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Sample records for rats small intestine

  1. Small intestine biopotentials in rats after hypokinesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groza, P.; Stanciu, C.

    To study the effect of hypokinesia on rats small intestine (jejunum and ileum) biopotentials it was first necessary to characterize it. Biopotentials were recorded by intracellular placed microelectrodes from oral and caudal segments of the small intestine. The character of rats small intestine biopotentials differs from that of other species (man, cat, rabbit, dog, e.a.), the slow waves (SW) being smaller and the frequency of basal electrical rhythm higher (31.23 c/min orally and 24.50 caudally). Spike potentials are inscribed on the descending slope of SW but frequently delayed in each successive wave with a regular interval. Hypokinesia obtained by keeping rats in small cages for two weeks create only little changes in intestine biopotentials. The only clear difference was the increase of the slow waves amplitude. The other parameters were not specifically changed.

  2. Streaming potentials in the rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, D. H.; Wright, E. M.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effect of adverse osmotic pressure gradients on fluid transfer and electrical potential across the wall of sacs of rat everted small intestine was investigated. 2. Addition of mannitol to the mucosal fluid produced a potential change of 0·062 mV/m-osM and a decrease in fluid transfer of 0·015 ml./m-osM/hr. This is consistent with the production of streaming potentials due to fluid movement through negatively charged pores in the intestine. 3. The solute-linked fluid movement does not pass through these negatively charged pores which are responsible for the streaming potentials. 4. From the magnitude and polarity of the streaming potential a value of —50 mV has been calculated for the zeta potential at the phase boundary in the pores. 5. Streaming potentials have been used to measure the equivalent pore radius, and a value of 4Å has been obtained. 6. It is concluded that electro-osmosis is not responsible for fluid transfer by the intestine, and the potential difference associated with hexose transfer is not electrokinetic in origin. PMID:5943002

  3. Melatonin protects rats from radiotherapy-induced small intestine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Moneim, Ahmed E Abdel; Ortiz, Francisco; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Molina-Navarro, María M; García-Verdugo, José M; Sayed, Ramy K A; Florido, Javier; Luna, Juan D; López, Luis Carlos; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity is among the most prevalent dose-limiting toxicities following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation enteropathy requires protection of the small intestine. However, despite the prevalence and burden of this pathology, there are currently no effective treatments for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity, and this pathology remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the changes induced in the rat small intestine after external irradiation of the tongue, and to explore the potential radio-protective effects of melatonin gel. Male Wistar rats were subjected to irradiation of their tongues with an X-Ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator, receiving a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days. For 21 days post-irradiation, rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin gel or vehicle, by local application into their mouths. Our results showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment, and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation were involved in the development of radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity. Oral treatment with melatonin gel had a protective effect in the small intestine, which was associated with mitochondrial protection and, consequently, with a reduced inflammatory response, blunting the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation. Thus, rats treated with melatonin gel showed reduced intestinal apoptosis, relieving mucosal dysfunction and facilitating intestinal mucosa recovery. Our findings suggest that oral treatment with melatonin gel may be a potential preventive therapy for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity in cancer patients.

  4. Melatonin protects rats from radiotherapy-induced small intestine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Moneim, Ahmed E. Abdel; Ortiz, Francisco; Shen, Ying-Qiang; Soto-Mercado, Viviana; Mendivil-Perez, Miguel; Guerra-Librero, Ana; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Molina-Navarro, María M.; García-Verdugo, José M.; Sayed, Ramy K. A.; Florido, Javier; Luna, Juan D.; López, Luis Carlos; Escames, Germaine

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity is among the most prevalent dose-limiting toxicities following radiotherapy. Prevention of radiation enteropathy requires protection of the small intestine. However, despite the prevalence and burden of this pathology, there are currently no effective treatments for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity, and this pathology remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the changes induced in the rat small intestine after external irradiation of the tongue, and to explore the potential radio-protective effects of melatonin gel. Male Wistar rats were subjected to irradiation of their tongues with an X-Ray YXLON Y.Tu 320-D03 irradiator, receiving a dose of 7.5 Gy/day for 5 days. For 21 days post-irradiation, rats were treated with 45 mg/day melatonin gel or vehicle, by local application into their mouths. Our results showed that mitochondrial oxidative stress, bioenergetic impairment, and subsequent NLRP3 inflammasome activation were involved in the development of radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity. Oral treatment with melatonin gel had a protective effect in the small intestine, which was associated with mitochondrial protection and, consequently, with a reduced inflammatory response, blunting the NF-κB/NLRP3 inflammasome signaling activation. Thus, rats treated with melatonin gel showed reduced intestinal apoptosis, relieving mucosal dysfunction and facilitating intestinal mucosa recovery. Our findings suggest that oral treatment with melatonin gel may be a potential preventive therapy for radiotherapy-induced gut toxicity in cancer patients. PMID:28403142

  5. Histomorphometric changes of small intestine in pregnant rat.

    PubMed

    Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Rahmanifar, Farhad; Tamadon, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Food intake of rats increases during pregnancy. This requires changes in the structure of the small intestine to absorb additional food. The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphological changes in the layers of small intestine in rats during pregnancy. Duodenum, jejunum and ileum of 18 pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats (day 7, 14 and 21 of pregnancy) were collected. Villous height and width and thickness of lamina propria, tunica muscularis entirely and separately (circular and longitudinal layers) were measured on transverse sections. During pregnancy increasing villi length and muscular layer thickness was observed in duodenum. Furthermore, along with the progress of gestation greatest histomorphometric change in small intestine was observed in the jejunum. The reduction in the ileum histomorphologic indices was observed during pregnancy. In conclusion, increase in histomorphologic indices of duodenum and jejunum supplies more capacity of duodenum to digest food intake during pregnancy and decrease in these indices in ileum controls the absorption of excess produced amino acids and glucose by hyperphagia.

  6. Iodide transport in rat small intestine: dependence on calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Ilundain, A; Larralde, J; Toval, M

    1987-01-01

    1. The involvement of calcium in the regulation of iodide secretion was investigated in stripped sheets of rat small intestine. 2. In the absence of exogenous modifiers a net iodide absorption was observed in the rat proximal intestine, whereas the mid-intestine secreted iodide. 3. Removal of Ca2+ from the bathing solutions abolished net I- secretion in the mid-intestine. The calcium channel blocker verapamil produced similar effects on net I- secretion. 4. Theophylline increased net I- secretion both in the absence and in the presence of verapamil, but the effects of theophylline were less in the presence of verapamil or in Ca2+-free media. 5. Trifluoperazine inhibited basal iodide secretion and attenuated theophylline-induced I- secretion. 6. All the modifiers which prevented net I- secretion reduced iodide fluxes across the mucosal border and increased serosal iodide exit. The opposite was observed with theophylline. 7. It is suggested that I- secretion might result from changes in both mucosal and serosal I- permeabilities, and that both processes appear to be regulated by calmodulin. PMID:3446797

  7. Developmental changes in distribution of the mucous gel layer and intestinal permeability in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Iiboshi, Y; Nezu, R; Khan, J; Chen, K; Cui, L; Yoshida, H; Wasa, M; Fukuzawa, M; Kamata, S; Takagi, Y; Okada, A

    1996-01-01

    From the developmental aspects, the distribution of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 70,000 (FTTC-dextran) and mucous gel across the lumen of small intestine was observed as an investigation into the role of mucous gel on intestinal permeability. Furthermore, the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent, on intestinal permeability was examined. In suckling and weaned rats, FTTC-dextran (750 mg/kg body wt) was gavage-fed. After 3 hours, blood samples were taken by cardiac puncture to analyze plasma FTTC-dextran by fluorescence spectrometry. Samples of small intestine with luminal contents were frozen and sectioned in a cryostat for fluorescence microscopy; the same sections were placed in a 0.2% celloidin solution to preserve mucous gel and were stained by periodic acid-Schiff reaction for light microscopy. In weaned rats, intestinal permeability was examined with different concentrations of intraluminally instilled NAC. The plasma level of FTTC-dextran showed a significant increase (p < .01) in suckling rats compared with the weaned rats. Morphologic findings were similar in both the jejunum and ileum: The spaces between villi were not entirely filled with mucus but filled with FTTC-dextran in suckling rats, whereas the spaces were filled with mucus and not filled with FTTC-dextran in weaned rats. Intestinal permeability in groups with NAC were significantly higher (p < .01) than that in group without NAC. These results suggest that an increase in the mucous gel layer that coats the epithelial lining according to the maturation of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most important factors for a restriction in intestinal permeability.

  8. Isoenzymes of glutathione transferase in rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, M K; Ozer, N; Mannervik, B

    1988-01-01

    The major glutathione transferases in the rat small-intestine cytosol were isolated and characterized. The enzymes active with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as second substrate were almost quantitatively recovered after affinity chromatography on immobilized S-hexylglutathione. The different basic forms of glutathione transferase, which account for 90% of the activity, were resolved by chromatofocusing. Fractions containing enzymes with lower isoelectric points were not further resolved. The isolated fractions were characterized by their elution position in chromatofocusing, apparent subunit Mr, reactions with specific antibodies, substrate specificities and inhibition characteristics. The major basic forms identified were glutathione transferases 1-1, 4-4 and 7-7. In addition, evidence for the presence of a variant form of subunit 1, as well as trace amounts of subunits 2 and 3, was obtained. A significant amount of transferase 8-8 in the fraction of acidic enzyme forms was demonstrated by immunoblot and Ouchterlony double-diffusion analysis. In the comparison of the occurrence of the different forms of glutathione transferase in liver, lung, kidney and small intestine, it was found that the small intestine is the richest source of glutathione transferase 7-7. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3140787

  9. Small intestinal transit of spherical particles in the active rat

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, P.T.; Sutton, S.C.; LeRoy-Wayne, S.

    1986-03-05

    Reproducible measurements of small intestine transit for spherical particles of 0.5 ..mu.. to 1 mm diameter, have been accomplished in the conscious rat. A short cannula of polyethylene is surgically implanted into the duodenum and exists through the abdominal wall. After recovery, a bolus of saline containing colored or isotopically labeled particulate material and an internal standard of NaCr/sup 51/O/sub 4/ is introduced with a modified pipette tip that snugly fills the cannula to prevent back flow. The rats eat and drink during the transit period and are maintained on a reversed light cycle so that transit is measured during their physically active period. Glass microspheres of 1mm, 500 ..mu.., and 50 ..mu.. were followed at 30 min, 1 hr, and 2 hr intervals by opening the intestine and photographing 1 cm segments along its length. Polymer beads of 500 ..mu.., 125 ..mu.., and 70 ..mu.. were labeled with /sup 125/I and located by freezing the exteriorized intestine and counting 1 cm segments in a gamma counter. Movement of the fluid bolus as detected by NaCr/sup 51/O/sub 4/ was reproducible with the fluid front moving through 59%, 73%, and 81% of the length at 30 min, 1 hr, and 2 hr. One millimeter to 125 ..mu.. glass and polymer beads moved with the fluid bolus. Evidence for separation of the fluid phase and particles under approx. 100 ..mu.. is accumulating. It is hypothesized that small particles under a critical size may become lodged in the mucus lining of the intestinal wall.

  10. Radioprotective potential of histamine on rat small intestine and uterus.

    PubMed

    Carabajal, E; Massari, N; Croci, M; Martinel Lamas, D J; Prestifilippo, J P; Bergoc, R M; Rivera, E S; Medina, V A

    2012-12-18

    The aim of this study was to improve knowledge about histamine radioprotective potential investigating its effect on reducing ionising radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage on the rat small intestine and uterus. Forty 10-week-old male and 40 female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Histamine and histamine-5Gy groups received a daily subcutaneous histamine injection (0.1 mg/kg) starting 24 h before irradiation. Histamine-5Gy and untreated-5Gy groups were irradiated with a dose of whole-body Cesium-137 irradiation. Three days after irradiation animals were sacrificed and tissues were removed, fixed, and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferation, apoptosis and oxidative DNA markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate chromosomal damage. Histamine treatment reduced radiation-induced mucosal atrophy, oedema and vascular damage produced by ionising radiation, increasing the number of crypts per circumference (239 ± 12 vs 160 ± 10; P<0.01). This effect was associated with a reduction of radiation-induced intestinal crypts apoptosis. Additionally, histamine decreased the frequency of micronuclei formation and also significantly attenuated 8-OHdG immunoreactivity, a marker of DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, radiation induced flattening of the endometrial surface, depletion of deep glands and reduced mitosis, effects that were completely blocked by histamine treatment. The expression of a proliferation marker in uterine luminal and glandular cells was markedly stimulated in histamine treated and irradiated rats. The obtained evidences indicate that histamine is a potential candidate as a safe radioprotective agent that might increase the therapeutic index of radiotherapy for intra-abdominal and pelvic cancers. However, its efficacy needs to be carefully investigated in prospective clinical trials.

  11. Goblet cells and intestinal Alkaline phosphatase expression (IAP) during the development of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gomes, José Rosa; Ayub, Laís Costa; Dos Reis, Camila Audrey; Machado, Miriam Joice; da Silva, Jéssica; Omar, Nádia Fayez; de Miranda Soares, Maria Albertina

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the temporal and spacial distribution of the mucins produced by goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) expression during the development of the small intestine of the rat. Intestines were removed from rats on the 15th, 17th and 18th days of intratuterine life (i.u.) and on the 3rd, 10th, 17th and 25th days after birth (a.b.). Intestines were processed for routine histological procedures and sections were submitted to histochemistry using PAS to stain neutral glycoproteins and Alcian blue for acidic glycoproteins, as well as immunohistochemistry to detect IAP. In rats, glycoprotein production was seen to begin in the intestinal epithelium cell at around the 17th day of i.u. life; however, this production was not accompanied by morphological indications of the presence of goblet cells. By the 18th i.u. day, the villus epithelium was undergoing differentiation and the first goblet cells could be identified from this time. At around the 10th day a.b., both compartments of the small intestine were detected; i.e. the villi and the crypts. At this timepoint, goblet cells were present in the villi, and also in the upper regions of the crypts. On the 3rd, 10th 17th and 25th days a.b., the presence of the goblet cells increased and presented regional differences in the sections evaluated. IAP was not detected during i.u. life, but was weakly detected in the cells of the villi from the 3rd day a.b., along the entire extension of the villi. On the 10th day, IAP was detected at the tip of the villi, while on the 25th day, it was detected along the extension of the villi, but with a weaker intensity. In conclusion, a temporal and spacial distribution of goblet cells and IAP activity occurs during the development of the small intestine, suggesting a possible regulatory control in accordance with the suckling and weaning phases of food intake in the rat's life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Intestinal mast cells and eosinophils in relation to Strongyloides ratti adult expulsion from the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Kadosaka, T; Kimura, E; Takagi, H; Kondo, S; Itoh, M

    2013-04-01

    Mucosal mast cells (MMC) play a crucial role in the expulsion of Strongyloides ratti adults from the small intestine of mice. We reported the large intestinal parasitism of S. ratti in rats, and there has been no report on MMC in the large intestine of the natural host. We studied kinetics of MMC, together with eosinophils, in the upper and lower small intestines, caecum and colon of infected rats. Two distinct phases of mastocytosis were revealed: one in the upper small intestine triggered by stimulation of 'ordinary' adults, and the other in the colon stimulated by 'immune-resistant' adults that started parasitizing the colon around 19 days post-infection. In all 4 intestinal sites, the MMC peaks were observed 5-7 days after the number of adult worms became the maximum and the height of MMC peaks appeared to be dependent on the number of parasitic adults, suggesting an important role played by worms themselves in the MMC buildup.

  13. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    Intestinal necrosis; Ischemic bowel - small intestine; Dead bowel - small intestine; Dead gut - small intestine; Infarcted bowel - small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine

  14. Effect of hypocholesterolemia on cholesterol synthesis in small intestine of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Feingold, K R; Moser, A H

    1987-11-01

    Studies by our and other laboratories have demonstrated that cholesterol synthesis is increased in the small intestine of insulinopenic diabetic animals. In normal animals, many factors have been shown to regulate cholesterol synthesis in the small intestine, including changes in plasma cholesterol levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lowering plasma cholesterol levels on small intestine cholesterol synthesis in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (4-APP)-induced hypocholesterolemia (plasma cholesterol levels less than 20 mg/dl) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in small intestine cholesterol synthesis, which was most marked in the distal small intestine, decreasing proximally. In the distal small intestine the incorporation of 3H2O into cholesterol was 0.28 +/- 0.04 mumol.h-1.g-1 in diabetic rats versus 1.60 +/- 0.38 in diabetic rats administered 4-APP (P less than .01). This stimulation of cholesterol synthesis occurred in the upper villus, middle villus, and crypt cells isolated from the middle intestine of the 4-APP-treated diabetic animals. In agreement with these observations, "functional hypocholesterolemia" due to Triton WR-1339 administration also stimulated cholesterol synthesis 2.5-fold in the small intestine of normal and diabetic animals. In the distal small intestine, cholesterol synthesis was 0.43 +/- 0.10 mumol.h-1.g-1 in the diabetic rats versus 1.08 +/- 0.21 in diabetic rats treated with Triton WR-1339 (P less than .05). In both the 4-APP and Triton WR-1339 experiments, the response of the diabetic rats was similar to that observed in normal rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Effect of hypocholesterolemia on cholesterol synthesis in small intestine of diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, K.R.; Moser, A.H.

    1987-11-01

    Studies by our and other laboratories have demonstrated that cholesterol synthesis is increased in the small intestine of insulinopenic diabetic animals. In normal animals, many factors have been shown to regulate cholesterol synthesis in the small intestine, including changes in plasma cholesterol levels. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of lowering plasma cholesterol levels on small intestine cholesterol synthesis in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic rats, 4-aminopyrazolo(3,4-d)pyrimidine (4-APP)-induced hypocholesterolemia (plasma cholesterol levels less than 20 mg/dl) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in small intestine cholesterol synthesis, which was most marked in the distal small intestine, decreasing proximally. In the distal small intestine the incorporation of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O into cholesterol was 0.28 +/- 0.04 mumol.h-1.g-1 in diabetic rats versus 1.60 +/- 0.38 in diabetic rats administered 4-APP (P less than .01). This stimulation of cholesterol synthesis occurred in the upper villus, middle villus, and crypt cells isolated from the middle intestine of the 4-APP-treated diabetic animals. In agreement with these observations, functional hypocholesterolemia due to Triton WR-1339 administration also stimulated cholesterol synthesis 2.5-fold in the small intestine of normal and diabetic animals. In the distal small intestine, cholesterol synthesis was 0.43 +/- 0.10 mumol.h-1.g-1 in the diabetic rats versus 1.08 +/- 0.21 in diabetic rats treated with Triton WR-1339 (P less than .05). In both the 4-APP and Triton WR-1339 experiments, the response of the diabetic rats was similar to that observed in normal rats.

  16. Ghrelin in small intestine, its contribution to regulation of food intake and body weight in cross-intestinal parabiotic rats.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hitoshi; Masaki, Takayuki; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin has been shown to be associated with feeding behavior in humans and rodents. It has been suggested that ghrelin may play a role behind the effect of bariatric surgery. Inbred rats were made into parabiotic pairs so that they shared a single abdominal cavity. A further operation is performed later in which the small intestines are transected and re-connected so that one rat continually lost nutrition to its partner. Changes in food intake and body weight were recorded. Seven weeks later, content of ghrelin in the plasma, stomach and upper intestines were measured in the paired rats. Rats which lost nutrients to its counterpart (Loss rats) ingested significantly more food than sham control rats (p<0.001). Rats which gained nutrient (Gain rats) ingested less than controls (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in body weight, blood glucose, insulin, free fatty acids and triglycerides between the paired rats. There was significantly higher levels of ghrelin in the plasma (p<0.008) and the intestine of the Loss rats (p<0.02). There were no difference in ghrelin in the stomach between parabiotic rats and sham operated controls. The ghrelin content of the plasma and intestines were significantly higher in the Loss rats, which ate more, and normal in the Gain rats, which ate less than controls. Because no remarkable changes in the ghrelin content were observed in the stomach, difference in the quality of the chime may affect the local synthesis and release of ghrelin.

  17. Histopathological changes in small and large intestines during hymenolepidosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Kolasa, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta is a chronic parasite living in the small intestine of rats, mice and humans. The aim of this study was to determine histopathological changes in the rat intestine during experimental hymenolepidosis. Our results showed that in rats infected with H. diminuta slight changes occurred in the length of the villus and crypts in different parts of the digestive tract. The changes were most distinct in the duodenum and jejunum on the 16 days post H. diminuta infection.

  18. Dietary phytic acid and wheat bran enhance mucosal phytase activity in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lopez, H W; Vallery, F; Levrat-Verny, M A; Coudray, C; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of dietary phytic acid (PA) on intestinal phytase activity in growing rats by in vitro determination of phytase activity in the three segments of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum), and by in vivo intestinal perfusion of a solution rich in PA (diluted soymilk). Using the in vitro method, duodenal and jejunal activities were enhanced significantly by adaptation to purified PA (+44 and +145% respectively, compared with control rats). For the rats adapted to the wheat bran (WB) diet, the induction of intestinal phytase by the substrate compared with the control values (P < 0.001) was observed only in ileum. Using soymilk in perfusions, rats consuming PA or WB diets hydrolyzed more phytate (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) than controls. Further, Mg absorption from diluted soymilk was not affected by food adaptation, whereas Ca absorption was greater in the PA and WB groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) than in the control group. Thus, intake of pure PA by rats enhances phytase in the upper parts of the small intestine (duodenum and jejunum), whereas the WB diet activates ileal phytase. Furthermore, the induction of phytase activity is greater in magnitude in rats fed synthetic PA than that observed in rats fed the WB diet. The enhancement of phytase improves intestinal Ca absorption, thus showing the capacity of the small intestine to adapt to diets rich in PA and poor in Ca.

  19. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  20. Yoghurts containing probiotics reduce disruption of the small intestinal barrier in methotrexate-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Southcott, E; Tooley, K L; Howarth, G S; Davidson, G P; Butler, R N

    2008-07-01

    Small intestinal permeability was employed to assess the efficacy of commercially available yoghurts containing probiotics in a rat model of methotrexate (MTX)-induced mucositis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to four groups (n = 8): MTX + water, MTX + cow's milk yoghurt (CY; fermented with Lactobacillus johnsonii), MTX + sheep's milk yoghurt (SY; containing Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus), and saline. Treatment gavage occurred twice daily for 7 days pre-MTX and 5 days post-MTX. Intestinal permeability was assessed on days -7, -1, 2, and 5 of the trial. Intestinal sections were collected at sacrifice for histological and biochemical analyses. Histology revealed that rats receiving CY and SY did not have a significantly damaged duodenum compared to controls. However, an improved small intestinal barrier function was evident, determined by a decreased lactulose/mannitol ratio. Probiotics containing SY and CY may be useful in preventing disruption to intestinal barrier function in MTX-induced mucositis.

  1. Prostacyclin inhibits gastric emptying and small-intestinal transit in rats and dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Ruwart, M.J.; Rush, B.D.

    1984-08-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) antagonizes 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2-induced diarrhea in rats, presumably by inhibiting the fluid accumulation of ''enteropooling'' in the small intestine. The effect of PGI2 on gastric emptying, small intestinal transit, and colonic transit was examined in rats and dogs to determine if interference with propulsion might also contribute to the antidiarrheal properties of this compound. Rats implanted with chronic duodenal cannulas were given subcutaneous PGI2 (0.1-1000 microgram/kg) followed 10 min later by intragastric /sup 2/Cr and a visually detectable duodenal transit marker. Forty-five minutes later, the animals were killed. Subcutaneous PGI2 inhibited gastric emptying maximally at 10 micrograms/kg. Small-intestinal transit was significantly decreased at 50 micrograms/kg and almost completely suppressed at 1.0 mg/kg. Subcutaneous naloxone (0.5 mg/kg) given 10 min before and 20 min after subcutaneous PGI2 administration did not block PGI2's effects. Intravenous or oral PGI2, had none of these effects. Small intestinal transit was only decreased by PGI2 infusion, suggesting that this parameter was more sensitive to a sustained blood level than gastric emptying. Hourly injections of subcutaneous PGI2 (0.5 mg/kg) had no effect on rat colonic transit measured over a 3-h period after deposition of the transit marker through a colonic cannula in a manner similar to that described for small-intestinal transit above. Small-intestinal transit was also measured in dogs given a barium suspension through a chronic duodenal cannula. In vehicle-treated dogs, barium reached the cecal area in an average of 2.8 h after instillation. In PGI2-treated dogs, barium never reached the cecum in the 5-h examination period. Thus, PGI2 inhibits gastric emptying in rat and small-intestinal transit in rat and dog but has no effect on rat colonic transit.

  2. [Histophysiologic aspects of the remnant intestine of rats subjected to partial resection of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Delgado, M J; Moreno, J; Murillo, M L; Bolufer, J; López-Campos, J L

    1986-06-01

    The effect of small bowel resection on the morphology, mucous secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity of the remnant intestine was studied five months after surgical operation. Distal small bowel resection produced hyperplasia and infiltration of lymphocytes. The intestinal neutral and acid mucosubstances, and the alkaline phosphatase activity were increased in resected animals, whilst the sulphomucins content of goblet cells was unaltered. The serum alkaline phosphatase activity two and five months after resection was also increased.

  3. Transfer of propionate by rat small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R. J. C.; Jackson, M. J.; Smyth, D. H.

    1966-01-01

    1. The transfer of propionate by sacs of rat everted intestine has been investigated in relation to a number of physico-chemical factors which affect movement of weak electrolytes. 2. Neither the observed movement nor the distribution of propionate can be accounted for by the theory of non-ionic diffusion or by modifications of it, such as the microclimate hypothesis or partial permeability to ions. 3. It is not possible to account for the observed propionate movement by the electrical potential across the gut or by solvent drag. 4. The most satisfactory explanation for the observations is a transfer process in the gut for volatile fatty acids, and some features of this are discussed. PMID:5937409

  4. Plasma catecholamines and postoperative gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dubois, A; Henry, D P; Kopin, I J

    1975-03-01

    The role of adrenal medullary discharge of catecholamines on inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion after laparotomy was examined in rats. The rate of movement of a 51Cr-labeled liquid test meal, which had been introduced by gastric intubation, out of the stomach and through the small intestine, was retarded 12 hr after laparotomy. Adrenal demedullation produced a striking decrease in plasma catecholamines and abolished surgically induced elevation of the catecholamines, but had no significant effect on gastric emptying or intestinal propulsion in rats subjected to laparotomy or in the unoperated control animals. Thus circulating catecholamines play little if any role in controlling normal gastroinestinal motility or in the postoperative decrease in rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal motility.

  5. Intestinal absorption of berberine and 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine and their effects on sugar absorption in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-chao; Dong, Su; Xu, Li-jun; Zhang, Chen-yu

    2014-04-01

    The intestinal absorption of berberine (Ber) and its structural modified compound 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine (Hdber) was compared, and their effects on the intestinal absorption of sugar by perfusion experiment were investigated in order to reveal the mechanism of low dose and high activity of Hdber in the treatment of hyperglycemia. The absorption of Hdber and Ber in rat small intestine was measured by in situ perfusion. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the concentrations of Hdber and Ber. In situ perfusion method was also used to study the effects of Hdber and Ber on sugar intestinal absorption. Glucose oxidase method and UV spectrophotometry were applied to examine the concentrations of glucose and sucrose in the perfusion fluid. The results showed that the absorption rate of Ber in the small intestine was lower than 10%, but that of Hdber was larger than 70%. Both Hdber and Ber inhibited the absorption of glucose and sucrose at the doses of 10 and 20 μg/mL. However, Hdber presented stronger activity than Ber (P<0.01). It is suggested that Hdber is absorbed easily in rat small intestine and that its inhibitory effect on the absorption of sugar is better than Ber.

