, Jinshui; Lin, Yujian; Yang, Yi; Ji, Lei; Li, Meng; Yuan, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    The genome of Schizophyllum commune encodes a diverse repertoire of degradative enzymes for plant cell wall breakdown. Recent comparative genomics study suggests that this wood decayer likely has a mode of biodegradation distinct from the well-established white-rot/brown-rot models. However, much about the extracellular enzyme system secreted by S. commune during lignocellulose deconstruction remains unknown and the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, extracellular proteins of S. commune colonizing Jerusalem artichoke stalk were analyzed and compared with those of two white-rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and a brown-rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum. Under solid-state fermentation (SSF) conditions, S. commune displayed considerably higher levels of hydrolytic enzyme activities in comparison with those of P. chrysosporium, C. subvermispora and G. trabeum. During biodegradation process, this fungus modified the lignin polymer in a way which was consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, similar to that of G. trabeum. The crude enzyme cocktail derived from S. commune demonstrated superior performance over a commercial enzyme preparation from Trichoderma longibrachiatum in the hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass at low enzyme loadings. Secretomic analysis revealed that compared with three other fungi, this species produced a higher diversity of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes, especially hemicellulases and pectinases acting on polysaccharide backbones and side chains, and a larger set of enzymes potentially supporting the generation of hydroxyl radicals. In addition, multiple non-hydrolytic proteins implicated in enhancing polysaccharide accessibility were identified in the S. commune secretome, including lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) and expansin-like proteins. Plant lignocellulose degradation by S. commune involves a hydroxyl radical-mediated mechanism for lignocellulose modification

  18. Tyrosyl rotamer interconversion rates and the fluorescence decays of N-acetyltyrosinamide and short tyrosyl peptides.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Jay R; Liyanage, Mangala Roshan; Johnson, Carey K

    2007-05-17

    It has long been recognized that the fluorescence lifetimes of amino acid residues such as tyrosine and tryptophan depend on the rotameric configuration of the aromatic side chain, but estimates of the rate of interchange of rotameric states have varied widely. We report measurements of the rotameric populations and interchange rates for tyrosine in N-acetyltyrosinamide (NATyrA), the tripeptide Tyr-Gly-Gly (YGG), and the pentapeptide Leu-enkephalin (YGGFL). The fluorescence lifetimes were analyzed to determine the rotameric interchange rates in the context of a model incorporating exchange among three rotameric states. Maximum entropy method analysis verified the presence of three fluorescence decay components for YGGFL and two for YGG and NATyrA. Rotameric exchange between the gauche(-) and trans states occurred on the nanosecond time scale, whereas exchange with the gauche(+) state occurred on a longer time scale. Good agreement was obtained with rotameric populations and exchange rates from molecular dynamics simulations. Quenching by iodide was used to vary the intrinsic fluorescence lifetimes, providing additional constraints on the determined interchange rates. The temperature dependence was measured to determine barriers to exchange of the two most populated rotamers of 3, 5, and 7 kcal/mol for NATyrA, YGG, and YGGFL, respectively.

  19. The use of new, aqueous chemical wood modifications to improve the durability of wood-plastic composites

    Treesearch

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons; George C. Chen

    2017-01-01

    The wood flour used in wood-plastic composites (WPCs) can biologically deteriorate and thus the overall mechanical performance of WPCs decrease when exposed to moisture and fungal decay. Protecting the wood flour by chemical modification can improve the durability of the wood in a nontoxic way so it is not harmful to the environment. WPCs were made with modified wood...

  20. Monitoring the Error Rate of Modern Methods of Construction Based on Wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švajlenka, Jozef; Kozlovská, Mária

    2017-06-01

    A range of new and innovative construction systems, currently developed, represent modern methods of construction (MMC), which has the ambition to improve the performance parameters of buildings throughout their life cycle. Regarding the implementation modern methods of construction in Slovakia, assembled buildings based on wood seem to be the most preferred construction system. In the study, presented in the paper, were searched already built and lived-in wood based family houses. The residents' attitudes to such type of buildings in the context with declared designing and qualitative parameters of efficiency and sustainability are overlooked. The methodology of the research study is based on the socio-economic survey carried out during the years 2015 - 2017 within the Slovak Republic. Due to the large extent of data collected through questionnaire, only selected parts of the survey results are evaluated and discussed in the paper. This paper is aimed at evaluating the quality of buildings expressed in a view of users of existing wooden buildings. Research indicates some defects, which can be eliminated in the next production process. Research indicates, that some defects occur, so the production process quality should be improved in the future development.

  1. Cooperative Lamb shift and the cooperative decay rate for an initially detuned phased state

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-04-15

    The cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) is hard to measure because in samples much larger than a resonant wavelength it is much smaller, for an initially prepared resonantly phased state, than the cooperative decay rate (CDR). We show, however, that if the phasing of the initial state is detuned so that the spatial wave vector is k{sub 1} congruent with k{sub 0{+-}}O((1/R)) (where k{sub 0}={omega}{sub 0}/c is the resonant frequency), the CLS grows to 'giant' magnitudes making it comparable to the CDR. Moreover, for certain controlled values of detuning, the initial CDR becomes small so that the dynamical Lamb shift (DLS) can be measured over a considerable period of time.

