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Sample records for rats field testing

  1. Science Operations Development for Field Analogs: Lessons Learned from the 2010 Desert RATS Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, D. B.; Ming, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of hardware and operations tests carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona on the San Francisco Volcanic Field. Conducted since 1997, these activities are designed to exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable. Such activities not only test vehicle subsystems through extended rough-terrain driving, they also stress communications and operations systems and allow testing of science operations approaches to advance human and robotic surface capabilities.

  2. Estimation of the level of anxiety in rats: differences in results of open-field test, elevated plus-maze test, and Vogel's conflict test.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Nazarova, G A; Alekseeva, E V; Bashkatova, V G

    2013-07-01

    We compared individual anxiety assessed by three standard tests, open-field test, elevated plus-maze test, and Vogel conflict drinking test, in the same animals. No significant correlations between the main anxiety parameters were found in these three experimental models. Groups of animals with high and low anxiety rats were formed by a single parameter and subsequent selection of two extreme groups (10%). It was found that none of the tests could be used for reliable estimation of individual anxiety in rats. The individual anxiety level with high degree of confidence was determined in high-anxiety and low-anxiety rats demonstrating behavioral parameters above and below the mean values in all tests used. Therefore, several tests should be used for evaluation of the individual anxiety or sensitivity to emotional stress.

  3. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses: Reverberant Acoustic Testing (RAT) vs. Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    Loudspeakers have been used for acoustic qualification of spacecraft, reflectors, solar panels, and other acoustically responsive structures for more than a decade. Limited measurements from some of the recent speaker tests used to qualify flight hardware have indicated significant spatial variation of the acoustic field within the test volume. Also structural responses have been reported to differ when similar tests were performed using reverberant chambers. To address the impact of non-uniform acoustic field on structural responses, a series of acoustic tests were performed using a flat panel and a 3-ft cylinder exposed to the field controlled by speakers and repeated in a reverberant chamber. The speaker testing was performed using multi-input-single-output (MISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) control schemes with and without the test articles. In this paper the spatial variation of the acoustic field due to acoustic standing waves and their impacts on the structural responses in RAT and DFAT (both using MISO and MIMO controls for DFAT) are discussed in some detail.

  4. Ontogeny and adolescent alcohol exposure in Wistar rats: open field conflict, light/dark box and forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that heavy drinking and alcohol abuse and dependence peak during the transition between late adolescence and early adulthood. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that alcohol exposure during adolescence can cause a modification in some aspects of behavioral development, causing the "adolescent phenotype" to be retained into adulthood. However, the "adolescent phenotype" has not been studied for a number of behavioral tests. The objective of the present study was to investigate the ontogeny of behaviors over adolescence/young adulthood in the light/dark box, open field conflict and forced swim test in male Wistar rats. These data were compared to previously published data from rats that received intermittent alcohol vapor exposure during adolescence (AIE) to test whether they retained the "adolescent phenotype" in these behavioral tests. Three age groups of rats were tested (post-natal day (PD) 34-42; PD55-63; PD69-77). In the light/dark box test, younger rats escaped the light box faster than older adults, whereas AIE rats returned to the light box faster and exhibited more rears in the light than controls. In the open field conflict test, both younger and AIE rats had shorter times to first enter the center, spent more time in the center of the field, were closer to the food, and consumed more food than controls. In the forced swim test no clear developmental pattern emerged. The results of the light/dark box and the forced swim test do not support the hypothesis that adolescent ethanol vapor exposure can "lock-in" all adolescent phenotypes. However, data from the open field conflict test suggest that the adolescent and the AIE rats both engaged in more "disinhibited" and food motivated behaviors. These data suggest that, in some behavioral tests, AIE may result in a similar form of behavioral disinhibition to what is seen in adolescence.

  5. The multivariate concentric square field test reveals different behavioural profiles in male AA and ANA rats with regard to risk taking and environmental reactivity.

    PubMed

    Roman, Erika; Meyerson, Bengt J; Hyytiä, Petri; Nylander, Ingrid

    2007-11-02

    The aim of the present investigation was to compare the behavioural profiles in alcohol-preferring AA (Alko, alcohol) and alcohol-avoiding ANA (Alko, non-alcohol) rats. Twelve adult, alcohol-naïve male AA and ANA rats were tested in the recently established multivariate concentric square field (MCSF) test. The more traditional open field and elevated plus-maze tests were used as reference tests. Six weeks after the initial MCSF test, a repeated testing was used to explore differences in acquired recognition after a previous experience. The results revealed distinct differences between the two lines. The ANA rats were generally more active in the three tests. In the MCSF, parameters of risk taking and shelter seeking indicated differences between the two lines. The ANA rats had higher shelter seeking behaviour and less risk taking behaviour than the AA rats. Repeated exposure to the MCSF caused a general decrease in activity and reduction in the number of visits to the various zones, especially evident in the ANA rats. The ANA rats showed more shelter seeking than the AA rats and also more shelter seeking than in the first trial, supporting an "anxiety-like" profile in these rats. In conclusion, the parameters related to risk taking and shelter seeking revealed obvious differences between AA and ANA rats. The higher risk taking behaviour seen in the AA rats might relate to their innate propensity for high voluntary alcohol intake. The results are discussed in relation to the reported neurobiological differences and in relation to other alcohol-preferring and alcohol-avoiding rat lines.

  6. [Comparative analysis of the maternal motivation expression in WAG/Rij and Wistar rats in the place preference and open field tests].

    PubMed

    Dobriakova, Iu V; Tanaeva, K K; Dubynin, V A; Sarkisova, K Iu

    2014-01-01

    Maternal behavior in females of WAG/Rij and Wistar rats was compared in the place preference test from 2 to 8 days after delivery, as well as in the open field test from 4 to 6 days after delivery. In females of WAG/Rij rats compared with females of Wistar rats weaker expression of maternal motivation has been revealed in both tests: they spend less time in the compartment associated with pups. Moreover, in females of WAG/Rij rats, number of approaches to pups, number of pup-carryings and time spent with pups (time of contacts) were less than in females of Wistar rats. Reduced maternal motivation in females of WAG/Rij rats in the place preference test persisted in repeated testing, while in the open field test it was detected only in the first testing, indicating higher reliability of the place preference test for revealing inter-strain differences in the expression of maternal motivation. It is supposed that weaker expression of maternal behavior and preference is due to hypo-function of the mesolimbic dopaminergic bran system in WAG/Rij rats as a genetic model of depression associated with absence epilepsy.

  7. Lower risk taking and exploratory behavior in alcohol-preferring sP rats than in alcohol non-preferring sNP rats in the multivariate concentric square field (MCSF) test.

    PubMed

    Roman, Erika; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2009-12-14

    The present investigation continues previous behavioral profiling studies of selectively bred alcohol-drinking and alcohol non-drinking rats. In this study, alcohol-naïve adult Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) and non-preferring (sNP) rats were tested in the multivariate concentric square field (MCSF) test. The MCSF test has an ethoexperimental approach and measures general activity, exploration, risk assessment, risk taking, and shelter seeking in laboratory rodents. The multivariate design enables behavioral profiling in one and the same test situation. Age-matched male Wistar rats were included as a control group. Five weeks after the first MCSF trial, a repeated testing was done to explore differences in acquired experience. The results revealed distinct differences in exploratory strategies and behavioral profiles between sP and sNP rats. The sP rats were characterized by lower activity, lower exploratory drive, higher risk assessment, and lower risk taking behavior than in sNP rats. In the repeated trial, risk-taking behavior was almost abolished in sP rats. When comparing the performance of sP and sNP rats with that of Wistar rats, the principal component analysis revealed that the sP rats were the most divergent group. The vigilant behavior observed in sP rats with low exploratory drive and low risk-taking behavior is interpreted here as high innate anxiety-related behaviors and may be related to their propensity for high voluntary alcohol intake and preference. We suggest that the different lines of alcohol-preferring rats with different behavioral characteristics constitute valuable animal models that mimic the heterogeneity in human alcohol dependence.

  8. Role of thirst and visual barriers in the differential behavior displayed by streptozotocin-treated rats in the elevated plus-maze and the open field test.

    PubMed

    Rebolledo-Solleiro, Daniela; Crespo-Ramírez, Minerva; Roldán-Roldán, Gabriel; Hiriart, Marcia; Pérez de la Mora, Miguel

    2013-08-15

    Conflicting results have been obtained by several groups when studying the effects of streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rats in the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Since thirst is a prominent feature in STZ-induced diabetic-like condition, we studied whether the walls of the closed arms of the EPM, by limiting the search for water in the environment, may contribute to the observed differential behavioral outcomes. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether visual barriers within the EPM have an influence on the behavior of STZ-treated rats in this test of anxiety. A striking similarity between STZ-treated (50 mg/kg, i.p., in two consecutive days) and water deprived rats (72 h) was found in exploratory behavior in the EPM, showing an anxiolytic-like profile. However the anxiolytic response of STZ-treated rats exposed to the EPM shifts into an anxiogenic profile when they are subsequently tested in the open-field test, which unlike the EPM is devoid of visual barriers. Likewise, water deprived rats (72 h) also showed an anxiogenic profile when they were exposed to the open-field test. Our results indicate that experimental outcomes based on EPM observations can be misleading when studying physiological or pathological conditions, e.g. diabetes, in which thirst may increase exploratory behavior.

  9. Mission control team structure and operational lessons learned from the 2009 and 2010 NASA desert RATS simulated lunar exploration field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Ernest R.; Badillo, Victor; Coan, David; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; Rosenbaum, Megan; Smart, Tifanie; Stone, Jeffry; Stueber, Ronald; Welsh, Daren; Guirgis, Peggy; Looper, Chris; McDaniel, Randall

    2013-10-01

    The NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is an annual field test of advanced concepts, prototype hardware, and potential modes of operation to be used on human planetary surface space exploration missions. For the 2009 and 2010 NASA Desert RATS field tests, various engineering concepts and operational exercises were incorporated into mission timelines with the focus of the majority of daily operations being on simulated lunar geological field operations and executed in a manner similar to current Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. The field test for 2009 involved a two week lunar exploration simulation utilizing a two-man rover. The 2010 Desert RATS field test took this two week simulation further by incorporating a second two-man rover working in tandem with the 2009 rover, as well as including docked operations with a Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM). Personnel for the field test included the crew, a mission management team, engineering teams, a science team, and the mission operations team. The mission operations team served as the core of the Desert RATS mission control team and included certified NASA Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) flight controllers, former flight controllers, and astronaut personnel. The backgrounds of the flight controllers were in the areas of Extravehicular Activity (EVA), onboard mechanical systems and maintenance, robotics, timeline planning (OpsPlan), and spacecraft communicator (Capcom). With the simulated EVA operations, mechanized operations (the rover), and expectations of replanning, these flight control disciplines were especially well suited for the execution of the 2009 and 2010 Desert RATS field tests. The inclusion of an operations team has provided the added benefit of giving NASA mission operations flight control personnel the opportunity to begin examining operational mission control techniques, team compositions, and mission scenarios. This also gave the mission operations

  10. Mobilestar field test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubow, Wayne

    1988-01-01

    Various field tests were performed in order to gain practical experience and a broader understanding of mobile communications. The first phase consisted of CW propagation tests to develop firsthand experience of propagation phenomena. From this information, estimates of the feasibility and accuracy of power control were possible. The next phase tested the idea of power control. Equipment representative of that expected to be used in an actual mobile satellite communication system was assembled and tested under a variety of environments.

  11. Pilot Field Test Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherriff, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The Field Test study is currently in full swing, preceded by the successful completion of the Pilot Field Test study that paved the way for collecting data on the astronauts in the medical tent in Kazakhstan. Abigail Sherriff worked alongside Logan Dobbe on one Field Test aspect to determine foot clearance over obstacles (5cm, 10cm, and 15cm) using APDM Inc. Internal Measurement Units (IMU) worn by the astronauts. They created a program to accurately calculate foot clearance using the accelerometer, magnetometer, and gyroscope data with the IMUs attached to the top of the shoes. To validate the functionality of their program, they completed a successful study on test subjects performing various tasks in an optical motion studio, considered a gold standard in biomechanics research. Future work will include further validation and expanding the program to include other analyses.

  12. Direct Field Acoustic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, Paul; Goldstein, Bob

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an update to the methods and procedures used in Direct Field Acoustic Testing (DFAT). The paper will discuss some of the recent techniques and developments that are currently being used and the future publication of a reference standard. Acoustic testing using commercial sound system components is becoming a popular and cost effective way of generating a required acoustic test environment both in and out of a reverberant chamber. This paper will present the DFAT test method, the usual setup and procedure and the development and use of a closed-loop, narrow-band control system. Narrow-band control of the acoustic PSD allows all standard techniques and procedures currently used in random control to be applied to acoustics and some examples are given. The paper will conclude with a summary of the development of a standard practice guideline that is hoped to be available in the first quarter of next year.

  13. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  14. Behavioral effects of low, acute doses of morphine in nontolerant groups of rats in an open-field test.

    PubMed

    Schiørring, E; Hecht, A

    1979-06-28

    Groups of eight rats were treated with low, acute doses of morphine (2, 3.5, and 5 mg/kg body weight) or a corresponding volume of isotonic NaCl solution. The formation of groups, certain other features of social interaction, plus some individual items were recorded. Morphine induced an increase in the frequency of group formations without disruption of grooming and rearing patterns. The total picture of morphine-induced behavior changes at the dose levels used might be characterized as a polyactivation (or a varied stimulation); different from the selective stimulation reported for d-amphetamine.

  15. FSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.; Weaver, R. W.; Lee, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The 12 continental remote sites were decommissioned. Testing was consolidated into a five-site network consisting of the four Southern California sites and a new Florida site. 16 kW of new state-of-the-art modules were deployed at the five sites. Testing of the old modules continued at the Goldstone site but as a low-priority item. Array testing of modules is considered. Additional new testing capabilities were added. A battery-powered array data logger is discussed. A final set of failure and degradation data was obtained from the modules.

  16. FSA field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P.; Weaver, R. W.; Lee, R. E.

    1981-12-01

    The 12 continental remote sites were decommissioned. Testing was consolidated into a five-site network consisting of the four Southern California sites and a new Florida site. 16 kW of new state-of-the-art modules were deployed at the five sites. Testing of the old modules continued at the Goldstone site but as a low-priority item. Array testing of modules is considered. Additional new testing capabilities were added. A battery-powered array data logger is discussed. A final set of failure and degradation data was obtained from the modules.

  17. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1980-01-01

    After almost four years of endurance testing of photovoltaic modules, no fundamental life-limiting mechanisms were identified that could prevent the twenty-year life goal from being met. The endure data show a continual decline in the failure rate with each new large-scale procurement. Cracked cells and broken interconnects continue to be the principal causes of failure. Although the modules are more adversely affected physically by hot, humid environments than by cool or dry environments there are insufficient data to correlate failure with environment. There is little connection between the outward physical condition of a module and changes in its electrical performance.

  18. Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

    2000-06-30

    In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

  19. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Geolab 2010: Desert Rats Field Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cindy A.; Calaway, M. J.; Bell, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    In 2010, Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS), NASA's annual field exercise designed to test spacesuit and rover technologies, will include a first generation lunar habitat facility, the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU). The habitat will participate in joint operations in northern Arizona with the Lunar Electric Rover (LER) and will be used as a multi-use laboratory and working space. A Geology Laboratory or GeoLab is included in the HDU design. Historically, science participation in Desert RATS exercises has supported the technology demonstrations with geological traverse activities that are consistent with preliminary concepts for lunar surface science Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). Next year s HDU demonstration is a starting point to guide the development of requirements for the Lunar Surface Systems Program and test initial operational concepts for an early lunar excursion habitat that would follow geological traverses along with the LER. For the GeoLab, these objectives are specifically applied to support future geological surface science activities. The goal of our GeoLab is to enhance geological science returns with the infrastructure that supports preliminary examination, early analytical characterization of key samples, and high-grading lunar samples for return to Earth [1, 2] . Figure 1: Inside view schematic of the GeoLab a 1/8 section of the HDU, including a glovebox for handling and examining geological samples. Other outfitting facilities are not depicted in this figure. GeoLab Description: The centerpiece of the GeoLab is a glovebox, allowing for samples to be brought into the habitat in a protected environment for preliminary examination (see Fig. 1). The glovebox will be attached to the habitat bulkhead and contain three sample pass-through antechambers that would allow direct transfer of samples from outside the HDU to inside the glovebox. We will evaluate the need for redundant chambers, and other uses for the glovebox

  1. Descent Advisor Preliminary Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Steven M.; Vivona, Robert A.; Sanford, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    A field test of the Descent Advisor (DA) automation tool was conducted at the Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in September 1994. DA is being developed to assist Center controllers in the efficient management and control of arrival traffic. DA generates advisories, based on trajectory predictions, to achieve accurate meter-fix arrival times in a fuel efficient manner while assisting the controller with the prediction and resolution of potential conflicts. The test objectives were: (1) to evaluate the accuracy of DA trajectory predictions for conventional and flight-management system equipped jet transports, (2) to identify significant sources of trajectory prediction error, and (3) to investigate procedural and training issues (both air and ground) associated with DA operations. Various commercial aircraft (97 flights total) and a Boeing 737-100 research aircraft participated in the test. Preliminary results from the primary test set of 24 commercial flights indicate a mean DA arrival time prediction error of 2.4 seconds late with a standard deviation of 13.1 seconds. This paper describes the field test and presents preliminary results for the commercial flights.

  2. Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

    2011-01-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  3. Full-engine field test

    SciTech Connect

    Gianola, M.

    1988-10-01

    For purposes of both final verification and optimization of TG 20 and TG 50 combustion systems, test programs have been carried out directly on full engines operating in the field, as well as in the test bench. These programs were carried out in two separate phases: the first one directed to determine the behavior at load by means of experimental data acquisition, including temperature distribution on the combustor exit plane for different burner arrangements, and the second one directed to optimize the ignition process and the acceleration sequence. This paper, after a brief description of the instrumentation used for each test, reports the most significant results burning both fuel oil and natural gas. Moreover, some peculiar operational problems are mentioned, along with their diagnosis and the corrections applied to the combustion system to solve them.

  4. Digital Audio Radio Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1997-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the beginning of phase two of Digital Audio Radio testing conducted by the Consumer Electronic Manufacturers Association (a sector of the Electronic Industries Association and the National Radio Systems Committee) and cosponsored by the Electronic Industries Association and the National Association of Broadcasters. The bulk of the field testing of the four systems should be complete by the end of October 1996, with results available soon thereafter. Lewis hosted phase one of the testing process, which included laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes (see the following table). Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes, thus making a total of nine systems for testing. These nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent channel (IBAC), and new bands - the L-band (1452 to 1492 MHz) and the S-band (2310 to 2360 MHz).

  5. Diabetic rat testes: morphological and functional alterations.

    PubMed

    Ricci, G; Catizone, A; Esposito, R; Pisanti, F A; Vietri, M T; Galdieri, M

    2009-12-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is a consequence of diabetes, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the histological and molecular alterations in the testes of rats injected with streptozotocin at prepuperal (SPI rats) and adult age (SAI rats) to understand whether diabetes affects testicular tissue with different severity depending on the age in which this pathological condition starts. The testes of diabetic animals showed frequent abnormal histology, and seminiferous epithelium cytoarchitecture appeared altered as well as the occludin distribution pattern. The early occurrence of diabetes increased the percentage of animals with high number of damaged tubules. The interstitial compartment of the testes was clearly hypertrophic in several portions of the organs both in SPI and SAI rats. Interestingly, fully developed Leydig cells were present in all the treated animals although abnormally distributed. Besides the above-described damages, we found a similar decrease in plasma testosterone levels both in SPI and SAI rats. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications, and in our experimental models we found that manganese superoxide dismutase was reduced in diabetic animals. We conclude that in STZ-induced diabetes, the altered spermatogenesis, more severe in SPI animals, is possibly due to the effect of OS on Leydig cell function which could cause the testosterone decrease responsible for the alterations found in the seminiferous epithelium of diabetic animals.

  6. Biological effects of prolonged exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields in rats: III. 50 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zecca, L; Mantegazza, C; Margonato, V; Cerretelli, P; Caniatti, M; Piva, F; Dondi, D; Hagino, N

    1998-01-01

    Groups of adult male Sprague Dawley rats (64 rats each) were exposed for 8 months to electromagnetic fields (EMF) of two different field strength combinations: 5microT - 1kV/m and 100microT - 5kV/m. A third group was sham exposed. Field exposure was 8 hrs/day for 5 days/week. Blood samples were collected for hematology determinations before the onset of exposure and at 12 week intervals. At sacrifice, liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, bone marrow, and testes were collected for morphology and histology assessments, while the pineal gland and brain were collected for biochemical determinations. At both field strength combinations, no pathological changes were observed in animal growth rate, in morphology and histology of the collected tissue specimens (liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, testes, bone marrow), and in serum chemistry. An increase in norepinephrine levels occurred in the pineal gland of rats exposed to the higher field strength. The major changes in the brain involved the opioid system in frontal cortex, parietal cortex, and hippocampus. From the present findings it may be hypothesized that EMF may cause alteration of some brain functions.

  7. Reverberant Acoustic Testing and Direct Field Acoustic Testing Acoustic Standing Waves and their Impact on Structural Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Doty, Benjamin; Chang, Zensheu

    2012-01-01

    The aerospace industry has been using two methods of acoustic testing to qualify flight hardware: (1) Reverberant Acoustic Test (RAT), (2) Direct Field Acoustic Test (DFAT). The acoustic field obtained by RAT is generally understood and assumed to be diffuse, expect below Schroeder cut-of frequencies. DFAT method of testing has some distinct advantages over RAT, however the acoustic field characteristics can be strongly affected by test setup such as the speaker layouts, number and location of control microphones and control schemes. In this paper the following are discussed based on DEMO tests performed at APL and JPL: (1) Acoustic wave interference patterns and acoustic standing waves, (2) The structural responses in RAT and DFAT.

  8. Forced swim test behavior in postpartum rats.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Kostick, M L; Rogers, J A; White, C L; Tsutsui, K T

    2010-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether depression-like behavior can be observed in gonadally intact females that have experienced normal pregnancy. When tested on the forced swim test (FST) on postpartum days 1-7, previously pregnant rats spent slightly more time immobile, significantly less time swimming and diving, and defecated more than virgin controls. Subchronic treatment with nomifensine (DA reuptake inhibitor, 2.5mg/kg) but not sertraline (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg) or desipramine (norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg) significantly decreased immobility on postpartum day 2. In rats pre-exposed to the FST in mid-pregnancy, neither subchronic nor chronic treatment with desipramine or sertraline decreased immobility on postpartum day 2; in contrast, chronic desipramine significantly decreased immobility in virgin controls. These results indicate that postpartum female rats, compared to virgin controls, show a reduction in some "active coping behaviors" but no significant increase in immobility when tested during the early postpartum period, unlike ovariectomized females that have undergone hormone-simulated pregnancy (HSP). Additionally, immobility that is increased by FST pre-exposure is not readily prevented by treatment with standard antidepressant medications in postpartum females. Depression-like behaviors previously observed in females that have undergone HSP may result from the more dramatic changes in estradiol, prolactin or corticosterone that occur during the early "postpartum" period, compared to the more subtle changes in these hormones that occur in actual postpartum females.

  9. Introduction to Analog Field Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA tests systems and operational concepts in analog environments, which include locations underwater, in the arctic, on terrestrial impact craters, in the desert, and on the International Space S...

  10. The Evolution of Extravehicular Activity Operations to Lunar Exploration Based on Operational Lessons Learned During 2009 NASA Desert RATS Field Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Ernest R., Jr.; Welsh, Daren; Coan, Dave; Johnson, Kieth; Ney, Zane; McDaniel, Randall; Looper, Chris; Guirgis, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    This paper will present options to evolutionary changes in several philosophical areas of extravehicular activity (EVA) operations. These areas will include single person verses team EVAs; various loss of communications scenarios (with Mission Control, between suited crew, suited crew to rover crew, and rover crew A to rover crew B); EVA termination and abort time requirements; incapacitated crew ingress time requirements; autonomous crew operations during loss of signal periods including crew decisions on EVA execution (including decision for single verses team EVA). Additionally, suggestions as to the evolution of the make-up of the EVA flight control team from the current standard will be presented. With respect to the flight control team, the major areas of EVA flight control, EVA Systems and EVA Tasks, will be reviewed, and suggested evolutions of each will be presented. Currently both areas receive real-time information, and provide immediate feedback during EVAs as well as spacesuit (extravehicular mobility unit - EMU) maintenance and servicing periods. With respect to the tasks being performed, either EMU servicing and maintenance, or the specific EVA tasks, daily revising of plans will need to be able to be smoothly implemented to account for unforeseen situations and findings. Many of the presented ideas are a result of lessons learned by the NASA Johnson Space Center Mission Operations Directorate operations team support during the 2009 NASA Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS). It is important that the philosophy of both EVA crew operations and flight control be examined now, so that, where required, adjustments can be made to a next generation EMU and EVA equipment that will complement the anticipated needs of both the EVA flight control team and the crews.

  11. Analyzing Educational Testing Service Graduate Major Field Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Barry; Arbogast, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    The Educational Testing Service (ETS) created the Graduate Major Field Test in Business (GMFT-B) for MBA students. This test is administered to all MBA classes at Jacksonville University for the purpose of measuring student academic achievement and growth, as well as to assess educational outcomes. The test is given in the capstone course,…

  12. Test fields cannot destroy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natário, José; Queimada, Leonel; Vicente, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    We prove that (possibly charged) test fields satisfying the null energy condition at the event horizon cannot overspin/overcharge extremal Kerr-Newman or Kerr-Newman-anti de Sitter black holes, that is, the weak cosmic censorship conjecture cannot be violated in the test field approximation. The argument relies on black hole thermodynamics (without assuming cosmic censorship), and does not depend on the precise nature of the fields. We also discuss generalizations of this result to other extremal black holes.

  13. Biologic effects of prolonged exposure to ELF electromagnetic fields in rats. 2: 50 Hz magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Margonato, V.; Cerretelli, P.; Nicolini, P.; Conti, R.; Zecca, L.; Veicsteinas, Z.

    1995-12-31

    To provide possible laboratory support to health risk evaluation associated with long-term, low-intensity magnetic field exposure, 256 male albino rats and an equal number of control animals (initial age 12 weeks) were exposed 22 h/day to a 50 Hz magnetic flux density of 5 {micro}T for 32 weeks (a total of about 5,000 h). Hematology was studied from blood samples before exposure to the field and at 12 week intervals. Morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, and testes as well as brain neurotransmitters were assessed at the end of the exposure period. In two identical sets of experiments, no significant differences in the investigated variables were found between exposed and sham-exposed animals. It is concluded that continuous exposure to a 50 Hz magnetic field of 5 {micro}T from week 12 to week 44, which makes up {approximately}70% of the life span of the rat before sacrifice, does not cause changes in growth rate, in the morphology and histology of liver, heart, mesenteric lymph nodes, testes, and bone marrow, in hematology and hematochemistry, or in the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin.

  14. Repeated exposure attenuates the behavioral response of rats to static high magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Houpt, Thomas A.; Cassell, Jennifer A.; Hood, Alison; DenBleyker, Megan; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Kathleen; Ortega, Breyda; Smith, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of rats to high strength static magnetic fields of 7 T or above has behavioral effects such as the induction of locomotor circling, the suppression of rearing, and the acquisition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). To determine if habituation occurs across magnetic field exposures, rats were pre-exposed two times to a 14 T static magnetic field for 30 min on two consecutive days; on the third day, rats were given access to a novel 0.125% saccharin prior to a third 30-min exposure to the 14 T magnetic field. Compared to sham-exposed rats, pre-exposed rats showed less locomotor circling and an attenuated CTA. Rearing was suppressed in all magnet-exposed groups regardless of pre-exposure, suggesting that the suppression of rearing is more sensitive than other behavioral responses to magnet exposure. Habituation was also observed when rats under went pre-exposures at 2–3 hour intervals on a single day. Components of the habituation were also long lasting; a diminished circling response was observed when rats were exposed to magnetic field 36 days after 2 pre-exposures. To control for possible effects of unconditioned stimulus pre-exposure, rats were also tested in a similar experimental design with two injections of LiCl prior to the pairing of saccharin with a third injection of LiCl. Pre-exposure to LiCl did not attenuate the LiCl-induced CTA, suggesting that 2 pre-exposures to an unconditioned stimulus are not sufficient to explain the habituation to magnet exposure. Because the effects of magnetic field exposure are dependent on an intact vestibular apparatus, and because the vestibular system can habituate to many forms of perturbation, habituation to magnetic field exposure is consistent with mediation of magnetic field effects by the vestibular system. PMID:20045422

  15. Hydrogen Field Test Standard: Laboratory and Field Performance

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Jodie G.; Wright, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed a prototype field test standard (FTS) that incorporates three test methods that could be used by state weights and measures inspectors to periodically verify the accuracy of retail hydrogen dispensers, much as gasoline dispensers are tested today. The three field test methods are: 1) gravimetric, 2) Pressure, Volume, Temperature (PVT), and 3) master meter. The FTS was tested in NIST's Transient Flow Facility with helium gas and in the field at a hydrogen dispenser location. All three methods agree within 0.57 % and 1.53 % for all test drafts of helium gas in the laboratory setting and of hydrogen gas in the field, respectively. The time required to perform six test drafts is similar for all three methods, ranging from 6 h for the gravimetric and master meter methods to 8 h for the PVT method. The laboratory tests show that 1) it is critical to wait for thermal equilibrium to achieve density measurements in the FTS that meet the desired uncertainty requirements for the PVT and master meter methods; in general, we found a wait time of 20 minutes introduces errors < 0.1 % and < 0.04 % in the PVT and master meter methods, respectively and 2) buoyancy corrections are important for the lowest uncertainty gravimetric measurements. The field tests show that sensor drift can become a largest component of uncertainty that is not present in the laboratory setting. The scale was calibrated after it was set up at the field location. Checks of the calibration throughout testing showed drift of 0.031 %. Calibration of the master meter and the pressure sensors prior to travel to the field location and upon return showed significant drifts in their calibrations; 0.14 % and up to 1.7 %, respectively. This highlights the need for better sensor selection and/or more robust sensor testing prior to putting into field service. All three test methods are capable of being successfully performed in the field and give

  16. Field Test of the Verbal Skills Curriculum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    twon.) A Verbal Skills Curriculum program, designed for recruits with deficiencies in English language listening and speaking , was field-tested at... Skills program and presents the results of a field test of the program with recruits who speak English as a second language. The reoort also presents... Skills Curriculum provides remedial instruction to recruits experiencing difficulty in English language speaking or listening skills . English language

  17. Testing Large Structures in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Carne, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Field testing large structures creates unique challenges such as limited choices for boundary conditions and the fact that natural excitation sources cannot be removed. Several critical developments in field testing of large structures are reviewed, including: step relaxation testing which has been developed into a useful technique to apply large forces to operational systems by careful windowing; the capability of large structures testing with free support conditions which has been expanded by implementing modeling of the support structure; natural excitation which has been developed as a viable approach to field testing; and the hybrid approach which has been developed to allow forces to be estimated in operating structures. These developments have increased the ability to extract information from large structures and are highlighted in this presentation.

  18. SRS environmental technology development field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, B.D.; Rossabi, J.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    A critical and difficult step in the development and implementation of new technologies for environmental monitoring and characterization is successfully transferring these technologies to industry and government users for routine assessment and compliance activities. The Environmental Sciences Section of the DOE Savannah River Technology Center provides a forum for developers, potential users, and regulatory organizations to evaluate new technologies in comparison with baseline technologies in a well characterized field test bed. The principal objective of this project is to conduct comprehensive, objective field tests of monitoring and characterization technologies that are not currently used in EPA standard methods and evaluate their performance during actual operating conditions against baseline methods. This paper provides an overview of the field test site and a description of some of the technologies demonstrated at the site including their field applications.

  19. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  20. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L.; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  1. Background field coils for the High Field Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zbasnik, J.P.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Jewell, A.M.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Chaplin, M.R.

    1980-09-22

    The High Field Test Facility (HFTF), presently under construction at LLNL, is a set of superconducting coils that will be used to test 1-m-o.d. coils of prototype conductors for fusion magnets in fields up to 12 T. The facility consists of two concentric sets of coils; the outer set is a stack of Nb-Ti solenoids, and the inner set is a pair of solenoids made of cryogenically-stabilized, multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor, developed for use in mirror-fusion magnets. The HFTF system is designed to be parted along the midplane to allow high-field conductors, under development for Tokamak fusion machines, to be inserted and tested. The background field coils were wound pancake-fashion, with cold-welded joints at both the inner and outer diameters. Turn-to-turn insulation was fabricated at LLNL from epoxy-fiberglass strip. The coils were assembled and tested in our 2-m-diam cryostat to verify their operation.

  2. Cold chain: solar refrigerator field tested.

    PubMed

    1983-04-01

    The Health Ministries of Colombia and Peru, in collaboration with the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), have begun field testing a solar-powered vaccine refrigerator. The aim of the fields trials is to determine whether solar refrigerators can maintain the temperatures required for vaccine storage (+4-8 degrees Celsius) and produce ice at a rate of 2 kg/24 hours under different environmental conditions. these refrigerators would be particularly useful in areas that lack a consistent supply of good quality fuel or where the electrical supply is intermittent or nonexistent. Full appraisal of this technology will require 2 years of field testing; Colombia and Peru expect to complete testing in 1985. To date, 5 models have passed CDC-developed specifications, all of which are manufactured in the US. PAHO/WHO recommends that health ministries should consider the following guidelines in considering the purchase of a particular system: the initial purchase should be for a limited quantity (about 5) of refrigerators to permit field testing; solar panels should meet specific criteria; consideration should be given only to those models that have passed qualification tests; each unit should be fully equipped with monitoring devices and spare parts; and a trained refrigerator technician should be available to repair the equipment.

  3. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  4. The effects of exposure to electromagnetic field on rat myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kiray, Amac; Tayefi, Hamid; Kiray, Muge; Bagriyanik, Husnu Alper; Pekcetin, Cetin; Ergur, Bekir Ugur; Ozogul, Candan

    2013-06-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) causes increased adverse effects on biological systems. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EMF on heart tissue by biochemical and histomorphological evaluations in EMF-exposed adult rats. In this study, 28 male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were used. The rats were divided into two groups: sham group (n = 14) and EMF group (n = 14). Rats in sham group were exposed to same conditions as the EMF group except the exposure to EMF. Rats in EMF group were exposed to a 50-Hz EMF of 3 mT for 4 h/day and 7 days/week for 2 months. After 2 months of exposure, rats were killed; the hearts were excised and evaluated. Determination of oxidative stress parameters was performed spectrophotometrically. To detect apoptotic cells, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and caspase-3 immunohistochemistry were performed. In EMF-exposed group, levels of lipid peroxidation significantly increased and activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase decreased compared with sham group. The number of TUNEL-positive cells and caspase-3 immunoreactivity increased in EMF-exposed rats compared with sham. Under electron microscopy, there were mitochondrial degeneration, reduction in myofibrils, dilated sarcoplasmic reticulum and perinuclear vacuolization in EMF-exposed rats. In conclusion, the results show that the exposure to EMF causes oxidative stress, apoptosis and morphologic damage in myocardium of adult rats. The results of our study indicate that EMF-related changes in rat myocardium could be the result of increased oxidative stress. Further studies are needed to demonstrate whether the exposure to EMF can induce adverse effects on myocardium.

  5. Comparative Field Tests of Pressurised Rover Prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, G. A.; Wood, N. B.; Clarke, J. D.; Piechochinski, S.; Bamsey, M.; Laing, J. H.

    The conceptual designs, interior layouts and operational performances of three pressurised rover prototypes - Aonia, ARES and Everest - were field tested during a recent simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah. A human factors experiment, in which the same crew of three executed the same simulated science mission in each of the three vehicles, yielded comparative data on the capacity of each vehicle to safely and comfortably carry explorers away from the main base, enter and exit the vehicle in spacesuits, perform science tasks in the field, and manage geological and biological samples. As well as offering recommendations for design improvements for specific vehicles, the results suggest that a conventional Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) would not be suitable for analog field work; that a pressurised docking tunnel to the main habitat is essential; that better provisions for spacesuit storage are required; and that a crew consisting of one driver/navigator and two field science crew specialists may be optimal. From a field operations viewpoint, a recurring conflict between rover and habitat crews at the time of return to the habitat was observed. An analysis of these incidents leads to proposed refinements of operational protocols, specific crew training for rover returns and again points to the need for a pressurised docking tunnel. Sound field testing, circulating of results, and building the lessons learned into new vehicles is advocated as a way of producing ever higher fidelity rover analogues.

  6. Static magnetic field induced hypovitaminosis D in rat.

    PubMed

    Aïda, Lahbib; Frédéric, Lecomte; Soumaya, Ghodbane; Philippe, Hubert; Mohsen, Sakly; Hafedh, Abdelmelek

    2013-01-01

    In the following study, we mainly investigate the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) (128 mT, 1 hr/day during 5 consecutive days) on 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and calcium homeostasis. Wistar male rats, weighing 50-70 g, were randomly divided into four experimental groups: control, SMF-exposed rat, co-exposed rats (the last day and after exposure rats received a single dose of vitamin D per os) and supplemented with vitamin D group (without exposure to SMF). Exposure to SMF induced a decrease of plasmatic 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 level (P < 0.001). While, calcium and phosphorus levels were not affected (P > 0.05). The same treatment failed also to alter body, relative liver and kidney weights. Interestingly, oral supplementation with vitamin D corrected hypovitaminosis D induced by SMF. Likewise, the same treatment failed to alter calcium homeostasis. More studies are needed to evaluate how SMF induces hypovitaminosis D.

  7. First Astronaut- Rover Interaction Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Ross, Amy; Cabrol, Nathalie A.

    2000-01-01

    The first Astronaut - Rover (ASRO) Interaction field test was conducted successfully on February 22-27, 1999, in Silver Lake, Mojave Desert, California in a representative planetary surface terrain. This test was a joint effort between the NASA Ames Research Center , Moffett Field, California and the NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. As prototype advanced planetary surface space suit and rover technologies are being developed for human planetary surface exploration , it has been determined that it is important to better understand the potential interaction and benefits of an EVA astronaut interacting with a robotic rover . This interaction between an EVA astronaut and a robotic rover is seen as complementary and can greatly enhance the productivity and safety of surface excursions . This test also identified design requirements and options in an advanced space suit and robotic rover. The test objectives were: 1. To identify the operational domains where the EVA astronauts and rover are complementary and can interact and thus collaborate in a safe , productive and cost- effective way, 2. To identify preliminary requirements and recommendations for advanced space suits and rovers that facilitate their cooperative and complementary interaction, 3. To develop operational procedures for the astronaut-rover teams in the identified domains, 4. To test these procedures during representative mission scenarios during field tests by simulating the exploration of a planetary surface by an EVA crew interacting with a robotic rover, 5. To train a space suited test subject, simulated Earth-based and l or lander-based science teams, and robotic vehicle operators in mission configurations, and 6. To evaluate and understand socio-technical aspects of the astronaut - rover interaction experiment in order to guide future technologies and designs. Test results and areas for future research in the design of planetary space suits will be discussed .

  8. Development of a Pediatric Visual Field Test

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Marco A.; Henson, David B.; Fenerty, Cecilia; Biswas, Susmito; Aslam, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We describe a pediatric visual field (VF) test based on a computer game where software and hardware combine to provide an enjoyable test experience. Methods The test software consists of a platform-based computer game presented to the central VF. A storyline was created around the game as was a structure surrounding the computer monitor to enhance patients' experience. The patient is asked to help the central character collect magic coins (stimuli). To collect these coins a series of obstacles need to be overcome. The test was presented on a Sony PVM-2541A monitor calibrated from a central midpoint with a Minolta CS-100 photometer placed at 50 cm. Measurements were performed at 15 locations on the screen and the contrast calculated. Retinal sensitivity was determined by modulating stimulus in size. To test the feasibility of the novel approach 20 patients (4–16 years old) with no history of VF defects were recruited. Results For the 14 subjects completing the study, 31 ± 15 data points were collected on 1 eye of each patient. Mean background luminance and stimulus contrast were 9.9 ± 0.3 cd/m2 and 27.9 ± 0.1 dB, respectively. Sensitivity values obtained were similar to an adult population but variability was considerably higher – 8.3 ± 9.0 dB. Conclusions Preliminary data show the feasibility of a game-based VF test for pediatric use. Although the test was well accepted by the target population, test variability remained very high. Translational Relevance Traditional VF tests are not well tolerated by children. This study describes a child-friendly approach to test visual fields in the targeted population. PMID:27980876

  9. Bilateral receptive fields of cells in rat Sm1 cortex.

    PubMed

    Armstrong-James, M; George, M J

    1988-01-01

    Single cells in the primary somatosensory (Sm1) cortex were investigated for responses to bilateral hindpaw stimulation in Wistar rats anaesthetised by continuous intravenous administration of Althesin. Fifty-one percent of cells sampled (N = 134) responded to equivalent punctate mechanical stimuli delivered to both the contralateral and ipsilateral hindpaws under light anaesthesia. The distribution by cortical depth of cells with receptive fields (RFs) on both hindpaws was not significantly different from cells which had only contralateral RFs. No cell was found with a purely ipsilateral RF. For 86% of cells tested (N = 44) the ipsilateral RF was partly or completely homologous with areas within the contralateral RF. The sizes of ipsilateral RFs were smaller on 66% of occasions when tested against their contralateral RFs. Modal latencies to ipsilateral mechanical stimulation were longer than to contralateral stimulation (34.1 +/- 9.1 ms (S.D) cf. 26.4 +/- 7.2 ms, N = 44). Ipsilateral RFs were lost for 77% of cells tested following a 33% increase in anaesthetic infusion rate. Conditioning mechanical stimuli applied to the centre receptive field (CRF) on the ipsilateral hindpaw reduced or abolished a cell's responses to equivalent test stimuli applied to it's contralateral CRF with C-T intervals of 20-200 ms. Conditioning stimuli applied to the CRF contralateral to the cell reduced or abolished responses to test stimuli on the cell's ipsilateral CRF using C-T intervals of 0-900 ms. Responses in one cortex to stimulation of the ipsilateral hindpaw were unaffected by elimination of responses from the same hindpaw in the opposite contralateral Sm1 cortex, where responses had been suppressed by topical Lignocaine administration. Retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase from hindpaw Sm1 cortex labelled many cells in homolateral thalamus, but failed to label cells in the entire forebrain contralateral to the injection site. It is concluded that direct crossed

  10. Altered auditory function in rats exposed to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Hoffman, L.; Horowitz, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of an orthodynamic hypergravic field of 6 G on the brainstem auditory projections was studied in rats. The brain temperature and EEG activity were recorded in the rats during 6 G orthodynamic acceleration and auditory brainstem responses were used to monitor auditory function. Results show that all animals exhibited auditory brainstem responses which indicated impaired conduction and transmission of brainstem auditory signals during the exposure to the 6 G acceleration field. Significant increases in central conduction time were observed for peaks 3N, 4P, 4N, and 5P (N = negative, P = positive), while the absolute latency values for these same peaks were also significantly increased. It is concluded that these results, along with those for fields below 4 G (Jones and Horowitz, 1981), indicate that impaired function proceeds in a rostro-caudal progression as field strength is increased.

  11. Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) Local and Remote Test Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoiko, Barbara; Kosmo, Joseph; Eppler, Dean

    2007-01-01

    Desert RATS (Research and Technology Studies) is a combined group of inter-NASA center scientists and engineers, collaborating with representatives of industry and academia, for the purpose of conducting remote field exercises. These exercises provide the capability to validate experimental hardware and software, to evaluate and develop mission operational techniques, and to identify and establish technical requirements applicable for future planetary exploration. D-RATS completed its ninth year of field testing in September 2006. Dry run test activities prior to testing at designated remote field site locations are initially conducted at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Remote Field Demonstration Test Site. This is a multi-acre external test site located at JSC and has detailed representative terrain features simulating both Lunar and Mars surface characteristics. The majority of the remote field tests have been subsequently conducted in various high desert areas adjacent to Flagstaff, Arizona. Both the local JSC and remote field test sites have terrain conditions that are representative of both the Moon and Mars, such as strewn rock and volcanic ash fields, meteorite crater ejecta blankets, rolling plains, hills, gullies, slopes, and outcrops. Flagstaff is the preferred remote test site location for many reasons. First, there are nine potential test sites with representative terrain features within a 75-mile radius. Second, Flagstaff is the location of the United States Geologic Survey (USGS)/Astrogeology Branch, which historically supported Apollo astronaut geologic training and currently supports and provides host accommodations to the D-RATS team. Finally, in considering the importance of logistics in regard to providing the necessary level of support capabilities, the Flagstaff area provides substantial logistics support and lodging accommodations to take care of team members during long hours of field operations.

  12. Deep Borehole Field Test Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest L.

    2016-09-30

    This report documents conceptual design development for the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT), including test packages (simulated waste packages, not containing waste) and a system for demonstrating emplacement and retrieval of those packages in the planned Field Test Borehole (FTB). For the DBFT to have demonstration value, it must be based on conceptualization of a deep borehole disposal (DBD) system. This document therefore identifies key options for a DBD system, describes an updated reference DBD concept, and derives a recommended concept for the DBFT demonstration. The objective of the DBFT is to confirm the safety and feasibility of the DBD concept for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. The conceptual design described in this report will demonstrate equipment and operations for safe waste handling and downhole emplacement of test packages, while contributing to an evaluation of the overall safety and practicality of the DBD concept. The DBFT also includes drilling and downhole characterization investigations that are described elsewhere (see Section 1). Importantly, no radioactive waste will be used in the DBFT, nor will the DBFT site be used for disposal of any type of waste. The foremost performance objective for conduct of the DBFT is to demonstrate safe operations in all aspects of the test.

  13. Goldstone field test activities: Target search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1986-01-01

    In March of this year prototype SETI equipment was installed at DSS13, the 26 meter research and development antenna at NASA's Goldstone complex of satellite tracking dishes. The SETI equipment will remain at this site at least through the end of the summer so that the hardware and software developed for signal detection and recognition can be fully tested in a dynamic observatory environment. The field tests are expected to help understand which strategies for observing and which signal recognition algorithms perform best in the presence of strong man-made interfering signals (RFI) and natural astronomical sources.

  14. Design, development and field testing of Cecil

    SciTech Connect

    Trovato, S.A. ); Ruggieri, S.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Inspection and cleaning of the secondary side of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator should be performed on a regular basis to prevent the degradation and early replacement of this equipment due to corrosion. Corrosion products, or sludge, settle in the secondary side of the steam generator and promote corrosion of the tube bundle. The CECIL robot was developed to improve inspection and cleaning of the secondary side of a steam generator. This paper describes the evolution in design of the CECIL robot. The design, development and field testing of the robot at India Point 2 nuclear station are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the fourth generation of its design, CECIL-4. The importance of iteration in design, test, fabrication and field application of mobile robots in a nuclear power station is discussed.

  15. Field Test Kit for Gun Residue Detection

    SciTech Connect

    WALKER, PAMELA K.; RODACY, PHILIP J.

    2002-01-01

    One of the major needs of the law enforcement field is a product that quickly, accurately, and inexpensively identifies whether a person has recently fired a gun--even if the suspect has attempted to wash the traces of gunpowder off. The Field Test Kit for Gunshot Residue Identification based on Sandia National Laboratories technology works with a wide variety of handguns and other weaponry using gunpowder. There are several organic chemicals in small arms propellants such as nitrocellulose, nitroglycerine, dinitrotoluene, and nitrites left behind after the firing of a gun that result from the incomplete combustion of the gunpowder. Sandia has developed a colorimetric shooter identification kit for in situ detection of gunshot residue (GSR) from a suspect. The test kit is the first of its kind and is small, inexpensive, and easily transported by individual law enforcement personnel requiring minimal training for effective use. It will provide immediate information identifying gunshot residue.

  16. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Hietala, J.; Wendland, R.D.; Collins, F.

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  17. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E. ); Hietala, J. ); Wendland, R.D. ); Collins, F. )

    1992-01-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  18. Endocrinological effects of strong 60-Hz electric fields on rats

    SciTech Connect

    Free, M.J.; Kaune, W.T.; Phillips, R.D.; Cheng, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    Adult male rats were exposed or sham-exposed to 60-Hz electric fields without spark discharges, ozone, or significant levels or other secondary variables. No effects were discharges, ozone, or significant levels of other secondary variables. No effects were observed on body weights or plasma hormone levels after 30 days of exposure at an effective field strength of 68 kV/m. After 120 days of exposure (effective field strength = 64 kV/m), effects were inconsistent, with signficant reductions in body weight and plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone occurring in one replicate experiment but not in the other. Plasma testosterone levels were significantly reduced after 120 days of exposure in one experiment, with a similar but not statistically significant reduction in a replicate experiment. Weanling rats, exposed or sham-exposed in electric fields with an effective field strength of 80 kV/m from 20 to 56 days of age, exhibited identical or closely similar growth trends in body and organ weights. Hormone levels in exposed and sham-exposed groups were also similar. However, there was an apparent phase shift between the two groups in the cyclic variations of concentrations of hormones at different stages of development, particularly with respect to follicle-stimulating hormone and corticosterone. We concluded that 60-Hz electric fields may bring about subtle changes in the endocrine system of rats, and that these changes may be related to alterations in episodic rhythms.

  19. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, L; Cautley, D.; Bohac, D.; Francisco, P.; Shen, L.; Gloss, S.

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  20. A prototype tap test imaging system: Initial field test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, J. J.; Barnard, D. J.; Hudelson, N. A.; Simpson, T. S.; Hsu, D. K.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes a simple, field-worthy tap test imaging system that gives quantitative information about the size, shape, and severity of defects and damages. The system consists of an accelerometer, electronic circuits for conditioning the signal and measuring the impact duration, a laptop PC and data acquisition and processing software. The images are generated manually by tapping on a grid printed on a plastic sheet laid over the part's surface. A mechanized scanner is currently under development. The prototype has produced images for a variety of aircraft composite and metal honeycomb structures containing flaws, damages, and repairs. Images of the local contact stiffness, deduced from the impact duration using a spring model, revealed quantitatively the stiffness reduction due to flaws and damages, as well as the stiffness enhancement due to substructures. The system has been field tested on commercial and military aircraft as well as rotor blades and engine decks on helicopters. Field test results will be shown and the operation of the system will be demonstrated.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order No. IA016 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

  1. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  2. Deep Borehole Field Test Laboratory and Borehole Testing Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Brady, Patrick V.; MacKinnon, Robert J.; Heath, Jason E.; Herrick, Courtney G.; Jensen, Richard P.; Gardner, W. Payton; Sevougian, S. David; Bryan, Charles R.; Jang, Je-Hun; Stein, Emily R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Daley, Tom; Freifeld, Barry M.; Birkholzer, Jens; Spane, Frank A.

    2016-09-19

    Deep Borehole Disposal (DBD) of high-level radioactive wastes has been considered an option for geological isolation for many years (Hess et al. 1957). Recent advances in drilling technology have decreased costs and increased reliability for large-diameter (i.e., ≥50 cm [19.7”]) boreholes to depths of several kilometers (Beswick 2008; Beswick et al. 2014). These advances have therefore also increased the feasibility of the DBD concept (Brady et al. 2009; Cornwall 2015), and the current field test design will demonstrate the DBD concept and these advances. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013) specifically recommended developing a research and development plan for DBD. DOE sought input or expression of interest from States, local communities, individuals, private groups, academia, or any other stakeholders willing to host a Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT). The DBFT includes drilling two boreholes nominally 200m [656’] apart to approximately 5 km [16,400’] total depth, in a region where crystalline basement is expected to begin at less than 2 km depth [6,560’]. The characterization borehole (CB) is the smaller-diameter borehole (i.e., 21.6 cm [8.5”] diameter at total depth), and will be drilled first. The geologic, hydrogeologic, geochemical, geomechanical and thermal testing will take place in the CB. The field test borehole (FTB) is the larger-diameter borehole (i.e., 43.2 cm [17”] diameter at total depth). Surface handling and borehole emplacement of test package will be demonstrated using the FTB to evaluate engineering feasibility and safety of disposal operations (SNL 2016).