  6. Cholesterol synthesis and high density lipoprotein uptake are regulated independently in rat small intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Lutton, C; Champarnaud, G

    1994-01-01

    The rates of high density lipoprotein HDL uptake and cholesterol synthesis were compared in the normocholesterolaemic (SW) and genetically hypercholesterolaemic (RICO) rat intestine. The RICO rat has a hyperintestinal cholesterol synthesis. 14C sucrose, a marker which becomes irreversibly entrapped within the cells, was used to measure total rat HDL uptake over 24 hours in the various cells of the small intestinal mucosa. The rates of sterol synthesis were estimated in vivo with 1-14C acetate, as previously validated. The rates of HDL uptake in the upper villus cells were similar along the length of the small intestine in both types of rat, but the rates of sterol synthesis varied up to eightfold. When the mucosal epithelium was divided along the villus/crypt axis, HDL uptake increased two to threefold and cholesterol synthesis two to fivefold in the upper villus compared with the crypt cells in both SW and RICO rats. The high cholesterogenesis in the mucosal cells of the RICO rat is not related to a modified HDL cholesterol uptake. Thus, cholesterol synthesis and HDL uptake seem to be regulated independently in the rat small intestinal mucosa. PMID:8150344

  7. Rebamipide protects small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by indomethacin by modulating intestinal microbiota and the gene expression in intestinal mucosa in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Satoshi; Nakashima, Takako; Osaki, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Shibamori, Masafumi; Sakurai, Kazushi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a mucosal protective drug, on small intestinal mucosal injury caused by indomethacin was examined using a rat model. Indomethacin administration (10 mg/kg, p.o.) induced intestinal mucosal injury was accompanied by an increase in the numbers of intestinal bacteria particularly Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunum and ileum. Rebamipide (30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., given 5 times) was shown to inhibit the indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury and decreased the number of Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunal mucosa to normal levels. It was also shown that the detection rate of segmented filamentous bacteria was increased by rebamipide. PCR array analysis of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and wound healing showed that indomethacin induced upregulation and downregulation of 14 and 3 genes, respectively in the rat jejunal mucosa by more than 5-fold compared to that of normal rats. Rebamipide suppressed the upregulated gene expression of TNFα and Duox2 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our study confirmed that disturbance of intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury, and suggests that rebamipide could be used as prophylaxis against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury, by modulating microbiota and suppressing mucosal inflammation in the small intestine.

  8. Rebamipide protects small intestinal mucosal injuries caused by indomethacin by modulating intestinal microbiota and the gene expression in intestinal mucosa in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Satoshi; Nakashima, Takako; Osaki, Takako; Uematsu, Naoya; Shibamori, Masafumi; Sakurai, Kazushi; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The effect of rebamipide, a mucosal protective drug, on small intestinal mucosal injury caused by indomethacin was examined using a rat model. Indomethacin administration (10 mg/kg, p.o.) induced intestinal mucosal injury was accompanied by an increase in the numbers of intestinal bacteria particularly Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunum and ileum. Rebamipide (30 and 100 mg/kg, p.o., given 5 times) was shown to inhibit the indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury and decreased the number of Enterococcaceae and Enterobacteriaceae in the jejunal mucosa to normal levels. It was also shown that the detection rate of segmented filamentous bacteria was increased by rebamipide. PCR array analysis of genes related to inflammation, oxidative stress and wound healing showed that indomethacin induced upregulation and downregulation of 14 and 3 genes, respectively in the rat jejunal mucosa by more than 5-fold compared to that of normal rats. Rebamipide suppressed the upregulated gene expression of TNFα and Duox2 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our study confirmed that disturbance of intestinal microbiota plays a crucial role in indomethacin-induced small intestinal mucosal injury, and suggests that rebamipide could be used as prophylaxis against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs -induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury, by modulating microbiota and suppressing mucosal inflammation in the small intestine. PMID:25834302

  9. Hyperenteroglucagonaemia and small intestinal mucosal growth after colonic perfusion of glucose in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Miazza, B M; Al-Mukhtar, M Y; Salmeron, M; Ghatei, M A; Felce-Dachez, M; Filali, A; Villet, R; Wright, N A; Bloom, S R; Crambaud, J C

    1985-01-01

    Beside intraluminal factors, humoral agents play an important role in intestinal adaptation. Enteroglucagon, the mucosal concentration of which is maximal in the terminal ileum and colon, is the strongest candidate for the role of small intestinal mucosal growth factor. The present experiment was designed to study the role of colonic enteroglucagon in stimulating mucosal growth in rats with a normal small intestine. After eight days of glucose large bowel perfusion, enteroglucagon plasma concentrations were 120.7 +/- SEM 9.2 pmol/l, versus 60.1 +/- 6.8 in mannitol perfused control rats (p less than 0.001). Gastrin, cholecystokinin, neurotensin, pancreatic glucagon, and insulin plasma concentrations were unchanged. Crypt cell proliferation, measured by the vincristine metaphase arrest technique, increased significantly in the small intestine of glucose perfused animals (p less than 0.005-0.001) in comparison with the controls. This resulted in a greater mucosal mass in both proximal and distal small bowel: mucosal wet weight, DNA, protein and alpha D-glucosidase per unit length intestine were all significantly higher (p less than 0.05-0.001) than in mannitol perfused rats. Our data, therefore, support the hypothesis that enteroglucagon is an enterotrophic factor and stress the possible role of the colon in the regulation of small bowel trophicity. PMID:3996942

  10. Blood flow, O2 extraction and O2 consumption along the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, N R; Weiss, H R

    1988-05-01

    Differences in O2 delivery and consumption along the fed and fasted small intestine are described. Total wall blood flow was determined in sequential segments of small intestine from 5 to 6-month-old male, anesthetized Fischer 344 rats either 75-80 min before or after feeding, using radioactive microspheres. Oxygen saturation in submucosal arterioles and venules (50-60 micron diam) was determined throughout the intestine, using a microspectrophotometric technique. Venous O2 saturations showed considerable heterogeneity in all regions, and ranged from 0 to 77%. Arterial-venous O2 content differences (CaO2-CvO2) did not change along the fasted rat intestine, and averaged 8.2 ml O2/100 ml blood. However, CaO2-CvO2 followed a small proximal to distal gradient (proximal greater than distal) in the fed rats. Larger proximal to distal gradients (proximal greater than distal) occurred in both blood flow and O2 consumption in both groups. Feeding did not change intestinal average CaO2-CvO2. However, feeding induced a 53% increase in average O2 consumption, with the greatest increase (130%) occurring in the middle third of the intestine. Feeding induced a 42% increase in average blood flow, with the greatest increase (70%) occurring in the distal third of the intestine. The increased O2 used by the fed intestine was primarily provided by the increased blood flow. The O2 consumption gradient is assumed to reflect differences in mucosal mass along the intestine and/or differences in metabolic activity.

  11. Metabolism of heme and bilirubin in rat and human small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, F; Bissell, D M

    1982-01-01

    Formation of heme, bilirubin, and bilirubin conjugates has been examined in mucosal cells isolated from the rat upper small intestine. Intact, viable cells were prepared by enzymatic dissociation using a combined vascular and luminal perfusion and incubated with an isotopically labeled precursor, delta-amino-[2,3-3H]levulinic acid. Labeled heme and bile pigment were formed with kinetics similar to those exhibited by hepatocytes. Moreover, the newly formed bilirubin was converted rapidly to both mono- and diglucuronide conjugates. In addition, cell-free extracts of small intestinal mucosa from rats or humans exhibited a bilirubin-UDP-glucuronyl transferase activity that was qualitatively similar to that present in liver. The data suggest that the small intestinal mucosa normally contributes to bilirubin metabolism. PMID:6806320

  12. Protective effect of geranylgeranylacetone against loxoprofen sodium-induced small intestinal lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Tomohisa; Ichikawa, Takafumi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Goso, Yukinobu; Kurihara, Makoto; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2011-02-10

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs induce small intestinal ulcers but the preventive measures against it remain unknown. So we evaluated the effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), a mucosal protectant, on both the mucus content and loxoprofen sodium-induced lesions in the rat small intestine. Normal male Wistar rats were given GGA (200 or 400mg/kg p.o.) and euthanized 3h later for measurement of mucin content and immunoreactivity. Other Wistar rats were given loxoprofen sodium (30mg/kg s.c.) and euthanized 24h later. GGA (30-400mg/kg p.o.) was administered twice: 30min before and 6h after loxoprofen sodium. The total mucin content of the small intestinal mucosa increased, especially the ratio of sialomucin, which increased approximately 20% more than the control level after a single dose of GGA. Loxoprofen sodium provoked linear ulcers along the mesenteric margin of the distal jejunum, accompanied by an increase in enterobacterial translocation. Treatment of the animals with GGA dose-dependently prevented the development of intestinal lesions, and bacterial translocation following loxoprofen sodium was also significantly decreased. GGA protects the small intestine against loxoprofen sodium-induced lesions, probably by inhibiting enterobacterial invasion of the mucosa as a result of the increase in the mucosal barrier. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microsomal quercetin glucuronidation in rat small intestine depends on age and segment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward the flavonoid quercetin and UGT protein were characterized in 3 equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats, n=8/age using villin to control for enterocyte content. SI microsomal intrinsic clearance of quercetin...

  14. De novo purine nucleotide synthesis in the rat small and large intestine: effect of dietary protein and purines.

    PubMed

    LeLeiko, N S; Bronstein, A D; Baliga, B S; Munro, H N

    1983-05-01

    This study assessed the pathway for de novo purine nucleotide synthesis in rat small intestinal and colonic mucosal cells, and determined the effects of dietary purines and protein on de novo purine nucleotide synthetic activity in the small intestine in vitro. Incubation of small intestinal mucosal scrapings with [14C]glycine failed to show an active pathway of de novo synthesis; in contrast, the colon showed incorporation of [14C]glycine into RNA. Rats fed a diet deficient in purines demonstrated increased incorporation of [14C]glycine into RNA-adrenine in small intestinal mucosal cells. Measurement of glutamine-amidophosphoribosyltransferase demonstrated that, regardless of the purine content of the diet, enzyme activity in the small intestine is significantly lower than in the colon or liver. The results indicate that, in the small intestine of the rat, there is an inactive de novo pathway of purine nucleotide biosynthesis that can be stimulated when purines are omitted from the diet.

  15. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  16. Differential stimulation of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase by difluoromethylornithine in the rat colon and small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Halline, A G; Dudeja, P K; Brasitus, T A

    1989-01-01

    The effects of chronic inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by the specific inhibitor difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) in the rat colon and small intestine on mucosal contents of polyamines, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (decarboxylated AdoMet) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMet decarboxylase) activity were studied. Administration of 1% DFMO in the drinking water for 10 or 15 weeks resulted in inhibition of ODC and decreases in intracellular putrescine and spermidine contents in both proximal and distal segments of small intestine and colon. At both time points DFMO administration resulted in a dramatic stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase activity and a rise in decarboxylated AdoMet content in the proximal and distal small-intestinal segments compared with controls, which was not seen in either colonic segment of DFMO-treated animals. This differential stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase by DFMO in the small intestine and colon could not be entirely explained on the basis of differences in polyamine contents, which are known to regulate this enzyme activity. Kinetic and inhibition studies of AdoMet decarboxylase in control small and large intestine revealed that: (1) there was no difference in Vmax. values between the tissues; (2) the Km for AdoMet was higher in the small intestine than in the colon; and (3) the Ki for product inhibition by decarboxylated AdoMet was higher in the small intestine than in the colon. These results suggest that the differential stimulation of AdoMet decarboxylase by DFMO in the small intestine and colon may be due to different isoenzymes and could play a significant role in the regulation of polyamine contents throughout the gut. PMID:2497738

  17. The assay and partial characterization of macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Young, E; Horner, A A

    1979-06-15

    Homogenates of rat small intestine can depolymerize macromolecular rat skin heparin (RS heparin) to products similar in size to commercial heparin [Horner (1972) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 69, 3469--3473]. This activity is attributed to an enzyme provisionally named 'macromolecular heparin depolymerase'. An assay for macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine has been developed, based on the action of the enzyme on 35S-labelled macromolecular RS heparin. The depolymerized products are separated into two peaks by gel chromatography through columns of Bio-Gel A-15m. The amount of label in the second peak, expressed as a percentage of the total radioactivity, is the index of enzyme activity. The pH optimum was found to be 6.0 and the temperature optimum 45 degrees C. The enzyme was shown to be most stable in 50mM-Tris/maleate buffer containing 1 mM-EDTA. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity measured as a function of time and substrate concentration produced curves typical of an enzymic reaction. Evidence was obtained demonstrating that the activity did not originate from bacteria in the intestine. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity was increased by dilution and storage at 7 degrees C for 24 h. This suggests that homogenates of rat small intestine contain an unstable inhibitor of the enzyme.

  18. The assay and partial characterization of macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Young, E; Horner, A A

    1979-01-01

    Homogenates of rat small intestine can depolymerize macromolecular rat skin heparin (RS heparin) to products similar in size to commercial heparin [Horner (1972) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 69, 3469--3473]. This activity is attributed to an enzyme provisionally named 'macromolecular heparin depolymerase'. An assay for macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity in rat small intestine has been developed, based on the action of the enzyme on 35S-labelled macromolecular RS heparin. The depolymerized products are separated into two peaks by gel chromatography through columns of Bio-Gel A-15m. The amount of label in the second peak, expressed as a percentage of the total radioactivity, is the index of enzyme activity. The pH optimum was found to be 6.0 and the temperature optimum 45 degrees C. The enzyme was shown to be most stable in 50mM-Tris/maleate buffer containing 1 mM-EDTA. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity measured as a function of time and substrate concentration produced curves typical of an enzymic reaction. Evidence was obtained demonstrating that the activity did not originate from bacteria in the intestine. Macromolecular heparin depolymerase activity was increased by dilution and storage at 7 degrees C for 24 h. This suggests that homogenates of rat small intestine contain an unstable inhibitor of the enzyme. PMID:39552

  19. Lack of small intestinal ulcerogenecity of nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin, NCX-530, in rats.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Hase, S; Tanaka, A; Takeuchi, K

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the intestinal ulcerogenic property of nitric oxide-releasing indomethacin (NCX-530) in the rat, in comparison with indomethacin. Animals were given indomethacin or NCX-530 subcutaneously and killed 24 h later for macroscopic examination of the small intestine. A single administration of indomethacin (10 mg/kg) provoked damage, mainly in the jejunum and ileum, accompanied by an increase in myeloperoxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities as well as bacterial translocation. NCX-530 at an equimolar dose (14.2 mg/kg) caused no gross damage in the small intestine, nor any significant change in inducible nitric oxide synthase and myeloperoxidase activities or bacterial translocation. NOR-3, the nitric oxide donor (6.0 mg/kg), when administered subcutaneously together with indomethacin, significantly prevented the occurrence of intestinal lesions and other mucosal changes. Indomethacin reduced mucus and fluid secretions in the small intestine, while both NCX-530 and NOR-3 enhanced these secretions. NCX-530 reduced the mucosal prostaglandin E2 contents and exhibited an anti-inflammatory action against carrageenan-induced paw oedema, with equal effectiveness to indomethacin. NCX-530 does not cause intestinal damage, despite inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. The reduced intestinal toxicity of NCX-530 may be attributable to inhibition of enterobacterial translocation, partly by increasing the mucus and fluid secretions mediated by nitric oxide released from this compound.

  20. Alterations in the small intestinal wall and motor function after repeated cisplatin in rat.

    PubMed

    Uranga, J A; García-Martínez, J M; García-Jiménez, C; Vera, G; Martín-Fontelles, M I; Abalo, R

    2017-07-01

    Gastrointestinal adverse effects occurring during cancer chemotherapy are well known and feared; those persisting once treatment has finished are relatively unknown. We characterized the alterations occurring in the rat small intestine, after repeated treatment with cisplatin. Male Wistar rats received saline or cisplatin (2 mg kg(-1)  week(-1) , for 5 weeks, ip). Gastric motor function was studied non-invasively throughout treatment (W1-W5) and 1 week after treatment finalization (W6). During W6, upper gastrointestinal motility was also invasively studied and small intestinal samples were collected for histopathological and molecular studies. Structural alterations in the small intestinal wall, mucosa, submucosa, muscle layers, and lymphocytic nodules were histologically studied. Periodic acid-Schiff staining and immunohistochemistry for Ki-67, chromogranin A, and neuronal-specific enolase were used to detect secretory, proliferating, endocrine and neural cells, respectively. The expression of different markers in the tunica muscularis was analyzed by RT/qPCR. Repeated cisplatin induced motility alterations during and after treatment. After treatment (W6), the small intestinal wall showed histopathological alterations in most parameters measured, including a reduction in the thickness of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Expression of c-KIT (for interstitial cells of Cajal), nNOS (for inhibitory motor neurons), pChAT, and cChAT (for excitatory motor neurons) increased significantly (although both ChATs to a lesser extent). Repeated cisplatin induces relatively long-lasting gut dysmotility in rat associated with important histopathological and molecular alterations in the small intestinal wall. In cancer survivors, the possible chemotherapy-induced histopathological, molecular, and functional intestinal sequelae should be evaluated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The reduction of inorganic sulphate to inorganic sulphite in the small intestine of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, H. C.

    1965-01-01

    1. Whole scrapings of rat intestinal mucosa were incubated with carrier-free sodium [35S]sulphate. Radioactivity was found in S-sulphocysteine and to a small extent in S-sulphoglutathione. 2. Whole scrapings of rat intestinal mucosa incubated with carrier-free sodium [35S]sulphate and oxidized glutathione formed S[35S]-sulphoglutathione as the main radioactive product. The amount of S[35S]-sulphocysteine formed was considerably lower than in a control that contained no oxidized glutathione. 3. The supernatant fraction of homogenates of rat intestinal mucosa catalyses the NADPH-dependent reduction of adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-sulphatophosphate to inorganic sulphite. NADH or GSH fail to replace NADPH as reducing agents. 4. The formation of inorganic [35S]sulphite from inorganic [35S]-sulphate may account for the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into S-sulphoglutathione by the small intestine of the rat in vivo and in vitro. PMID:14340059

  2. Protein synthesis of muscle fractions from the small intestine in alcohol fed rats.

    PubMed Central

    Preedy, V R; Peters, T J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on the amounts and synthesis rates of cytoplasmic, contractile, and stromal protein fractions were investigated in the small intestine of eight pairs of immature and seven pairs of mature rats. Treated rats were fed ethanol as 36% of total energy in a nutritionally adequate liquid diet. Paired controls were fed isovolumetric amounts of the same diet in which ethanol was substituted by isocaloric glucose. After six weeks the total cytoplasmic and contractile protein content in immature rats was reduced by 18% and 31%, respectively (p less than or equal to 0.007). The decline in the stromal protein content (26%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.130). In mature rats the protein contents were also reduced in the cytoplasmic (25%, p = 0.035) and contractile (27%, p = 0.005) protein fractions, though the stromal protein fraction was unaltered (p = 0.913). In immature rats fractional rates of protein synthesis in cytoplasmic and contractile protein fractions of the small intestine were unaltered by chronic ethanol feeding (p less than or equal to 0.853). In mature rats, the synthesis rates of corresponding fractions declined, by 18% and 31%, respectively, but were also not statistically significant (p less than or equal to 0.369). Absolute rates of protein synthesis in immature rats fell by 6% (p = 0.549) in the cytoplasmic and 31% in the contractile protein fraction (p = 0.045). In mature rats, the corresponding reductions were 38% (p = 0.106) and 48% (p = 0.033), respectively. Virtually no radioactivity could be detected in the stromal fraction, signifying very low synthesis rates. Chronic ethanol feeding reduces the amount of protein in the small intestine of the immature and mature rat with the contractile protein fraction showing the greatest decrease. In the absence of statistically significant reductions in fractional synthesis rates a partial adaptation in turnover rates may have occurred. PMID:2323594

  3. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  4. Immunohistochemical characterization of cellular proliferation in small intestinal hyperplasia of rats with hepatic Strobilocercus fasciolaris infection.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, J T; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M

    2008-07-01

    Rats infected with the larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis harbour the intermediate stage of the parasite Strobilocercus fasciolaris within the liver. Affected animals also develop gastric and intestinal hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of the gastric hyperplasia has been extensively investigated, but few studies have addressed the nature of the intestinal changes. This study characterizes the proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemical labelling for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. At 6 weeks post-infection (wpi) there was an increase in villous length but crypt depth was normal. At 9 wpi there was evidence of epithelial hyperplasia, increased villous length and crypt depth, and expansion of zones of epithelial proliferation. Immunohistochemical labelling indicated that an increase in the number of proliferating cells produced a greater number of progeny cells. Intestinal hyperplasia during experimental infection with T. taeniaeformis larvae is likely to be related to the associated gastropathy, although the mechanisms underlying both changes remain undefined.

  5. Effects of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate in rats.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aynur; Ozcicek, Adalet; Suleyman, Bahadir; Coban, Taha Abdulkadir; Cimen, Ferda Keskin; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Altuner, Durdu; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal mucositis is one of the major problems in the patients receiving cancer treatment. Nimesulide is a drug with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiulcer features. We aimed to investigate the effect of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate (MTX) in rats. Experimental animals were divided into the control group, MTX group (MTXG) and nimesulide+MTX administered group (NMTXG) with eight rats per group. The control and MTXG groups were given distilled water by gavage and the NMTXG was given nimesulide 100 mg/kg orally. After one hour, the NMTXG and MTXG rat groups were administered oral MTX 5 mg/kg. This procedure was repeated once a day for 15 days and the rats were sacrificed. The duodenum and jejunum of each rat was removed for the assessment of biochemical markers and histopathological evaluation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were significantly higher in the duodenal and jejunal tissues of the animals which received MTX, compared to the control and NMTXG (P<0.001). Also, the levels of total glutathione (tGSH), glutathione reductase (GSHRd), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly lower in the MTXG (P<0.001) compared to other groups. MTX led to villus and crypt epithelial damage and inflammation containing marked PMNL and eosinophils in the intestinal tissues histopathologically. Whereas, there was only mild irregularities in the villus structures of the NMTXG. Nimesulide protected the small intestines against damage by MTX. Intestinal mucositis caused by MTX may be preventable by co-administered nimesulide.

  6. Effects of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate in rats

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Aynur; Ozcicek, Adalet; Suleyman, Bahadir; Coban, Taha Abdulkadir; Cimen, Ferda Keskin; Nalkiran, Hatice Sevim; Kuzucu, Mehmet; Altuner, Durdu; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal mucositis is one of the major problems in the patients receiving cancer treatment. Nimesulide is a drug with antioxidant, antiinflammatory and antiulcer features. We aimed to investigate the effect of nimesulide on the small intestine mucositis induced by methotrexate (MTX) in rats. Experimental animals were divided into the control group, MTX group (MTXG) and nimesulide+MTX administered group (NMTXG) with eight rats per group. The control and MTXG groups were given distilled water by gavage and the NMTXG was given nimesulide 100 mg/kg orally. After one hour, the NMTXG and MTXG rat groups were administered oral MTX 5 mg/kg. This procedure was repeated once a day for 15 days and the rats were sacrificed. The duodenum and jejunum of each rat was removed for the assessment of biochemical markers and histopathological evaluation. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels were significantly higher in the duodenal and jejunal tissues of the animals which received MTX, compared to the control and NMTXG (P<0.001). Also, the levels of total glutathione (tGSH), glutathione reductase (GSHRd), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly lower in the MTXG (P<0.001) compared to other groups. MTX led to villus and crypt epithelial damage and inflammation containing marked PMNL and eosinophils in the intestinal tissues histopathologically. Whereas, there was only mild irregularities in the villus structures of the NMTXG. Nimesulide protected the small intestines against damage by MTX. Intestinal mucositis caused by MTX may be preventable by co-administered nimesulide. PMID:27333839

  7. Biochemical investigation and gene expression analysis of the immunostimulatory functions of an edible Salacia extract in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yuriko; Ueda, Fumitaka; Kamei, Asuka; Kakinuma, Chihaya; Abe, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    Roots and bark from plants belonging to genus Salacia of the family Hippocrateaceae (Salacia reticulata, Salacia oblonga, etc.) have been used for traditional Ayurvedic medicine, particularly for the treatment of diabetes. In our study, we evaluated the gene expression profiles in the small intestinal epithelium of rats that were given a Salacia plant extract to gain insight into its effects on the small intestine. In detail, DNA microarray analysis was performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in the rat ileal epithelium. The intestinal bacterial flora was also studied using T-RFLP (Nagashima method) in these rats. Expressions of many immune-related genes, especially Th1-related genes associated with cell-mediated immunity, were found to increase in the small intestinal epithelium and the intestinal bacterial flora became similar to those in the case with Salacia plant extract administration. Our study thus revealed that Salacia plant extract exerts bioregulatory functions by boosting intestinal immunity.

  8. [Electron microscope observation on effect of kudingcha inspissation tea on small intestine villus in the adiposity rats].

    PubMed

    Lu, J; Liu, H

    1999-12-01

    Experimental study on pharmacological action of Guang Dong kudingcha inspissation tea on small intestine villus in the adiposity rats (nutrition obesity). By using electron microscope method, check on small intestine villus of 60 experiment rats of just wean and count and analyse and conclude. Under the scan electron imcroscope, the surface configuration on small intestine villus of model group and various kudingcha dosage groups is similar to the blank (P > 0.05), but fenfluramine group appear constriction on top end of small intestine villus. Compring with fenfluramine, Guang Dong kudingcha inspissation tea has not effect on configuration of small intestine of adiposity rats (nutrition obesity), but has more strong modulation function on fat tissue lipocyte hypertrophy and quantitative.

  9. SMIT2 mediates all myo-inositol uptake in apical membranes of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Aouameur, Rym; Da Cal, Sandra; Bissonnette, Pierre; Coady, Michael J; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2007-12-01

    This study presents the characterization of myo-inositol (MI) uptake in rat intestine as evaluated by use of purified membrane preparations. Three secondary active MI cotransporters have been identified; two are Na(+) coupled (SMIT1 and SMIT2) and one is H(+) coupled (HMIT). Through inhibition studies using selective substrates such as d-chiro-inositol (DCI, specific for SMIT2) and l-fucose (specific for SMIT1), we show that SMIT2 is exclusively responsible for apical MI transport in rat intestine; rabbit intestine appears to lack apical transport of MI. Other sugar transport systems known to be present in apical membranes, such as SGLT1 or GLUT5, lacked any significant contribution to MI uptake. Functional analysis of rat SMIT2 activity, via electrophysiological studies in Xenopus oocytes, demonstrated similarities to the activities of SMIT2 from other species (rabbit and human) displaying high affinities for MI (0.150 +/- 0.040 mM), DCI (0.31 +/- 0.06 mM), and phlorizin (Pz; 0.016 +/- 0.007 mM); low affinity for glucose (36 +/- 7 mM); and no affinity for l-fucose. Although these functional characteristics essentially confirmed those found in rat intestinal apical membranes, a unique discrepancy was seen between the two systems studied in that the affinity constant for glucose was approximately 40-fold lower in vesicles (K(i) = 0.94 +/- 0.35 mM) than in oocytes. Finally, the transport system responsible for the basolateral efflux transporter of glucose in intestine, GLUT2, did not mediate any significant radiolabeled MI uptake in oocytes, indicating that this transport system does not participate in the basolateral exit of MI from small intestine.

  10. Human, rat and chicken small intestinal Na+-Cl−-creatine transporter: functional, molecular characterization and localization

    PubMed Central

    Peral, M J; García-Delgado, M; Calonge, M L; Durán, J M; De La Horra, M C; Wallimann, T; Speer, O; Ilundáin, A A

    2002-01-01

    In spite of all the fascinating properties of oral creatine supplementation, the mechanism(s) mediating its intestinal absorption has(have) not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize intestinal creatine transport. [14C]Creatine uptake was measured in chicken enterocytes and rat ileum, and expression of the creatine transporter CRT was examined in human, rat and chicken small intestine by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results show that enterocytes accumulate creatine against its concentration gradient. This accumulation was electrogenic, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, with a probable stoichiometry of 2 Na+: 1 Cl−: 1 creatine, and inhibited by ouabain and iodoacetic acid. The kinetic study revealed a Km for creatine of 29 μm. [14C]Creatine uptake was efficiently antagonized by non-labelled creatine, guanidinopropionic acid and cyclocreatine. More distant structural analogues of creatine, such as GABA, choline, glycine, β-alanine, taurine and betaine, had no effect on intestinal creatine uptake, indicating a high substrate specificity of the creatine transporter. Consistent with these functional data, messenger RNA for CRT was detected only in the cells lining the intestinal villus. The sequences of partial clones, and of the full-length cDNA clone, isolated from human and rat small intestine were identical to previously cloned CRT cDNAs. Immunological analysis revealed that CRT protein was mainly associated with the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This study reports for the first time that mammalian and avian enterocytes express CRT along the villus, where it mediates high-affinity, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, apical creatine uptake. PMID:12433955

  11. A simple new method to calculate small intestine absorptive surface in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kisielinski, K; Willis, S; Prescher, A; Klosterhalfen, B; Schumpelick, V

    2002-11-01

    The rat is an established model for studying intestinal adaptations following abdominal surgery. In the study of functional and morphological adaptations of the small intestine, it is helpful to estimate the mucosal surface area. In order to simplify measurements and calculation we developed a new mathematical model for calculation of the mucosal surface area on histological sections. In contrast to other methods, it requires only cross-sections of small intestine and includes the measurement of only three histological parameters: length and width of villus and width of crypt. The new approach was compared with the most commonly used procedures, the Harris and the Fisher-Parsons methods, under experimental conditions. An animal study including single-pass perfusion, fixation, staining and subsequent histomorphometry of jejunum and ileum using these different methods was performed. The new method showed the least work and presented no significant differences compared with the precise Harris method. In conclusion, the method described is an adequate tool to estimate the mucosal surface area with less work and with comparable results to established methods. The less-complex method may be a valuable tool in experimental research of small intestine adaptations in rats.