  2. Combined results on b-hadron production rates, lifetimes, oscillations and semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    WIllocq, stephane

    2000-08-02

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates B{sub d}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} system, and the values of the CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} are obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 99 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations.

  3. Spontaneous decay rate and Casimir-Polder potential of an atom near a lithographed surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Radiative corrections to an atom are calculated near a half-space that has arbitrarily shaped small depositions upon its surface. The method is based on calculation of the classical Green's function of the macroscopic Maxwell equations near an arbitrarily perturbed half-space using a Born-series expansion about the bare half-space Green's function. The formalism of macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is used to carry this over into the quantum picture. The broad utility of the calculated Green's function is demonstrated by using it to calculate two quantities: the spontaneous decay rate of an atom near a sharp surface feature and the Casimir-Polder potential of a finite grating deposited on a substrate. Qualitatively different behavior is found for the latter case where it is observed that the periodicity of the Casimir-Polder potential persists even outside the immediate vicinity of the grating.

  4. Oscillating decay rate in electron capture and the neutrino mass difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkin, Murray

    2015-04-01

    Reported oscillations in the rate of decay of certain ions by K -electron capture have raised questions about whether and how such oscillations can arise in quantum-mechanical theory and whether they can measure the neutrino mass difference. Here I show that simple principles of quantum mechanics answer some questions and clarify what must be performed theoretically or experimentally to answer some others. The principal result is that quantum mechanics does allow mass-difference-dependent oscillations in principle, but it imposes conditions not obeyed by the approximate dynamical models that have been put forth up to now. In particular, indirect coupling between two neutrino mass channels must be taken into account. What needs to be done experimentally and theoretically is discussed.

  5. Indoor acrolein emission and decay rates resulting from domestic cooking events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Vincent Y.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Cahill, Thomas M.

    2009-12-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is a common constituent of both indoor and outdoor air, can exacerbate asthma in children, and may contribute to other chronic lung diseases. Recent studies have found high indoor levels of acrolein and other carbonyls compared to outdoor ambient concentrations. Heated cooking oils produce considerable amounts of acrolein, thus cooking is likely an important source of indoor acrolein. A series of cooking experiments were conducted to determine the emission rates of acrolein and other volatile carbonyls for different types of cooking oils (canola, soybean, corn and olive oils) and deep-frying different food items. Similar concentrations and emission rates of carbonyls were found when different vegetable oils were used to deep-fry the same food product. The food item being deep-fried was generally not a significant source of carbonyls compared to the cooking oil. The oil cooking events resulted in high concentrations of acrolein that were in the range of 26.4-64.5 μg m -3. These concentrations exceed all the chronic regulatory exposure limits and many of the acute exposure limits. The air exchange rate and the decay rate of the carbonyls were monitored to estimate the half-life of the carbonyls. The half-life for acrolein was 14.4 ± 2.6 h, which indicates that indoor acrolein concentrations can persist for considerable time after cooking in poorly-ventilated homes.

  6. Spatio-temporal attributes of left ventricular pressure decay rate during isovolumic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Erina; Kovács, Sándor J

    2012-03-01

    Global left ventricular (LV) isovolumic relaxation rate has been characterized: 1) via the time constant of isovolumic relaxation τ or 2) via the logistic time constant τ(L). An alternate kinematic method, characterizes isovolumic relaxation (IVR) in accordance with Newton's Second Law. The model's parameters, stiffness E(k), and damping/relaxation μ result from best fit of model-predicted pressure to in vivo data. All three models (exponential, logistic, and kinematic) characterize global relaxation in terms of pressure decay rates. However, IVR is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. Apical and basal LV wall segments untwist at different times and rates, and transmural strain and strain rates differ due to the helically variable pitch of myocytes and sheets. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the exponential model (τ) or kinematic model (μ and E(k)) parameters will elucidate the spatiotemporal variation of IVR rate. Left ventricular pressures in 20 subjects were recorded using a high-fidelity, multipressure transducer (3 cm apart) catheter. Simultaneous, dual-channel pressure data was plotted in the pressure phase-plane (dP/dt vs. P) and τ, μ, and E(k) were computed in 1631 beats (average: 82 beats per subject). Tau differed significantly between the two channels (P < 0.05) in 16 of 20 subjects, whereas μ and E(k) differed significantly (P < 0.05) in all 20 subjects. These results show that quantifying the relaxation rate from data recorded at a single location has limitations. Moreover, kinematic model based analysis allows characterization of restoring (recoil) forces and resistive (crossbridge uncoupling) forces during IVR and their spatio-temporal dependence, thereby elucidating the relative roles of stiffness vs. relaxation as IVR rate determinants.