  3. 40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false PEMS preparation for field testing... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.925 PEMS preparation for field testing. Take the following steps to prepare PEMS for field testing:...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.925 - PEMS preparation for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false PEMS preparation for field testing... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement Systems § 1065.925 PEMS preparation for field testing. Take the following steps to prepare PEMS for field testing:...

  5. Exposure to high- and low-light conditions in an open-field test of anxiety increases c-Fos expression in specific subdivisions of the rat basolateral amygdaloid complex.

    PubMed

    Hale, Matthew W; Bouwknecht, J Adriaan; Spiga, Francesca; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A

    2006-12-11

    Anxiety states and anxiety-related behaviors appear to be regulated by a distributed and highly interconnected system of forebrain structures including the basolateral amygdaloid complex (basolateral amygdala). Despite a wealth of research examining the role of the basolateral amygdala in anxiety-related behaviors and anxiety states, the specific subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala that are involved in responses to anxiogenic stimuli have not been examined. In this study, we investigated the effects of exposure to a novel open-field environment, with either low- or high-levels of illumination, on expression of the protein product of the immediate-early gene c-Fos in subdivisions of the rat basolateral amygdala. The subdivisions studied included the lateral, ventrolateral and ventromedial parts of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus, the anterior, posterior and ventral parts of the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus and the anterior and posterior part of the basomedial amygdaloid nucleus. Small increases in the number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells were observed in several, but not all, of the subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala studied following exposure of rats to either the high- or low-light conditions, compared to home cage or handled control groups. Open-field exposure in both the high- and low-light conditions resulted in a marked increase in c-Fos expression in the anterior part of the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus compared to either home cage or handled control groups. These findings point toward anatomical and functional heterogeneity within the basolateral amygdaloid complex and an important role of the anterior part of the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus in the neural mechanisms underlying physiological or behavioral responses to this anxiety-related stimulus.

  6. Refinement of the urine concentration test in rats.

    PubMed

    Kulick, Lisa J; Clemons, Donna J; Hall, Robert L; Koch, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    The urine concentration test is a potentially stressful procedure used to assess renal function. Historically, animals have been deprived of water for 24 h or longer during this test, creating the potential for distress. Refinement of the technique to lessen distress may involve decreasing the water-deprivation period. To determine the feasibility of reduced water-deprivation time, 10 male and 10 female rats were food- and water-deprived for 22 h. Clinical condition and body weights were recorded, and urine was collected every 2 h, beginning 16 h after the onset of food and water deprivation. All rats lost weight (P < 0.001). All rats were clinically normal after 16 h, but 90% of the males and 30% of the females appeared clinically dehydrated after 22 h. After 16 h, mean urine specific gravities were 1.040 and 1.054 for males and females, respectively, and mean urine osmolalities were 1,362 and 2,080 mOsm/kg, respectively, indicating the rats were adequately concentrating urine. The rats in this study tolerated water deprivation relatively well for 16 h but showed clinical signs of dehydration after 22 h. Based on this study, it was concluded that the urine concentration test can be refined such that rats are not deprived of water for more than 16 h without jeopardizing test results.

  7. A new method of field MRTD test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Song, Yan; Liu, Xianhong; Xiao, Wenjian

    2014-09-01

    MRTD is an important indicator to measure the imaging performance of infrared camera. In the traditional laboratory test, blackbody is used as simulated heat source which is not only expensive and bulky but also difficult to meet field testing requirements of online automatic infrared camera MRTD. To solve this problem, this paper introduces a new detection device for MRTD, which uses LED as a simulation heat source and branded plated zinc sulfide glass carved four-bar target as a simulation target. By using high temperature adaptability cassegrain collimation system, the target is simulated to be distance-infinite so that it can be observed by the human eyes to complete the subjective test, or collected to complete objective measurement by image processing. This method will use LED to replace blackbody. The color temperature of LED is calibrated by thermal imager, thereby, the relation curve between the LED temperature controlling current and the blackbody simulation temperature difference is established, accurately achieved the temperature control of the infrared target. Experimental results show that the accuracy of the device in field testing of thermal imager MRTD can be limited within 0.1K, which greatly reduces the cost to meet the project requirements with a wide application value.

  8. The regulation of rat activity following exposure to hyperdynamic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A.; Ishihama, Linda M.; Murakami, Dean M.

    1993-01-01

    The microgravity of space flight and the hyperdynamic fields produced via centrifugation have allowed researchers to examine the effect of altered gravitational environments on the regulation of physiological systems. In this study, a high frequency light/dark cycle was provided for 24 hours as an environmental challenge to assess the recovery of homeostatic and circadian components of physiological regulation in rats. For example, the nocturnal rat exhibited a homeostatic increase in body temperature during the dark periods and a decrease during the light periods. In addition, the magnitude of the body temperature response exhibits a time of day variation demonstrating the effect on circadian regulation.

  9. Smarter Balanced "Tests of the Test" Successful: Field Test Provides Clear Path Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doorey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Between March and June of 2014, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium conducted a field test of its new online assessment system. Thirteen participating states provided the results of surveys given to students and adults involved in the Field Test. Overall, more than 70% of test coordinators in each of seven states indicated that the Field…

  10. Thermoregulation in rats: Effects of varying duration of hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of hypergravitational fields on the thermoregulatory system of the rat are examined. The question underlying the investigation was whether the response of the rat to the one hour cold exposure depends only upon the amplitude of the hypergravic field during the period of cold exposure or whether the response is also dependent on the amplitude and duration of the hypergravic field prior to cold exposure. One hour of cold exposure applied over the last hour of either a 1, 4, 7, 13, 19, 25, or 37 hr period of 3G evoked a decrease in core temperature (T sub c) of about 3 C. However, when rats were subjected concurrently to cold and acceleration following 8 days at 3G, they exhibited a smaller fall in T sub c, suggesting partial recovery of the acceleration induced impairment of temperature regulation. In another series of experiments, the gravitational field profile was changed in amplitude in 3 different ways. Despite the different gravitational field profiles used prior to cold, the magnitude of the fall in T sub c over the 1 hr period of cold exposure was the same in all cases. These results suggest that the thermoregulatory impairment has a rapid onset, is a manifestation of an ongoing effect of hypergravity, and is not dependent upon the prior G profile.

  11. Acute restraint stress produces behavioral despair in weanling rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Morales, Blandina; Contreras, Carlos M; Cueto-Escobedo, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Stressful experiences in the rat during early life increase the vulnerability to later signs of behavioral despair in adulthood, reflected in increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST). However, the possible immediate effects of stress in weanling rats have only been partially described. The present study tested whether a single session of mild restraint stress modifies immobility in the FST in 21-day-old Wistar rats. After evaluating any possible changes in locomotion using the open field test (OFT), the latency and total duration of immobility were assessed in a single FST session. Regardless of gender, mild restraint stress significantly reduced crossings in the OFT, shortened the latency to the first period of immobility, and increased immobility in the FST compared with a control group devoid of stress. We conclude that a single mild physical stress session, as early as postnatal day 21, produces signs of behavioral despair.

  12. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  13. Produced water treating equipment: Recent field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.R.; Choi, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    For several decades, flotation cells have been workhorses for treatment of oilfield produced water for disposal or reinjection. In the last few years several alternative devices which have come on the market for the removal of oil from water have been tested in the oil field. Some of these have distinct advantages over flotation cells in terms of space and weight, better oil-recovery efficiency, and lower operating costs. This paper summarizes the results of field trials of a passive hydrocyclone, in the Arabian Gulf and in the North Sea, a coalescer which uses a specially treated ion-exchange resin as a medium in the Gulf of Mexico, two somewhat similar filter-coalescers which use crushed nut shells as media, onshore in New Mexico, West Texas, and California, and an upflow sand coalescer system in New Mexico and West Texas.

  14. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  15. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Field testing requirements. 236.1035 Section 236... Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an... A through G of this part that the railroad believes are necessary to support the field testing,...

  16. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field testing requirements. 236.1035 Section 236... Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an... A through G of this part that the railroad believes are necessary to support the field testing,...

  17. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field testing requirements. 236.1035 Section 236... Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an... A through G of this part that the railroad believes are necessary to support the field testing,...

  18. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field testing requirements. 236.1035 Section 236... Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an... A through G of this part that the railroad believes are necessary to support the field testing,...

  19. 49 CFR 236.1035 - Field testing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field testing requirements. 236.1035 Section 236... Train Control Systems § 236.1035 Field testing requirements. (a) Before any field testing of an... A through G of this part that the railroad believes are necessary to support the field testing,...

  20. 3X-100 blade field test.

    SciTech Connect

    Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

    2008-03-01

    In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

  1. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and

  2. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  3. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special field test authorizations. 73.1515... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field test authorizations. (a) A special field test authorization may be issued to conduct field strength surveys to aid...

  4. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special field test authorizations. 73.1515... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field test authorizations. (a) A special field test authorization may be issued to conduct field strength surveys to aid...

  5. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special field test authorizations. 73.1515... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field test authorizations. (a) A special field test authorization may be issued to conduct field strength surveys to aid...

  6. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special field test authorizations. 73.1515... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field test authorizations. (a) A special field test authorization may be issued to conduct field strength surveys to aid...

  7. Field testing of the Cobra Seal System

    SciTech Connect

    Yellin, E.; Vodrazka, P. ); Ystesund, K.; Drayer, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The Cobra Seal System consists of a passive fiber optic seal and verification equipment which have been modified to take advantage of current technology. The seal permits on-site verification without requiring replacement of the seal. The modifications to the original Cobra Seal System extended the maximum fiber optic cable length from 1 meter to 10 meters. This improvement allowed the Cobra Seal to be considered for application on dry irradiated fuel storage canisters at two Canadian facilities. These canisters are located in an exterior environment exposed to extreme weather conditions. This paper describe the application of the Cobra Seal to these canisters, a housing for the protection of the Cobra Seal body from the environment, and some preliminary results of the IAEA field tests. 4 refs.

  8. Desert Research and Technology Studies (RATS) 2007 Field Campaign Objectives and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph; Romig, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Desert "RATS" (Research and Technology Studies) is a combined, multi-discipline group of inter-NASA center scientists and engineers, net-working and collaborating with representatives of industry and academia, for the purpose of conducting planetary surface exploration-focused remote field exercises. These integrated testing exercises conducted under representative analog Lunar and Mars surface terrain conditions, provide NASA the capability to validate experimental prototype hardware and software systems as well as to evaluate and develop mission operational techniques in order to identify and establish technical requirements and identify potential technology "gaps" applicable for future planetary human exploration. The 2007 D-RATS field campaign test activities were initiated based on the major themes and objectives of a notional 5-year plan developed for conducting relative analog test activities in support of the engineering evaluation and assessment of various system architectural requirements, conceptual prototype support equipment and selected technologies necessary for the establishment of a lunar outpost. Specifically, the major objectives included measuring task efficiency during robot, human, and human-robot interactive tasks associated with lunar outpost site surveying and reconnaissance activities and deployment of a representative solar panel power and distribution system. In addition, technology demonstrations were conducted with a new Lithium-ion battery and autonomous software to coordinate multiple robot activities. Secondary objectives were evaluating airlock concept mockups and prototype removable space suit over-garment elements for dust mitigation, and upgrades to the prototype extravehicular activities (EVA) communication and information system. Dry run test activities, prior to testing at a designated remote field site location, were initially conducted at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Remote Field Demonstration Test Site. This is a multi

  9. Acute neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Li, Ling; Wang, Yan-Gang; Fei, Zhou; Zhong, Jun; Wei, Li-Zhou; Long, Qian-Fa; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2012-05-10

    Traumatic brain injury commonly has a result of a short window of opportunity between the period of initial brain injury and secondary brain injury, which provides protective strategies and can reduce damages of brain due to secondary brain injury. Previous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields. However, the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neural damage after traumatic brain injury have not been reported yet. The present study aims to investigate effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the model of lateral fluid percussion injury, which were placed in non-electromagnetic fields and 15 Hz (Hertz) electromagnetic fields with intensities of 1 G (Gauss), 3 G and 5 G. At various time points (ranging from 0.5 to 30 h) after lateral fluid percussion injury, rats were treated with kainic acid (administered by intraperitoneal injection) to induce apoptosis in hippocampal cells. The results were as follows: (1) the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was dramatically decreased during the neuroprotective time window. (2) The kainic acid-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields. (3) Electromagnetic fields exposure shortened the escape time in water maze test. (4) Electromagnetic fields exposure accelerated the recovery of the blood-brain barrier after brain injury. These findings revealed that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields significantly prolong the window of opportunity for brain protection and enhance the intensity of neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury.

  10. An Efficient Method for Transferring Adult Mosquitoes during Field Tests,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CULICIDAE, *COLLECTING METHODS, REPRINTS, BLOOD SUCKING INSECTS, FIELD TESTS, HAND HELD, EFFICIENCY, LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, MORTALITY RATES , ADULTS, AEDES, ASPIRATORS, CULICIDAE, TEST AND EVALUATION, REPRINTS

  11. Validity of Field Tests of Upper Body Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell, R; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the validity of field tests of elementary students' upper body muscular strength and endurance. Field tests were found to be moderately valid measures of weight-relative muscular strength but not of absolute strength and muscular endurance. (SM)

  12. NASA Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test 1994-1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Mele, Gary D.; Naidu, Sujata

    1996-01-01

    The major objective of this Cooperative Agreement was to develop a noise level specification for laboratory rats in the Centrifuge Facility Specimen Chambers (Space Station Biological Research Project), and to validate the specification for 3 noise octave bands: center frequencies 8 kHz, 16, kHz, and 32 kHz. This has been accomplished. Objective measures were used to verify that the chronic noise exposure was not harmful to the animals from physiological and behavioral perspectives. These measures were defined in the Stress Assessment Battery Validation for the Rat Acoustic Tolerance Test. In addition, the effects of the chronic noise exposure on rat hearing was assessed by the Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential Method (BAER).

  13. Parietal and frontal eye field neglect in the rat.

    PubMed

    Crowne, D P; Richardson, C M; Dawson, K A

    1986-12-01

    Rats were given unilateral aspiration lesions of parietal, medial frontal, or dorsolateral frontal (motor) cortex and then tested for visual, auditory and tactile neglect, and for circling. All medial frontal lesion animals showed contralateral neglect in each modality and circled ipsiversively. The parietal lesion rats initially displayed contralateral visual and auditory neglect as severe as that in the medial frontal group. Three weeks after the lesions, the parietal group had a smaller residual deficit on the visual test than the medial frontal group. In the first week, parietal animals responded less than the medial frontals to stroking the vibrissae but were more responsive to mild pinching of a toe contralateral to the lesion side. In striking contrast to the medial frontal animals, the parietal group circled strongly to the contralateral side. No rat with a motor cortex lesion neglected or circled preferentially. Like medial frontal cortex, unilateral parietal lesions also produce neglect and circling, but there are important features distinguishing unilateral lesion effects in these two regions.

  14. The four-meter confrontation visual field test.

    PubMed

    Kodsi, S R; Younge, B R

    1992-01-01

    The 4-m confrontation visual field test has been successfully used at the Mayo Clinic for many years in addition to the standard 0.5-m confrontation visual field test. The 4-m confrontation visual field test is a test of macular function and can identify small central or paracentral scotomas that the examiner may not find when the patient is tested only at 0.5 m. Also, macular sparing in homonymous hemianopias and quadrantanopias may be identified with the 4-m confrontation visual field test. We recommend use of this confrontation visual field test, in addition to the standard 0.5-m confrontation visual field test, on appropriately selected patients to obtain the most information possible by confrontation visual field tests.

  15. Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    David Burnett

    2009-05-31

    The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

  16. Results of the fourth Hanna field test

    SciTech Connect

    Covell, J. R.; Wojdac, L. F.; Barbour, F. A.; Gardner, G. W.; Glass, R.; Hommert, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    The second phase (Hanna IVB) of a coal gasification experiment near Hanna, Wyoming, was completed in September 1979. The experiment attempted to link and gasify coal between process wells spaced 34.3 meters apart. Intermediate wells were positioned between the process wells so that the link could be relayed over shorter distances. Reverse combustion linking was attempted over a 22.9-meter and a 11.4-meter distance of the total well spacing. Thermal activity was generally noted in the upper 3 meters of the coal seam during the link. Two attempts to gasify over the 34.3-meter distance resulted in the propagation of the burn front at the coal overburden interface. Post-burn evaluation indicates fractures as major influencing factors of the combustion process. The Hanna IVB field test provided much insight into influence that geologic features have on in situ coal combustion. The influence of these faults, permeable zones, and cleats, on the air flow patterns can drastically change the overall results of a gasification experiment and should be studied further. The overall results of Hanna IVB were discouraging because of the rapid decline in the heating values for the production gas and the amount of coal gasified. With more complete geologic characerization prior to experimentation and proper well completions, it is believed that most of the subsurface operational problems encountered during Hanna IV could have been avoided.

  17. Maternal isobutyl-paraben exposure alters anxiety and passive avoidance test performance in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Maiko; Irie, Kaoru; Morohoshi, Kaori; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Morita, Masatoshi; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Imai, Hideki; Himi, Toshiyuki

    2009-10-01

    Isobutyl-paraben (IBP), one of the most widely used preservatives, exhibits estrogenic activity. In this study, we analyzed the effects of maternal IBP treatment on the emotional behavior and learning performance in mature offspring. Pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with IBP via a subcutaneous Silastic capsule. Consequently, the offspring were exposed to IBP during gestation through the placentae, and before weaning through the milk. Male and female offspring were tested for emotional behavior in an open field and in an elevated plus maze at five and six weeks old, respectively. IBP-exposed male (but not female) rats spent less time in the open arms of the elevated plus maze. At 11 weeks old, all females were gonadectomized and treated chronically with 17beta-estradiol or cholesterol by Silastic capsules; all males were kept intact. They were tested for learning performance in a passive avoidance test and a Morris water maze. IBP exposure impaired the performance of males in the passive avoidance test. These findings suggest that male rats are more affected by early exposure to IBP than female rats. IBP affects their adult behavior including anxiety and learning abilities.

  18. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of field testing. In the case of grant assistance for field testing of innovative or alternative wastewater...

  19. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of field testing. In the case of grant assistance for field testing of innovative or alternative wastewater...

  20. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of field testing. In the case of grant assistance for field testing of innovative or alternative wastewater...

  1. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of field testing. In the case of grant assistance for field testing of innovative or alternative wastewater...

  2. 40 CFR 35.2262 - Funding of field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funding of field testing. 35.2262... ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works § 35.2262 Funding of field testing. In the case of grant assistance for field testing of innovative or alternative wastewater...

  3. Draft Test Guideline: Field Testing For Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following draft test guideline is part of a series of test guidelines that have been developed by EPA for use in the testing of pesticides and toxic substances, and the development of test data for submission to the Agency for review.

  4. Field testing of asphalt-emulsion radon-barrier system

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Baker, E.G.; Elmore, M.R.; Nelson, D.A.; Voss, C.F.; Koehmstedt, P.L.

    1981-09-01

    Three years of laboratory and field testing have demonstrated that asphalt emulsion seals are effective radon diffusion barriers. Both laboratory and field tests in 1979, 1980 and 1981 have shown that an asphalt emulsion seal can reduce radon fluxes by greater than 99.9%. The effective diffusion coefficient for the various asphalt emulsion admix seals averages about 10/sup -6/ cm/sup 2//s. The 1981 joint field test is a culmination of all the technology developed to date for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. Preliminary results of this field test and the results of the 1980 field test are presented. 18 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Nanoscale Electric Field Sensor-Development and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brame, Jon; Woods, Nathan

    2008-10-01

    The goal of this project is to test a carbon nanotube based electric field sensing device. The device consists of a miniature gold needle suspended on a mat of carbon nanotubes over a trench on a Si/Si02 substrate. Field tests were made by recording the electric field inside dust devils in a Nevada desert, and those electric fields were simulated in a lab environment. Further tests to determine the device sensitivity were performed by manually manipulating the gold needle with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) tip. We report on fabrication techniques, field and lab test results and AFM testing results.

  6. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  7. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; ...

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin wasmore » determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states

  8. A sensitive and reliable test instrument to assess swimming in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Åkesson, Elisabet; Holmberg, Lena; Sundström, Erik

    2015-09-15

    For clinical translation of experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) research, evaluation of animal SCI models should include several sensorimotor functions. Validated and reliable assessment tools should be applicable to a wide range of injury severity. The BBB scale is the most widely used test instrument, but similar to most others it is used to assess open field ambulation. We have developed an assessment tool for swimming in rats with SCI, with high discriminative power and sensitivity to functional recovery after mild and severe injuries, without need for advanced test equipment. We studied various parameters of swimming in four groups of rats with thoracic SCI of different severity and a control group, for 8 weeks after surgery. Six parameters were combined in a multiple item scale, the Karolinska Institutet Swim Assessment Tool (KSAT). KSAT scores for all SCI groups showed consistent functional improvement after injury, and significant differences between the five experimental groups. The internal consistency, the inter-rater and the test-retest reliability were very high. The KSAT score was highly correlated to the cross-section area of white matter spared at the injury epicenter. Importantly, even after 8 weeks of recovery the KSAT score reliably discriminated normal animals from those inflicted by the mildest injury, and also displayed the recovery of the most severely injured rats. We conclude that this swim scale is an efficient and reliable tool to assess motor activity during swimming, and an important addition to the methods available for evaluating rat models of SCI.

  9. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  10. Effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Da-Sheng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Qian, Jun; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration in rats with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] A rat model of spinal cord injury was constructed by using the Allen weight-drop method. These rats were randomly divided into normal, spinal cord injury, and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation groups. The experimental group received the intervention with oscillating electrical field stimulation, and the control group received the intervention with an electrical field stimulator without oscillating electrical field stimulation. Each group was then randomly divided into seven subgroups according to observation time (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and inclined plate test score evaluation, motor evoked potential detection, and histological observation were performed. [Results] In the first 2 weeks of oscillating electrical field stimulation, the oscillating electrical field stimulation and inclined plate test scores of spinal cord injury group and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group were not significantly different. In the fourth week, the scores of the spinal cord injury group were significantly lower than those of the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group. The motor evoked potential incubation period in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group at the various time points was shorter than that in the spinal cord injury group. In the sixth week, the relative area of myelin in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group was evidently larger than that in the spinal cord injury group. [Conclusion] Oscillating electrical field stimulation could effectively improve spinal cord conduction function and promote motor function recovery in rats with spinal cord injury, as well as promote myelin

  11. NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) In-Field Demonstration at Desert RATS 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tri, Terry O.; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Toups, Larry; Gill, Tracy R.; Howe, A. Scott

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the construction, assembly, subsystem integration, transportation, and field testing operations associated with the Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Pressurized Excursion Module (PEM) and discusses lessons learned. In a one-year period beginning summer 2009, a tightly scheduled design-develop-build process was utilized by a small NASA "tiger team" to produce the functional HDU-PEM prototype in time to participate in the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) field campaign. The process required the coordination of multiple teams, subcontractors, facility management and safety staff. It also required a well-choreographed material handling and transportation process to deliver the finished product from the NASA-Johnson Space Center facilities to the remote Arizona desert locations of the field test. Significant findings of this paper include the team s greater understanding of the HDU-PEM s many integration issues and the in-field training the team acquired which will enable the implementation of the next-generation of improvements and development of high-fidelity field operations in a harsh environment. The Desert RATS analog environment is being promoted by NASA as an efficient means to design, build, and integrate multiple technologies in a mission architecture context, with the eventual goal of evolving the technologies into robust flight hardware systems. The HDU-PEM in-field demonstration at Desert RATS 2010 provided a validation process for the integration team, which has already begun to retool for the 2011 field tests that require an adapted architecture.

  12. Behavioral effects on rats of motion within a high static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Thomas A; Carella, Lee; Gonzalez, Dani; Janowitz, Ilana; Mueller, Anthony; Mueller, Kathleen; Neth, Bryan; Smith, James C

    2011-03-01

    Some human subjects report vestibular disturbances such as vertigo, apparent motion, and nausea around or within high strength MRI systems operating at 4 T to 9.4 T. These vestibular effects have been ascribed to the consequences of movement through the high magnetic field. We have previously found that exposure to magnetic fields above 7 T suppresses rearing, causes locomotor circling, and induces conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in rodents. The present experiments were designed to test the effects on rats of motion through the magnetic field of the 14.1 T superconducting magnet. In Experiment 1, we compared the effects of multiple rapid insertions and removals from the center of the magnet to the effects of continuous exposure. Repeated traversal of the magnetic field gradient with only momentary exposure to 14.1 T was sufficient to suppress rearing and induce a significant CTA. Repeated insertion and removal from the magnet, however, did not have a greater effect than a single 30-min exposure on either acute locomotor behavior or CTA acquisition. Prolonged exposure was required to induce locomotor circling. In the second series of experiments, we controlled the rate of insertion and removal by means of an electric motor. Locomotor circling appeared to be dependent on the speed of insertion and removal, but the suppression of rearing and the acquisition of CTA were independent of speed of insertion and removal. In Experiment 3, we inserted rats into the center of the magnet and then rotated them about their rostral-caudal axis during a 30-min 14.1 T exposure. Rotation within the magnet did not modulate the behavioral effects of exposure. We conclude that, in rats, movement through the steep gradient of a high magnetic field has some behavioral effects, but sustained exposure to the homogenous center of the field is required for the full behavioral consequences.

  13. Home cage testing of delay discounting in rats.

    PubMed

    Koot, S; Adriani, W; Saso, L; van den Bos, R; Laviola, G

    2009-11-01

    Testing rodents in their home cages has become increasingly popular. Since human intervention, handling, and transport are minimized, behavior can be recorded undisturbed and continuously. Currently existing home cage systems are too complex if only relatively simple operant-learning tests are to be carried out in rats. For that purpose, a new low-cost computer-controlled operant panel was designed, which can be placed inside the home cage. A pilot study was carried out, using an intolerance-to-delay protocol, classically developed for testing behavioral impulsivity. Male adult rats were tested in their home cages, containing the operant panel provided with nose-poking holes. Nose poking in one hole resulted in the immediate delivery of one food pellet (small-soon, SS), whereas nose poking in the other hole delivered five food pellets after a delay (large-late), which was increased progressively each day (0-150 sec). The two daily sessions, spaced 8 h apart, lasted 1 h each, and the time-out after food delivery was 90 sec. A clear-cut shift toward preference for SS, which is considered a classical index of cognitive impulsivity, was shown at the longest delay. It is noteworthy that rats shifted when the delay interval was longer than the mean intertrial interval-that is, when they experienced more than one delay-equivalent odds against discounting (see Adriani & Laviola, 2006). The shortened training (2 days) and testing (5 days) phases, as allowed by prolonged and multiple daily sessions, can be advantageous in testing rodents during selected short phases of development. Current research is focusing on further validation of this and similar protocols.

  14. The effects of simultaneous combined exposure to CDMA and WCDMA electromagnetic fields on rat testicular function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-June; Jin, Yeung Bae; Kim, Tae-Hong; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Choi, Hyung-Do; Lee, Jae-Seon; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2012-05-01

    Wireless mobile phones and other telecommunication devices are used extensively in daily life. We therefore examined the effects of combined exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on rat testicular function, specifically with respect to sensitive processes such as spermatogenesis. Male rats were exposed to single code division multiple access (CDMA) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA) RF signals for 12 weeks. The RF exposure schedule comprised 45 min/day, 5 days/week for a total of 12 weeks. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA and WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg each or 4.0 W/kg in total. We then investigated the correlates of testicular function such as sperm count in the cauda epididymis, testosterone concentration in the blood serum, malondialdehyde concentrations in the testes and epididymis, frequency of spermatogenesis stages, and appearance of apoptotic cells in the testes. We also immunoblotted for p53, bcl2, GADD45, cyclin G, and HSP70 in the testes of sham- and combined RF-exposed animals. Based on the results, we concluded that simultaneous exposure to CDMA and WCDMA RF-EMFs at 4.0 W/kg SAR did not have any observable adverse effects on rat spermatogenesis.

  15. Field Testing the EUSO-SPB instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eser, Johannes; Cummings, Austin; Gregg, Rachel; Krantz, Harry; Polonsky, Zach; Wiencke, Lawrence; JEM-EUSO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In September of 2016 the Extreme Universe Space Observatory on a super pressure balloon (EUSO-SPB) instrument was tested in the west Utah desert with a laser ``test beam'' system. Laser tracks were measured at distances of 24 km with the laser tilted away from the detector. This geometry is similar to the expected geometry of downward going cosmic ray air showers during the planned balloon flight. We describe the test beam system and the tests. We acknowledge support of NASA grants NNX13AH55G, NNX13AH53G.

  16. CALIPERS. Planning the Systems Approach to Field Testing Educational Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    Field testing, the last step in the developmental cycle for educational products, must ascertain whether the test product, placed in a natural environment, will actually elicit the behavioral changes it was designed to effect. A systems approach to field testing requires that certain basic areas of investigation first be established. Specific…

  17. Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) Hardware Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Ken; Boody, April; Reed, Dave; Wang, Chung; Stuckey, Bob; Cox, Dave

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this study are threefold: (1) Provide insight into water delivery in microgravity and determine optimal germination paper wetting for subsequent seed germination in microgravity; (2) Observe the behavior of water exposed to a strong localized magnetic field in microgravity; and (3) Simulate the flow of fixative (using water) through the hardware. The Magnetic Field Apparatus (MFA) is a new piece of hardware slated to fly on the Space Shuttle in early 2001. MFA is designed to expose plant tissue to magnets in a microgravity environment, deliver water to the plant tissue, record photographic images of plant tissue, and deliver fixative to the plant tissue.

  18. Does Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy Influence Nerve Regeneration in the Median Nerve Model of the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Smeets, Ralf; Becker, Stephan T.; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pulsed magnetic field therapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after median nerve injury and primary coaptation in the rat. Both median nerves were surgically exposed and denervated in 24 female Wistar rats. A microsurgical coaptation was performed on the right side, whereas on the left side a spontaneous healing was prevented. The study group underwent a daily pulsed magnetic field therapy; the other group served as a control group. The grasping force was recorded 2 weeks after the surgical intervention for a period of 12 weeks. The right median nerve was excised and histologically examined. The histomorphometric data and the functional assessments were analyzed by t-test statistics and one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant influence of group affiliation and grasping force (P = 0.0078). Grasping strength was higher on a significant level in the experimental group compared to the control group permanently from the 9th week to the end of the study. T-test statistics revealed a significantly higher weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle (P = 0.0385) in the experimental group. The histological evaluation did not reveal any statistically significant differences concerning the histomorphometric parameters. Our results suggest that the pulsed magnetic field therapy has a positive influence on the functional aspects of neural regeneration. More studies are needed to precisely evaluate and optimize the intensity and duration of the application. PMID:25143937

  19. Subchronic in vivo effects of a high static magnetic field (9.4 T) in rats.

    PubMed

    High, W B; Sikora, J; Ugurbil, K; Garwood, M

    2000-07-01

    The potential adverse biologic effects of sub chronic (cumulatively 10 weeks) exposure to a high magnetic field (9.4 T) were evaluated in young adult male and female Fischer rats as well as in their progeny. Biologic end points in adult rats included changes in daily clinical observations; spatial memory tests; weekly heart rates, body weights, food and water consumption, and the feed efficiency ratio; terminal hematologic, blood biochemical and urinary parameter changes; gross pathologic findings; and major organ weights. In offspring, biologic end points included the gestation period, number of live births, number of pups, ratio of male to female pups/litter; postnatal time period of eye opening; birth and weekly body weights, behavioral changes, central nervous system responses, as well as hematologic, blood biochemistry, and urinary parameter changes; and gross pathologic findings. Findings from this study showed that there were no adverse biologic effects in male and female adult rats or their progeny that could be attributed to 10-week exposure to a 9.4-T static magnetic field.

  20. Multiphase pumping: The lessons of long-term field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Elf-Aquitaine, E.L.; Taiani, S.

    1995-12-31

    The field testing of a POSEIDON rotodynamic helicoaxial pump (P302) manufactured by SULZER is being conducted since June 1994 on the Elf Aquitaine`s onshore site of the PECORADE oil field located in the south-west of France. This one-year testing program is aimed at qualifying this design of multiphase pump for future field applications. The multiphase pump has been previously tested at the IFP`s test loop of SOLAIZE for factory acceptance and performance test. This paper describes the PECORADE multiphase loop, the multiphase pump testing procedures and the results obtained in the field of performance, sensitivity, and endurance. The operational and maintenance lessons to be learned from this long-term field testing are presented from the point of view of the operator.

  1. [Effect of an alternating magnetic field on the development of spontaneous hypertension in rats].

    PubMed

    Markov, Kh M; Petrichuk, S V; Zavrieva, M K; Suslova, G F; Nartsissov, R P

    1984-12-01

    The effect of varying magnetic field on the development of spontaneous hypertension was studied in experiments on Okamoto rats. The influence of magnetic field during antenatal development caused persistent changes in lymphocyte and organ metabolism and accelerated the appearance of spontaneous hypertension in rats. Based on enzymatic activity of lymphocytes it is possible to predict the development of spontaneous arterial hypertension.

  2. Desert Rats 2010 Operations Tests: Insights from the Geology Crew Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Hurtado, J. M., Jr.; Young, K. E.; Rice, J.; Garry, W. B.; Eppler, D.

    2011-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of tests of NASA hardware and operations deployed in the high desert of Arizona. Conducted annually since 1997, these activities exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in relatively harsh conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable. Such activities not only test vehicle subsystems, they also stress communications and operations systems and enable testing of science operations approaches that advance human and robotic surface exploration capabilities. Desert RATS 2010 tested two crewed rovers designed as first-generation prototypes of small pressurized vehicles, consistent with exploration architecture designs. Each rover provided the internal volume necessary for crewmembers to live and work for periods up to 14 days, as well as allowing for extravehicular activities (EVAs) through the use of rear-mounted suit ports. The 2010 test was designed to simulate geologic science traverses over a 14-day period through a volcanic field that is analogous to volcanic terrains observed throughout the Solar System. The test was conducted between 31 August and 13 September 2010. Two crewmembers lived in and operated each rover for a week with a "shift change" on day 7, resulting in a total of eight test subjects for the two-week period. Each crew consisted of an engineer/commander and an experienced field geologist. Three of the engineer/commanders were experienced astronauts with at least one Space Shuttle flight. The field geologists were drawn from the scientific community, based on funded and published field expertise.

  3. Failure to produce taste-aversion learning in rats exposed to static electric fields and air ions

    SciTech Connect

    Creim, J.A.; Lovely, R.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Forsythe, W.C.; Anderson, L.E.

    1995-12-01

    Taste-aversion (TA) learning was measured to determine whether exposure to high-voltage direct current (HVdc) static electric fields can produce TA learning in male Long Evans rats. Fifty-six rats were randomly distributed into four groups of 14 rats each. All rats were placed on a 20 min/day drinking schedule for 12 consecutive days prior to receiving five conditioning trials. During the conditioning trials, access to 0.1% sodium saccharin-flavored water was given for 20 min, followed 30 min later by one of four treatments. Two groups of 14 rats each were individually exposed to static electric fields and air ions, one group to +75 kV/m (+2 {times} 10{sup 5} air ions/cm{sup 3}) and the other group to {minus}75 kV/m ({minus}2 {times} 10{sup 5} air ions/cm{sup 3}). Two other groups of 14 rats each served as sham-exposed controls, with the following variation in one of the sham-exposed groups: this group was subdivided into two subsets of seven rats each, so that a positive control group could be included to validate the experimental design. The positive control group (n = 7) was injected with cyclophosphamide 25 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min after access to saccharin-flavored water on conditioning days, whereas the other subset of seven rats was similarly injected with an equivalent volume of saline. Access to saccharin-flavored water on conditioning days was followed by the treatments described above and was alternated daily with water recovery sessions in which the rats received access to water for 20 min in the home cage without further treatment. Following the last water-recovery session, a 20 min, two-bottle preference test (between water and saccharin-flavored water) was administered to each group. The positive control group did show TA learning, thus validating the experimental protocol.

  4. [Experimental behavioral tests using monkey and rat offspring born from mothers exposed perinatally to EDCs].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2005-06-01

    Purpose of this study is to conduct risk assessment of EDCs for the development of CNS in humans by extrapolation from the results of behavioral tests in rats and monkeys. Our hypotheses on the mechanism which gives an adverse effect of EDCs to the developing neural systems are as follows. Thyroid hormone (TH) disrupting chemicals induce deterioration of neural development and estrogen (E2) agonistic chemicals may disturb apoptosis of fetal neural cells resulting in injury of normal neural circuit. The strategy of this study is a bottom up system; for example, basic information was obtained by an experiment using rats and then an experiment using monkey was designed to adapt the results from rats. The monkey experiment data will be assessed in comparison with human behavior. The tactics of this study are, however, a top down system. It is neural behaviors which are an end point evaluation that are primarily performed. They are mother-infant interactions, social behaviors, open field test, memory and learning tests, etc. As for analysis of the mechanism of EDCs' adverse effect, we tried two methods: one is an in vivo drug biased test which interferes with the monoamine oxidase (MAO) system and the other is an in vitro primary neural cell culture. EDCs including BPA, NP, propylthiouracil (PTU) and PCB-OH are injected orally to pregnant rats from gestation day 3 (GD3) to post natal day 21 (PND21) at weaning and their offspring were tested. On the other hand TCDD, BPA and PCB effect are assessed in rhesus monkey or cynomolgus monkey offspring. The study is still continuing and we will present the results obtained to date.

  5. Chronic alcoholism-mediated metabolic disorders in albino rat testes

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Larysa B.; Matvienko, Anatoliy V.; Kovalenko, Valentina M.

    2014-01-01

    There is good evidence for impairment of spermatogenesis and reductions in sperm counts and testosterone levels in chronic alcoholics. The mechanisms for these effects have not yet been studied in detail. The consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on the structure and/or metabolism of testis cell macromolecules require to be intensively investigated. The present work reports the effects of chronic alcoholism on contents of free amino acids, levels of cytochrome P450 3A2 (CYP3A2) mRNA expression and DNA fragmentation, as well as on contents of different cholesterol fractions and protein thiol groups in rat testes. Wistar albino male rats were divided into two groups: I – control (intact animals), II – chronic alcoholism (15% ethanol self-administration during 150 days). Following 150 days of alcohol consumption, testicular free amino acid content was found to be significantly changed as compared with control. The most profound changes were registered for contents of lysine (–53%) and methionine (+133%). The intensity of DNA fragmentation in alcohol-treated rat testes was considerably increased, on the contrary CYP3A2 mRNA expression in testis cells was inhibited, testicular contents of total and etherified cholesterol increased by 25% and 45% respectively, and protein SH-groups decreased by 13%. Multidirectional changes of the activities of testicular dehydrogenases were detected. We thus obtained complex assessment of chronic alcoholism effects in male gonads, affecting especially amino acid, protein, ATP and NADPH metabolism. Our results demonstrated profound changes in testes on the level of proteome and genome. We suggest that the revealed metabolic disorders can have negative implication on cellular regulation of spermatogenesis under long-term ethanol exposure. PMID:26109895

  6. Factors influencing extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa staining of rat testes.

    PubMed

    Bassey, R B; Bakare, A A; Peter, A I; Oremosu, A A; Osinubi, A A

    2012-08-01

    Some plant extracts can be used in biology and medicine to reveal or identify cellular components and tissues. We investigated the effects of time and concentration on staining of histological sections of rat testes by an acidified extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa. An ethanolic extract of H. sabdariffa was diluted using 1% acetic acid in 70% ethanol to stain histological sections of testes at concentrations of 0.2, 0.1 and 0.05 g/ml for 5, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min. The sections of testes were stained deep red. The staining efficiency of H. sabdariffa was greater at a high concentration and required less time to achieve optimal staining. H. sabdariffa is a strongly basic dye that can be used for various diagnostic purposes. Staining time and concentration must be considered to achieve optimal results.

  7. Rapid Field Toxicity Test for Water Supplies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-28

    four hours to allow toxins to react with the cells, bioluminescent bacteria , and for the cells to regain their ight-producing powers. In 1993, the...chart bioluminescent bacteria . recorder, where it is depicted as a cumulative curve (Fig. 5). Mud testing uses the suspended particulate phase (SPP, Fig...in perfect Correlation with the bioluminescent bacteria assay agreement. Correlation of E50 with LC50 is shown (Fig. 10) is good below an EC50 (half

  8. Field Lysimeter Test Facility: Second year (FY 1989) test results

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.D.; Gee, G.W.; Kanyid, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.

    1990-04-01

    The Record of Decision associated with the Hanford Defense Waste Environmental Impact Statement (53 FR 12449-53) commits to an evaluation of the use of protective barriers placed over near-surface wastes. The barrier must protect against wind and water erosion and limit plant and animal intrusion and infiltration of water. Successful conclusion of this program will yield the necessary protective barrier design for near-surface waste isolation. This report presents results from the second year of tests at the FLTF. The primary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to measure the water budgets within the various barriers and assess the effectiveness of their designs in limiting water intrusion into the zone beneath each barrier. Information obtained from these measurements is intended for use in refining barrier designs. Four elements of water budget were measured during the year: precipitation, evaporation, storage, and drainage. Run-off, which is a fifth element of a complete water budget, was made negligible by a lip on the lysimeters that protrudes 5 cm above the soil surface to prevent run-off. A secondary objective of testing protective barriers at the FLTF was to refine procedures and equipment to support data collection for verification of the computer model needed for long-term projections of barrier performance. 6 refs.

  9. Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test

    SciTech Connect

    Giangiacomo, L.A.

    1999-05-28

    The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

  10. Nevada Test Site field trip guidebook 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Dockery, H.A.; Byers, F.M. Jr.; Orkild, P.P.

    1985-04-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in southern Nevada, was established in 1950 as an area for testing nuclear devices. Various geologic studies performed in conjunction with these activities as well as recent work on a proposed radioactive waste repository are reported in detail in this guidebook and include studies on the structure, stratigraphy, geochemistry, and physical properties of the rocks at NTS. The oldest sequence of rocks exposed in the NTS region is comprised of late Precambrian to Permian miogeoclinal rocks which were subsequently deformed during Jura-Cretaceous contraction, probably related to the Sevier orogeny. These rocks were then locally intruded by late Mesozoic (approx.93 m.y.BP) plutonic rocks related to the Sierra Nevada batholith. Voluminous calcalkaline ash-flow tuffs and associated volcanic rocks originating from the Timber Mountain-Oasis Valley caldera complex were extruded over much of NTS and adjacent areas from approx.16 to 10 m.y.BP. Peralkaline rocks intercalated in the volcanic sequence issued from both Silent Canyon (15 to 13 m.y.BP) and Black Mountain (9 to 7 m.y.BP) volcanic centers. The youngest igneous rocks at NTS are composed of basaltic rocks, primarily hawaiite, the older of which are associated with the evolving silicic volcanic centers and the younger associated with Cenozoic regional extension. Late Tertiary to Recent alluvium derived from the ranges form large, coalescing fans which fill the basins with sediments and reach thicknesses of over 1 km. 45 refs., 21 figs.

  11. FSA field test report, 1980 - 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, H. G.; Grimmett, C. A.; Repar, J.; Frickland, P. O.; Amy, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Photovoltaic modules made of new and developing materials were tested in a continuing study of weatherability, compatibility, and corrosion protection. Over a two-year period, 365 two-cell submodules have been exposed for various intervals at three outdoor sites in Southern California or subjected to laboratory acceptance tests. Results to date show little loss of maximum power output, except in two types of modules. In the first of these, failure is due to cell fracture from the stresses that arise as water is regained from the surrounding air by a hardboard substrate, which shrank as it dried during its encapsulation in plastic film at 150 C in vacuo. In the second, the glass superstrate is sensitive to cracking, which also damages the cells electrostatically bonded to it; inadequate bonding of interconnects to the cells is also a problem in these modules. In a third type of module, a polyurethane pottant has begun to yellow, though as yet without significant effect on maximum power output.

  12. Test particle acceleration in turbulent reconnecting magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosiano, John; Matthaeus, William H.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Plante, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    The effect of turbulence on particle acceleration in a MHD field was investigated by computing test particle trajectories in turbulent MHD reconnecting fields, including reconnection simulations at different magnetic Reynolds numbers. The dynamics of individual particles were investigated making it possible to examine the acceleration mechanism in great detail. It was found that turbulence influences the acceleration in two ways. It enhances the reconnection electric field while producing a stochastic electric field that gives rise to momentum diffusion; and it produces magnetic 'bubbles' and other irregularities that can temporarily trap test particles in the strong reconnection electric field for times comparable to the magnetofluid characteristic time.

  13. Brahms Mobile Agents: Architecture and Field Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Kaskiris, Charis; vanHoof, Ron

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a model-based, distributed architecture that integrates diverse components in a system designed for lunar and planetary surface operations: an astronaut's space suit, cameras, rover/All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV), robotic assistant, other personnel in a local habitat, and a remote mission support team (with time delay). Software processes, called agents, implemented in the Brahms language, run on multiple, mobile platforms. These mobile agents interpret and transform available data to help people and robotic systems coordinate their actions to make operations more safe and efficient. The Brahms-based mobile agent architecture (MAA) uses a novel combination of agent types so the software agents may understand and facilitate communications between people and between system components. A state-of-the-art spoken dialogue interface is integrated with Brahms models, supporting a speech-driven field observation record and rover command system (e.g., return here later and bring this back to the habitat ). This combination of agents, rover, and model-based spoken dialogue interface constitutes a personal assistant. An important aspect of the methodology involves first simulating the entire system in Brahms, then configuring the agents into a run-time system.

  14. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.

    1997-01-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  15. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bula, C.; E-144 Collaboration

    1996-10-01

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collision with terawatt pulses of 1,054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{var_epsilon}m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  16. Prenatal exposure to restraint or predator stresses attenuates field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Saboory, Ehsan; Ahmadzadeh, Ramin; Roshan-Milani, Shiva

    2011-12-01

    Exposure to stress is known to change synaptic plasticity and results in long-term depression; further, this stress precipitates seizures. In the study described here, the prenatal restraint and predator stress models were used to test the hypothesis that indirect prenatal stresses influence hippocampal synaptic potentiation and may affect seizures susceptibility in infant rats. Pregnant female Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: control, restraint-stressed, and predator-stressed groups. Both stressed groups were exposed to the stressor on gestation days 15, 16, and 17. The restraint stress involved 1-h sessions twice daily in a Plexiglas tube and the predator stress involved 2-h sessions once daily in a cage placed within the visual range of a caged cat. Blood corticosterone (COS) levels were measured in different time points. Hippocampal slices were prepared and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) were studied on postnatal day 15. Pilocarpine was administered on postnatal day 25 and mortality rates were measured after 2 and 24h. Restraint and predator stresses resulted in significantly elevated COS blood levels in dams and pups. Both the amplitude and slope of fEPSP in the CA1 area decreased significantly in the stressed groups as compared to the control. Prenatal restraint and predator stresses significantly increased the fatal effect of pilocarpine at 24h after injection. Exposure to prenatal stresses and COS blood levels elevation reduce hippocampal synaptic potentiation and increase mortality rate of seizure in infant rats and may affect on later seizure susceptibility and prognosis.

  17. Failure to produce taste-aversion learning in rats exposed to static electric fields and air ions.

    PubMed

    Creim, J A; Lovely, R H; Weigel, R J; Forsythe, W C; Anderson, L E

    1995-01-01

    Taste-aversion (TA) learning was measured to determine whether exposure to high-voltage direct current (HVdc) static electric fields can produce TA learning in male Long Evans rats. Fifty-six rats were randomly distributed into four groups of 14 rats each. All rats were placed on a 20 min/day drinking schedule for 12 consecutive days prior to receiving five conditioning trials. During the conditioning trials, access to 0.1% sodium saccharin-flavored water was given for 20 min, followed 30 min later by one of four treatments. Two groups of 14 rats each were individually exposed to static electric fields and air ions, one group to +75 kV/m (+2 x 10(5) air ions/cm3) and the other group to -75 kV/m (-2 x 10(5) air ions/cm3). Two other groups of 14 rats each served as sham-exposed controls, with the following variation in one of the sham-exposed groups: This group was subdivided into two subsets of seven rats each, so that a positive control group could be included to validate the experimental design. The positive control group (n = 7) was injected with cyclophosphamide 25 mg/kg, i.p., 30 min after access to saccharin-flavored water on conditioning days, whereas the other subset of seven rats was similarly injected with an equivalent volume of saline. Access to saccharin-flavored water on conditioning days was followed by the treatments described above and was alternated daily with water "recovery" sessions in which the rats received access to water for 20 min in the home cage without further treatment. Following the last water-recovery session, a 20 min, two-bottle preference test (between water and saccharin-flavored water) was administered to each group. The positive control group did show TA learning, thus validating the experimental protocol. No saccharin-flavored water was consumed in the two-bottle preference test by the cyclophosphamide-injected, sham-exposed group compared to 74% consumed by the saline-injected sham-exposed controls (P < .0001). Saccharin

  18. Effect of short-term 50 Hz electromagnetic field exposure on the behavior of rats.

    PubMed

    Balassa, T; Szemerszky, R; Bárdos, Gy

    2009-12-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field generated by transformer stations located within buildings has been suspected to initiate non-specific health problems. This possibility was examined in model experiments in rats. Following short-term exposure (50 Hz, 500 mircoT, 20 min), situational and social anxiety as well as locomotor activity pattern were examined by several different tests (elevated plus-maze, novel object exploration, social interaction and territoriality).Based on our results having obtained so far, it seems that these field parameters (that equals the official reference limit for workers) may cause some kind of discomfort, may influence behavior, increase passivity and situational anxiety, but has no verified effect on the social and territorial behavior.

  19. NASA Desert RATS 2010: Preliminary results for science operations conducted in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, J. E.; Lofgren, G. E.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Abercromby, A. F.

    2013-10-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with international partners to develop the space architectures and mission plans necessary for human spaceflight beyond Earth orbit. The Apollo missions to the Moon demonstrated conclusively that surface mobility is a key asset that improves the efficiency of human explorers on a planetary surface. NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS), a multi-year series of tests of hardware and operations carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona, has tested a crewed pressurized rover concept referred to as the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). During NASA's Desert RATS 2010, four 2-person crews driving two SEVs collectively conducted 12 days of field exploration in the San Francisco Volcanic Field in northern Arizona. They collected 461 samples, with a total mass of 161.2 kg, on 70 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). Each SEV crew traveled over 60 km during their field explorations. This paper illustrates where the actual field sites, or 'science stations', were located, provides a brief description of the types of samples collected at each station, and highlights some of the more interesting sites. Most of the geologic samples collected at Desert RATS 2010 were well documented at the site of collection, and upon delivery to the Johnson Space Center the samples were given a preliminary examination. The samples are available for further study by interested researchers developing scientific instruments for use on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, or for geological investigations of the San Francisco Volcanic Field.

  20. Managing Science Operations During Planetary Surface: The 2010 Desert RATS Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.; Ming, D. W.

    2011-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of hardware and operations tests carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona on the San Francisco Volcanic Field. Conducted since 1997, these activities are designed to exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable. Such activities not only test vehicle subsystems through extended rough-terrain driving, they also stress communications and operations systems and allow testing of science operations approaches to advance human and robotic surface capabilities. Desert RATS is a venue where new ideas can be tested, both individually and as part of an operation with multiple elements. By conducting operations over multiple yearly cycles, ideas that make the cut can be iterated and tested during follow-on years. This ultimately gives both the hardware and the personnel experience in the kind of multi-element integrated operations that will be necessary in future human planetary exploration.

  1. Probe Station and Near-Field Scanner for Testing Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Afroz; Lee, Richard Q.; Darby, William G.; Barr, Philip J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Lambert, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A facility that includes a probe station and a scanning open-ended waveguide probe for measuring near electromagnetic fields has been added to Glenn Research Center's suite of antenna-testing facilities, at a small fraction of the cost of the other facilities. This facility is designed specifically for nondestructive characterization of the radiation patterns of miniaturized microwave antennas fabricated on semiconductor and dielectric wafer substrates, including active antennas that are difficult to test in traditional antenna-testing ranges because of fragility, smallness, or severity of DC-bias or test-fixture requirements. By virtue of the simple fact that a greater fraction of radiated power can be captured in a near-field measurement than in a conventional far-field measurement, this near-field facility is convenient for testing miniaturized antennas with low gains.