  12. Subcellular localization of enterokinase (enteropeptidase EC 3.4.21.9) in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lebenthal, E; Morrissey, G W

    1977-04-27

    The subcellular localization of enterokinase is controversial. In this study, enterokinase was extracted from a soluble fraction and a brush border fraction of rat small intestine by differential centrifugation. The soluble fraction contained 41% of the initial enterokinase activity while the brush border fraction contained only 4.6% of the initial activity. In contrast, alkaline phosphatase monitored as a brush border marker, yielded 26.3% in the brush border fraction and only 6% in the soluble fraction. Further separation of the soluble fraction on a Sepharose 4B column revealed three peaks of enterokinase activity. One small peak (3%) of a bound enzyme (Mr, 2 - 10(6)) and two larger peaks of free enzyme (Mr, 3 - 10(5) and 9 -10). In contrast, alkaline phosphatase major fraction was in a high molecular weight peak of bound enzyme. When the brush border fraction was chromatographed only a single peak of bound enterokinase and alkaline phosphatase were found. In the lower part of the small intestine, no brush border-bound enterokinase was found, while the peak of alkaline phosphatase was the same as in the upper intestine. These data suggest that enterokinase activity in the rat intestine is mainly in a free form localized in the mucin and soluble fraction and to a negligible extent in the brush border.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of opioid receptor types in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.R.; Sykes, R.M.; Thompson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The selective mu and delta ligands (/sup 3/H)DAGO and (/sup 3/H)DPDPE have been used to investigate the distribution of specific opioid subtypes in the rat small intestine by in vitro autoradiography. There was a greater density of (/sup 3/H)DPDPE binding at regions of the villi and crypts than (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding. These results suggest that the opioid receptors located in these regions are predominantly of the delta subtype.

  14. [The x-ray microanalysis of the mucosa of the rat small intestine].

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, A G; Matys, Iu V

    1990-01-01

    A rat small intestine mucosa is shown to accumulate significant amount of potassium and chloride. There was found a correlation between the content of these chemical elements and glycoprotein compartmentalization in goblet cell secret, brush border of enterocytes and a mucus layer. In this connection a role of mucus glycoproteins in membrane digestion is discussed. For preparation of samples the cryotechniques of electron microscopy are used.

  15. Digestive enzyme expression and epithelial structure of small intestine in neonatal rats after 16 days spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, M.; Yamasaki, M.; Hazama, A.; Ijiri, K.; Shimizu, T.

    It is important to assure whether digestive system can develop normally in neonates during spaceflight. Because the small intestine changes its function and structure drastically around weaning known as redifferentiation. Lactase expression declines and sucrase increases in small intestine for digestion of solid food before weaning. In this paper, we compared this enzyme transition and structural development of small intestine in neonatal rats after spaceflight. To find digestive genes differentially expressed in fight rats, DNA membrane macroarray was also used. Eight-day old rats were loaded to Space Shuttle Columbia, and housed in the animal facility for 16 days in space (STS-90, Neurolab mission). Two control groups (AGC; asynchronous ground control and VIV; vivarium) against flight group (FLT) were prepared. There was no difference in structure (crypt depth) and cell differentiation of epithelium between FLT and AGC by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that the amount of sucrase mRNA compared to lactase was decreased in FLT by RT-PCR. It reflected the enzyme transition was inhibited. Increase of 5 genes (APO A-I, APO A-IV, ACE, aFABP and aminopeptidase M) and decrease of carboxypeptidase-D were detected in FLT using macroarray. We think nutrition differences (less nourishment and late weaning) during spaceflight may cause inhibition of enzyme transition at least partly. The weightlessness might contribute to the inhibition through behavioral change.

  16. Cellular differentiation in the emerging fetal rat small intestinal epithelium: mosaic patterns of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Ong, D E; Gordon, J I

    1989-02-01

    We have examined the pattern of differentiation of the small intestinal epithelium in fetal rats during the 17th through 21st days of gestation. Five genes expressed in late fetal, neonatal, and adult enterocytes were used as markers of differentiation. They encode three homologous small cytoplasmic hydrophobic ligand binding proteins--liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), and cellular retinol binding protein II (CRBP II)--and two apolipoproteins--apoAI and apoAIV. RNA blot hybridization studies indicated that gradients in mRNA concentration from the proximal small intestine to colon appear coincident with the initiation of rapid epithelial cell proliferation and villus formation (days 17-19 of the 22-day gestation period). Immunocytochemical studies disclosed a remarkably heterogeneous pattern of cell-specific expression of the three hydrophobic ligand binding proteins that was not apparent with either apoAIV or apoAI. This "mosaic" staining pattern was observed in morphologically similar cells occupying identical topographic positions along nascent villi in 17- to 18-day fetuses. The onset and resolution of this mosaicism varies between I-FABP, L-FABP, and CRBP II in the proximal small bowel, although it completely resolves by the first postnatal day. The distal small intestine exhibits a developmental delay of 1-2 days in the appearance of this heterogeneous pattern of initial gene expression. Double-label immunofluorescent analyses using L-FABP and I-FABP antibodies indicated that on the 18th day of gestation the proximal small intestinal columnar epithelium contains several populations of enterocytes expressing neither, one, or both proteins. The potential significance of this mosaic pattern of intestinal epithelial differentiation is discussed in light of recent studies with transgenic and chimeric mice.

  17. Membrane potentials of epithelial cells in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R. J. C.; Eggenton, Jacqueline

    1972-01-01

    1. Stripped sacs of rat jejunum in which the outer muscle layers had been removed were found to maintain substantial transport and electrical activities. 2. Mucosal and serosal membrane potentials of epithelial cells of normal and stripped everted sacs of rat jejunum were recorded in vitro together with the transmural potential difference. 3. The cell interior was negative relative to both serosal and mucosal fluids, the transmural potential being the sum of the two membrane potentials. 4. Changes in the transmural potentials in the presence of actively transferred hexoses and amino acids were entirely due to variations in the serosal potential, the mucosal potential being unchanged. 5. Serosal and transmural potential increases on the addition of galactose were consistent with Michaelis—Menten kinetics, giving apparent Km values of 14·9 and 14·1 mM respectively. 6. Phlorrhizin, ouabain, 2,4-dinitrophenol and sodium fluoroacetate inhibited serosal potential changes in the presence of galactose. 7. Osmotic potentials resulting from transmural osmotic gradients originated from the serosal layers of the tissue. 8. The results are consistent with the concept of a serosally located, electrogenic sodium pump which is stimulated by actively transferred hexoses and amino acids. The sodium-dependent entry mechanism at the mucosal membrane is non-electrogenic. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:4646578

  18. Small intestinal morphometric and biomechanical changes during physiological growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2005-03-01

    Changes in small intestinal geometry, residual strain and stress-strain properties during physiological growth were studied in rats ranging from 1 to 32 weeks of age. Small intestinal mass and dimensions increased many-fold with age, e.g. the weight per unit length increased five-fold with age and the wall cross-sectional area increased four-fold. The opening angle of duodenum obtained at zero-stress state was approximately 220 degrees and 290 degrees during the first and second week after birth and decreased to 170 degrees at other ages (p < 0.005). The opening angle of ileum ranged between 120 degrees and 150 degrees . The residual strain of duodenum at the mucosal surface did not vary with age (p > 0.05) whereas the residual strain of ileum at the mucosal surface decreased with age (p < 0.001). The circumferential and longitudinal stress-strain curves fitted well to a mono-exponential function. At a given circumferential stress, the corresponding strain values increased during the first 8 weeks of age (p < 0.05) where after no further change was observed. Hence, the small intestine became more compliant during early life. At a given longitudinal stress, the corresponding strains of ileum and duodenum became larger during the first 2-4 weeks of age (p < 0.05) where after no further change was observed. The small intestine was stiffer in longitudinal direction compared to the circumferential direction. In conclusion, pronounced morphometric and biomechanical changes were observed in the rat small intestine during physiological growth. Such data may prove useful in the understanding of the functional changes of the digestive tract during early life.

  19. [Inhibitory effects of saponins from Tribulus terrestris on alpha-glucosidase in small intestines of rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Su-jun; Qu, Wei-jing; Zhong, Shu-yun

    2006-06-01

    To determine the effects of saponins from Tribulus terrestris (STT) on small intestinal a-glucosidase and postprandial blood glucose levels in rats. The inhibitory effects of STT on a-glucosidase extracted from small intestines in rats were carried out in vitro. The blood glucose levels were measured after 60 min when sucrose (2 g x kg(-1)) or glucose (2 g x kg(-1)) was administered orally with STT (100 mg x kg(-1)). After treated with STT (100 mg x kg(-1)) for 14 d, the activities of a-glucosidase were determined daily, as well as the postprandial blood glucose levels after oraly administered sucrose (2 g x kg(-1)). STT at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg x mL(-1) reduced significantly the activities of alpha-glucosidase with inhibitory rates of (20.83 +/- 1.66)%, (43.73 +/- 2.39)% and (52.62 +/- 2.69)%, respectively. In facts STT (100 mg x kg(-1)) considerably decreased the blood glucose levels which was 52.61% of that of the control in rats co-administered orally with sucrose (2 g x kg(-1)). However, it showed no such effect on the rats co-administered orally with glucose (2 g x kg(-1)). After orally administered of STT for 14 d, the activity of alpha-glucosidase was significantly reduced (P < 0.05) to (58.17 +/- 3.24)% of that those in control. Meanwhile, The rats were oral administered with sucrose, the increase of postprandial blood glucose levels were (69.50 +/- 4.28)% of that in control 60 min later ( P < 0.05). It was through inhibiting the activity of a-glucosidase in small intestines that STT significantly retarded the increase in postprandial blood glucose levels in rats.

  20. [Responses of peptide hydrolases of the small and large intestines in rats on the administration of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Borshchëv, Iu Iu; Gromova, L V; Ermolenko, E I; Grefner, N M; Borshchëva, I Iu; Gruzdkov, A A

    2012-06-01

    Effects of antibiotics on the structure and functional state of the intestine are not clear. We investigated some structural parameters of the small and large intestine, and activities of two intestinal peptide hydrolases in rats after administration of ampicillin and metronidazole during 3 and 5 days. After 3 days of antibiotic administration a decrease in the weight of mucosa in the small intestine, accompanied with a reduction in the villous height and width in this part of the intestine, and in the weight ofmucosa in the colon occured. At the same time the number of goblet cells in the small intestinal epithelium was increased. Specific activities of aminopeptidase M, and glycyl-L-leucine dipeptidase (micromol/min per g) in the mucosa of the small intestine were increased, and the total activities (micromol/min calculated per a part of the intestine) of the same enzymes did not change. The administration of antibiotics for 5 days resulted in increase of specific activity ofaminopeptidase M in the mucosa of the proximal part of the small intestine. In the chyme of the small intestine and colon, activities of the same enzymes (micromol/min calculated per a part of the intestine) were increased on the third and fifth days of the antibiotic administration. Thus, the application ofampicillin and metronidazole within 3-5 days causes a disturbance of the structural and functional parameters in the small and large intestines, which is most pronounced on the third day of the drug administration.

  1. Melibiose, a Nondigestible Disaccharide, Promotes Absorption of Quercetin Glycosides in Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiya; Shinoki, Aki; Hara, Hiroshi

    2016-12-14

    We demonstrated that melibiose, a nondigestible disaccharide composed of galactose and glucose with α-1,6 glycoside linkage, promotes the absorption of water-soluble quercetin glycosides in ligated small intestinal loop of anesthetized rats. Water-soluble quercetin glycoside, a quercetin-3-O-glucoside mixture (Q3GM), includes quercetin-3-O-glucoside (Q3G, 31.9%), mono (21.2%) and di (17.1%), glucose adducts with α-1,4 linkages. After instillation of Q3GM into the intestinal loop with or without melibiose, the plasma concentration of quercetin derivatives in the portal blood was considerably higher in the melibiose group at 60 min. Furthermore, we evaluated the hydrolytic rate of Q3G by the mucosal homogenate of the small intestine with six different disaccharides. Melibiose and isomaltose, which have α-1,6 glycoside linkage, were found to promote Q3G hydrolysis to aglycone. These results suggest that melibiose promotes quercetin glycoside absorption in rats by increasing glycoside hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen and that α-1,6 linkage is involved in this process.

  2. Ingestion of potato starch containing esterified phosphorus increases alkaline phosphatase activity in the small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Hitoshi; Morikawa, Nao; Ohmi, Sayako; Ishida, Kyo; Machida, Ayaka; Kanazawa, Takumi; Chiji, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Michihiro; Noda, Takahiro

    2010-05-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) hydrolyzes a variety of monophosphate esters and plays an important role in phosphorus (P) metabolism. Several nutrients in food have been reported to affect intestinal ALP activity in animal models. Previous reports indicated that high levels of P or phosphate in diets decreased intestinal ALP activity in rats. Because potato starch contains considerable amounts of esterified P, unlike other starch-derived plants, we hypothesized that the feeding of potato starch would decrease ALP activity in the intestinal tract. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were fed 3 different types of diet containing 60% corn starch or 1 of 2 types of potato starch with different esterified P content for 1 or 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake of each rat were measured every day throughout the experimental periods. At the end of the feeding periods, the small intestine was removed to determine ALP activity in the mucosal tissues. Significant differences were observed in ALP activity in the small intestine between the 2 feeding periods, among the 4 segments of the small intestine, and among the 3 diet groups. Significant positive linear correlations between the amount of P derived from the starch and mucosal ALP activity were obtained in the jejunum and jejunoileum in rats after feeding for 5 weeks. We concluded, contrary to our hypotheses, that the ingestion of potato starch adaptively increases ALP activity in the upper part of the small intestine of growing rats in an esterified P content-dependent manner.

  3. Morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2015-12-16

    The present study aimed to study the morphometric and biomechanical remodeling of the small intestine during aging in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar rats, aged from 6 to 22 months, were used in the study. The body weight and the wet weight per length of duodenal and ileal segments were measured at the termination of the experiments. Morphometry data was obtained by measuring the wall thickness and cross-sectional area. The mechanical test was done as a step-wise distension experiment. The intestinal diameter and length were obtained from digitized images of the segments at pre-selected pressure levels and at the no-load and zero-stress states. Circumferential and longitudinal stresses (force per area) and strains (deformation) were computed from the length, diameter and pressure data and from the zero-stress state geometry. The duodenal and ileal dimensions increased slightly from 6 to 22 months, e.g. the wall thickness and the wall cross-sectional area increased about 4% and 25% for duodenum and 5% and 8% for ileum. The opening angle gradually decreased from 154 to 117 degrees for duodenum and from 144 to 87 degrees for ileum during aging. The circumferential stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 22 months (p<0.05) whereas the longitudinal stress-strain curves significantly shifted to the left after 18 months (p<0.01) both for duodenum and ileum. The intestinal wall became stiffer circumferentially and longitudinally during the aging. Furthermore, the intestinal wall was stiffer longitudinally than circumferentially. In conclusion, pronounced morphometric and biomechanical remodeling occurred in the rat intestine during aging.

  4. Exacerbation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal lesions by antisecretory drugs in rats: the role of intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Amagase, Kikuko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-11-01

    Antisecretory drugs such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2-RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used for the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, the effects of these drugs on NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers are not fully understood. The effects of H2-RAs and PPIs on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal lesions and small intestinal motility were examined in rats. Male Wistar rats (180-220 g) were used. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg) was administered orally in fasted or fed rats, and gastrointestinal lesions were examined 24 h after indomethacin administration. Intestinal motility was measured by using a balloon method under urethane anesthesia. Indomethacin produced multiple lesions in the gastric corpus in fasted rats and in the small intestine in fed rats: 1) H2-RAs (cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine) and PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole) markedly inhibited the formation of gastric lesions. 2) The drugs, except for lansoprazole, increased intestinal lesions. 3) H2-RAs augmented the increase in intestinal motility caused by indomethacin, and the effects of H2-RAs on motility and intestinal lesions were markedly inhibited by atropine. 4) Lansoprazole inhibited the formation of intestinal lesions, and the effect was prevented by both pharmacological ablation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons and pretreatment with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a selective inhibitor of nitric-oxide synthesis. The results suggest that: 1) inhibition of acid secretion by antisecretory drugs may exacerbate NSAID-induced intestinal lesions, 2) H2-RAs further aggravate lesions by increasing intestinal motility via the activation of cholinergic pathways, and 3) lansoprazole protects the intestinal mucosa against NSAID-related ulcerative stimuli.

  5. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Protective effect of baicalin on the small intestine in rats with food allergy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiu-Mei; Yan, Jing-Bin; Huang, Kai-Yu; Pan, Tong-Tong; Xu, Zhang; Lu, Hua-Jun

    2017-09-26

    The therapeutic effect of baicalin and its mechanism were explored. A total of 30 Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups of 10: ovalbumin group (OVA group), baicalin intervention group (HQ group), and saline-group (NC group). Serum OVA-IgE antibody levels were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); and diarrhea in rats was observed. Animals were sacrificed at week seven. Then, a 5-cm long duodenum beneath the Treitz ligament was collected from each rat, and was fixed, embedded, sliced and stained with toluidine blue to evaluate the integrity of mast cells. Next, pathological changes of the intestine were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and the ultrastructure of the intestinal mucosa was observed under a transmission electron microscope. Serum OVA-sIgE level were significantly lower (at sixth week, OVA group: 12.86±1.35, HQ group: 3.47±0.51, F=117.05, P<0.01), the number of eosinophils significantly decreased (HQ group: 2.73±1.02, OVA group: 16.48±2.32, P<0.01), mast cell integrated rate was significantly increased (HQ group: 89.90±4.43, OVA group: 35.30±9.78, P<0.01) uniform small intestinal villi were observed, the organelles were basically normal, and lesions were significantly fewer in the HQ group, compared with the OVA group. Baicalin can effectively reduce serum OVA-sIgE in rats with food allergy, increase mast cell integrated rate and alleviate intestinal pathological changes. Hence, baicalin has a good therapeutic effect on food allergy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestinal mucosa in rats.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G E; Erokhina, M V; Abramchuk, S S; Shaitan, K V; Raspopov, R V; Smirnova, V V; Vasilevskaya, L S; Gmoshinski, I V; Kirpichnikov, M P; Tutelyan, V A

    2012-12-01

    Penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles into enterocytes after their administration into isolated loop of rat small intestine was shown in vivo by transmission electron microscopy. Using electron diffraction, titanium dioxide nanoparticles were identified in the apical regions of the cells under plasma membranes and in deeper parts of the cytoplasm as solitary objects or small aggregations. Water dispersions of nanoparticles (3-h exposure to high concentrations) caused no appreciable morphological changes in enterocyte ultrastructure. A 28-day subacute intragastric administration of water dispersion of nanoparticles to rats led to titanium accumulation in the liver, their level was significantly higher than in the control group, which was shown by mass spectrometry with inductive-bound plasma. These data indicated the possibility of penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles through the gastrointestinal barrier under near-physiological conditions.

  8. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  9. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  10. Targeted enhancement of oleoylethanolamide production in proximal small intestine induces across-meal satiety in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jin; Kim, Janet; Oveisi, Fariba; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele

    2008-07-01

    Pharmacological administration of the natural lipid amide, oleoylethanolamide (OEA), inhibits food intake in free-feeding rodents by prolonging latency to feed and postmeal interval. This anorexic effect is mediated by activation of type-alpha peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR-alpha). Food intake stimulates mucosal cells in duodenum and jejunum to generate OEA, suggesting that this lipid-derived messenger may act as a local satiety hormone. As a test of this hypothesis, here, we examined whether targeted enhancement of OEA production in the small intestine affects feeding behavior in rats. We constructed an adenoviral vector (Ad-NPLD) that directs overexpression of the enzyme N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)-phospholipase D (PLD), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAPE to generate OEA. Intraduodenal injection of the Ad-NPLD vector resulted in a time-dependent increase in NAPE-PLD expression and OEA production, which was restricted to the proximal small intestine. No such effect was observed after administration of a control adenoviral vector. Enhanced OEA production in Ad-NPLD-injected animals was temporally associated with increased expression of two PPAR-alpha target genes (PPAR-alpha and CD36) and with decreased food intake. The hypophagic phenotype of Ad-NPLD-injected rats was attributable to increase feeding latency and postmeal interval, rather than decreased meal size. The results suggest that localized changes in OEA production in the small intestine, such as those produced by food intake, are sufficient to induce in rats a state of across-meal satiety similar to that elicited by systemic administration of exogenous OEA.

  11. Activation of transcription factor AP-1 in response to thermal injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Tao; Wan, Changrong; Liu, Xiaoxi; Gao, Zhimin; Hou, Xiaolin; Jiang, Linshu; Liu, Fenghua

    2015-07-11

    Our previous studies indicated that heat stress can cause significant damage to the intestinal epithelium and induce differential expression of many genes in rat small intestine. The transcription factors AP-1 and NF-κB, which act as important mediators by binding to specific DNA sequences within gene promoters, regulate the transcription of genes associated with immune regulation, stress response and cell fate. To determine whether AP-1 and NF-κB are involved in hyperthermia-induced injury in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells, we investigated their activity, and the expression of related proteins, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and western blotting, respectively. Heat stress resulted in severe damage to the epithelium of the small intestine. The cell morphology and viability were obviously altered when IEC-6 cell was exposed to hyperthermia. AP-1 was activated in the small intestine of heat-stressed rats, as was phosphorylation of the JNK signaling pathway. In IEC-6 cell line, AP-1 activation in groups exposed to 42 °C for 1 h, 2 h and 4 h was significantly increased. In contrast, NF-κB was not activated in both in vivo and in vitro models. These results reveal that AP-1 is likely to play an important role in regulating gene transcription in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells during exposure to heat stress.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Heat- and Shake-Induced Injury in the Rat Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Peng; Xu, Jianqin; He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Yin, Jie; Wan, Changrong; mei, Chen; Yin, Yulong; Xu, Xiaolong; Xia, Zhaofei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms underlying damage to rat small intestine in heat- and shake-induced stress. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and a 3-day stressed group treated 2 h daily for 3 days on a rotary platform at 35°C and 60 r/min. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained paraffin sections of the jejunum following stress revealed shedding of the villus tip epithelial cells and lamina propria exposure. Apoptosis increased at the villus tip and extended to the basement membrane. Photomicrographs revealed that the microvilli were shorter and sparser; the nuclear envelope invaginated and gaps in the karyolemma increased; and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) swelled significantly. Gene microarray analysis assessed 93 differentially expressed genes associated with apoptosis, ER stress, and autophagy. Relevant genes were compiled from the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Forty-one genes were involved in the regulation of apoptosis, fifteen were related to autophagy, and eleven responded to ER stress. According to KEGG, the apoptosis pathways, mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK) signaling pathway, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, and regulation of autophagy were involved. Caspase3 (Casp3), caspase12 (Casp12), and microtubule-associate proteins 1 light chain 3(LC3) increased significantly at the villus tip while mTOR decreased; phosphorylated-AKT (P-AKT) decreased. ER stress was involved and induced autophagy and apoptosis in rat intestinal damage following heat and shake stress. Bioinformatic analysis will help determine the underlying mechanisms in stress-induced damage in the small intestine. PMID:26636675

  13. The effects of age on mucosal morphology and epithelial cell production in rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R M

    1977-01-01

    Six groups of male Wistar rats were used, with mean weights of 29, 63, 97, 161, 249 and 399 g. Pieces of small intestine from three sites were examined after staining in bulk with the Feulgen reaction. Crypt/villus ratio (the number of crypts per villus) rose with age at all three sites, Villus height and crypt depth were measured on microdissected specimens. Villi in the proximal intestine were always taller than those distally. Proximal villi increased in height in successively older rats, except in the oldest group. Villi at the two distal sites tended to be tall in the youngest group of rats, but suffered a temporary reduction in height in the next two age groups. Crypt depth increased markedly within the first three age groups, and more slowly thereafter. Colchicine-metaphase accumulation rate was estimated from counts on microdissected intact crypts. The rate was low in the youngest group (8 cells/crypt/hour) but about 30 cells/crypt/hour in all other groups. After the changes during the early phase of rapid growth, no marked changes were seen during later life. The significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:885792

  14. Sympathetic axonopathies and hyperinnervation in the small intestine smooth muscle of aged Fischer 344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Powley, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that the intrinsic enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract sustains neuronal losses and reorganizes as it ages. In contrast, age-related remodeling of the extrinsic sympathetic projections to the wall of the gut is poorly characterized. The present experiment, therefore, surveyed the sympathetic projections to the aged small intestine for axonopathies. Furthermore, the experiment evaluated the specific prediction that catecholaminergic inputs undergo hyperplastic changes. Jejunal tissue was collected from 3-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month-old male Fischer 344 rats, prepared as whole mounts consisting of the muscularis, and processed immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzymatic marker for norepinephrine, and either the protein CD163 or the protein MHCII, both phenotypical markers for macrophages. Four distinctive sympathetic axonopathy profiles occurred in the small intestine of the aged rat: (1) swollen and dystrophic terminals, (2) tangled axons, (3) discrete hyperinnervated loci in the smooth muscle wall, including at the bases of Peyer's patches, and (4) ectopic hyperplastic or hyperinnervating axons in the serosa/subserosal layers. In many cases, the axonopathies occurred at localized and limited foci, involving only a few axon terminals, in a pattern consistent with incidences of focal ischemic, vascular, or traumatic insult. The present observations underscore the complexity of the processes of aging on the neural circuitry of the gut, with age-related GI functional impairments likely reflecting a constellation of adjustments that range from selective neuronal losses, through accumulation of cellular debris, to hyperplasias and hyperinnervation of sympathetic inputs. PMID:24104187

  15. GABA-related actions in isolated in vitro preparations of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Krantis, A; Harding, R K

    1987-09-11

    Longitudinal organ bath preparations of the rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum were tested for their responsiveness to GABA-receptor agonists. The GABAA-receptor agonists, GABA and 3APS, induced non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic relaxations and/or contractions, although the magnitude and type of response varied depending upon the region tested. All regions relaxed to applied GABA or 3APS, however the jejunum and ileum also responded with cholinergic contractions. These relaxant and contractile actions were neurogenic and sensitive to blockade by the GABA antagonists bicuculline or picrotoxinin, and desensitization to either agonist. The GABAB-receptor agonist baclofen, caused a reduction in electrically evoked cholinergic contractions. These inhibitory actions of baclofen were insensitive to bicuculline or picrotoxinin. Taken together, these results show that GABA-ergic actions in the rat small intestine are mediated by two pharmacologically distinct neural receptor populations, the GABAA and GABAB sites, the distribution and sensitivity of which differ along the length of the small intestine.

  16. Glutamine supplementation and deprivation: effect on artificially reared rat small intestinal morphology.

    PubMed

    Potsic, Bradley; Holliday, Nicolette; Lewis, Pat; Samuelson, Donald; DeMarco, Vincent; Neu, Josef

    2002-09-01

    The mechanisms of how glutamine benefits critically ill patients have not been established. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dietary and endogenously produced glutamine on small intestinal morphology using light and transmission electron microscopy in artificially reared rat pups. It was hypothesized that deprivation of dietary glutamine leads to intestinal disease that is exacerbated by inhibition of glutamine synthetase by methionine sulfoximine (MS). Rat pups were placed into five different test groups: The first was a reference group that was reared by their mother. The other four groups were reared artificially and received a 10% Travasol amino acid solution at 5 g/kg per day, which does not contain glutamine, added to a mixture containing carbohydrates, lipids, and vitamins. This dose was chosen because it represents an approximation of the amount of glutamine these rats would be receiving in a normal rat diet (approximately 40 g/kg per day total protein, 10 to 15% of which is glutamine + glutamate). The glutamine was manipulated by adding glutamine (Q) or MS or both. The four groups were as follows: MS-Q-, MS-Q+, MS+Q-, and MS+Q+. Light microscopy revealed the greatest blunting of villus height in the ileum of rats from the MS+Q- group when compared with the MS-Q+ group (123 +/- 48.9 micro m versus 207 +/- 36 microm, p < 0.05). The other two groups exhibited intermediate villus heights, but all were shorter than the villi from the mother-reared animals. The number of villi per unit length of bowel was also lowest in the animals that were treated with MS and not provided with dietary glutamine. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated breakdown of the epithelial junctions in the glutamine-deprived and glutamine synthetase-inhibited intestines. Glutamine-deprived animals also displayed sloughing of microvilli, decreased actin cores, and degeneration of the terminal web. In summary, these studies support the hypothesis that

  17. Effect of protein deficiency on macroelement and trace element levels of weanling rats' small intestine and liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Kilicalp, D; Dede, S; Belge, F; Tatar, M

    2005-12-01

    Protein energy malnutrition has become a major health issue in developing countries. In the present study, the effect of protein deficiency on the small intestine and liver tissue content of macroelements and trace elements was investigated in weanling rats. Forty-five male weanling Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. The control group (C) was fed a standard diet containing 25% casein, whereas the two experimental groups E1 and E2 consumed 12% and 3% casein, respectively, over a period of 45 d. The tissue samples were analyzed for zinc, copper, iron, manganese, calcium, and magnesium by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The protein-deficient groups showed increased levels of iron in both tissues and decreased manganese in small intestine tissue from the E1 group. No other differences were found for the other elements. These results suggest that protein deficiency might cause iron accumulation in the liver and intestine and decreases of manganese in the small intestine.