  7. Graphene plasmonics for tuning photon decay rate near metallic split-ring resonator in a multilayered substrate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongpin P; Sha, Wei E I; Jiang, Lijun; Hu, Jun

    2015-02-09

    Study of photon decay rate is essential to various optical devices, where graphene is an emerging building block due to its electrical tunability. In this paper, we study photon decay rate of a quantum emitter near a metallic split-ring resonator, which is embedded in a multilayered substrate incorporating a graphene layer. Analyzing photon decay rate in such a complex multilayered system is not only computationally challenging but also highly important to experimentally realizable devices. First, the dispersion relation of graphene plasmonics supported at a dieletric/graphene/dielectric structure is investigated systematically. Meanwhile, the dispersion relation of metallic plasmonics supported at a dielectric/metal structure is studied comparatively. According to our investigation, graphene offers several flexible tuning routes for manipulating photon decay rate, including tunable chemical potential and the emitter's position and polarization. Next, considering plasmonic waves in a graphene sheet occur in the infrared regime, we carefully design a metallic split ring resonating around the same frequency range. Consequently, this design enables a mutual interaction between graphene plasmonics and metallic plasmonics. The boundary element method with a multilayered medium Green's function is adopted in the numerical simulation. Blue-shifted and splitting resonance peaks are theoretically observed, which suggests a strong mode coupling. Moreover, the mode coupling has a switch on-off feature via electrostatically doping the graphene sheet. This work is helpful to dynamically manipulate photon decay rate in complex optical devices.

  8. Temporal dynamics of instream wood in headwater streams draining mixed Carpathian forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galia, Tomáš; Šilhán, Karel; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Tichavský, Radek; Stoffel, Markus

    2017-09-01

    Instream wood can reside in fluvial systems over varying periods depending on its geographical context, instream position, tree species, piece size, and fluvial environment. In this paper, we investigate the residence time of two typical species representing a majority of instream wood in steep headwaters of the Carpathians and located under mixed forest canopy. Residence times of individual logs were then confronted with other wood parameters (i.e., wood dimensions, mean annual increment rate, tree age, class of wood stabilisation and decay, geomorphic function of wood pieces, and the proportion of the log length within the active channel). Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) samples indicated more than two times longer mean and maximal residence times as compared to European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) based on the successful cross-dating of 127 logs. Maximum residence time in the headwaters was 128 years for P. abies and 59 years for F. sylvatica. We demonstrate that log age and log diameter played an important role in the preservation of wood in the fluvial system, especially in the case of F. sylvatica instream wood. By contrast, we did not observe any significant trends between wood residence time and total wood length. Instream wood with geomorphic functions (i.e., formation of steps and jams) did not show any differences in residence time as compared to nonfunctional wood. Nevertheless, we found shorter residence times for hillslope-stabilised pieces when compared to pieces located entirely in the channel (either unattached or stabilised by other wood or bed sediments). We also observed changes of instream wood orientation with respect to wood residence time. This suggests some movement of instream wood (i.e., its turning or short-distance transport), including pieces longer than channel width in the steep headwaters studied here (1.5 ≤ W ≤ 3.5 m), over the past few decades.

  9. Untreated and copper-treated wood soaked in sodium oxalate: effects of decay by copper-tolerant and copper-sensitive fungi

    Treesearch

    Katie M. Ohno; Grant T. Kirker; Amy B. Bishell; Carol A. Clausen

    2017-01-01

    Copper is widely used as the primary component in wood protectants because it demonstrates a broad range of biocidal properties. However, a key concern with using copper in wood preservative formulations is the possibility for brown-rot basidiomycetes to resist the toxic effect. Many brown-rot basidiomycetes have evolved mechanisms, like the production and accumulation...

  10. Influence of xylem ray integrity and degree of polymerization on bending strength of beech wood decayed by Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor

    Treesearch

    Ehsan Bari; Reza Oladi; Olaf Schmidt; Carol A. Clausen; Katie Ohno; Darrel D. Nicholas; Mehrdad Ghodskhah Daryaei; Maryam Karim

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this research was to evaluate the influence of xylem ray (XR) and degree of polymerization (DP) of holocellulose in Oriental beech wood (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) on impact bending strength against two white-rot fungi. Beech wood specimens, exposed to Pleurotus ostreatus and Trametes versicolor, were evaluated for...

  11. Pressure Decay Testing Methodology for Quantifying Leak Rates of Full-Scale Docking System Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Penney, Nicholas; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. This system, called the Low Impact Docking System, is a mechanism designed to connect the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to the International Space Station, the lunar lander (Altair), and other future Constellation Project vehicles. NASA Glenn Research Center is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this docking system. This seal will be relatively large with an outside diameter in the range of 54 to 58 in. (137 to 147 cm). As part of this effort, a new test apparatus has been designed, fabricated, and installed to measure leak rates of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Using this test apparatus, a pressure decay testing and data processing methodology has been developed to quantify full-scale seal leak rates. Tests performed on untreated 54 in. diameter seals at room temperature in a fully compressed state resulted in leak rates lower than the requirement of less than 0.0025 lbm, air per day (0.0011 kg/day).