  2. Field Geologic Observation and Sample Collection Strategies for Planetary Surface Exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS Geologist Crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurtado, Jose M., Jr.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic field- work, the Desert RATS(Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crew members who participated in the 2010 field test.We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies relatedtoduplicationofsamplesandobservations;logisticalconstraintson the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to flexibly execute their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  3. Effect of light-dark changes on the locomotor activity in open field in adult rats and opossums.

    PubMed

    Klejbor, I; Ludkiewicz, B; Turlejski, K

    2013-11-01

    There have been no reports on how the light-dark changes determine the locomotor activity of animals in the group of high reactivity (HR) and low reactivity (LR). In the present study we have compared selected parameters of the locomotor activity of the HR and the LR groups of the laboratory opossums and Wistar rats during consecutive, light and dark phases in the open field test. Sixty male Wistar adult rats, at an average weight of 350 g each, and 24 adult Monodelphis opossums of both sexes at an average weight of 120 g each were used. The animals' activity for 2 h daily between the hours of 17:30 and 19:30, in line with the natural light-dark cycle were recorded and then analysed using VideoTrack ver.2.0 (Vievpoint France). According to our results, we noted that a change of the experimental conditions from light to dark involves an increase in the locomotor activity in rats and opossums of the HR group, while there is no effect on the activity of the rats and opossums in the LR group. Locomotor activity in the HR rats, both in the light and dark conditions is characterised by a consistent pattern of change - higher activity in the first stage of the recording and a slowdown (habituation) in the second phase of the observation. The locomotor activity of the opossum, during both light and dark conditions, was observed to be at a consistently high level compared to the rats.

  4. Social Effects on Rat Spatial Choice in an Open Field Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Matthew R.; Brown, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Pairs of rats foraged in trials either together or separately in an open field apparatus for pellets hidden in discreet locations in a 5 x 5 matrix. Trial duration was either 1 or 4 min. The tendency to choose locations that had earlier been visited by another rat was examined by comparing the choices made in the presence and absence of the other…

  5. Effects of 100-μT extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields exposure on hematograms and blood chemistry in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jinsheng; Zhang, Yemao; Zhang, Jiangong; Liu, Xingfa; Ruan, Guoran; Chaugai, Sandip; Tang, Jiarong; Wang, Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) affect health or not. Here, we constructed a 100-μT/50 Hz electromagnetic field atmosphere. A total of 128 rats were randomly assigned into two groups: the ELF EMF group and the sham group. The ELF EMF group was exposed to 100-μT/50-Hz ELF EMF for 20 h per day for three months; at the same time the other group was exposed to a sham device without ELF EMF. During the three months, the weight was recorded every 2 weeks, and the water intake and food intake of the animals were recorded weekly. The hematologic parameters were detected before and after the exposure, whereas blood chemistry analysis was performed every 4 weeks. The general condition of the exposed rats was not affected by ELF EMF. Compared with the sham group, the hematograms were not significantly altered in the ELF EMF group. Similarly, the blood chemistry (including lipid profile, blood glucose, liver function and renal function of rats) from the ELF EMF group showed no difference compared with rats from the control group during the three months exposure. The present study indicated that short-term exposure of 100-μT/50-Hz ELF EMF may not affect hematograms and blood chemistry in rats.

  6. Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.

    PubMed

    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

    2013-02-01

    The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing

  7. Photovoltaic-Powered Vaccine Refrigerator: Freezer Systems Field Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratajczak, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    A project to develop and field test photovoltaic-powered refrigerator/freezers suitable for vaccine storage was undertaken. Three refrigerator/freezers were qualified; one by Solar Power Corp. and two by Solvolt. Follow-on contracts were awarded for 19 field test systems and for 10 field test systems. A total of 29 systems were installed in 24 countries between October 1981 and October 1984. The project, systems descriptions, installation experiences, performance data for the 22 systems for which field test data was reported, an operational reliability summary, and recommendations relative to system designs and future use of such systems are explained. Performance data indicate that the systems are highly reliable and are capable of maintaining proper vaccine storage temperatures in a wide range of climatological and user environments.

  8. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  9. Influence of grid bar shape on field cleaner performance - field testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A test was conducted to evaluate the influence of grid bar cross sectional shape on cotton stripper field cleaner performance in terms of cleaning efficiency, seed cotton loss, and fiber and yarn quality. Three field cleaner configurations were tested on a cotton stripper harvester operating under f...

  10. Effect of electric field exposure on melatonin and enzyme circadian rhythms in the rat pineal

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.; Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of chronic 30-day electric field exposure on pineal serotonin N-acetyl transferase (EC 2.1.15) activity as well as melatonin and 5-methoxy tryptophol (5-MTOL) concentrations in rats, were assessed.

  11. Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Enamul

    2017-01-01

    Here I represent a Perihelion advance of a test particle in the Kerr field. I assume that the spin of the central body to be very small and planar motion occurs only in the equatorial plane. I find some physical picture which is different from the case of Schwarzschild field and can recover the picture for Schwarzschild field. We use perturbation method to solve the equation of motion.

  12. The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

  13. Field geologic observation and sample collection strategies for planetary surface exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS geologist crewmembers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, José M.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W.

    2013-10-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic fieldwork, the Desert RATS (Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crewmembers who participated in the 2010 field test. We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies related to duplication of samples and observations; logistical constraints on the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to "flexibly execute" their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  14. Tools and Technologies Needed for Conducting Planetary Field Geology While On EVA: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS Geologist Crewmembers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Kelsey; Hurtado, Jose M., Jr.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Bleisath, Scott; Buffington, Jesse; Rice, James W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic fieldwork, the Desert RATS (Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crewmembers who participated in the 2010 field test. We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies related to duplication of samples and observations; logistical constraints on the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to "flexibly execute" their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  15. Ethopharmacological evaluation of the rat exposure test: a prey-predator interaction test.

    PubMed

    Campos, Kelciane Ferreira Caetano; Amaral, Vanessa Cristiane Santana; Rico, Javier Leonardo; Miguel, Tarciso Tadeu; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2013-03-01

    The rat exposure test (RET) is a prey (mouse)-predator (rat) situation that activates brain defensive areas and elicits hormonal and defensive behavior in the mouse. Here, we investigated possible correlations between the spatiotemporal [time spent in protected (home chamber and tunnel) and unprotected (surface) compartments and frequency of entries into the three compartments] and ethological [e.g., duration of protected and unprotected stretched-attend postures (SAP), duration of contact with the rat's compartment] measures (Experiment 1). Secondly, we investigated the effects of systemic treatment with pro- or anti-aversive drugs on the behavior that emerged from the factor analysis (Experiment 2). The effects of chronic (21 days) imipramine and fluoxetine on defensive behavior were also investigated (Experiment 3). Exp. 1 revealed that the time in the protected compartment, protected SAP and rat contacts loaded on factor 1 (defensive behavior), while the total entries and unprotected SAP loaded on factor 2 (locomotor activity). Exp. 2 showed that alprazolam (but not diazepam) selectively changed the defensive factor. Caffeine produced a mild proaversive-like effect, whereas yohimbine only decreased locomotor activity (total entries). Fluoxetine (but not imipramine) produced a weak proaversive-like effect. 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(2) receptor ligands did not change any behavioral measure. In Exp. 3, chronic fluoxetine (but not imipramine) attenuated the defensive behavior factor without changing locomotion. Given that the defensive factor was sensitive to drugs known to attenuate (alprazolam and chronic fluoxetine) and induce (caffeine) panic attack, we suggest the RET as a useful test to assess the effects of panicolytic and panicogenic drugs.

  16. Effects of pentoxifylline administration on histomorphological parameters of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat testes

    PubMed Central

    Piryaei, Abbas; Najar, Azam

    2015-01-01

    The effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) administration on histomorphological parameters of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) in male rat testes were evaluated. We randomly divided 40 male rats into the following four groups: group 1: control or normal glycemic (NG) rats; group 2 or NG rats that received only normal saline (NS), (NG+NS); group 3 or diabetic rats which were not treated by PTX (DM+vehicle solution (NS)); and group 4 which comprised diabetic rats treated with 50 mg/kg of PTX (DM+PTX). Type 1 DM was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ (55 mg/kg). Rats were held for 30 days after which the experimental group received PTX twice daily (25 mg/kg) or NS. After 14 days of treatment by PTX or NS, the left testes from all rats were extracted and prpared for histological study. Apoptotic cells, blood vessel density, and spermatogenesis were evaluated. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test. PTX-treated-diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in number of apoptotic cells and decrease in blood vessel density compared to the DM+NS rats. A significant increase in spermatogenesis was observed in the PTX-treated diabetic group, compared to the DM+NS groups. It was concluded that PTX administration to STZ-induced type 1 DM rats affected apoptotic cell number positively. Moreover, blood vessel density significantly decreased and improvements were observed in spermatogenesis. PMID:26472963

  17. A hypomagnetic field aggravates bone loss induced by hindlimb unloading in rat femurs.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bin; Xie, Li; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Peng-fei; Zhang, Wei-ju; Ding, Chong; Qian, Ai-rong; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    A hypomagnetic field is an extremely weak magnetic field--it is considerably weaker than the geomagnetic field. In deep-space exploration missions, such as those involving extended stays on the moon and interplanetary travel, astronauts will experience abnormal space environments involving hypomagnetic fields and microgravity. It is known that microgravity in space causes bone loss, which results in decreased bone mineral density. However, it is unclear whether hypomagnetic fields affect the skeletal system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the complex effects of a hypomagnetic field and microgravity on bone loss. To study the effects of hypomagnetic fields on the femoral characteristics of rats in simulated weightlessness, we established a rat model of hindlimb unloading that was exposed to a hypomagnetic field. We used a geomagnetic field-shielding chamber to generate a hypomagnetic field of <300 nT. The results show that hypomagnetic fields can exacerbate bone mineral density loss and alter femoral biomechanical characteristics in hindlimb-unloaded rats. The underlying mechanism might involve changes in biological rhythms and the concentrations of trace elements due to the hypomagnetic field, which would result in the generation of oxidative stress responses in the rat. Excessive levels of reactive oxygen species would stimulate osteoblasts to secrete receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and promote the maturation and activation of osteoclasts and thus eventually cause bone resorption.

  18. Ontogenesis of Ap-2γ expression in rat testes.

    PubMed

    Hou, M; Stukenborg, J-B; Nurmio, M; Andersson, M; Toppari, J; Söder, O; Jahnukainen, K

    2011-01-01

    Searching for useful markers of spermatogonial stem cells and their differentiation, we used rat testes from ages representing different stages of testicular maturation to investigate the expression profile of transcription factor activation protein-2γ (Ap-2γ). The immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical evaluation using Ap-2γ and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger in combination with sorting of CD9 and CD90 positive cells (undifferentiated spermatogonia) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting was performed. Our experiments revealed that Ap-2γ is detectable in testes of late fetal age and up to 60 days postnatally and is expressed in gonocytes and spermatogonia from late fetal age throughout all maturational stages. Restricted nuclear expression of Ap-2γ to undifferentiated male germ cells was verified by coexpression of Ap-2γ with promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger in sections of paraffin-embedded testes as well as in cells sorted positive for CD9 and CD90 expression. Our study demonstrated clearly that nuclear expression of Ap-2γ is a useful marker for identifying undifferentiated male germ cells, although its functional role is yet to be fully explored.

  19. Results of field tests of a transportable calorimeter assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Rakel, D.A.; Lemming, J.F.; Rodenburg, W.W.; Duff, M.F.; Jarvis, J.Y.

    1981-01-01

    A transportable calorimetric assay system, developed for use by US Department of Energy inspectors, is described. The results of field tests at three DOE sites are presented. The samples measured in these tests represent a variety of forms (ash, oxide, metal buttons), isotopic composition, and total plutonium content.

  20. Differential Gender Performance on the Major Field Test-Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

    2013-01-01

    The Major Field Test in Business (MFT-B), a standardized assessment test of business knowledge among undergraduate business seniors, is widely used to measure student achievement. Many previous studies analyzing scores on the MFT-B report gender differences on the exam even after controlling for student's aptitude, general intellectual ability,…

  1. Structural and ultrastructural study of rat testes influenced by electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Almášiová, Viera; Holovská, Katarína; Cigánková, Viera; Račeková, Enikö; Fabianová, Kamila; Martončíková, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the influence of whole-body electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on testicular parenchyma of Wistar rats. Sexually mature rats were subjected to pulsed electromagnetic field at frequency of 2.45 GHz and mean power density 2.8 mW/cm(2) by 3-h daily applications for 3 wk. Tissue samples were obtained 3 h after the last irradiation and processed by histological techniques for light and transmission electron microscopy. Testes showed apparent degenerative changes of seminiferous epithelium. The seminiferous tubules were mostly irregular in shape, and seminiferous epithelium contained a number of empty spaces of different size. Subsequently, groups of sloughed epithelial cells were often found inside the lumina of tubules. Except for relatively unchanged Sertoli cells, some locations of basal compartment of seminiferous epithelium contained shriveled Sertoli cells with dark cytoplasm. These areas showed degenerative features including necrotizing and shriveled spermatogonia surrounded by empty irregular spaces, and undulating basement membrane. The intertubular spaces were enlarged but interstitial Leydig cells did not show any marked morphological changes. Evidence demonstrates the adverse effects of EMR on testicular parenchyma in rats.

  2. A Hypomagnetic Field Aggravates Bone Loss Induced by Hindlimb Unloading in Rat Femurs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Bin; Xie, Li; Zheng, Qi; Yang, Peng-fei; Zhang, Wei-ju; Ding, Chong; Qian, Ai-rong; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    A hypomagnetic field is an extremely weak magnetic field—it is considerably weaker than the geomagnetic field. In deep-space exploration missions, such as those involving extended stays on the moon and interplanetary travel, astronauts will experience abnormal space environments involving hypomagnetic fields and microgravity. It is known that microgravity in space causes bone loss, which results in decreased bone mineral density. However, it is unclear whether hypomagnetic fields affect the skeletal system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the complex effects of a hypomagnetic field and microgravity on bone loss. To study the effects of hypomagnetic fields on the femoral characteristics of rats in simulated weightlessness, we established a rat model of hindlimb unloading that was exposed to a hypomagnetic field. We used a geomagnetic field-shielding chamber to generate a hypomagnetic field of <300 nT. The results show that hypomagnetic fields can exacerbate bone mineral density loss and alter femoral biomechanical characteristics in hindlimb-unloaded rats. The underlying mechanism might involve changes in biological rhythms and the concentrations of trace elements due to the hypomagnetic field, which would result in the generation of oxidative stress responses in the rat. Excessive levels of reactive oxygen species would stimulate osteoblasts to secrete receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and promote the maturation and activation of osteoclasts and thus eventually cause bone resorption. PMID:25157571

  3. To develop behavioral tests of vestibular functioning in the Wistar rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Two tests of vestibular functioning in the rat were developed. The first test was the water maze. In the water maze the rat does not have the normal proprioceptive feedback from its limbs to help it maintain its orientation, and must rely primarily on the sensory input from its visual and vestibular systems. By altering lighting conditions and visual cues the vestibular functioning without visual cues was assessed. Whether there was visual compensation for some vestibular dysfunction was determined. The second test measured vestibular functioning of the rat's behavior on a parallel swing. In this test the rat's postural adjustments while swinging on the swing with the otoliths being stimulated were assessed. Less success was achieved in developing the parallel swing as a test of vestibular functioning than with the water maze. The major problem was incorrect initial assumptions of what the rat's probable behavior on the parallel swing would be.

  4. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  5. Individual Differences in Male Rats in a Behavioral Test Battery: A Multivariate Statistical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Feyissa, Daniel D.; Aher, Yogesh D.; Engidawork, Ephrem; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert; Korz, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Animal models for anxiety, depressive-like and cognitive diseases or aging often involve testing of subjects in behavioral test batteries. The large number of test variables with different mean variations and within and between test correlations often constitute a significant problem in determining essential variables to assess behavioral patterns and their variation in individual animals as well as appropriate statistical treatment. Therefore, we applied a multivariate approach (principal component analysis) to analyse the behavioral data of 162 male adult Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent a behavioral test battery including commonly used tests for spatial learning and memory (holeboard) and different behavioral patterns (open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim test) as well as for motor abilities (Rota rod). The high dimensional behavioral results were reduced to fewer components associated with spatial cognition, general activity, anxiety-, and depression-like behavior and motor ability. The loading scores of individual rats on these different components allow an assessment and the distribution of individual features in a population of animals. The reduced number of components can be used also for statistical calculations like appropriate sample sizes for valid discriminations between experimental groups, which otherwise have to be done on each variable. Because the animals were intact, untreated and experimentally naïve the results reflect trait patterns of behavior and thus individuality. The distribution of animals with high or low levels of anxiety, depressive-like behavior, general activity and cognitive features in a local population provides information of the probability of their appeareance in experimental samples and thus may help to avoid biases. However, such an analysis initially requires a large cohort of animals in order to gain a valid assessment. PMID:28261069

  6. Individual Differences in Male Rats in a Behavioral Test Battery: A Multivariate Statistical Approach.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Daniel D; Aher, Yogesh D; Engidawork, Ephrem; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert; Korz, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Animal models for anxiety, depressive-like and cognitive diseases or aging often involve testing of subjects in behavioral test batteries. The large number of test variables with different mean variations and within and between test correlations often constitute a significant problem in determining essential variables to assess behavioral patterns and their variation in individual animals as well as appropriate statistical treatment. Therefore, we applied a multivariate approach (principal component analysis) to analyse the behavioral data of 162 male adult Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent a behavioral test battery including commonly used tests for spatial learning and memory (holeboard) and different behavioral patterns (open field, elevated plus maze, forced swim test) as well as for motor abilities (Rota rod). The high dimensional behavioral results were reduced to fewer components associated with spatial cognition, general activity, anxiety-, and depression-like behavior and motor ability. The loading scores of individual rats on these different components allow an assessment and the distribution of individual features in a population of animals. The reduced number of components can be used also for statistical calculations like appropriate sample sizes for valid discriminations between experimental groups, which otherwise have to be done on each variable. Because the animals were intact, untreated and experimentally naïve the results reflect trait patterns of behavior and thus individuality. The distribution of animals with high or low levels of anxiety, depressive-like behavior, general activity and cognitive features in a local population provides information of the probability of their appeareance in experimental samples and thus may help to avoid biases. However, such an analysis initially requires a large cohort of animals in order to gain a valid assessment.

  7. The successive alleys test of anxiety in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Robert M J

    2013-06-17

    The plus-maze was derived from the early work of Montgomery. He observed that rats tended to avoid the open arms of a maze, preferring the enclosed ones. Handley, Mithani and File et al. performed the first studies on the plus-maze design we use today, and in 1987 Lister published a design for use with mice. Time spent on, and entries into, the open arms are an index of anxiety; the lower these indices, the more anxious the mouse is. Alternatively, a mouse that spends most of its time in the closed arms is classed as anxious. One of the problems of the plus-maze is that, while time spent on, and entries into, the open arms is a fairly unambiguous measure of anxiety, time in the central area is more difficult to interpret, although time spent here has been classified as "decision making". In many tests central area time is a considerable part of the total test time. Shepherd et al. produced an ingenious design to eliminate the central area, which they called the "zero maze". However, although used by several groups, it has never been as widely adopted as the plus-maze. In the present article I describe a modification of the plus-maze design that not only eliminates the central area but also incorporates elements from other anxiety tests, such as the light-dark box and emergence tests. It is a linear series of four alleys, each having increasing anxiogenic properties. It has given similar results to the plus-maze in general. Although it may not be more sensitive than the plus-maze (more data is needed before a firm conclusion can be reached on this point), it provides a useful confirmation of plus-maze results which would be useful when, for example, only a single example of a mutant mouse was available, as, for example, in ENU-based mutagenesis programs.

  8. A field validation of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Steven P; Cole, Faith A

    2002-07-01

    A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay (WA, USA). Sediment samples were collected at 30 stations with a 0.1 m2 grab from which subsamples were taken for sediment toxicity testing and geochemical and macrofaunal analyses. Standard 10-d sediment-amphipod toxicity tests were conducted with Rhepoxynius abronius and Leptocheiros plumulosus. Sediments were analyzed for 33 PAHs, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls, acid-volatile sulfide, simultaneously extracted metals (Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni), total organic carbon, and grain size. Sediment temperature, oxygen-reduction potential, water depth, and interstitial water salinity were also measured. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, quantified as total PAH toxic units (TU(PAH)), were confirmed to be an important common causal agent of the changes in the two toxicity test (% survival R. abronius, % survival L. plumulosus) and five macrofaunal community (number of species, S; numerical abundance, A: total biomass, B: Swartz's dominance index, SDI; Brillouin's index, H) endpoints. Two other macrofaunal community metrics (the complement of Simpson's index, 1 - SI, and McIntosh's index, MI) were less sensitive to TU(PAH) than the two toxicity test endpoints. The sensitivities of R. abronius and L. plumulosus to TU(PAH) were statistically indistinguishable. Field validations were conducted by testing the association between or among each toxicity test endpoint, each of seven macrofaunal community metrics (S, A, B, SDI, H, 1 - SI, MI), and TU(PAH) by (1) Spearman's coefficient of rank correlation, (2) Kendall's coefficient of concordance, (3) G tests of independence, and (4) regression analysis. Some field validations based on multivariable tests of association (e.g., points 2 and 3) among toxicity test, field, and stressor endpoints produced

  9. Testing of Photomultiplier Tubes in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, Zachary; A1 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The A1 collaboration at MAMI in Mainz, Germany has designed a neutron detector that can be used in experiments to measure the electric form factor of the neutron. They will measure elastic scattering from the neutron, using the polarized electron beam from MAMI at A1's experimental hall. The detector will be composed of two walls of staggered scintillator bars which will be read out by photomultiplier tubes (PMT), connected to both ends of each scintillator via light guides. The experiment requires a magnetic field with strength of 1 Tesla, 2m away from the first scintillator wall. The resulting fringe field is sufficient to disrupt the PMTs, despite the addition of Mu Metal shielding. The effects of the fringe field on these PMTs was tested to optimize the amplification of the PMTs. A Helmholtz Coil was designed to generate a controlled magnetic field with equivalent strength to the field that the PMTs will encounter. The PMTs were read out using a multi-channel analyzer, were tested at various angles relative to the magnetic field in order to determine the optimal orientation to minimize signal disruption. Tests were also performed to determine: the neutron detector response to cosmic radiation; and the best method for measuring a magnetic field's strength in two dimensions. National Science Foundation Grant No. IIA-1358175.

  10. Effects of a unique electromagnetic field system on the fertility of rats.

    PubMed

    Gathiram, Prem; Kistnasamy, Barry; Lalloo, Umesh

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the fertility of male and female rats exposed to a unique-design electromagnetic apparatus (Hivex Electromagnetic Field System-5 [EMFS-5]), which establishes an omni-directional, spatial field and has a wide band range of 100 MHz-3 GHz. We used 32 male and 32 female rats that were proven breeders. Sixteen rats from each sex were exposed to the EMFS for 8h/day for 10 days. The others were sham exposed. The rats were divided into the following 4 groups: in group AG1-AG8, males and females were exposed; in group AG9-AG16, only females were exposed; in group AG17-AG24, only males were exposed; and in group AG25-AG32, males and females were sham exposed. After exposure for each group, a male rat was cohabited with a female rat until parturition. The authors' results showed that except for 1 male, the fertility of all other rats was not affected. They did not see differences in reproductive ability (latency to parturition, litter size, number of male/female pups, male-to-female ratio, mass of pups at weaning) between experimental groups and the sham exposed group. The authors concluded that exposure of male and female rats to the Hivex EMFS-5 does not affect fertility or reproductive ability.

  11. Delta undulator model: Magnetic field and beam test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temnykh, A.; Babzien, M.; Davis, D.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Park, J.; Yakimenko, V.

    2011-09-01

    A novel type of in-vacuum Elliptical Polarization Undulator (EPU) magnet optimized for linac beam (Delta undulator) was developed at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) at Cornell University as part of insertion device development for the future Cornell 5 GeV Energy Recovery Source of coherent hard X-rays [1,7]. To evaluate mechanical, vacuum and magnetic properties of the magnet, a short 30 cm model with a 5 mm diameter round gap and a 2.4 cm period was built and tested in LEPP. The beam test of the Delta undulator model was conducted at Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in BNL with ˜60 MeV linac beam. The beam testing results confirmed basic properties of the undulator magnet obtained through the magnetic field measurement. In the paper we describe the magnet design, techniques and setups used for the magnetic field measurement and the beam testing results.

  12. DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

    2001-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

  13. Histologic study of the internal organs of rats chronically exposed to a high-intensity electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Seto, Y.J.; Majeau-Chargois, D.; Lymangrover, J.R.; Dunlap, W.P.; Hsieh, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 120-day exposure to a high-intensity (80 kV/m), 60-Hz electric field on histology of selected internal organs of Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. The organs examined were the pituitary, thymus, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, right and left adrenals, right and left kidneys, and right and left testes. Histological examination of 10-micron tissue sections from randomly selected animals revealed no specific evidence of histopathologic differences between field-exposed and sham-exposed animals at the light microscopic level.

  14. Development of a new field-test procedure for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Kenji; Iwata, Yuko T; Segawa, Hiroki; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Kuwayama, Kenji; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The Scott test, widely used as the field test for cocaine, is performed in three steps. If a sample contains cocaine, blue precipitates appear in step 1, the precipitates are dissolved and the solution turns pink in step 2, and the lower layer turns blue in step 3. However, some pyrrolidine-type cathinones produce cocaine-like results when tested, necessitating modification of the test procedure. Filtration of the second-step mixture weakened the blue color in step 3; however, the blue color did not completely disappear. Adding the Chen-Kao reagent to the test procedure enhanced the differentiation: when the reagent was added to cocaine, the solution was initially turbid, but then became clear over time; its addition to cathinones resulted in turquoise or light sky-blue precipitation. These results indicated that the Chen-Kao test was useful for exclusion of cathinones. A combination of the modified Scott test and the Chen-Kao test was successfully applied to the forensic samples containing cocaine or pyrrolidine-type cathinones. In conclusion, a combination of these tests will be the useful field-test procedure for cocaine.

  15. Antarctic field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Field tests of SARSAT personal locater beacons were conducted in the Antarctic to assess the viability of using these beacons to increase the safety of Antarctic field parties. Data were collected on the extent to which dry or wet snow, melting conditions, crevasse walls and snow bridges affected the ability of the SARSAT satellite to calculate an accurate position of the beacon. Average response time between beacon turn on and alert reception in McMurdo was between 4 and 5 hours for these tests. It is concluded that the SARSAT system is viable for Antarctic operations and it is recommended that it be implemented for future field operations. Because of obstruction of line-of-sight between beacon and satellite degrades the accuracy of the location calculation (particularly in wet snow), it is further recommended that field parties have sufficient numbers of beacons to insure that in an emergency, one will be able to operate from the surface.

  16. [Examination of rats' serial learning process with a wild card test in a modified Hill maze].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Makoto; Taniuchi, Tohru

    2005-08-01

    The present study examined rats' learning process of three-item series task in a modified Hill maze, using a subset test and a wild card test. In the first phase, four rats were trained with three item series composed of three simultaneously presented barriers (items A, B, C). They learned to get over the barriers in a prescribed order (A-B-C) reliably. In the next phase, three subsets of items (AB, BC, AC) were presented as prove trials. All rats responded to the subsets in a serial order consistent with the original series. In the final phase, rats were trained to produce "wild card" series (W-B-C, A-W-C, A-B-W) in addition to the original series. With training, rats mastered to substitute the wild card item (W) for the omitted original items. These results suggested that rats learned the series without using item association learning or response chaining.

  17. Field tests of carbon monitoring methods in forestry projects

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-01

    In response to the emerging scientific consensus on the facts of global climate change, the international Joint Implementation (JI) program provided a pilot phase in which utilities and other industries could finance, among other activities, international efforts to sequester carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. To make JI and its successor mechanisms workable, however, cost-effective methods are needed for monitoring progress in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The papers in this volume describe field test experiences with methods for measuring carbon storage by three types of land use: natural forest, plantation forest, and agroforestry. Each test, in a slightly different land-use situation, contributes to the knowledge of carbon-monitoring methods as experienced in the field. The field tests of the agroforestry guidelines in Guatemala and the Philippines, for example, suggested adaptations in terms of plot size and method of delineating the total area for sampling.

  18. Field testing of fugitive dust control techniques at a uranium mill tailings pile - 1982 Field Test, Gas Hills, Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-12-01

    A field test was conducted on a uranium tailings pile to evaluate the effectiveness of 15 chemical stabilizers for control of fugitive dust from uranium mill tailings. A tailings pile at the Federal American Partners (FAP) Uranium Mill, Gas Hills, Wyoming, was used for the field test. Preliminary laboratory tests using a wing tunnel were conducted to select the more promising stabilizers for field testing. Fourteen of the chemical stabilizers were applied with a field spray system pulled behind a tractor; one--Hydro Mulch--was applied with a hydroseeder. A portable weather station and data logger were installed to record the weather conditions at the test site. After 1 year of monitoring (including three site visits), all of the stabilizers have degraded to some degree; but those applied at the manufacturers' recommended rate are still somewhat effective in reducing fugitive emissions. The following synthetic polymer emulsions appear to be the more effective stabilizers: Wallpol 40-133 from Reichold Chemicals, SP-400 from Johnson and March Corporation, and CPB-12 from Wen Don Corporation. Installed costs for the test plots ranged from $8400 to $11,300/ha; this range results from differences in stabilizer costs. Large-scale stabilization costs of the test materials are expected to range from $680 to $3600/ha based on FAP experience. Evaluation of the chemical stabilizers will continue for approximately 1 year. 2 references, 33 figures, 22 tables.

  19. Post-training scopolamine treatment induced maladaptive behavior in open field habituation task in rats.

    PubMed

    Popović, Natalija; Caballero-Bleda, María; Popović, Miroljub

    2014-01-01

    The effects of scopolamine on memory consolidation are controversial and depend on several factors (i.e. site of administration, time of administration and testing, dose, cognitive task, experimental protocol, specie, strain, etc.). Generally, the range dose of systemic administered scopolamine, used in memory consolidation studies, has varied from 0.05 to 50 mg/kg. However, according to the literature, the most frequently used doses of scopolamine efficient on memory consolidation, are 1 and 30 mg/kg, low and high doses, respectively. In open field habituation studies only lower doses of scopolamine were used to test memory consolidation. Therefore, in the present study we compared the effects of low (1 mg/kg) and high (30 mg/kg) scopolamine dose, on the open field habituation task, in male Wistar rats. Scopolamine was administered immediately after the acquisition task and animals were retested 48 h later on. On the retested day, the ambulation and rearing in the open field decreased in the same manner in all tested groups. In saline- and 1 mg/kg scopolamine-treated animals, the time spent in grooming significantly decreased in the habituation task, while the same parameter significantly increased in animals treated with 30 mg/kg of scopolamine. The defecation rate significantly decreased (control group), maintained (1 mg/kg of scopolamine treated animals) or significantly increased (30 mg/kg of scopolamine treated group) on retention test. In conclusion, the present data suggest that post-training scopolamine administration does not affect locomotion neither exploration in the habituation to a novel environment, but increases defecation and grooming, two behaviours associated with fearful and stressful situations.

  20. VARIABILITY IN THE PREWEANLING ONTOGENY OF MOTOR ACTIVITY IN RATS: INFLUENCE OF DEVICE, TEST DAY, AND RAT SUPPLIER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current developmental neurotoxicity testing guidelines include evaluation of preweanling motor activity in rats. The ontogeny of activity levels as well as within-session habituation may be measured by repeatedly testing subjects at specific days of age. Activity levels are i...

  1. Studies on prenatal and postnatal development in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Montgomery, L.D.; Smith, L.G.; Phillips, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    A series of three experiments was performed to determine the effects of 30-day exposures to uniform 60-Hz electric fields (100 kV/m) on reproduction and on growth and development in the fetuses and offspring of rats. In the first experiment, exposure of females for 6 days prior to and during the mating period did not affect their reproductive performance, and continued exposure through 20 days of gestation (dg) did not affect the viability, size, or morphology of their fetuses. In the second experiment, exposure of the pregnant rat was begun on 0 dg and continued until the resulting offspring reached 8 days of age. In the third experiment, exposure began at 17 dg and continued through 25 days of postnatal life. In the second and third experiments, no statistically significant differences suggesting impairment of the growth or survival of exposed offspring were detected. In the second experiment, a significantly greater percentage of the exposed offspring showed movement, standing, and grooming at 14 days of age than among-sham-exposed offspring. There was a significant decrease at 14 days in the percentage of exposed offspring displaying the righting reflex in the second experiment and negative geotropism in the third experiment. These differences were all transient and were not found when the animals were tested again at 21 days of age. Evaluation of the reproductive integrity of the offspring of the second experiment did not disclose any deficits.

  2. Influence of 50 Hz magnetic field on sex hormones and other fertility parameters of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Akhras, Moh'd-Ali; Darmani, Homa; Elbetieha, Ahmed

    2006-02-01

    The effects of an extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field on the sex hormones and other fertility parameters of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated. Adult male rats were exposed to a 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic field at approximately 25 microT (rms) for 18 consecutive weeks. There were no significant effects on the absolute body weight and the weight of the testes of the exposed rats. However, the weights of seminal vesicles and preputial glands were significantly reduced in the exposed male rats. Similarly, a significant reduction in sperm count was observed in the exposed group. Furthermore, there were no significant effects on the serum levels of male follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) during the 18 weeks of exposure period. On the other hand, there was a significant increase in the serum levels of male luteinizing hormone (LH) after 18 weeks of exposure (P < .005), while testosterone levels were significantly decreased only after 6 and 12 weeks of the exposure period. These results suggest that long term exposure to ELF could have adverse effects on mammalian fertility and reproduction.

  3. Effects of power frequency electromagnetic fields on melatonin and sleep in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Dyche, Jeff; Anch, A. Michael; Fogler, Kethera A. J.; Barnett, David W.; Thomas, Cecil

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies investigating the effect of power frequency (50–60 Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMF) on melatonin synthesis in rats have been inconsistent with several showing suppression of melatonin synthesis, others showing no effect and a few actually demonstrating small increases. Scant research has focused on the ensuing sleep patterns of EMF exposed rats. The present study was designed to examine the effects of extremely low power frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the production of melatonin and the subsequent sleep structure in rats. Methods Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a 1000 milligauss (mG) magnetic field for 1 month. Urine was collected for the final 3 days of the exposure period for analysis of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin, the major catabolic product of melatonin found in urine. Subsequent sleep was analyzed over a 24-hour period. Results Melatonin production was mildly increased in exposed animals. Although there were no statistically significant changes in sleep structure, exposed animals showed slight decreases in REM (rapid eye movement) sleep as compared to sham (non-exposed) animals. Conclusions Power frequency magnetic fields induced a marginally statistically significant increase in melatonin levels in exposed rats compared to control. Subsequent sleep analysis indicated little effect on the sleep architecture of rats, at least not within the first day after 1 month's continuous exposure. Varying results in the literature are discussed and future research suggested. PMID:22529876

  4. Toward a Model for Field-Testing Patient Decision-Support Technologies: A Qualitative Field-Testing Study

    PubMed Central

    Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian; Watson, Eila; Austoker, Joan; Grol, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Field-testing is a quality assurance criterion in the development of patient decision-support technologies (PDSTs), as identified in the consensus statement of the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration. We incorporated field-testing into the development of a Web-based, prostate-specific antigen PDST called Prosdex, which was commissioned as part of the UK Prostate Cancer Risk Management Programme. Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a model for the future field-testing of PDSTs, based on the field-testing of Prosdex. Our objectives were (1) to explore the reactions of men to evolving prototypes of Prosdex, (2) to assess the effect of these responses on the development process, and (3) to develop a model for field-testing PDSTs based on the responses and their effect on the development process. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with the men after they had viewed evolving prototypes of Prosdex in their homes. The men were grouped according to the prototype viewed. Men between 40 and 75 years of age were recruited from two family practices in different parts of Wales, United Kingdom. In the interviews, the men were asked for their views on Prosdex, both as a whole and in relation to specific sections such as the introduction and video clips. Comments and technical issues that arose during the viewings were noted and fed back to the developers in order to produce subsequent prototypes. Results A total of 27 men were interviewed, in five groups, according to the five prototypes of Prosdex that were developed. The two main themes from the interviews were the responses to the information provided in Prosdex and the responses to specific features of Prosdex. Within these themes, two of the most frequently encountered categories were detail of the information provided and balance between contrasting viewpoints. Criticisms were encountered, particularly with respect to navigation of the site. In addition, we found

  5. Field test of fiber optic ocean bottom seismograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wentao; Wang, Zhaogang; Huang, Wenzhu; Li, Li; Liu, Wenyi; Luo, Yingbo; Li, Fang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report the field test of fiber optic ocean bottom seismograph (OOBS) which can be used in the active source seismic research. There are three fiber laser accelerometers (FLAs) and one fiber laser hydrophone (FLH), which is wavelength division multiplexed, in the OOBS. The interrogation system is put on shore and is connected with the OOBS with optical fiber cable. The field test of using an air gun is carried out under water with a depth of 30 m. The results show that the OOBS has similar performance as conventional electric OBS.

  6. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on synaptic transmission and peripheral nerve function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R A; Laszewski, B L; Carr, D B; Phillips, R D

    1980-01-01

    Several reports have suggested that the nervous system can be affected by exposure to electric fields and that these effects may have detrimental health consequences for the exposed organism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic (30-day) exposure of rats to a 60Hz, 100-kV/m electric field on synaptic transmission and peripheral-nerve function. One hundred forty-four rats, housed in individual polycarbonate cages were exposed to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz electric fields in a system free of corona discharge and ozone formation and in which the animals did not receive spark discharges or other shocks during exposure. Following 30 days of exposure to the electric field, superior cervical sympathetic ganglia, vagus and sciatic nerves were removed from rats anesthetized with urethan, placed in a temperature-controlled chamber, and superfused with a modified mammalian Ringer's solution equilibrated with 95% O2 and 5% CO2. Several measures and tests were used to characterize synaptic transmission and peripheral-nerve function. These included amplitude, area, and configuration of the postsynaptic or whole-nerve compound-action potential; conduction velocity; accommodation; refractory period; strength-duration curves; conditioning-test (C-T) response, frequency response; post-tetanic response; and high-frequency-induced fatigue. The results of a series of neurophysiologic tests and measurements indicate that only synaptic transmission is significantly and consistently affected by chronic (30-day) exposure to a 60-Hz, 100-kV/m electric field. Specifically, and increase in synaptic excitability was detected in replicated measurements of the C-T response ratio. In addition, there are trends in other data that can be interpreted to suggest a generalized increase in neuronal excitability in exposed animals.

  7. Field test of two energetic models for yellow perch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, J.S.; Haas, R.C.; Diana, J.S.; Breck, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    Field data from a population of yellow perch Perca flavescens in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, were used to evaluate the ability of two energetic models to predict consumption by yellow perch. Field estimates of daily ration for age-l-4 fish during May through October 1987 and 1988 were compared with independent predictions made by the Wisconsin energetic model and an energetic model developed by Karas and Thoresson. Predictions of daily ration using the Wisconsin model were lower than daily rations estimated from field data for all ages, primarily due to poor model-field agreement at temperatures above 22??C. This caused estimates of cumulative consumption from the Wisconsin model to be 25-50% lower than field estimates. Predictions of daily ration by the Karas-Thoresson model agreed with field estimates over a temperature range of 1026??C for age-1-3 yellow perch but not for older fish. Despite improvement, model predictions of cumulative consumption were 2-35% lower than field estimates. Although these tests of predicted and estimated rations may provide insight into which model produced more accurate results, it must be emphasized that field measures of daily ration are also estimates and may be in error, particularly at temperatures above 22??C where gastric evacuation rates were estimated. The Karas-Thoresson modification of the Wisconsin energetic model produced better fits to field ration data and is recommended for model applications.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on a Huntington's disease rat model: effects on neurotrophic factors and neuronal density.

    PubMed

    Tasset, I; Medina, F J; Jimena, I; Agüera, E; Gascón, F; Feijóo, M; Sánchez-López, F; Luque, E; Peña, J; Drucker-Colín, R; Túnez, I

    2012-05-03

    There is evidence to suggest that the neuroprotective effect of exposure of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) may be due, at least in part, to the effect of these fields on neurotrophic factors levels and cell survival, leading to an improvement in behavior. This study was undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective effects of ELFEF in a rat model of 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP)-induced Huntington's disease. Behavior patterns were evaluated, and changes in neurotrophic factor, cell damage, and oxidative stress biomarker levels were monitored in Wistar rats. Rats were given 3NP over four consecutive days (20 mg/kg body weight), whereas ELFEF (60 Hz and 0.7 mT) was applied over 21 days, starting after the last injection of 3NP. Rats treated with 3NP exhibited significantly different behavior in the open field test (OFT) and the forced swim test (FST), and displayed significant differences in neurotrophic factor levels and oxidative stress biomarkers levels, together with a neuronal damage and diminished neuronal density, with respect neuronal controls. ELFEF improved neurological scores, enhanced neurotrophic factor levels, and reduced both oxidative damage and neuronal loss in 3NP-treated rats. ELFEF alleviates 3NP-induced brain injury and prevents loss of neurons in rat striatum, thus showing considerable potential as a therapeutic tool.

  9. Field tests-low input, side-wall vented boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, W.L.; Butcher, T.A.; Celebi, Y.

    1996-07-01

    The Fan Atomized Burner (FAB) was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Oil Heat Combustion Equipment Technology Program to provide a practical low-firing rate technology leading to new, high efficiency oil-fired appliances. The development of the burner design and results of application testing have been presented in prior oil heat conferences over the past several years. This information is also summarized in a more comprehensive BNL report. The first field trial of a prototype unit was initiated during the 1994-95 heating season. This paper presents the results of the second year of testing, during the 1995-96 heating season. The field tests enable the demonstration of the reliability and performance of the FAB under practical, typical operating conditions. Another important objective of the field test was to demonstrate that the low input is adequate to satisfy the heating and hot water demands of the household. During the first field trial it was shown that at a maximum input rate of 0.4 gph (55,000 Btu/hr) the burner was able to heat a home with over 2,000 square feet of conditioned living space and provide adequate supply of domestic hot water for a family of six. The test is located in Long Island, NY.

  10. Field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.; Amaro, C.R.

    1993-12-01

    A field test of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted as part of a demonstration sponsored by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The RTML is a mobile, field- deployable laboratory developed for use at buried radioactive waste remediation sites to allow onsite preparation and analysis of soil, smear, and air filter samples for alpha and gamma-emitting contaminants. Analytical instruments installed in the RTML include an extended range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer, two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, and four alpha continuous air monitors. The performance of the RTML was tested at the Test Reactor Area and Cold Test Pit near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL. Objectives, experimental procedures, and an evaluation of the performance of the RTML are presented.

  11. Thymoquinone therapy abrogates toxic effect of cadmium on rat testes.

    PubMed

    Fouad, A A; Jresat, I

    2015-05-01

    The protective effect of thymoquinone was investigated against cadmium-induced testicular toxicity in rats. Testicular toxicity was induced by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cadmium chloride (2 mg kg(-1) ). Thymoquinone treatment (10 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) , i.p.) was applied for five consecutive days, starting 3 days before cadmium administration. Thymoquinone significantly attenuated the cadmium-induced decreases in serum testosterone, and testicular reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity and significantly decreased the elevations of testicular malondialdehyde, nitric oxide and cadmium ion levels resulted from cadmium chloride administration. Also, thymoquinone ameliorated the cadmium-induced testicular tissue injury observed by histopathological examination. In addition, thymoquinone significantly decreased the cadmium-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumour necrosis factor-α, cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-κB and caspase-3 in testicular tissue. It was concluded that thymoquinone, through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, may represent a potential candidate to protect the testes against the detrimental effect of cadmium exposure.

  12. Sequential accelerated tests: Improving the correlation of accelerated tests to module performance in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felder, Thomas; Gambogi, William; Stika, Katherine; Yu, Bao-Ling; Bradley, Alex; Hu, Hongjie; Garreau-Iles, Lucie; Trout, T. John

    2016-09-01

    DuPont has been working steadily to develop accelerated backsheet tests that correlate with solar panels observations in the field. This report updates efforts in sequential testing. Single exposure tests are more commonly used and can be completed more quickly, and certain tests provide helpful predictions of certain backsheet failure modes. DuPont recommendations for single exposure tests are based on 25-year exposure levels for UV and humidity/temperature, and form a good basis for sequential test development. We recommend a sequential exposure of damp heat followed by UV then repetitions of thermal cycling and UVA. This sequence preserves 25-year exposure levels for humidity/temperature and UV, and correlates well with a large body of field observations. Measurements can be taken at intervals in the test, although the full test runs 10 months. A second, shorter sequential test based on damp heat and thermal cycling tests mechanical durability and correlates with loss of mechanical properties seen in the field. Ongoing work is directed toward shorter sequential tests that preserve good correlation to field data.

  13. U.S. field testing programs and results

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    2000-06-09

    The United States has been active in four major international in-situ or field testing programs over the past two decades, involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms and package components. These programs are designed to supplement laboratory testing studies in order to obtain the most complete and realistic picture possible of waste glass behavior under realistic repository-relevant conditions.

  14. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine and sertraline prevents forced swimming test-induced hypercontractility of rat detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Sirri; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Bas, Duygu B; Aksoz, Elif; Savli, Evren; Ilkaya, Fatih; Kesim, Yuksel

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake inhibitors represent important targets for the development of new treatments for detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the forced swimming test (FST) on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle and to examine the effects of in vivo treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline on altered detrusor muscle contractility. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg ip) and sertraline (10 mg/kg ip) were administered once a day for 14 days. Rats were exposed to the FST on the 15th day. After the test, detrusor muscles were removed and placed in organ baths, and the contraction responses induced by carbachol, potassium chloride (KCl) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were recorded. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to carbachol and electrical field stimulation were found to be increased at all carbachol doses and frequencies, respectively. FST also increased the contractile responses to KCl, which is used to test the differences in postreceptor-mediated contractions. The hypercontractile responses of detrusor strips to carbachol, EFS and KCl were abolished by treatment with both fluoxetine and sertraline. These treatments also decreased the immobility duration in the FST consistent with an antidepressant-like effect in this test. The results of this study provide the first evidence that FST increases contractility of the rat detrusor muscle, and this hypercontractility was abolished by chronic treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline at antidepressant doses by decreasing the postreceptor-mediated events.

  15. Seasonal variations of grounding parameters by field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.G.

    1992-07-01

    The past fifteen years have seen considerable research in the area of substation grounding design, analysis and testing. These research include the revision of the IEEE Std.-80, the development of PC based computer programs, the in depth analysis of grounding parameters and the development of new field testing methods and devices. In spite of these advances, several questions were often asked, primarily due to safety concerns. The questions were related to the seasonal variation of critical grounding parameters such as the soil and gravel resistivities and their influence on the body current in an accidental circuit. There was also a need to study the total behavior of a substation ground grid with respect to different weather conditions by performing field tests. In response to the above needs, a comprehensive field test program was developed and implemented. The field test consisted of flowing approximately 150 amperes through the Texas Valley ground grid from a remote substation. The parameters investigated in this project were the grid impedance, the grid potential rise (GPR) , the fault current distribution, the touch/step voltages, the body current on different gravel beds and the soil/gravel resistivities. The measurements were performed in the rainy, winter and summer weather conditions during 1989--1990. The field test results, overall, indicate that the rainy weather is the worst condition for the substation safety because of the substantial reduction in the protective characteristics of the gravel. Among the gravel types, the washed gravel has much superior protective characteristics compared to the crusher run type of gravel. A comparison of SGSYS computed grounding parameters with measured results indicates that the grid resistance and GPR compare well but the computed touch voltage and body current are substantially higher than the measured values.

  16. Testing electromagnetic fields for potential carcinogenic activity: a critical review of animal models.

    PubMed Central

    McCann, J; Kavet, R; Rafferty, C N

    1997-01-01

    In order to assess the potential of electromagnetic fields (EMF) to influence the process of carcinogenesis, it will be necessary to supplement epidemiological studies with controlled laboratory studies in animals. There are now a number of suitable assays available that focus on different histopathological forms of cancer and on different stages of carcinogenesis--induction, promotion, progression. In this review we discuss eight major systems in the context of this generalized carcinogenesis paradigm. Our aim is to bring together what is currently known about the biology of carcinogenesis in these systems in order to provide a context for evaluating EMF results as they become available. We also critically discuss EMF test results that have so far been obtained in the animal models reviewed. Most of the 19 completed studies identified were negative. However, suggestive positive results were reported in three promotion assays (in rat mammary gland, in rat liver, and in mouse skin), and in one multigeneration study in mice. Results in the rat liver assay and in the multigeneration study have only been reported in abstract form and cannot be adequately evaluated. Positive results reported in both the rat mammary gland and the mouse skin systems are of weak statistical significance and have not been independently replicated. However, it may be of interest that effects in both systems appear primarily to involve the progression stage of carcinogenesis. We suggest that more definitive conclusions as to the carcinogenic potential of EMF may require expanded test protocols that reinforce traditional carcinogenesis end points with biochemical or other parameters reflective of biological processes known to be associated with carcinogenesis in the different systems. PMID:9114279

  17. Moderate-Intensity Rotating Magnetic Fields Do Not Affect Bone Quality and Bone Remodeling in Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guanghao; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Xinmin; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence has substantiated the positive effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF) on inhibiting osteopenia and promoting fracture healing. However, the osteogenic potential of rotating magnetic fields (RMF), another common electromagnetic application modality, remains poorly characterized thus far, although numerous commercial RMF treatment devices have been available on the market. Herein the impacts of RMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone metabolism were systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty two 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the Control (n = 10), HU (n = 10) and HU with RMF exposure (HU+RMF, n = 12) groups. Rats in the HU+RMF group were subjected to daily 2-hour exposure to moderate-intensity RMF (ranging from 0.60 T to 0.38 T) at 7 Hz for 4 weeks. HU caused significant decreases in body mass and soleus muscle mass of rats, which were not obviously altered by RMF. Three-point bending test showed that the mechanical properties of femurs in HU rats, including maximum load, stiffness, energy absorption and elastic modulus were not markedly affected by RMF. µCT analysis demonstrated that 4-week RMF did not significantly prevent HU-induced deterioration of femoral trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Serum biochemical analysis showed that RMF did not significantly change HU-induced decrease in serum bone formation markers and increase in bone resorption markers. Bone histomorphometric analysis further confirmed that RMF showed no impacts on bone remodeling in HU rats, as evidenced by unchanged mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, osteoblast numbers and osteoclast numbers in cancellous bone. Together, our findings reveal that RMF do not significantly affect bone microstructure, bone mechanical strength and bone remodeling in HU-induced disuse osteoporotic rats. Our study indicates potentially

  18. Convulsive threshold in humans and rats and magnetic field changes: observations during total solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Keshavan, M S; Gangadhar, B N; Gautam, R U; Ajit, V B; Kapur, R L

    1981-03-10

    Convulsive thresholds were measured in 26 psychiatric patients who were receiving electroconvulsive treatment, and in 8 rats subjects to electroconvulsive shocks, during the recent the recent total solar eclipse day (February 16th, 1980) and on control days. Our results showed that there was a significant reduction in the convulsive thresholds of both humans and rats at the time of solar eclipse, probably occurring due to the observed geomagnetic field variation of 19 Gammas.

  19. Acceptance test report: Field test of mixer pump for 241-AN-107 caustic addition project

    SciTech Connect

    Leshikar, G.A.

    1997-05-16

    The field acceptance test of a 75 HP mixer pump (Hazleton serial number N-20801) installed in Tank 241-AN-107 was conducted from October 1995 thru February 1996. The objectives defined in the acceptance test were successfully met, with two exceptions recorded. The acceptance test encompassed field verification of mixer pump turntable rotation set-up and operation, verification that the pump instrumentation functions within established limits, facilitation of baseline data collection from the mixer pump mounted ultrasonic instrumentation, verification of mixer pump water flush system operation and validation of a procedure for its operation, and several brief test runs (bump) of the mixer pump.