  18. Longitudinal residual strain and stress-strain relationship in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yanling; Fan, Yanhua; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-06-07

    To obtain a more detailed description of the stress-free state of the intestinal wall, longitudinal residual strain measurements are needed. Furthermore, data on longitudinal stress-strain relations in visceral organs are scarce. The present study aims to investigate the longitudinal residual strain and the longitudinal stress-strain relationship in the rat small intestine. The longitudinal zero-stress state was obtained by cutting tissue strips parallel to the longitudinal axis of the intestine. The longitudinal residual stress was characterized by a bending angle (unit: degrees per unit length and positive when bending outwards). Residual strain was computed from the change in dimensions between the zero-stress state and the no-load state. Longitudinal stresses and strains were computed from stretch experiments in the distal ileum at luminal pressures ranging from 0-4 cmH2O. Large morphometric variations were found between the duodenum and ileum with the largest wall thickness and wall area in the duodenum and the largest inner circumference and luminal area in the distal ileum (p < 0.001). The bending angle did not differ between the duodenum and ileum (p > 0.5). The longitudinal residual strain was tensile at the serosal surface and compressive at the mucosal surface. Hence, the neutral axis was approximately in the mid-wall. The longitudinal residual strain and the bending angle was not uniform around the intestinal circumference and had the highest values on the mesenteric sides (p < 0.001). The stress-strain curves fitted well to the mono-exponential function with determination coefficients above 0.96. The alpha constant increased with the pressure, indicating the intestinal wall became stiffer in longitudinal direction when pressurized. Large longitudinal residual strains reside in the small intestine and showed circumferential variation. This indicates that the tissue is not uniform and cannot be treated as a homogenous material. The longitudinal stiffness

  19. Longitudinal residual strain and stress-strain relationship in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Yanling; Fan, Yanhua; Zhao, Jingbo; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Background To obtain a more detailed description of the stress-free state of the intestinal wall, longitudinal residual strain measurements are needed. Furthermore, data on longitudinal stress-strain relations in visceral organs are scarce. The present study aims to investigate the longitudinal residual strain and the longitudinal stress-strain relationship in the rat small intestine. Methods The longitudinal zero-stress state was obtained by cutting tissue strips parallel to the longitudinal axis of the intestine. The longitudinal residual stress was characterized by a bending angle (unit: degrees per unit length and positive when bending outwards). Residual strain was computed from the change in dimensions between the zero-stress state and the no-load state. Longitudinal stresses and strains were computed from stretch experiments in the distal ileum at luminal pressures ranging from 0–4 cmH2O. Results Large morphometric variations were found between the duodenum and ileum with the largest wall thickness and wall area in the duodenum and the largest inner circumference and luminal area in the distal ileum (p < 0.001). The bending angle did not differ between the duodenum and ileum (p > 0.5). The longitudinal residual strain was tensile at the serosal surface and compressive at the mucosal surface. Hence, the neutral axis was approximately in the mid-wall. The longitudinal residual strain and the bending angle was not uniform around the intestinal circumference and had the highest values on the mesenteric sides (p < 0.001). The stress-strain curves fitted well to the mono-exponential function with determination coefficients above 0.96. The α constant increased with the pressure, indicating the intestinal wall became stiffer in longitudinal direction when pressurized. Conclusion Large longitudinal residual strains reside in the small intestine and showed circumferential variation. This indicates that the tissue is not uniform and cannot be treated as a homogenous

  20. A rat decellularized small bowel scaffold that preserves villus-crypt architecture for intestinal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Garriboli, Massimo; Riegler, Johannes; Orlando, Giuseppe; Burns, Alan J.; Sebire, Neil J.; Smith, Virpi V.; Fishman, Jonathan M.; Ghionzoli, Marco; Turmaine, Mark; Birchall, Martin A.; Atala, Anthony; Soker, Shay; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Seifalian, Alexander; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Management of intestinal failure remains a clinical challenge and total parenteral nutrition, intestinal elongation and/or transplantation are partial solutions. In this study, using a detergent-enzymatic treatment (DET), we optimize in rats a new protocol that creates a natural intestinal scaffold, as a base for developing functional intestinal tissue. After 1 cycle of DET, histological examination and SEM and TEM analyses showed removal of cellular elements with preservation of the native architecture and connective tissue components. Maintenance of biomechanical, adhesion and angiogenic properties were also demonstrated strengthen the idea that matrices obtained using DET may represent a valid support for intestinal regeneration. PMID:22305104

  1. The mesenterially perfused rat small intestine: A versatile approach for pharmacological testings.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Dominik; Klotz, Markus; Laures, Kerstin; Clasohm, Jasmin; Bischof, Michael; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds enter the body via several major natural gateways; i.e. the lung, the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Drug application during surgical operations can lead to severe impairment of gastrointestinal motility, which can contribute to a paralytic ileus. Here we investigated an ex vivo perfused small intestine model that allows us to ascertain the influence of pharmaceuticals upon the gut. Corresponding segments from the proximal jejunum of adult rats were used. Their mesenteric arteries and veins were cannulated and the jejunal segment excised. The individual segments were placed in a custom designed perfusion chamber and perfusion performed through the intestinal lumen as well as the mesenteric superior artery. Three test drugs, which are commonly used in anesthesiology; i.e. pentobarbital, propofol and ketamine were administered via the blood vessels. Their effects upon gastrointestinal motility patterns were evaluated by optical measurements. Longitudinal and pendular movements were distinguishable and separately analyzed. Pharmacological effects of the individual substances could be investigated. Propofol (50-200 μg/ml) was found to decrease intestinal motility, especially longitudinal movements in a dose dependent manner. Pentobarbital decreased intestinal motility only at high concentrations, above 2.5 mg/ml. A dose of 2.5 mg/ml lead to an increase in longitudinal- and pendular movements in comparison to control, while ketamine (2.5-10 mg/ml) did not alter intestinal motility at all. Histological examination of the perfused segments revealed only minor changes in tissue morphology after perfusion. The perfusion approach shown here allows for the identification of compounds which interfere with gut motility in a highly sophisticated way. It is suitable for characterization of drug and dose specific changes in motility patterns and can be used in drug development and preclinical studies.

  2. Dexamethasone damages the rat stomach but not small intestine during inhibition of COX-1.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Aya; Taniguchi, Masaki; Takahira, Yuka; Tanaka, Akiko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2007-06-01

    We previously reported that inhibition of both COX-1 and COX-2 is required for the gastrointestinal ulcerogenic properties of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Inhibition of COX-1 up-regulates COX-2 expression, and the prostaglandins (PGs) produced by COX-2 help to maintain the mucosal integrity during inhibition of COX-1. In the present study we investigated whether dexamethasone damages rat gastrointestinal mucosa during inhibition of COX-1 and further developed the idea that COX-2 expression is a key event in the ulcerogenic actions of NSAIDs. Dexamethasone was given p.o. in the absence or presence of SC-560 (a selective COX-1 inhibitor), and the stomach or intestine was examined 8 or 24 hr later, respectively. Neither dexamethasone nor SC-560 alone damaged the gastrointestinal mucosa. In the presence of SC-560, however, dexamethasone damaged the stomach but not small intestine. SC-560 decreased PGE(2) levels in both tissues, with a gradual recovery accompanying the up-regulation of COX-2 expression, and both the recovery of PGE(2) levels and the expression of COX-2 were inhibited by dexamethasone. In the animals treated with SC-560, iNOS expression was up-regulated in the intestinal but not the gastric mucosa, and this response was also inhibited by dexamethasone. These results suggest a risk from steroid therapy in the stomach when COX-2 expression is up-regulated. Dexamethasone does not provoke damage in the intestine, despite inhibiting the up-regulation of COX-2 expression under conditions of PG deficiency; at least one of the reasons is that this agent prevents the expression of iNOS, a major factor in the pathogenesis of intestinal lesions.

  3. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. The effect of auranofin on glucose uptake by the isolated vascularly perfused, small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed

    McMaster, D; Love, A H

    1987-11-01

    Auranofin at a concentration of 2.5 micrograms/ml had no effect on glucose uptake by the viable, isolated, vascularly perfused, small intestine of the rat and no net movement of water was detected. No effect on glucose uptake or water movement was found when intestines from rats fed 0.1 mg/Kg body weight per day for 4 weeks were perfused with drug free medium. Mucosal damage was seen in 1 of 2 rats fed Auranofin and examined histologically.

  5. Expression and effects of metabotropic CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Christophe; Juhem, Aurélie; Peinnequin, André; Sinniger, Valérie; Bonaz, Bruno

    2005-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-like peptides mediate their effects via two receptor subtypes, CRF1 and CRF2; these receptors have functional implication in the motility of the stomach and colon in rats. We evaluated expression and functions of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the rat small intestine (i.e., duodenum and ileum). CRF(1-2)-like immunoreactivity (CRF(1-2)-LI) was localized in fibers and neurons of the myenteric and submucosal ganglia. CRF(1-2)-LI was found in nerve fibers of the longitudinal and circular muscle layers, in the mucosa, and in mucosal cells. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a stronger expression of CRF2 than CRF1 in the ileum, whereas CRF1 expression was higher than CRF2 expression in the duodenum. Functional studies showed that CRF-like peptides increased duodenal phasic contractions and reduced ileal contractions. CRF1 antagonists (CP-154,526 and SSR125543Q) blocked CRF-like peptide-induced activation of duodenal motility but did not block CRF-like peptide-induced inhibition of ileal motility. In contrast, a CRF2 inhibitor (astressin2-B) blocked the effects of CRF-like peptides on ileal muscle contractions but did not influence CRF-like peptide-induced activation of duodenal motility. These results demonstrate the presence of CRF(1-2) in the intestine and demonstrate that, in vitro, CRF-like peptides stimulate the contractile activity of the duodenum through CRF1 receptor while inhibiting phasic contractions of the ileum through CRF2 receptor. These results strongly suggest that CRF-like peptides play a major role in the regulatory mechanisms that underlie the neural control of small intestinal motility through CRF receptors.

  6. Polyamidoamine dendrimers as novel potential absorption enhancers for improving the small intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yulian; Fujimori, Takeo; Kawaguchi, Naoko; Tsujimoto, Yuiko; Nishimi, Mariko; Dong, Zhengqi; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2011-01-05

    Effects of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbable drugs were examined by an in situ closed loop method in rats. 5(6)-Carboxyfluorescein (CF), fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FDs) with various molecular weights, calcitonin and insulin were used as model drugs of poorly absorbable drugs. The absorption of CF, FD4 and calcitonin from the rat small intestine was significantly enhanced in the presence of PAMAM dendrimers. The absorption-enhancing effects of PAMAM dendrimers for improving the small intestinal absorption of CF were concentration and generation dependent and a maximal absorption-enhancing effect was observed in the presence of 0.5% (w/v) G2 PAMAM dendrimer. However, G2 PAMAM dendrimer had almost no absorption-enhancing effect on the small intestinal absorption of macromolecular drugs including FD10 and insulin. Overall, the absorption-enhancing effects of G2 PAMAM dendrimer in the small intestine decreased as the molecular weights of drug increased. However, G2 PAMAM dendrimer did not enhance the intestinal absorption of these drugs with different molecular weights in the large intestine. Furthermore, we evaluated the intestinal membrane damage with or without G2 PAMAM dendrimer. G2 PAMAM dendrimer (0.5% (w/v)) significantly increased the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the amounts of protein released from the intestinal membranes, but the activities and amounts of these toxic markers were less than those in the presence of 3% Triton X-100 used as a positive control. Moreover, G2 PAMAM dendrimer at concentrations of 0.05% (w/v) and 0.1% (w/v) did not increase the activities and amounts of these toxic markers. These findings suggested that PAMAM dendrimers at lower concentrations might be potential and safe absorption enhancers for improving absorption of poorly absorbable drugs from the small intestine.

  7. Digestion and assimilation features of dietary DAG in the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hidehiko; Hase, Tadashi; Murase, Takatoshi; Tokimitsu, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that dietary DAG oil rich in 1,3-species suppresses the postprandial increase of serum TAG level and decreases body fat accumulation, compared with TAG oil. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of DAG, we investigated the metabolic features of DAG in the small intestine with regard to the digestion pathway in the lumen and the TAG-synthesis pathway in the mucosa. When intraduodenally infused as an emulsion, TAG was digested to 1,2-DAG, 2-MAG, and FFA, whereas 1,3-DAG was digested to 1(3)-MAG and FFA. When assessed by the incorporation of [1-14C]linoleic acid in lipids, the mucosal TAG-synthesis was significantly reduced by DAG infusion compared with TAG infusion. However, the mucosal 1,3-DAG synthesis was remarkably increased in the DAG-infused rats. The total amount of mucosal 1,3-DAG was also increased (4.5-fold) after DAG infusion compared with that after TAG infusion. Next, we examined the synthesis pathway of 1,3-DAG. In cultures of the everted intestinal sacs, 1,3-DAG production required the presence of 1-MAG, suggesting that the 1,3-DAG synthesis was due to acylation of 1(3)-MAG in the DAG-infused rats. Furthermore, measurements of DAG acyltransferase activity indicated that 1,3-DAG was little utilized in TAG synthesis. These findings suggest that features of 1,3-DAG digestion and assimilation in the intestine may be responsible for the reduction of the postprandial serum TAG level by dietary DAG.

  8. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: reversibility of reduced-energy status associated with the course of expulsion from the small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Kenji; Watanabe, Naohiro

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes require energy for active establishment in the gut against intestinal flow and peristaltic motion. In this study we employed CellTiter-Glo Luminescent Cell Viability Assay to measure the ATP value of individual adult Nippostrongylus brasiliensis during the course of immune-mediated expulsion from the small intestine in rats. The ATP values of adult worms taken from the lumen of the distal small intestine were lower than worms collected from the lumen of the proximal small intestine. Moreover, values from worms in the lumen of the proximal small intestine were lower than those from worms in the mucosa, the preferred site of adult N. brasiliensis. The reduction of ATP values in worms from each region was observed not only at expulsion phase, but also at established phases of the infection suggesting that energy metabolism of the parasites is independent of host immune response. When adult worms with low ATP values on day 12 post-infection were implanted surgically into the small intestine of naïve rats, the worms re-established in recipients and completely restored the ATP values. Short in vitro culture of adult worms under low oxygen tension resulted in low ATP value in the worms. These results suggested that adult worms were dislodged from their preferred site by intact energy metabolism activity.

  9. Whey protein hydrolysates enhance water absorption in the perfused small intestine of anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Noma, Teruyuki; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on the water absorption rate in the small intestine using a rat small intestine perfusion model. The rate was significantly higher with 5 g/L WPH than with 5 g/L soy protein hydrolysates or physiological saline (p < 0.05). WPH dose-dependently increased the water absorption rate in the range of 1.25-10.0 g/L. WPH showed a significantly higher rate than an amino acid mixture whose composition was equal to that of WPH (p < 0.05). The addition of 4-aminomethylbenzoic acid, an inhibitor of PepT1, significantly suppressed WPH's enhancement of water absorption (p < 0.05). The rate of water absorption was significantly correlated with that of peptides/amino acids absorption in WPH (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). These data suggest that WPH have a high water absorption-promoting effect, to which PepT1 contributes.

  10. Regulation of metallothionein gene expression and cellular zinc accumulation in a rat small intestinal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, J.M.; Cousins, R.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The effects of extracellular zinc concentration on metallothionein gene expression and cellular zinc accumulation were studied in IRD-98 cells. This is a non-transformed clonal line established by Negrel, et al. from fetal rat small intestine which possess characteristics of small bowel epithelial cells. Cells were maintained in DMEM and grown to confluent monolayers. The response to media zinc concentrations over the range of 5-150 {mu}mol/L was assessed. After 24 h in culture, cell zinc and metallothionein protein concentrations were significantly increased in cells provided higher levels of media zinc. Subsequent time course experiments showed that cells exposed to higher zinc levels had significant elevations in both metallothionein mRNA, peaking at 24 h, and metallothionein protein increasing through 48 h. Furthermore, cell zinc concentrations were significantly increased. At 48 h of culture, greater than 50% of the additional cellular zinc accumulated could be attributed to elevated metallothionein protein levels. These cells represent a zinc-responsive model to examine the mechanism of zinc uptake and transcellular transport by intestinal cells and the regulatory factors involved.

  11. Intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation following small bowel transplantation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Zhong, R.; Wang, P.Z.; Chen, H.F.; Garcia, B.; Behme, R.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J. )

    1991-08-01

    In addition to its role in absorbing nutrients, the intestinal mucosa provides an important barrier against toxins and bacteria in the bowel lumen. The present study evaluated gut barrier function following orthotopic (in continuity) intestinal grafting in rats. Graft histology, intestinal permeability, and bacterial translocation to the grafted mesenteric lymph nodes, the host's liver, and the host's spleen were assessed on the 3rd, 5th, and 7th postoperative days. The study group received no immunosuppression after allotransplantation. The two control groups included rats with isografts and rats with cyclosporine-treated allografts. On the 7th POD, the study animals had moderate transmural inflammation due to rejection, with normal histology in the isografts and CsA-treated allografts; increased intestinal permeability, measured by urinary excretion of oral 51Cr-EDTA (P less than 0.01); and increased number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen (P less than 0.05). The number of bacteria in the MLN and spleen of the study group positively correlated with the changes in intestinal permeability (P less than 0.05). Rejection of the orthotopic intestinal graft leads to increased intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation from the lumen of the graft to the host's reticuloendothelial system. Measures to improve gut barrier function and antibiotic therapy during rejection episodes may help reduce the incidence of septic complications after intestinal grafting.

  12. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  13. The effect of oat β-glucan on in vitro glucose diffusion and glucose transport in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Li; Qian, Haifeng; Qi, Xiguang; Ding, Xiangli; Hu, Bo; Li, Jiajia

    2016-01-30

    Many previous studies have reported the role of oat β-glucan (OBG) in the reduction of postprandial glucose, and hypothesised that OBG may form a protective layer along the intestinal wall, acting as a viscous barrier to decrease glucose transportation. This study examined whether the molecular weight (MW) and concentration of OBG affected the diffusion of glucose in vitro. The effect of OBG on glucose transportation in vitro and sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) activity in the everted small intestines of normal rats was also examined. In vitro, higher MWs and concentrations of OBG increased the inhibitory effects on glucose diffusion and glucose adsorption. The transport of glucose by glucose transporters and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in the small intestinal mucosa of rats were significantly lower following the addition of OBG than those in the absence of OBG at the same time-points throughout glucose transportation (P < 0.05). In the OBG-treated group, the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity decreased with increasing OBG MW. However, as the concentration of OBG in the solution increased, the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity in the small intestine increased due to stronger gastrointestinal motility. We also found that higher MWs of OBG had a greater inhibitory effect on intestinal disaccharidase activities in vitro. Oat β-glucan is able to adsorb glucose molecules, inhibit glucose transport, decrease the concentration of available glucose and suppress disaccharidase activities in the small intestine. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Penile enhancement using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Leungwattanakij, S; Pummangura, N; Ratana-Olarn, K

    2006-01-01

    Several biodegradable materials have been experimented for penile enhancement, but none show the potential for clinical use. This study was designed to use porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) augmenting the normal tunica albuginea to increase the functional girth of the rat penis. In all, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats constituted the study population. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of the control (n=10) and group 2 (n=10) consisted of rats that underwent penile enhancement by a longitudinal I-shaped incision of the tunica albuginea on both sides, and the dissection of the plane between tunica albuginea and cavernosal tissue was carried out (n=10). The incision was then patched with a 3 x 10 mm2 piece of SIS, using a 6/0 nylon suture material. The penile length and mid-circumference were then measured using a Vernier Caliper before and 2 months after surgery. All rat penises underwent histological examination using Masson's trichome and Verhoff's van Giesen's stain for collagen and elastic fibers. The penile length, mid-circumference and degree of fibrosis score were expressed as mean+/-s.e. (standard error) and analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. A statistical significance was accepted at P-value < or =0.05. Our results showed similar preoperative penile length and circumference in both groups. However, 2 months after the surgery, the mean penile circumference of the SIS group has grown significantly larger than the control group, while the mean penile length remained unchanged. The histological study of the rat penises revealed minimal amounts of fibrosis under the graft, and the elastic fibers of the graft showed orientation in a circular manner. In conclusion, SIS appears promising for material use in a penile enhancement.

  15. Disorders of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal ... Disorders of the Stomach Disorders of the Small Intestine Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the ...

  16. Study of the effector mechanism involved in the production of haemorrhagic necrosis of the small intestine in rat passive anaphylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Pellón, M. I.; Steil, A. A.; Furió, V.; Sánchez Crespo, M.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effector mechanism of intestinal necrosis in rat anaphylaxis was studied following several complementary approaches: (i) the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) belonging to different classes (IgG1, IgG2b and IgE anti-DNP), (ii) the assay of mediators, and (iii) the use of pharmacological tools. 2. Lethality and haemorrhagic necrosis of the small intestine were observed in IgE-sensitized rats, whereas IgG mAb produced milder physiological disturbances. 3. Inhibition of leukotriene biosynthesis reduced the drop of systemic blood pressure (BP) and the extent of protein-rich plasma exudation but it did not influence the haemorrhagic component of intestinal necrosis. 4. The antihistamine, pyrilamine, partially diminished the haemorrhagic component of the intestinal necrosis. 5. The involvement of mediators related to platelet-activating factor (PAF) was studied by examining the pharmacological effects of these autacoids and of PAF-receptor antagonists (PCA4248, UR12460 and BB823). PAF induced intestinal lesions similar to those observed in IgE-sensitized rats and PAF-receptor antagonists markedly decreased haemorrhage in IgE-sensitized rats. 6. PAF levels were transiently increased after dinitrophenol (DNP)- bovine serum albumin (BSA) challenge in the small intestine of IgE-sensitized rats. 7. These data stress differences in the outcome of anaphylaxis related to the type of receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulins that are involved. IgE is the antibody class that elicits the most severe response due to the activation of mast cells via Fc epsilon RI (surface receptors that bind IgE antibodies with high affinity), and the only one able to produce intestinal haemorrhagic necrosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952870

  17. The Correlation Between the Expression of Differentiation Markers in Rat Small Intestinal Mucosa and the Transcript Levels of Schlafen 3

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Pavlo L.; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The normal absorptive function and structural maintenance of the intestinal mucosa depend on a constant process of proliferation of enterocytic stem cells followed by progressive differentiation toward a mature phenotype. The mechanisms that govern enterocytic differentiation in the mucosa of the small intestine are poorly understood. OBJECTIVE To determine whether schlafen 3 (but not other schlafen proteins) act in vivo and whether its effects are limited to the small intestine. We have previously demonstrated in nonmalignant rat intestinal IEC-6 cells that schlafen 3 levels correlate with the expression of various differentiation markers in vitro in response to differentiation stimuli. DESIGN Randomized controlled experiment. SETTING Animal science laboratory. PARTICIPANTS Male Sprague-Dawley rats 8 to 13 weeks old. MAINOUTCOMES AND MEASURES Messenger RNA (mRNA) from jejunal and colonic mucosa was isolated, and transcript levels of schlafen proteins 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 13, and 14; sucrase isomaltase (SI); dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (Dpp4); glucose transporter type 2 (Glut2); and villin were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. We tested parallel variations in protein levels by Western blotting and Dpp4 enzyme activity. RESULTS The transcript level of schlafen 3 (Slfn3) correlated with the levels of the differentiation markers SI, Dpp4, Glut2, and villin. However, the expression of schlafen proteins 1, 2, 4, 5, 13, and 14 did not correlate with the expression of the differentiation markers. The mucosal mRNA levels of Slfn3, SI, Glut2, and Dpp4 were all substantially higher in the rat jejunum than in colonic mucosa by a mean (SE) factor of 51.0 (13.2) for 6 rats (P < .05), 599 (99) for 8 rats (P < .01), 12.5 (5.5) for 8 rats (P < .01), and 14.0 (3.9) for 8 rats (P < .01), respectively. In IEC-6 cells, infection with adenovirus-expressing GFP-tagged Slfn3 significantly increased Slfn3 expression and Dpp4-specific activity

  18. The correlation between the expression of differentiation markers in rat small intestinal mucosa and the transcript levels of schlafen 3.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Pavlo L; Basson, Marc D

    2013-11-01

    The normal absorptive function and structural maintenance of the intestinal mucosa depend on a constant process of proliferation of enterocytic stem cells followed by progressive differentiation toward a mature phenotype. The mechanisms that govern enterocytic differentiation in the mucosa of the small intestine are poorly understood. To determine whether schlafen 3 (but not other schlafen proteins) act in vivo and whether its effects are limited to the small intestine. We have previously demonstrated in nonmalignant rat intestinal IEC-6 cells that schlafen 3 levels correlate with the expression of various differentiation markers in vitro in response to differentiation stimuli. Randomized controlled experiment. Animal science laboratory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats 8 to 13 weeks old. Messenger RNA (mRNA) from jejunal and colonic mucosa was isolated, and transcript levels of schlafen proteins 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 13, and 14; sucrase isomaltase (SI); dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (Dpp4); glucose transporter type 2 (Glut2); and villin were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We tested parallel variations in protein levels by Western blotting and Dpp4 enzyme activity. The transcript level of schlafen 3 (Slfn3) correlated with the levels of the differentiation markers SI, Dpp4, Glut2, and villin. However, the expression of schlafen proteins 1, 2, 4, 5, 13, and 14 did not correlate with the expression of the differentiation markers. The mucosal mRNA levels of Slfn3, SI, Glut2, and Dpp4 were all substantially higher in the rat jejunum than in colonic mucosa by a mean (SE) factor of 51.0 (13.2) for 6 rats (P < .05), 599 (99) for 8 rats (P < .01), 12.5 (5.5) for 8 rats (P < .01), and 14.0 (3.9) for 8 rats (P < .01), respectively. In IEC-6 cells, infection with adenovirus-expressing GFP-tagged Slfn3 significantly increased Slfn3 expression and Dpp4-specific activity compared with GFP-expressing virus (in 6 rats; P < .05). Taken together with our

  19. Ghrelin upregulates PepT1 activity in the small intestine epithelium of rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingquan; Shi, Bin; Shi, Kai; Ma, Guoguang; Zhang, Hongze; Lou, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongxiang; Wan, Shengxia; Liang, Dongyu

    2017-02-01

    Sepsis causes nutritional substrate malabsorption; hence, preventing gut barrier problems and improving the nutritional status in sepsis is a compelling issue. We tested whether ghrelin administration affects peptide transporter 1 (PepT1) activity in the intestinal epithelium of rats with sepsis. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated, sepsis, and ghrelin-treated groups. The cecum of sham-operated rats was separated after laparotomy without ligation and perforation. Sepsis group rats underwent cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Mucosal specimens were used for immunohistochemstry, real-time PCR, and western blotting to detect PepT1 distribution, and mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. TNF-α, IL-1β, and ghrelin levels were estimated in serum and intestinal mucosal tissue by ELISA. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure PepT1 uptake by the epithelial cells. Moreover, survival, body weight, and food intake of the rats were recorded during the 7-day treatment period. All rats in the sham-operated group survived, and 80% of rats in the sepsis group died within 7d of CLP. Treatment with ghrelin attenuated the CLP-induced body weight loss, intestine mucosa damage, and the survival rate was better. In addition, ghrelin attenuated increases in TNF-α and IL-1β production. The expressions of PepT1 mRNA and protein were higher in ghrelin-treated group rats than in sepsis rats. Moreover, the uptake function of PepT1 was better in ghrelin-treated group rats. Ghrelin treatment can reduce the inflammatory response and greatly upregulate the physiological function of PepT1 in intestinal epithelial cells of rats with sepsis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Oral insulin stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover following massive small bowel resection in a rat and a cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Ben Lulu, Shani; Coran, Arnold G; Shehadeh, Naim; Shamir, Raanan; Mogilner, Jorge G; Sukhotnik, Igor

    2012-02-01

    We have recently reported that oral insulin (OI) stimulates intestinal adaptation after bowel resection and that OI enhances enterocyte turnover in correlation with insulin receptor expression along the villus-crypt axis. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of OI on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis in a rat model of short bowel syndrome (SBS) and in a cell culture model. Caco-2 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of insulin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by FACS cytometry. Cell viability was investigated using the Alamar Blue technique. Male rats were divided into three groups: Sham rats underwent bowel transection, SBS rats underwent a 75% bowel resection, and SBS-OI rats underwent bowel resection and were treated with OI given in drinking water (1 U/ml) from the third postoperative day. Parameters of intestinal adaptation, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis were determined on day 15. Real time PCR was used to determine the level of bax and bcl-2 mRNA and western blotting was used to determine bax, bcl-2, p-ERK and AKT protein levels. Statistical analysis was performed using the one-way ANOVA test, with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with insulin resulted in a significant increase in cell proliferation (twofold increase after 24 h and 37% increase after 48 h) and cell viability (in a dose-dependent manner), but did not change cell apoptosis. In a rat model of SBS, treatment with OI resulted in a significant increase in all parameters of intestinal adaptation. Elevated cell proliferation rate in insulin treated rats was accompanied by elevated AKT and p-ERK protein levels. Decreased cell apoptosis in SBS-INS rats corresponded with a decreased bax/bcl-2 ratio. Oral insulin stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover after massive small bowel resection in a rat model of SBS and a cell culture model.