  12. Deprotonation yields, pKa, and aci-nitro decay rates in some substituted o-nitrobenzaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we report the deprotonation yields, the pKa, and decay kinetics of the aci-nitro intermediates of some substituted 2-nitrobenzaldehydes that can be used as photoactivatable caged proton compounds. The decay of the aci-nitro absorbance for 2-nitrobenzaldehyde occurs within a few nanoseconds from photoexcitation. Addition of electron donating methoxy substituents at positions 4 and 5 leads to lower deprotonation yields, higher pKa, and slower decays of the aci-nitro intermediates. On the contrary, the decay rate is accelerated by the introduction of an electron-withdrawing Cl atom at position 4 in the phenyl ring, with little influence on the deprotonation yield and pKa of the aci-nitro intermediate.

  13. Can we relate respiration rates of bark and wood with tissue nitrogen concentrations and branch-level CO2 fluxes across woody species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, A. S.; Wright, I.; Cernusak, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Respiration from above-ground woody tissue is generally responsible for 5-15% of ecosystem respiration (~ 30% of total above-ground respiration). The CO2 respired by branches comes from both the sapwood and the living layers within the bark, but because there is considerable movement of respired CO2 within woody tissues (e.g. in the transpiration stream), and because the bark can present a considerable barrier to CO2 diffusion, it can be difficult to interpret measured CO2 efflux from intact branches in relation to the respiration rates of the component tissues, and to relative mass allocation to each. In this study we investigated these issues in 15 evergreen tree and shrub species native to the Sydney area in eastern Australia. We measured CO2 efflux and light-dependent refixation of respired CO2 in photosynthetic bark from the exterior surfaces of branches (0.5-1.5 cm in diameter), and measured the tissue-specific respiration rates of the bark and wood from those same branches. We also measured the nitrogen content and tissue density of the wood and bark to determine: 1) Among species, what is the relationship between %N and tissue respiration? 2) How is photosynthetic refixation of CO2 related to respiration and %N in the bark and underlying wood? and 3) What is the relationship between branch CO2 efflux and the respiration rates of the underlying wood and bark that make up the branch? Across the 15 species %N was a better predictor of respiration in wood than in bark. CO2 efflux measured from the exterior of the stem in the dark was positively correlated with photosynthetic refixation and explained ~40% of the variation in rates of refixation. Refixation rates were not strongly related to bark or wood %N. Differences among species in CO2 efflux rates were not well explained by differences in bark or wood %N and there was a stronger relationship between bark respiration and CO2 efflux than between wood respiration and CO2 efflux. These results suggest that the

  14. Coupled-Channels Study of α-DECAY Rates for Deformed Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    The generalized density-dependent cluster model is devoted to calculate α-decay half-lives of spherical and deformed nuclei. The multi-channel cluster model is developed to describe the α-decay fine structure in heavy deformed nuclei, including half-lives and branching ratios. After a brief review of these two models, special cases of the α-decay fine structure are presented. Calculations are separately performed using the coupled-channels and WKB approaches.

  15. Anomalous effects of radioactive decay rates and capacitance values measured inside a modified Faraday cage: Correlations with space weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholkmann, F.; Milián-Sánchez, V.; Mocholí-Salcedo, A.; Milián, C.; Kolombet, V. A.; Verdú, G.

    2017-03-01

    Recently we reported (Milián-Sánchez V. et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A, 828 (2016) 210) our experimental results involving 226Ra decay rate and capacitance measurements inside a modified Faraday cage. Our measurements exhibited anomalous effects of unknown origin. In this letter we report new results regarding our investigation into the origins of the observed effects. We report preliminary findings of a correlation analysis between the radioactive decay rates and capacitance time series and space weather related variables (geomagnetic field disturbances and cosmic-ray neutron counts). A significant correlation was observed for specific data sets. The results are presented and possible implications for future work discussed.

  16. Energy-level shifts and the decay rate of an atom in the presence of a conducting wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Zahra; Kheirandish, Fardin

    2015-12-01

    In the present article explicit expressions for the decay rate and energy-level shifts of an atom in the presence of an ideal conducting wedge, two parallel plates, and a half sheet are obtained in the framework of the canonical quantization approach. The angular and radial dependences of the decay rate for different atomic polarizations of an excited atom and also of the energy-level shifts are depicted and discussed. The consistency of the present approach in some limiting cases is investigated by comparing the relevant results obtained here to the previously reported results.