  20. Intermittent versus Continuous Incremental Field Tests: Are Maximal Variables Interchangeable?

    PubMed Central

    Carminatti, Lorival J.; Possamai, Carlos A. P.; de Moraes, Marcelo; da Silva, Juliano F.; de Lucas, Ricardo D.; Dittrich, Naiandra; Guglielmo, Luiz G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare physiological responses derived from an incremental progressive field test with a constant speed test i.e. intermittent versus continuous protocol. Two progressive maximum tests (Carminatti`s test (T-CAR) and the Vameval test (T-VAM)), characterized by increasing speed were used. T-CAR is an intermittent incremental test, performed as shuttle runs; while T-VAM is a continuous incremental test performed on an athletic track. Eighteen physically active, healthy young subjects (21.9 ± 2.0 years; 76.5 ± 8.6 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m, 11.2 ± 5.4% body fat), volunteered for this study. Subjects performed four different maximum test sessions conducted in the field: two incremental tests and two time to exhaustion tests (TTE) at peak test velocities (PV). No significant differences were found for PV (T-CAR = 15.6 ± 1.2; T-VAM = 15.5 ± 1.3 km·h-1) and maximal HR (T-CAR = 195 ± 11; T- VAM = 194 ± 14 bpm). During TTE, there were no significant differences for HR (TTET-CAR and TTET-VAM = 192 ± 12 bpm). However, there was a significant difference in TTE (p = 0.04) (TTET-CAR = 379 ± 84, TTET-VAM = 338 ± 58 s) with a low correlation (r = 0.41). The blood lactate concentration measured at the end of the TTE tests, showed no significant difference (TTET-CAR = 13.2 ± 2.4 vs. TTET-VAM = 12.9 ± 2.4 mmol·l-1). Based on the present findings, it is suggested that the maximal variables derived from T-CAR and T-VAM can be interchangeable in the design of training programs. Key points T-CAR is an intermittent shuttle run test that predicts the maximal aerobic speed with accuracy, hence, test results could be interchangeable with continuous straight-line tests. T-CAR provides valid field data for evaluating aerobic fitness. In comparison with T-VAM, T-CAR may be a more favourable way to prescribe intermittent training using a shuttle-running protocol. PMID:24149741

  1. The virtual fields method applied to spalling tests on concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierron, F.; Forquin, P.

    2012-08-01

    For one decade spalling techniques based on the use of a metallic Hopkinson bar put in contact with a concrete sample have been widely employed to characterize the dynamic tensile strength of concrete at strain-rates ranging from a few tens to two hundreds of s-1. However, the processing method mainly based on the use of the velocity profile measured on the rear free surface of the sample (Novikov formula) remains quite basic and an identification of the whole softening behaviour of the concrete is out of reach. In the present paper a new processing method is proposed based on the use of the Virtual Fields Method (VFM). First, a digital high speed camera is used to record the pictures of a grid glued on the specimen. Next, full-field measurements are used to obtain the axial displacement field at the surface of the specimen. Finally, a specific virtual field has been defined in the VFM equation to use the acceleration map as an alternative `load cell'. This method applied to three spalling tests allowed to identify Young's modulus during the test. It was shown that this modulus is constant during the initial compressive part of the test and decreases in the tensile part when micro-damage exists. It was also shown that in such a simple inertial test, it was possible to reconstruct average axial stress profiles using only the acceleration data. Then, it was possible to construct local stress-strain curves and derive a tensile strength value.

  2. A FIELD VALIDATION OF TWO SEDIMENT-AMPHIPOD TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field validation study of two sediment-amphipod toxicity tests was conducted using sediment samples collected subtidally in the vicinity of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated Superfund site in Elliott Bay, WA, USA. Sediment samples were collected at 30 stati...

  3. Development and Field Tests of the Army Work Environment Questionnaire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    from the low teens to the mid-twenties), a number of consistent trends were found in the pattern of relationships. In both field tests, the largest...identifying impediments to productivity (UPRDC TR-81-18). San Diego, CA: Navy Personnel Research and Development Center. 39 Appendix A iiOONMwc IUCIDU PORN

  4. Field Testing Vocational Education Metric Modules. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oldsen, Carl F.

    A project was conducted for the following purposes: (1) to develop a workshop training package to prepare vocational education teachers to use vocational subject-specific modules; (2) to train those teachers to use the workshop package; (3) to conduct field tests of the metric modules with experimental and control groups; (4) to analyze, describe,…

  5. A Field Test of the TIME Patient Simulation Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, William G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Technological Innovations in Medical Education (TIME) model, designed to be controlled by a professor in the classroom, incorporates voice recognition technology and video dramatization to create a believable patient encounter. A field test finding was that the students became committed to the care and management of the simulated patient.…

  6. A Preliminary Field Test of an Employee Work Passion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigarmi, Drea; Nimon, Kim; Houson, Dobie; Witt, David; Diehl, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Four dimensions of a process model for the formulation of employee work passion, derived from Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, and Diehl (2009), were tested in a field setting. A total of 447 employees completed questionnaires that assessed the internal elements of the model in a corporate work environment. Data from the measurements of work affect,…

  7. Injury Prevention for the Elderly. Field Test Instructor Coursebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie

    This coursebook is intended for use by the instructors presenting a workshop on preventing injuries in the elderly that was developed as a field test of a larger 10-module training program for staff of long-term health care facilities, senior center and adult day care staff, and home health aides. The curriculum guide served as a blueprint for the…

  8. Epilepsy and electromagnetic fields: effects of simulated atmospherics and 100-Hz magnetic fields on audiogenic seizure in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutilainen, J.; Björk, E.; Saali, K.

    1988-03-01

    In order to study the possible association between epileptic seizures and natural electromagnetic fields, 32 female audiogenic seizure (AGS)-susceptible rats were exposed to simulated 10 kHz and 28 kHz atmospherics and to a sinusoidally oscillating magnetic field with a frequency of 100 Hz and field strength of 1 A/m. After the electromagnetic exposure, seizures were induced in the rats with a sound stimulus. The severity of the seizure was determined on an ordinal scale, the audiogenic response score (ARS). The time from the beginning of the sound stimulus to the onset of the seizure (seizure latency) and the duration of the convulsion was measured. No differences from the control experiments were found in the experiments with simulated atmospherics, but the 100 Hz magnetic field increased the seizure latency by about 13% ( P<0.02). The results do not support the hypothesis that natural atmospheric electromagnetic signals could affect the onset of epileptic seizures, but they suggest that AGS-susceptible rats may be a useful model for studying the biological effects of electromagnetic fields.

  9. Test field for airborne laser scanning in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahokas, E.; Kaartinen, H.; Kukko, A.; Litkey, P.

    2014-11-01

    Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is a widely spread operational measurement tool for obtaining 3D coordinates of the ground surface. There is a need for calibrating the ALS system and a test field for ALS was established at the end of 2013. The test field is situated in the city of Lahti, about 100 km to the north of Helsinki. The size of the area is approximately 3.5 km × 3.2 km. Reference data was collected with a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system assembled on a car roof. Some streets were measured both ways and most of them in one driving direction only. The MLS system of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI) consists of a navigation system (NovAtel SPAN GNSS-IMU) and a laser scanner (FARO Focus3D 120). In addition to the MLS measurements more than 800 reference points were measured using a Trimble R8 VRS-GNSS system. Reference points are along the streets, on parking lots, and white pedestrian crossing line corners which can be used as reference targets. The National Land Survey of Finland has already used this test field this spring for calibrating their Leica ALS-70 scanner. Especially it was easier to determine the encoder scale factor parameter using this test field. Accuracy analysis of the MLS points showed that the point height RMSE is 2.8 cm and standard deviation is 2.6 cm. Our purpose is to measure both more MLS data and more reference points in the test field area to get a better spatial coverage. Calibration flight heights are planned to be 1000 m and 2500 m above ground level. A cross pattern, southwest-northeast and northwest-southeast, will be flown both in opposite directions.

  10. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, Patrick; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Kneafsey, Timothy; Borglin, Sharon; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary; Nakagawa, Seiji; Nihei, Kurt; Rutqvist, Jonny; Doughty, Christine; Reagan, Matthew

    2016-08-19

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition’s (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  11. Reduction of spermatogonia and testosterone in rat testes flown on Space Lab-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, Delbert E.; Stevenson, J.; Black, S.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of space flight on rat testes were investigated. The weight, spermatogonial cell count, and testosterone levels in six rats flown on Space Lab-3 were measured. It is observed that compared to ground control rats the average weight loss was 7.1 percent and the spermatogonial cell count decreased by 7.5 percent. The data reveal that the testosterone level for large control rats was 9.13 ng/ml and 0.31 ng/ml for flight rats; and 2.54 ng/ml and 0.233 ng/ml for smaller control and flight rats, respectively. It is noted that spermatogenesis and testosterone production are reduced during spaceflight.

  12. Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

  13. Behavioral effects on rats of high strength magnetic fields generated by a resistive electromagnet.

    PubMed

    Houpt, Thomas A; Pittman, David W; Riccardi, Christina; Cassell, Jennifer A; Lockwood, Denesa R; Barranco, Jan M; Kwon, Bumsup; Smith, James C

    2005-10-15

    It has been reported previously that exposure to static high magnetic fields of 7 T or above in superconducting magnets has behavioral effects on rats. In particular, magnetic field exposure acutely but transiently suppressed rearing and induced walking in tight circles; the direction of circular locomotion was dependent on the rats' orientation within the magnet. Furthermore, when magnet exposure was paired with consumption of a palatable, novel solution, rats acquired a persistent taste aversion. In order to confirm these results under more controlled conditions, we exposed rats to static magnetic fields of 4 to 19.4 T in a 189 mm bore, 20 T resistive magnet. By using a resistive magnet, field strengths could be arbitrary varied from -19.4 to 19.4 T within the same bore. Rearing was suppressed after exposure to 4 T and above; circling was observed after 7 T and above. Conditioned taste aversion was acquired after 14 T and above. The effects of the magnetic fields were dependent on orientation. Exposure to +14 T induced counter-clockwise circling, while exposure to -14 T induced clockwise circling. Exposure with the rostral-caudal axis of the rat perpendicular to the magnetic field produced an attenuated behavioral response compared to exposure with the rostral-caudal axis parallel to the field. These results in a single resistive magnet confirm and extend our earlier findings using multiple superconducting magnets. They demonstrate that the behavioral effects of exposure within large magnets are dependent on the magnetic field, and not on non-magnetic properties of the machinery. Finally, the effects of exposure to 4 T are clinically relevant, as 4 T magnetic fields are commonly used in functional MRI assays.

  14. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  15. Structural and function changes in organelles of liver cells in rats exposed to magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczynska, E. ); Wegrzynowicz, R. )

    1991-08-01

    Exposure of rats to magnetic fields of 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}2} T for 1 hr daily generated structural changes in hepatocytes mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and ribosomes. Simultaneously there was an increase in the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes: NADH dehydrogenase, succinic dehydrogenase, and cytochrome oxidase. The extent of the changes in liver cell properties following exposure depend on the duration of exposure to and the strength of the applied magnetic fields. Ultrastructural studies did not reveal any changes in external membranes of hepatocytes or in the membranes of cell nuclei. An increase in the amount of glycogen in hepatocytes of rats exposed to both 10{sup {minus}3} and 10{sup {minus}2} T was noted. The high level of cortisol in serum of exposed rats suggests that magnetic field may be a stress generating factor.

  16. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadian, A.; Wood, R.; Coe, H.; Latham, J.

    2011-12-01

    A possible field test for marine cloud brightening geoengineering. Abstract: The Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique (Latham et al 2008) hypothesizes that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre seawater particles can enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and increase cloud albedo. Here, we propose a set of field tests to critically assess the efficacy of the MCB geoengineering proposal over a limited area. The tests are de minimus with respect to their climate effects. The tests involve three phases, with increasing logistical complexity, each of which is designed to test one or more important components of the cloud brightening scheme. Each involves the introduction and monitoring of controlled aerosol perturbations from one or more ship-based seeding platforms up to a limited area of 100x100 km2. A suite of observational platforms of increasing number and complexity, including aircraft, ships and satellites, will observe the aerosol plume and in the later experiments the cloud and albedo responses to the aerosol perturbations. These responses must include the necessary cloud physical and chemical processes which determine the efficacy of the cloud brightening scheme. Since these processes are also central to the broader problem of aerosol-cloud-climate interactions, such field tests would have significant benefits for climate science in addition to providing a critical test of the MCB hypothesis. Such field experiments should be designed and conducted in an objective manner within the framework of emerging geoengineering research governance structures. Reference: Latham J. et al.. (2008) Global temperature stabilization via controlled albedo enhancement of low-level maritime clouds. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A doi:10.1098/rsta.2008.0137

  17. Laboratory or Field Tests for Evaluating Firefighters' Work Capacity?

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Ann-Sofie; Oksa, Juha; Malm, Christer

    2014-01-01

    Muscle strength is important for firefighters work capacity. Laboratory tests used for measurements of muscle strength, however, are complicated, expensive and time consuming. The aims of the present study were to investigate correlations between physical capacity within commonly occurring and physically demanding firefighting work tasks and both laboratory and field tests in full time (N = 8) and part-time (N = 10) male firefighters and civilian men (N = 8) and women (N = 12), and also to give recommendations as to which field tests might be useful for evaluating firefighters' physical work capacity. Laboratory tests of isokinetic maximal (IM) and endurance (IE) muscle power and dynamic balance, field tests including maximal and endurance muscle performance, and simulated firefighting work tasks were performed. Correlations with work capacity were analyzed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). The highest significant (p<0.01) correlations with laboratory and field tests were for Cutting: IE trunk extension (rs = 0.72) and maximal hand grip strength (rs = 0.67), for Stairs: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.81) and barbell shoulder press (rs = −0.77), for Pulling: IE shoulder extension (rs = −0.82) and bench press (rs = −0.85), for Demolition: IE knee extension (rs = 0.75) and bench press (rs = 0.83), for Rescue: IE shoulder flexion (rs = −0.83) and bench press (rs = −0.82), and for the Terrain work task: IE trunk flexion (rs = −0.58) and upright barbell row (rs = −0.70). In conclusion, field tests may be used instead of laboratory tests. Maximal hand grip strength, bench press, chin ups, dips, upright barbell row, standing broad jump, and barbell shoulder press were strongly correlated (rs≥0.7) with work capacity and are therefore recommended for evaluating firefighters work capacity. PMID:24614596

  18. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  19. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air flow. (2) If the standard-setting part requires hot-start emission measurements, shut down the...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... follows: (1) If the standard-setting part requires only hot-stabilized emission measurements, operate...

  20. Role of energy systems in two intermittent field tests in women field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Lemmink, Koen A P M; Visscher, Susan H

    2006-08-01

    The energetics of 2 field tests that reflect physical performance in intermittent sports (i.e., the Interval Shuttle Sprint Test [ISST] and the Interval Shuttle Run Test [ISRT]) were examined in 21 women field hockey players. The ISST required the players to perform 10 shuttle sprints starting every 20 seconds. During the ISRT, players alternately ran 20-m shuttles for 30 seconds and walked for 15 seconds with increasing speed. Anaerobic and aerobic power tests included Wingate cycle sprints and a .V(O2)max cycle test, respectively. Based on correlation and regression analyses, it was concluded that for the ISST, anaerobic energetic pathways contribute mainly to energy supply for peak sprint time, while aerobic energetic pathways also contribute to energy supply for total sprint time. Energy during the ISRT is supplied mainly by the aerobic energy system. Depending on the aspect of physical performance a coach wants to determine, the ISST or ISRT can be used.

  1. Overspinning BTZ black holes with test particles and fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düztaş, Koray

    2016-12-01

    It has been claimed that in a test of an asymptotically anti-de Sitter version of weak cosmic censorship conjecture by attempting to overspin a Bañados, Teitelboim, and Zanelli (BTZ) black hole with test particles, one finds that it is not possible to spin up the black hole past its extremal limit. The result of this analysis is restricted to the case where the initial black hole is extremal. We extend this analysis to find that massive test particles can overspin the black hole, if we start with a nearly extremal black hole, instead. We also consider the interaction of the BTZ black hole with test fields. We show that overspinning of nearly extremal black holes is possible whether or not there is super-radiance for the field. If there is super-radiance, overspinning occurs in a narrow range of frequencies bounded below by the super-radiant limit. However, if there is no super-radiance for the field, overspinning becomes generic and also applies to extremal black holes. This is in analogy with the Kerr case.

  2. ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments at DIII-D used an active-coil mock-up to investigate effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from two ferromagnetic Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in one ITER equatorial port. The largest and most prevalent observed effect was plasma toroidal rotation slowing across the entire radial profile, up to 60% in H-mode when the mock-up local ripple at the plasma was ˜4 times the local ripple expected in front of ITER TBMs. Analysis showed the slowing to be consistent with non-resonant braking by the mock-up field. There was no evidence of strong electromagnetic braking by resonant harmonics. These results are consistent with the near absence of resonant helical harmonics in the TBM field. Global particle and energy confinement in H-mode decreased by <20% for the maximum mock-up ripple, but <5% at the local ripple expected in ITER. These confinement reductions may be linked with the large velocity reductions. TBM field effects were small in L-mode but increased with plasma beta. The L-H power threshold was unaffected within error bars. The mock-up field increased plasma sensitivity to mode locking by a known n=1 test field (n = toroidal harmonic number). In H-mode the increased locking sensitivity was from TBM torque slowing plasma rotation. At low beta, locked mode tolerance was fully recovered by re-optimizing the conventional DIII-D ``I-coils'' empirical compensation of n=1 errors in the presence of the TBM mock-up field. Empirical error compensation in H-mode should be addressed in future experiments. Global loss of injected neutral beam fast ions was within error bars, but 1 MeV fusion triton loss may have increased. The many DIII-D mock-up results provide important benchmarks for models needed to predict effects of TBMs in ITER.

  3. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Resor, Brian Ray; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan Randall

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  4. Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-11-01

    This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

  5. Development and Field Testing of the FootFall Planning System for the ATHLETE Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SunSpiral, Vytas; Wheeler, D. W.; Chavez-Clementa, Daniel; Mittman, David

    2011-01-01

    The FootFall Planning System is a ground-based planning and decision support system designed to facilitate the control of walking activities for the ATHLETE (All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer) family of robots. ATHLETE was developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and is a large six-legged robot designed to serve multiple roles during manned and unmanned missions to the Moon; its roles include transportation, construction and exploration. Over the four years from 2006 through 2010 the FootFall Planning System was developed and adapted to two generations of the ATHLETE robots and tested at two analog field sites (the Human Robotic Systems Project's Integrated Field Test at Moses Lake, Washington, June 2008, and the Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS), held at Black Point Lava Flow in Arizona, September 2010). Having 42 degrees of kinematic freedom, standing to a maximum height of just over 4 meters, and having a payload capacity of 450 kg in Earth gravity, the current version of the ATHLETE robot is a uniquely complex system. A central challenge to this work was the compliance of the high-DOF (Degree Of Freedom) robot, especially the compliance of the wheels, which affected many aspects of statically-stable walking. This paper will review the history of the development of the FootFall system, sharing design decisions, field test experiences, and the lessons learned concerning compliance and self-awareness.

  6. The Sex Attractant Pheromone of Male Brown Rats: Identification and Field Experiment.

    PubMed

    Takács, Stephen; Gries, Regine; Zhai, Huimin; Gries, Gerhard

    2016-05-10

    Trapping brown rats is challenging because they avoid newly placed traps in their habitat. Herein, we report the identification of the sex pheromone produced by male brown rats and its effect on trap captures of wild female brown rats. Collecting urine- and feces-soiled bedding material of laboratory-kept rats and comparing the soiled-bedding odorants of juvenile and adult males, as well as of adult males and females, we found nine compounds that were specific to, or most prevalent in, the odor profiles of sexually mature adult males. When we added a synthetic blend of six of these compounds (2-heptanone, 4-heptanone, 3-ethyl-2-heptanone, 2-octanone, 2-nonanone, 4-nonanone) to one of two paired food-baited trap boxes, these boxes attracted significantly more laboratory-strain female rats in laboratory experiments, and captured ten times more wild female rats in a field experiment than the corresponding control boxes. Our data show that the pheromone facilitates captures of wild female brown rats.

  7. Scientific investigation plan for initial engineered barrier system field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wunan Lin

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this Scientific Investigation Plan (SIP) is to describe tests known as Initial Engineered Barrier System Field Tests (IEBSFT) and identified by Work Breakdown Structure as WBS 1.2.2.2.4. The IEBSFT are precursors to the Engineered Barrier System Field Test (EBSFT), WBS 1.2.2.2.4, to be conducted in the Exploratory Study Facility (ESF) at Yucca Mountain. The EBSFT and IEBSFT are designed to provide information on the interaction between waste packages (simulated by heated containers) and the surrounding rock mass, its vadose water, and infiltrated water. Heater assemblies will be installed in drifts or boreholes openings and heated to measure moisture movement during heat-up and subsequent cool-down of the rock mass. In some of the tests, infiltration of water into the heated rock mass will be studied. Throughout the heating and cooling cycle, instruments installed in the rock will monitor such parameters as temperature, moisture content, concentration of some chemical species, and stress and strain. Rock permeability measurements, rock and fluid (water and gas) sampling, and fracture pattern measurements will also be made before and after the test.

  8. Effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields exposure on cochlear cells' functionality in rats: evaluation of distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Galloni, Paolo; Lovisolo, Giorgio Alfonso; Mancini, Sergio; Parazzini, Marta; Pinto, Rosanna; Piscitelli, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo; Marino, Carmela

    2005-10-01

    In recent years, the widespread use of mobile phones has been accompanied by public debate about possible adverse consequences on human health. The auditory system is a major target of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) emitted by cellular telephones; the aim of this study was the evaluation of possible effects of cellular phone-like emissions on the functionality of rat's cochlea. Distortion Products OtoAcoustic Emission (DPOAE) amplitude was selected as cochlea's outer hair cells (OHC) status indicator. A number of protocols, including different frequencies (the lower ones in rat's cochlea sensitivity spectrum), intensities and periods of exposure, were used; tests were carried out before, during and after the period of treatment. No significant variation due to exposure to microwaves has been evidenced.

  9. Field test of the bulk-assay calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Keddar, A.

    1982-10-01

    The Bulk-Assay Calorimeter described in ANL-NDA-9/ISPO-14 was field tested at the Belgonucleaire mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plant at Dessel, Belgium, May 13-19, 1982. This instrument was developed under ISPO Tasks A-9 and A-47 at Argonne National Laboratory and was supplied to the IAEA through the U.S support program. Five containers of plutonium-oxide feed stock used in the manufacture of mixed-oxide LMFBR-type fuel were assayed during the test. Electrical measurements to verify the calibration of the calorimeter were also made.

  10. Resonant-test-field model of fluctuating nonlinear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Bruce J.

    1982-03-01

    A Hamiltonian system of nonlinear dispersive waves is used as a basis for generalizing the test-wave model to a set of resonantly interacting waves. The resonant test field (RTF) is shown to obey a nonlinear generalized Langevin equation in general. In the Markov limit a Fokker-Planck equation is obtained and the exact steady-state solution is determined. An algebraic expression for the power spectral density is obtained in terms of the number of resonantly interacting waves (n) in the RTF, the interaction strength (Vk), and the dimensionality of the wave field (d). For gravity waves on the ocean surface a k-4 spectrum is obtained, and for capillary waves a k-8 spectrum, both of which are in essential agreement with data.

  11. Field test of wake steering at an offshore wind farm

    DOE PAGES

    Fleming, Paul; Annoni, Jennifer; Shah, Jigar J.; ...

    2017-02-06

    In this study, a field test of wake steering control is presented. The field test is the result of a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Envision Energy, a smart energy management company and turbine manufacturer. In the campaign, an array of turbines within an operating commercial offshore wind farm in China have the normal yaw controller modified to implement wake steering according to a yaw control strategy. The strategy was designed using NREL wind farm models, including a computational fluid dynamics model, SOWFA, for understanding wake dynamics and an engineering model, FLORIS, for yaw control optimization.more » Results indicate that, within the certainty afforded by the data, the wake-steering controller was successful in increasing power capture, by amounts similar to those predicted from the models.« less

  12. Mathematical model of testing of pipeline integrity by thermal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vaganova, Nataliia

    2014-11-18

    Thermal fields testing at the ground surface above a pipeline are considered. One method to obtain and investigate an ideal thermal field in different environments is a direct numerical simulation of heat transfer processes taking into account the most important physical factors. In the paper a mathematical model of heat propagation from an underground source is described with accounting of physical factors such as filtration of water in soil and solar radiation. Thermal processes are considered in 3D origin where the heat source is a pipeline with constant temperature and non-uniform isolated shell (with 'damages'). This problem leads to solution of heat diffusivity equation with nonlinear boundary conditions. Approaches to analysis of thermal fields are considered to detect damages.

  13. In-situ field tests for site characterization and remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, C.M.

    1995-09-01

    An effort is under way at the Groundwater Remediation Field Laboratory National Test Site at Dover AFB to conduct a field demonstration of bioventing of a controlled release containing a mixture of JP-4 jet fuel and trichloroethylene (TCE). The main objective of the field experiment is to demonstrate that the fuel vapors will support the biological co-oxidation of TCE under the aerobic conditions provided by the bioventing system. Some highly chlorinated compounds, such as perchloroethylene (PCE), cannot be biodegraded under aerobic conditions. However, under the proper anaerobic conditions, PCE can be transformed to harmless degradation products via a series of sequential reductive dechlorination steps. A collaborative effort between the Air Force, Navy and EPA is taking place at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada, to determine if complete dechlorination of PCE can be efficiently stimulated in situ by the addition of suitable electron donors. Descriptions of these Air Force research demonstrations and results to date will be discussed in this presentation.

  14. Stressors can affect immobility time and response to imipramine in the rat forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Contreras, Carlos M

    2009-02-01

    We subjected Wistar rats to the forced swim test (FST) to compare the effects of two doses of imipramine in physically stressed rats (P: unavoidable electric footshocks), emotionally stressed rats (E: odors), or non-stressed rats (C). Stress or control sessions lasted 35 days. Drug treatments began on day 21 and continued for the next 14 days. E rats were placed for 10 min, once per day for 35 days, in a small non-movement-restricting cage impregnated with urine collected from a P rat. E and P rats exhibited opposite changes in locomotion. After 21 days of stress sessions, P rats displayed the longest immobility times in the FST, followed by E rats. In the P group, on day 7 of treatment (day 28 of the study), imipramine (2.5 mg/kg) reduced immobility time to baseline values. In the E group, immobility time decreased only after 14 days of treatment with the low imipramine dose. The high dose of imipramine (5.0 mg/kg) reduced immobility time at day 7 of treatment in all groups. In conclusion, physical and emotional stress similarly increased immobility time in the FST, but emotional stress appears to be more resistant to imipramine treatment.

  15. Failure of rats to escape from a potentially lethal microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D.R.; Levinson, D.M.; Justesen, D.R.; Clarke, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Ocularly pigmented rats, all mature females of the Long-Evans strain, were repeatedly presented an opportunity to escape from an intense 918-MHz field (whole-body dose rate . 60 mW/g) to a field of lower intensity (40, 30, 20, or 2 mW/g) by performing a simple locomotor response. Other rats could escape 800-microamperemeter faradic shock to the feet and tail by performing the same response in the same milieu, a multimode cavity. None of 20 irradiated rats learned to associate entry into a visually well-demarcated area of the cavity with immediate reduction of dose rate, in spite of field-induced elevations of body temperature to levels that exceeded 41 degrees C and would have been lethal but for a limit on durations of irradiation. In contrast, all of ten rats motivated by faradic shock rapidly learned to escape. The failure of escape learning by irradiated animals probably arose from deficiencies of motivation and, especially, sensory feedback. Whole-body hyperthermia induced by a multipath field may lack the painful or directional sensory properties that optimally promote the motive to escape. Moreover, a decline of body temperature after an escape-response-contingent reduction of field strength will be relatively slow because of the large thermal time constants of mammalian tissues. Without timely sensory feedback, which is an essential element of negative reinforcement, stimulus-response associability would be imparied, which could retard or preclude learning of an escape response.

  16. North Field 󈨛 Rapid Runway Repair Test Report. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    the grass, south of the repair site. Paint, polymer, and solvent, as well as storage drums for paint and polymer wastes, were stored in a designated ...events began. Fire and crash rescue support was provided by North Auxiliary Field. A "hot brakes" area was designated at the intersection of the NE/SW...upheaval and sag limits for each repair. Computer simulations, using the results of a runway survey and a test limit of 80 percent design limit load for

  17. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  18. Incorporating Spatial Models in Visual Field Test Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Nikki J.; McKendrick, Allison M.; Turpin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a perimetric algorithm (Spatially Weighted Likelihoods in Zippy Estimation by Sequential Testing [ZEST] [SWeLZ]) that uses spatial information on every presentation to alter visual field (VF) estimates, to reduce test times without affecting output precision and accuracy. Methods SWeLZ is a maximum likelihood Bayesian procedure, which updates probability mass functions at VF locations using a spatial model. Spatial models were created from empirical data, computational models, nearest neighbor, random relationships, and interconnecting all locations. SWeLZ was compared to an implementation of the ZEST algorithm for perimetry using computer simulations on 163 glaucomatous and 233 normal VFs (Humphrey Field Analyzer 24-2). Output measures included number of presentations and visual sensitivity estimates. Results There was no significant difference in accuracy or precision of SWeLZ for the different spatial models relative to ZEST, either when collated across whole fields or when split by input sensitivity. Inspection of VF maps showed that SWeLZ was able to detect localized VF loss. SWeLZ was faster than ZEST for normal VFs: median number of presentations reduced by 20% to 38%. The number of presentations was equivalent for SWeLZ and ZEST when simulated on glaucomatous VFs. Conclusions SWeLZ has the potential to reduce VF test times in people with normal VFs, without detriment to output precision and accuracy in glaucomatous VFs. Translational Relevance SWeLZ is a novel perimetric algorithm. Simulations show that SWeLZ can reduce the number of test presentations for people with normal VFs. Since many patients have normal fields, this has the potential for significant time savings in clinical settings. PMID:26981329

  19. On-site cell field test support program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniunas, J. W.; Merten, G. P.

    1982-09-01

    Utility sites for data monitoring were reviewed and selected. Each of these sites will be instrumented and its energy requirements monitored and analyzed for one year prior to the selection of 40 Kilowatt fuel cell field test sites. Analyses in support of the selection of sites for instrumentation shows that many building sectors offered considerable market potential. These sectors include nursing home, health club, restaurant, industrial, hotel/motel and apartment.

  20. Influence of Onabotulinumtoxin A on testes of the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Breikaa, Randa M; Mosli, Hisham A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2016-12-01

    Onabotulinumtoxin A (onabotA) is gaining wide medical use in children. The present study was planned to investigate the influence of its injection on the maturing testicular structures in rats. Immature rats were injected in the bilateral cremaster muscles by onabotA with three doses of (10, 20, and 40 U/kg) three times in a 2-week interval. The effect of these injections on fertility indices was examined. Levels of antisperm antibodies and several apoptosis parameters were also investigated. DNA content in form of ploidy and histopathological alterations were assessed. OnabotA-injected groups showed decreased sperm count and semen quality, while sperm vitality, morphology, and testosterone levels were not significantly affected. Furthermore, DNA flow cytometric analysis confirmed delayed sperm maturation. Apoptosis markers were significantly increased by the injections. In conclusion, onabotA injection in growing rats adversely affected sperm count and maturation. OnabotA testicular effects are mediated, at least partly, by apoptosis.

  1. Point-of-care cardiac troponin test accurately predicts heat stroke severity in rats.

    PubMed

    Audet, Gerald N; Quinn, Carrie M; Leon, Lisa R

    2015-11-15

    Heat stroke (HS) remains a significant public health concern. Despite the substantial threat posed by HS, there is still no field or clinical test of HS severity. We suggested previously that circulating cardiac troponin (cTnI) could serve as a robust biomarker of HS severity after heating. In the present study, we hypothesized that (cTnI) point-of-care test (ctPOC) could be used to predict severity and organ damage at the onset of HS. Conscious male Fischer 344 rats (n = 16) continuously monitored for heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and core temperature (Tc) (radiotelemetry) were heated to maximum Tc (Tc,Max) of 41.9 ± 0.1°C and recovered undisturbed for 24 h at an ambient temperature of 20°C. Blood samples were taken at Tc,Max and 24 h after heat via submandibular bleed and analyzed on ctPOC test. POC cTnI band intensity was ranked using a simple four-point scale via two blinded observers and compared with cTnI levels measured by a clinical blood analyzer. Blood was also analyzed for biomarkers of systemic organ damage. HS severity, as previously defined using HR, BP, and recovery Tc profile during heat exposure, correlated strongly with cTnI (R(2) = 0.69) at Tc,Max. POC cTnI band intensity ranking accurately predicted cTnI levels (R(2) = 0.64) and HS severity (R(2) = 0.83). Five markers of systemic organ damage also correlated with ctPOC score (albumin, alanine aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, cholesterol, and total bilirubin; R(2) > 0.4). This suggests that cTnI POC tests can accurately determine HS severity and could serve as simple, portable, cost-effective HS field tests.

  2. Performance evaluation of infrared imaging system in field test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chensheng; Guo, Xiaodong; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Zhi-jie

    2014-11-01

    Infrared imaging system has been applied widely in both military and civilian fields. Since the infrared imager has various types and different parameters, for system manufacturers and customers, there is great demand for evaluating the performance of IR imaging systems with a standard tool or platform. Since the first generation IR imager was developed, the standard method to assess the performance has been the MRTD or related improved methods which are not perfect adaptable for current linear scanning imager or 2D staring imager based on FPA detector. For this problem, this paper describes an evaluation method based on the triangular orientation discrimination metric which is considered as the effective and emerging method to evaluate the synthesis performance of EO system. To realize the evaluation in field test, an experiment instrument is developed. And considering the importance of operational environment, the field test is carried in practical atmospheric environment. The test imagers include panoramic imaging system and staring imaging systems with different optics and detectors parameters (both cooled and uncooled). After showing the instrument and experiment setup, the experiment results are shown. The target range performance is analyzed and discussed. In data analysis part, the article gives the range prediction values obtained from TOD method, MRTD method and practical experiment, and shows the analysis and results discussion. The experimental results prove the effectiveness of this evaluation tool, and it can be taken as a platform to give the uniform performance prediction reference.

  3. Field-testing UV disinfection of drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.; Drescher, A.; Greene, D.; Miller, P.; Motau, C.; Stevens, F.

    1997-09-01

    A recently invented device, ``UV Waterworks,`` uses ultraviolet (UV) light to disinfect drinking water. Its novel features are: low cost, robust design, rapid disinfection, low electricity use, low maintenance, high flow rate and ability to work with unpressurized water sources. The device could service a community of 1,000 persons, at an annual total cost of less than 10 US cents per person. UV Waterworks has been successfully tested in the laboratory. Limited field trials of an early version of the device were conducted in India in 1994--95. Insights from these trials led to the present design. Extended field trials of UV Waterworks, initiated in South Africa in February 1997, will be coordinated by the South African Center for Essential Community Services (SACECS), with technical and organizational support from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory(LBNL) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (both US). The first of the eight planned sites of the year long trial is an AIDS hospice near Durban. Durban metro Water and LBNL lab-tested a UV Waterworks unit prior to installing it at the hospice in August, 1997. The authors describe the field test plans and preliminary results from Durban.

  4. Artificial reproduction of magnetic fields produced by a natural geomagnetic storm increases systolic blood pressure in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.; Miranda-Anaya, M.; Durán, P.; Flores-Chávez, P. L.

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of geomagnetic storms may be associated with changes in circulatory physiology. The way in which the natural variations of the geomagnetic field due to solar activity affects the blood pressure are poorly understood and require further study in controlled experimental designs in animal models. In the present study, we tested whether the systolic arterial pressure (AP) in adult rats is affected by simulated magnetic fields resembling the natural changes of a geomagnetic storm. We exposed adult rats to a linear magnetic profile that simulates the average changes associated to some well-known geomagnetic storm phases: the sudden commencement and principal phase. Magnetic stimulus was provided by a coil inductor and regulated by a microcontroller. The experiments were conducted in the electromagnetically isolated environment of a semi-anechoic chamber. After exposure, AP was determined with a non-invasive method through the pulse on the rat's tail. Animals were used as their own control. Our results indicate that there was no statistically significant effect in AP when the artificial profile was applied, neither in the sudden commencement nor in the principal phases. However, during the experimental period, a natural geomagnetic storm occurred, and we did observe statistically significant AP increase during the sudden commencement phase. Furthermore, when this storm phase was artificially replicated with a non-linear profile, we noticed a 7 to 9 % increase of the rats' AP in relation to a reference value. We suggested that the changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm in its first day could produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response in AP.

  5. Artificial reproduction of magnetic fields produced by a natural geomagnetic storm increases systolic blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bretón, J L; Mendoza, B; Miranda-Anaya, M; Durán, P; Flores-Chávez, P L

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of geomagnetic storms may be associated with changes in circulatory physiology. The way in which the natural variations of the geomagnetic field due to solar activity affects the blood pressure are poorly understood and require further study in controlled experimental designs in animal models. In the present study, we tested whether the systolic arterial pressure (AP) in adult rats is affected by simulated magnetic fields resembling the natural changes of a geomagnetic storm. We exposed adult rats to a linear magnetic profile that simulates the average changes associated to some well-known geomagnetic storm phases: the sudden commencement and principal phase. Magnetic stimulus was provided by a coil inductor and regulated by a microcontroller. The experiments were conducted in the electromagnetically isolated environment of a semi-anechoic chamber. After exposure, AP was determined with a non-invasive method through the pulse on the rat's tail. Animals were used as their own control. Our results indicate that there was no statistically significant effect in AP when the artificial profile was applied, neither in the sudden commencement nor in the principal phases. However, during the experimental period, a natural geomagnetic storm occurred, and we did observe statistically significant AP increase during the sudden commencement phase. Furthermore, when this storm phase was artificially replicated with a non-linear profile, we noticed a 7 to 9 % increase of the rats' AP in relation to a reference value. We suggested that the changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm in its first day could produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response in AP.

  6. Temperature regulation in rats exposed to a 2 G field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihama, Linda M.; Murakami, Dean M.; Fuller, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The regulation of body temperature involves both homeostatic and circadian control systems. Both systems are influenced by exposure to hyperdynamic fields and demonstrate acute responses that eventually recover to an adapted level. This experiment examined both the homeostatic and circadian responses of body temperature to a separate environmental challenge (high frequency light/dark cycles) during exposure to a 2 G hyperdynamic field.

  7. Zinc supplementation ameliorates electromagnetic field-induced lipid peroxidation in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bediz, Cem Seref; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Oztekin, Esma

    2006-02-01

    Extremely low-frequency (0-300 Hz) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) generated by power lines, wiring and home appliances are ubiquitous in our environment. All populations are now exposed to EMF, and exposure to EMF may pose health risks. Some of the adverse health effects of EMF exposure are lipid peroxidation and cell damage in various tissues. This study has investigated the effects of EMF exposure and zinc administration on lipid peroxidation in the rat brain. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to three groups; they were maintained untreated for 6 months (control, n = 8), exposed to low-frequency (50 Hz) EMF for 5 minutes every other day for 6 months (n = 8), or exposed to EMF and received zinc sulfate daily (3 mg/kg/day) intraperitoneally (n = 8). We measured plasma levels of zinc and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) in erythrocytes. TBARS and GSH levels were also determined in the brain tissues. TBARS levels in the plasma and brain tissues were higher in EMF-exposed rats with or without zinc supplementation, than those in controls (p < 0.001). In addition, TBARS levels were significantly lower in the zinc-supplemented rats than those in the EMF-exposed rats (p < 0.001). GSH levels were significantly decreased in the brain and erythrocytes of the EMF-exposed rats (p < 0.01), and were highest in the zinc-supplemented rats (p < 0.001). Plasma zinc was significantly lower in the EMF-exposed rats than those in controls (p < 0.001), while it was highest in the zinc-supplemented rats (p < 0.001). The present study suggests that long-term exposure to low-frequency EMF increases lipid peroxidation in the brain, which may be ameliorated by zinc supplementation.

  8. Lessons Learned From Field Tests Of Planetary Surface Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoker, C. R.

    2003-04-01

    I review results and lessons learned from field tests of planetary surface rovers. Terrestrial field tests help to train scientists in rover capabilities, and guides developments to improve them. Key metrics of rover science performance include distance traveled and number of science targets studied using instrument placement or sample manipulation. Field tests show that traverse range is governed primarily by commanding frequency rather than a rover’s maximum speed. With real-time feedback, teleoperated rovers can traverse kilometers per day. With commanded operations, typical traverses are a few meters. Longer traverses are risky and error prone. Tasks requiring moving a few meters to a target followed by manipulation or instrument placement take several command cycles per target. Higher level autonomy for navigation and manipulation is needed to improve performance. Rovers are being called upon to play a key role in the search for evidence of life on Mars. Conditions on the Martian surface today appear to preclude living organisms, but more clement conditions in the past may have supported the formation of a fossil record. However, any fossil record on Mars is likely to be produced by microbial life, and to be extremely ancient. Finding unambiguous evidence of biogenic origin of putative fossil structures will require collecting high priority samples and returning them to Earth. Recognition of fossiliferous deposits using rover data is problematical. Information provided by a rover is of very low bandwidth and fidelity compared to that observed by a field geologist. Limitations arise in both quality and quantity of data transmitted to Earth. In a rover mission simulation performed in a fossil-rich terrestrial field site hosting dinosaur tracks and stromatolites, science teams did not find any evidence of fossils. However, living organisms such as endolithic microorganisms and lichens have been identified in field experiments using color imaging and

  9. Increased corticosterone levels in mice subjected to the rat exposure test.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Vanessa Cristiane Santana; Santos Gomes, Karina; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2010-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a notable interest in studying prey-predator relationships to develop rodent-based models for the neurobehavioral aspects of stress and emotion. However, despite the growing use of transgenic mice and results showing important differences in the behavioral responses of rats and mice, little research has been conducted regarding the responses of mice to predators. The rat exposure test (RET), a recently developed and behaviorally validated prey-predator (mouse-rat)-based model, has proven to be a useful tool in evaluating the defensive responses of mice facing rats. To further validate the RET, we investigated the endocrine and behavioral responses of mice exposed to this apparatus. We first constructed a plasma corticosterone secretion curve in mice exposed to a rat or to an empty cage (control). Rat-exposed mice showed a pronounced rise in corticosterone levels that peaked 15 min from the beginning of the predator exposure. The corticosterone levels and behavioral responses of mice exposed to a rat or to a toy in the RET apparatus were then measured. We observed high plasma corticosterone levels along with clear avoidance behaviors represented by decreases in tunnel and surface area exploration and increases in risk assessment behaviors and freezing. This strongly suggests that the test elicits a repertoire of behavioral responses compatible with an aversion state and indicates that it is a promising model for the evaluation of prey-predator interactions. However, more physiological, neurochemical, and pharmacological studies are needed to further validate the test.

  10. Development toxicology study in rats exposed to 60-Hz horizontal magnetic fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1997-09-01

    A replicate study using large numbers of animals was conducted to determine if 60 Hz magnetic fields would produce developmental toxicity in rats. Systems used previously for electric field exposures were retrofitted to provide magnetic field exposures to small laboratory animals. Large coils, separated from the rat cages, were energized by computer-controlled function generators providing a relatively pure, 1,000--{micro}T (10 G), 60-Hz, horizontal magnetic field for the high exposure group. Leakage fields to a second system provided a second exposure group with average exposures of 0.61 {micro}T (6.1 mG). Ambient fields within a third (control) system were 0.09 {micro}T (0.9 mG). Replicate experiments were conducted in which female rats were mated, and sperm-positive females were randomly distributed among the three exposure groups: (0.09, 0.61, and 1,000 {micro}T). Pregnant animals were exposed to 60 Hz horizontal magnetic fields for 20 hr/day from mating until very near term, 20 days later.

  11. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, Ernest

    2015-07-01

    This document presents design requirements and controlled assumptions intended for use in the engineering development and testing of: 1) prototype packages for radioactive waste disposal in deep boreholes; 2) a waste package surface handling system; and 3) a subsurface system for emplacing and retrieving packages in deep boreholes. Engineering development and testing is being performed as part of the Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT; SNL 2014a). This document presents parallel sets of requirements for a waste disposal system and for the DBFT, showing the close relationship. In addition to design, it will also inform planning for drilling, construction, and scientific characterization activities for the DBFT. The information presented here follows typical preparations for engineering design. It includes functional and operating requirements for handling and emplacement/retrieval equipment, waste package design and emplacement requirements, borehole construction requirements, sealing requirements, and performance criteria. Assumptions are included where they could impact engineering design. Design solutions are avoided in the requirements discussion. Deep Borehole Field Test Requirements and Controlled Assumptions July 21, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This set of requirements and assumptions has benefited greatly from reviews by Gordon Appel, Geoff Freeze, Kris Kuhlman, Bob MacKinnon, Steve Pye, David Sassani, Dave Sevougian, and Jiann Su.

  12. Single-dose Intravenous Toxicology Testing of Daebohwalryeok Pharmcopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Seung-Ho; Park, Sunju; Jeong, Jong-Jin; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Yu, Jun-Sang; Seo, Hyung-Sik; Kwon, Ki-Rok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of the study were to test the single-dose intravenous toxicity of Daebohwalryeok pharmacopuncture (DHRP) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and to estimate the crude lethal dose. Methods: The experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech Co., a Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratory, according to the GLP regulation and were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Biotoxtech Co. (Approval no: 110156). The rats were divided into three groups: DHRP was injected into the rats in the two test groups at doses of 10 mL/kg and 20 mL/kg, respectively, and normal saline solution was injected into the rats in the control group. Single doses of DHRP were injected intravenously into 6 week old SD rats (5 male and 5 female rats per group). General symptoms were observed and weights were measured during the 14 day observation period after the injection. After the observation period, necropsies were done. Then, histopathological tests were performed. Weight data were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) by using statistical analysis system (SAS, version 9.2). Results: No deaths and no statistical significant weight changes were observed for either male or female SD rats in either the control or the test groups during the observation period. In addition, no treatment related general symptoms or necropsy abnormalities were observed. Histopathological results showed no DHRP related effects in the 20 mL/kg DHRP group for either male or female rats. Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study, the results from single-dose intravenous injections of DHRP showed that estimated lethal doses for both male and female rats were above 20 mL/kg. PMID:26120487

  13. Experiment K-6-16. Morphological examination of rat testes. The effect of Cosmos 1887 flight on spermatogonial population and testosterone level in rat testes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Kato, K.; Stevenson, J.; Vasques, M.; Sapp, W.; Williams, C.; Popova, I. A.; Serova, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    Testes from rats flown on Cosmos 1887 for twelve and a half days were compared to basal control, synchronous control and vivarium maintained rats. When the mean weights of flight testes, normalized for weight/100 gms, were compared to the vivarium controls they were 6.7 percent lighter. Although the flight testes were lighter than the synchronous, the difference is not significant. Counts of spermatogonial cells from 5 animals in each group revealed a 4 percent decrease in flight compared to vivarium controls. In both cases the t-Test significance was less than 0.02. The serum testosterone levels of all animals (flight, synchronous and vivarium) were significantly below the basal controls.

  14. Simple and rapid field tests for brucellosis in livestock.

    PubMed

    Abdoel, Theresia; Dias, Isabel Travassos; Cardoso, Regina; Smits, Henk L

    2008-08-25

    Four simple and rapid field tests for the serodiagnosis of brucellosis in cattle, goat, sheep and swine were developed. The performance of the assays was investigated using serum samples collected in Portugal from animals originating from herds with a defined sanitary status with respect to the presence of brucellosis. The sensitivity calculated for the bovine, caprine, ovine and swine Brucella lateral flow assays based on results obtained for samples collected from animals with culture confirmed brucellosis was 90%, 100%, 90% and 73%, respectively. None of the samples from animals from herds free of brucellosis reacted in the flow assays indicating a high specificity. However, as expected, some degree of reactivity was observed when testing selected serum samples that reacted non-specific in reference tests for brucellosis.

  15. Serial Learning in Rats: A Test of Three Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capaldi, E. J.; Miller, Ronald Mellado

    2004-01-01

    Findings obtained by providing rats with a single fixed series of events, A-B-C-..., often are equally compatible with three alternative serial learning interpretations: that the signal for items is (A) their position in the series (position view), (B) the prior item of the series (chaining view), and (C) one, two, or more prior items of the…

  16. Field assessments in conjunction with whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    La Point, T.W.; Waller, W.T.

    2000-01-01

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests are widely used to assess potential effects of wastewater discharges on aquatic life. This paper represents a summary of chapters in a 1996 Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry-sponsored workshop and a literature review concerning linkages between WET testing and associated field biomonitoring. Most published studies thus far focus primarily on benthic macroinvertebrates and on effluent-dominated stream systems in which effluents demonstrate little or no significant acute toxicity. Fewer studies examine WET test predictability in other aquatic ecosystems (e.g., wetlands, estuaries, large rivers) or deal with instream biota such as fish and primary producers. Published results indicate that standards for the usual WET freshwater test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas, may not always protect most of the species inhabiting a receiving stream. Although WET tests are useful in predicting aquatic individual responses, they are not meant to directly measure natural population or community responses. Further, they do not address bioconcentration or bioaccumulation of hydrophobic compounds; do not assess eutrophication effects in receiving systems; and lastly, do not reflect genotoxic effects or function to test for endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Consequently, a more direct evaluation of ecosystem health, using bioassessment techniques, may be needed to properly evaluate aquatic systems affected by wastewater discharges.

  17. Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in rats exposed to intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E; Morris, J E; Miller, D L; Rafferty, C N; Ebi, K L; Sasser, L B

    2001-04-01

    An animal model for large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia in male Fischer 344 rats was utilized to determine whether magnetic field exposure can be shown to influence the progression of leukemia. We previously reported that exposure to continuous 60 Hz, 1 mT magnetic fields did not significantly alter the clinical progression of LGL leukemia in young male rats following injection of spleen cells from donor leukemic rats. Results presented here extend those studies with the following objectives: (a) to replicate the previous study of continuous 60 Hz magnetic field exposures, but using fewer LGL cells in the inoculum, and (b) to determine if intermittent 60 Hz magnetic fields can alter the clinical progression of leukemia. Rats were randomly assigned to four treatment groups (18/group) as follows: (1) 1 mT (10 G) continuous field, (2) 1 mT intermittent field (off/on at 3 min intervals), (3) ambient controls ( < 0.1 microT), and (4) positive control (5 Gy whole body irradiation from cobalt-60 four days prior to initiation of exposure). All rats were injected intraperitoneally with 2.2 x 10(6) fresh, viable LGL leukemic spleen cells at the beginning of the study. The fields were activated for 20 h per day, 7 days per week, and all exposure conditions were superimposed over the natural ambient magnetic field. The rats were weighed and palpated for splenomegaly weekly. Splenomegaly developed 9-11 weeks after transplantation of the leukemia cells. Hematological evaluations were performed at 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 weeks of exposure. Peripheral blood hemoglobin concentration, red blood cells, and packed cell volume declined, and total white blood cells and LGL cells increased dramatically in all treatment groups after onset of leukemia. Although the positive control group showed different body weight curves and developed signs of leukemia earlier than other groups, differences were not detected between exposure groups and ambient controls. Furthermore, there were no

  18. Geological Characterization of Remote Field Sites Using Visible and Infrared Spectroscopy: Results from the 1999 Marsokhod Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Ruff, S. W.; Moersch, J.; Roush, T.; Horton, K.; Bishop, J.; Cabrol, N. A.; Cockell, C.; Gazis, P.; Newsom, H. E.

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 Marsokhod Field Experiment (MFE) provided an opportunity to test the suitability of rover-borne visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared field spectrometers to contribute to the remote geological exploration of a Mars analog field site.

  19. Statistical Tests of Taylor's Hypothesis: An Application to Precipitation Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthi, A.; Li, B.; Bowman, K.; North, G.; Genton, M.; Sherman, M.