  1. Suppression by Trypanosoma brucei of anaphylaxis-mediated ion transport in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S S; Castro, G A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that failure of hosts infected with Trypanosoma brucei to express type 1 hypersensitivity is related to this parasite's ability to down-regulate IgE production, and not to an innate lack of allergenicity of T. brucei antigens, was tested by studying anaphylaxis-induced changes in net epithelial ion transport in rats. Transport changes were quantified electrophysiologically in vitro, as a change in transmural short-circuit current when sensitized intestine was challenged with homologous antigen. Rats injected parenterally with trypanosome antigen elicited intestinal anaphylaxis in response to antigenic challenge, whereas the intestine of rats infected with T. brucei failed to respond. Infection with T. brucei also suppressed the anaphylactic response in rats sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin and T. spiralis-derived antigens. In these cases suppression was related to the ability of T. brucei to block production of IgE, and not to the physiological failure of the epithelial response. However, in rats sensitized by infection with T. spiralis, neither the anaphylactic response nor IgE production were inhibited by T. brucei. Furthermore, intestinal mastocytosis normally associated with trichinosis was unaffected by the trypanosome infection. Results support the conclusion that the failure to express anaphylaxis in T. brucei-infected rats is due to the inhibition of IgE production and not to the lack of allergenicity of trypanosome antigens. PMID:8206518

  2. Inhibition of small-intestinal sugar absorption mediated by sodium orthovanadate Na3VO4 in rats and its mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Jing; Du, Jie; Wang, Ning; Du, Zhi-Min; Yang, Bao-Feng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of sodium orthovanadate on small-intestinal glucose and maltose absorption in rats and its mechanism. METHODS: Normal Wistar rats were lavaged with sodium orthovanadate (16 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg) for 6 d. Blood glucose values were measured after fasting and 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 h after glucose and maltose feeding with oxidation-enzyme method. α-glucosidase was abstracted from the upper small intestine, and its activity was examined. mRNA expression of α-glucosidase and glucose-transporter 2 (GLUT2) in epithelial cells of the small intestine was observed by in situ hybridization. RESULTS: Sodium orthovanadate could delay the increase of plasma glucose concentration after glucose and maltose loading, area under curve (AUC) in these groups was lower than that in control group. Sodium orthovanadate at dosages of 10 μmol/L, 100 μmol/L and 1000 μmol/L could suppress the activity of α-glucosidase in the small intestine of normal rats, with an inhibition rate of 68.18%, 87.22% and 91.91%, respectively. Sodium orthovanadate reduced mRNA expression of α-glucosidase and GLUT2 in epithelial cells of small intestine. CONCLUSION: Sodium orthovanadate can reduce and delay the absorption of glucose and maltose. The mechanism may be that it can inhibit the activity and mRNA expression of α-glucosidase, as well as mRNA expression of GLUT2 in small intestine. PMID:15534916

  3. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Small Intestine in Rats After Six-Month-Long Exposure to Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Belyaeva, N N; Sycheva, L P; Savostikova, O N

    2016-10-01

    Structural and functional analysis of the small intestinal villi in outbred rats was performed after treatment with multiwalled carbon nanotube suspension in comparison with the effects of fine charcoal suspension. Chronic (6 months) exposure to nanotubes in a concentration of 0.2 mg/liter and, particularly, 0.5 mg/liter induced significant changes in the small intestine manifested in a decrease in the number of villi without changes in the brush border integrity, increase in the number of destructed villi, and appearance of villi with apical necrosis. These abnormalities were not observed after treatment for a shorter period of time (2 months).

  4. Influence of high-calorie (cafeteria) diets on the population of Paneth cells in the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed

    Becerril, Adriana; Castillo-Robles, Guadalupe; González-Hernández, Margarita; Villanueva, Iván

    2005-01-01

    A high-calorie (cafeteria) diet is known to cause changes in the intestinal morphology and functioning that seem to be related to calorie overfeeding. Among the cell lineages found in the small intestine epithelium, the Paneth cell (PC) population is known to be influenced by factors related mainly to the intestinal microbiota. The role of PCs in the intestinal cell concert remains unclear, because experimental evidence suggests PC involvement in local processes other than protection against pathogens. Participation of PC in digestive mechanisms has been proposed on this basis. We have analyzed the effect of high-carbohydrate (HC) and high-fat (HF) cafeteria diets on the PC population in the small intestine of the adult rat. For 8 weeks, both HC and HF diets caused a gain in body weight, but whereas the HC-fed rats showed reduced counts of intestinal crypts per 5-mum section, the HF-fed group showed the opposite. In control rats, the number of crypts per section showed a slight tendency to decrease along the duodenum - ileum axis, whereas the number of PCs per crypt was increased towards the ileum. As a result, the number of PCs per section (calculated from these data) remained constant along the three segments of the intestine. The hypercaloric diets did not modify the general tendencies seen in the crypt and PC counts, but reduced the number of PCs per section in the duodenum by 50%. HC-fed, but not HF-fed, rats showed a similar reduction in jejunum also. These changes do not correlate particularly with any of the predictable effects of diet composition, so that a multifactorial control of PC density is proposed.

  5. Effect of prostaglandin E/sub 2/ on the small intestine of indomethacin-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Romain, N.; Dandrifosse, G.; Forget, P.; Lepoint, A.

    1987-09-07

    In the present study, the protective effect of PGE/sub 2/ on intestinal damage in indomethacin-treated adult rats was investigated. Ileal integrity was evaluated making use of different biochemical and histological parameters : activities of sucrase, maltase and diamine oxidase; concentrations of DNA, putrescine, spermidine and spermine; incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into DNA; mitotic index and mucosal thickness. Results expressed per g of mucosal weight, showed that : - maltase and diamine oxidase activities as well as DNA, spermidine and spermine concentrations decreased markedly in indomethacin-treated rats when compared to control rats; - the decrease of maltase activity as well as DNA, spermidine and spermine concentration was less pronounced in PGE/sub 2/-treated rats when compared to indomethacin-treated rats; - /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA and mitotic index values showed no significant variation in the course of different treatments; - mucosal thickness increased strongly, the PGE/sub 2/-protected rats. The authors suggest that PGE/sub 2/ could protect the rat's intestinal mucosa against the effects of indomethacin through a trophic action on intestinal villi. 15 references, 3 tables.

  6. Segmental heterogeneity of swelling-induced Cl- transport in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Diener, M; Bertog, M; Fromm, M; Scharrer, E

    1996-06-01

    The effect of cell swelling induced by hypotonic media was studied in segments of rat small intestine. In the Ussing chamber, exposure to a hypotonic medium caused a decrease in short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (Vms) in the jejunum, whereas the ileum responded with an increase in Isc and Vms. The transition from one pattern to the other was located about in the middle of the small intestine. Tissue conductance decreased in both segments, probably due to a reduction of paracellular shunt conductance induced by the cell swelling. Voltage scanning experiments revealed that the observed decrease in total tissue conductance in the ileum was caused solely by a decrease in local conductance in the villus region while the crypt conductance did not change, suggesting that the decrease in paracellular conductance of the crypts is compensated by an increase in cellular conductance. The response in both segments was dependent on the presence of Cl- and was blocked by the Cl- channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB). It was not affected by the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin. In the jejunum the swelling-induced decrease in Isc was reduced in the presence of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, or the lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid. In the ileum the Cl- secretion induced by hypotonicity was blocked by the K+ channel blocker quinine and was reversed into a decrease in Isc when serosal Ca2+ was zero. We conclude that the observed volume regulatory changes are initiated in the jejunum by an eicosanoid-mediated opening of basolateral Cl- channels and in the ileum by a Ca2+-mediated opening of K+ channels which enhances apical Cl- efflux.

  7. A new method to measure intestinal secretion using fluorescein isothiocyanate-inulin in small bowel of rats.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Abraham, Armando Salim; Judeeba, Sami; Alkukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alfadda, Tariq; Patron-Lozano, Roger; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Geibel, John P

    2015-08-01

    Small intestine ischemia can be seen in various conditions such as intestinal transplantation. To further understand the pathologic disruption in ischemia-reperfusion injury, we have developed a method to measure fluid changes in the intestinal lumen of rats. Two 10-cm rat intestine segments were procured, connected to the terminal apertures of a perfusion device, and continuously infused with 3 mL of HEPES solution (control solution) containing 50 μM of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-inulin. The perfusion device consists of concentric chambers that contain the perfused bowel segments, which are maintained at 37°C via H₂O bath. The individual chamber has four apertures as follows: two fill and/or drain the surrounding HEPES solution on the blood side of the tissue. The others provide flow of HEPES solution containing FITC-inulin through the lumens. The experimental intestine was infused with the same solution with 100 μM of Forskolin. A pump continuously circulated solutions at 6 mL/min. Samples were collected at 15-min intervals until 150 min and were measured by the nanoflourospectrometer. A mean of 6-μM decrease in the FITC-inulin concentration in the Forskolin-treated experimental intestine was observed in comparison with that in the control intestine. The FITC-inulin count dilution in the experimental intestine is a result of an increase of fluid secretion produced by the effect of Forskolin, with P values <0.0001. We demonstrate that it is possible to measure luminal fluid changes over time using our new modified perfusion system along with FITC-inulin to allow real-time determinations of fluid and/or electrolyte movement along the small intestine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  9. Reconstruction of abdominal wall musculofascial defects with small intestinal submucosa scaffolds seeded with tenocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhicheng; Peng, Zhiyou; Liu, Zhengni; Yang, Jianjun; Tang, Rui; Gu, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The repair of abdominal wall defects following surgery remains a difficult challenge. Although multiple methods have been described to restore the integrity of the abdominal wall, there is no clear consensus on the ideal material for reconstruction. This study explored the feasibility of in vivo reconstruction of a rat model of an abdominal wall defect with a composite scaffold of tenocytes and porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). In the current study, we created a 2×1.5 cm abdominal wall defect in the anterolateral abdominal wall of Sprague-Dawley rats, which were assigned into three groups: the cell-SIS construct group, the cell-free SIS scaffold group, and the abdominal wall defect group. Tenocytes were obtained from the tendons of rat limbs. After isolation and expansion, cells (2×10(7)/mL) were seeded onto the three-layer SIS scaffolds and cultured in vitro for 5 days. Cell-SIS constructs or cell-free constructs were implanted to repair the abdominal wall defects. The results showed that the tenocytes could grow on the SIS scaffold and secreted corresponding matrices. In addition, both scaffolds could repair the abdominal wall defects with no hernia recurrence. In comparison to the cell-free SIS scaffold, the composite scaffold exhibited increased vascular regeneration and mechanical strength. Furthermore, following increased time in vivo, the mechanical strength of the composite scaffold became stronger. The results indicate that the composite scaffold can provide increased mechanical strength that may be suitable for repairing abdominal wall defects.

  10. [Effects of malnutrition in utero and during lactation on various parameters of the small intestine in rats].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J M; Alvarez-Ordás, I; Fernández, S; Marín, B; Menéndez-Patterson, A

    1988-12-01

    Short and long term effects of malnutrition on the small intestine, applied to the rat in uterus and lactation, have been studied. Malnutrition was induced by feeding the pregnant rats on 14 g daily during pregnancy and 21 g during lactation. In the pups (0, 15, 30, 90 and 150 days old), body weight and wet and dry weight and length of small intestine were measured. At 2.5-3 months of age, food transformation efficiency was studied, at 3 and 5 months of age in vivo intestinal absorption of D-glucose (11 mM) was measured. The results indicate a significant decrease in intestinal morphometric parameters in malnourished animals from birth to the age of 5 months. At the age of 3 months both food transformation efficiency and in vivo absorption of glucose were significantly higher in early undernourished animals, whereas at 5 months, glucose absorption was significantly higher in control. It can thus be concluded that early malnutrition altered the small intestine development and functionality and that total recovery did not occur after 4 months on a normal diet.

  11. Glycoprotein biosynthesis in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Perdomo, Jose

    1972-01-01

    Rat small intestinal mucosa was examined for ability to produce mucins with human blood group A, B, and H activity. Blood group activity of the mucins was compared to antigenic activity of red blood cells in individual rats and the enzymatic basis for differences was investigated. Red cells in all the rats examined contained human blood group A and B antigens. All rats synthesized intestinal mucins having B and H antigenic activity but 57% failed to produce mucins with blood group A activity (A-); the remaining 43% (A+) produced A substance. The activities of five glycosyltransferases including α(1→2) fucosyltransferase, the determinant of human secretor status, were measured in the intestine of A+ and A- rats. Four enzymes were the same in both groups, while the fifth, N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase, was present only in A+ rats. The specificity of this latter enzyme, as found in the rat, appeared similar to that in humans, since it catalyzed addition of N-acetyl-D-galactosamine only to acceptors which had the H determinant structure. In the presence of the enzyme, A- mucin could be converted to A+ mucin; this was shown both by hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitin studies of the products of incubation of A- mucin with UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and the enzyme. These studies indicate that the difference between A+ and A- rats is due to the apparent absence of N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase in the intestinal mucosa of A- rats. These rats may provide experimental models for studies on the effect of ABO and secretor status on susceptibility to ulceration and carcinogenesis. Images PMID:4112001

  12. A comparison of absorption of glycerol tristearate and glycerol trioleate by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstedt, S.E.; Hayashi, H.; Kritchevsky, D.; Tso, P. )

    1990-09-01

    Generally, fats rich in saturated fatty acids raise serum cholesterol, whereas fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids lower it. There appear to be exceptions; e.g., stearic acid (18:0)-rich fats have little or no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations. This apparent lack of cholesterolemic effect of stearic acid-rich fat could be because intestinal absorption of fat is poor or subsequent plasma and/or tissue metabolism of fat is different. To investigate mechanisms involved, we compared intestinal digestion, uptake, and lymphatic transport of glycerol tristearate (TS) and glycerol trioleate (TO, 18:1). Two groups of rats bearing intestinal lymph fistulas were used. TO rats were fed intraduodenally for 8 h at a constant rate a lipid emulsion of 25 mumols/h of TO (labeled with glycerol tri(9,10 (n)-3H)oleate), 7.8 mumols of egg phosphatidylcholine, and 57 mumols of sodium taurocholate in 3 ml of phosphate-buffered saline. TS rats were fed the same lipid emulsion except that TS replaced TO and the emulsion was labeled with glyceryl (1,3-14C)tristearate. The lymph triglyceride and radioactivity were determined. After infusion, the luminal and mucosal radioactive lipid content was analyzed. The results showed that there was significantly less lipid transported in the lymph of TS rats compared with TO rats. The results also showed a significant decrease in the absorption of TS as compared with TO. This was due in part to poor lipolysis. In addition, the lipid absorbed by the intestine of the TS rats was transported into lymph less efficiently than in TO rats.

  13. Evidence for regulatory control of iron uptake from ferric maltol across the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Barrand, M. A.; Callingham, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    1. 59Fe absorption from the novel iron compound, ferric maltol, was studied in rats pretreated twice daily for two weeks with non-radioactive ferric maltol in oral doses containing 7 mg elemental iron. Tissue accumulation of 59Fe 2 h after administration of radioactive ferric maltol into the stomach was significantly lower in iron pretreated animals than in saline-treated controls. 2. 59Fe uptake from ferric maltol into isolated fragments of ileum and of duodenum was of similar magnitude in control animals but in iron-treated animals, duodenal uptake was significantly lower than that of the ileum. 3. Absorption of 59Fe was also investigated in anaesthetized rats after intestinal perfusion with saline (controls) or with 5 mM chenodeoxycholate to render the intestines more permeable. 4. Changes in permeability of the small intestine were monitored by estimating the amount of [14C]-mannitol absorbed and fluid secreted with reference to the non-absorbable [3H]-inulin in the perfusate effluents. 5. Despite the increased permeability of the intestines after bile salt treatment, there was little difference from control in the tissue accumulation of 59Fe from ferric maltol 2 h after intraduodenal administration. However 59Fe absorption from ferrous sulphate was significantly increased after bile salt treatment. 6. Gel filtration profiles of plasma made 5 and 60 min after intraduodenal administration of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol demonstrated that metal and ligand do not enter the circulation as the complex even when intestinal permeability is increased. 7. Uptake of 59Fe was investigated in isolated fragments of rat small intestine after saline or bile salt perfusion. Although 59Fe uptake from ferric maltol was somewhat greater in the bile salt-treated intestinal fragments, saturable kinetics were still observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:2015422

  14. A simple and fast method for the isolation of basolateral plasma membranes from rat small-intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Scalera, V; Storelli, C; Storelli-Joss, C; Haase, W; Murer, H

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for the analytical and preparative isolation of basolateral plasma membranes from rat small intestine. They were separated on a self-orientating Percoll (modified colloidal silica) gradient starting with a heavy microsomal-membrane fraction and involving centrifugation at 48,000 g for 1 h. (Na+ + K+)-stimulated ATPase activity, used as a marker enzyme for the basolateral plasma membrane, is enriched 20-fold compared with that found in the homogenate of isolated intestinal epithelial cells. Images PLATE 1 PMID:6245639

  15. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gmoshinskii, I.V.; Khvylya, S.I.; Kon', I.Ya.

    1987-07-01

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH)/sub 3/ was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of /sup 125/I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured.

  16. Luminal preservation of rat small intestine with University of Wisconsin or Celsior solution.

    PubMed

    Leuvenink, H G D; van Dijk, A; Freund, R L; Ploeg, R J; van Goor, H

    2005-01-01

    Luminal administration of a preservation solution that prevents mucosal injury may decrease posttransplant complications. However, luminal administration of University of Wisconsin solution (UW) is controversial. In this study, we examined the potential of Celsior as a luminal small bowel preservation solution in comparison to UW or UW enriched with glutamine. Small bowels of six normal WagRij rats were excised and divided into six equal segments. Each segment was luminally flushed with 10 mL ice-cold UW, UW with glutamine (20 g/L) or Celsior, and stored for 0, 2.5, and 24 hours at 4 degrees C. LDH, glucose, and lactate concentrations were determined in the preservation solutions. Histologic changes were determined using the Park score. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) was increased in all solutions after 2.5- and after 24-hour preservation. However, LDH was lower in Celsior than UW and UW with glutamine. Furthermore, higher glucose and lactate levels were found after 2.5- and 24-hour preservation in UW and UW with glutamine compared to Celsior. Histologically, jejunal segments were more susceptible to preservation than ileal segments, irrespective of the preservation solution used. Mucosal injury was evident after 2.5 hours (Park Scale 0-3) and increased significantly after 24 hours (park scale 3-6). Based on the lower glucose, lactate, and LDH levels in small intestines stored in Celsior, this study suggests that Celsior is a better luminal preservation solution than UW. Unfortunately, histological evaluations still show severe mucosal injury, indicating that there is a need for better luminal preservation solutions or for concomittant intravascular delivery of a preservation solution.

  17. Assessment of in Vitro Digestibility of Dietary Carbohydrates Using Rat Small Intestinal Extract.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Lazarte, Alvaro; Olano, Agustín; Villamiel, Mar; Moreno, F Javier

    2017-09-13

    There are few studies on the assessment of digestibility of nondigestible carbohydrates, despite their increasingly important role in human health. In vitro digestibility of a range of dietary carbohydrates classified as digestible (maltose, sucrose, and lactose), well-recognized (lactulose, fructooligosaccharides (FOS), and two types of galactooligosaccharides (GOS) differing in the predominant glycosidic linkage), and potential (lactosucrose and GOS from lactulose, OsLu) prebiotics using a rat small intestinal extract (RSIE) under physiological conditions of temperature and pH is described. Recognized and potential prebiotics were highly resistant to RSIE digestion although partial hydrolysis at different extents was observed. FOS and lactulose were the most resistant to digestion, followed closely by OsLu and more distantly by both types of GOS and lactosucrose. In GOS, β(1 → 6) linkages were more resistant to digestion than β(1 → 4) bonds. The reported in vitro digestion model is a useful, simple, and cost-effective tool to evaluate the digestibility of dietary oligosaccharides.

  18. Effect of fiber length of carbon nanotubes on the absorption of erythropoietin from rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukako; Venkatesan, Natarajan; Hirako, Noriko; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Takada, Kanji

    2007-06-07

    Erythropoietin (EPO) loaded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with surfactant as an absorption enhancer were prepared for the oral delivery of EPO using two types of CNTs, long and short fiber length CNTs, and the effect of CNT fiber length on the absorption efficiency of EPO was studied. After Labrasol, PEG-8 caprylic/capric glycerides, as absorption enhancer was adsorbed into long fiber CNTs of which mean fiber length was 20-80 microm, as a carrier, EPO and casein as protease inhibitor and Explotab (sodium starch glycolate) as a disintegrating agent, were mixed. The resulting solid preparation was administered into the rat jejunum and serum EPO levels were measured by ELISA. The dose of EPO, CNTs, casein and Explotab were 100 IU/kg, 5mg/kg, 25mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Serum EPO level reached to C(max), 69.0+/-3.9 mIU/ml, at 3.5+/-0.1h and AUC was 175.7+/-13.8 mIU h/ml. These values were approximately half of that obtained with short fiber length CNTs of which C(max) was 143.1+/-15.2 mIU/ml and AUC was 256.3+/-9.7 mIU h/ml. When amphoteric surfactant, Lipomin LA, sodium beta-alkylaminopropionic acid, was used to accelerate the disaggregation of long fiber length CNTs, C(max) was 36.0+/-4.9 and AUC was 96.9+/-11.9, which showed less bioavailability (BA) of EPO. These results suggest that the short fiber length CNTs deliver more both EPO and absorption enhancer to the absorptive cells of the rat small intestine and the aggregation of CNTs is not the critical factor for the oral delivery of EPO.

  19. Effect of White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Beldia) on Small Intestine Morphology and Function in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; Bergaoui, Nacef; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Trabelsi, Najoua; Zekri, Sami; Guémira, Fathi; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-12-01

    The chronic ingestion of raw or undercooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) causes functional and morphological derangement in various tissues. The major objectives of this study were to investigate the gavage effects of a raw Beldia bean variety that is widely consumed in Tunisia, on the small intestine morphology and jejunal absorption of water, electrolytes, and glucose in Wistar rats. Twenty young male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 10 rats. The first group served as the control and was gavaged with 300 mg of a rodent pellet flour suspension (RPFS), whereas the second experimental group was challenged with 300 mg of a Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS) for 10 days. Histological studies were performed using light and electron microcopy. The intestinal transport of water, sodium, potassium, and glucose was studied by perfusing the jejunal loops of the small bowels in vivo. The feeding experiments indicated that BBFS did not affect weight gain. Histomorphometric analyses showed that the villus heights, crypt depths, and crypt/villus ratios in the jejunum and ileum were greater in the BBFS-fed rats than controls. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the rats exposed to RPFS exhibited intact intestinal tracts; however, the BBFS-treated rats demonstrated intestinal alterations characterized by abnormal microvillus architectures, with short and dense or long and slender features, in addition to the sparse presence of vesicles near the brush border membrane. BBFS administration did not significantly affect glucose absorption. However, significant decreases were observed in water and electrolyte absorption compared with the uptake of the controls. In conclusion, raw Beldia beans distorted jejunum morphology and disturbed hydroelectrolytic flux.

  20. Existence of serotonin and neuropeptides-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the small and large intestines of the mole-rats (Spalax leucodon).

    PubMed

    Yaman, M; Bayrakdar, A; Tarakçı, B G

    2012-08-01

    The present study was conducted to clarify the regional distribution and relative frequency of endocrine cells secreting serotonin, substance P (SP), cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and neurotensin in the small and large intestine of the mole-rats (Spalax leucodon), by specific immunohistochemical methods. In the small and large intestine of mole-rats (Spalax leucodon), serotonin, SP and VIP were identified with various frequencies, but CCK-8 and neurotensin were not observed. Most of the IR cells in the small and large intestine were located in the intestinal crypt and epithelium however, they were more frequency in the intestinal crypt. Serotonin-IR cells were detected throughout the whole intestinal tract, predominantly in the duodenum and colon. SP-IR cells were demonstrated throughout the whole intestinal tract except for the ileum and rectum with highest frequencies in the cecum. VIP-IR cells were found in all parts of the small intestine except for the large intestine. In conclusion, the general distribution patterns and relative frequency of intestinal endocrine cells of the mole-rats (Spalax leucodon) was similar to those of some rodent species. However, some species-dependent unique distributions and frequencies characteristics of endocrine cells were also observed in the present study.

  1. Pretreatment of cromolyn sodium prior to reperfusion attenuates early reperfusion injury after the small intestine ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hei, Zi-Qing; Gan, Xiao-Liang; Luo, Gang-Jian; Li, Shang-Rong; Cai, Jun

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Cromolyn Sodium (CS) pretreated prior to reperfusion on the activity of intestinal mucosal mast cells (IMMC) and mucous membrane of the small intestine in ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury of rats. METHODS: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham group (group S), model group (group M), high and low dosage of CS groups, (treated with CS 50 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg, group C1 and C2). Intestinal IR damage was induced by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 60 min. CS was intravenouly administrated 15 min before reperfusion. Ultrastructure and counts of IMMC, intestinal structure, the expression of tryptase, levels of malondisldehyde (MDA), TNF-α, histamine and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of the small intestine were detected at the end of experiment. RESULTS: The degranulation of IMMC was seen in group M and was attenuated by CS treatment. Chiu’s score of group M was higher than the other groups. CS could attenuate the up-regulation of the Chiu’s score, the levels of MDA, TNF-α, and expression of tryptase and the down-regulation of SOD activity and histamine concentration. The Chiu’s score and MDA content were negatively correlated, while SOD activity was positively correlated to the histamine concentration respectively in the IR groups. CONCLUSION: Pretreated of CS prior to reperfusion protects the small intestine mucous from ischemia-reperfusion damage, the mechanism is inhibited IMMC from degranulation. PMID:17876882

  2. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections.

  3. Emu oil expedites small intestinal repair following 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Tran, Cuong D; Howarth, Gordon S

    2013-11-01

    Mucositis resulting from cancer chemotherapy is characterized by intestinal inflammation and ulceration. Previously, emu oil (EO) improved intestinal architecture (Br J Nutr, 2010) in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We investigated EO for its further potential to promote intestinal repair in this mucositis model. Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged with water, olive oil (OO) or EO once daily (1 mL), injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or saline on day 5 and euthanized on day 8, 9, 10 or 11. Intestinal villus height (VH) and crypt depth (CD), neutral mucin-secreting goblet cell (GC) count, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and selected cytokines were quantified; P < 0.05 was considered significant. In 5-FU-injected rats, only EO administration significantly increased VH in the ileum (day 8), jejunum and jejunum-ileum junction (days 8 and 9) compared to 5-FU controls (P < 0.05). GC count was significantly reduced by 5-FU (jejunum: days 8 and 9; ileum: day 8; P < 0.05) and EO increased ileal GC on days 10 and 11 compared to 5-FU controls. MPO activity was significantly increased in jejunum (days 8 and 9) and ileum (day 8) following 5-FU injection, compared to normal controls (P < 0.05). Both EO and OO significantly reduced jejunal MPO on days 8 and 9; however, only EO decreased ileal MPO on day 8. Cytokine levels were not significantly affected by either oil or 5-FU administration at the day 8 time point. Promotion of repair from injury could represent a new mechanism of action for EO, suggesting potential as an adjunct to conventional treatment approaches for cancer management.