  17. SU(3) flavor symmetry and CP violating rate differences for charmless B{yields}PV decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang; Shi, Jian-Qing

    2000-08-01

    We derive several relations between CP violating rate differences {delta}(B{yields}PV)={gamma}(B{yields}PV)-{gamma}(B(bar sign){yields}P(bar sign)V(bar sign)) for charmless B{yields}PV decays in the standard model using SU(3) flavor symmetry. It is found that although the relations between branching ratios of {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=-1 processes are complicated, there are simple relations independent of hadronic models between some of the {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=-1 rate differences due to the unitarity property of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, such as {delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup +}{rho}{sup -})=-{delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup +}K{sup *-}), {delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup -}{rho}{sup +})=-{delta}(B{yields}K{sup -}{rho}{sup +}). SU(3) breaking effects are also estimated using the factorization approximation. These relations can be tested at B factories in the near future. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. The effect of temperature and heating rate on char properties obtained from solar pyrolysis of beech wood.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kuo; Minh, Doan Pham; Gauthier, Daniel; Weiss-Hortala, Elsa; Nzihou, Ange; Flamant, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Char samples were produced from pyrolysis in a lab-scale solar reactor. The pyrolysis of beech wood was carried out at temperatures ranging from 600 to 2000°C, with heating rates from 5 to 450°C/s. CHNS, scanning electron microscopy analysis, X-ray diffractometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption were employed to investigate the effect of temperature and heating rate on char composition and structure. The results indicated that char structure was more and more ordered with temperature increase and heating rate decrease (higher than 50°C/s). The surface area and pore volume firstly increased with temperature and reached maximum at 1200°C then reduced significantly at 2000°C. Besides, they firstly increased with heating rate and then decreased slightly at heating rate of 450°C/s when final temperature was no lower than 1200°C. Char reactivity measured by TGA analysis was found to correlate with the evolution of char surface area and pore volume with temperature and heating rate.

  19. Antifungal susceptibility of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii isolates from decayed wood of trunk hollows of Ficus religiosa and Syzygium cumini trees in north-western India.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zia U; Randhawa, Harbans S; Kowshik, Tusharantak; Chowdhary, Anuradha; Chandy, Rachel

    2007-08-01

    We present antifungal susceptibility data on environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans (serotype A, n=117) and Cryptococcus gattii (serotype B, n=65) cultured from decayed wood of trunk hollows of Ficus religiosa and Syzygium cumini trees. Susceptibilities to amphotericin B, fluconazole, ketoconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole were determined by using Etest. The MICs were read after 48 h as per the guidelines provided by the manufacturer. The MIC90s and susceptibility ranges for C. neoformans isolates were as follows: 0.094 (0.004-0.25) mg/L for amphotericin B, 4 (0.032-12) mg/L for fluconazole, 0.094 (0.004-0.75) mg/L for itraconazole, 0.064 (0.002-0.19) mg/L for ketoconazole, and 0.047 (0.006-0.125) mg/L for voriconazole, whereas for C. gattii isolates these were 0.125 (0.023-0.5) mg/L for amphotericin B, 8 (0.032-16) mg/L for fluconazole, 0.75 (0.006-2) mg/L for itraconazole, 0.125 (0.003-0.19) mg/L for ketoconazole, and 0.094 (0.004-0.125) mg/L for voriconazole. A comparison of the geometric means of MICs (mg/L) revealed that C. gattii was less susceptible than C. neoformans to amphotericin B (0.075 versus 0.051, P=0.0003), fluconazole (2.912 versus 2.316, P=0.003), itraconazole (0.198 versus 0.0344, P<0.0001), ketoconazole (0.072 versus 0.037, P<0.0001), and voriconazole (0.045 versus 0.023, P<0.0001). The antifungal susceptibility data obtained in this study indicate that the occurrence of primary resistance among environmental isolates of C. neoformans serotype A and C. gattii serotype B is rare, and serotype B isolates are less susceptible than serotype A isolates.

  20. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  1. Diurnal changes in embolism rate in nine dry forest trees: relationships with species-specific xylem vulnerability, hydraulic strategy and wood traits.

    PubMed

    Trifilò, Patrizia; Nardini, Andrea; Lo Gullo, Maria A; Barbera, Piera M; Savi, Tadeja; Raimondo, Fabio

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have reported correlations between stem sapwood capacitance (C(wood)) and xylem vulnerability to embolism, but it is unclear how C(wood) relates to the eventual ability of plants to reverse embolism. We investigated possible functional links between embolism reversal efficiency, C(wood), wood density (WD), vulnerability to xylem embolism and hydraulic safety margins in nine woody species native to dry sclerophyllous forests with different degrees of iso versus anisohydry. Substantial inter-specific differences in terms of seasonal/diurnal changes of xylem and leaf water potential, maximum diurnal values of transpiration rate and xylem vulnerability to embolism formation were recorded. Significant diurnal changes in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC) were recorded for five species. Significant correlations were recorded between diurnal PLC changes and P50 and P88 values (i.e., xylem pressure inducing 50 and 88% PLC, respectively) as well as between diurnal PLC changes and safety margins referenced to P50 and P88. WD was linearly correlated with minimum diurnal leaf water potential, diurnal PLC changes and wood capacitance across all species. In contrast, significant relationships between P50, safety margin values referenced to P50 and WD were recorded only for the isohydric species. Functional links between diurnal changes in PLC, hydraulic strategies and WD and C(wood) are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Relaxation of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3: Solvent effects and decay rates using classical nonequilibrium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Sai G.; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2006-12-01