    2009-05-01

    The Taylor Hypothesis (TH) as applied to rainfall is a proposition about the space-time covariance structure of the rainfall field. Specifically, it supposes that if a spatio-temporal precipitation field with a stationary covariance Cov(r, τ) in both space r and time τ, moves with a constant velocity v, then the temporal covariance at time lag τ is equal to the spatial covariance at space lag v τ, that is, Cov(0, τ) = Cov(v τ, 0). Qualitatively this means that the field evolves slowly in time relative to the advective time scale, which is often referred to as the 'frozen field' hypothesis. Of specific interest is whether there is a cut-off or decorrelation time scale for which the TH holds for a given mean flow velocity v. In this study the validity of the TH is tested for precipitation fields using high-resolution gridded NEXRAD radar reflectivity data produced by the WSI Corporation by employing two different statistical approaches. The first method is based upon rigorous hypothesis testing while the second is based on a simple correlation analysis, which neglects possible dependencies in the correlation estimates. We use radar reflectivity values from the southeastern United States with an approximate horizontal resolution of 4 km x 4 km and a temporal resolution of 15 minutes. During the 4-day period from 2 to 5 May 2002, substantial precipitation occurs in the region of interest, and the motion of the precipitation systems is approximately uniform. The results of both statistical methods suggest that the TH might hold for the shortest space and time scales resolved by the data (4 km and 15 minutes), but that it does not hold for longer periods or larger spatial scales. Also, the simple correlation analysis tends to overestimate the statistical significance through failing to account for correlations between the covariance estimates.

  20. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  1. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on neuromuscular function in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.A.; Laszewski, B.L.; Carr, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    Neuromuscular function in adult male rats was studied following 30 days of exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 100 kV/m (unperturbed field strength). Isometric force transducters were attached to the tendons of the plantaris (predominantly fast twitch), and soleus (predominantly slow twitch) muscles in the urethan-anesthetized rat. Square-wave stimuli were delivered to the distal stump of the transected sciatic nerve. Several measurements were used to characterize neuromuscular function, including twitch characteristics, chronaxie, tetanic and posttetanic potentiation, and fatigue and recovery. The results from three independent series of experiments are reported. Only recovery from fatigue in slow-twitch muscles was consistently and significantly affected (enhanced) by electric-field exposure. This effect does not appear to be mediated by field-induced changes in either neuromuscular transmission, or in the contractile mechanism itself. It is suggested that the effect may be mediated secondary to an effect on mechanisms regulating muscle blood flow or metabolism.

  2. Chronic exposure to a 60-Hz electric field: effects on neuromuscular function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R A; Laszewski, B L; Carr, D B

    1981-01-01

    Neuromuscular function in adult male rats was studied following 30 days of exposure to a 60-Hz electric field at 100 kV/m (unperturbed field strength). Isometric force transducers were attached to the tendons of the plantaris (predominantly fast twitch), and soleus (predominantly slow twitch) muscles in the urethan-anesthetized rat. Square-wave stimuli were delivered to the distal stump of the transected sciatic nerve. Several measurements were used to characterized neuromuscular function, including twitch characteristics, chronaxie, tetanic and posttetanic potentiation, and fatigue and recovery. The results from three independent series of experiments are reported. Only recovery from fatigue in slow-twitch muscles was consistently and significantly affected (enhanced) by electric-field exposure. This effect does not appear to be mediated by field-induced changes in either neuromuscular transmission, or in the contractile mechanism itself. It is suggested that the effect may be mediated secondary to an effect on mechanisms regulating muscle blood flow or metabolism.

  3. Operant self-administration models for testing the neuropharmacological basis of ethanol consumption in rats.

    PubMed

    June, Harry L; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2010-04-01

    Operant self-administration procedures are used to assess the neural basis of ethanol-seeking behavior under a wide range of experimental conditions. In general, rats do not spontaneously self-administer ethanol in pharmacologically meaningful amounts. This unit provides a step-by-step guide for training rats to self-administer quantities of ethanol that produce moderate to high blood-alcohol content. Different protocols are used for rats that are genetically heterogeneous versus rats that are selectively bred for high alcohol preference. Also, these protocols have different sets of advantages and disadvantages in terms of the ability to control for caloric intake and taste of solutions in operant testing. Basic self-administration protocols can also be altered to focus on different aspects of the motivational properties of ethanol (for example, those related to dependence). This unit provides multiple protocols that lead to alcohol intake in rats, which can be pharmacologically probed relative to a variety of control conditions.

  4. Brown-colored deposits on hair of female rats chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Miller, R.A.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-01-01

    An increased incidence and severity of a brownish coloration of hair has been observed around the nose and on the ears of female rats that were chronically exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Microscopic examination of the colored areas revealed a red-brown globular deposit on hair shafts in affected areas without signs of physical injury.

  5. Absence of repeated-trial tolerance to the anxiolytic-like effects of chlordiazepoxide in the rat triple test.

    PubMed

    Wehrmeister, Thaize D; Izídio, Geison S; Pereira, Elayne; Izídio, Gustavo; Ramos, André

    2010-12-01

    The triple test, recently developed to assess anxiety-related behaviors in rodents, combines three widely used behavioral tests: the open field (OF), elevated plus maze (EPM) and light/dark box (LDB). The EPM and LDB, individually, are normally sensitive to the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepines only in the first trial, due to the phenomenon of one-trial tolerance, which limits their use in longitudinal studies. The main objective of the present investigation was to verify whether the anxiolytic-like effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDZ), previously observed in naive animals submitted to the triple test, would persist after repeated testing. To this end, three experiments were carried out where male Wistar rats received CDZ (10mg/kg) 30min before the triple test for 2, 3 or 20 consecutive days. Except for the first day of drug treatment following a previous test experience in an undrugged state, CDZ had enduring anxiolytic-like effects under all schedules, promoting an increase in the exploration of the EPM open arms (and in some cases of the white compartment of the LDB), without affecting the number of closed-arm entries. The finding that rats did not develop tolerance to CDZ even with chronic treatment and repeated exposures to the triple test suggests that this new device is a promising tool to be used in longitudinal studies involving pharmacological manipulations of anxiety-related behaviors.

  6. Field tests of 2- and 40-tube condensers at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.W.; Domingo, N.

    1982-05-01

    Two water-cooled isobutane condensers, one with 2 tubes and one with 40 tubes, were subjected to field tests at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site to assess relative heat transfer performance in both surface evaporator and direct-contact evaporator modes. The five groups of tests established that field performance was below earlier laboratory-determined levels and that direct-contact evaporator mode performance was poorer than that for the surface evaporator mode. In all test situations, fluted condenser tubes performed better than smooth condenser tubes. Cooling water quality had no significant effect on performance, but brine preflash in the direct-contact mode did promote some relative performance improvement. Important implications of these results for binary geothermal power plants are that (1) working-fluid-side impurities can significantly degrade heat transfer performance of the power plant condensers and (2) provisions for minimizing such impurities may be required.

  7. Relation of field independence and test-item format to student performance on written piagetian tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ló; Pez-Rupérez, F.; Palacios, C.; Sanchez, J.

    In this study we have investigated the relationship between the field-dependence-independence (FDI) dimension as measured by the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) and subject performance on the Longeot test, a pencil-and-paper Piagetian test, through the open or closed format of its items. The sample consisted of 141 high school students. Correlation and variance analysis show that the FDI dimension and GEFT correlate significantly on only those items on the Longeot test that require formal reasoning. The effect of open- or closed-item format is found exclusively for formal items; only the open format discriminates significantly (at the 0.01 level) between the field-dependent and -independent subjects performing on this type of item. Some implications of these results for science education are discussed.

  8. High temperature superconducting axial field magnetic coupler: realization and test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belguerras, L.; Mezani, S.; Lubin, T.; Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    2015-09-01

    Contactless torque transmission through a large airgap is required in some industrial applications in which hermetic isolation is necessary. This torque transmission usually uses magnetic couplers, whose dimension strongly depends on the airgap flux density. The use of high temperature superconducting (HTS) coils to create a strong magnetic field may constitute a solution to reduce the size of the coupler. It is also possible to use this coupler to replace a torque tube in transmitting the torque produced by a HTS motor to its load. This paper presents the detailed construction and tests of an axial field HTS magnetic coupler. Pancake coils have been manufactured from BSCCO tape and used in one rotor of the coupler. The second rotor is mainly composed of NdFeB permanent magnets. Several tests have been carried out showing that the constructed coupler is working properly. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the studied coupler has been developed. Airgap magnetic field and torque measurements have been carried out and compared to the FE results. It has been shown that the measured and the computed quantities are in satisfactory agreement.

  9. Validity of Selected Lab and Field Tests of Physical Working Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Edmund J.

    The validity of selected lab and field tests of physical working capacity was investigated. Forty-four male college students were administered a series of lab and field tests of physical working capacity. Lab tests include a test of maximum oxygen uptake, the PWC 170 test, the Harvard Step Test, the Progressive Pulse Ratio Test, Margaria Test of…

  10. Noninvasive assessment of the iridial microcirculation in rats using sidestream dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Cerny, V; Zhou, J; Kelly, M; Alotibi, I; Turek, Z; Whynot, S; Saleh, I Abdo; Lehmann, C

    2013-02-01

    Sidestream dark field imaging represents a novel, noninvasive method to study the microcirculation in humans and animals. To-date, it has been used extensively in various peripheral tissues (e.g. sublingual area, intestinal mucosa), however no data for the ocular vasculature, including the iridial microcirculation, are currently available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the reliability and reproducibility of sidestream dark field imaging within the iridial microcirculation in experimental animals. Male Lewis rats were anaesthetized and the iris microvasculature was observed using an sidestream dark field probe gently placed against a cover slip covering the right eye. All video sequences recorded were analysed off-line by using AVA 3.0 software (MicroVision Medical, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). Results are expressed as mean (±SE) or median (interquartile range). Clear images were recorded from each animal and the total number of analysable video sequences was 50. All raw data for selected vessel density parameters passed normality test. The total all and small vessel density (in mm mm(-2) ) were 22,6 (±0,58) and 19,6 (±0,68), respectively. The perfused all and small vessel density were 20,9 (±0,61) and 19,1 (±0,65), respectively. The mean values of all iris vessel density parameters are shown in Figure 4. The DeBacker Score (n/mm) was 15,2 (±0,45), the proportion of perfused vessel was 94,5% (89,8-99,1%), and the MFI was 3 points (3-3). Taken together, these results indicate that SDF imaging provides a reliable and noninvasive method to examine the iridial microvascular bed in vivo and, thus, may provide unique opportunities for the study of the iridial vascular network in various experimental and clinical settings and disease models.

  11. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields induce oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Manikonda, Pavan K; Rajendra, Pilankatta; Devendranath, D; Gunasekaran, B; Channakeshava; Aradhya, Shivakumara R S; Sashidhar, Rao B; Subramanyam, Chivukula

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to understand the influence of long-term exposure of rats to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF), focusing on oxidative stress (OS) on different regions of rat's brain. Male Wistar rats (21-day-old) were exposed to ELF-MF (50 Hz; 50 and 100 µT) for 90 days continuously; hippocampal, cerebellar and cortical regions from rats were analyzed for (i) reactive oxygen species (ROS), (ii) metabolites indicative of OS and (iii) antioxidant enzymes. In comparison to control group rats, the rats that were continuously exposed to ELF-MF caused OS and altered glutathione (GSH/GSSG) levels in dose-dependent manner in all the regions of the brain. Accumulation of ROS, lipid peroxidation end products and activity of superoxide dismutase in different regions was in the descending order of cerebellum < hippocampus < cortex. Decrement in GSH/GSSG levels and increment in glutathione peroxidase activity were in the descending order of hippocampus < cerebellum < cortex. The continuous exposure to ELF-MF caused OS in all the examined regions of brain more significantly at 100 µT than at 50 µT. Varied influences observed in different regions of the brain, as documented in this study, may contribute to altered metabolic patterns in its related regions of the central nervous system, leading to aberrant neuronal functions.

  12. A rat liver foci promotion study with 50-Hz magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Rannug, A; Holmberg, B; Mild, K H

    1993-08-01

    To investigate the possible tumor-promoting effect of magnetic fields (MF), we have performed two liver foci bioassays in rats which were exposed to MF at four flux density levels (0.5 microT, 5 microT, 0.05 mT, and 0.5 mT). The MF were generated in exposure equipment consisting of copper coils surrounding racks with animal cages and giving homogenous horizontal 50-Hz magnetic fields. Rats previously submitted to partial hepatectomy and diethylnitrosamine treatment were exposed to MF for 12 weeks. Exposed and control rats were kept in separate rooms. As a positive control phenobarbital (PB) was administered for 12 weeks. The number, area, and volume of foci expressing gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST-p) were evaluated. The body weight gains and relative liver weights of MF-exposed rats were not different as compared to control rats. There was a slight increase in GGT-staining foci, but not in GST-p-staining foci, in the groups exposed to flux densities of 0.5 microT and 0.05 mT compared to the control group in the first experiment. The number of both GGT- and GST-p-staining foci in the livers of all MF-exposed groups were, however, within the control range when the results of the two experiments were considered together.

  13. Effects of a buried magnetic field on cranial bone reconstruction in rats.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maíra Cavallet de; Ponzoni, Deise; Langie, Renan; Artuzi, Felipe Ernesto; Puricelli, Edela

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of bone repair phenomena is a fundamental part of dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Objective The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of buried magnetic field stimulation on bone repair in rat calvaria after reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts, synthetic powdered hydroxyapatite, or allogeneic cartilage grafts, with or without exposure to magnetic stimulation. Material and Methods Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into 18 groups of five animals each. Critical bone defects were created in the rats' calvaria and immediately reconstructed with autogenous bone, powdered synthetic hydroxyapatite or allogeneic cartilage. Magnetic implants were also placed in half the animals. Rats were euthanized for analysis at 15, 30, and 60 postoperative days. Histomorphometric analyses of the quantity of bone repair were performed at all times. Results These analyses showed significant group by postoperative time interactions (p=0.008). Among the rats subjected to autogenous bone reconstruction, those exposed to magnetic stimulation had higher bone fill percentages than those without magnetic implants. Results also showed that the quality of bone repair remained higher in the former group as compared to the latter at 60 postoperative days. Conclusions After 60 postoperative days, bone repair was greater in the group treated with autogenous bone grafts and exposed to a magnetic field, and bone repair was most pronounced in animals treated with autogenous bone grafts, followed by those treated with powdered synthetic hydroxyapatite and allogeneic cartilage grafts.

  14. Test plan and technical protocol for a field treatability test for bioventing

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Ong, S.K.; Miller, R.N.; Downey, D.C.; Frandt, R.

    1992-05-01

    Bioventing is an extremely cost-effective method for treating soils contaminated with fuels (JP-4, diesel, gasoline, and heating oil) and non-chlorinated solvents. In April of this year, the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) launched a nation-wide bioventing initiative to test the effectiveness of this innovative process at 55 contaminated sites in nineteen states. Twenty systems have already been installed and tested. To ensure that systems were installed and tested consistently, AFCEE developed the comprehensive protocol document. With minimal site specific modifications, the protocol is also used as a regulatory test plan. The concept significantly reduces test plan preparation costs. The AFCEE document introduces the bioventing technology and describes the technical procedures used to set up a bioventing system for field evaluation. It also provides testing, equipment, measurements, and other relevant quantitative data.

  15. Site Guidelines for a Deep Borehole Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassani, D.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Freeze, G. A.; MacKinnon, R. J.; Perry, F.

    2015-12-01

    The US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) is initiating a Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT), without use of any radioactive waste, to evaluate the geoscience of the approach and technical capabilities for implementation. DOE has identified Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as the Technical Lead for the UFDC DBFT Project, with the role of supporting DOE in (i) developing the overall DBFT Project Plan, (ii) management and integration of all DBFT Project activities, and (iii) providing Project technical guidance to DOE, other DOE National Laboratories, and university partners. The DBFT includes drilling one Characterization Borehole (CB-8.5" diameter), followed by an optional Field Test Borehole (FTB), to a depth of about 5,000 m (16,400 feet) into crystalline basement rock in a geologically stable continental location. The DBFT CB will be drilled and completed to facilitate downhole scientific testing and analyses. If site conditions are found to be favorable, DOE may drill the larger-diameter (17") FTB to facilitate proof-of-concept of handling, emplacement, and retrieval activities using surrogate waste containers. Guidelines for favorable DBFT site geohydrochemical and geomechanical conditions will be discussed and status of the DBFT Project will be provided. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2015-6426A.

  16. Geotechnical field measurements: G-tunnel, Nevada test site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, R. M.; Vollendorf, W. C.

    1982-05-01

    The FY81 geotechnical measurements focused on borehole measurements in the Grouse Canyon welded tuff in G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site. These ambient temperature measures were taken to: (1) establish baseline reference field data, and (2) gain field testing experience in welded tuff. The in situ state of stress was obtained using the three-hole overcoring method with the US Bureau of Mines three-component borehole deformation gage. The orthogonal horizontal stresses were 5.5 and 0.3 MPa and the nominal vertical was 8.5. Biaxial tests were performed on recovered cores and the average modulus of deformation was 31 GPa. The modulus of deformation using the borehole jack (Goodman) had an average value of 12 GPa. This value is not corrected for effective bearing contact area. Two orthogonal boreholes were used to determine the range of hydraulic conductivities. The range was from 0.022 cm/s (22 Darcy's) to 1.923 cm/s (1988 Dracy's).

  17. Geotechnical field measurements: G-tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Vollendorf, W.C.

    1982-05-01

    The FY81 geotechnical measurements focused on borehole measurements in the Grouse Canyon welded tuff in G-tunnel on the Nevada Test Site. These ambient temperature measurements were taken to: (1) establish baseline reference field data, and (2) gain field testing experience in welded tuff. The in situ state of stress was obtained using the three-hole overcoring method with the US Bureau of Mines three-component borehole deformation gage. The orthogonal horizontal stresses were 5.5 and 0.3 MPa and the nominal vertical was 8.5. Biaxial tests were performed on recovered cores and the average modulus of deformation was 31 GPa. The modulus of deformation using the borehole jack (Goodman) had an average value of 12 GPa. This value is not corrected for effective bearing contact area. Two orthogonal boreholes were used to determine the range of hydraulic conductivities. The range was from 0.022 cm/s (22 Darcy`s) to 1.923 cm/s (1988 Darcy`s).

  18. Sudden death in epileptic rats exposed to nocturnal magnetic fields that simulate the shape and the intensity of sudden changes in geomagnetic activity: an experiment in response to Schnabel, Beblo and May

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persinger, M. A.; McKay, B. E.; O'Donovan, C. A.; Koren, S. A.

    2005-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that sudden unexplained death (SUD) in some epileptic patients is related to geomagnetic activity we exposed rats in which limbic epilepsy had been induced to experimentally produced magnetic fields designed to simulate sudden storm commencements (SSCs). Prior studies with rats had shown that sudden death in groups of rats in which epilepsy had been induced months earlier was associated with the occurrence of SSCs and increased geomagnetic activity during the previous night. Schnabel et al. [(2000) Neurology 54:903 908) found no relationship between SUD in human patients and geomagnetic activity. A total of 96 rats were exposed to either 500, 50, 10 40 nT or sham (less than 10 nT) magnetic fields for 6 min every hour between midnight and 0800 hours (local time) for three successive nights. The shape of the complex, amplitude-modulated magnetic fields simulated the shape and structure of an average SSC. The rats were then seized with lithium and pilocarpine and the mortality was monitored. Whereas 10% of the rats that had been exposed to the sham field died within 24 h, 60% of the rats that had been exposed to the experimental magnetic fields simulating natural geomagnetic activity died (P<.001) during this period. These results suggest that correlational analyses between SUD in epileptic patients and increased geomagnetic activity can be simulated experimentally in epileptic rats and that potential mechanisms might be testable directly.

  19. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

  20. Laboratory and field testing of improved geothermal rock bits

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

    1980-07-01

    The development and testing of 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bits are described. The new bits were fabricated by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability, and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Two types of experimental bits were subjected to laboratory air drilling tests at 250/sup 0/C (482/sup 0/F) in cast iron. These tests indicated field testing could be conducted without danger to the hole, and that bearing wear would be substantially reduced. Six additional experimental bits, and eight conventional bits were then subjected to air drilling a 240/sup 0/C (464/sup 0/F) in Francisan Graywacke at The Geysers, CA. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction-pin wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. Geysers drilling performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling life was increased by 70%. All bits at The Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole over the conventional bits. These tests demonstrated a potential well cost reduction of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

  1. Efficient field testing for load rating railroad bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Jeffrey L.; Brett C., Commander

    1995-06-01

    As the condition of our infrastructure continues to deteriorate, and the loads carried by our bridges continue to increase, an ever growing number of railroad and highway bridges require load limits. With safety and transportation costs at both ends of the spectrum. the need for accurate load rating is paramount. This paper describes a method that has been developed for efficient load testing and evaluation of short- and medium-span bridges. Through the use of a specially-designed structural testing system and efficient load test procedures, a typical bridge can be instrumented and tested at 64 points in less than one working day and with minimum impact on rail traffic. Various techniques are available to evaluate structural properties and obtain a realistic model. With field data, a simple finite element model is 'calibrated' and its accuracy is verified. Appropriate design and rating loads are applied to the resulting model and stress predictions are made. This technique has been performed on numerous structures to address specific problems and to provide accurate load ratings. The merits and limitations of this approach are discussed in the context of actual examples of both rail and highway bridges that were tested and evaluated.

  2. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  3. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Paul; Churchfield, Matt; Scholbrock, Andrew; Clifton, Andrew; Schreck, Scott; Johnson, Kathryn; Wright, Alan; Gebraad, Pieter; Annoni, Jennifer; Naughton, Brian; Berg, Jon; Herges, Tommy; White, Jon; Mikkelsen, Torben; Sjoholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nicolas

    2016-10-03

    This study describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental design and setup. Lastly, all data collected as part of this field experiment will be archived and made available to the public via the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  4. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, P.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.; Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Johnson, K.; Wright, A.; Gebraad, P.; Annoni, J.; Naughton, B.; Berg, J.; Herges, T.; White, J.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.; Angelou, N.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental design and setup. All data collected as part of this field experiment will be archived and made available to the public via the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  5. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    DOE PAGES

    Fleming, Paul; Churchfield, Matt; Scholbrock, Andrew; ...

    2016-10-03

    This study describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental design and setup. Lastly, all data collected as partmore » of this field experiment will be archived and made available to the public via the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.« less

  6. Field Test: Results from the One Year Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kofman, I. S.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stenger, M. B.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laurie, S. S.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Fisher, E. A.; Phillips, T.; Ribeiro, C.; Taylor, L. C.; Miller, C. A.; Gadd, N. E.; Peters, B. T.; Kitov, V. V.; Lysova, N. Yu; Holden, K. L.; De Dios, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The One Year Mission was designed to aid in determining the effect that extending the duration on orbit aboard the International Space Station (ISS) would have on a number of biological and physiological systems. Two crewmembers were selected to participate in this endeavor, one U.S. On-Orbit Segment (USOS) astronaut and one Russian cosmonaut. The Neuroscience and Cardiovascular and Vision Laboratories at the Johnson Space Center and the Sensory-Motor and Countermeasures Division within the Institute for Biomedical Problems were selected to investigate vestibular, sensorimotor and cardiovascular function with the two long-duration crewmembers using the established methodology developed for the Field Test (FT).

  7. Field Testing of Utility Robots for Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Bualat, Maria; Deans, Matt; Allan, Mark; Bouyssounouse, Xavier; Broxton, Michael; Edwards, Laurence; Lee, Pascal; Lee, Susan Y.; Lees, David; Park, Eric; Pedersen, Liam; Smith, Trey; To, Vinh; Utz, Hans; Pacis, Estrellina; Schreckenghost, Debra

    2008-01-01

    Since 2004, NASA has been working to return to the Moon. In contrast to the Apollo missions, two key objectives of the current exploration program is to establish significant infrastructure and an outpost. Achieving these objectives will enable long-duration stays and long-distance exploration of the Moon. To do this, robotic systems will be needed to perform tasks which cannot, or should not, be performed by crew alone. In this paper, we summarize our work to develop "utility robots" for lunar surface operations, present results and lessons learned from field testing, and discuss directions for future research.

  8. Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, D. W.

    1981-02-01

    The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

  9. Development and field testing of an adaptive power factor controller

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawi, M.; Venkata, S.S.; Butler, N.G.; Yinger, R.W.

    1987-12-01

    The Adaptive Power Factor Controller (APFC) is a device that switches capacitors electronically to achieve almost unity power factor at the point of installation. It was designed and developed at the University of Washington (UW), and is being tested at the R and D facility of the Southern California Edison Company (SCE). It is particularly intended for loads with dynamically varying reactive power demands such as induction generators in wind power stations, or cyclically changing loads such as induction motors in process industries. It is also ideally suited for improving the power factor profile of a distribution line. The purposes of this paper are two-fold: to explain the most recent design of the 50-kVAR APFC and to report the results of the field testing program on the device after it was installed at the terminals of a 50-kW three-phase induction generator located at the Dever Wind R and D site of SCE.

  10. Evaluation of reproductive function of female rats exposed to radiofrequency fields (27. 12 MHz) near a shortwave diathermy device

    SciTech Connect

    Brown-Woodman, P.D.; Hadley, J.A.; Richardson, L.; Bright, D.; Porter, D.

    1989-04-01

    In recent years, there has been increased concern regarding effects of operator exposure to the electromagnetic (EM) field associated with shortwave diathermy devices. The present study was designed to investigate the effects, on rats, of repeated exposure to such an EM field. Following repeated exposure for 5 wk, a reduction in fertility occurred as indicated by a reduced number of matings in exposed rats compared to sham-irradiated rats and a reduction in the number of rats that conceived after mating. The data suggest that female operators could experience reduced fertility, if they remained close to the console for prolonged periods. This has particular significant for the physiotherapy profession.

  11. Effect of chronic 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammary tumorigenesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Leung, F.C.; Rommereim, D.N.; Buschbom, R.L.; Wilson, B.W.; Stevens, R.G.

    1989-07-01

    Female rats were administered a single dosage of 7 or 10 mg of DMBA intragastrically between 50 and 55 days of age and palpated weekly for mammary tumors in two experiments. Rats were either exposed to a 40 kV/m 60-Hz electric field or sham-exposed in utero through 18 or 23 weeks of age. There was no difference between electric field exposed and sham-exposed in incidence of first tumor. When the results of the two experiments were combined, the electric field exposed groups had significantly more tumors per tumor-bearing animal than the sham-groups. These results may have implications for the role of electric power use in the etiology and promotion of breast cancer. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Use of laboratory and field testing to identify potential production problems in the Troll field

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, R.; Jadid, M.B.

    1989-02-01

    The areal extent of the oil found in Troll made it clear at a very early stage in the field's appraisal that subsea wells would be required if the oil were developed. Owing to cooling in the subsea flowline, subsea wells can be expected to pose more production chemistry problems than would be expected with conventional platform wells. Consequently, a number of laboratory tests were carried out during the appraisal campaign to identify problems to be expected with scaling, foaming, emulsification, wax deposition, and hydrates. Dehydration and wax deposition tests were also carried out offshore during appraisal-well testing. These tests are described, together with the methods subsequently adopted to minimize future production problems.

  13. Effects of exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields on spermatogenesis in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weixia; Liu, Chuan; Wu, Hongjuan; Chen, Chunhai; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Peng; Luo, Xue; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    The constant exposure of modern society to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) has raised considerable concerns about the potential risks to male reproduction. However, the epidemiological and experimental data remain contradictory and inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 50 Hz ELF-MF of 500 µT applied 4 h/day, 7 days/week for 4 and 8 weeks on male reproduction, focusing on changes in spermatogenesis. Several biological endpoints related to testicular function and spermatogenesis were measured, including the following: body mass, masses of testes and epididymis, sperm count and abnormal sperm ratio in the caudal epididymis, serum testosterone level, testicular histology, frequency of 14 stages of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium and of four stages of meiosis I, germ cell apoptosis and testicular oxidative status. No significant differences were found in the biological endpoints between the sham control and the exposed rats in either the 4- or 8-week exposure period. These negative results may result from the lack of change in serum testosterone. In conclusion, our study indicates that exposure to low intensity ELF-MF may have no adverse effects on spermatogenesis.

  14. Analysis of rat testicular proteome following 30-day exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed

    Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Kazemipour, Nasrin; Saeb, Mehdi; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-12-01

    The use of electromagnetic field (EMF) generating apparatuses such as cell phones is increasing, and has caused an interest in the investigations of its effects on human health. We analyzed proteome in preparations from the whole testis in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats that were exposed to 900 MHz EMF radiation for 1, 2, or 4 h/day for 30 consecutive days, simulating a range of possible human cell phone use. Subjects were sacrificed immediately after the end of the experiment and testes fractions were solubilized and separated via high-resolution 2D electrophoresis, and gel patterns were scanned, digitized, and processed. Thirteen proteins, which were found only in sham or in exposure groups, were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. Among them, heat shock proteins, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin-1, and other proteins related to misfolding of proteins and/or stress were identified. These results demonstrate significant effects of radio frequency modulated EMFs exposure on proteome, particularly in protein species in the rodent testis, and suggest that a 30-day exposure to EMF radiation induces nonthermal stress in testicular tissue. The functional implication of the identified proteins was discussed.

  15. Verapamil Parameter- and Dose-Dependently Impairs Memory Consolidation in Open Field Habituation Task in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Popović, Natalija; Giménez de Béjar, Verónica; Caballero-Bleda, María; Popović, Miroljub

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of the phenylalkylamine class of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel antagonist, verapamil (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/kg i.p.), administered immediately after the acquisition task, on memory consolidation of the open field habituation task, in male Wistar rats. On the 48 h retested trial, all tested parameters (ambulation in the side wall and in the central areas, number of rearing, time spent grooming and defecation rate) significantly decreased in the saline treated animals. A significant decrease of rearing was observed in all verapamil treated groups. On the retention day, the ambulation in the side wall and central areas significantly decreased in the animals treated with 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg of verapamil, while the time spent grooming and the defecation rate significantly decreased only in the group treated with 1 mg/kg of verapamil. According to the change ratio scores that correct the individual behavioral baseline differences during initial and final sessions, habituation deficit was found in animals treated with verapamil as follows: ambulation along the side wall area (1, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg), number of rearing (all used dose) and time spent grooming (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg). In conclusion, the present data suggest that the post-training administration of verapamil, parameter- and dose-dependently, impairs the habituation to a novel environment. PMID:28119614

  16. Field exercise testing for assessing fitness in French standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Couroucé, A

    1999-03-01

    This review considers standardized exercise testing which is, routinely used for French Trotters in the field. Track testing provides a more limited range of measurements than treadmill testing, but has the advantage of being performed in the horse's natural environment. Various measurements such as heart rate during exercise and blood lactate concentration after exercise may be measured on the track and lead to the calculation of physiological variables such as V200 (velocity corresponding to a 200 bpm heart rate) and V4 (velocity corresponding to a 4 mmol/L blood lactate concentration). V4 is related to the onset of blood lactate accumulation and relates to the aerobic capacity of the horse, as horses with high values for V4 have higher aerobic capacities. Although V4 is calculated during submaximal intensity exercise, it is related to racing performance and seems to be the most important measurement to assess changes in fitness. V200 represents the cardiac capacity of the horse during exercise and is close to V4 in mature horses. To explain further the clinical usefulness of track testing, and to help interpret both V4 and V200 variables, examples of exercise tests in 3-year-old French Trotters are presented here. These results show that changes may occur in V4 and V200 according to different factors such as the horse's physical ability and either training or disease states. It underlines the importance of exercise tests for both trainers and veterinarians and how they may help in the evaluation of a horse's performance ability; in defining the intensity of a training program, and also in the early detection of underlying diseases.

  17. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus test of 4,4'-methylenedianiline using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Hisakazu; Koyama, Naomi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    Liver micronucleus (MN) tests using partial hepatectomized rats or juvenile rats have been shown to be useful for the detection of hepatic carcinogens. Moreover, Narumi et al. established the repeated-dose liver MN test using young adult rats for integration into general toxicity. In the present study, in order to examine the usefulness of the repeated-dose liver MN test, we investigated MN induction with a 14 or 28 day treatment protocol using young adult rats treated with 4,4′-methylenedianiline (MDA), a known hepatic carcinogen. MDA dose-dependently induced micronuclei in hepatocytes in 14- and 28-day repeated-dose tests. However, although statistically significant increases in micronuclei were observed in bone marrow cells at two dose levels in the 14-day study, there was no dose response and no increases in micronuclei in the 28-day study. These results indicate that the evaluation of genotoxic effects using hepatocytes is effective in cases where chromosomal aberrations are not clearly detectable in bone marrow cells. Moreover, the repeated-dose liver MN test allows evaluation at a dose below the maximum tolerable dose, which is required for the conventional MN test because micronucleated hepatocytes accumulate. The repeated-dose liver MN test employed in the present study can be integrated into the spectrum of general toxicity tests without further procedural modifications.

  18. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  19. Effect of non-ionizing electromagnetic field on the alteration of ovarian follicles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Seyed Shahin; Khaki, Amir Afshin; Ainehchi, Nava; Alihemmati, Alireza; Khatooni, Azam Asghari; Khaki, Arash; Asghari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, there has been an increase in the attention paid to safety effects, environmental and society’s health, extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF), and radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). The aim of this research was to determine the effect of EMF on the alteration of ovarian follicles. Methods In this experimental study at Tabriz Medical University in 2015, we did EMF exposures and assessed the alteration of rats’ ovarian follicles. Thirty three-month old rats were selected randomly from laboratory animals, and, after their ages and weights were determined, they were divided randomly into three groups. The control group consisted of 10 rats without any treatment, and they were kept in normal conditions. The second group of rats was influenced by a magnetic field of 50 Hz for eight weeks (three weeks intrauterine and five weeks ectopic). The third group of rats was influenced by a magnetic field of 50 Hz for 13 weeks (three weeks intrauterine and ten weeks ectopic). Samples were fixed in 10% buffered formaldehyde and cleared with Xylol and embedded in paraffin. After sectioning and staining, samples were studied by optic microscopy. Finally, SPSS version 17, were used for data analysis. Results EMF radiation increased the harmful effects on the formation of ovarian follicles and oocytes implantation. Studies on the effects of electromagnetic fields on ovarian follicles have shown that the nuclei of the oocytes become smaller and change shape. There were significant, harmful changes in the groups affected by electromagnetic waves. Atresia of ovarian follicles was significantly significant in both study groups compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion Exposure to electromagnetic fields during embryonic development can cause morphological changes in oocytes and affect the differentiation of oocytes and folliculogenesis, resulting in decreased ovarian reserve leading to infertility or reduced

  20. DEXA analysis on the bones of rats exposed in utero and neonatally to static and 50 Hz electric fields.

    PubMed

    Okudan, Berna; Keskin, Ali Umit; Aydin, Mustafa Asim; Cesur, Gökhan; Cömlekçi, Selçuk; Süslü, Harun

    2006-10-01

    Effects of the electromagnetic fields on living bodies, bones in particular, are among the relevant issues of contemporary life. In this study, we report the influences of 50 Hz and 0 Hz (static) electric fields (EF), on intact rat bones, as evaluated by dual energy X-ray absorbtion (DEXA) measurements on bone content and density when these animals (n = 27) are continuously exposed in utero and neonatally to EFs (10 kV/m) 14 days before and 14 days after their birth, for 28 days in total. Differences between 50 Hz EF and static EF groups are found to be significant (95% confidence level) for total bone mineral content (BMC), TBMC (P = .002). Differences between 50 Hz and control groups are found to be significant for total bone mineral density (BMD), TBMD (P = .002), lumbar BMC, LBMC (P = .023), and TBMC (P = .001). Differences between static EF and control groups are found to be significant for femoral BMD, FBMD (P = .009), TBMD (P = .002), LBMC (P = .001), and TBMC (P = .001). Note that TBMC parameters are jointly significant for all differences between the three groups of test animals. These results have shown that both static and 50 Hz EFs influence the early development of rat bones. However, the influence of static EFs is more pronounced than that of the 50 Hz field.

  1. Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of

  2. Influence of 50 Hz frequency sinusoidal magnetic field on the blood-brain barrier permeability of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, Baria; Kalkan, Tunaya; Tuncel, Handan

    2004-07-01

    The combined effects of diabetes and a 50 Hz, 5 mT RMS flux density sinusoidal magnetic field for 8 h a day, for 21 consecutive days on the permeation of Evans-blue dye through the blood-brain barrier were studied in male Wistar albino rats. Our results suggest that magnetic field has no effect on the blood-brain barrier permeability in normoglycemic animals, but that diabetic rats are vulnerable to magnetic fields.

  3. A field test of the TIME patient simulation model.

    PubMed

    Harless, W G; Duncan, R C; Zier, M A; Ayers, W R; Berman, J R; Pohl, H S

    1990-05-01

    The Technological Innovations in Medical Education (TIME) Project has created an interactive videodisc patient-simulation model that provides faculty with a new method for patient-centered teaching in the medical school classroom. The TIME model is designed to be controlled by a professor in the classroom setting, and incorporates voice recognition technology and video dramatization to create a believable patient encounter. Under the auspices of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, National Library of Medicine, where the Project originated in 1983, three medical schools participated in a field test of this "high-tech" model. Six faculty members made ten classroom presentations of two TIME simulations to 306 second-year medical students. The principal finding was that, in a group setting, a large majority of the students at all three schools became individually committed to the care and management of the simulated patient. They acted as if the patient's problems were real and left the session feeling as though they had interacted with an actual person. Therefore, in terms of simulating a real patient, the TIME patient-simulation model was validated, providing the basis for the development of new patient-centered methods to teach and test medical students in the classroom setting. The Project has been at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, where the model is being introduced into the existing curriculum, since 1988. It is currently being used as a part of the final examination for second-year students and in discussion-group settings for fourth-year students in the internal medicine clerkship. A field test is also under way using the TIME model to assess the clinical performance of third-year students.

  4. Effects of theanine, a unique amino acid in tea leaves, on memory in a rat behavioral test.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takashi; Terashima, Takehiko; Honma, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Shinichi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Juneja, Lekh Raj; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2008-05-01

    We identified an effect of theanine on memory functions in a novel object test. Rats were fed theanine for 3 weeks ad libitum, and then they performed the object test. The theanine-fed group performed search behavior for the novel object in the test session. The results suggest that theanine-fed rats showed improved recognition, and that theanine affected learning and memory.

  5. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) at the Hanford Site: Installation and initial tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.; Downs, J.L.; Campbell, M.D.

    1989-02-01

    The objectives of this program are to test barrier design concepts and to demonstrate a barrier design that meets established performance criteria for use in isolating wastes disposed of near-surface at the Hanford Site. Specifically, the program is designed to assess how well the barriers perform in controlling biointrusion, water infiltration, and erosion, as well as evaluating interactions between environmental variables and design factors of the barriers. To assess barrier performance and design with respect to infiltration control, field lysimeters and small- and large-scale field plots are planned to test the performance of specific barrier designs under actual and modified (enhanced precipitation) climatic conditions. The Field Lysimeter Test Facility (FLTF) is located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site just east of the 200 West Area and adjacent to the Hanford Meteorological Station. The FLTF data will be used to assess the effectiveness of selected protective barrier configurations in controlling water infiltration. The facility consists of 14 drainage lysimeters (2 m dia x 3 m deep) and four precision weighing lysimeters (1.5 m x 1.5 m x 1.7 m deep). The lysimeters are buried at grade and aligned in a parallel configuration, with nine lysimeters on each side of an underground instrument chamber. The lysimeters were filled with materials to simulate a multilayer protective barrier system. Data gathered from the FLTF will be used to compare key barrier components and to calibrate and test models for predicting long-term barrier performance.

  6. Changes in NGF/c-Fos colocalization in specific limbic structures of juvenile and aged rats after open field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Szalewska, E; Klejbor, I; Cecot, T; Domaradzka-Pytel, B; Ludkiewicz, B; Moryś, J

    2009-08-01

    Changes in NGF release during stressful events have been associated with the activation of neurons expressing NGF receptors. This study examined the influence of acute stress-induced stimulation on NGF/c-Fos colocalization in the following limbic regions: the paraventricular (PV) nucleus of the hypothalamus, medial (MeA) nucleus of the amygdala, and CA3 hippocampus. Juvenile (P21) and aged rats (P360) were exposed to a 15-minute acute open field (OF) test. Double immunofluorescence staining, used to detect NGF-ir and c-Fos-ir cells, revealed a higher percentage of NGF/c-Fos-ir neurons in the P21 control group than in the P360 control group. Under OF acute stimulation, a statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase of NGF/c-Fos level in CA3 of juvenile animals and in PV and CA3 of the aged rats was observed. These observations indicate that the investigated structures in both age groups show a different response to acute OF stimulation. Acute OF affects the levels of NGF/c-Fos more significantly in aged rats.

  7. Rats avoid exposure to HVdc electric fields: a dose response study.

    PubMed

    Creim, J A; Lovely, R H; Weigel, R J; Forsythe, W C; Anderson, L E

    1993-01-01

    Rats, given the choice, avoid exposure to alternating current (ac) 60-Hz electric fields at intensities > or = 75 kV/m. This study investigated the generality of this behavior by studying the response of rats when exposed to high voltage direct current (HVdc) electric fields. Three hundred eighty male Long Evans rats were studied in 9 experiments with 40 rats per experiment and in one experiment with 20 rats to determine 1) if rats avoid exposure to HVdc electric fields of varying field strengths, and 2) if avoidance did occur, what role, if any, the concentration of air ions would have on the avoidance behavior. In all experiments a three-compartment glass shuttlebox was used; either the left or right compartment could be exposed to a combination of HVdc electric fields and air ions while the other compartment remained sham-exposed. The third, center compartment was a transition zone between exposure and sham-exposure. In each experiment, the rats were individually assessed in 1-h sessions where half of the rats (n = 20) had the choice to locomote between the two sides being exposed or sham-exposed, while the other half of the rats (n = 20) were sham-exposed regardless of their location, except in one experiment where there was no sham-exposed group. The exposure levels for the first six experiments were 80, 55, 42.5, 30, -36, and -55 kV/m, respectively. The air ion concentration was constant at 1.4 x 10(6) ions/cc for the four positive exposure levels and -1.4 x 10(6) ions/cc for the two negative exposure levels. Rats having a choice between exposure and non-exposure relative to always sham-exposed control animals significantly reduced the amount of time spent on the exposed side at 80 kV/m (P < .002) as they did at both 55 and -55 kV/m (P < .005). No significant differences between groups were observed at 42.5, 30, or -36 kV/m. To determine what role the air ion concentration might have had on the avoidance behavior at field strengths of 55 kV/m or greater, four

  8. [The hemathological reactions in rats after partial screening from natural electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Iamshanov, V A; Kovan'ko, E G; Koshelevskiĭ, V K; Iamshanov, Iu A; Ivanov, S D

    2005-01-01

    The influence of partial screening of EMF on the composition of white blood cells was studied in the experiments on rats. Two kinds of copper rings were used in these experiments: individual for each rat and common for the cage. It was shown that inside the ring the composition of blood cells was changed--in 3-5 hours the number of granulocytes increased and in 24 hours it restored to the initial level. The effect was more expressive in the experiments using individual rings. In control groups the experiment with plastic rings didn't reveal this effect. It was presumed that EMF prevented the decay of granulocytes. It leads to the increase of their guantity. It was revealed that there was a positive correlation between Ki-indexes of geomagnetic field (GMF) in 1-2 days before the experiments and the number of granulocytes in rats during 1995-2002. Ki-indexes reflect the degree of GMF disturbance. During magnetic storms the spreading of EMF in radio-frequency range changes. It was presumed that the effect of partial screening of EMF of rats and the activity of magnetic storms are similar in their influence on the composition of white blood cells of rats.

  9. Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  10. Design and Field Test of a Galvanometer Deflected Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, C C; Goosman, D R; Wade, J T; Avara, R

    2002-11-08

    We have developed a compact fieldable optically-deflected streak camera first reported in the 20th HSPP Congress. Using a triggerable galvanometer that scans the optical signal, the imaging and streaking function is an all-optical process without incurring any photon-electron-photon conversion or photoelectronic deflection. As such, the achievable imaging quality is limited mainly only by optical design, rather than by multiple conversions of signal carrier and high voltage electron-optics effect. All core elements of the camera are packaged into a 12 inch x 24 inch footprint box, a size similar to that of a conventional electronic streak camera. At LLNL's Site-300 Test Site, we have conducted a Fabry-Perot interferometer measurement of fast object velocity using this all-optical camera side-by-side with an intensified electronic streak camera. These two cameras are configured as two independent instruments for recording synchronously each branch of the 50/50 splits from one incoming signal. Given the same signal characteristics, the test result has undisputedly demonstrated superior imaging performance for the all-optical streak camera. It produces higher signal sensitivity, wider linear dynamic range, better spatial contrast, finer temporal resolution, and larger data capacity as compared with that of the electronic counterpart. The camera had also demonstrated its structural robustness and functional consistence to be well compatible with field environment. This paper presents the camera design and the test results in both pictorial records and post-process graphic summaries.

  11. Field testing of sound absorption coefficients in a classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettyjohn, Steve

    2005-09-01

    Formal procedures for determining the sound absorption coefficients of materials installed in the field do not exist. However, the U.S. Air Force requested such tests to prove that the sound-absorbing material used in classrooms at Beale AFB in Marysville, CA, met the specified NRC of 0.80. They permitted the use of two layers of 0.5-in. fiberboard or 1-in.-thick fiberglass panels to meet the specified NRC rating. Post-construction tests showed reverberation times longer than expected. Unrealistic sound-absorption coefficients for room finish materials had to be used with the Sabine equation to achieve agreement between the measured and predicted reverberation time. By employing the Fitzroy equation and generally published absorption coefficients for ceiling tile, carpet, and fiberboard, the model provided excellent agreement with the measured reverberation times. The NRC of the fiberboard was computed to be 0.35, agreeing with published data. Since this did not meet project specifications, the Fitzroy model was used to learn the type and quantity of material needed to meet design goals. Follow-up tests showed good agreement between the predicted and measured reverberation times with material added, and project specifications were met. Results are also compared with the requirements of ANSI 12.60.

  12. Circularly polarized, sinusoidal, 50 Hz magnetic field exposure does not influence plasma testosterone levels of rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Honma, K; Shigemitsu, T; Shiga, Y

    1994-01-01

    We exposed rats to circularly polarized 50 Hz magnetic fields to determine if plasma testosterone concentration was affected. Previous experiments indicate that magnetic fields suppress the nighttime rise in melatonin, suggesting that other neuroendocrine changes might occur as well. Male Wistar-King rats were exposed almost continuously for 6 weeks to magnetic flux densities of 1, 5, or 50 microT. Blood samples were obtained by decapitation at 12:00 h and 24:00 h. Plasma testosterone concentration showed a significant day-night difference, with a higher level at 12:00 h when studied in July and December, but night difference, with a higher level at 12:00 h when studied in July and December, but the day-night difference disappeared when concentrations were studied in April. In three experiments, magnetic field exposure had no statistically significant effect on plasma testosterone levels compared with the sham-exposed groups. These findings indicate that 6 weeks of nearly continuous exposure to circularly polarized, 50 Hz magnetic fields did not change plasma testosterone concentration in rats.

  13. Adaptation of a primate operant test battery to the rat: effects of chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, A J; Popke, E J; Fogle, C M; Paule, M G

    2000-01-01

    The National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR) Operant Test Battery (OTB) has been used extensively in rhesus monkeys to characterize the effects of drugs and toxicants on the performance of tasks designed to model several cognitive functions. Recently, the majority of the OTB tasks have been adapted for use in rats. The current study is the first to examine the effects of a prototypic pharmacological agent previously assessed in monkeys on rat OTB performance. The effects of the dopamine antagonist chlorpromazine (0.56-5.6 mg/kg, i.p.) were assessed in rats performing tasks designed to model auditory-visual-position discrimination, learning, time estimation, and appetitive motivation. All four tasks were equally sensitive to the behavioral effects of chlorpromazine. This pattern of sensitivity was very similar to that obtained when chlorpromazine was tested in monkeys performing the OTB. These data thus suggest that operant tasks designed to model cognitive functions in monkeys can also be used in rats, and that the effects of chlorpromazine on the performance of these tasks may be predictive of results obtained with monkeys. Further characterization of the rat OTB using prototypic pharmacological agents will further determine the extent to which drug effects on rat OTB performance can be generalized to primates.

  14. Neural and behavioral teratological evaluation of rats exposed to ultra-wideband electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Cobb, B L; Jauchem, J R; Mason, P A; Dooley, M P; Miller, S A; Ziriax, J M; Murphy, M R

    2000-10-01

    Several investigators have reported teratologic effects of electromagnetic field exposure. The majority of these studies have been performed at levels of exposure that could produce substantial heating of the animals. New and unique sources of ultra-wideband (UWB) electromagnetic fields are currently being developed and tested that are capable of generating nonthermalizing, high-peak-power, microwave (MW) pulses with nanosecond (ns) pulse widths, picosecond (ps) rise times, and an UWB of frequencies. Our study was performed to determine if teratological changes occur in rat pups as a result of (i) daily UWB exposures during gestation days 3-18, or (ii) as a result of both prenatal and postnatal (10 days) exposures. Dams were exposed either to (i) UWB irradiation from a Kentech system that emitted a 55 kV/m-peak E field, 300 ps rise time, and a 1.8 ns pulse width, average whole-body specific absorption rate 45 mW/kg; (ii) sham irradiation; or (iii) a positive control, lead (Pb) acetate solution (2000 microg/ml) continuously available in the drinking water. Offspring were examined for ontogeny (litter size, sex-ratios, weights, coat appearance, tooth-eruption, eye-opening, air-righting, and ultrasonic stress vocalizations). Male pups were tested on various performance measures (locomotor, water-maze learning, and fertilization capabilities). The pups postnatally exposed were examined for hippocampal morphology and operant behavior. Behavioral, functional, and morphological effects of UWB exposure were unremarkable with these exceptions: (i) The UWB-exposed pups emitted significantly more stress vocalizations than the sham-exposed pups; (ii) the medial-to-lateral length of the hippocampus was significantly longer in the UWB-exposed pups than in the sham-exposed animals; (iii) male offspring exposed in utero to UWB mated significantly less frequently than sham-exposed males, but when they did mate there was no difference in fertilization and offspring numbers from the

  15. The influence of testing angle on the biomechanical properties of the rat supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Newton, Michael D; Davidson, Abigail A; Pomajzl, Ryan; Seta, Joseph; Kurdziel, Michael D; Maerz, Tristan

    2016-12-08

    Rotator cuff tears are a common shoulder pathology. The rat supraspinatus tendon model is commonly employed for preclinical assessment of rotator cuff pathology or regeneration. However, there is a lack of a standardized biomechanical testing protocol; previous studies have tested the tendon at abduction angles ranging from -15° to 90°. This study aimed to assess the effect of abduction/testing angle on the biomechanical properties of the rat supraspinatus tendon. Fourty-eight shoulders (n=12/group) from healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to 4 testing angle groups: 0° (corresponding to 90° abduction), 30°, 60°, and 90° (0° abduction). Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus was performed, consisting of stress-relaxation and load-to-failure. Mechanical properties were calculated, and nonlinear tensile modeling was performed via the Quasilinear Viscoelastic (QLV) and Structurally Based Elastic (SBE) models. Results indicate that testing angle significantly affects supraspinatus tendon biomechanics. Stiffness and modulus significantly decreased with increasing testing angle (stiffness: 20.93±5.8N/mm at 0° vs. 6.12±1.0N/mm at 90°, P<.001; modulus: 59.51±34.0MPa at 0° vs. 22.37±7.4MPa at 90°, P=.002). Testing angle correlated significantly to ultimate strain, yield strain, and all coefficients of the SBE and QLV models, implying differences in collagen fiber crimp patterns and viscoelastic behavior as a function of testing angle. These results suggest that differences in testing methodology, in particular testing angle, significantly affect the measured mechanical properties of the supraspinatus tendon. Future studies may consider utilizing testing angles of 0°-30°, at which tendon stiffness is maximized, and full standardization of rat rotator cuff testing protocols is necessary.