  4. Adaptation of electrolytes and fluid transport in rat small and large intestine after distal small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, C M; Molina, M T; Ilundain, A

    1988-06-01

    Na+, Cl- and water transport were studied in jejunum, caecum and colon after either 50% or 80% of small bowel resection (SBR). Four weeks after surgery, dry and wet weights, net absorption in vivo of sodium, chloride and water were determined. There was a significant intestinal growth after 50% or 80% SBR except for the colon which only showed increased tissue mass after 80% SBR. Net transport was stimulated both, per organ and per unit mass. In the small intestine and caecum both organ growth and changes in cell function appear to be involved in the adaptive response, regardless the extent of the small intestine resected. In the colon, compensatory growth appear to contribute to the adaptive response only after 80% SBR, whilst the transport function of the colonocytes seems to be stimulated after both types of SBR.

  5. Thiamine outflow from the enterocyte: a study using basolateral membrane vesicles from rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Laforenza, U; Gastaldi, G; Rindi, G

    1993-01-01

    1. Rat small intestinal basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMVs) were prepared and found to be 31% non-vesiculated and 69% vesiculated, 4.9% right side out and 63.8% inside out. 2. Thiamine uptake by BLMVs followed a hyperbolic time course reaching equilibrium after 60-90 min incubation. Uptake was not affected by the transmembrane potential or by the presence or absence of Na+ or K+ in the incubation medium. 3. At concentrations below 1.25 microM, [3H]thiamine was taken up mainly by a saturable mechanism with an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) = 1.32 microM and maximal flux (Jmax) = 1.93 pmol (mg protein)-1 (4 s)-1. At higher concentrations, a non-saturable mechanism prevailed. 4. Only 29% of [3H]thiamine taken up by the vesicles was membrane bound, the remaining being translocated into the vesicular space. No thiamine phosphoesters could be detected inside the vesicles. 5. In the absence of ATP, the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase inhibitors ouabain, frusemide and vanadate reduced thiamine uptake by 35, 30 and 15% respectively. 6. In experiments conducted with K+ inside the vesicles and Na+, Mg2+ and ATP outside, the time course of thiamine uptake by BLMVs displayed an overshoot (80-90% increment) at 30 s incubation as compared to controls. When ATP was replaced with phosphocreatine, or when NaCl was replaced with isosmotic amounts of KCl, the overshoot disappeared. 7. The thiamine analogues pyrithiamine, amprolium and 4'-oxythiamine decreased the ATPase-dependent transport of [3H]thiamine by 100, 86 and 31% respectively. 8. These results provide evidence that the transport of thiamine by BLMVs is coupled directly to the hydrolysis of ATP (primary active transport). PMID:8254515

  6. Trophic status of the small intestine in young and aged rats: modulation by a yogurt-supplemented diet.

    PubMed

    Foligne, Benoit; Sénégas-Balas, Françoise; Antoine, Jean-Michel; Cayuela, Chantal; Rolf-Pedersen, Nathalie; Balas, Daniel

    2004-08-01

    Among the multifactorial causes of undernutrition in old age, gastrointestinal mucosa altered function and resulting specific malabsorption are the most relevant. Despite numerous studies that have dealt with the effects of aging on the digestive tract of mammals, results showed discrepancies in terms of proliferation and biochemical aging small intestine events. However, the slowing-down of the maturation process and the poor adaptation of metabolism and intestinal function are obvious and there is evidence that protective mechanisms are impaired with age and contribute to affecting the trophic activity and related systemic homeostasis. Good prospects to improve gastrointestinal function in the elderly are essential and research on nutritional intervention to limit and counteract age-related impairments must be extensive. Probiotics are good candidates and fermented milks might be of great interest. In the present study we first show the main structural and functional variations between 3- and 23-month-old rat small intestines. The trophic consequences of aging and nutritional adaptation under basal conditions are also analyzed and discussed after 20 days of a yogurt-supplemented specific diet in both young and aged rats. The main variations that occur with aging and yogurt diet are located in the proximal small intestine. The present findings indicate a slight improvement of morphological trophic parameters in both young and aged rats by yogurt, whereas enzymatic changes are more discrete. Despite the obvious age-related decrease in trophicity, we suggest that assessment of probiotic potentials on trophicity requires a more altered model than normal, healthy aging animals.

  7. Folate-binding protein and the absorption of folic acid in the small intestine of the suckling rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.B.; Selhub, J.

    1988-09-01

    The folate in milk is largely bound to high-affinity folate-binding protein (FBP). With an in vivo intestinal loop technique, we examined the absorption of folic acid bound to FBP (FA-FBP) in the small intestine of the suckling rat. In contrast to unbound folic acid (FA), FA-FBP is absorbed more avidly in the ileum than in the jejunum (p less than 0.025) and its absorption is not inhibited by 1 mmol sulfasalazine/L. Folate-binding activities in the mucosa of the proximal (duodenum and jejunum combined) and distal (ileum) small intestine were also examined and found to be 0.32 and 1.31 pmol/mg protein, respectively (p less than 0.001). A 6-h fast produced a 42% decrease in folate-binding activity in the distal small intestine (p less than 0.01) but did not change activity in the proximal portion. Collectively, these observations suggest that FA-FBP is absorbed by a mechanism that is distinct from that responsible for the absorption of FA and that absorption does not require prior dissociation of the vitamin-binding protein complex.

  8. Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed in rat small intestine by phytic-acid-aided matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Min; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Yoshii, Saori; Mine, Yoshinori; Matsui, Toshiro

    2013-11-05

    Enhanced visualization of small peptides absorbed through a rat intestinal membrane was achieved by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) with the aid of phytic acid as a matrix additive. Penetrants through intestinal peptide transporter 1, i.e., glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar, 147.1 m/z) and antihypertensive dipeptide, Val-Tyr (281.2 m/z), were chosen for MALDI-IMS. The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of dipeptides Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr were seen to increase by 2.4- and 8.0-fold, respectively, when using a 2',4',6'-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) matrix containing 5.0 mM phytic acid, instead of the THAP matrix alone. Owing to the phytic-acid-aided MALDI-IMS method, Gly-Sar and Val-Tyr absorbed in the rat intestinal membrane were successfully visualized. The proposed imaging method also provided useful information on intestinal peptide absorption; to some extent, Val-Tyr was rapidly hydrolyzed to Tyr by peptidases located at the intestinal microvillus during the absorption process. In conclusion, the strongly acidic additive, phytic acid, is beneficial for enhancing the visualization of small peptides using MALDI-IMS, owing to the suppression of ionization-interfering salts in the tissue.

  9. Aquaporin-6 is expressed along the rat gastrointestinal tract and upregulated by feeding in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Laforenza, Umberto; Gastaldi, Giulia; Polimeni, Mariarosa; Tritto, Simona; Tosco, Marisa; Ventura, Ulderico; Scaffino, Manuela F; Yasui, Masato

    2009-01-01

    Background Several aquaporins (a family of integral membrane proteins) have been recently identified in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and their involvement in the movement of fluid and small solutes has been suggested. In this direction we investigated, in some regions of the rat gastrointestinal tract, the presence and localization of aquaporin-6, given its peculiar function as an ion selective channel. Results RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments showed that aquaporin-6 was expressed in all the investigated portions of the rat gastrointestinal tract. The RT-PCR experiments showed that aquaporin-6 transcript was highly expressed in small intestine and rectum, and less in stomach, caecum and colon. In addition, jejunal mRNA expression was specifically stimulated by feeding. Immunoblotting analysis showed a major band with a molecular weight of about 55 kDa corresponding to the aquaporin-6 protein dimer; this band was stronger in the stomach and large intestine than in the small intestine. Immunoblotting analysis of brush border membrane vesicle preparations showed an intense signal for aquaporin-6 protein. The results of in situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that aquaporin-6 transcript is present in the isthmus, neck and basal regions of the stomach lining, and throughout the crypt-villus axis in both small and large intestine. In the latter regions, immunohistochemistry revealed strong aquaporin-6 labelling in the apical membrane of the surface epithelial cells, while weak or no labelling was observed in the crypt cells. In the stomach, an intense staining was observed in mucous neck cells and lower signal in principal cells and some parietal cells. Conclusion The results indicate that aquaporin-6 is distributed throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Aquaporin-6 localization at the apical pole of the superficial epithelial cells and its upregulation by feeding suggest that it may be involved in movements of water and anions through the epithelium

  10. Myoelectrical activity of small intestine in rats with experimental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Banach, Tomasz; Zurowski, Daniel; Kania, Dariusz; Thor, Piotr J

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility is governed by enteric nervous system being under surveillance of central and autonomic representation. In Parkinson's disease (PD) GI dysmotility has been attributed in part to peripheral action of neurotoxines. We evaluated the effect of chronic salsolinol administration on intestinal myoelectrical activity (IMA) during fasting and in response to gastric distension (GD) in rats. Fasting IMA recordings didn't reveal differences in frequency of migrating myoelectrical complexes (MMC) (p = 0.06) and dominant frequency (DF) of slow waves (p = 0.1) between salsolinol and saline group. However in response to gastrointestinal stimulation with GD in the salsolinol group DF of IMA remained unchanged whereas in the controls increased (p = 0.04). The results suggest the direct effect of salsolinol on gastro-duodenal reflexes in PD rats.

  11. Experiment K-6-17. Structural changes and cell turnover in the rats small intestine induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity associated with microgravity conditions of space flight as evidenced by negative nitrogen balance and muscle atrophy (Nicogossian and Parker, 1982; Oganov, 1981), as well as inhibited lymphocyte proliferation (Bechler and Cogoli, 1986), would be evident in cells characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. As a model, researchers chose to study the turnover of mucosal cells lining the jejunum of the small intestine, since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Under normal conditions, epithelial cells that line the small intestine are continually produced in the crypts of Lieberkuhn. These cells migrate out of the crypts onto intestinal villi, are progressively pushed up the villus as new crypt cells are formed, and ultimately reach the tip of villi where they are then descquamated. In rats, the entire process, from initial proliferation in crypts to desquamation, takes approximately 2 days (Cairnie et al., 1965; Lipkin, 1973). In this study, researchers determined the mitotic index for mucosal cells lining the proximal, middle, and distal regions of the jejunum in rats from three treatment groups (synchronous control, vivarium control and flight), and measured the depth of the crypts of Lieberkuhn and the length of villi present in each of the three jejunal regions sampled.

  12. [Effect of Tongfu granules and its constituents on barrier function of small intestine in rats with sepsis].

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Ren, Ai-Min; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shu-Wen; Wen, Yan

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the effects of Tongfu granules and its constituents on barrier function of small intestine in rats with sepsis. The male rats were divided into model group, Tongfu granules group, Rhubarb group and Magnoliae cortex group by random digits table, normal rats as control group. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 6 mg/kg) was used to reproduce sepsis model. After establishment of model, rats in Tongfu granules group were given Tongfu granules 28 g×kg(-1)×d(-1) by gavage, and Rhubarb group and Magnoliae cortex group rats were given Rhubarb or Magnoliae cortex 5 g×kg(-1)×d(-1) by gavage, while the model group was given normal saline in same quantity, once a day. Blood samples of rats were collected at 24, 48, 72 hours for measuring tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The pathological changes in intestinal mucosa were observed, and the pathological scores was estimated at 72 hours. The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were significantly higher in model group than those in control group at different time points. The serum levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were significantly lower in treatment groups than those in model group, and the level of TNF-α (ng/L) in Tongfu granules group was significantly lower than that in Rhubarb and Magnoliae cortex groups at different time points (24 hours: 44.64±1.48 vs. 47.18±1.83 and 46.96±2.23, 48 hours: 51.38±1.36 vs. 57.17±2.23 and 59.41±2.01, 72 hours: 55.54±2.58 vs. 64.34±1.02 and 65.96±3.45, all P<0.05), and IL-8 (ng/L) level at 72 hours was significantly lower than that in Magnoliae cortex group (65.53±4.52 vs. 69.14±2.82,P<0.05). The scores of the lesions were significantly higher in model group than that in control group (3.90±0.17 vs. 0). The scores of Rhubarb group, Magnoliae cortex group and Tongfu granules group were 3.15±0.28, 3.18±0.08, and 2.95±0.15, respectively, which were lower than those of the model group (all P

  13. A carrier-mediated transport for folate in basolateral membrane vesicles of rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Said, H M; Redha, R

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of exit of folate from the enterocyte, i.e. transport across the basolateral membrane, is not known. In this study we examined, using basolateral membrane vesicles, the transport of folic acid across the basolateral membrane of rat intestine. Uptake of folic acid by these vesicles represents transport of the substrate into the intravesicular compartment and not binding to the membrane surface. The rate of folic acid transport was linear for the first 1 min of incubation but decreased thereafter, reaching equilibrium after 5 min of incubation. The transport of folic acid was: (1) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 0.6 +/- 0.17 microM and Vmax. of 1.01 +/- 0.11 pmol/30 s per mg of protein; (2) inhibited in a competitive manner by the structural analogues 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and methotrexate (Ki = 2 and 1.4 microM, respectively); (4) electroneutral; (5) Na+-independent; (6) sensitive to the effect of the anion exchange inhibitor 4,4'-di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). These data indicate the existence of a carrier-mediated transport system for folic acid in rat intestinal basolateral membrane and demonstrate that the transport process is electroneutral, Na+-independent and sensitive to the effect of anion exchange inhibition. PMID:3689340

  14. [Effect of gaseous hypoxic mixture GHM-10 on the intestinal death of Wistar rats and Na+,K+-ATPase activity of the plasma membrane of the small intestine mucosa after irradiation].

    PubMed

    Strelkov, R B; Dvoretskiĭ, A I; Kucherenko, N G

    1986-01-01

    It was shown that gas hypoxic mixture containing O2 (10%) and N2 (90%) significantly decreases "intestinal" death of Wistar rats on the 5th day following irradiation and normalizes Na+,K+-ATPase activity of the small intestine mucosa plasma membranes.

  15. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  16. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to ...

  17. High wholegrain barley β-glucan lowers food intake but does not alter small intestinal macronutrient digestibility in ileorectostomised rats.

    PubMed

    Belobrajdic, Damien P; Hino, Shingo; Kondo, Takashi; Jobling, Stephen A; Morell, Matthew K; Topping, David L; Morita, Tatsuya; Bird, Anthony R

    2016-09-01

    Using barley cultivars differing widely in β-glucan content, we aimed to determine their effects on small intestinal macronutrient digestion in 24 ileorectostomised rats. The rats were fed 1 of 4 experimental diets, each containing a different barley variety, for 11 d. The diets had a content of 0, 2.1, 2.6 and 4.3 g of β-glucan/100 g. Feed intake and faecal excretion of fat, protein, starch, and non-starch polysaccharides were determined in the final 5 d of the study and apparent macronutrient digestibility calculated. Higher dietary levels of β-glucan (2.6% and 4.3%) lowered feed intake (by 15 and 19%, respectively) but final body weight was only lowered by the 4.3% β-glucan diet relative to rats fed the 0% β-glucan diet (all ps < 0.05). Protein, lipid and starch digestibility was unrelated to the dietary β-glucan content. Higher dietary levels of barley β-glucan lower feed intake of ileorectostomised rats, which is independent of intestinal fermentation and unrelated to macronutrient digestibility.

  18. Identification and Characterization of Phytohemagglutinins from White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Beldia) in the Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Haj Sassi, Fayçal; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lectin toxicity is widely known, its effects in the gastrointestinal tract require further study. This investigation aimed to identify and characterize phytohemagglutinins (PHAs) in the small intestine and sera of rats following oral challenge with ground white beans. Twenty young, adult male rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The control group underwent gavage with a suspension of 300 mg of rodent pellet flour. The experimental group was administered a 300 mg Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS). After 10 days of daily treatment, jejunal rinse liquid (JRL) and ileum rinse liquid and secretions, as well as sera, were collected. All biological fluids were screened for lectin reactivity using competitive inhibition ELISA, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and immunoelectrophoresis techniques. The results revealed the presence of immunogenic intraluminal PHAs 3-4 h after the oral intake of the BBFS in the JRLs as well as in the jejunal and ileal secretions; however, no PHA was detectable in the rat sera. Ingestion of raw Beldia beans may lead to interaction between PHAs and the mucosa of the small intestine, potentially resulting in an inflammatory response.

  19. In vitro influence of spices and spice-active principles on digestive enzymes of rat pancreas and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna Rao, R; Platel, Kalpana; Srinivasan, K

    2003-12-01

    In vitro influence of 14 individual spices (curcumin, capsaicin, piperine, garlic, onion, ginger, mint, coriander, cumin, ajowan, fennel, fenugreek, mustard, and asafoetida) on the activities of digestive enzymes of rat pancreas and small intestine was examined by including them in the reaction mixture at two different concentrations. A majority of spices enhanced the activity of pancreatic lipase and amylase when they are directly in contact with the enzyme. It is inferred that this positive influence on the activity of enzymes may have a supplementary role in the overall digestive stimulant action of spices, besides causing an enhancement of the titres of digestive enzymes in pancreatic tissue.

  20. [Ultrastructural changes in the wall and microcirculatory bed of the small intestinal villi of rats exposed to organochlorine toxicant].

    PubMed

    Nurmukhambetova, B N

    1997-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were administered 60 mg/kg of organochlorine pesticide 2,4-D daily (two permissible daily doses) for 2.5 months in order to develop an experimental model of chronic intoxication. It was found that the long term administration of organochlorine toxicant resulted in marked structural changes in both the cells of the wall of small intestine and in lymphatic and blood capillaries of the villi (distention of the rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns, reduction of the number of mitochondrial christae, increase in the secondary lysosomal content, reduction of the number of micropinocytotic vesicles).

  1. Segmental-dependent permeability throughout the small intestine following oral drug administration: Single-pass vs. Doluisio approach to in-situ rat perfusion.

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; Zur, Moran; Beig, Avital; Fine, Noa; Cohen, Yael; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Bermejo, Marival; Dahan, Arik

    2016-12-30

    Intestinal drug permeability is position dependent and pertains to a specific point along the intestinal membrane, and the resulted segmental-dependent permeability phenomenon has been recognized as a critical factor in the overall absorption of drug following oral administration. The aim of this research was to compare segmental-dependent permeability data obtained from two different rat intestinal perfusion approaches: the single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) model and the closed-loop (Doluisio) rat perfusion method. The rat intestinal permeability of 12 model drugs with different permeability characteristics (low, moderate, and high, as well as passively and actively absorbed) was assessed in three small intestinal regions: the upper jejunum, mid-small intestine, and the terminal ileum, using both the SPIP and the Doluisio experimental methods. Excellent correlation was evident between the two approaches, especially in the upper jejunum (R(2)=0.95). Significant regional-dependent permeability was found in half of drugs studied, illustrating the importance and relevance of segmental-dependent intestinal permeability. Despite the differences between the two methods, highly comparable results were obtained by both methods, especially in the medium-high Peff range. In conclusion, the SPIP and the Doluisio method are both equally useful in obtaining crucial segmental-dependent intestinal permeability data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Small-intestinal manifestations of dextran sulfate sodium consumption in rats and assessment of the effects of Lactobacillus fermentum BR11.

    PubMed

    Geier, Mark S; Smith, Cassie L; Butler, Ross N; Howarth, Gordon S

    2009-06-01

    The dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model has been utilized to screen for novel therapeutics for ulcerative colitis. Evidence suggests the small intestine may also be affected by DSS. We characterized the effects of DSS on the small intestine and assessed the potential for Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 to modify or normalize DSS-induced changes. Rats were allocated to three groups, Water + Vehicle, DSS + Vehicle, and DSS + L. fermentum BR11. BR11 was administered twice daily for 14 days. DSS (2%) was provided from days 7 to 14. Small-intestinal tissue was analyzed for sucrase activity, histology, and crypt cell proliferation. Increased ileum crypt depth and cell proliferation was observed in DSS-treated rats compared to controls (P < 0.05). BR11 normalized these parameters. While DSS predominantly induces colonic damage, minor morphological alterations were also detected in the distal small intestine. L. fermentum BR11 normalized these features.

  3. Sweet taste receptors in rat small intestine stimulate glucose absorption through apical GLUT2

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Oliver J; Affleck, Julie; Patel, Nick; Kellett, George L

    2007-01-01

    Natural sugars and artificial sweeteners are sensed by receptors in taste buds. T2R bitter and T1R sweet taste receptors are coupled through G-proteins, α-gustducin and transducin, to activate phospholipase C β2 and increase intracellular calcium concentration. Intestinal brush cells or solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) have a structure similar to lingual taste cells and strongly express α-gustducin. It has therefore been suggested over the last decade that brush cells may participate in sugar sensing by a mechanism analogous to that in taste buds. We provide here functional evidence for an intestinal sensing system based on lingual taste receptors. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry revealed that all T1R members are expressed in rat jejunum at strategic locations including Paneth cells, SCCs or the apical membrane of enterocytes; T1Rs are colocalized with each other and with α-gustducin, transducin or phospholipase C β2 to different extents. Intestinal glucose absorption consists of two components: one is classical active Na+–glucose cotransport, the other is the diffusive apical GLUT2 pathway. Artificial sweeteners increase glucose absorption in the order acesulfame potassium ∼ sucralose > saccharin, in parallel with their ability to increase intracellular calcium concentration. Stimulation occurs within minutes by an increase in apical GLUT2, which correlates with reciprocal regulation of T1R2, T1R3 and α-gustducin versus T1R1, transducin and phospholipase C β2. Our observation that artificial sweeteners are nutritionally active, because they can signal to a functional taste reception system to increase sugar absorption during a meal, has wide implications for nutrient sensing and nutrition in the treatment of obesity and diabetes. PMID:17495045

  4. Intracellular hydrolysis of short chain glycerides by rat small intestine in vitro and transfer of glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Howard, J.; Jackson, M. J.; Smyth, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    1. When triacetin, tripropionin and tributyrin are incubated with sacs of rat everted intestine, they enter the epithelial cells and are completely hydrolysed to free fatty acids and glycerol. 2. The distribution between the mucosal and serosal fluids of the glycerol released is very different from that of the fatty acid. Although both hydrolytic products are accumulated in the serosal fluid, a much higher fraction of the fatty acid appears in this compartment. 3. When glycerol is initially present in the mucosal fluid there is no evidence of its movement against a concentration gradient. 4. The results confirm the existence of a transport mechanism for fatty acids released intracellularly but do not require the hypothesis of a special mechanism for glycerol transfer. PMID:5500736

  5. Handling of glycerides of acetic acid by rat small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Barry, R. J. C.; Jackson, M. J.; Smyth, D. H.

    1966-01-01

    1. When mono-, di- and triacetins are incubated with sacs of rat everted intestine, they enter the epithelial cells and are hydrolysed to free glycerol and acetic acid. 2. The rate-limiting step in the process is the entry of glyceride into the epithelial cell. 3. The three acetins enter the epithelial cell at the same rate, and the mechanism of this remains unknown. 4. The acetate released appears in higher concentrations on the serosal side, and the relation of this to the mechanism for transfer of volatile fatty acids is discussed. 5. It is not necessary to postulate a special mechanism for entry of volatile fatty acids into the cell. PMID:5950558

  6. Effects of 4-nitrophenol on expression of the ER-α and AhR signaling pathway-associated genes in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Song, Meiyan; Watanabe, Gen; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Rui, Xiaoli; Li, ChunMei

    2016-09-01

    4-Nitrophenol (PNP) is a persistent organic pollutant that was proven to be an environmental endocrine disruptor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway in regulating the damage response to PNP in the small intestine of rats. Wistar-Imamichi male rats (21 d) were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and PNP group. Each group had three processes that were gavaged with PNP or vehicle daily: single dose (1 d), repeated dose (3 consecutive days) (3 d), and repeated dose with recovery (3 consecutive days and 3 recovery days) (6 d). The weight of the body, the related viscera, and small intestine were examined. Histological parameters of the small intestine and the quantity of mucus proteins secreted by small goblet cells were determined using HE staining and PAS staining. The mRNA expression of AhR, ER-α, CYP1A1, and GST was measured by real-time qPCR. In addition, we also analyzed the AhR, ER-α, and CYP1A1 expression in the small intestine by immunohistochemical staining. The small intestines histologically changed in the PNP-treated rat and the expression of AhR, CYP1A1, and GST was increased. While ER-α was significantly decreased in the small intestine, simultaneously, when rats were exposed to a longer PNP treatment, the damages disappeared. Our results demonstrate that PNP has an effect on the expression of AhR signaling pathway genes, AhR, CYP1A1, and GST, and ER-α in the rat small intestine.

  7. Antispasmodic effects of myrrh due to calcium antagonistic effects in inflamed rat small intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Cica; Goos, Karl-Heinz; Goos, Ole; Nieber, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Myrrh is the oleo-gum resin of mainly Commiphora molmol and as a powdered substance, one compound in the traditional medicinal product Myrrhinil-Intest®, which has been used for the treatment of unspecific, inflammatory intestinal disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antispasmodic effect of myrrh under healthy and inflamed conditions, and to evaluate a calcium-antagonistic effect as a possible mode of action. Therefore, an ethanolic myrrh extract was tested for its effects on muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contractions in untreated and inflamed rat ileum/jejunum preparations. Inflammation was experimentally induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (10 mM, 30 min). Additionally, the effect of the calcium channel agonist Bay K8644 in the presence of varying myrrh extract concentrations was examined. Myrrh extract (0.99 mg/mL) suppressed the acetylcholine-induced contraction down to 25.8 % in untreated and 15.2 % in inflamed preparations. Myrrh extract (0.15; 0.25 and 0.35 mg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the Bay K8644 concentration-response curve in untreated and inflamed preparations with a significant EC50 shift. Schild analysis resulted in a pA2 value of 0.93 for untreated preparations. Increasing myrrh extract concentrations induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the agonistic maximum effect in untreated and inflamed preparations down to 15.8 % and 25.8 %, respectively, for the highest concentration leading to a pD2 value of 0.58. Myrrh extract reduced intestinal muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contraction of untreated and inflamed ileum/jejunum preparations based on dual calcium antagonism characterized by a right shift of the agonistic dose-response curve and a depression of the maximum effect. The resulting reduction of intestinal motility and spasmolytic effects provide a rationale for the symptom treatment of intestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome

  8. Non-invasive detection of a palifermin-mediated adaptive response following chemotherapy-induced damage to the distal small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Yazbeck, Roger; Howarth, Gordon S; Borges, Luis; Geier, Mark S; Smith, Cassie L; Davidson, Geoffrey P; Butler, Ross N

    2011-09-01

    Pre-clinical studies have indicated that palifermin may be an effective treatment modality for intestinal mucositis, a debilitating complication of cancer chemotherapy. We determined whether palifermin was protective in rats with experimentally induced intestinal mucositis and the applicability of the sucrose breath test (SBT) to monitor palifermin for its efficacy as an anti-mucositis agent. SBT values and sucrase activity were reduced in all 5-FU-treated groups compared with untreated controls (p < 0.05). At 72 h post 5-FU, sucrase activity was higher in rats treated with palifermin compared with 5-FU controls (p < 0.05). Jejunal and ileal villus heights were lower in all 5-FU groups compared with saline controls. Dark agouti rats (n = 10) were subcutaneously injected with palifermin or vehicle for 3 d after which they were injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and sacrificed after 72 h. The in vivo SBT and in vitro sucrase assay were used to evaluate small intestinal function and damage. Intestinal disease severity was determined by histological assessment of villus height and crypt depth. The SBT can monitor the ability of palifermin to modify the functional capacity of the small intestine in rats with intestinal mucositis. Further studies are indicated to investigate the prophylactic potential of palifermin against intestinal mucositis.

  9. Maltitol inhibits small intestinal glucose absorption and increases insulin mediated muscle glucose uptake ex vivo but not in normal and type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of maltitol on intestinal glucose absorption and muscle glucose uptake using ex vivo and in vivo experimental models. The ex vivo experiment was conducted in isolated jejunum and psoas muscle from normal rats. The in vivo study investigated the effects of a single bolus dose of maltitol on gastric emptying, intestinal glucose absorption and digesta transit in normal and type 2 diabetic rats. Maltitol inhibited glucose absorption in isolated rat jejunum and increased glucose uptake in isolated rat psoas muscle in the presence of insulin but not in the absence of insulin. In contrast, maltitol did not significantly (p > 0.05) alter small intestinal glucose absorption or blood glucose levels as well as gastric emptying and digesta transit in normal or type 2 diabetic rats. The results suggest that maltitol may not be a suitable dietary supplement for anti-diabetic food and food products to improve glycemic control.

  10. General Treatment Information for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer A-Z Small Intestine Cancer Treating Small Intestine Cancer General treatment information Depending on the type ... questions about your treatment options. More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  11. The dynamic structure of a flat small intestinal mucosa studied on the explanted rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Loehry, C A; Grace, R

    1974-04-01

    Small pieces of jejunum with an intact blood supply were explanted to the anterior abdominal wall in rats. Six weeks after explantation the mucosa appeared totally flat in many areas, both histologically and under the dissecting microscope. The structure of the flattened mucosa was shown to be identical to that in coeliac disease with hypertrophied intervillous ridges. A dynamic study with tritium-labelled thymidine demonstrated a considerably increased turnover in the flat mucosa with some disorganization of cell production and migration.