    This article addresses two questions regarding the decay of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3. The first is whether the initial steps of the relaxation primarily involve energy redistribution within the excited molecule alone. Gas phase quantum mechanical and classical calculations are performed to examine the role of the solvent in this process. At the fundamental excitation level, it is found that CH stretch decay is, in fact, strongly solvent driven. The second question is on the applicability of a fully classical approach to the calculation of CH stretch condensed phase decay rates. To this end, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed. The results are compared with quantum mechanical rates computed previously. The two methods are found to be in fair agreement with each other. However, care must be exercised in the interpretation of the classical results.

  3. A Correlation Between Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Swift UVOT GRB Optical/UV Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oates, S. R.; Page, M. J.; De Pasquale, M.; Schady, P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Holland, S. T.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Marshall, F. E.

    2012-01-01

    We examine a sample of 48 Swift/UVOT long Gamma-ray Burst light curves and find a correlation between the logarithmic luminosity at 200s and average decay rate determined from 200s onwards, with a Spearman rank coefficient of -0.58 at a significance of 99.998% (4.2 sigma ). We discuss the causes of the log L200s - alpha (greater than) 200s correlation, finding it to be an intrinsic property of long GRBs, and not resulting from the selection criteria. We find two ways to produce the correlation. One possibility is that there is some property of the central engine, outflow or external medium that affects the rate of energy release so that the bright afterglows release their energy more quickly and decay faster than the fainter afterglows. Alternatively, the correlation may be produced by variation of the observers viewing angle, with observers at large viewing angles observing fainter and slower decaying light curves.

  4. Experimental investigation of effect of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between a lift jet and an aircraft wing for a jet VTOL aircraft was performed for the simplified model of an unheated, subsonic, circular jet exiting at right angles to a flat plate into a uniform subsonic crosswind. The effects of jet dynamic pressure decay rate upon the jet location and jet induced pressure distribution on the plate were studied over a range of jet to crossflow velocity ratios of 2.2 or = R or = 10. Jet decay rate was varied through use of cylindrical centerbodies with flat or hemispherical tips submerged in the jet nozzle at various depths below the jet exit plane. Quicker jet dynamic pressure decay, caused by the presence of a centerbody, resulted in reductions in the jet induced lift loss by as much as 45 percent relative to values for jets with no centerbody. These reductions in lift loss were observed at the larger values of crossflow velocity.

  5. Wood and Wood Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Raymond A.

    Wood has been utilized by humans since antiquity. Trees provided a source of many products required by early humans such as food, medicine, fuel, and tools. For example, the bark of the willow tree, when chewed, was used as a painkiller in early Greece and was the precursor of the present-day aspirin. Wood served as the primary fuel in the United States until about the turn of the 19th century, and even today over one-half of the wood now harvested in the world is used for heating fuel.

  6. Changes in mass and nutrient content of wood during decomposition in a south Florida mangrove forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romero, L.M.; Smith, T. J.; Fourqurean, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    1 Large pools of dead wood in mangrove forests following disturbances such as hurricanes may influence nutrient fluxes. We hypothesized that decomposition of wood of mangroves from Florida, USA (Avicennia germinans, Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle), and the consequent nutrient dynamics, would depend on species, location in the forest relative to freshwater and marine influences and whether the wood was standing, lying on the sediment surface or buried. 2 Wood disks (8-10 cm diameter, 1 cm thick) from each species were set to decompose at sites along the Shark River, either buried in the sediment, on the soil surface or in the air (above both the soil surface and high tide elevation). 3 A simple exponential model described the decay of wood in the air, and neither species nor site had any effect on the decay coefficient during the first 13 months of decomposition. 4 Over 28 months of decomposition, buried and surface disks decomposed following a two-component model, with labile and refractory components. Avicennia germinans had the largest labile component (18 ?? 2% of dry weight), while Laguncularia racemosa had the lowest (10 ?? 2%). Labile components decayed at rates of 0.37-23.71% month -1, while refractory components decayed at rates of 0.001-0.033% month-1. Disks decomposing on the soil surface had higher decay rates than buried disks, but both were higher than disks in the air. All species had similar decay rates of the labile and refractory components, but A. germinans exhibited faster overall decay because of a higher proportion of labile components. 5 Nitrogen content generally increased in buried and surface disks, but there was little change in N content of disks in the air over the 2-year study. Between 17% and 68% of total phosphorus in wood leached out during the first 2 months of decomposition, with buried disks having the greater losses, P remaining constant or increasing slightly thereafter. 6 Newly deposited wood from living trees was

  7. Bioremediation of treated wood with fungi

    Treesearch

    Barbara L. Illman; Vina W. Yang

    2006-01-01

    The authors have developed technologies for fungal bioremediation of waste wood treated with oilborne or metal-based preservatives. The technologies are based on specially formulated inoculum of wood-decay fungi, obtained through strain selection to obtain preservative-tolerant fungi. This waste management approach provides a product with reduced wood volume and the...