  16. Effects of a buried magnetic field on cranial bone reconstruction in rats

    PubMed Central

    de ABREU, Maíra Cavallet; PONZONI, Deise; LANGIE, Renan; ARTUZI, Felipe Ernesto; PURICELLI, Edela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The understanding of bone repair phenomena is a fundamental part of dentistry and maxillofacial surgery. Objective The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of buried magnetic field stimulation on bone repair in rat calvaria after reconstruction with autogenous bone grafts, synthetic powdered hydroxyapatite, or allogeneic cartilage grafts, with or without exposure to magnetic stimulation. Material and Methods Ninety male Wistar rats were divided into 18 groups of five animals each. Critical bone defects were created in the rats’ calvaria and immediately reconstructed with autogenous bone, powdered synthetic hydroxyapatite or allogeneic cartilage. Magnetic implants were also placed in half the animals. Rats were euthanized for analysis at 15, 30, and 60 postoperative days. Histomorphometric analyses of the quantity of bone repair were performed at all times. Results These analyses showed significant group by postoperative time interactions (p=0.008). Among the rats subjected to autogenous bone reconstruction, those exposed to magnetic stimulation had higher bone fill percentages than those without magnetic implants. Results also showed that the quality of bone repair remained higher in the former group as compared to the latter at 60 postoperative days. Conclusions After 60 postoperative days, bone repair was greater in the group treated with autogenous bone grafts and exposed to a magnetic field, and bone repair was most pronounced in animals treated with autogenous bone grafts, followed by those treated with powdered synthetic hydroxyapatite and allogeneic cartilage grafts. PMID:27119765

  17. Rat liver foci study on coexposure with 50 Hz magnetic fields and known carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Rannug, A.; Holmberg, B.; Ekstroem, T. ); Mild, K.H. )

    1993-01-01

    A study was performed to investigate possible interactions by magnetic fields (MF) with the processes of initiation and promotion of chemically induced preneoplastic lesions in rat liver. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 70% partial hepatectomy followed after 24 h by i.p. injection of diethylnitrosamine (DENA) as a tumor initiator. Starting one week after the DENA-treatment phenobarbital (PB) was given to promote growth of enzymatically altered foci of liver cells. MF was applied immediately after the partial hepatectomy and continued until sacrifice after 12 weeks of PB exposure. Homogeneous horizontal AC magnetic fields with a frequency of 50Hz and flux densities of 0.5 [mu]T or 0.5 mT were used. The rats coexposed with MF and DENA plus PB did not gain weight as much as the rats exposed to the chemical agents only. The MF-exposure also resulted in a slight reduction in size and numbers of the focal lesions. The results suggest an interaction of MF with the processes of chemical carcinogenesis either as a result of stress or depending on effects on the proliferation of preneoplastic cells.

  18. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.

    2002-09-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed a new commercial product ready for technology transfer, the Diesel Dog{reg_sign} Portable Soil Test Kit, for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated as ASTM Method D 5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In June 2001, the Diesel Dog technology won an American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovations Award. To gain field experience with the new technology, Diesel Dog kits have been used for a variety of site evaluation and cleanup activities. Information gained from these activities has led to improvements in hardware configurations and additional insight into correlating Diesel Dog results with results from laboratory methods. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) used Diesel Dog Soil Test Kits to guide cleanups at a variety of sites throughout the state. ENSR, of Acton, Massachusetts, used a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit to evaluate sites in the Virgin Islands and Georgia. ChemTrack and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers successfully used a test kit to guide excavation at an abandoned FAA fuel-contaminated site near Fairbanks, Alaska. Barenco, Inc. is using a Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kit for site evaluations in Canada. A small spill of diesel fuel was cleaned up in Laramie, Wyoming using a Diesel

  19. Near-field modeling in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlmann, K.; Shirley, C.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating the effects of nuclear testing in underground test areas (the UGTA program) at the Nevada Test Site. The principal focus of the UGTA program is to better understand and define subsurface radionuclide migration. The study described in this report focuses on the development of tools for generating maps of hydrogeologic characteristics of subsurface Tertiary volcanic units at the Frenchman Flat corrective Action Unit (CAU). The process includes three steps. The first step involves generation of three-dimensional maps of the geologic structure of subsurface volcanic units using geophysical logs to distinguish between two classes: densely welded tuff and nonwelded tuff. The second step generates three-dimensional maps of hydraulic conductivity utilizing the spatial distribution of the two geologic classes obtained in the first step. Each class is described by a correlation structure based on existing data on hydraulic conductivity, and conditioned on the generated spatial location of each class. The final step demonstrates the use of the maps of hydraulic conductivity for modeling groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in volcanic tuffs from an underground nuclear test at the Frenchman Flat CAU. The results indicate that the majority of groundwater flow through the volcanic section occurs through zones of densely welded tuff where connected fractures provide the transport pathway. Migration rates range between near zero to approximately four m/yr, with a mean rate of 0.68 m/yr. This report presents the results of work under the FY96 Near-Field Modeling task of the UGTA program.

  20. Acoustic Nondestructive Testing and Measurement of Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members: Part 2 - Field Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Many reinforced concrete structures contain embedded pre- and post- tensioned steel members that are subject to corrosion and fracturing...Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members Part 2 – Field Testing by Michael K. McInerney PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical...Specifically, the technology application addresses the problem of determining tension in concrete -embedded pre- and post-tensioned reinforcement rods

  1. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, N.

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  2. Unraveling complex hydrogeologic systems using field tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, William A.; Nicholson, Thomas

    Tracking the movement of underground contaminants is vital to protecting public health and the environment worldwide. Scientific efforts using field tracer techniques to solve contaminant migration problems are rapidly evolving to fill critical information gaps and provide confirmation of laboratory data and numerical models. Various chemical tracers are being used to formulate and evaluate alternative conceptual hydrogeologic modelssemi; namely, to constrain hydraulic properties of geologic systems, identify sources of groundwater, flow paths, and rates, and determine mechanisms that affect contaminant transport. Naturally occurring elements and environmental isotopes from atmospheric and underground nuclear testing can make excellent tracers. In addition, characterizing sites of future waste disposal, such as the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, requires new and innovative techniques like injecting surrogate tracers that simulate potential contaminants and shed light on mechanisms that could control future contaminant migration.

  3. Field Tested Service Oriented Robotic Architecture: Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flueckiger, Lorenzo; Utz, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the lessons learned from six years of experiments with planetary rover prototypes running the Service Oriented Robotic Architecture (SORA) developed by the Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) at NASA Ames Research Center. SORA relies on proven software methods and technologies applied to the robotic world. Based on a Service Oriented Architecture and robust middleware, SORA extends its reach beyond the on-board robot controller and supports the full suite of software tools used during mission scenarios from ground control to remote robotic sites. SORA has been field tested in numerous scenarios of robotic lunar and planetary exploration. The results of these high fidelity experiments are illustrated through concrete examples that have shown the benefits of using SORA as well as its limitations.

  4. Testing Einstein's Equivalence Principle with supercluster Laniakea's gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi-Xing; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Comparing the parameterized post-Newtonian parameter γ values for different types of particles, or the same type of particles with different energies is an important method to test the Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP). Assuming that the observed time delays are dominated by the gravitational potential of the Laniakea supercluster of galaxies, better results of EEP constraints can be obtained. In this paper, we apply photons from three kinds of cosmic transients, including TeV blazars, gamma-ray bursts as well as fast radio bursts to constrain EEP. With a gravitational field far more stronger than a single galaxy, we obtain 4-5 orders of magnitude more stringent than the previous results.

  5. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study FY 2003 Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2003-04-15

    Conceptual models have been identified as one of the sources of uncertainty in the interpretation and prediction of contaminant migration through the vadose zone at Hanford. Current conceptual models are limited partly because they often do not account for the random heterogeneity that occurs under the extremes of very nonlinear flow behavior typical of the Hanford vadose zone. Over the last two years significant progress has been made in characterizing physical heterogeneity and in the development of techniques for incorporating this heterogeneity into predictive and inverse models for field-scale subsurface flow. One of the remaining pieces of the puzzle is the impact of heterogeneity on the distribution of reactive contaminants. Reactive transport occurs over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. However, the manner in which the various subsurface physical and chemical processes interact to influence transport is not very well understood. Hydrogeologic characterization and model analysis, however, have traditionally focused on measurement of physical properties and predicting the effects of variability in these properties on flow and transport. As a result, the role of geochemical heterogeneity on solute transport has remained largely unexplored. This project will use a combination of geophysical and soil physics techniques to investigate the infiltration and redistribution of water and reactive tracers in a controlled field experiment at the Army loop Road clastic dike site. In the FY2003 tests, surface deployed ground penetrating radar will be used to identify the discrete three-dimensional pattern of horizonation and small-scale heterogeneities that characterize the test site and to develop a lithofacies map. The transect will be instrumented to allow water to be applied along its length from a line source. Local-scale water content, matric potential, and tracer concentrations will be monitored as a function of spatial scale by multipurpose TDR probes

  6. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2000-06-23

    This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

  7. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  8. Development of a Specific Anaerobic Field Test for Aerobic Gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen’s d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings. PMID:25876039

  9. Development of a specific anaerobic field test for aerobic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christiano Robles Rodrigues; Borelli, Marcello Tadeu Caetano; Paineli, Vitor de Salles; Azevedo, Rafael de Almeida; Borelli, Claudia Cristine Gomes; Lancha Junior, Antônio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno; Artioli, Guilherme Giannini

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation aimed to develop a valid specific field test to evaluate anaerobic physical performance in Aerobic Gymnastics athletes. We first designed the Specific Aerobic Gymnast Anaerobic Test (SAGAT), which included gymnastics-specific elements performed in maximal repeated sprint fashion, with a total duration of 80-90 s. In order to validate the SAGAT, three independent sub-studies were performed to evaluate the concurrent validity (Study I, n=8), the reliability (Study II, n=10) and the sensitivity (Study III, n=30) of the test in elite female athletes. In Study I, a positive correlation was shown between lower-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03 and Peak power: p = 0.02, r = -0.72, CI: -0.95 to -0.04) and between upper-body Wingate test and SAGAT performance (Mean power: p = 0.03, r = -0.67, CI: -0.94 to 0.02 and Peak power: p = 0.03, r = -0.69, CI: -0.94 to 0.03). Additionally, plasma lactate was similarly increased in response to SAGAT (p = 0.002), lower-body Wingate Test (p = 0.021) and a simulated competition (p = 0.007). In Study II, no differences were found between the time to complete the SAGAT in repeated trials (p = 0.84; Cohen's d effect size = 0.09; ICC = 0.97, CI: 0.89 to 0.99; MDC95 = 0.12 s). Finally, in Study III the time to complete the SAGAT was significantly lower during the competition cycle when compared to the period before the preparatory cycle (p < 0.001), showing an improvement in SAGAT performance after a specific Aerobic Gymnastics training period. Taken together, these data have demonstrated that SAGAT is a specific, reliable and sensitive measurement of specific anaerobic performance in elite female Aerobic Gymnastics, presenting great potential to be largely applied in training settings.

  10. Results of field testing of waste forms using lysimeters

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W., Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the field testing task, using lysimeter arrays, is to expose samples of solidified resin waste to the actual physical, chemical, and microbiological conditions of disposal enviroment. Wastes used in the experiment include a mixture of synthetic organic ion exchange resins and a mixture of organic exchange resins and an inorganic zeolite. Solidification agents used to produce the 4.8-by 7.6-cm cylindrical waste forms used in the study were Portland Type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene. Seven of these waste forms were stacked end-to-end and inserted into each lysimeter to provide a 1-L volume. There are 10 lysimeters, 5 at ORNL and 5 at ANL-E. Lysimeters used in this study were designed to be self-contained units which will be disposed at the termination of the 20-year study. Each is a 0.91-by 3.12-m right-circular cylinder divided into an upper compartment, which contains fill material, waste forms, and instrumentation, and an empty lower compartment, which collects leachate. Four lysimeters at each site are filled with soil, while a fifth (used as a control) is filled with inert silica oxide sand. Instrumentation within each lysimeter includes porous cup soil-water samplers and soil moisture/temperature probes. The probes are connected to an on-site data acquisition and storage system (DAS) which also collects data from a field meteorological station located at each site. 9 refs.

  11. Alterations in heat loss and heat production mechanisms in rat exposed to hypergravic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of studies investigating the thermal response of rats exposed to hypergravic fields well below maximum tolerance levels is presented. It is concluded that several lines of evidence indicate that the neural switching network for temperature regulation and cardiovascular channeling of blood flow is transiently affected during the first hour a rat is exposed to hypergravity. Moreover, even after one hour of exposure, when the core temperature has fallen several degrees, shivering and nonshivering thermogenesis are not fully activated. Only after prolonged exposure to hypergravic fields do heat production mechanisms recover sufficiently to bring the core temperature back to a normal level. Thus, the data indicate a more rapid recovery of effector mechanisms for heat loss than for heat production.

  12. Static magnetic field influence on rat brain function detected by heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Veliks, Viktors; Ceihnere, Edīte; Svikis, Igors; Aivars, Juris

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) on rat brain structures that control autonomic functions, specifically heart rate and heart rhythmicity. The experiments were carried out on 44 male Wistar rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. SMF was induced using samarium-cobalt fused magnets (20 x 20 x 10 mm in size) placed bitemporally. Magnetic induction intensity was 100 mT on the surface of the head. Duration of magnetic field application was 15 min. An electrocardiogram was recorded from limb lead II, and both heart rate (average duration of cardiac cycles) and heart rhythmicity were analyzed before and after SMF application. SMF evoked changes in both heart rate and rhythm in 80% of the animals; the predominant effects were bradycardia and disappearance of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, the effectiveness of SMF in large measure depends on both functional peculiarities and functional activities of brain autonomic centers.

  13. Field-Based Video Pre-Test Counseling, Oral Testing, and Telephonic Post-Test Counseling: Implementation of an HIV Field Testing Package among High-Risk Indian Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Hannah; Yeldandi, Vijay V.; Kumar, G. Prem; Liao, Chuanhong; Lakshmi, Vemu; Gandham, Sabitha R.; Muppudi, Uma; Oruganti, Ganesh; Schneider, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In India, men who have sex with men (MSM) and truck drivers are high-risk groups that often do not access HIV testing due to stigma and high mobility. This study evaluated a field testing package (FTP) that identified HIV positive participants through video pre-test counseling, OraQuick oral fluid HIV testing, and telephonic post-test counseling…

  14. 76 FR 3075 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Feline Leukemia Vaccine, Live Canarypox Vector. The... field testing of this vaccine, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1375-2007 - Equipment specifications for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment specifications for field... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1375-2007 Equipment specifications for field testing. For testing conducted with engines installed in vehicles, including field testing conducted to measure emissions under...

  19. Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

    1997-02-01

    A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

  20. Field test of fiber optic hydrazine dosimeters at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimcak, Charles M.; Chan, Y.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1999-02-01

    We tested seventy-two hydrazine fuel fiber optic dosimeters for periods up to three months or Cape Canaveral in order to determine the effect of the local environment on its lifetime and sensitivity. The dosimeters were deployed at a diverse group of sites including fuel, oxidizer, and hydrocarbon fuel storage and transfer locations, a salt spray corrosion test facility, a satellite processing area, an estuarine marsh, a paint storage locker, and several indoor locations including chemical laboratory fume hoods and bathrooms. In addition, a group were set aside in a sealed enclosure for control purposes. The dosimeters were retrieved at monthly intervals and exposed to measured doses of hydrazine vapor to determine the effects of the field exposure on their hydrazine response. Our analysis indicated that 90% of the exposed dosimeters were able to sense hydrazine at a dose detectivity of less than 15 ppb-hr, a value that meets the current hydrazine sensing requirement. Consequently, we are planning to deploy a full scale, continuously operating fiber optic system for detecting potential hydrazine leaks during launch operations at Cape Canaveral.

  1. Effects of 60-Hz electric fields on serotonin metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Phillips, R.D.; Wilson, B.W.; Chess, E.K.

    1982-06-01

    Serotonin and two of its metabolites, melatonin and 5-methoxytryptophol, exhibit circadian rhythmicity in the pineal gland. We recently reported a marked reduction in the normal night-time increase in melatonin concentration in the pineal glands of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Concomitant with the apparent abolition of melatonin rhythmicity, serotonin-N-acetyl transferase (SNAT) activity was suppressed. We have now conducted studies to determine if abolition of the rhythm in melatonin production in electric-field-exposed rats arises solely from interference in SNAT activity, or if the availability of pineal serotonin is a factor that is affected by exposure. Pineal serotonin concentrations were compared in rats that were either exposed or sham exposed to 65 kV/m for 30 days. Sham-exposed animals exhibited normal diurnal rhythmicity for pineal concentrations of both melatonin and serotonin; melatonin levels increased markedly during the dark phase with a concurrent decrease in serotonin levels. In the exposed animals, however, normal serotonin rhythmicity was abolished; serotonin levels in these animals did not increase during the light period. The conclusion that electric field exposure results in a biochemical alteration in SNAT enzyme activity can be inferred from the loss of both serotonin and melatonin rhythmicity, as well as by direct measurement of SNAT activity itself. 35 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  2. Effects of static magnetic field exposure on plasma element levels in rat.

    PubMed

    Aida, Lahbib; Soumaya, Ghodbane; Myriam, Elferchichi; Mohsen, Sakly; Hafedh, Abdelmelek

    2014-07-01

    The interaction of static magnetic fields (SMFs) with living organisms is a rapidly growing field of investigation. The magnetic fields (MFs) effect observed with radical pair recombination is one of the well-known mechanisms by which MFs interact with biological systems. SMF influenced cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms by affecting antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT). However, there were insufficient reports about the effects of SMF on macro and trace elements in serum, and the results were contradictory until now. In the current study, 12 rats were divided into two groups, namely as control and exposure group (128 mT and 1 h/day during five consecutive days). The macro and trace element concentrations in serum were examined. No significant difference was observed in the sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and selenium (Se) levels in rat compared to control. By contrast, exposure to SMF showed an increase in the zinc (Zn) level and a decrease in iron (Fe) concentration. Under our experimental conditions, SMF exposure cannot affect the plasma levels of macroelements, while it can disrupt Zn and Fe concentrations in rat.

  3. Field Testing the STRATA Ground Penetrating Radar for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. K.; Grant, J. A.; Leuschen, C. J.; Schutz, A. E.

    2005-12-01

    With the MARSIS and SHARAD orbital radar sounders now in operation at and in transit to Mars, respectively, radar investigation of the deep structure of Mars down to several kilometers is underway. By contrast, optical and thermal instruments both in orbit and on the surface have provided information about the top several millimeters and the Mars Exploration Rovers have dug to several cm with their wheels. Nevertheless, little is known about the shallow subsurface of Mars to depths of meters except at locations where continuation of outcrop into the subsurface can be extrapolated. As the methods for exploring Mars evolve, the utility of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for investigating the shallow subsurface of that planet is being considered. GPR has been used for several decades on Earth as a non-invasive tool for studying subsurface structures and stratigraphy for applications in geology, engineering, and archaeology. The STRATA GPR for Mars has been developed as an adaptable, low power, compact, rover-mounted instrument capable of penetrating 10-20 m to reveal subsurface information. Field-testing of this instrument has taken place in volcanic, cratered, permafrost, and deltaic settings, and data collected at 400 MHz possess vertical resolutions of a few cm, sufficient to interpret the subsurface geologic setting. Results from the permafrost environment showed detection of buried massive ground ice as well as the base of the active layer. GPR analysis of this ice distribution was confirmed by resistivity measurements. The fine vertical resolution and good penetration in a variety of geologic settings show that the STRATA instrument provides data quality indistinguishable from commercial systems used on Earth. Most recently, the STRATA instrument has been tested in aeolian and filled crater environments. Data were collected over a sand dune overlying a basalt lava flow near St. Anthony, ID, and at the Campo del Cielo impact crater field in Chaco Province

  4. Results from laboratory and field testing of nitrate measuring spectrophotometers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-01-01

    In Phase II, the analyzers were deployed in field conditions at three diferent USGS sites. The measured nitrate concentrations were compared to discrete (reference) samples analyzed by the Direct UV method on a Shimadzu UV1800 bench top spectrophotometer, and by the National Environmental Methods Index (NEMI) method I-2548-11 at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory. The first deployment at USGS site 0249620 on the East Pearl River in Hancock County, Mississippi, tested the ability of the TriOs ProPs (10-mm path length), Hach NITRATAX (5 mm), Satlantic SUNA (10 mm), and the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5 mm) to accurately measure low-level (less than 2 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations while observing the effect turbidity and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) would have on the analyzers' measurements. The second deployment at USGS site 01389005 Passaic River below Pompton River at Two Bridges, New Jersey, tested the analyzer's accuracy in mid-level (2-8 mg-N/L) nitrate concentrations. This site provided the means to test the analyzers' performance in two distinct matrices—the Passaic and the Pompton Rivers. In this deployment, three instruments tested in Phase I (TriOS, Hach, and SUNA) were deployed with the S::CAN Spectro::lyser (35 mm) already placed by the New Jersey Water Science Center (WSC). The third deployment at USGS site 05579610 Kickapoo Creek at 2100E Road near Bloomington, Illinois, tested the ability of the analyzers to measure high nitrate concentrations (greater than 8 mg-N/L) in turbid waters. For Kickapoo Creek, the HIF provided the TriOS (10 mm) and S::CAN (5 mm) from Phase I, and a SUNA V2 (5 mm) to be deployed adjacent to the Illinois WSC-owned Hach (2 mm). A total of 40 discrete samples were collected from the three deployment sites and analyzed. The nitrate concentration of the samples ranged from 0.3–22.2 mg-N/L. The average absolute difference between the TriOS measurements and discrete samples was 0.46 mg-N/L. For the combined data

  5. Towards strong field tests of beyond Horndeski gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy; Babichev, Eugeny; Koyama, Kazuya; Langlois, David; Saito, Ryo

    2017-03-01

    Theories of gravity in the beyond Horndeski class encompass a wide range of scalar-tensor theories that will be tested on cosmological scales over the coming decade. In this work, we investigate the possibility of testing them in the strong field regime by looking at the properties of compact objects—neutron, hyperon, and quark stars—embedded in an asymptotically de Sitter space-time, for a specific subclass of theories. We extend previous works to include slow rotation and find a relation between the dimensionless moment of inertia (I ¯ =I c2/GNM3 ) and the compactness C =GNM /R c2 (an I ¯-C relation), independent of the equation of state, that is reminiscent of but distinct from the general relativity prediction. Several of our equations of state contain hyperons and free quarks, allowing us to revisit the hyperon puzzle. We find that the maximum mass of hyperon stars can be larger than 2 M⊙ for small values of the beyond Horndeski parameter, thus providing a resolution of the hyperon puzzle based on modified gravity. Moreover, stable quark stars exist when hyperonic stars are unstable, which means that the phase transition from hyperon to quark stars is predicted just as in general relativity (GR), albeit with larger quark star masses. Two important and potentially observable consequences of some of the theories we consider are the existence of neutron stars in a range of masses significantly higher than in GR and I ¯-C relations that differ from their GR counterparts. In the former case, we find objects that, if observed, could not be accounted for in GR because they violate the usual GR causality condition. We end by discussing several difficult technical issues that remain to be addressed in order to reach more realistic predictions that may be tested using gravitational wave searches or neutron star observations.

  6. Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

    1999-06-01

    Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

  7. Common behaviors alterations after extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure in rat animal model.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Najafi Abedi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Naturally, the presence of electromagnetic waves in our living environment affects all components of organisms, particularly humans and animals, as the large part of their body consists of water. In the present study, we tried to investigate the relation between exposure to the extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and common behaviors such as body weight, food and water intake, anorexia (poor appetite), plasma glucose concentration, movement, rearing and sniffing in rats. For this purpose, rats were exposed to 40  Hz ELF-EMF once a day for 21 days, then at days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after exposure, any changes in the above-mentioned items were assessed in the exposed rats and compared to the non-exposed group as control. Body weight of irradiated rats significantly increased only a week after exposure and decreased after that. No significant change was observed in food and water intake of irradiated rats compared to the control, and the anorexia parameter in the group exposed to ELF-EMF was significantly decreased at one and two weeks after irradiation. A week after exposure, the level of glucose was significantly increased but at other days these changes were not significant. Movements, rearing and sniffing of rats at day 1 after exposure were significantly decreased and other days these changes did not follow any particular pattern. However, the result of this study demonstrated that exposure to ELF-EMF can alter the normal condition of animals and may represent a harmful impact on behavior.

  8. FUELS IN SOIL TEST KIT: FIELD USE OF DIESEL DOG SOIL TEST KITS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-05-31

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is commercializing Diesel Dog Portable Soil Test Kits for performing analysis of fuel-contaminated soils in the field. The technology consists of a method developed by WRI (U.S. Patents 5,561,065 and 5,976,883) and hardware developed by WRI that allows the method to be performed in the field (patent pending). The method is very simple and does not require the use of highly toxic reagents. The aromatic components in a soil extract are measured by absorption at 254 nm with a field-portable photometer. WRI added significant value to the technology by taking the method through the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) approval and validation processes. The method is designated ASTM Method D-5831-96, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This ASTM designation allows the method to be used for federal compliance activities. In FY 99, twenty-five preproduction kits were successfully constructed in cooperation with CF Electronics, Inc., of Laramie, Wyoming. The kit components work well and the kits are fully operational. In the calendar year 2000, kits were provided to the following entities who agreed to participate as FY 99 and FY 00 JSR (Jointly Sponsored Research) cosponsors and use the kits as opportunities arose for field site work: Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) (3 units), F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Gradient Corporation, The Johnson Company (2 units), IT Corporation (2 units), TRC Environmental Corporation, Stone Environmental, ENSR, Action Environmental, Laco Associates, Barenco, Brown and Caldwell, Dames and Moore Lebron LLP, Phillips Petroleum, GeoSyntek, and the State of New Mexico. By early 2001, ten kits had been returned to WRI following the six-month evaluation period. On return, the components of all ten kits were fully functional. The kits were upgraded with circuit modifications, new polyethylene foam inserts, and updated instruction manuals.

  9. Analgesic effect of simultaneous exposure to infrared laser radiation and μT magnetic field in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Mrowiec, Janina; Kasperczyk, Slawomir; Sieron-Stoltny, Karolina; Sieron, Aleksander

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the experiment was to estimate the effect of repeated simultaneous exposures to infrared laser radiation and μT variable magnetic field used in magnetostimulation on pain perception in rats, as well as the involvement of endogenous opioid system in the mechanism of this effect. In experimental group clean-shaven scull of male Wistar rats placed individually in a specially designed plastic chamber were simultaneously exposed to infrared laser radiation (wavelength - 855 nm, mean power - 4,1 mW, energy density - 30 J/cm2) and variable magnetic field of saw-like shape of impulse, at a frequency of basic impulse 180-195 Hz and mean induction value of 120 μT generated by magneto-laser applicator of device for magnetostimulation Viofor JPS (Med & Life, Poland) 12 minutes daily for 2 periods of 5 consecutive days, with 2 days-lasting break between them, while control animals were sham-exposed. The pain perception was determined by means of "hot plate" test on the basis of calculated analgesic index. As a result of repeated exposures a significant increase in analgesic index persisting also till 14 th day after the end of a cycle of exposures was observed. This analgesic effect was inhibited by prior i.p. injection of opioid antagonist - Naloxone.

  10. Right-but not left-paw use in female rats provides advantage in forced swim tests.

    PubMed

    Soyman, Efe; Tunckol, Elcin; Lacin, Emre; Canbeyli, Resit

    2015-10-15

    Left- and right-pawed adult female Wistar rats were subjected to forced swimming on two consecutive days. Compared to the right-pawed group, left- pawed rats displayed significantly increased immobility from the first to the second swim test and remained significantly more immobile in the second swim test. Both groups performed similarly in spatial learning in the Morris water maze suggesting that left- pawed rats are differentially and specifically susceptible to depressogenic treatment.

  11. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Arndt, David L; Peterson, Christy J; Cain, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression.

  12. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, David L.; Peterson, Christy J.; Cain, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression. PMID:26154768

  13. Exposure to 900 MHz electromagnetic fields activates the mkp-1/ERK pathway and causes blood-brain barrier damage and cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jun; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Liming; Chen, Qianwei; Tan, Liang; Zuo, Shilun; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang

    2015-03-19

    With the rapid increase in the number of mobile phone users, the potential adverse effects of the electromagnetic field radiation emitted by a mobile phone has become a serious concern. This study demonstrated, for the first time, the blood-brain barrier and cognitive changes in rats exposed to 900 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF) and aims to elucidate the potential molecular pathway underlying these changes. A total of 108 male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a 900 MHz, 1 mW/cm(2) EMF or sham (unexposed) for 14 or 28 days (3h per day). The specific energy absorption rate (SAR) varied between 0.016 (whole body) and 2 W/kg (locally in the head). In addition, the Morris water maze test was used to examine spatial memory performance determination. Morphological changes were investigated by examining ultrastructural changes in the hippocampus and cortex, and the Evans Blue assay was used to assess blood brain barrier (BBB) damage. Immunostaining was performed to identify heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-positive neurons and albumin extravasation detection. Western blot was used to determine HO-1 expression, phosphorylated ERK expression and the upstream mediator, mkp-1 expression. We found that the frequency of crossing platforms and the percentage of time spent in the target quadrant were lower in rats exposed to EMF for 28 days than in rats exposed to EMF for 14 days and unexposed rats. Moreover, 28 days of EMF exposure induced cellular edema and neuronal cell organelle degeneration in the rat. In addition, damaged BBB permeability, which resulted in albumin and HO-1 extravasation were observed in the hippocampus and cortex. Thus, for the first time, we found that EMF exposure for 28 days induced the expression of mkp-1, resulting in ERK dephosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that exposure to 900 MHz EMF radiation for 28 days can significantly impair spatial memory and damage BBB permeability in rat by activating the mkp-1/ERK pathway.

  14. Diurnal patterns in brain biogenic amines of rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, B.J.; Anderson, L.E.; Lowery, C.I.; Adey, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    Levels of brain neurotransmitters and their metabolites, as well as concentrations of enzymes associated with their synthesis and metabolism, fluctuate during the day in patterns defined as circadian. The present study examined these rhythms in albino rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Thirty-six animals were exposed to a 39 kV/m field for 4 weeks, 20 h/day, in a parallel-plate electrode system. A group of 36 sham animals was similarly handled and housed in a nonenergized exposure system. On the sampling day, animals were sacrificed at 4-h intervals throughout the 24-h day. Brains were removed, dissected, and kept frozen until chemically analyzed. The levels of biogenic amines and their acidic metabolites in the striatum, hypothalamus, and hippocampus were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) methods. Repeated exposure to 60-Hz electric fields produced significant alterations in the diurnal rhythms of several biogenic amines: dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, the primary metabolite of dopamine in the rat) in the striatum, and norepinephrine, dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA; serotonin metabolite) in the hypothalamus. Levels of serotonin in the striatum and hypothalamus showed clear circadian patterns that was not affected by the field. No diurnal or field-related changes were observed in the hippocampal amines.

  15. The point of entry contributes to the organization of exploratory behavior of rats on an open field: an example of spontaneous episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Farshad; Whishaw, Ian Q

    2007-08-22

    The exploratory behavior of rats on an open field is organized in that animals spend disproportionate amounts of time at certain locations, termed home bases, which serve as centers for excursions. Although home bases are preferentially formed near distinctive cues, including visual cues, animals also visit and pause and move slowly, or linger, at many other locations in a test environment. In order to further examine the organization of exploratory behavior, the present study examined the influence of the point of entry on animals placed on an open field table that was illuminated either by room light or infrared light (a wavelength in which they cannot see) and near which, or on which, distinctive cues were placed. The main findings were that in both room light and infrared light tests, rats visited and lingered at the point of entry significantly more often than comparative control locations. Although the rats also visited and lingered in the vicinity of salient visual cues, the point of entry still remained a focus of visits. Finally, the preference for the point of entry increased as a function of salience of the cues marking that location. That the point of entry influences the organization of exploratory behavior is discussed in relation to the idea that the exploratory behavior of the rat is directed toward optimizing security as well as forming a spatial representation of the environment.

  16. Field Testing GEOICE: A Next-Generation Polar Seismometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B. C.; Winberry, J. P.; Huerta, A. D.; Chung, P.; Parker, T.; Anderson, K. R.; Bilek, S. L.; Carpenter, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the development of a new NSF MRI-community supported seismic observatory designed for studies in ice-covered regions - the Geophysical Earth Observatory for Ice Covered Environs (GEOICE). This project is motivated by the need to densify and optimize the collection of high-quality seismic data relevant to key solid Earth and cryosphere science questions. The GEOICE instruments and their power and other ancillary systems are being designed to require minimal installation time and logistical load (i.e., size and weight), while maximizing ease-of-use in the field. The system is capable of advanced data handling and telemetry while being able to withstand conditions associated with icy environments, including cold/wet conditions and high-latitude solar limitations. The instrument capability will include a hybrid seismograph pool of broadband and intermediate elements for observation of both long-period signals (e.g, long-period surface waves and slow sources) and intermediate-to-short-period signals (e.g., teleseismic body waves, local seismicity, and impulsive or extended glaciogenic signals).Key features will include a design that integrates the seismometer and digitizer into a single, environmentally and mechanically robust housing; very low power requirements (~1 watt) for the intermediate-band systems; and advanced power systems that optimize battery capacity and operational limits. The envisioned ~100 element GEOICE instruments will nearly double the current polar inventory of stations and will be maintained and supported at the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center to ensure full and flexible peer-reviewed community use. Prototype instruments are currently deployed in Antarctica and Alaska, with a larger Antarctic deployment planned for the 2015-2016 season. The results of these field tests will help to refine instrumentation design and lead to the production of robust and capable next-generation seismic sensors.

  17. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  18. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-SP Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2015-01-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  19. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-Sp Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Skinner, J. A.; Feng, W.

    2015-12-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Influences the Promoting Role of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields on Sciatic Nerve Regeneration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu; Ge, Jun; Liu, Zhongyang; Liu, Liang; Jing, Da; Ran, Mingzi; Wang, Meng; Huang, Liangliang; Yang, Yafeng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythm (CR) plays a critical role in the treatment of several diseases. However, the role of CR in the treatment of peripheral nerve defects has not been studied. It is also known that the pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) can provide a beneficial microenvironment to quicken the process of nerve regeneration and to enhance the quality of reconstruction. In this study, we evaluate the impact of CR on the promoting effect of PEMF on peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. We used the self-made “collagen-chitosan” nerve conduits to bridge the 15-mm nerve gaps in Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that PEMF stimulation at daytime (DPEMF) has most effective outcome on nerve regeneration and rats with DPEMF treatment achieve quickly functional recovery after 12 weeks. These findings indicate that CR is an important factor that determines the promoting effect of PEMF on peripheral nerve regeneration. PEMF exposure in the daytime enhances the functional recovery of rats. Our study provides a helpful guideline for the effective use of PEMF mediations experimentally and clinically. PMID:28360885

  1. The Antinociceptive Effects of Hydroalcoholic Extract of Borago Officinalis Flower in Male Rats Using Formalin Test

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadimoghadm, Mahdieh; Shahraki, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Borago officinalis flower (borage) is a known sedative in herbal medicine; the aim of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of borage hydroalcoholic extract in formalin test male rats. Methods: Fifty-six adult male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups: Control groups of A (intact), B (saline), and C (Positive control) plus test groups of D, E, F, and G (n=8). The groups D, E, and F received 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/kg, Borago officinalis flower hydroalcholic extract before the test, respectively but group G received 25 mg/kg borage extract and aspirin before the test. A biphasic pain was induced by injection of formalin 1%. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software ver. 17 employing statistical tests of Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney. The results were expressed as mean±SD. Statistical differences were considered significant at P<0.05. Results: The results revealed that the acute and chronic pain behavior score in test groups of D, E, F, and G significantly decreased compared to groups A and B, but this score did not show any difference compared to group C. Moreover, chronic pain behavior score in group G was significantly lower than all other groups. Discussion: The results indicated that Borago officinalis hydroalcoholic extract affects the acute and chronic pain behavior response in formaline test male rats. PMID:26649166

  2. Progress in crosswell induction imaging for EOR: field system design and field testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkendall, B A; Lewis, J P; Hunter, S L; Harben, P E

    1999-03-04

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we are continuing our effort to develop improved crosswell low-frequency electromagnetic imaging techniques, which are used to map in situ steamflood and waterflood movement during enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. Toward this effort, we procured two new borehole-logging field vehicles, and developed and integrated new crosswell electromagnetic transmitter and receiver data acquisition and control systems into these vehicles. We tested this new acquisition system by conducting a suite of background measurements and repeatability experiments at the Richmond Field Station in Richmond, California. Repeatability of a given scan in which the receiver was fixed and the transmitter position was varied over 60 m in 0.2-m increments resulted in amplitude differences of less than 0.6% and phase differences of less than 0.54 deg. Forward modeling produced a resistivity map fully consistent with well log data from the Richmond Field Station. In addition, modeling results suggest (1) that residual high-conductivity saltwater, injected in 1993 and pumped out in 1995, is present at the site and (2) that it has diffused outward from the original target strata. To develop crosswell electromagnetic imaging into a viable commercial product, our future research must be a two-fold approach: (1) improved quantification of system noise through experiments such as ferromagnetic core characterization as a function of temperature, and (2) development of procedures and codes to account for steel-cased hole scenarios.

  3. Unitary inhibitory field potentials in the CA3 region of rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bazelot, Michaël; Dinocourt, Céline; Cohen, Ivan; Miles, Richard

    2010-06-15

    Glickfeld and colleagues (2009) suggested that single hippocampal interneurones generate field potentials at monosynaptic latencies. We pursued this observation in simultaneous intracellular and multiple extracellular records from the CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. We confirmed that interneurones evoked field potentials at monosynaptic latencies. Pyramidal cells initiated disynaptic inhibitory field potentials, but did not initiate detectable monosynaptic excitatory fields. We confirmed that inhibitory fields were GABAergic in nature and showed they were suppressed at low external Cl(-), suggesting they originate at postsynaptic sites. Field potentials generated by a single interneuron were detected at multiple sites over distances of more than 800 mum along the stratum pyramidale of the CA3 region. We used arrays of extracellular electrodes to examine amplitude distributions of spontaneous inhibitory fields recorded at sites orthogonal to or along the CA3 stratum pyramidale. Cluster analysis of spatially distributed inhibitory field events let us separate events generated by interneurones terminating on distinct zones of somato-dendritic axis. Events generated at dendritic sites had similar amplitudes but occurred less frequently and had somewhat slower kinetics than perisomatic events generated near the stratum pyramidale. In records from multiple sites in the CA3 stratum pyramidale, we distinguished inhibitory fields that seemed to be initiated by interneurones with spatially distinct axonal arborisations.

  4. Visual field test simulation and error in threshold estimation.

    PubMed Central

    Spenceley, S E; Henson, D B

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To establish, via computer simulation, the effects of patient response variability and staircase starting level upon the accuracy and repeatability of static full threshold visual field tests. METHOD: Patient response variability, defined by the standard deviation of the frequency of seeing versus stimulus intensity curve, is varied from 0.5 to 20 dB (in steps of 0.5 dB) with staircase starting levels ranging from 30 dB below to 30 dB above the patient's threshold (in steps of 10 dB). Fifty two threshold estimates are derived for each condition and the error of each estimate calculated (difference between the true threshold and the threshold estimate derived from the staircase procedure). The mean and standard deviation of the errors are then determined for each condition. The results from a simulated quadrantic defect (response variability set to typical values for a patient with glaucoma) are presented using two different algorithms. The first corresponds with that normally used when performing a full threshold examination while the second uses results from an earlier simulated full threshold examination for the staircase starting values. RESULTS: The mean error in threshold estimates was found to be biased towards the staircase starting level. The extent of the bias was dependent upon patient response variability. The standard deviation of the error increased both with response variability and staircase starting level. With the routinely used full threshold strategy the quadrantic defect was found to have a large mean error in estimated threshold values and an increase in the standard deviation of the error along the edge of the defect. When results from an earlier full threshold test are used as staircase starting values this error and increased standard deviation largely disappeared. CONCLUSION: The staircase procedure widely used in threshold perimetry increased the error and the variability of threshold estimates along the edges of defects. Using

  5. Site Characterization for a Deep Borehole Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Hardin, E. L.; Freeze, G. A.; Sassani, D.; Brady, P. V.

    2015-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy is at the beginning of 5-year Deep Borehole Field Test (DBFT) to investigate the feasibility of constructing and characterizing two boreholes in crystalline basement rock to a depth of 5 km (16,400 ft). The concept of deep borehole disposal for radioactive waste has some advantages over mined repositories, including incremental construction and loading, the enhanced natural barriers provided by deep continental crystalline basement, and reduced site characterization. Site characterization efforts need to determine an eligible site that does not have the following disqualifying characteristics: greater than 2 km to crystalline basement, upward vertical fluid potential gradients, presence of economically exploitable natural resources, presence of high permeability connection to the shallow subsurface, and significant probability of future seismic or volcanic activity. Site characterization activities for the DBFT will include geomechanical (i.e., rock in situ stress state, and fluid pressure), geological (i.e., rock and fracture infill lithology), hydrological (i.e., quantity of fluid, fluid convection properties, and solute transport mechanisms), and geochemical (i.e., rock-water interaction and natural tracers) aspects. Both direct (i.e., sampling and in situ testing) and indirect (i.e., borehole geophysical) methods are planned for efficient and effective characterization of these site aspects and physical processes. Borehole-based characterization will be used to determine the variability of system state (i.e., stress, pressure, temperature, and chemistry) with depth, and interpretation of material and system parameters relevant to numerical site simulation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE

  6. Field tests of acoustic telemetry for a portable coastal observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, M.; Butman, B.; Ware, J.; Frye, D.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term field tests of a low-cost acoustic telemetry system were carried out at two sites in Massachusetts Bay. At each site, an acoustic Doppler current profiler mounted on a bottom tripod was fitted with an acoustic modem to transmit data to a surface buoy; electronics mounted on the buoy relayed these data to shore via radio modem. The mooring at one site (24 m water depth) was custom-designed for the telemetry application, with a custom designed small buoy, a flexible electro-mechanical buoy to mooring joint using a molded chain connection to the buoy, quick-release electro-mechanical couplings, and dual hydrophones suspended 7 m above the bottom. The surface buoy at the second site (33 m water depth) was a U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) channel buoy fitted with telemetry electronics and clamps to hold the hydrophones. The telemetry was tested in several configurations for a period of about four years. The custom-designed buoy and mooring provided nearly error-free data transmission through the acoustic link under a variety of oceanographic conditions for 261 days at the 24 m site. The electro mechanical joint, cables and couplings required minimal servicing and were very reliable, lasting 862 days deployed before needing repairs. The acoustic communication results from the USCG buoy were poor, apparently due to the hard cobble bottom, noise from the all-steel buoy, and failure of the hydrophone assembly. Access to the USCG buoy at sea required ideal weather. ??2006 IEEE.

  7. An Automated, Experimenter-Free Method for the Standardised, Operant Cognitive Testing of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rivalan, Marion; Munawar, Humaira; Fuchs, Anna; Winter, York

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of human pathology are essential for biomedical research. However, a recurring issue in the use of animal models is the poor reproducibility of behavioural and physiological findings within and between laboratories. The most critical factor influencing this issue remains the experimenter themselves. One solution is the use of procedures devoid of human intervention. We present a novel approach to experimenter-free testing cognitive abilities in rats, by combining undisturbed group housing with automated, standardized and individual operant testing. This experimenter-free system consisted of an automated-operant system (Bussey-Saksida rat touch screen) connected to a home cage containing group living rats via an automated animal sorter (PhenoSys). The automated animal sorter, which is based on radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology, functioned as a mechanical replacement of the experimenter. Rats learnt to regularly and individually enter the operant chamber and remained there for the duration of the experimental session only. Self-motivated rats acquired the complex touch screen task of trial-unique non-matching to location (TUNL) in half the time reported for animals that were manually placed into the operant chamber. Rat performance was similar between the two groups within our laboratory, and comparable to previously published results obtained elsewhere. This reproducibility, both within and between laboratories, confirms the validity of this approach. In addition, automation reduced daily experimental time by 80%, eliminated animal handling, and reduced equipment cost. This automated, experimenter-free setup is a promising tool of great potential for testing a large variety of functions with full automation in future studies. PMID:28060883

  8. Managing Science Operations during Planetary Surface Operations at Long Light Delay-Time Targets: The 2011 Desert RATS Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of hardware and operations tests carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona in the San Francisco Volcanic Field. Conducted since 1997, these activities are designed to exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in conditions where multi-day tests are achievable. Desert RATS 2011 Science Operations Test simulated the management of crewed science operations at targets that were beyond the light delay time experienced during Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) and lunar surface missions, such as a mission to a Near-Earth Object (NEO) or the martian surface. Operations at targets at these distances are likely to be the norm as humans move out of the Earth-Moon system. Operating at these distances places significant challenges on mission operations, as the imposed light-delay time makes normal, two-way conversations extremely inefficient. Consequently, the operations approach for space missions that has been exercised during the first half-century of human space operations is no longer viable, and new approaches must be devised.

  9. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  10. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, S.E.; Christy, C.E.; Heath, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  11. Rigorously testing multialternative decision field theory against random utility models.

    PubMed

    Berkowitsch, Nicolas A J; Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive models of decision making aim to explain the process underlying observed choices. Here, we test a sequential sampling model of decision making, multialternative decision field theory (MDFT; Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001), on empirical grounds and compare it against 2 established random utility models of choice: the probit and the logit model. Using a within-subject experimental design, participants in 2 studies repeatedly choose among sets of options (consumer products) described on several attributes. The results of Study 1 showed that all models predicted participants' choices equally well. In Study 2, in which the choice sets were explicitly designed to distinguish the models, MDFT had an advantage in predicting the observed choices. Study 2 further revealed the occurrence of multiple context effects within single participants, indicating an interdependent evaluation of choice options and correlations between different context effects. In sum, the results indicate that sequential sampling models can provide relevant insights into the cognitive process underlying preferential choices and thus can lead to better choice predictions.

  12. Geomechanical Considerations for the Deep Borehole Field Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, B. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is under consideration as a potential alternative to shallower mined repositories. The disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole into crystalline basement rocks to a depth of 5 km, emplacement of canisters containing solid waste in the lower 2 km, and plugging and sealing the upper 3 km of the borehole. Crystalline rocks such as granites are particularly attractive for borehole emplacement because of their low permeability and porosity at depth, and high mechanical strength to resist borehole deformation. In addition, high overburden pressures contribute to sealing of some of the fractures that provide transport pathways. We present geomechanical considerations during construction (e.g., borehole breakouts, disturbed rock zone development, and creep closure), relevant to both the smaller-diameter characterization borehole (8.5") and the larger-diameter field test borehole (17"). Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Field test of a wideband downhole EM transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Alex; Lee, Ki Ha; Reginato, Lou

    1999-07-01

    A viable large bandwidth TEM transmitter can be constructed using very conventional means although in the present case the effective magnetic permeability of the solenoid core was lower than expected. Only a small number of turns can be used too maintain reasonably low inductance. This has to be compensated with the use of large currents. In this case, good ventilation must be provided to avoid overheating the electronics. In our case the most temperature sensitive element was the optic fiber transmitter which usually failed after about an hour of operation. Care must also be taken to guarantee balance between the negative and positive pulses as this improves the signal/noise ratio. Finally, we reiterate the need to review the origin and nature of the trigger pulse so that consistent properly clocked data can be acquired. In spite of the unlimited nature of the RFS tests which prevented us from acquiring data suitable for a direct demonstration of the wavefield transform, we did secure high quality wideband data that confirmed the proper performance of the prototype transmitter. We are certain that this equipment can now be used in an oil-field environment to acquire data suitable for a practical verification of the wavefield transform.

  14. Implementing the Mars Science Laboratory Terminal Descent Sensor Field Test Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Overall, the MSL TDS Field Test campaign was very successful. TDS was shown to perform extremely well over the required operational envelope. Early BB TDS field tests uncovered a number of issues, but none that invalidated the TDS design or implementation. EM TDS tests uncovered minor things of interest, but nothing of concern. Value of testing hardware in the field was demonstrated and significantly contributed to the overall TDS V&V effort. Over the 5-plus year field test campaign, numerous lessons were learned that will inform future field test efforts.

  15. Direct Field and Reverberant Chamber Acoustic Test Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnell, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reverberant and direct acoustic test comparisons were analyzed in this viewgraph presentation. The acoustic test data set includes: 1) CloudSat antenna subjected to PF reverberant chamber acoustic test; 2) CloudSat subjected to a PF direct speaker acoustic test; and 3) DAWN flight spacecraft subjected to PF direct speaker and a workmanship reverberant chamber acoustic test.

  16. 40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the field-testing procedures... § 1048.515 What are the field-testing procedures? (a) This section describes the procedures to determine whether your engines meet the field-testing emission standards in § 1048.101(c). These procedures...

  17. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee shall submit a report containing the procedure, cost, results and conclusions of any field testing. The...

  18. 40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the field-testing procedures... § 1048.515 What are the field-testing procedures? (a) This section describes the procedures to determine whether your engines meet the field-testing emission standards in § 1048.101(c). These procedures...

  19. 40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the field-testing procedures... § 1048.515 What are the field-testing procedures? (a) This section describes the procedures to determine whether your engines meet the field-testing emission standards in § 1048.101(c). These procedures...

  20. 40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the field-testing procedures... § 1048.515 What are the field-testing procedures? (a) This section describes the procedures to determine whether your engines meet the field-testing emission standards in § 1048.101(c). These procedures...

  1. 40 CFR 1048.515 - What are the field-testing procedures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the field-testing procedures... § 1048.515 What are the field-testing procedures? (a) This section describes the procedures to determine whether your engines meet the field-testing emission standards in § 1048.101(c). These procedures...

  2. 40 CFR 35.2211 - Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Field testing for Innovative and... Treatment Works § 35.2211 Field testing for Innovative and Alternative Technology Report. The grantee shall submit a report containing the procedure, cost, results and conclusions of any field testing. The...

  3. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or... laboratory analyses. (b) If the Director finds that a phased permit may be issued, he will establish, as requirements in the first phase of the facility permit, conditions for conducting the field tests or...

  4. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or... laboratory analyses. (b) If the Director finds that a phased permit may be issued, he will establish, as requirements in the first phase of the facility permit, conditions for conducting the field tests or...

  5. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or... laboratory analyses. (b) If the Director finds that a phased permit may be issued, he will establish, as requirements in the first phase of the facility permit, conditions for conducting the field tests or...

  6. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the field test or laboratory analyses, or as a two-phase facility permit covering the field tests, or... laboratory analyses. (b) If the Director finds that a phased permit may be issued, he will establish, as requirements in the first phase of the facility permit, conditions for conducting the field tests or...

  7. 40 CFR 270.63 - Permits for land treatment demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conducting such tests or analyses. The owner or operator must also submit all data collected during the field... demonstrations using field test or laboratory analyses. 270.63 Section 270.63 Protection of Environment... using field test or laboratory analyses. (a) For the purpose of allowing an owner or operator to...

  8. Toward a model of impaired reality testing in rats.

    PubMed

    McDannald, Michael; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2009-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic brain disorder that affects about 1.1% of the adult US population annually. Hallucinations, delusions, and impaired reality testing are prominent symptoms of the disorder. Modeling these symptoms is difficult because it is unclear how to assess impaired reality testing in animals. Animals cannot discuss their beliefs; however, a century of learning experiments has shown us that they, like us, construct complex internal representations of their world. Presumably, these representations can become confused with reality for animals in much the same way that they do for schizophrenic patients. Indeed, there is evidence from studies of Pavlovian conditioning that this happens even in normal animals. For example, early in training a cue that has been paired with reward elicits a highly realistic, sensory representation of that reward, which is to some extent indistinguishable from reality. With further training, this sensory hallucination of reward is replaced by a more abstract representation, termed a reward expectancy. Reward expectancies reflect the sensory and other qualities of the impending reward but are distinguishable from the actual reward. Notably, the hallucinatory representations depend on subcortical regions, such as amygdala, whereas reward expectancies require the progressive involvement of prefrontal areas, such as orbitofrontal cortex. Abnormal prefrontal function is associated with schizophrenia; impaired reality testing may result from a failure of the normal shift from highly realistic, sensory representations to more abstract, prefrontal expectancies. The Pavlovian procedures discussed here could be applied to animal models and schizophrenic patients to test this hypothesis.