  12. Effect of antibiotics on the 5-hydroxytryptamine content of the small intestine and other organs in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, T. J.

    1961-01-01

    Rats and mice were given antibiotics orally and by subcutaneous injection and the effects on tissue levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine and intestinal bacteria were studied. In mice it was found that antibiotics which caused a large reduction in the bacterial flora of the intestine when given orally also caused a significant increase in intestinal 5-hydroxytryptamine. In rats, neomycin caused a reduction in the urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. In both rats and mice, many antibiotics caused a significant reduction in the weight of the spleen. PMID:19108146

  13. [Study on detoxication of euphorbia pekinensis radix processed with vinegar on rat small intestinal crypt epithelial cells IEC-6].

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu-Dan; Yan, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Li; Ding, An-Wei

    2014-03-01

    To compare the difference of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix before and after being processed with vinegar in the toxicity on rat small intestinal crypt epithelial cells IEC-6, and make a preliminary study on the mechanism of detoxication of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix processed with vinegar. With rat small intestinal crypt epithelial cells IEC-6 as the study object, the MTT method was adopted to detect the effect of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix before and after being processed with vinegar on IEC-6 cell activity. The morphology of cells were observed by the inverted microscope. The down-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway of enterocytes caused by the vinegar processing was analyzed by using the high content screening. Compared with the negative control group, the proliferation inhibition experiment showed that Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix showed a relatively high intestinal cell toxicity (P < 0.01). The results of HCS analysis showed that Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix could significantly reduce the cell nucleus Hoechst fluorescence intensity and mitochondria membrane (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), and increase Annexin V-FITC and PI fluorescence intensity and membrane permeability (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.01). After being processed with vinegar, compared with Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix groups with different doses, Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix processed with vinegar could significantly decrease the cell proliferation inhibition effect on enterocytes, increase the cell nuclear Hoechst fluorescence intensity and mitochondria membrane (P < 0.05, P < 0.05), and decrease Annexin V-FITC and PI fluorescence intensity and membrane permeability (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, P < 0.05), and showed a certain dose-effect relationship. The vinegar processing can further reduce the toxicity of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix on enterocytes. Its possible mechanism can decrease the effect of Euphorbia Pekinensis Radix on the permeability of IEC-6 cell membrane, so as to provide a basis for further explanation of

  14. Inhalation of methane preserves the epithelial barrier during ischemia and reperfusion in the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Mészáros, András T; Büki, Tamás; Fazekas, Borbála; Tuboly, Eszter; Horváth, Kitti; Poles, Marietta Z; Szűcs, Szilárd; Varga, Gabriella; Kaszaki, József; Boros, Mihály

    2017-06-01

    Methane is part of the gaseous environment of the intestinal lumen. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the bioactivity of exogenous methane on the intestinal barrier function in an antigen-independent model of acute inflammation. Anesthetized rats underwent sham operation or 45-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A normoxic methane (2.2%)-air mixture was inhaled for 15 min at the end of ischemia and at the beginning of a 60-min or 180-min reperfusion. The integrity of the epithelial barrier of the ileum was assessed by determining the lumen-to-blood clearance of fluorescent dextran, while microvascular permeability changes were detected by the Evans blue technique. Tissue levels of superoxide, nitrotyrosine, myeloperoxidase, and endothelin-1 were measured, the superficial mucosal damage was visualized and quantified, and the serosal microcirculation and mesenteric flow was recorded. Erythrocyte deformability and aggregation were tested in vitro. Reperfusion significantly increased epithelial permeability, worsened macro- and microcirculation, increased the production of proinflammatory mediators, and resulted in a rapid loss of the epithelium. Exogenous normoxic methane inhalation maintained the superficial mucosal structure, decreased epithelial permeability, and improved local microcirculation, with a decrease in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. Both the deformability and aggregation of erythrocytes improved with incubation of methane. Normoxic methane decreases the signs of oxidative and nitrosative stress, improves tissue microcirculation, and thus appears to modulate the ischemia-reperfusion-induced epithelial permeability changes. These findings suggest that the administration of exogenous methane may be a useful strategy for maintaining the integrity of the mucosa sustaining an oxido-reductive attack. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Intestinal Transport of Bovine Milk Exosomes Is Mediated by Endocytosis in Human Colon Carcinoma Caco-2 Cells and Rat Small Intestinal IEC-6 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Tovah; Baier, Scott R; Zempleni, Janos

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs play essential roles in gene regulation. A substantial fraction of microRNAs in tissues and body fluids is encapsulated in exosomes, thereby conferring protection against degradation and a pathway for intestinal transport. MicroRNAs in cow milk are bioavailable in humans. This research assessed the transport mechanism of bovine milk exosomes, and therefore microRNAs, in human and rodent intestinal cells. The intestinal transport of bovine milk exosomes and microRNAs was assessed using fluorophore-labeled bovine milk exosomes in human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells and rat small intestinal IEC-6 cells. Transport kinetics and mechanisms were characterized using dose-response studies, inhibitors of vesicle transport, carbohydrate competitors, proteolysis of surface proteins on cells and exosomes, and transepithelial transport in transwell plates. Exosome transport exhibited saturation kinetics at 37°C [Michaelis constant (Km) = 55.5 ± 48.6 μg exosomal protein/200 μL of media; maximal transport rate = 0.083 ± 0.057 ng of exosomal protein · 81,750 cells(-1) · h(-1)] and decreased by 64% when transport was measured at 4°C, consistent with carrier-mediated transport in Caco-2 cells. Exosome uptake decreased by 61-85% under the following conditions compared with controls in Caco-2 cells: removal of exosome and cell surface proteins by proteinase K, inhibition of endocytosis and vesicle trafficking by synthetic inhibitors, and inhibition of glycoprotein binding by carbohydrate competitors. When milk exosomes, at a concentration of 5 times the Km, were added to the upper chamber in transwell plates, Caco-2 cells accumulated miR-29b and miR-200c in the lower chamber, and reverse transport was minor. Transport characteristics were similar in IEC-6 cells and Caco-2 cells, except that substrate affinity and transporter capacity were lower and higher, respectively. The uptake of bovine milk exosomes is mediated by endocytosis and depends on cell and exosome

  16. Exercise training decreases gene expression of endo- and xeno-sensors in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ngo Sock, Emilienne Tudor; Farahnak, Zahra; Lavoie, Jean-Marc

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that gene expression of members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily known to act as endo- and xeno-sensors is reduced in the ileum of exercise-trained (Tr) rats. Healthy female rats were either treadmill-trained for 8 weeks, 5 times/week, or remained sedentary (Sed). Training resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in plasma free fatty acid (0.18 ± 0.01 to 0.15 ± 0.01 mmol/L) and glycerol (24.8 ± 0.8 to 18.7 ± 0.8 mg/L) concentrations. Gene expressions of NRs farnesoid X receptor (FXR; p < 0.05), liver X receptor (LXR; p < 0.05), pregnane X receptor (PXR; p < 0.01), and retinoid X receptor (RXR; p < 0.06) were reduced in the ileum of Tr compared with Sed animals. Tr was also associated with a reduction (p < 0.05) in gene expression of FXR downstream heterodimeric organite solute transporters α (OSTα) and β (OSTβ) involved in the transport of bile acids, LXR downstream genes heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCG5/G8) involved in transport of absorbed cholesterol back to the lumen, and Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) involved in cholesterol absorption. These data indicate that exercise training lowers the expression of molecules involved in the defense system of the ileum against endobiotic and xenobiotic insults under normal conditions, thus, suggesting that regular exercise contributes to the intestinal maintenance of cholesterol and bile acid homeostasis.

  17. Anti-fatigue effect of ginsenoside Rb1 on postoperative fatigue syndrome induced by major small intestinal resection in rat.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shanjun; Zhou, Feng; Li, Ning; Dong, Qiantong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Xingzhao; Guo, Jian; Chen, Bicheng; Yu, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1), one of the principle active ingredients of Panax ginseng, exerts multiple pharmacological activities to fight fatigue. In the present study, we investigate the anti-fatigue effect of GRb1 on postoperative fatigue syndrome (POFS) in a rat model induced by major small intestinal resection. GRb1 (10 mg/kg) was administrated intraperitoneally once daily for 1, 3, 7, and 10 d from the operation day. Anti-fatigue effect was assessed by grasping test and biochemical parameters in blood or skeletal muscle were determined by autoanalyzer or commercially available kits. Transmission electron microscope was applied to observe the ultra microstructure of skeletal muscles. The results revealed that GRb1 significantly enhanced rat maximum grip strength with POFS. Similarly, negative alterations in biochemical parameters (lactic acid, hepatic glycogen, muscle glycogen and malondialdehyde) of POFS rats were improved by GRb1. In addition, GRb1 also increased the activity of lactate dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase in POFS. No significant differences of levels of blood urea nitrogen and ultra microstructure of skeletal muscles were found between the POFS and GRb1 treatment rats. The potent anti-fatigue effect of GRb1 on POFS might be achieved through improvement of energy metabolism and suppression of skeletal muscle oxidative stress.

  18. Digestion and absorption of sugars and sugar substitutes in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Y; Yamada, K; Hosoya, N; Moriuchi, S

    1986-02-01

    The bioavailability of newly developed sugar substitutes was observed by measuring the transmural potential difference (delta PD) evoked by Na+-dependent active transport of glucose, which is supposed to be produced by the hydrolysis of sugar substitutes. delta PD was measured using everted intestinal sac prepared from jejunum of adult rats and compared with the digestibility of sugar substitutes in the mucosal homogenate of everted sac. delta PDs evoked by glucose, maltose or maltosylfructose had almost the same levels, however, the delta PD evoked by sucrose was a little lower. delta PDs evoked by maltitol or palatinose were low, and delta PDs evoked by fructo-oligosaccharides were negligible. The hydrolyzing activities of these sugars and sugar substitutes by the mucosal homogenate were correlated with the delta PDs. A significant positive correlation was observed between delta PDmax of various sugars and sugar substitutes and the Vmax of their corresponding hydrolyzing activities. Also, a significant positive correlation was observed between Kt and Km values of these sugars. These results suggest that the absorption of sugar substitutes is dependent on digestibility by membrane digestive enzymes.

  19. Transport of thiamine by brush-border membrane vesicles from rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Casirola, D; Ferrari, G; Gastaldi, G; Patrini, C; Rindi, G

    1988-01-01

    1. Microvillous vesicles obtained by a Ca2+ precipitation method from the intestine of adult Wistar albino rats were incubated at 25 degrees C with [35S]- or [3H]thiamine of high specific activity. 2. The time course of thiamine uptake was not influenced by the presence of Na+ or K+ nor by the absence of alkaline cations in the incubation medium. 3. At concentrations below 1.25 microM, thiamine was taken up mainly by a saturable mechanism with apparent Km = 0.8 microM and Vmax = 0.35 pmol mg protein-1 4 s-1. At higher concentrations, a non-saturable uptake mechanism prevailed. 4. The thiamine taken up was transferred to the intravesicular space. No thiamine phosphoesters could be detected in the vesicles. 5. The vesicular transport of thiamine was inhibited competitively by several thiamine derivatives and structural analogues, including: cold thiamine; thiamine monophosphate (inhibition constant, Ki = 33 microM); pyrithiamine (Ki = 1.7 microM); 2'-ethylthiamine (Ki = 27 microM); 5-chloroethylthiamine (Ki = 70 microM): Amprolium (Ki = 55 microM); 4'-oxythiamine (Ki = 510 microM). PMID:3392675

  20. Strongyloides ratti: transplantation of adults recovered from the small intestine at different days after infection into the colon of naive and infection-primed Wistar rats, and the effect of antioxidant treatment on large intestinal parasitism.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Takagi, H; Kadosaka, T; Nagaoka, F; Kondo, S; Itoh, M; Honda, S; Kimura, E

    2011-07-01

    Strongyloides ratti (Nagoya strain) is unique in that a portion of adults parasitizing the small intestine withstands 'worm expulsion', which starts at around day 8 post-infection (p.i.) by host immunity, and establishes in the large intestine after day 19 p.i. To investigate the mechanism, adults obtained from the small intestine at day 7 or 19 p.i. were transplanted into the colon of infection-primed immune rats. Adults obtained at day 7 p.i. were rejected quickly, whereas those obtained at day 19 p.i. could establish infection. Moreover, the body length and the number of intrauterine eggs increased in the large intestine. In a separate experiment, large intestinal parasitism was abolished by the treatment of host rats with an anti-oxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole. These results indicate that small intestinal adults between days 7 and 19 p.i. acquired the ability to parasitize the large intestine of immune rats, and that free radicals produced by the host may have played a significant role in the process.

  1. Effects of the pyrones, maltol and ethyl maltol, on iron absorption from the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Barrand, M A; Callingham, B A; Hider, R C

    1987-03-01

    The pyrones, 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4-pyrone (maltol) and 3-hydroxy-2-ethyl-4-pyrone (ethyl maltol) chelate iron with a high affinity and selectivity. The resulting 1:3 (metal-ligand) complexes, being neutral, are able to partition readily across cell membranes and thus may facilitate iron transport across the intestinal wall. Absorption of radioactive iron (59Fe) in the presence of these pyrones was investigated in male rats 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after intraduodenal administration of a 7 micrograms dose and compared with that of 59Fe given as the sulphate, gluconate, fumarate or complexed to EDTA. Total body absorption and distribution were calculated from the 59Fe content of various tissue samples. With all the iron preparations used, blood levels of 59Fe were highest 1 h after injection whilst the 59Fe content at the major site of deposition, i.e. the bone marrow, increased up to 6 h. No 59Fe was found in the urine. Total body absorption of 59Fe was significantly higher from the pyrones than from the other four preparations. Over the dose range 0.7-700 micrograms, the proportion of 59Fe absorbed from both iron maltol and iron sulphate decreased with increasing dose. Enhanced 59Fe uptake from maltol was evident at 0.7-70 micrograms but not at 700 micrograms suggesting that use of these pyrones will not result in iron overload. Absorption of 59Fe given into the stomach was slower in onset but was sustained longer presumably via a steady delivery of iron to the duodenum from the gastric reservoir.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Study on the small intestine absorptive kinetics characters of tanshinol and protocatechualdehyde of Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai; Zhai, Shuiting; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Guoquan; Fu, Xiaoyang; Li, Tianxiao

    2016-07-01

    In order to provide scientific basis for clinical selection of drugs, to compare and analyze the effective constitutes and the intestinal absorption in vivo in rats of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills (taken as the representatives). Determine the contents of tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B and tanshinone II A, cryptotanshinone, ginseng saponin Rg1 and Rb1 in the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The intestinal absorption condition of the tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills in rats were detected by intestinal perfusion experiment. Only the intake of protocatechuic aldehyde in the compound salvia tablets was higher than in the compound dropping pills, the intake of the other 6 effective constitutes were all lower than in the compound dropping pills. The intestinal absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was rather complete, while the intestinal absorption of tanshinol and salvianolic acid B were not significant. The duodenum was the main absorption region of these three components. The absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was different in different regions of the intestines. Each intake of the effective constitutes in the tablets and dropping pills were significantly different, and the rat intestinal absorption of part of the components were different.

  3. Digestion-Resistant Dextrin Derivatives Are Moderately Digested in the Small Intestine and Contribute More to Energy Production Than Predicted from Large-Bowel Fermentation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takashi; Handa, Kei; Genda, Tomomi; Hino, Shingo; Hamaguchi, Norihisa; Morita, Tatsuya

    2017-03-01

    Background: Digestion-resistant dextrin derivatives (DRDDs), including resistant maltodextrin (RM), polydextrose, and resistant glucan (RG), have been developed as low-energy foods. However, data on the resistance of DRDDs to small-intestinal digestion are scarce.Objective: We sought to determine the site and extent of DRDD breakdown in the rat intestine and to predict its energy contributions.Methods: In vitro small-intestinal resistance of DRDDs was evaluated by the AOAC method for dietary fiber measurement and by artificial digestion with the use of pancreatic α-amylase and brush-boarder membrane vesicles. In vivo small-intestinal resistance of DRDDs was determined from the feces of male ileorectostomized Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control diet or a diet containing one of the DRDDs at 50 g/kg for 9 d (period 1) and then for 10 d (period 2), during which they received 1 g neomycin/L in their drinking water. Separately, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the same diets for 4 wk, and the whole-gut recoveries of DRDDs were determined from feces at days 8-10.Results: Small-intestinal resistances determined in vitro by artificial digestion (RM: 70%; polydextrose: 67%; RG: 69%) were lower than those measured by the AOAC method (RM: 92%; polydextrose: 80%; RG: 82%). In the ileorectostomized rats, fecal dry-matter excretions were consistently greater in the DRDDs than in the control. The small-intestinal resistances of the DRDDs were 68%, 58%, and 62% in period 1 and 66%, 61%, and 67% during period 2 for RM, polydextrose, and RG, respectively. The resistances did not differ among the DRDDs at either time. In the normal rats, food intakes and body weight gains did not differ among the groups. The whole-gut recovery of RM (13%) was lower than that of polydextrose (33%) and RG (29%), which did not differ.Conclusions: DRDDs were more digestible in the rat small intestine than the AOAC method. The energy contribution from small-intestine digestibility, not just large

  4. Epithelial transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)-dependent adrenomedullin upregulates blood flow in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kono, Toru; Kaneko, Atsushi; Omiya, Yuji; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Ohno, Nagisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2013-02-15

    The functional roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the gastrointestinal tract have garnered considerable attention in recent years. We previously reported that daikenchuto (TU-100), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) via adrenomedullin (ADM) release from intestinal epithelial (IE) cells (Kono T et al. J Crohns Colitis 4: 161-170, 2010). TU-100 contains multiple TRP activators. In the present study, therefore, we examined the involvement of TRP channels in the ADM-mediated vasodilatatory effect of TU-100. Rats were treated intraduodenally with the TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin (CAP), the TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC), or TU-100, and jejunum IBF was evaluated using laser-Doppler blood flowmetry. All three compounds resulted in vasodilatation, and the vasodilatory effect of TU-100 was abolished by a TRPA1 antagonist but not by a TRPV1 antagonist. Vasodilatation induced by AITC and TU-100 was abrogated by anti-ADM antibody treatment. RT-PCR and flow cytometry revealed that an IEC-6 cell line originated from the small intestine and purified IE cells expressed ADM and TRPA1 but not TRPV1. AITC increased ADM release in IEC cells remarkably, while CAP had no effect. TU-100 and its ingredient 6-shogaol (6SG) increased ADM release dose-dependently, and the effects were abrogated by a TRPA1 antagonist. 6SG showed similar TRPA1-dependent vasodilatation in vivo. These results indicate that TRPA1 in IE cells may play an important role in controlling bowel microcirculation via ADM release. Epithelial TRPA1 appears to be a promising target for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders.

  5. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia. PMID:27746864

  6. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia[PARANDCO1]. PMID:27635197

  7. Reduced urothelial regeneration in rat bladders augmented with permeable porcine small intestinal submucosa assessed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Xia, Ding; Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Fung, Kar-Ming; Aston, Christopher E; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Hurst, Robert E; Madihally, Sundararajan V; Kropp, Bradley P; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2017-09-13

    Augmentation enterocystoplasty remains the gold standard surgical bladder reconstruction procedure to increase the capacity and compliance of dysfunctional bladders. Since the use of the patient's intestine has severe risks of complications, alternative biodegradable matrices have been explored. Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) has gained immense interests in bladder reconstruction due to its favorable properties. However, trials have shown inconsistent regeneration with SIS, attributed to the heterogeneity in microstructures and mechanical properties. We hypothesize that uneven SIS permeability to urine is a factor responsible for the inconsistency. We measured permeability to urine in situ using a contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and evaluated urothelium regeneration using immunohistochemical staining of urothelial cell markers in SIS-augmented rat bladders. Results showed significant differences in permeability among SIS-augmented rat bladders. Commercial SIS scaffolds were then categorized into nonleaky and leaky groups based on MRI results. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed higher numbers of inflammatory cells in leaky SIS on day 14 relative to nonleaky SIS. In addition, trichrome staining showed major changes in the distribution of collagen on day 28 between SIS-augmented bladder groups. Furthermore, expressions of urothelium-associated markers (cytokeratins AE1/AE3, claudin 4, and uroplakin III) were completed in bladders augmented with nonleaky SIS, whereas limited urothelial differentiation was noticed in leaky SIS-augmented bladders at post-augmentative day 14. These results show that scaffold permeability to urine may be responsible for variations in regenerative capacity of porcine SIS. Applications of MRI technique will be helpful to understand a relationship between biomaterial property and regenerative capacity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  8. A preliminary study on the absorption of isometamidium chloride (Samorin) in the stomach and small intestine of rat.

    PubMed

    Ogun, C O; Eghianruwa, K I

    1993-04-01

    The levels of absorption of isometamidium chloride (Samorin) in the stomach and intestine of the rat were determined because of problems usually associated with parenteral administration of the drug. The in situ loop method and in situ recirculation technique were used to determine the absorption of the drug in the stomach and intestine respectively. 54.8% of isometamidium chloride was absorbed in the stomach in 30 minutes while 2% was absorbed in the intestine in one hour. These results warrant the comparative study of the blood and tissue concentrations of isometamidium chloride following oral and parenteral administration.

  9. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professional Small Intestine Cancer Treatment Research Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  11. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Staged? Staging is a process that tells ... distant m etastasis (M). T categories for small intestine adenocarcinoma T categories of small intestine cancer describe ...

  12. Effect of Kaiyu Qingwei Jianji on the morphometry and residual strain distribution of small intestine in experimental diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hong; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Zhou, Shui-Ping; Tong, Xiao-Lin; Zhuang, Feng-Yuan; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of a Chinese medicine, Kaiyu Qingwei Jianji (KYQWJJ) used for diabetic treatment, on the morphometry and residual strain distribution of the small intestine in streptozotocin (STZ) -induced diabetic rats. Correlation analysis was also performed between the opening angle and residual strain with the blood glucose level. METHODS: Forty-two male Wistar rats weighing 220-240 g were included in this study. Thirty-two STZ-induced diabetic rats were subdivided into four groups (n = 8 in each group), i.e. diabetic control group (DM); high dose of KYQWJJ (T1, 36g/kg per day); low dose of KYQWJJ (T2, 17 g/kg per day) and Gliclazide (T3, 50 mg/kg per day). Another ten rats were used as non-diabetic control (CON). The medicines were poured directly into stomach lumen by gastric lavage twice daily. The rats of CON and DM groups were only poured the physiological saline. Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were measured. Experimental period was 35 d. At the end of experiment, three 5-cm long segments were harvested from the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Three rings of 1-2 mm in length for no-load and zero-stress state tests were cut from the middle of different segments. The morphometric data, such as the circumferential length, the wall thickness and the opening angle were measured from the digitized images of intestinal segments in the no-load state and zero-stress state. The residual strain was computed from the morphometry data. Furthermore, the linear regression analysis was performed between blood glucose level with morphometric and biomechanical data in the different intestinal segments. RESULTS: The blood glucose level of DM group was consistent 4-fold to 5-fold higher than those in CON group during the experiment (16.89 ± 1.11 vs 3.44 ± 0.15 mmol/L, P < 0.001). The blood glucose level in the T1 (16.89 ± 1.11 vs 11.08 ± 2.67 mmol/L, P < 0.01) and T3 groups (16.89 ± 1.11 vs 13.54 ± 1.73 mmol/L, P < 0.05), but not in T2 group (P > 0

  13. Amino acid and peptide absorption after proximal small intestinal resection in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, A B; Freeman, H J; Chung, Y C; Kim, Y S

    1979-01-01

    In experimental animals with massive proximal intestinal resection, in vivo ileal absorption of an amino acid mixture containing L-leucine and glycine as well as two different dipeptides, L-leucyl-glycine and glycyl-L-leucine, were compared. Both amino acid and dipeptide absorption were markedly enhanced in the ileal segments. However, the absorption rates from the two perfused dipeptides differed. L-leucine absorption from L-leucyl-glycine was much greater than from glycyl-L-leucine. Brush border amino-peptidase activities after resection were also increased but dissociation between absorption and hydrolytic activity occurred. This study indicates that certain dipeptides are handled differently by adapting ileal segments. Furthermore, the changes observed probably reflect mucosal cellular hyperplasia occurring in association with intestinal adaptation. PMID:428822

  14. Emu Oil Reduces Small Intestinal Inflammation in the Absence of Clinical Improvement in a Rat Model of Indomethacin-Induced Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abimosleh, Suzanne M.; Tran, Cuong D.; Howarth, Gordon S.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal-anti-inflammatory-drug (NSAID) enteropathy is characterized by small intestinal damage and ulceration. Emu Oil (EO) has previously been reported to reduce intestinal inflammation. Aim. We investigated EO for its potential to attenuate NSAID-enteropathy in rats. Methods. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 10/group) were gavaged with Water, Olive Oil (OO), or EO (0.5 mL; days 0–12) and with 0.5 mL Water or the NSAID, Indomethacin (8 mg/kg; days 5–12) daily. Disease activity index (DAI), 13C-sucrose breath test (SBT), organ weights, intestinal damage severity (IDS), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assessed. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results. In Indomethacin-treated rats, DAI was elevated (days 10–12) and SBT values (56%) and thymus weight (55%) were decreased, relative to normal controls. Indomethacin increased duodenum (68%), colon (24%), SI (48%), caecum (48%), liver (51%) and spleen (88%) weights, IDS scores, and MPO levels (jejunum: 195%, ileum: 104%) compared to normal controls. Jejunal MPO levels were decreased (64%) by both EO and OO, although only EO decreased ileal MPO (50%), compared to Indomethacin controls. Conclusions. EO reduced acute intestinal inflammation, whereas other parameters of Indomethacin-induced intestinal injury were not affected significantly. Increased EO dose and/or frequency of administration could potentially improve clinical efficacy. PMID:23573127

  15. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Louise W; Kuhre, Rune E; Janus, Charlotte; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays a central role in modern treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the form of GLP-1 enhancers and GLP-1 mimetics. An alternative treatment strategy is to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells using a targeted approach. The G-protein-coupled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we examined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, perfused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 agonists (TAK-875, AMG 837, AM-1638, and AM-5262) were administered through intraluminal and intra-arterial routes, respectively, and dynamic changes in GLP-1 secretion were evaluated. Vascular administration of 10 μmol/L TAK-875, 10 μmol/L AMG 837, 1 μmol/L and 0.1 μmol/L AM-1638, 1 μmol/L AM-6252, and 1 mmol/L LA, all significantly increased GLP-1 secretion compared to basal levels (P < 0.05), whereas luminal administration of LA and FFAR1 agonists was ineffective. Thus, both natural and small-molecule agonists of the FFAR1 receptor appear to require absorption prior to stimulating GLP-1 secretion, indicating that therapies based on activation of nutrient sensing may be more complex than hitherto expected. PMID:26381015

  16. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Verburg, Melissa; Renes, Ingrid B; Van Nispen, Danielle J P M; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Jorritsma, Marieke; Büller, Hans A; Einerhand, Alexandra W C; Dekker, Jan

    2002-11-01

    The rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were localized on tissue sections and quantified at mRNA and protein levels relative to control levels. We analyzed correlations in temporal expression patterns between markers. mRNA expression of enterocyte and goblet cell markers decreased significantly during damage for a specific period. Of these, sucrase-isomaltase (-62%) and CPS (-82%) were correlated. Correlations were also found between lactase (-76%) and SGLT1 (-77%) and between I-FABP (-52%) and L-FABP (-45%). Decreases in GLUT5 (-53%), MUC2 (-43%), and TFF3 (-54%) mRNAs occurred independently of any of the other markers. In contrast, lysozyme mRNA present in Paneth cells increased (+76%). At the protein level, qualitative and quantitative changes were in agreement with mRNA expression, except for Muc2 (+115%) and TFF3 (+81%), which increased significantly during damage, following independent patterns. During regeneration, expression of each marker returned to control levels. The enhanced expression of cytoprotective molecules (Muc2, TFF3, lysozyme) during damage represents maintenance of goblet cell and Paneth cell functions, most likely to protect the epithelium. Decreased expression of enterocyte-specific markers represents decreased enterocyte function, of which fatty acid transporters were least affected.