  8. Using the Inflection Points and Rates of Growth and Decay to Predict Levels of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The ascending and descending inflection points and rates of growth and decay at specific times during the sunspot cycle are examined as predictors for future activity. On average, the ascending inflection point occurs about 1-2 yr after sunspot minimum amplitude (Rm) and the descending inflection point occurs about 6-7 yr after Rm. The ascending inflection point and the inferred slope (including the 12-mo moving average (12-mma) of (Delta)R (the month-to-month change in the smoothed monthly mean sunspot number (R)) at the ascending inflection point provide strong indications as to the expected size of the ongoing cycle s sunspot maximum amplitude (RM), while the descending inflection point appears to provide an indication as to the expected length of the ongoing cycle. The value of the 12-mma of (Delta)R at elapsed time T = 27 mo past the epoch of RM (E(RM)) seems to provide a strong indication as to the expected size of Rm for the following cycle. The expected Rm for cycle 24 is 7.6 +/- 4.4 (the 90-percent prediction interval), occurring before September 2008. Evidence is also presented for secular rises in selected cycle-related parameters and for preferential grouping of sunspot cycles by amplitude and/or period.

  9. Precision measurement of the decay rate of the negative positronium ion Ps{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Ceeh, Hubert; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Schreckenbach, Klaus; Gaertner, Stefan A.; Thirolf, Peter G.; Fleischer, Frank; Schwalm, Dirk

    2011-12-15

    The negative positronium ion Ps{sup -} is a bound system consisting of two electrons and a positron. Its three constituents are pointlike leptonic particles of equal mass, which are subject only to the electroweak and gravitational force. Hence, Ps{sup -} is an ideal object in which to study the quantum mechanics of a three-body system. The ground state of Ps{sup -} is stable against dissociation but unstable against annihilation into photons. We report here on a precise measurement of the Ps{sup -} ground-state decay rate {Gamma}, which was carried out at the high-intensity NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh (NEPOMUC) at the research reactor FRM II in Garching. A value of {Gamma}=2.0875(50) ns{sup -1} was obtained, which is three times more precise than previous experiments and in agreement with most recent theoretical predictions. The achieved experimental precision is at the level of the leading corrections in the theoretical predictions.

  10. Probing Anderson localization of light via decay rate statistics in aperiodic Vogel spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofi, Aristi; Pinheiro, Felipe A.; Dal Negro, Luca

    We systematically investigate the spectral properties of different types of two-dimensional aperiodic Vogel spiral arrays of pointlike scatterers and three-dimensional metamaterials with Vogel spiral chirality using rigorous Green's function spectral method. We considered an efficient T-matrix approach to analyze multiple-scattering effects, including all scattering orders, and to understand localization properties through the statistics of the Green's matrix eigenvalues. The knowledge of the spectrum of the Green matrix of multi-particle scattering systems provides important information on the character of light propagation and localization in chiral media with deterministic aperiodic geometry. In particular, we analyze for the first time the statistics of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Green matrix and extract the decay rates of the eigenmodes, their inverse participation ratio (IPR), the Wigner delay times and their quality factors. We emphasize the unique properties of aperiodic Vogel spirals with respect to random scattering media, which have been investigated so far. This work was supported by the Army Research Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement Number W911NF-12-2-0023.

  11. Decay rates of a molecule in the vicinity of a spherical surface of an isotropic magnetodielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. Y.; Leung, P. T.; Tsai, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive study is presented on the decay rates of excited molecules in the vicinity of a magnetodielectric material of spherical geometry via electrodynamic modeling. Both the models based on a driven-damped harmonic oscillator and on energy transfers will be applied so that the total decay rates can be rigorously decomposed into the radiative and the nonradiative rates. Clarifications of the equivalence of these two models for arbitrary geometry will be provided. Different possible orientations and locations of the molecule are studied with the molecule being placed near a spherical particle or a cavity. Among other results, TE modes are observed which can be manifested via nonradiative transfer from a tangential dipole within a small range of dissipation parameters set for the spherical particle. In addition, spectral analysis shows that decay rates at such a particle with small absorption are largely dominated by radiative transfer except at multipolar resonances when nonradiative transfer becomes prominent, and relatively unmodified decay is possible when negative refraction takes place.

  12. Determination of plate wave velocities and diffuse field decay rates with braod-band acousto-ultrasonic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Lowest symmetric and lowest antisymmetric plate wave modes were excited and identified in broad-band acousto-ultrasonic (AU) signals collected from various high temperature composite materials. Group velocities have been determined for these nearly nondispersive modes. An algorithm has been developed and applied to determine phase velocities and hence dispersion curves for the frequency ranges of the broad-band pulses. It is demonstrated that these data are sensitive to changes in the various stiffness moduli of the materials, in agreement by analogy, with the theoretical and experimental results of Tang and Henneke on fiber reinforced polymers. Diffuse field decay rates have been determined in the same specimen geometries and AU configuration as for the plate wave measurements. These decay rates are of value in assessing degradation such as matrix cracking in ceramic matrix composites. In addition, we verify that diffuse field decay rates respond to fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and density in ceramic matrix composites. This work shows that velocity/stiffness and decay rate measurements can be obtained in the same set of AU experiments for characterizing materials and in specimens with geometries useful for mechanical measurements.