  9. Effects of magnetic fields produced by simulated and real geomagnetic storms on rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Bretón, J. L.; Mendoza, B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we report experiments of arterial pressure (AP) measurements of ten Wistar rats subjected to geomagnetic field changes and to artificially stimulated magnetic field variations. Environmental electromagnetic effects were screened using a semianechoic chamber, which allowed us to discern the effects associated with geomagnetic storms. We stimulated the subjects with a linear magnetic profile constructed from the average changes of sudden storm commencement (SSC) and principal phases of geomagnetic storms measured between 1996 and 2008 with Dst ⩽ -100 nT. Although we found no statistically significant AP variations, statistically significant AP changes were found when a geomagnetic storm occurred during the experimental period. Using the observed geomagnetic storm variations to construct a geomagnetic profile to stimulate the rats, we found that the geomagnetic field variations associated to the SSC day were capable of increasing the subjects AP between 7% and 9% from the reference value. Under this magnetic variation, the subjects presented a notably restless behavior not seen under other conditions. We conclude that even very small changes in the geomagnetic field associated with a geomagnetic storm can produce a measurable and reproducible physiological response.

  10. Simulation and experimental study of DC electric field distribution characteristics of rat hippocampal slices in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Qiu, Qian; Li, Ze-yan; Zhao, Zhe; Chen, Rui-juan; Wang, Hui-quan

    2016-06-01

    Direct current (DC) electric field is a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons. Despite its efficacy, the dielectric constant of artificial cerebrospinal fluid and the position and direction of brain slices and other factors can affect the field intensity and distribution acting on the surface of rat hippocampus slices, thus causing errors. In this study, we describe a new analytical method optimized for DC electric fields acting on brain slices, and the design of an external DC electric field stimulator to allow scientific evaluation of brain slices. We investigated parameters regarding the uniformity of electric field distribution and identified the maximal parameters using the finite element method. Then, we selected and simplified slice images using magnetic resonance imaging data and calculated the electric field intensity of the original and simplified models. The electric field simulator induced action potential and excitatory postsynaptic current with intensities of 1, 5, and 10 V/m. This study describes the development of a new electric field stimulator and successfully demonstrates its practicability for scientific evaluation of tissue slices.

  11. Field testing of the Alere DDS2 Mobile Test System for drugs in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Moore, Christine; Kelley-Baker, Tara; Lacey, John

    2013-06-01

    A preliminary field evaluation of a second-generation handheld oral fluid testing device, the Alere DDS2 Mobile Test System (DDS2), is described. As part of a larger study, drivers were randomly stopped at various locations across California (in 2012) and asked to submit voluntarily to a questionnaire regarding their drug and alcohol use, a breath alcohol test and collection of oral fluid with the Quantisal device. The Quantisal-collected oral fluid samples were sent for laboratory-based analyses. At one location, 50 drivers were asked to submit an additional oral fluid sample using the DDS2 collection device; these samples were analyzed by using the DDS2 mobile test system. Thirty-eight donors (76%) provided specimens that were successfully run on the mobile system; in 12 cases (24%), the device failed to provide a valid result. Thirty-two of the 38 collected samples were negative for all drugs; five were positive for tetrahydrocannabinol and one was positive for methamphetamine using the mobile device. These results corresponded exactly with the laboratory-based results from the Quantisal oral fluid collection.

  12. Prolonged weakening of the geomagnetic field (GMF) affects the immune system of rats.

    PubMed

    Roman, Adam; Tombarkiewicz, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out how a long-term shielding of the geomagnetic field (GMF) affected the immune system of rats. Male and female Wistar rats were kept up to an age of 2 months in a natural GMF (about 37 microT). Afterwards, the rats were divided into four groups (males and females separately): control rats were maintained in ambient GMF, while experimental animals were housed under conditions of a weakened GMF (below 12 microT) achieved with steel cages. After 6 months, the rats were sacrificed by decapitation. Spleens and thymuses were isolated and weighed. Peritoneal cells were eluted and cultured in vitro to study their ability to produce nitric oxide (NO) and to synthesize superoxide anion (O2(-)), important microbicidal molecules of macrophages. The number of macrophages was estimated by a crystal violet staining method. We found that the long-term shielding of the GMF could influence the functioning of the immune system in a sex-dependent manner. The deprivation of the GMF delayed physiological thymus involution, that effect being more strongly expressed in females. The weakening of the GMF resulted in an increased number of peritoneal macrophages, especially in males. The shielding of the GMF diminished the ability of macrophages to release NO and to synthesize O2(-), those effects being more powerfully expressed in males and females, respectively. It is proposed that the observed changes in the immune system occur as a consequence of the protective effect of GMF shielding on the circadian rhythm-dependent level of melatonin.

  13. Effects of electromagnetic fields on bone loss in hyperthyroidism rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoxu; Zhang, Yingchi; Fu, Tao; Liu, Yang; Wei, Sheng; Yang, Yong; Zhao, Dongming; Zhao, Wenchun; Song, Mingyu; Tang, Xiangyu; Wu, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Optimal therapeutics for hyperthyroidism-induced osteoporosis are still lacking. As a noninvasive treatment, electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been proven to be effective for treating osteoporosis in non-hyperthyroidism conditions. We herein systematically evaluated the reduced effects of EMF on osteoporosis in a hyperthyroidism rat model. With the use of Helmholtz coils and an EMF stimulator, 15 Hz/1 mT EMF was generated. Forty-eight 5-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four different groups: control, levothyroxine treated (L-T4), EMF exposure + levothyroxine (EMF + L-T4), and EMF exposure without levothyroxine administration (EMF). All rats were treated with L-T4 (100 mg/day) except those in control and EMF groups. After 12 weeks, the results obtained from bone mineral density analyses and bone mechanical measurements showed significant differences between L-T4 and EMF + L-T4 groups. Micro CT and bone histomorphometric analyses indicated that trabecular bone mass and architecture in distal femur and proximal tibia were augmented and restored partially in EMF + L-T4 group. In addition, bone thyroid hormone receptors (THR) expression of hyperthyroidism rats was attenuated in EMF + L-T4 group, compared to control group, which was not observed in L-T4 group. According to these results, we concluded that 15 Hz/1 mT EMF significantly inhibited bone loss and micro architecture deterioration in hyperthyroidism rats, which might occur due to reduced THR expression caused by EMF exposure. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:137-150, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Circadian Rhythmicity of Antioxidant Markers in Rats Exposed to 1.8 GHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Honglong; Qin, Fenju; Liu, Xueguan; Wang, Jiajun; Cao, Yi; Tong, Jian; Zhao, Heming

    2015-01-01

    Background: The potential health risks of exposure to Radiofrequency Fields (RF) emitted by mobile phones are currently of considerable public interest, such as the adverse effects on the circadian rhythmicities of biological systems. To determine whether circadian rhythms of the plasma antioxidants (Mel, GSH-Px and SOD) are affected by RF, we performed a study on male Sprague Dawley rats exposed to the 1.8 GHz RF. Methods: All animals were divided into seven groups. The animals in six groups were exposed to 1.8 GHz RF (201.7 μW/cm2 power density, 0.05653 W/kg specific absorption rate) at a specific period of the day (3, 7, 11, 15, 19 and 23 h GMT, respectively), for 2 h/day for 32 consecutive days. The rats in the seventh group were used as sham-exposed controls. At the end of last RF exposure, blood samples were collected from each rat every 4 h (total period of 24 h) and also at similar times from sham-exposed animals. The concentrations of three antioxidants (Mel, GSH-Px and SOD) were determined. The data in RF-exposed rats were compared with those in sham-exposed animals. Results: circadian rhythms in the synthesis of Mel and antioxidant enzymes, GSH-Px and SOD, were shifted in RF-exposed rats compared to sham-exposed animals: the Mel, GSH-Px and SOD levels were significantly decreased when RF exposure was given at 23 and 3 h GMT. Conclusion: The overall results indicate that there may be adverse effects of RF exposure on antioxidant function, in terms of both the daily antioxidative levels, as well as the circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25685954

  15. Science Operations During Planetary Surface Exploration: Desert-RATS Tests 2009-2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Research and Technology Studies (RATS) team evaluates technology, human-robotic systems and extravehicular equipment for use in future human space exploration missions. Tests are conducted in simulated space environments, or analog tests, using prototype instruments, vehicles, and systems. NASA engineers, scientists and technicians from across the country gather annually with representatives from industry and academia to perform the tests. Test scenarios include future missions to near-Earth asteroids (NEA), the moon and Mars.. Mission simulations help determine system requirements for exploring distant locations while developing the technical skills required of the next generation of explorers.

  16. Chronic exposure to 60-Hz electric fields: effects on pineal function in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Anderson, L.E.; Hilton, D.I.; Philips, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    As a component of studies to search for effects of 60-Hz electric field exposure on mammalian endocrine function, concentrations of melatonin, 5-methoxytryptophol, and serotonin-N-acetyl transferase activity were measured in the pineal glands of rats exposed or sham-exposed at 65 kV/m for 30 days.In two replicate experiments there were statistically significant differences between exposed and control rats in that the normal nocturnal increase in pineal melatonin content was depressed in the exposed animals. Concentrations of 5-methoxytryptophol were increased in the pineal glands of the exposed groups when compared to sham-exposed controls. An alteration was also observed in serotonin-N-acetyl transferase activity, with lower levels measured in pineal glands from exposed animals.

  17. Ethylene Oxide: Acute Four-Hour and One-Hour Inhalation Toxicity Testing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Snellings, William M.; Nachreiner, Donald J.; Pottenger, Lynn H.

    2011-01-01

    Ethylene oxide was tested on groups of rats for either 4-hour or 1-hour inhalation exposure, followed by 14 days of observation. Groups of five Sprague-Dawley rats/sex were exposed, and clinical signs and mortality were recorded. Clinical signs noted included irregular breathing, absence of certain reflexes, and tremors. Rats that died had moderate to severe pulmonary congestion. The calculated LC50 values, reported as ppm by volume (with 95% confidence limits), were as follows. 4-hour LC50 values were 1972 (1887 to 2061) ppm for males; 1537 (1391 to 1698) ppm for females; 1741 (1655 to 1831) ppm for the combined sexes. The 1-hour LC50 values were 5748 (5276 to 6262) ppm for males; 4439 (4034 to 4884) ppm for females; 5029 (4634 to 5459) ppm for the combined sexes. PMID:21785591

  18. Functional alterations in immature cultured rat hippocampal neurons after sustained exposure to static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Yoneda, Yukio

    2004-01-15

    In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, gradual increases were seen in the expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), neuronal nuclei (NeuN) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), in proportion to increased duration, up to 9 days in vitro (DIV). Sustained exposure to static magnetic fields at 100 mT for up to 9 DIV significantly decreased expression of MAP-2 and NeuN in cultured rat hippocampal neurons without markedly affecting GAP-43 expression. Although a significant increase was seen in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in hippocampal neuronal preparations cultured for 6-9 DIV under sustained magnetism, GFAP and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression were not affected markedly in cultured astrocytes prepared from rat hippocampus and neocortex, irrespective of cellular maturity. No significant alteration was seen in cell survivability of hippocampal neurons or astrocytes cultured under sustained magnetism. In hippocampal neurons cultured for 3 DIV under sustained magnetism, marked mRNA expression was seen for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits, NR1, NR2A-2C, NR2D, and NR3A. In addition, significant potentiation of the ability of NMDA to increase intracellular free Ca(2+) ions was observed. Differential display analysis revealed a significant decrease in mRNA expression for the transcription factor ALF1 in response to sustained magnetism for 3 DIV. These results suggest that sustained exposure to static magnetic fields may affect cellular functionality and maturity in immature cultured rat hippocampal neurons through modulation of expression of particular NMDA receptor subunits.

  19. Structural and numerical chromosome aberration inducers in liver micronucleus test in rats with partial hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Satoru; Hattori, Chiharu; Nagata, Mayumi; Sanbuissho, Atsushi

    2012-08-30

    The liver micronucleus test is an important method to detect pro-mutagens such as active metabolites not reaching bone marrow due to their short lifespan. We have already reported that dosing of the test compound after partial hepatectomy (PH) is essential to detect genotoxicity of numerical chromosome aberration inducers in mice [Mutat. Res. 632 (2007) 89-98]. In naive animals, the proportion of binucleated cells in rats is less than half of that in mice, which suggests a species difference in the response to chromosome aberration inducers. In the present study, we investigated the responses to structural and numerical chromosome aberration inducers in the rat liver micronucleus test. Two structural chromosome aberretion inducers (diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine) and two numerical chromosome aberration inducers (colchicine and carbendazim) were used in the present study. PH was performed a day before or after the dosing of the test compound in 8-week old male F344 rats and hepatocytes were isolated 4 days after the PH. As a result, diethylnitrosamine and 1,2-dimethylhydrazine, structural chromosome aberration inducers, exhibited significant increase in the incidence of micronucleated hepatocyte (MNH) when given either before and after PH. Colchicine and carbendazim, numerical chromosome aberration inducers, did not result in any toxicologically significant increase in MNH frequency when given before PH, while they exhibited MNH induction when given after PH. It is confirmed that dosing after PH is essential in order to detect genotoxicity of numerical chromosome aberration inducers in rats as well as in mice. Regarding the species difference, a different temporal response to colchicine was identified. Colchicine increased the incidence of MNH 4 days after PH in rats, although such induction in mice was observed 8-10 days after PH.

  20. Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests

    SciTech Connect

    AL Ward; GW Gee

    2000-06-23

    : identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

  1. Large-scale field testing on flexible shallow landslide barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugnion, Louis; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna; Roth, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    Open shallow landslides occur regularly in a wide range of natural terrains. Generally, they are difficult to predict and result in damages to properties and disruption of transportation systems. In order to improve the knowledge about the physical process itself and to develop new protection measures, large-scale field experiments were conducted in Veltheim, Switzerland. Material was released down a 30° inclined test slope into a flexible barrier. The flow as well as the impact into the barrier was monitored using various measurement techniques. Laser devices recording flow heights, a special force plate measuring normal and shear basal forces as well as load cells for impact pressures were installed along the test slope. In addition, load cells were built in the support and retaining cables of the barrier to provide data for detailed back-calculation of load distribution during impact. For the last test series an additional guiding wall in flow direction on both sides of the barrier was installed to achieve higher impact pressures in the middle of the barrier. With these guiding walls the flow is not able to spread out before hitting the barrier. A special constructed release mechanism simulating the sudden failure of the slope was designed such that about 50 m3 of mixed earth and gravel saturated with water can be released in an instant. Analysis of cable forces combined with impact pressures and velocity measurements during a test series allow us now to develop a load model for the barrier design. First numerical simulations with the software tool FARO, originally developed for rockfall barriers and afterwards calibrated for debris flow impacts, lead already to structural improvements on barrier design. Decisive for the barrier design is the first dynamic impact pressure depending on the flow velocity and afterwards the hydrostatic pressure of the complete retained material behind the barrier. Therefore volume estimation of open shallow landslides by assessing

  2. NASA Desert RATS 2010: Preliminary Results for Science Operations Conducted in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, J. E.; Lofgren, G. E.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Bell, E. R.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with international partners to develop the space architectures and mission plans necessary for human spaceflight beyond earth orbit. These mission plans include the exploration of planetary surfaces with significant gravity fields. The Apollo missions to the Moon demonstrated conclusively that surface mobility is a key asset that improves the efficiency of human explorers on a planetary surface. NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series tests of hardware and operations carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona. Conducted since 1998, these activities are designed to exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in relatively harsh climatic conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable

  3. Automated assessment of pain in rats using a voluntarily accessed static weight-bearing test

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hung Tae; Uchimoto, Kazuhiro; Duellman, Tyler; Yang, Jay

    2015-01-01

    The weight-bearing test is one method to assess pain in rodent animal models; however, the acceptance of this convenient method is limited by the low throughput data acquisition and necessity of confining the rodents to a small chamber. New methods We developed novel data acquisition hardware and software, data analysis software, and a conditioning protocol for an automated high throughput static weight-bearing assessment of pain. With this device, the rats voluntarily enter the weighing chamber, precluding the necessity to restrain the animals and thereby removing the potential stress-induced confounds as well as operator selection bias during data collection. We name this device the Voluntarily Accessed Static Incapacitance Chamber (VASIC). Results Control rats subjected to the VASIC device provided hundreds of weight-bearing data points in a single behavioral assay. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) surgery and paw pad injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or carrageenan in rats generated hundreds of weight-bearing data during a 30 minute recording session. Rats subjected to CCI, CFA, or carrageenan demonstrated the expected bias in weight distribution favoring the un-operated leg, and the analgesic effect of i.p. morphine was demonstrated. In comparison with existing methods, brief water restriction encouraged the rats to enter the weighing chamber to access water, and an infrared detector confirmed the rat position with feet properly positioned on the footplates, triggering data collection. This allowed hands-off measurement of weight distribution data reducing operator selection bias. Conclusion The VASIC device should enhance the hands-free parallel collection of unbiased weight-bearing data in a high throughput manner, allowing further testing of this behavioral measure as an effective assessment of pain in rodents. PMID:26143745

  4. The effects of prenatal exposure to a 900-MHz electromagnetic field on the 21-day-old male rat heart.

    PubMed

    Türedi, Sibel; Hancı, Hatice; Topal, Zehra; Ünal, Deniz; Mercantepe, Tolga; Bozkurt, İlyas; Kaya, Haydar; Odacı, Ersan

    2015-01-01

    The growing spread of mobile phone use is raising concerns about the effect on human health of the electromagnetic field (EMF) these devices emit. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on rat pup heart tissue of prenatal exposure to a 900 megahertz (MHz) EMF. For this purpose, pregnant rats were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group rats were exposed to a 900 MHz EMF (1 h/d) on days 13-21 of pregnancy. Measurements were performed with rats inside the exposure box in order to determine the distribution of EMF intensity. Our measurements showed that pregnant experimental group rats were exposed to a mean electrical field intensity of 13.77 V/m inside the box (0.50 W/m(2)). This study continued with male rat pups obtained from both groups. Pups were sacrificed on postnatal day 21, and the heart tissues were extracted. Malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase values were significantly higher in the experimental group rats, while glutathione values were lower. Light microscopy revealed irregularities in heart muscle fibers and apoptotic changes in the experimental group. Electron microscopy revealed crista loss and swelling in the mitochondria, degeneration in myofibrils and structural impairments in Z bands. Our study results suggest that exposure to EMF in the prenatal period causes oxidative stress and histopathological changes in male rat pup heart tissue.

  5. Antinociceptive Effects of Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Nociceptive Behavior of Adult Rats during the Formalin Test

    PubMed Central

    Onifer, Stephen M.; Reed, William R.; Sozio, Randall S.; Long, Cynthia R.

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing pain relief resulting from spinal manipulative therapies, including low velocity variable amplitude spinal manipulation (LVVA-SM), requires determining their mechanisms. Pain models that incorporate simulated spinal manipulative therapy treatments are needed for these studies. The antinociceptive effects of a single LVVA-SM treatment on rat nociceptive behavior during the commonly used formalin test were investigated. Dilute formalin was injected subcutaneously into a plantar hindpaw. Licking behavior was video-recorded for 5 minutes. Ten minutes of LVVA-SM at 20° flexion was administered with a custom-made device at the lumbar (L5) vertebra of isoflurane-anesthetized experimental rats (n = 12) beginning 10 minutes after formalin injection. Hindpaw licking was video-recorded for 60 minutes beginning 5 minutes after LVVA-SM. Control rats (n = 12) underwent the same methods except for LVVA-SM. The mean times spent licking the formalin-injected hindpaw of both groups 1–5 minutes after injection were not different. The mean licking time during the first 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM of experimental rats was significantly less than that of control rats (P < 0.001). The mean licking times of both groups during the second and third 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM were not different. Administration of LVVA-SM had a short-term, remote antinociceptive effect similar to clinical findings. Therefore, mechanistic investigations using this experimental approach are warranted. PMID:26693243

  6. Cue-invariant shape recognition in rats as tested with second-order contours.

    PubMed

    De Keyser, Roxane; Bossens, Christophe; Kubilius, Jonas; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are the main animal model to investigate high-level properties of human cortical vision. For one property, transformation-invariant object recognition, recent studies have revealed interesting and unknown capabilities in rats. Here we report on the ability of rats to rely upon second-order cues that are important to structure the incoming visual images into figure and background. Rats performed a visual shape discrimination task in which the shapes were not only defined by first-order luminance information but also by a variety of second-order cues such as a change in texture properties. Once the rats were acquainted with a first set of second-order stimuli, they showed a surprising degree of generalization towards new second-order stimuli. The limits of these capabilities were tested in various ways, and the ability to extract the shapes broke down only in extreme cases where no local cues were available to solve the task. These results demonstrate how rats are able to make choices based on fairly complex strategies when necessary.

  7. Spatial task for rats testing position recognition of an object displayed on a computer screen.

    PubMed

    Klement, Daniel; Levcik, David; Duskova, Lenka; Nekovarova, Tereza

    2010-03-05

    We developed two spatial tasks for rats employing computer monitor for stimuli presentation. Both tasks were aimed for testing rats' ability to recognize position of a distant object. In the first task the object was stationary except moments when it jumped from one position to another. In the second task it moved continuously across the screen. Rats were trained in an operant chamber located in front of the monitor. They responded to the object position by pressing a lever for food reward. Responses were reinforced when the object was displayed in a to-be-recognized position in the first task and when it was passing through a to-be-recognized region in the second task. The to-be-recognized position as well as the to-be-recognized region had to be determined with respect to surrounding orientation cues. Responding rate of well trained rats negatively depended on the distance between the object and the to-be-recognized position/region. In the first task this relationship was apparent during a short time after the object changed its position and it held even for newly presented unfamiliar positions of the object. We conclude that in both tasks the rats recognize position of the object by estimating distance between the object and the to-be-recognized position/region. We also analyzed contribution of timing behavior to the solution of the second task.

  8. Chronic inositol treatment reduces depression-like immobility of Flinders Sensitive Line rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Einat, Haim; Belmaker, Robert H; Zangen, Avraham; Overstreet, D H; Yadid, Gal

    2002-01-01

    Inositol, a precursor of the PIP cycle that was reported to have therapeutic effects in depressive patients and to be effective in two animal models of depression, was evaluated in the forced swim test using the genetic Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats model of depression. Groups of rats were tested in a 2 x 2 design with Strain (FSL or Control) as one factor and Drug (Inositol or Placebo) as the second factor. Rats received chronic treatment (daily for 14 days) with inositol (1.2 g/kg) or placebo (1:2 glucose/mannitol solution). On day 14 rats were exposed to the forced swim test for 5 min and their behavior videotaped. Tapes were analyzed for three levels of activity: immobility, swimming, and vigorous struggle. Inositol countered the exaggerated immobility of FSL rats in the forced swim test, without affecting control animals. Data support our previous suggestion of inositol as a potential antidepressant.

  9. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siekmann, Adam; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  10. Field test for mechanical efficiency evaluation in matching volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Laconi, P; Melis, F; Crisafulli, A; Sollai, R; Lai, C; Concu, A

    1998-01-01

    Field tests were performed in 10 volleyball (VB) players (4 females and 6 males) in order to obtain an index of mechanical work efficiency (mu' = Wmec/Woxy) while athletes played a game. Wmec was the mechanical work output, obtained by means of home made video image analysis software, by summing potential, kinetic translational and kinetic rotational energies of running and jumping athletes. Woxy was the oxidative energy consumption obtained from O2 consumption (VO2) by a telemetry device (Cosmed K2) that also gave values of pulmonary ventilation (VE) and heart rate (HR). VB were studied at rest before a game (R), during attacking phases (A) and during defensive phases (D). At R were found: VE = 11 +/- 1 l x min(-1), HR = 78 +/- 7b x min(-1), VO2 = 3.71 +/- 1.1 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), Woxy = 75.1 +/- 22.3 J x kg(-1) x min(-1). During A all variables increased: VE = 49 +/- 6l x min(-1), HR = 149 +/- 15 b x min(-1), VO2 = 23.1 +/- 3.3ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), Woxy = 482.8 +/- 69.0 J x kg(-1) x min(-1), and Wmec 275.5 +/- 57.0 J x kg(-1) x min(-1) with mu'=0.57 +/- 0.09. In D HR (-9%), VE, VO2 and Woxy (-18%) were reduced when compared to A, decreasing mu' to 0.21 +/- 0.05. On the other hand mu' was found higher than 0.25 during A indicating an anaerobic contribution to energy expenditure; in D the mu' lower than 0.25 indicated a restoration of anaerobic energy sources. It might be proposed that a greater difference in mu' values between A and D also means a higher anaerobic energy contribution to the volleyball game.

  11. Postpartum depression in rats: differences in swim test immobility, sucrose preference and nurturing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jamie Winderbaum; Grizzell, J Alex; Philpot, Rex M; Wecker, Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common disorder affecting both mothers and their offspring. Studies of PPD in laboratory animals have typically assessed either immobility on forced swim testing or sucrose preference in ovariectomized rats following hormone supplementation and withdrawal or in stress models. To date, few studies have related these measures to maternal behaviors, a potential indicator of depressive-like activity postpartum. Because a single measure may be insufficient to characterize depression, the present study determined the distribution of depressive-like behaviors in Sprague-Dawley rats postpartum. Nurturing and non-nurturing behaviors exhibited by undisturbed dams were recorded during the first 12 days postpartum, and immobility in the forced swim test and sucrose preference were determined thereafter. A median-split analysis indicated that 19% of dams exhibited high sucrose preference and low immobility, 30% exhibited either only high immobility or only low sucrose preference, and 21% exhibited both high immobility and low preference. Dams exhibiting depressive-like activity on either or both tests displayed increased self-directed behaviors and decreased active nurturing during the dark phase of the diurnal cycle. This is the first study to characterize undisturbed nurturing and non-nurturing behaviors, and use both sucrose preference and immobility in the forced swim test, to classify PPD endophenotypes exhibited by rat dams following parturition. The present study underscores the idea that multiple tests should be used to characterize depressive-like behavior, which is highly heterogeneous in both the human and laboratory animal populations.

  12. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Haitham S; Fahmy, Heba M; Radwan, Nasr M; Elsayed, Anwar A

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  13. Spontaneous and nitrosourea-induced primary tumors of the central nervous system in Fischer 344 rats exposed to frequency-modulated microwave fields.

    PubMed

    Adey, W R; Byus, C V; Cain, C D; Higgins, R J; Jones, R A; Kean, C J; Kuster, N; MacMurray, A; Stagg, R B; Zimmerman, G

    2000-04-01

    In a 2-year bioassay, we exposed Fischer 344 rats to a frequency-modulated (FM) signal (836.55 MHz +/- 12.5 KHz deviation) simulating radiofrequency exposures in the head of users of hand-held mobile phones. We tested for effects on spontaneous tumorigenicity of central nervous system (CNS) tumors in the offspring of pregnant rats and also for modified incidence of primary CNS tumors in rats treated with a single dose of the neurocarcinogen ethylnitrosourea (ENU) in utero. ENU dosage (4 mg/kg) was selected to give an expected brain tumor incidence of 10-15% over the mean life span of 26 months. Pregnant dams (n = 102) were randomly assigned to six groups. Their offspring were treated as cohorts in each of the six groups (n = 90 per group; total, n = 540): Sham ENU/Sham Field, Sham ENU/Field Exposed, ENU/Sham Field, ENU/Field Exposed, ENU/Cage Control, and Sham ENU/Cage Control. Intermittent field exposures began on gestation day 19 and continued until weaning at 21 days, resuming thereafter at 31 days and continuing until experiment termination at 731-734 days. Energy absorption rates (SARs) in the rats' brains were similar to localized peak brain exposures of a phone user (female, 236 g, 1.0 W/kg; male, 450 g, 1.2 W/kg). Of the original 540 rats, 168 died before the termination of the experiment. In these rats, ENU significantly reduced survival from a mean of 708 days in three groups without ENU treatment to 645 days in three groups treated with ENU (P < 0.0005). There were no effects on survival attributable to FM field exposure in either ENU-treated or in sham-treated groups. Spontaneous CNS tumor incidence in control groups was 1.1-4.4% but sharply higher in rats receiving ENU (14.4-22.2%; P < 0.0001). No FM field-mediated changes were observed in number, incidence, or histological type of either spontaneous or ENU-induced brain tumors, nor were gender differences detected in tumor numbers. These negative findings with FM fields contrast with our study using

  14. Chronic prenatal exposure to the 900 megahertz electromagnetic field induces pyramidal cell loss in the hippocampus of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Bas, O; Odaci, E; Mollaoglu, H; Ucok, K; Kaplan, S

    2009-07-01

    Widespread use of mobile phones which are a major source of electromagnetic fields might affect living organisms. However, there has been no investigation concerning prenatal exposure to electromagnetic fields or their roles in the development of the pyramidal cells of the cornu ammonis in postnatal life. Two groups of pregnant rats, a control group and an experimental group, that were exposed to an electromagnetic field were used. For obtaining electromagnetic field offspring, the pregnant rats were exposed to 900 megahertz electromagnetic fields during the 1-19th gestation days. There were no actions performed on the control group during the same period. The offspring rats were spontaneously delivered--control group (n = 6) and electromagnetic field group (n = 6). Offspring were sacrificed for stereological analyses at the end of the 4th week. Pyramidal cell number in rat cornu ammonis was estimated using the optical fractionator technique. It was found that 900 megahertz of electromagnetic field significantly reduced the total pyramidal cell number in the cornu ammonis of the electromagnetic field group (P < 0.001). Therefore, although its exact mechanism is not clear, it is suggested that pyramidal cell loss in the cornu ammonis could be due to the 900 megahertz electromagnetic field exposure in the prenatal period.

  15. [Test Reviews in Child Psychology: Test Users Wish to Obtain Practical Information Relevant to their Respective Field of Work].

    PubMed

    Renner, Gerolf; Irblich, Dieter

    2016-11-01

    Test Reviews in Child Psychology: Test Users Wish to Obtain Practical Information Relevant to their Respective Field of Work This study investigated to what extent diagnosticians use reviews of psychometric tests for children and adolescents, how they evaluate their quality, and what they expect concerning content. Test users (n = 323) from different areas of work (notably social pediatrics, early intervention, special education, speech and language therapy) rated test reviews as one of the most important sources of information. Readers of test reviews value practically oriented descriptions and evaluations of tests that are relevant to their respective field of work. They expect independent reviews that critically discuss opportunities and limits of the tests under scrutiny. The results show that authors of test reviews should not only have a background in test theory but should also be familiar with the practical application of tests in various settings.

  16. Topographic Distribution of Stimulus-Specific Adaptation across Auditory Cortical Fields in the Anesthetized Rat.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Diego, Javier; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2016-03-01

    Stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA) in single neurons of the auditory cortex was suggested to be a potential neural correlate of the mismatch negativity (MMN), a widely studied component of the auditory event-related potentials (ERP) that is elicited by changes in the auditory environment. However, several aspects on this SSA/MMN relation remain unresolved. SSA occurs in the primary auditory cortex (A1), but detailed studies on SSA beyond A1 are lacking. To study the topographic organization of SSA, we mapped the whole rat auditory cortex with multiunit activity recordings, using an oddball paradigm. We demonstrate that SSA occurs outside A1 and differs between primary and nonprimary cortical fields. In particular, SSA is much stronger and develops faster in the nonprimary than in the primary fields, paralleling the organization of subcortical SSA. Importantly, strong SSA is present in the nonprimary auditory cortex within the latency range of the MMN in the rat and correlates with an MMN-like difference wave in the simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP). We present new and strong evidence linking SSA at the cellular level to the MMN, a central tool in cognitive and clinical neuroscience.

  17. Histological changes in testes of rats treated with testosterone, nandrolone, and stanozolol

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Mutalip, Siti Syairah; Surindar Singh, Gurmeet Kaur; Mohd Shah, Aishah; Mohamad, Mashani; Mani, Vasudevan; Hussin, Siti Nooraishah

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is being used in medical treatments, but AAS also was identified to have the risks of adverse effects towards patients and consumers health. Objective: Present study was conducted to observe the effects of testosterone, nandrolone, and stanozolol (forms of AAS) intake during onset of puberty on the rat testicular histology. Materials and Methods: Juvenile male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n=42) were divided into seven groups and were injected subcutaneously with medium dose of polyethylene glycol-200 (PEG-200) (control), testosterone, nandrolone, and stanozolol for six weeks (PND 41-87). The animals were weighed daily and sacrificed on PND 88. Testes were removed, weighed, and prepared for histological assessment and finally specimens were observed under microscope. Results: The results showed an insignificant increase in mean daily body weight with highest and lowest body weight gained was of 177.6±1.69 gr and 140.0±12.26 gr respectively. There was significant decrease in the testes absolute weight (p≤0.01) in all experimental groups except in the nandrolone 2.5 mg/kg/week treated group. Testicular histology of rats treated with AAS also showed slight changes in the uniformity of arrangements of seminiferous tubules. Conclusion: Data from present study suggests that AAS have been initiating the adverse effects on testicular normal functions in rats during onset of puberty. PMID:24639803

  18. Sevoflurane anesthesia induces neither contextual fear memory impairment nor alterations in local population connectivity of medial prefrontal cortex local field potentials networks in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinyu; Zhang, Qian; Tian, Xin; Wang, Guolin

    2016-08-01

    Sevoflurane has been found to increase apoptosis and pathologic markers associated with Alzheimer disease, provoking concern over their potential contribution to postoperative cognitive dysfunction. This study aimed to determine the effects of sevoflurane on contextual fear memory of aged rats and to characterize local population connectivity of local field potentials (LFPs) in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of aged rats during contextual fear memory. Eighteen-month-old male SD rats were implanted with one multichannel electrode array in mPFC. The aged rats were divided into control group, sevoflurane group (1 MAC sevoflurane for 2 h) and surgical group with 1.0 MAC sevoflurane for 2 h. We then assessed the effect of the anesthesia on contextual fear memory, and alterations in the local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks by partial directed coherence (PDC). Surgery impaired contextual fear memory and reduced local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks in aged rats at day 1 after the surgery and anesthesia. 1 MAC Sevoflurane anesthesia induced neither contextual fear memory impairment nor alterations in local population connectivity of mPFC LFP networks in aged rats when tested 1, 7, 15 and 30 days after exposure (P > 0.05). PDC values of theta band mPFC LFPs became strongly increased during contextual fear memory at 1, 7, 15, and 30 days after anesthesia. Our results suggest that 1 MAC sevoflurane anesthesia does not induce contextual fear memory impairment in aged rats and suggest that the increased local population connectivity in theta bands LFPs of mPFC plays a role in contextual fear memory.

  19. Ultra high frequency-electromagnetic field irradiation during pregnancy leads to an increase in erythrocytes micronuclei incidence in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Amâncio Romanelli; Knakievicz, Tanise; Pasquali, Matheus Augusto de Bittencourt; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Fernández, Claudio Enrique Rodriguez; de Salles, Alvaro Augusto de Almeida; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2006-12-03

    Mobile telephones and their base stations are an important ultra high frequency-electromagnetic field (UHF-EMF) source and their utilization is increasing all over the world. Epidemiological studies suggested that low energy UHF-EMF emitted from a cellular telephone may cause biological effects, such as DNA damage and changes on oxidative metabolism. An in vivo mammalian cytogenetic test, the micronucleus (MN) assay, was used to investigate the occurrence of chromosomal damage in erythrocytes from rat offspring exposed to a non-thermal UHF-EMF from a cellular phone during their embryogenesis; the irradiated group showed a significant increase in MN occurrence. In order to investigate if UHF-EMF could also alter oxidative parameters in the peripheral blood and in the liver - an important hematopoietic tissue in rat embryos and newborns - we also measured the activity of antioxidant enzymes, quantified total sulfhydryl content, protein carbonyl groups, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species and total non-enzymatic antioxidant defense. No significant differences were found in any oxidative parameter of offspring blood and liver. The average number of pups in each litter has also not been significantly altered. Our results suggest that, under our experimental conditions, UHF-EMF is able to induce a genotoxic response in hematopoietic tissue during the embryogenesis through an unknown mechanism.

  20. Histological analysis of the effects of a static magnetic field on bone healing process in rat femurs

    PubMed Central

    Puricelli, Edela; Ulbrich, Lucienne M; Ponzoni, Deise; Filho, João Julio da Cunha

    2006-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate, in vivo, the quality of bone healing under the effect of a static magnetic field, arranged inside the body. Methods A metallic device was developed, consisting of two stainless steel washers attached to the bone structure with titanium screws. Twenty-one Wistar rats (Rattus novergicus albinus) were used in this randomized experimental study. Each experimental group had five rats, and two animals were included as control for each of the groups. A pair of metal device was attached to the left femur of each animal, lightly touching a surgically created bone cavity. In the experimental groups, washers were placed in that way that they allowed mutual attraction forces. In the control group, surgery was performed but washers, screws or instruments were not magnetized. The animals were sacrificed 15, 45 and 60 days later, and the samples were submitted to histological analysis. Results On days 15 and 45 after the surgical procedure, bone healing was more effective in the experimental group as compared to control animals. Sixty days after the surgical procedure, marked bone neoformation was observed in the test group, suggesting the existence of continued magnetic stimulation during the experiment. Conclusion The magnetic stainless steel device, buried in the bone, in vivo, resulted in increased efficiency of the experimental bone healing process. PMID:17125508

  1. Testing Wetland Delineation Indicators in New England Boulder Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    groundwater seeps around the boulders into Moose - head Lake. Unlike the Saddleback boulder field, the Burnt Jacket boulder field lacks a clearly defined...September. At Moose - head, the precipitation was normal for June and July and above normal in May, August, and September. The above-normal values in

  2. An analysis of pharmaceutical experience with decades of rat carcinogenicity testing: support for a proposal to modify current regulatory guidelines.

    PubMed

    Sistare, Frank D; Morton, Daniel; Alden, Carl; Christensen, Joel; Keller, Douglas; Jonghe, Sandra De; Storer, Richard D; Reddy, M Vijayaraj; Kraynak, Andrew; Trela, Bruce; Bienvenu, Jean-Guy; Bjurström, Sivert; Bosmans, Vanessa; Brewster, David; Colman, Karyn; Dominick, Mark; Evans, John; Hailey, James R; Kinter, Lewis; Liu, Matt; Mahrt, Charles; Marien, Dirk; Myer, James; Perry, Richard; Potenta, Daniel; Roth, Arthur; Sherratt, Philip; Singer, Thomas; Slim, Rabih; Soper, Keith; Fransson-Steen, Ronny; Stoltz, James; Turner, Oliver; Turnquist, Susan; van Heerden, Marjolein; Woicke, Jochen; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2011-06-01

    Data collected from 182 marketed and nonmarketed pharmaceuticals demonstrate that there is little value gained in conducting a rat two-year carcinogenicity study for compounds that lack: (1) histopathologic risk factors for rat neoplasia in chronic toxicology studies, (2) evidence of hormonal perturbation, and (3) positive genetic toxicology results. Using a single positive result among these three criteria as a test for outcome in the two-year study, fifty-two of sixty-six rat tumorigens were correctly identified, yielding 79% test sensitivity. When all three criteria were negative, sixty-two of seventy-six pharmaceuticals (82%) were correctly predicted to be rat noncarcinogens. The fourteen rat false negatives had two-year study findings of questionable human relevance. Applying these criteria to eighty-six additional chemicals identified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as likely human carcinogens and to drugs withdrawn from the market for carcinogenicity concerns confirmed their sensitivity for predicting rat carcinogenicity outcome. These analyses support a proposal to refine regulatory criteria for conducting a two-year rat study to be based on assessment of histopathologic findings from a rat six-month study, evidence of hormonal perturbation, genetic toxicology results, and the findings of a six-month transgenic mouse carcinogenicity study. This proposed decision paradigm has the potential to eliminate over 40% of rat two-year testing on new pharmaceuticals without compromise to patient safety.

  3. Short-term expansion of receptive fields in rat primary somatosensory cortex after hindpaw digit denervation.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J A; Calford, M B

    1991-11-29

    The immediate effect of changing the driving cutaneous input to locations within primary somatosensory cortex (SI) was examined by denervating one or more digits of the rat hindpaw by amputation or local anesthesia. When all or part of a receptive field of a cluster of neurons was denervated, it was found that the cortical location recorded from gained responsiveness to cutaneous stimulation of hindpaw areas bordering the denervated region. In 22 of the 29 animals studied this expansion took place within 5 min of the denervation.

  4. Simple and integrated detours: field tests with Columbian ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Anna Pavlovna; Hansen, Frank

    2009-09-01

    An internal representation of space offers flexibility to animals during orientation and allows execution of short cuts and detours. We tested the ability of 19 free-ranging Columbian ground squirrels (Spermophilus columbianus) to perform integrated detours that required travelling under- and aboveground. Squirrels were individually tested on their territories (2 tests) and in an arena (7 tests). During tests, animals could reach food by running aboveground and then through tunnels. For the territory tests, natural tunnels were available. For the arena tests, animals used artificial tunnels within a fenced-in part of the meadow. For the last arena test, tubes were placed aboveground replicating the underground structure. In this test animals were asked to make a simple detour, when the full path to the goal was visible. On their territories, 41% of squirrels performed detours. All animals reached the food in the arena. When choosing an arena detour, squirrels based their decision on the proximity of the burrow as well as on whether it led to food. On the last arena test, more squirrels performed correct detours on the first attempt compared to other tests. The results suggest that ground squirrels can perform simple and integrated detours, but animals perform better if the full path is visible.

  5. BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Hodge

    2008-03-01

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  6. Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge, Ding Yuan, Raymond P. Keegan, Michael A. Krstich

    2007-07-09

    Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as 'Pagers'. This test, 'Bobcat', was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

  7. Neuregulin improves response to glucose tolerance test in control and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    López-Soldado, Iliana; Niisuke, Katrin; Veiga, Catarina; Adrover, Anna; Manzano, Anna; Martínez-Redondo, Vicente; Camps, Marta; Bartrons, Ramon; Zorzano, Antonio; Gumà, Anna

    2016-03-15

    Neuregulin (NRG) is an EGF-related growth factor that binds to the tyrosine kinase receptors ErbB3 and ErbB4, thus inducing tissue development and muscle glucose utilization during contraction. Here, we analyzed whether NRG has systemic effects regulating glycemia in control and type 2 diabetic rats. To this end, recombinant NRG (rNRG) was injected into Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and their respective lean littermates 15 min before a glucose tolerance test (GTT) was performed. rNRG enhanced glucose tolerance without promoting the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) or insulin receptor substrates (IRS) in muscle and liver. However, in control rats, rNRG induced the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) in liver but not in muscle. In liver, rNRG increased ErbB3 tyrosine phosphorylation and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), thus indicating that rNRG activates the ErbB3/PI3K/PKB signaling pathway. rNRG increased glycogen content in liver but not in muscle. rNRG also increased the content of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2), an activator of hepatic glycolysis, and lactate in liver but not in muscle. Increases in lactate were abrogated by wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, in incubated hepatocytes. The liver of ZDF rats showed a reduced content of ErbB3 receptors, entailing a minor stimulation of the rNRG-induced PKB/GSK-3 cascade and resulting in unaltered hepatic glycogen content. Nonetheless, rNRG increased hepatic Fru-2,6-P2 and augmented lactate both in liver and in plasma of diabetic rats. As a whole, rNRG improved response to the GTT in both control and diabetic rats by enhancing hepatic glucose utilization.

  8. Sinusoidal 50 Hz, 500 {micro}T magnetic field has no acute effect on urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin in Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bakos, J.; Nagy, N.; Thuroczy, G.; Szabo, L.D.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of a 50 Hz, vertical magnetic field on the excretion of urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) of male and female Wistar rats was studied in a self-controlled experiment. Twenty rats were kept in metabolic cages under 9:15 h light:dark conditions. The urine of the animals was collected twice per day for 5 consecutive days. The concentration of aMT6s in the rat urine was measured by {sup 125}I radioimmunoassay. The rats were exposed to 5 and 500 {micro}T flux density for 24 h. The excretion of urinary aMT6s did not show significant changes during or after magnetic field exposure.

  9. Acute toxicity testing of some herbicides-, alkaloids-, and antibiotics-metabolizing soil bacteria in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Classen, H G; Eberspächer, J; Lingens, F

    1981-01-01

    Seven strains of soil bacteria with the ability to metabolize herbicides, alkaloids or antibiotics were tested in rats for acute toxicity. 1. Upon oral administration of 9.0 x 10(8) to 6.6 x 10(10) cells daily during 7 d no adverse reactions were observed. 2. Exposure by air did not lead to specific pulmonary changes. 3. Intracutaneous injection of 7.5 x 10(6) to 1.4 x 10(8) cells did not lead to adverse skin reactions. 4. Intraperitoneal injections up to 10(8) cells per animal did not kill rats although bacteria entered blood. At higher concentrations some mortality occurred partly due to unspecific stress reactions. 5. Animal data and observations on 20 humans being exposed to these strains for 2 months up to 15 years support the view that the bacteria tested are essentially harmless for health.

  10. 40 CFR 53.58 - Operational field precision and blank test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operational field precision and blank... Methods for PM 2.5 or PM 10-2,5 § 53.58 Operational field precision and blank test. (a) Overview. This... days of field operation, using three collocated test samplers. Measurements of PM are made at a...

  11. Protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice on testes against carbon tetrachloride intoxication in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pomegranate fruit has been extensively used as a natural medicine in many cultures. The present study was aimed at evaluating the protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative stress and testes injury in adult Wistar rats. Methods Twenty eight Wistar albino male rats were divided equally into 4 groups for the assessment of protective potential of pomegranate juice. Rats of group I (control) received only vehicles and had free access to food and water. Rats of groups II and IV were treated with CCl4 (2 ml/kg bwt) via the intraperitoneal route once a week for ten weeks. The pomegranate juice was supplemented via drinking water 2 weeks before and concurrent with CCl4 treatment to group IV. Group III was supplemented with pomegranate juice for twelve weeks. The protective effects of pomegranate on serum sex hormones, oxidative markers, activities of antioxidant enzymes and histopathology of testes were determined in CCl4-induced reproductive toxicity in rats. Results Pomegranate juice showed significant elevation in testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) those depleted by the injection of CCl4. Activity levels of endogenous testesticular antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione (GSH) contents were increased while lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were decreased with pomegranate juice. Moreover, degeneration of germ and Leydig cells along with deformities in spermatogenesis induced after CCl4 injections were restored with the treatment of pomegranate juice. Conclusion The results clearly demonstrated that pomegranate juice augments the antioxidant defense mechanism against carbon tetrachloride-induced reproductive toxicity and provides evidence that it may have a therapeutic role in free radical mediated

  12. Radiation effects on rat testes. IX. Studies on oxidative enzymes after partial body gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G S; Bawa, S R

    1975-08-01

    Oxidative enzymes in the rat testes have been studied after gamma irradiation. The role of these enzymes in relation to spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis after radiation injury to testis has been discussed. Loss of succinic dehydrogenase and sorbitol dehydrogenase reflects the losts of germ cell population. Malic enzyme and malic dehydrogenase seem to the related to the deficiency of steroid hormones, whereas increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP isocitric dehydrogenase is due to secondary stimulation of pituitary.

  13. Pressure transient testing at Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, J.R.; Samaniego, F.V.; Schroeder, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the inherent problems in applying pressure build-up tests to wells producing two-phase fluids, it was decided to use variable flow tests of short duration known as two-rates tests. In these tests of variation in the well flow rates can be used to intepret the transient pressure response in order to determine reservoir parameters such as permeability, well-bore damage and mean reservoir pressure in the well drainage area. Some examples will illustrate the application of this technique. 11 refs.

  14. Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: field evaluation of prototype test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, W.J.; Roberts, W.E.; Mathey, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    The report describes results of the third and final phase of a study conducted for the General Services Administration (GSA) to develop a field-test method to measure the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal-insulation materials. Field tests were conducted on 17 fibrous and 2 cementitious spray-applied materials to assess surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact properties. The tests were performed using prototype devices developed in an earlier phase of the study. As expected, the field specimens displayed varying response to dislodgment or indentation in the tests. The field tests confirmed that the goal of the study had been achieved.

  15. Effects of low-frequency magnetic fields on implantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Huuskonen, H; Saastamoinen, V; Komulainen, H; Laitinen, J; Juutilainen, J

    2001-01-01

    Effects of 50-Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields (MFs) on embryo implantation, serum 17beta-estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and melatonin levels, and on estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) densities in the uterus were studied during the preimplantation and implantation periods in rats. Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to magnetic r.m.s. field strengths of 10 or 100 A/m (13 or 130 microT) or sham-exposed (controls) from day 0 of pregnancy for 24 h/day and killed during light and dark periods between 70 h and 176 h after ovulation. MFs did not influence the mean total number of implantations. The nocturnal mean serum melatonin concentration decreased by 34 and 38% at 10 and 100 A/m, respectively. At the same time, the first embryos, at an early developmental stage, arrived in the uterus in the MF-exposed groups. Serum estradiol and progesterone levels did not significantly change. Nuclear PgR and ER densities in the uterus decreased before implantation and there was an increased incidence of early stage embryos and fewer hatched embryos were found in the uterus at 100 A/m. During the early implantation period, the uterine cytosolic ER/PgR-ratio was increased at 100 A/m and no implants were concomitantly found in uterus. The nuclear ER/PgR-ratio decreased during implantation in both MF-groups due to decreased nuclear ER density. At the same time, 19% and 15% of the embryos (calculated from the corpora luteae) at 10 and 100 A/m, respectively, were yet morulae and not implanted. In summary, the results show that MFs do not impair implantation in rats although there may be some borderline changes in the transport and development of embryos and associated endocrinologic parameters.

  16. Increased WDR spontaneous activity and receptive field size in rats following a neuropathic or inflammatory injury: implications for mechanical sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Katharine L; Faltynek, Connie R; Jarvis, Michael F; McGaraughty, Steve

    2004-11-30

    Spontaneous activity and receptive field size for spinal wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons were measured and related to the mechanical allodynia in both neuropathic (L5-L6 ligation, 14 days post-injury) and complete Freund's adjuvant-inflamed rats (CFA, 2 days post-injury). The size of the WDR receptive field located on the hindpaw expanded significantly (p<0.01) following both modes of injury, with no difference between CFA and neuropathic animals. Likewise, the spontaneous firing of WDR neurons was significantly elevated following both the CFA (4.4+/-0.6 spikes/s, p<0.01) and neuropathic (3.2+/-0.3 spikes/s, p<0.05) injuries compared to naive (2.1+/-0.2 spikes/s) and sham-neuropathic (1.9+/-0.3 spikes/s) rats. Furthermore, the spontaneous WDR activity recorded from CFA rats was also significantly greater (p<0.05) than neuropathic rats. Mechanical allodynia, as measured by application of a von Frey hair stimulus, was observed from both CFA and neuropathic rats, however, the degree of sensitivity was significantly greater (p<0.01) for the CFA animals. These data suggest that the differences in mechanical sensitivity between CFA and neuropathic rats may be related to their respective changes in WDR spontaneous activity, but not to the changes in receptive field size, and is further demonstration of the importance of spontaneous WDR activity in determining mechanical sensitivity following injury.

  17. Field test of a center pivot irrigation system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Uniformity of water distribution of a variable rate center pivot irrigation system was evaluated. This 4-span center pivot system was configured with 10 water application zones along its 233 m-long lateral. Two experiments were conducted for the uniformity tests. In one test, a constant water applic...

  18. A Field Test for Upper Body Strength and Endurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jack K.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Researchers studied the reliability of the modified push-up test in measuring upper body strength and endurance in elementary through college students. It also examined the accuracy of partner scoring. The test proved much easier to administer than the regular floor push-up. It was valid and reliable for all students and suitable for partner…

  19. In vitro stimulation with a strongly pulsed electromagnetic field on rat basophilic leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. W.; Shin, S. C.; Kim, S.; Chung, E. R.; Bang, J. H.; Cho, G. I.; Choi, S. D.; Park, Y. S.; Jang, T. S.; Yoo, Y. M.; Lee, S. S.; Hwang, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation with a strong magnetic field on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells were investigated to confirm the efficacy of the magnetic stimulator for biomedical applications. The maximum intensity of the magnetic field generated from the stimulation coil was 0.203 T, and the transition time was 126 μs. The oscillation time and frequency of the pulsed field were almost 0.1 ms and 8 kHz, respectively. The cell count as well as the mRNA expression and DNA sequence of the cytokine genes, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), of the stimulated RBL-2H3 cells were analyzed with a hemocytometer and via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to determine the physiological response under a strong pulse field. After 12 h stimulation, cell death was observed at an increasing scale with the increase in the stimulation time. On the other hand, the cells that were stimulated for 10 min almost doubled as the interval time between the stimulations was extended.