  13. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caufield

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture”. Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  14. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture.” Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  15. Exact evaluation of the rates of electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    Electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir and ion sound waves (L→L′+S) and scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions (L+i→L′+i′, also called “nonlinear Landau damping”) are important nonlinear weak-turbulence processes. The rates for these processes depend on the quadratic longitudinal response function α{sup (2)} (or, equivalently, the quadratic longitudinal susceptibility χ{sup (2)}), which describes the second-order response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. Previous calculations of these rates for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma have relied upon an approximate form for α{sup (2)} that is valid where two of the wave fields are fast (i.e., v{sub φ}=ω/k≫V{sub e} where ω is the angular frequency, k is the wavenumber, and V{sub e} is the electron thermal speed) and one is slow (v{sub φ}≪V{sub e}). Recently, an exact expression was derived for α{sup (2)} that is valid for any phase speeds of the three waves in an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma. Here, this exact α{sup (2)} is applied to the calculation of the three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions, and the resulting exact rates are compared with the approximate rates. The calculations are performed using previously derived three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay given in terms of a general α{sup (2)}, and newly derived three-dimensional rates for scattering off thermal ions; the scattering rate is derived assuming a Maxwellian ion distribution, and both rates are derived assuming arc distributions for the wave spectra. For most space plasma conditions, the approximate rate is found to be accurate to better than 20%; however, for sufficiently low Langmuir phase speeds (v{sub φ}/V{sub e}≈3) appropriate to some spatial domains of the foreshock regions of planetary bow shocks and type II solar radio bursts, the use of the exact rate may be necessary for accurate calculations. The relative rates of electrostatic decay

  16. Wood decomposition of Cyrilla racemiflora in a tropical montane forest.

    Treesearch

    Juan A. Torres

    1994-01-01

    Changes in wood density, nutrient content, and invertebrate populations throughout the decay of Cyrilla racemiflora (Cyrillaceaea) were compared with those observed in temperate woody tree species. Wood density tended ro remain constant as decay advanced except in the late stages. Nutrients (N, P, Ca, Mg) were in highest concentrations in intact bark, surface wood, and...

  17. Mechanism of Transport Through Wood Cell Wall Polymers

    Treesearch

    Joseph E. Jakes; Nayomi Plaza; Donald S. Stone; Christopher G. Hunt; Samuel V. Glass; Samuel L. Zelinka

    2013-01-01

    The movement of chemicals through wood is necessary for decay and fastener corrosion to occur in forest products. However, the mechanism responsible for the onset of fastener corrosion and decay in wood is not known. The onset occurs before the formation of free water in wood cavities and aqueous chemical transport would be possible. Here, we propose that the onset...

  18. Tolerance of Serpula lacrymans to copper-based wood preservatives

    Treesearch

    Anne Christine Steenkjaer Hastrup; Frederick Green; Carol A. Clausen; Bo Jensen

    2005-01-01

    Serpula lacrymans, the dry rot fungus, is considered the most economically important wood decay fungus in certain temperate regions of the world, namely northern Europe, Japan, and Australia. Previously, copper-based wood preservatives were commonly used for pressure treatment of wood for building construction, but some decay fungi are known to be copper tolerant. In...

  19. Cottonwood: An American Wood

    Treesearch

    Harvey E. Kennedy

    1985-01-01

    Two species of cottonwood trees in the United States are commercially important: eastern cottonwood and black cottonwood. Eastern cottonwood is the more important of these. Wood of both species is similar in appearance and properties, being light in weight and color with a fairly straight grain and uniform texture. It is not strong and decays rapidly in damp areas or...

  20. Exact estimate of the α -decay rate and semiclassical approach in deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.

    2015-11-01

    We compare the quantum mechanical procedures to estimate the total α -decay width from deformed nuclei in the laboratory and intrinsic systems of coordinates. Our analysis shows that the total half-life estimated in the intrinsic frame by neglecting the rotational motion of the core (adiabatic approach) is one order of magnitude smaller at β2=0.3 than the corresponding value in the spherical case. A similar calculation in the laboratory system of coordinates by considering the core motion (giving the correct theoretical estimate) predicts a reduction by only a factor of 2. The widely used "angular WKB" (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) semiclassical procedure provides decay widths which are comparable to the adiabatic approach. We propose a new and very simple semiclassical "angular momentum WKB" procedure to evaluate the decay width in deformed nuclei. It provides decay widths very close to the ones obtained by the exact laboratory coupling channels procedure.