  20. Decoding the rat forelimb movement direction from epidural and intracortical field potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutzky, Marc W.; Jordan, Luke R.; Lindberg, Eric W.; Lindsay, Kevin E.; Miller, Lee E.

    2011-06-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) use signals from the brain to control a device such as a computer cursor. Various types of signals have been used as BMI inputs, from single-unit action potentials to scalp potentials. Recently, intermediate-level signals such as subdural field potentials have also shown promise. These different signal types are likely to provide different amounts of information, but we do not yet know what signal types are necessary to enable a particular BMI function, such as identification of reach target location, control of a two-dimensional cursor or the dynamics of limb movement. Here we evaluated the performance of field potentials, measured either intracortically (local field potentials, LFPs) or epidurally (epidural field potential, EFPs), in terms of the ability to decode reach direction. We trained rats to move a joystick with their forepaw to control the motion of a sipper tube to one of the four targets in two dimensions. We decoded the forelimb reach direction from the field potentials using linear discriminant analysis. We achieved a mean accuracy of 69 ± 3% with EFPs and 57 ± 2% with LFPs, both much better than chance. Signal quality remained good up to 13 months after implantation. This suggests that using epidural signals could provide BMI inputs of high quality with less risk to the patient than using intracortical recordings.

  1. 78 FR 29698 - Availability of an Environmental Assessment for Field Testing a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... a Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... testing, and then to field test, an unlicensed Canine Lymphoma Vaccine, DNA. The environmental assessment... vaccine and related information, examines the potential effects that field testing this veterinary...

  2. Small-scale field tests of attract-and-kill stations for pest Tephritid fruit flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field tests were conducted at UF-TREC, Homestead to test efficacy of wax-matrix bait stations and mass trapping for control of the Caribbean fruit fly in a 5 by 30 tree guava planting. Results of the study and the ability to document control using small-scale field tests will be discussed....

  3. Comparison of field and laboratory-simulated drill-off tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, J.C.; Peltier, B. ); Cooper, G.A. ); Curry, D.A. ); McCann, D. )

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, field drill-off test results are compared with data from laboratory simulations. A simple theory for analyzing drill-off tests is developed. The weight-on bit (WOB) decay with time is close to exponential, but large threshold WOB's, resulting from poor weight transmission downhole, are sometimes observed in field tests.

  4. Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

    1983-01-01

    A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

  5. Testosterone enhancement during pregnancy influences the 2D:4D ratio and open field motor activity of rat siblings in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Talarovicová, Alzbeta; Krsková, Lucia; Blazeková, Jana

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the relationship between the prenatal testosterone exposure and the ratio of the second and the fourth digits (2D:4D) has been extensively studied. Surprisingly, data on this relationship have thus far been lacking in experimental animals such as rats. We studied the effect of maternal testosterone enhancement during pregnancy on the digit ratio and open field activity of adult progeny in Wistar rats. Elevated levels of maternal testosterone resulted in lower 2D:4D ratios and an elongated 4D on the left and right forepaws in both males and females. We found no sex difference in 2D:4D in control animals. In the open field test, control females were more active than control males and testosterone females, while the activity of testosterone females did not differ from that of control males. We found a positive correlation between motor activity and the right forepaw 2D:4D ratio of control males and females. Prenatal exposure to testosterone resulted in the disappearance of this correlation in both males and females. Our results show that elevated levels of testosterone during the prenatal period can influence forepaw 4D length, 2D:4D ratio, and open field motor activity of rats, and that these variables are positively correlated. Thus, this approach represents a noninvasive and robust method for evaluating the effects of prenatal testosterone enhancement on anatomical and physiological parameters.

  6. Field tests of syntheticManduca sexta sex pheromone.

    PubMed

    Tumlinson, J H; Mitchell, E R; Doolittle, R E; Jackson, D M

    1994-03-01

    In field experiments traps were baited with live females or with a two-, four-, or eight-component blend of the 16-carbon aldehydes previously identified as components of the sex pheromone emitted by femaleManduca sexta moths. The blends were formulated on rubber septa. Traps baited with a blend of all eight aldehydes captured moreM. sexta males than any other treatment. Septa loaded with 600 μg of the eight-component blend were attractive to males for about seven days in the field. Septa loaded with the eight-component blend and stored in a refrigerator at 4°C for a year released the conjugated diene and triene aldehydes at the same rate as freshly prepared septa and were equally attractive in the field.

  7. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  8. Testing chameleon theories with light propagating through a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Mota, David F.

    2007-10-15

    It was recently argued that the observed PVLAS anomaly can be explained by chameleon field theories in which large deviations from Newton's law can be avoided. Here we present the predictions for the dichroism and the birefringence induced in the vacuum by a magnetic field in these models. We show that chameleon particles behave very differently from standard axionlike particles (ALPs). We find that, unlike ALPs, the chameleon particles are confined within the experimental setup. As a consequence, the birefringence is always bigger than the dichroism in PVLAS-type experiments.

  9. ANOLE Portable Radiation Detection System Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Chris A. Hodge

    2007-07-12

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named “Anole,” it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  10. Radiation Isotope Identification Device (RIIDs) Field Test and Evaluation Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Hodge, Raymond Keegan

    2007-08-01

    Handheld, backpack, and mobile sensors are elements of the Global Nuclear Detection System for the interdiction and control of illicit radiological and nuclear materials. They are used by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other government agencies and organizations in various roles for border protection, law enforcement, and nonproliferation monitoring. In order to systematically document the operational performance of the common commercial off-the-shelf portable radiation detection systems, the DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office conducted a test and evaluation campaign conducted at the Nevada Test Site from January 18 to February 27, 2006. Named 'Anole', it was the first test of its kind in terms of technical design and test complexities. The Anole test results offer users information for selecting appropriate mission-specific portable radiation detection systems. The campaign also offered manufacturers the opportunity to submit their equipment for independent operationally relevant testing to subsequently improve their detector performance. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies of the DHS Anole portable radiation detection system test campaign.

  11. Field testing the wildlink capture collar on wolves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; Gese, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Seventeen Wildlink capture collars were tested 61 times on 18 gray wolves (Canis lupus) during 1989-1991 in the Superior National Forest of northeastern Minnesota. Overall success rate was 89%, and most failures were attributable to premature battery expiration. When batteries were changed .ltoreq. every 2 months, 17 of 17 tests succeeded. With an upgraded version of the collar in which batteries lasted longer, 17 of 18 tests succeeded. Over the 2-year study, 6 of the 17 collars were lost. For serially recapturing individuals, the Wildlink collar proved useful and reliable if care was taken to replace batteries at proper intervals.

  12. Furan toxicity on testes and protective role of lycopene in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Özlem; Baş, Hatice; Pandır, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Objective Furan (C4H4O) is a heat-induced food contaminant that is utilized as an industrial chemical agent. Lycopene is a natural substance that is produced by plants and tomatoes. We aimed to evaluate the toxicity of furan on testes and the protective effect of lycopene in diabetic rats. Material and Methods Male Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: Group 1 (control group) received 1 mL/kg corn oil. Group 2 (diabetic control group) received 55 mg/kg STZ and 1 mL/kg corn oil. Group 3 (diabetic lycopene group) received 55 mg/kg STZ and 4 mg/kg lycopene. Group 4 (diabetic furan group) received 55 mg/kg STZ and 40 mg/kg furan. Group 5 (diabetic furan + lycopene group) received 55 mg/kg STZ, 40 mg/kg furan, and 4 mg/kg lycopene. After 28 days, the testes were extirpated in all groups. In the testicular tissue samples, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reducted glutathione (GST) were studied. Serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were measured. Histopathologic examination was performed by light microscope. Results The MDA level and the activities of CAT, GPx, SOD, and GST were found to be higher in the furan group than in the control and diabetic control groups (p<0.05). The MDA level and the activities of CAT, GPx, SOD, and GST were significantly lower in the furan + lycopene group than in the furan group (p<0.05). Conclusion The low blood testosterone level in the rats who received furan suggested the presence of endocrinological defects and cellular degenerative changes. Lycopene may be effective to reverse furan toxicity in diabetic rat testes. PMID:27990087

  13. Use of the light/dark test for anxiety in adult and adolescent male rats.

    PubMed

    Arrant, Andrew E; Schramm-Sapyta, Nicole L; Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2013-11-01

    The light/dark (LD) test is a commonly used rodent test of unconditioned anxiety-like behavior that is based on an approach/avoidance conflict between the drive to explore novel areas and an aversion to brightly lit, open spaces. We used the LD test to investigate developmental differences in behavior between adolescent (postnatal day (PN) 28-34) and adult (PN67-74) male rats. We investigated whether LD behavioral measures reflect anxiety-like behavior similarly in each age group using factor analysis and multiple regression. These analyses showed that time in the light compartment, percent distance in the light, rearing, and latency to emerge into the light compartment were measures of anxiety-like behavior in each age group, while total distance traveled and distance in the dark compartment provided indices of locomotor activity. We then used these measures to assess developmental differences in baseline LD behavior and the response to anxiogenic drugs. Adolescent rats emerged into the light compartment more quickly than adults and made fewer pokes into the light compartment. These age differences could reflect greater risk taking and less risk assessment in adolescent rats than adults. Adolescent rats were less sensitive than adults to the anxiogenic effects of the benzodiazepine inverse agonist N-methyl-β-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142) and the α₂ adrenergic antagonist yohimbine on anxiety-like behaviors validated by factor analysis, but locomotor variables were similarly affected. These data support the results of the factor analysis and indicate that GABAergic and noradrenergic modulation of LD anxiety-like behavior may be immature during adolescence.

  14. Effects of chronic and acute stress on rat behaviour in the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Suvrathan, Aparna; Tomar, Anupratap; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2010-11-01

    Stress and depression may share common neural plasticity mechanisms. Importantly, the development and reversal of stress-induced plasticity requires time. These temporal aspects, however, are not captured fully in the forced-swim test (FST), a behavioural model for testing antidepressant efficacy, used originally in naïve animals. The present study probed whether and how a rodent model of stress affects behaviour in the FST over time. We found that the intensity and duration of stress are critical in the development of depressive symptoms in male Wistar rats (n = 37) as tested in the FST. Chronic immobilization stress (2 h/day for 10 days) elicited a range of responses, from low to high values of immobility in the FST on day 1, and subsequent immobility on day 2 was inversely related to individual day 1 values. As a whole, chronically stressed rats did not exhibit any significant change in immobility either on day 1 or day 2 compared to control rats. However, climbing behaviour was reduced uniformly from day 1 to day 2, despite the differences in immobility. In contrast, a separate group of rats (n = 30) subjected to the same chronic stressor displayed a significant reduction in open-arm exploration in the elevated plus maze, indicative of a robust increase in anxiety-like behaviour. Furthermore, when the 10-day chronic stress paradigm was reduced to a single 2-h episode of immobilization stress, it triggered a uniform day 1 to day 2 increase in immobility, which was not persistent 10 days later. These results highlight a need for closer examination of the ways in which stress-induced modulation of behaviour in the FST may be used and interpreted in future studies aimed at exploring connections between stress and depression.

  15. Marked rapid alterations in nocturnal pineal serotonin metabolism in mice and rats exposed to weak intermittent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lerchl, A.; Nonaka, K.O.; Stokkan, K.A.; Reiter, R.J. )

    1990-05-31

    Adult AMES mice and male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to an artificial magnetic field, generated by Helmholtz coils. 3.5 hours after the onset of darkness the coils were activated for one hour resulting in an inversion of the horizontal component of the earth's magnetic field. The coils were activated and deactivated at 5 min intervals during the 1 hour exposure period. In both mice and rats, the levels of serotonin in the pineal were markedly increased by the exposure. In rats, an increase of pineal 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and a decrease of the activity of the pineal enzyme serotonin-N-acetyltransferase also was observed. However, pineal and serum melatonin levels were not altered. The results indicate that the metabolism of serotonin in the pineal is quickly affected by the exposure of animals to a magnetic field.

  16. CATION TRANSPORT AND PARTITIONING DURING A FIELD TEST OF ELECTROOSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of soil properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and mineral content, on pH, soluble ion concentrations, and electrical conductivity during electroosmosis in a silty clay soil. The soil is composed mainly of quartz ...

  17. Laboratory and Field Tests of Ultrasonic Sensors for Precision Sprayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliable function of sensors under rough field conditions is required for the development of variable-rate sprayers to deliver pest control agents to tree liners in ornamental nurseries. Two ultrasonic sensors were examined to identify how their durability and detection stability would be influenced...

  18. 47 CFR 73.1515 - Special field test authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... immediate direction of an operator holding a commercial radio operator license (any class, unless otherwise... Section 73.1515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.1515 Special field...

  19. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan C.; Resor, Brian R.; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  20. Soldier Performance Research Project: Armor Field and SIMNET Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    Event 5. The crew will react to an ATGM ambush. The TC must issue the contact report and fire command (both timed). The tank should take evasive ...Cammand’s (TEXO34) Armor and Engineer Board who conducted the Soldier Performance Research Project (SPRP) Armor tests: MC Royce Simson, Test Director CPI...the Soldier Performance Research Project (SPP), the Armor portion was conducted in two phases to provide a rigorous assessment of the cognitive skill

  1. A field test of attractant traps for invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) in southern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, R.N.; Hart, K.M.; Rodda, G.H.; Mazzotti, F.J.; Snow, R.W.; Cherkiss, M.; Rozar, R.; Goetz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus bivittatus) are established over thousands of square kilometres of southern Florida, USA, and consume a wide range of native vertebrates. Few tools are available to control the python population, and none of the available tools have been validated in the field to assess capture success as a proportion of pythons available to be captured. Aims. Our primary aim was to conduct a trap trial for capturing invasive pythons in an area east of Everglades National Park, where many pythons had been captured in previous years, to assess the efficacy of traps for population control.Wealso aimed to compare results of visual surveys with trap capture rates, to determine capture rates of non-target species, and to assess capture rates as a proportion of resident pythons in the study area. Methods.Weconducted a medium-scale (6053 trap nights) experiment using two types of attractant traps baited with live rats in the Frog Pond area east of Everglades National Park.Wealso conducted standardised and opportunistic visual surveys in the trapping area. Following the trap trial, the area was disc harrowed to expose pythons and allow calculation of an index of the number of resident pythons. Key results. We captured three pythons and 69 individuals of various rodent, amphibian, and reptile species in traps. Eleven pythons were discovered during disc harrowing operations, as were large numbers of rodents. Conclusions. The trap trial captured a relatively small proportion of the pythons that appeared to be present in the study area, although previous research suggests that trap capture rates improve with additional testing of alternative trap designs. Potential negative impacts to non-target species were minimal. Low python capture rates may have been associated with extremely high local prey abundances during the trap experiment. Implications. Results of this trial illustrate many of the challenges in implementing and interpreting results

  2. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Waugh, W.J.; Albright, W.H.; Smith, G.M.; Bush, R.P.

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  3. 3D video analysis of the novel object recognition test in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Jumpei; Uehara, Takashi; Urakawa, Susumu; Takamura, Yusaku; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Suzuki, Michio; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2014-10-01

    The novel object recognition (NOR) test has been widely used to test memory function. We developed a 3D computerized video analysis system that estimates nose contact with an object in Long Evans rats to analyze object exploration during NOR tests. The results indicate that the 3D system reproducibly and accurately scores the NOR test. Furthermore, the 3D system captures a 3D trajectory of the nose during object exploration, enabling detailed analyses of spatiotemporal patterns of object exploration. The 3D trajectory analysis revealed a specific pattern of object exploration in the sample phase of the NOR test: normal rats first explored the lower parts of objects and then gradually explored the upper parts. A systematic injection of MK-801 suppressed changes in these exploration patterns. The results, along with those of previous studies, suggest that the changes in the exploration patterns reflect neophobia to a novel object and/or changes from spatial learning to object learning. These results demonstrate that the 3D tracking system is useful not only for detailed scoring of animal behaviors but also for investigation of characteristic spatiotemporal patterns of object exploration. The system has the potential to facilitate future investigation of neural mechanisms underlying object exploration that result from dynamic and complex brain activity.

  4. A composite neurobehavioral test to evaluate acute functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Nowrangi, Derek; Kaur, Harpreet; Wu, Guangyong; Huang, Lei; Lekic, Tim; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2017-01-01

    Cerebellar haemorrhage accounts for 5-10% of all intracerebral haemorrhages and leads to severe, long-lasting functional deficits. Currently, there is limited research on this stroke subtype, which may be due to the lack of a suitable composite neuroscoring system specific for cerebellar injury in rodents. The purpose of this study is to develop a comprehensive composite neuroscore test for cerebellar injury using a rat model of cerebellar haemorrhage. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or cerebellar haemorrhage. Twenty-four hours post-injury, neurological behaviour was evaluated using 17 cost-effective and easy-to-perform tests, and a composite neuroscore was developed. The composite neuroscore was then used to assess functional recovery over seven days after cerebellar haemorrhage. Differences in the composite neuroscore deficits for the mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage models were observed for up to five days post-ictus. Until now, a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was not available for rodent studies. Herein, using mild and moderate cerebellar haemorrhage rat models a composite neuroscore for cerebellar injury was developed and used to assess functional deficits after cerebellar haemorrhage. This composite neuroscore may also be useful for other cerebellar injury models.

  5. Effect of dietary iron source and iron status on iron bioavailability tests in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Hendricks, D.G.; Mahoney, A.W.

    1986-03-05

    Weanling male rats were made anemic in 7 days by feeding a low iron diet and bleeding. Healthy rats were fed the low iron diet supplemented with ferrous sulfate (29 ppm Fe). Each group was subdivided and fed for 10 days on test diets containing about 29 ppm iron that were formulated with meat:spinach mixtures or meat:soy mixtures to provided 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, or 0:100% of the dietary iron from these sources or from a ferrous sulfate diet. After 3 days on the diets all rats were dosed orally with 2 or 5 micro curries of /sup 59/Fe after a 18 hour fast and refeeding for 1.5 hours. Iron status influenced liver iron, carcass iron, liver radio activity and percent of radioactive dose retained. Diet influenced fecal iron and apparent absorption of iron. In iron bioavailability studies assessment methodology and iron status of the test subject greatly influences the estimates of the value of dietary sources of iron.

  6. Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-03-01

    The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single-family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings. Builders and practitioners have found that fire-resistance rated wall assemblies are a major source of difficulty in air sealing/compartmentalization, particularly in townhouse construction. This problem is exacerbated when garages are “tucked in” to the units and living space is located over the garages. In this project, Building Science Corporation examined the taping of exterior sheathing details to improve air sealing results in townhouse and multifamily construction, when coupled with a better understanding of air leakage pathways. Current approaches are cumbersome, expensive, time consuming, and ineffective; these details were proposed as a more effective and efficient method. The effectiveness of these air sealing methods was tested with blower door testing, including “nulled” or “guarded” testing (adjacent units run at equal test pressure to null out inter-unit air leakage, or “pressure neutralization”). Pressure diagnostics were used to evaluate unit-to-unit connections and series leakage pathways (i.e., air leakage from exterior, into the fire-resistance rated wall assembly, and to the interior).

  7. Field testing the prototype BNL fan-atomized oil burner

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.; Celebi, Y.

    1995-04-01

    BNL has developed a new oil burner design referred to as the Fan Atomized burner System. The primary objective of the field study was to evaluate and demonstrate the reliable operation of the Fan Atomized Burner. The secondary objective was to establish and validate the ability of a low firing rate burner (0.3-0.4 gph) to fully satisfy the heating and domestic hot water load demands of an average household in a climate zone with over 5,000 heating-degree-days. The field activity was also used to evaluate the practicality of side-wall venting with the Fan Atomized Burner with a low stack temperature (300F) and illustrate the potential for very high efficiency with an integrated heating system approach based on the Fan Atomized Burner.

  8. Histological evaluation of the influence of magnetic field application in autogenous bone grafts in rats

    PubMed Central

    Puricelli, Edela; Dutra, Nardier B; Ponzoni, Deise

    2009-01-01

    Background Bone grafts are widely used in oral and maxillofacial reconstruction. The influence of electromagnetic fields and magnets on the endogenous stimulation of target tissues has been investigated. This work aimed to assess the quality of bone healing in surgical cavities filled with autogenous bone grafts, under the influence of a permanent magnetic field produced by in vivo buried devices. Methods Metal devices consisting of commercially pure martensitic stainless steel washers and titanium screws were employed. Thirty male Wistar rats were divided into 3 experimental and 3 control groups. A surgical bone cavity was produced on the right femur, and a bone graft was collected and placed in each hole. Two metallic washers, magnetized in the experimental group but not in the control group, were attached on the borders of the cavity. Results The animals were sacrificed on postoperative days 15, 45 and 60. The histological analysis of control and experimental samples showed adequate integration of the bone grafts, with intense bone neoformation. On days 45 and 60, a continued influence of the magnetic field on the surgical cavity and on the bone graft was observed in samples from the experimental group. Conclusion The results showed intense bone neoformation in the experimental group as compared to control animals. The intense extra-cortical bone neoformation observed suggests that the osteoconductor condition of the graft may be more susceptible to stimulation, when submitted to a magnetic field. PMID:19134221

  9. Effect of the nootropic drug oxiracetam on field potentials of rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, A. M.; Corradetti, R.; Ballerini, L.; Pepeu, G.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of the nootropic drug oxiracetam on hippocampal neurotransmission was investigated in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampal slice in vitro by use of extracellular recordings. 2. Superfusion of oxiracetam (0.1-100 microM) produced a concentration-dependent, wash-resistant (greater than 90 min), increase in initial slope and amplitude of the dendritic field excitatory postsynaptic potential (e.p.s.p.). This increase was maximal at a concentration of 1 microM (70%). 3. Input-output curves relating the initial slope to the amplitude of the afferent volley were significantly (P less than 0.05) steeper and showed a greater maximal response in the presence of 1 microM oxiracetam than in control conditions. 4. Two trains of high frequency stimulation (100 Hz, 0.4 s, 5 min apart) delivered in the stratum radiatum 30 min after washout of oxiracetam (1 microM) still elicited a long-term potentiation (LTP) of the field e.p.s.p. However, the absolute magnitude of the LTP produced did not differ from that obtained in untreated slices. 5. After induction and establishment of LTP, oxiracetam (1 microM) had a smaller (27%) and reversible effect on the evoked field e.p.s.p. 6. D-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5), at the same concentration (50 microM) which in our conditions prevented the induction of LTP, blocked the action of 1 microM oxiracetam and strongly depressed the effect of higher concentrations of the nootropic drug. 7. It is concluded that oxiracetam provokes an enduring increase of neurotransmission in the CA1 rat hippocampal region.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1970492

  10. Lack of Teratological Effects in Rats Exposed to 20 or 60 kHz Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Izumi; Oshima, Atsushi; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Negishi, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A risk assessment of magnetic field (MF) exposure conducted by the World Health Organization indicated the need for biological studies on primary hazard identification and quantitative risk evaluation of intermediate frequency (300 Hz–100 kHz) MFs. Because induction heating cookers generate such MFs for cooking, reproductive and developmental effects are a concern due to the close proximity of the fields' source to a cook's abdomen. METHODS: Pregnant Crl:CD(SD) rats (25/group) were exposed to a 20 kHz, 0.2 mT(rms) or 60 kHz, 0.1 mT(rms) sinusoidal MF or sham-exposed for 22 hr/day during organogenesis, and their fetuses were examined for malformations on gestation day 20. All teratological evaluations were conducted in a blind fashion, and experiments were duplicated for each frequency to confirm consistency of experimental outcomes. RESULTS: No exposure-related changes were found in clinical signs, gross pathology, or number of implantation losses. The number of live fetuses and low-body-weight fetuses as well as the incidence of external, visceral, and skeletal malformations in the fetuses did not indicate significant differences between MF-exposed and sham-exposed groups. Although some fetuses showed isolated changes in sex ratio and skeletal variation and ossification, such changes were neither reproduced in duplicate experiments nor were they common to specific field frequencies. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure of rats to MFs during organogenesis did not show significant reproducible teratogenicity under experimental conditions. Present findings do not support the hypothesis that intermediate frequency MF exposure after implantation carries a significant risk for developing mammalian fetuses. Birth Defects Res (Part B) 92:469–477, 2011. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21770026

  11. Far-Field Antenna Pattern From a Near-Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Galindo-Israel, V.; Mittra, R.

    1982-01-01

    Plane/polar geometry simplifies measurement of near-field data for this antenna and allows a determination of far-field pattern by Jacobi-Bessel series expansion of data. Measuring probe is an undersized, dielectrically loaded and open-ended waveguide with a far-field pattern similar to that of a small magnetic dipole in its forward directions, making it unnecessary to rotate probe in direction similar to antenna rotation.

  12. Tyndall AFB Bomb Damage Repair Field Test, Documentation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    was not tested, as bping Irrele- vant to these tests. Simulation of this event was not attempted because it would have provided little or no...Richardson, Texas, Report No. AFWL-TR-71-42, October 1971. 11. Bussone, P.S., B.J. Bottomley, and G.C. Hoff , Rapid Repair of Bomb- Damaged Runways...Airfield Runways, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Klrtland AFB, New Mexico, Report No. AFWL-TR-73-214, February 1974. 19. Hoff , George C, Investigation of

  13. Measurement of the bioavailability of iron, using the rat hemoglobin repletion test.

    PubMed

    Fritz, J C; Pla, G W; Harrison, B N; Clark, G A; Smith, E A

    1978-05-01

    Variations in the AOAC official first action rat hemoglobin repletion test for iron were studied. These changes included (1) use of a simplified basal diet to eliminate ingredients which sometimes contribute too much iron; (2) increased fortification of the basal diet with vitamin E, pantothenic acid, and pyridoxine; (3) increased dietary copper; (4) variations in the carbohydrate source in the basal diet; (5) changes in the length of the depletion and repletion periods; and (6) comparison of prophylactic and curative procedures. The changes yielded results comparable to those obtained with the present official method. Further study may reveal that the depletion period can be shortened or eliminated. To fully meet the rat's vitamin requirements, increased levels of vitamin E, pantothenic acid, and pyridoxine are recommended. It is further recommended that the present method remain in official first action status, and that study be continued.

  14. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  15. Moving from the laboratory to the field: Adding natural environmental conditions to toxicology testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    While laboratory toxicology tests are generally easy to perform, cost effective and readily interpreted, they have been criticized for being unrealistic. In contrast, field tests are considered realistic while producing results that are difficult to interpret and expensive. To ...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.910 - PEMS auxiliary equipment for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Field Testing and Portable Emission Measurement... overload the power system. (ii) The engine emissions do not change significantly as a result of the...

  17. Effects of prenatal exposure to a 900 MHz electromagnetic field on 60-day-old rat testis and epididymal sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Odacı, E; Hancı, H; Yuluğ, E; Türedi, S; Aliyazıcıoğlu, Y; Kaya, H; Çolakoğlu, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of exposure in utero to a 900 megahertz (MHz) electromagnetic field (EMF) on 60-day-old rat testis and epididymis. Pregnant rats were divided into control (CG; no treatment) and EMF (EMFG) groups. The EMFG was exposed to 900 MHz EMF for 1 h each day during days 13 - 21 of pregnancy. Newborn rats were either newborn CG (NCG) or newborn EMF groups (NEMFG). On postnatal day 60, a testis and epididymis were removed from each animal. Epididymal semen quality, and lipid and DNA oxidation levels, apoptotic index and histopathological damage to the testis were compared. We found a higher apoptotic index, greater DNA oxidation levels and lower sperm motility and vitality in the NEMFG compared to controls. Immature germ cells in the seminiferous tubule lumen, and altered seminiferous tubule epithelium and seminiferous tubule structure also were observed in hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of NEMFG testis. Nuclear changes that indicated apoptosis were identified in TUNEL stained sections and large numbers of apoptotic cells were observed in most of the seminiferous tubule epithelium in the NEMFG. Sixty-day-old rat testes exposed to 900 MHz EMF exhibited altered sperm quality and biochemical characteristics.

  18. Effects of static magnetic field and cadmium on oxidative stress and DNA damage in rat cortex brain and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Douki, Thierry; Garrel, Catherine; Favier, Alain; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2011-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of co-exposure to static magnetic field (SMF) and cadmium (Cd) on the antioxidant enzymes activity and DNA integrity in rat brain. Sub-chronic exposure to CdCl (CdCl(2), 40 mg/L, per os) for 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in antioxidant enzyme activity such as the glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Total GSH were decreased in the frontal cortex of the Cd-exposed group. Cd exposure induced an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Moreover, the same exposure increased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-desoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) level in rat brain. Interestingly, the combined effect of SMF (128 mT, 1 hour/day for 30 consecutive days) and CdCl (40 mg/L, per os) decreased the SOD activity and glutathione level in frontal cortex as compared with the Cd group. Moreover, the association between SMF and Cd increased MDA concentration in frontal cortex as compared with Cd-exposed rats. DNA analysis revealed that SMF exposure failed to alter 8-oxodGuo concentration in Cd-exposed rats. Our data showed that Cd exposure altered the antioxidant enzymes activity and induced oxidative DNA lesions in rat brain. The combined effect of SMF and Cd increased oxidative damage in rat brain as compared with Cd-exposed rats.

  19. Pancreas Transplantation Delays the Progression of Morphological, Morphometric and Ultrastructural Changes in Testes of Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Tadeu Spadella, César; Teixeira Trindade, Amélia Arcângela; Natália Lucchesi, Amanda; Sperandéo de Macedo, Célia

    2017-02-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of pancreas transplantation on the progression of testicular lesions in diabetic rats. Methods: Diabetic rats were subjected to pancreas transplantation and sacrificed after 6, 14, 26 and 50 weeks of follow-up, using non-diabetic and untreated diabetic rats as controls. Results: Successful pancreas transplantation corrected all of the metabolic changes observed in diabetic rats, including low levels of testosterone. The testicular mass was decreased, and the relative weight of the testes was high in diabetic rats. The seminiferous tubules of diabetic rats showed progressive atrophy of the germinal epithelium, with cytoplasmic vacuolization, detachment of germ cells to the tubular lumen and the appearance of giant cells. Leydig cells were abnormally distributed, and hyperplasia of Sertoli cells was observed. Sperm were not detectable within the tubular lumen in late follow-up. The diameter, total area, lumen area, and germinal epithelium area of the seminiferous tubules were low, and tubular density was high in diabetic rats. Ultrastructural changes were also observed in these rats, compromising the cytoplasm, organelles and cellular nuclei of the germ, Sertoli, and Leydig cells. The most frequent changes consisted of accumulation of lipid droplets and electron-dense dark material in the cell cytoplasm, cellular degeneration and apoptosis. Similar to non-diabetic rats, pancreas-transplanted rats showed progressive testicular lesions, but they were much less severe and occurred much later than in the untreated diabetic controls. Conclusion: Diabetes causes morphological and ultrastructural changes in rat testes, but the progression of lesions can be significantly delayed by successful pancreas transplantation, which may have a positive impact on male infertility due to diabetes.

  20. The effects of a 50-Hz magnetic field on the cardiovascular system in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ling; Wan, Baoquan; Liu, Xingfa; Zhang, Yemao; Lai, Jinsheng; Ruan, Guoran; He, Mengying; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    A 50-Hz magnetic field (MF) is a potential health-risk factor. Its effects on the cardiovascular system have not been fully investigated. This study was conducted to explore the effects of long-term exposure to a 50-Hz MF on the cardiovascular system. In the study, an exposure system was constructed, and the distribution of the 50-Hz MF was determined. Sixty-four Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to a 50-Hz MF at 100 μT for 24 weeks, 20 h per day, while another 64 rats were sham exposed. During the exposure, blood pressure was measured every 4 weeks. After 24 weeks, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization and electrocardiography were performed. Moreover, heart and body weight were recorded, and haematoxylin–eosin staining and real-time PCR were conducted. The results showed that compared with the sham group, exposure to a 50-Hz MF did not exert any effects on blood pressure, pulse rate, heart rate or cardiac rhythm. Furthermore, echocardiography and cardiac catheterization showed that there were no significant differences in the cardiac morphology or haemodynamics. In addition, histopathological examination showed that exposure to a 50-Hz MF had no effects on the structure of the heart. Finally, expression of the cardiac hypertrophy–related genes did not show any significant differences between the 50-Hz MF exposure group and the sham group. Taken together, in SD rats, exposure to a 50-Hz/100 μT MF for 24 weeks did not show any obvious effects on the cardiovascular system. PMID:27694282

  1. Impact of Acrylamide on Calcium Signaling and Cytoskeletal Filaments in Testes From F344 Rat.

    PubMed

    Recio, Leslie; Friedman, Marvin; Marroni, Dennis; Maynor, Timothy; Chepelev, Nikolai L

    Acrylamide (AA) at high exposure levels is neurotoxic, induces testicular toxicity, and increases dominant lethal mutations in rats. RNA-sequencing in testes was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEG), explore AA-induced pathway perturbations that could contribute to AA-induced testicular toxicity and then used to derive a benchmark dose (BMD). Male F344/DuCrl rats were administered 0.0, 0.5, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, or 12.0 mg AA/kg bw/d in drinking water for 5, 15, or 31 days. The experimental design used exposure levels that spanned and exceeded the exposure levels used in the rat dominant lethal, 2-generation reproductive toxicology, and cancer bioassays. The time of sample collection was based on previous studies that developed gene expression-based BMD. At 12.0 mg/kg, there were 38, 33, and 65 DEG ( P value <.005; fold change >1.5) in the testes after 5, 15, or 31 days of exposure, respectively. At 31 days, there was a dose-dependent increase in the number of DEG, and at 12.0 mg/kg/d the top three functional clusters affected by AA exposure were actin filament organization, response to calcium ion, and regulation of cell proliferation. The BMD lower 95% confidence limit using DEG ranged from 1.8 to 6.8 mg/kg compared to a no-observed-adverse-effect-level of 2.0 mg/kg/d for male reproductive toxicity. These results are consistent with the known effects of AA on calcium signaling and cytoskeletal actin filaments leading to neurotoxicity and suggest that AA can cause rat dominant lethal mutations by these same mechanisms leading to impaired chromosome segregation during cell division.

  2. EZVI Injection Field Test Leads to Pilot-Scale Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing and monitoring of emulsified zero-valent ironTM (EZVI) injections was conducted at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Launch Complex 34, FL, in 2002 to 2005 to evaluate the technology’s efficacy in enhancing in situ dehalogenation of dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) ...

  3. Field Test of an Epidemiology Curriculum for Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaelin, Mark A.; Huebner, Wendy W.; Nicolich, Mark J.; Kimbrough, Maudellyn L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a middle school epidemiology curriculum called Detectives in the Classroom. The curriculum presents epidemiology as the science of public health, using health-related issues that capture the interest of young students and help prepare them to make evidence-based health-related decisions.…

  4. Preparing Undergraduate Students for the Major Field Test in Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisalski, Heather Cooper; Helms, Marilyn M.; Whitesell, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Many business programs address the learning of undergraduate students with an exit exam. A reference librarian and the business school faculty created an online test preparation study guide (or LibGuide) which included no-cost resources that were readily available yet academically authoritative to aid students in studying for the Educational…

  5. Catalase in testes and epididymidis of wistar rats fed zinc deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Bedwal, S; Prasad, S; Nair, N; Saini, M R; Bedwal, R S

    2009-01-01

    Catalase activities have been evaluated in testes and caput and cauda epididymis of Wistar rats fed on zinc deficient diet for 2 and 4 weeks. The enzyme activity has been measured as chromic acetate formed by heating of dichromate (in acetic acid) in presence of H(2) O(2) with perchromic acid as an unstable intermediate. Observed non-significant increase in catalase activity in testes as well as in caput and cauda epididymis of 2 weeks experiments has been related to low levels of H(2) O(2) produced in two organs whereas significant (P<0.01/0.001) increase in catalase activity in 4-weeks experiments indicate for increased oxidative stress due to phagocytotic activity of Sertoli cells in testes and damaged spermatozoa in epididymis. Thus, zinc deficiency increases catalase activity in testes and epididymis.

  6. Comparing performances of logistic regression and neural networks for predicting melatonin excretion patterns in the rat exposed to ELF magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Jahandideh, Samad; Abdolmaleki, Parviz; Movahedi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2010-02-01

    Various studies have been reported on the bioeffects of magnetic field exposure; however, no consensus or guideline is available for experimental designs relating to exposure conditions as yet. In this study, logistic regression (LR) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used in order to analyze and predict the melatonin excretion patterns in the rat exposed to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF). Subsequently, on a database containing 33 experiments, performances of LR and ANNs were compared through resubstitution and jackknife tests. Predictor variables were more effective parameters and included frequency, polarization, exposure duration, and strength of magnetic fields. Also, five performance measures including accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC) and normalized percentage, better than random (S) were used to evaluate the performance of models. The LR as a conventional model obtained poor prediction performance. Nonetheless, LR distinguished the duration of magnetic fields as a statistically significant parameter. Also, horizontal polarization of magnetic fields with the highest logit coefficient (or parameter estimate) with negative sign was found to be the strongest indicator for experimental designs relating to exposure conditions. This means that each experiment with horizontal polarization of magnetic fields has a higher probability to result in "not changed melatonin level" pattern. On the other hand, ANNs, a more powerful model which has not been introduced in predicting melatonin excretion patterns in the rat exposed to ELF-MF, showed high performance measure values and higher reliability, especially obtaining 0.55 value of MCC through jackknife tests. Obtained results showed that such predictor models are promising and may play a useful role in defining guidelines for experimental designs relating to exposure conditions. In conclusion, analysis of the bioelectromagnetic data could result in

  7. Protective Effect of Quinine on Chemical Kindling and Passive Avoidance Test in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Faridkia, Zahra; Yaghmaei, Parichehr; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Background In humans, convulsive diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy are usually accompanied by learning and memory impairments. In recent years, the role of gap junction channels as an important target of antiepileptic drugs has been studied and discussed. Quinine, as a gap junction blocker of connexin 36, can abolish ictal epileptiform activity in brain slices. Objectives The role of quinine in memory retrieval in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled rats was examined using a step-through passive avoidance task. Methods Forty rats were used in this experimental study in groups of 10 animals. Quinine (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg, i.p.) and PTZ (35 mg/kg, i.p.) were injected into the rats before the start of the learning test. Then, retention tests were conducted after the treatments ended. Results Quinine could attenuate seizure severity at doses of 15, 30 and 60 mg/kg compared with the control at the beginning of the kindling experiment by lowering the mean seizure stages (P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.001). Quinine at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg could significantly increase memory retrieval compared with the control in the retention test 24 and 48 hours after training (P < 0.05). Quinine at a dose of 60 mg/kg increased latency to enter the dark chamber 24 and 48 hours after training (P < 0.001). The results of the retention test one and two weeks after training of quinine were not significant (P > 0.05). Conclusions Quinine may decrease the severity of seizure and improve the memory retrieval of animals by inhibiting the gap junction channel. However, further studies are needed to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of quinine. PMID:28144451

  8. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) promote early wound healing and myofibroblast proliferation in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Cheing, Gladys Lai-Ying; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lin; Kwan, Rachel Lai-Chu; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen

    2014-04-01

    Reduced collagen deposition possibly leads to slow recovery of tensile strength in the healing process of diabetic cutaneous wounds. Myofibroblasts are transiently present during wound healing and play a key role in wound closure and collagen synthesis. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) have been shown to enhance the tensile strength of diabetic wounds. In this study, we examined the effect of PEMF on wound closure and the presence of myofibroblasts in Sprague-Dawley rats after diabetic induction using streptozotocin. A full-thickness square-shaped dermal wound (2 cm × 2 cm) was excised aseptically on the shaved dorsum. The rats were randomly divided into PEMF-treated (5 mT, 25 Hz, 1 h daily) and control groups. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between the groups in blood glucose level and body weight. However, PEMF treatment significantly enhanced wound closure (days 10 and 14 post-wounding) and re-epithelialization (day 10 post-wounding), although these improvements were no longer observed at later stages of the wound healing process. Using immunohistochemistry against α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), we demonstrated that significantly more myofibroblasts were detected on days 7 and 10 post-wounding in the PEMF group when compared to the control group. We hypothesized that PEMF would increase the myofibroblast population, contributing to wound closure during diabetic wound healing.

  9. Continuous Force Decoding from Local Field Potentials of the Primary Motor Cortex in Freely Moving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Abed; Heydari Beni, Nargess; Shalchyan, Vahid; Daliri, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Local field potential (LFP) signals recorded by intracortical microelectrodes implanted in primary motor cortex can be used as a high informative input for decoding of motor functions. Recent studies show that different kinematic parameters such as position and velocity can be inferred from multiple LFP signals as precisely as spiking activities, however, continuous decoding of the force magnitude from the LFP signals in freely moving animals has remained an open problem. Here, we trained three rats to press a force sensor for getting a drop of water as a reward. A 16-channel micro-wire array was implanted in the primary motor cortex of each trained rat, and obtained LFP signals were used for decoding of the continuous values recorded by the force sensor. Average coefficient of correlation and the coefficient of determination between decoded and actual force signals were r = 0.66 and R2 = 0.42, respectively. We found that LFP signal on gamma frequency bands (30–120 Hz) had the most contribution in the trained decoding model. This study suggests the feasibility of using low number of LFP channels for the continuous force decoding in freely moving animals resembling BMI systems in real life applications. PMID:27767063

  10. The effects of 30 mT electromagnetic fields on hippocampus cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Teimori, Farzaneh; Khaki, Amir A.; Rajabzadeh, Asghar; Roshangar, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the use of electromagnetic waves in the treatment of some acute and chronic diseases, application of these waves in everyday life has created several problems for humans, especially the nerve system. In this study, the effects of 30mT electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the hippocampus is investigated. Methods: Twenty-four 5-month Wistar rats weighing 150–200 g were divided into two groups. The experimental group rats were under the influence of an EMF at an intensity of 3 mT for approximately 4 hours a day (from 8 AM to 12 PM) during 10 weeks. After the hippocampus was removed, thin slides were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) to study the ultrastructural tissue. Cell death detection POD kits were used to determine the apoptosis rate. Results: The results of the TEM showed that, in the hippocampus of the experimental group, in comparison to the control group, there was a substantial shift; even intracellular organelles such as the mitochondria were morphologically abnormal and uncertain. The number of apoptotic cells in the exposed group compared to the control group showed significant changes. Conclusions: Similar to numerous studies that have reported the effects of EMFs on nerves system, it was also confirmed in this lecture. Hence, the hippocampus which is important in regulating emotions, behavior, motivation, and memory functions, may be impaired by the negative impacts of EMFs. PMID:27453795

  11. Novel protective effects of pulsed electromagnetic field ischemia/reperfusion injury rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fenfen; Li, Wenwen; Li, Xinghui; Tran, Ba Hieu; Suguro, Rinkiko; Guan, Ruijuan; Hou, Cuilan; Wang, Huijuan; Zhang, Aijie; Zhu, Yichun; Zhu, YiZhun

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has shown the ability to regenerate tissue by promoting cell proliferation. In the present study, we investigated for the first time whether PEMF treatment could improve the myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and uncovered its underlying mechanisms. In our study, we demonstrated for the first time that extracorporeal PEMF has a novel effect on myocardial I/R injury. The number and function of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were increased in PEMF treating rats. The in vivo results showed that per-treatment of PEMF could significantly improve the cardiac function in I/R injury group. In addition, PEMF treatment also reduced the apoptosis of myocardial cells by up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptosis protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and down-regulating the expression of pro-apoptosis protein (Bax). In vitro, the results showed that PEMF treatment could significantly reduce the apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in primary neonatal rat cardiac ventricular myocytes (NRCMs) induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). In particular, PEMF increased the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which might be closely related to attenuated cell apoptosis by increasing the releasing of nitric oxide (NO). Therefore, our data indicated that PEMF could be a potential candidate for I/R injury. PMID:27780890

  12. Effects of low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields on plateau frostbite healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Mingke; Lou, Lin; Jiao, Lin; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Zhongming; Xu, Wenjuan; Geng, Xiliang; Song, Hongping

    2016-11-01

    Plateau frostbite (PF) treatments have remained a clinical challenge because this condition injures tissues in deep layers and affected tissues exhibit unique pathological characteristics. For instance, low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) can affect tissue restoration and penetrate tissues. Therefore, the effect of PEMF on PF healing should be investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of low-frequency PEMF on PF healing systematically. Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly and equally divided into three groups: normal control, partial thickness plateau frostbite (PTPF), and PTPF with low-frequency PEMF exposure (PTPF + PEMF). PTPF wounds were induced in the dorsum of the rats. The PTPF + PEMF group was exposed to low-frequency PEMF daily. During PF healing, wound microcirculation in each group was monitored through contrast ultrasonography. Wound appearance, histological observation, and wound tensile strength were also evaluated. Results showed that the rate of the microcirculation restoration of the PTPF + PEMF group was nearly 25% faster than that of the PTPF group, and wound appearance suggested that the healing of the PTPF group was slower than that of the PTPF + PEMF group. Histological observation revealed that PEMF accelerated the growth of different deep tissues, as confirmed by tensile strength examination. Low-frequency PEMF could penetrate PF tissues, promote their restoration, and provide a beneficial effect on PF healing. Therefore, this technique may be a potential alternative to treat PF.

  13. Cosmological tests of an axiverse-inspired quintessence field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Razieh; Grin, Daniel; Pradler, Josef; Raccanelli, Alvise; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the string axiverse idea, it has been suggested that the recent transition from decelerated to accelerated cosmic expansion is driven by an axion-like quintessence field with a sub-Planckian decay constant. The scenario requires that the axion field be rather near the maximum of its potential but is less finely tuned than other explanations of cosmic acceleration. The model is parametrized by an axion decay constant f , the axion mass m , and an initial misalignment angle |θi| which is close to π . In order to determine the m and θi values consistent with observations, these parameters are mapped onto observables: the Hubble parameter H (z ) at an angular-diameter distance dA(z ) to redshift z =0.57 , as well as the angular sound horizon of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale at z ≃0.57 by the BOSS survey and Planck measurements of CMB temperature anisotropies are then used to probe the {m ,f ,θi} parameter space. With current data, CMB constraints are the most powerful, allowing a fraction of only ˜0.2 of the parameter-space volume. Measurements of the BAO scale made using the SPHEREx or SKA experiments could go further, observationally distinguishing all but ˜10-2 or ˜10-5 of the parameter-space volume (allowed by simple priors) from the Λ CDM model.

  14. Roadside tree/pole crash barrier field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests was carried out to evaluate the performance of a crash barrier designed to protect the occupants of an automobile from serious injury. The JPL barrier design is a configuration of empty aluminum beverage cans contained in a tear-resistant bag which, in turn, is encased in a collapsible container made of plywood and steel. Tests were conducted with a driven vehicle impacting the barrier. The basic requirements of NCHRP Report 153 were followed except that speeds of 30 mph rather than 60 mph were used. Accelerometer readings on the driver's helmet showed that the driver was never subjected to dangerous decelerations, and never experienced more than temporary discomfort. Also, all of the requirements of the cited report were met. An extrapolation of data indicated that the JPL barrier installed in front of a tree or telephone pole along a roadside would also have met the requirements at a speed of 40 mph.

  15. Summary of Tray Pack Field Acceptance Tests and Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    test was conducted during 18-22 September 1984 at Fort Bragg, Fayetteville, NC. Eighteen items were tested since Turkey/Gravy, Chocolate Cake and...5.27 [3] (7.14) 5.54 [3] (7.08) 6.52 A (6.78) Chocolate Cake 4.63 R (6.68) 4 4.83 R (7.46) Egg Loaf w/Cheese 2.95 R (4.82) 3.33 R (5.24) 4.09 R (4.01...6.83) 7.3R A (6.60) Chocolate Pudding 5.52 [1] A (6.57) 5.49 [3) (6.64) 4.71 R (6.65) Turkey Sl w/Gravy [4) [4) 6.85 A Blueberry Cake [4] [4] 6.51 A

  16. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  17. Field Test of a Steam Condenser Heat Sink Concept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-01-01

    Research Branch, USA CRREL; and Marcus M. Greenberg, Mechanical Engi- neer, Research and Technology Division, U.S. Army Nuclear Power Group. The study...They were then most ably assisted by SP Brian Murray and SP Theodore Maffei in monitoring the test 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for 38 days. The...suspected ibai the steam rule had probably decieased, how- ever, a compaiison ol t’eed- waler iates indicates only a slight decrease m steam input

  18. Characterization of floating element balance for field panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsucker, J. Travis; Gardner, Harrison; Swain, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Multiple experiments were performed to investigate and characterize the uncertainty and bias of a through-hull flush mounted floating element balance designed to measure the hydrodynamic drag forces of biofouling and marine coatings on 25 x 30 cm test panels. The instrument is located in a wet well on the aft portion of a 27' Chris Craft Commander. Testing occurs over a series of speeds ranging from a Froude number of 0.50-2.20 on calm days (force 3 or less) in waters along the central east coast of Florida. Recent modifications have been made to the instrumentation in an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the system. This study compares frictional drag measurements of the floating element balance to those obtained using the Clauser chart and Preston tube methods for a smooth surface. Boundary layer velocity profiles are examined to understand the nature of the flow over the testing section. Roughness function values for 60 and 220 grit sandpaper were calculated from data obtained using the floating element balance. These values were compared with previous work to examine the overall bias of the methodology. Repeat measurements for a smooth panel were analyzed to characterize the overall uncertainty in the system. This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research under grants N00014-10-1-0919 and N00014-11-1-0915.

  19. Pressure-interference testing of the Sumikawa geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Ariki, K.; Kawano, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Pressure interference tests have been used to determine the permeability structure of the Sumikawa reservoir. Interference tests between wells S-4 and KY-1 have indicated the presence of a very high permeability (140 md) north-south channel in the altered andesite layer. Pressure buildup data from well SN-7D have provided indications of a high transmissivity (kh {approx} 18 darcy-meters) reservoir located in the granodiorite layer, lack of pressure response in nearby shutin Sumikawa wells implies that the reservoir penetrated by SN-7D is isolated from the shallower reservoir in the altered andesites. The ''altered andesite'' and the ''granodiorite'' formations constitute the principal geothermal aquifers at Sumikawa. Pressure interference tests (wells KY-1 and SB-2, and wells KY-2 and SB-3) have also confirmed the presence of moderately high transmissivity ({approx} 2 darcy-meters) dacitic layers in the ''marine-volcanic complex'' formation. Because of its low vertical permeability, the ''marine volcanic complex'' formation constitutes an attractive target for the reinjection of waste geothermal fluids.

  20. Parentage verification in field progeny testing program of Mehsana buffalo.

    PubMed

    Jakhesara, S J; Rank, D N; Kansara, J D; Parikh, R C; Patel, V M; Vataliya, P H; Solanki, J V

    2012-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to construct a multiplex microsatellite panel for parentage testing in Mehsana buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). The study was based on a total of 212 Mehsana buffalos (100 dams, 100 daughters, and 12 sires). Genomic DNA was extracted from blood and semen samples. A panel of 10 microsatellite markers (CSSM61, ILSTS29, ILSTS17, ILSTS28, CSSM57, CSSM22, ILSTS61, CSSM8, ETH152, and ILSTS11) was amplified in a single multiplex reaction and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis on an automated DNA sequencer. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.642 to 0.833 (mean 0.762). The total exclusion probability using 10 microsatellite loci with 1 known parent was 0.993. Seven out of 10 microsatellite loci revealed relatively high polymorphic information content (>0.7). Eighty-one daughters out of 100 daughters qualified by compatibility according to Mendelism. The results suggest that multiplex microsatellite panel is a fast, robust, reliable, and economic tool to verify the parentage as well as to assign the putative sire to daughters under progeny testing with very high accuracy and hence can be used in routine parentage testing.