  17. Effect of iron and protein deficiency on the expulsion of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis from the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, T D; Davis, A E; Cummins, A G; Duncombe, V M; Kelly, J D

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between iron deficiency and protein deficiency and infestation of the rat with the nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis was investigated. There was a significant delay in the expulsion of N. brasiliensis from the small intestine of both iron deficient and protein deficient animals and those with a combined deficiency of iron and protein. Iron repletion returned the time of worm expulsion to normal and this would appear to be related to iron deficiency per se rather than to anaemia. Antibody initiated damage to worms was normal in the control animals and in animals with nutritional deficiencies. This suggests that the defect in worm expulsion occurs either in the cell-mediated immune system or in one of the other mediators of expulsion. Extrapolation to the human situation has important therapeutic implications in that iron and protein deficiency may play an important role in the perpetuation of helminth infestations. Thus, to be successful antihelminth therapy should be accompanied by iron and protein supplementation. PMID:558135

  18. [The effect of glucose on antidiuretic hormone absorption in the rat and frog small intestine].

    PubMed

    Prutskova, N P; Tse, Gao; Shakhmatova, E I

    2005-03-01

    Administration of 5 ml/100 g body weight of 1% glucose solution to stomach produced the same diuretic kidney response in fasted Wistar rats as administration of the same amount of water. Intragastric administration of arginine vasopressin along with the water load evoked an antidiuretic response. Arginine vasopressin in the same volume of glucose induced no kidney response difference as compared with the hormone action in experiments with water load. 0.1 nmol of arginine vasotocin, having been itroduced into the rat isolated ileum, prevented the effect of glucose on the hormone absoption. 0.1 nmol of arginine vasotocin, having been introduced into the frog isolated ileum along with isotonic glucose solution, increased the hormone absorption; fructose did not affect this process whereas mannitol decreased absorption ofarginine vasotocin. This absorption was also reduced by intraileal introduction of arginine vasotocin with the hypotonic Ringer solution. The findings suggest that glucose in the rat gastrointestinal tract does not affect arginine vasopressin absorption in vivo, whereas in the frog ileum glucose increases arginine vasotocin absorption in vitro.

  19. Effect of a cocoa diet on the small intestine and gut-associated lymphoid tissue composition in an oral sensitization model in rats.

    PubMed

    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Franch, Àngels; Untersmayr, Eva; Castell, Margarida

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have attributed to the cocoa powder the capacity to attenuate the immune response in a rat oral sensitization model. To gain a better understanding of cocoa-induced mechanisms at small intestinal level, 3-week-old female Lewis rats were fed either a standard diet or a diet containing 10% cocoa for 4 weeks with or without concomitant oral sensitization with ovalbumin (OVA). Thereafter, we evaluated the lymphocyte composition of the Peyer's patches (PPL), small intestine epithelium (IEL) and lamina propria (LPL). Likewise, gene expression of several immune molecules was quantified in the small intestine. Moreover, histological samples were used to evaluate the proportion of goblet cells, IgA+ cells and granzyme+cells as well. In cocoa-fed animals, we identified a five-time reduction in the percentage of IgA+ cells in intestinal tissue together with a decreased proportion of TLR4+ IEL. Analyzing the lymphocyte composition, almost a double proportion of TCRγδ+cells and an increase of NK cell percentage in PPL and IEL were found. In addition, a rise in CD25+, CD103+ and CD62L- cell proportions was observed in CD4+ PPL from cocoa-fed animals, along with a decrease in gene expression of CD11b, CD11c and IL-10. These results suggest that changes in PPL and IEL composition and in the gene expression induced by the cocoa diet could be involved, among other mechanisms, on its tolerogenic effect.

  20. Comparative toxicogenomic analysis of oral Cr(VI) exposure effects in rat and mouse small intestinal epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; Thompson, Chad M.; Kim, Suntae; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2012-07-15

    Continuous exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal tumors in mice but not rats. Concentration-dependent gene expression effects were evaluated in female F344 rat duodenal and jejunal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/L (as sodium dichromate dihydrate, SDD) in drinking water. Whole-genome microarrays identified 3269 and 1815 duodenal, and 4557 and 1534 jejunal differentially expressed genes at 8 and 91 days, respectively, with significant overlaps between the intestinal segments. Functional annotation identified gene expression changes associated with oxidative stress, cell cycle, cell death, and immune response that were consistent with reported changes in redox status and histopathology. Comparative analysis with B6C3F1 mouse data from a similarly designed study identified 2790 differentially expressed rat orthologs in the duodenum compared to 5013 mouse orthologs at day 8, and only 1504 rat and 3484 mouse orthologs at day 91. Automated dose–response modeling resulted in similar median EC{sub 50}s in the rodent duodenal and jejunal mucosae. Comparative examination of differentially expressed genes also identified divergently regulated orthologs. Comparable numbers of differentially expressed genes were observed at equivalent Cr concentrations (μg Cr/g duodenum). However, mice accumulated higher Cr levels than rats at ≥ 170 mg/L SDD, resulting in a ∼ 2-fold increase in the number of differentially expressed genes. These qualitative and quantitative differences in differential gene expression, which correlate with differences in tissue dose, likely contribute to the disparate intestinal tumor outcomes. -- Highlights: ► Cr(VI) elicits dose-dependent changes in gene expression in rat intestine. ► Cr(VI) elicits less differential gene expression in rats compared to mice. ► Cr(VI) gene expression can be phenotypically anchored to intestinal changes. ► Species

  1. Antioxidant activity of a novel extract from bamboo grass (AHSS) against ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Toshimitsu; Itagaki, Shirou; Yamaji, Toshihiko; Nakata, Chie; Noda, Toshihiro; Hirano, Takeshi; Iseki, Ken

    2006-11-01

    Production of free radical species in cells and body tissues is known to cause many pathological disorders. Therefore, free radical scavengers play an important role in the prevention of various human diseases. Bamboo grass, Sasa senanensis, is a native Japanese plant. Sasa has been used for medicine in Japan for many centuries. In this study, we investigated the antioxidative activity of Absolutely Hemicellulose Senanensis (AHSS), a novel extract from Sasa. In the first part of this study, we found that AHSS has antioxidant activities by the assay using superoxide anion-2-methyl-6-methoxyphenylethynylimidazopyrazynone (MPEC) reaction kit. We then confirmed its antioxidative activity using a rat ischemia and subsequent reperfusion (I/R) injury model. Breakdown of the intestinal wall caused by intestinal I/R was attenuated by pretreatment with AHSS. Moreover, AHSS inhibited the production of lipid peroxide by intestinal I/R. AHSS could be an important source of ingredients for use in functional foods and other applications.

  2. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption.

  3. Prevention by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, of indomethacin -induced small intestinal ulceration in rats through induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Y; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Tokioka, S; Murano, M; Kakimoto, K; Nishio, H; Umegaki, E; Takeuchi, K; Higuchi, K

    2010-06-01

    The effect of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), on indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration was examined in rats, particularly in relation to heme oxygenase (HO)-1. The animals were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and killed 24 h later. Lansoprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) and omeprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) were given 30 min before the administration of indomethacin, while tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP: 30 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of HO-1, was injected 10 min before indomethacin or lansoprazole. Indomethacin produced hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine, accompanied with an increase of mucosal invasion of enterobacteria, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the mucosa. Pretreatment with lansoprazole dose- dependently reduced the severity of the indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions, with suppression of the increased MPO activity, while omeprazole had no effect. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly exacerbated these intestinal lesions and almost totally abolished the protective effect of lansoprazole. The up-regulation of iNOS mRNA expression following indomethacin was suppressed by lansoprazole in a SnPP-inhibitable manner, although the enhanced enterobacterial invasion remained unaffected. The amount of HO-1 protein in the intestinal mucosa was significantly increased by lansoprazole but not by omeprazole. Prior administration of carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2; 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the severity of these lesions and the enhancement of mucosal iNOS mRNA expression induced in the small intestine by indomethacin. These results suggest that lansoprazole prevents indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration, and this effect is associated with inhibition of iNOS expression, through up-regulation of HO-1/CO production in the mucosa.

  4. Contrasting effects of the stomach and small intestine of rats on copper absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Craft, N.; Lewis, C.; Holbrook, J.; Rose, A.; Reiser, S.; Smith, J.C.

    1986-11-01

    Since the severity of copper deficiency has been shown to be enhanced by feeding diets containing fructose but ameliorated by diets containing starch, we decided to investigate the effect of fructose or starch on copper absorption. As copper transport has been reported to occur also from the stomach, it was possible that copper absorption is inhibited by fructose already from that tissue. Under anesthesia, stomachs of 72 rats fed copper-deficient or supplemented diets containing fructose or starch were ligated prior to the oral administration of /sup 64/Cu. Gastric absorption of /sup 64/Cu was studied when the isotope was administered by gastric tube either in diet containing fructose or starch or in water. /sup 64/Cu was not absorbed from the stomach regardless of the type of dietary treatment, copper status or whether the copper was administered either in diet or in water. In addition, the absorption of /sup 64/Cu from a diet containing either fructose or starch or from a saline solution was studied using the isolated ligated duodenal loop. When /sup 64/Cu was administered with dietary fructose /sup 64/Cu retention and absorption were impaired when compared to starch. When /sup 64/Cu was administered in saline solution, differences in retention and absorption between the four dietary groups disappeared. It is suggested that the requirements for copper rather than the decreased absorption of copper are responsible at least in part for the more pronounced severity of copper deficiency in rats fed fructose compared to those fed starch.

  5. Small intestinal physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K; Otterson, M F

    1989-06-01

    The small intestine, like the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, is an intelligent organ. It generates a wide variety of motor patterns to meet motility requirements in different situations. Its basic motor function after a meal is to mix the chyme with exocrine and intestinal secretions, agitate its contents to uniformly and evenly expose them to the mucosal surface, and to propel them distally at a rate that allows optimal absorption of food components, and reabsorption of bile. Most of these functions are performed by individual phasic contractions. In humans, the phasic contractions are largely disorganized in time and space. These contractions may cause mixing and agitation of luminal contents with slow distal propulsion. Occasionally, an individual contraction of large amplitude and long duration migrates over several centimeters and may rapidly propel the contents over this distance. In general, the spatial and temporal relationships of individual phasic contractions become less organized distally, resulting in a slower propulsion rate in the distal small intestine than in the proximal small intestine. The migrating clustered contractions generated after a meal may also be propulsive, but because of their unpredictable and irregular occurrence, their precise role in postprandial propulsion is incompletely understood. Rapidly migrating contractions may occur when the electrical control activity is obliterated by pharmacologic agents or during parasitic infections. Their effects on motility are not known yet. Between meals, when digestion is complete, the small intestine generates migrating motor complexes that help keep the small intestine clean by dislodging debris from the villi and dumping them into the colon. This may prevent decay of these materials in the small intestine and limit their contribution to bacterial overgrowth. Giant migrating contractions may perform a similar function in the distal small intestine as well as return any refluxed fecal

  6. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  7. What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? For some people with small intestine cancer, ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Stops Working More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  8. Indomethacin induces small intestinal damage and inhibits amitrole-associated thyroid carcinogenesis in rats initiated with N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Imai, Toshio; Onose, Jun-ichi; Hasumura, Mai; Takizawa, Tamotsu; Hirose, Masao

    2006-06-20

    Effects of intestinal damage on thyroid carcinogenesis due to amitrole (AT) were examined in F344 male rats initiated with N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine (DHPN). In experiment 1, rats were provided with diet containing 0.03% AT for 20 weeks after a single subcutaneous injection of DHPN (2800 mg/kg body weight), and concomitantly received 0.01% indomethacin (IM) in the diet to cause small intestinal damage or 1% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in the drinking water for induction of colitis following a schedule of intermittent 1-week administration and 1-week withdrawal for a total of 10 times. Groups without AT- and/or IM or DSS treatment were also included. Histopathological examination revealed significant reduction in the incidence and multiplicity of follicular cell adenomas and adenocarcinomas in the group concomitantly treated with IM, but no change in the DSS group, as compared with the AT alone group. In experiment 2, rats were similarly fed diet containing AT for 3 weeks with concomitant IM or DSS treatment after a DHPN initiation, and serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels were found to be significantly elevated only in the IM case. The increase in thyroid follicular cell proliferation due to AT was also clearly suppressed in the group concomitantly treated with IM. From these findings, IM-induced intestinal damage may inhibit thyroid carcinogeneisis in rats, although contributions of other factors, such as a direct inhibitory effect of IM to thyroid follicular cell proliferation cannot be ruled out.

  9. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-04-30

    Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea.

  10. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. Methods The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. Results The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). Conclusions These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea. PMID:26645247

  11. Effects of intraluminal hydrostatic pressure on L-methionine absorption in the obstructed small intestine of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Enochsson, L.; Nylander, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of elevated intraluminal hydrostatic pressure on the active absorption of the amino acid selenium 75 L-methionine has been analyzed in the normal and obstructed small intestine. An intestinal loop of defined position and length was included in a recircling perfusion system from which the elimination rate of the radiolabeled amino acid was measured. Preset pressure levels within the system were maintained by a servo-controlled unit, which added or subtracted volume to keep the pressure constant. The rate of amino acid elimination increased when the nonobstructed loop was subjected to a pressure of 10 cm H2O but decreased when exposed to 20cm H2O. Using a loop of intestine subjected to 48 hours of obstruction, amino acid elimination was greatly retarded compared with that of the nonobstructed loop. By increasing the intraluminal pressure to 10 and 20 cm H2O, the elimination rate increased, equalling that of the nonobstructed gut. The results suggest that intestinal obstruction per se decreases active absorption secondary to impaired intestinal viability. Moderately increased intraluminal pressure adds a driving force to L-methionine absorption, the mechanism of which is obscure.

  12. Inhibitory effect of aluminium on calcium absorption in small intestine of rats with different thyroid hormone status.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    To analyse the influence of thyroid status on the effect of aluminium (Al) upon intestinal calcium (Ca) absorption, adult male Wistar rats with experimentally altered thyroid hormones circulating levels, were orally treated (o.g.) with 0 (control), or 50 mg elemental Al (as chloride)/kg body weight (b.w.) per day, for a 14 d period. Hyper- and hypo-thyroid conditions were respectively achieved by means of administration of either sodium levothyroxine (50 microg/kg b.w. per day, o.g.) or methimazole, a thyroxine synthesis inhibitor (1mg/kg b.w. per day, o.g.). In duodenum-jejunum segments, in vitro mucosa-to-serosa (45)Ca flux (JCa(ms)) and kinetics of (45)Ca uptake in isolated enterocytes, were determined. In serum, concentrations of thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) were measured by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Unlike non-Al-treated rats, JCa(ms) of Al-exposed rats decreased as serum levels of T4 and T3 increased, showing a significant inverse correlation in both cases (T4: r(2)=0.414, P=0.024; T3: r(2)=0.443, P=0.018). Enterocytes isolated from rats treated with Al plus thyroxine showed a reduction of both maximum Ca uptake (4.86+/-0.44 vs. 6.85+/-1.04 nmol Ca/mg protein, P<0.05) and K(m) (0.84+/-0.18 vs. 1.05+/-0.36 mM, P<0.05) when compared to control. The observed variability in the Al effect on Ca transport with thyroid status of rats could be reflecting a negative interaction of Al with thyroid hormone action mechanisms on intestinal Ca absorption, which would take place mainly at Ca entry into enterocyte from lumen.

  13. Differentiation of epithelial cells to M cells in response to bacterial colonization on the follicle-associated epithelium of Peyer's patch in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chin, Keigi; Onishi, Sachiko; Yuji, Midori; Inamoto, Tetsurou; Qi, Wang-Mei; Warita, Katsuhiko; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    To clarify the relationship between M cells and intestinal microflora, histoplanimetrical investigation into the bacterial colonization and the differentiation to M cells was carried out in rat Peyer's patch under physiological conditions. The follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), except for the narrow area of apical region, was closely covered with both neighboring intestinal villi and a thick mucous layer, the latter of which also filled the intervillous spaces as well as the space between the FAE and the neighboring intestinal villi. Indigenous bacteria adhered almost constantly to the narrow areas of apical regions of both intestinal villi and the FAE. Bacterial colonies were occasionally located on the basal to middle region of FAE, where M cells also appeared, forming large pockets. When bacterial colonies were located on the basal to middle region of FAE, bacteria with the same morphological characteristics also proliferated in the intervillous spaces neighboring the Peyer's patch. In cases with no bacterial colonies on the basal to middle region of FAE, however, M cells were rare in the FAE. Histoplanimetrical analysis showed the similar distribution pattern of bacterial colonies on the FAE and M cells in the FAE. M cells ultrastructurally engulfed indigenous bacteria, which were then transported to the pockets. These results suggest that indigenous bacterial colonization on the FAE stimulates the differentiation of M cells in the FAE under physiological conditions. The uptake of bacteria by M cells might contribute the regulation of the development of indigenous bacterial colonies in the small intestine.

  14. Effect of garlic oil on neutrophil infiltration in the small intestine of endotoxin-injected rats and its association with levels of soluble and cellular adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chia-Hao; Lee, Shih-Hua; Chen, Ke-Ming; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Liu, Cheng-Tzu

    2011-07-27

    Garlic ( Allium sativum ) possesses anti-inflammatory effects. This study investigated the effects of garlic oil on endotoxin-induced neutrophil infiltration in the small intestine. Wistar rats received by gavage 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg body wt garlic oil (GO) or the vehicle (corn oil; 2 mL/kg body wt) every other day for 2 weeks before being injected with endotoxin (ip, 5 mg/kg body wt). Control rats were administered corn oil and injected with sterile saline. Blood samples for the measurement of soluble adhesion molecules were collected at various time points after injection, and all other samples were collected 18 h after injection. The 10 and 50 mg/kg doses suppressed endotoxin-induced neutrophilia, serum levels of sL-selectin and sICAM-1, cellular CD11b on neutrophils, intestinal ICAM-1 content, and neutrophil infiltration (P < 0.05). The 100 mg/kg dose significantly lowered local ICAM-1 and cellular CD11b on neutrophils (P < 0.05) but did not have a beneficial effect on neutrophil infiltration. In addition, 100 mg/kg of GO worsened the elevation of the local TNF-α level and neutrophilia. Appropriate doses of garlic oil have a preventive effect on endotoxin-induced neutrophil infiltration and damage to the small intestine.

  15. Experimental colonic carcinogenesis: changes in faecal bile acids after promotion of intestinal tumours by small bowel resection in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, A P; Sian, M S; Matthews, J L; Bloom, S R; Cooke, T

    1988-01-01

    Small bowel resection promotes the development of colonic tumours in azoxymethane treated rats. As high faecal bile acid concentrations are associated with colonic cancer and may be altered by resection, we have studied changes in faecal bile acid concentrations during promotion of colonic carcinogenesis by increasing small bowel resection. Twenty rats in each group underwent either jejunal transection or 20%, 50%, or 80% proximal small bowel resection. Tumours were induced with azoxymethane 10 mg/kg by 12 weekly subcutaneous injections, and faecal bile acid concentrations were measured at six and 16 weeks. Colonic tumour number rose from 0.6 per rat in the transection group to 1.6 per rat in the 50% resection group (p less than 0.01) but were not significantly different to transection values at 0.8 per rat in the 80% resection group. Total daily faecal bile acid excretion and bile acid concentrations fell with increasing resection from 14.2 (1.6) mg/rat/day and 5.8 (0.7) mg/g dry faeces respectively in the transection group to 6.5 (0.5) mg/rat/day and 2.9 (0.2) mg/g respectively in the 80% resection group (p less than 0.001). The greatest reduction was seen in the concentration of deoxycholic acid which has been particularly associated with the aetiology of colonic cancer. The promotion of colonic tumours following small bowel resection in carcinogen treated rats is unlikely to be mediated by changes in faecal bile acid concentration or composition. PMID:3371718

  16. Short term effects of indomethacin on rat small intestinal permeability. Role of eicosanoids and platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mion, F; Cuber, J C; Minaire, Y; Chayvialle, J A

    1994-01-01

    Short term effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability were studied on a model of rat isolated vascularly perfused terminal ileum. The objectives of this study were (a) to assess the effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability and histology; (b) to assess the effects of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and platelet activating factor (PAF) on the same parameters; (c) to evaluate the role of these inflammation mediators on indomethacin induced permeability modifications. Intravascular administration of 1.25 and 2.5 mM indomethacin induced a significant increase of 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate. Histological analysis showed only mucosal oedema. Pretreatment with 16,16 dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 did not reverse these changes. Intravascular administration of PAF, leukotrienes B4 and D4 provoked a significant rise in 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate and intraluminal protein leakage, with an intense vascocongestion of the mucosal capillaries. These changes were completely prevented by perfusion of the respective specific antagonists (BN52021 for PAF, LY255,583 for leukotriene B4 and MK571 for leukotriene D4). None of these three antagonists, however, or MK886, a selective 5'-lipo-oxygenase inhibitor, could reverse the indomethacin induced permeability changes. Indomethacin induced increased intestinal permeability at these high concentrations does not seem to be a result of changed prostanoid or PAF metabolism. Alternative mechanisms of the initial damage of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs should be sought. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8174986

  17. Antiinflammatory effects of soluble complement receptor type 1 promote rapid recovery of ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Eror, A T; Stojadinovic, A; Starnes, B W; Makrides, S C; Tsokos, G C; Shea-Donohue, T

    1999-02-01

    We examined the effect of soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) on mucosal injury and inflammation in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion. Groups of vehicle- and sCR1-treated rats underwent 30 min of mesenteric ischemia followed by 60 or 120 min of reperfusion. When compared to vehicle-treated rats, treatment with sCR1 (12 mg/kg) prior to 120 min of reperfusion significantly reduced mucosal injury, neutrophil infiltration, leukotriene B4 production, and restored villus height to control levels. The protective effect of sCR1 evident at 120 min of reperfusion was not observed at 60 min of reperfusion despite rapid inactivation of complement. These data suggest that complement inhibition minimized mucosal disruption by facilitating mucosal restitution or interrupting the inflammatory process. Delayed administration of sCR1 for 30 or 60 min into the reperfusion period progressively reduced the protection. sCR1-mediated rapid recovery of rat intestine after ischemia/reperfusion underscores the fundamental role of complement activation in neutrophil-mediated tissue injury.

  18. The effects of cyclooxygenase inhibitors on the gastric emptying and small intestine transit in the male rats following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Khaksari, Mohammad; Shahrokhi, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): This study was carried out to investigate the effects of COX-2 selective inhibitor (Celecoxib) or non-selective COX inhibitor (Ibuprofen) on gastrointestinal motility. Materials and Methods: The rats were randomly divided into five groups including: intact, sham, traumatic brain injury (TBI) group (intact rats under TBI), Celecoxib group (10 mg/kg), Ibuprofen group (10 mg/kg). Rats of the treatment groups received gavages at 1 hr before the TBI induction. The TBI was moderate and diffused using the Marmarou method. The gastric emptying and small intestine transit were measured by phenol red method. Results: The gastric emptying didn’t change following TBI induction compared to intact group. The consumption of ibuprofen or celecoxib didn’t have any effect on gastric emptying compared to sham group. TBI induction didn’t have any effect on the intestinal transit. Also, there was no significant difference between ibuprofen or celecoxib consumption vs. sham group (P>0.05). Conclusion: The COX-2 selective inhibitor (celecoxib) or non-selective COX inhibitor (ibuprofen) have no effects on gastric or small bowel transit. Further work is necessary to investigate the effects of non-selective COX inhibitors and their impact on gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:25140201

  19. Schlafen 3 changes during rat intestinal maturation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Mary F; Hermann, Rebecca; Sun, Kelian; Basson, Marc D

    2012-11-01

    Understanding gut development may illuminate the adaptive response to massive small-bowel resection and facilitate enteral nutrition. We reported that Schlafen-3 (Slfn3) mediates differentiation in vitro in rat intestinal epithelial. We hypothesized that Slfn3 is involved in intestinal development in vivo. We removed fetal intestines, liver, and lungs on day 20 of gestation, at birth, and on postnatal days 1 and 5. Expression of Slfn3, markers of intestinal differentiation, and Slfn5, to address specificity, were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Villin expression increased on days 1 and 5 (8.7 ± .6 and 5.4 ± .4, respectively; P < .01). Intestinal Slfn3 expression was increased substantially after birth (2.1- ± .5-fold) and on days 1 and 5 (P < .02). Slfn3 was higher after birth in liver and lung but decreased sharply thereafter. Slfn5 expression was mostly unchanged. The data suggest that the developmental/maturation effects we observed correlate with Slfn3 but not Slfn5 and are more relevant to the intestines. A better understanding of how Slfn3 promotes intestinal differentiation could help promote intestinal maturation, improving outcomes in children or adults with short-gut syndrome. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Schlafen 3 changes during rat intestinal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Mary F.; Hermann, Rebecca; Sun, Kelian; Basson, Marc D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding gut development may illuminate the adaptive response to massive small-bowel resection and facilitate enteral nutrition. We reported that Schlafen-3 (Slfn3) mediates differentiation in vitro in rat intestinal epithelial. We hypothesized that Slfn3 is involved in intestinal development in vivo. METHODS We removed fetal intestines, liver, and lungs on day 20 of gestation, at birth, and on postnatal days 1 and 5. Expression of Slfn3, markers of intestinal differentiation, and Slfn5, to address specificity, were determined by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS Villin expression increased on days 1 and 5 (8.7 ± .6 and 5.4 ± .4, respectively; P < .01). Intestinal Slfn3 expression was increased substantially after birth (2.1- ± .5-fold) and on days 1 and 5 (P < .02). Slfn3 was higher after birth in liver and lung but decreased sharply thereafter. Slfn5 expression was mostly unchanged. CONCLUSIONS The data suggest that the developmental/maturation effects we observed correlate with Slfn3 but not Slfn5 and are more relevant to the intestines. A better understanding of how Slfn3 promotes intestinal differentiation could help promote intestinal maturation, improving outcomes in children or adults with short-gut syndrome. PMID:22906252

  1. The Ingestion of Proteins and Colloidal Materials by Columnar Absorptive Cells of the Small Intestine in Suckling Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Sam L.

    1959-01-01

    Proteins and colloidal materials, administered orally to suckling rats and mice, were ingested by columnar absorptive cells of the jejunum and ileum, but not of the duodenum. Bovine gamma globulin and ovalbumin were identified in the apical cytoplasm by staining with fluorescent antibody; trypan blue, Evans blue, saccharated iron oxide, and colloidal gold were detected intracellularly by their color, specific staining, and appearance in the electron microscope. Each substance was segregated in membrane-enclosed vacuoles, apparently part of a system of potentially interconnecting vacuoles and tubules in the apical cytoplasm which is continuous in places with the apical cell membrane. We postulate that ingestion of foreign materials was accomplished by pinocytosis, that is, by invagination of the apical cell membrane to form vacuoles containing material from the intestinal lumen. Approximately 18 days after birth columnar absorptive cells lost the ability to ingest proteins and colloids, and no longer contained large vacuoles and numerous tubules. At this age rats and mice lose the ability to absorb antibodies from the intestine in an immunologically intact form, and we conclude that cellular ingestion is part of the mechanism of absorption of intact proteins in suckling animals. Particulate fat apparently is absorbed in both newborn and adult animals by micropinocytosis. Thus adult animals may not have lost the capacity for pinocytosis, but rather have become selective as to what substances provoke it. Cortisone acetate, administered subcutaneously to rats 8 to 10 days old alters the columnar absorptive cells within 72 hours so that they resemble the cells in adult animals and no longer ingest proteins. PMID:13630932

  2. Inhibition of heat-induced apoptosis in rat small intestine and IEC-6 cells through the AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhimin; Liu, Fenghua; Yin, Peng; Wan, Changrong; He, Shasha; Liu, Xiaoxi; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Tao; Xu, Jianqin; Guo, Shining

    2013-12-02

    As the world warms up, heat stress is becoming a major cause of economic loss in the livestock industry. Long-time exposure of animals to hyperthermia causes extensive cell apoptosis, which is harmful to them. AKT and AKT-related serine-threonine kinases are known to be involved in signaling cascades that regulate cell survival, but the mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we demonstrate that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) /AKT signal pathway provides protection against apoptosis induced by heat stress to ascertain the key point for treatment. Under heat stress, rats showed increased shedding of intestinal epithelial cells. These rats also had elevated levels of serum cortisol and improved expression of heat shock proteins (Hsp27, Hsp70 and Hsp90) in response to heat stress. Apoptosis analysis by TUNEL assay revealed a higher number of villi epithelial cells that were undergoing apoptosis in heat-treated rats than in the normal control. This is supported by gene expression analysis, which showed an increased ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 (p < 0.05), an important indicator of apoptosis. During heat-induced apoptosis, more AKTs were activated, showing increased phosphorylation. An increase of BAD phosphorylation, which is an inhibitory modification, ensued. In rat IEC-6 cell line, a significant higher level of AKT phosphorylation was observed at 2 h after heat exposure. This coincided with a marked reduction of apoptosis. Together, these results suggest that heat stress caused damages to rat jejunum and induced apoptosis to a greater degree. HSPs and pro-survival factors were involved in response to heat stress. Among them, AKT played a key role in inhibiting heat-induced apoptosis.

  3. Kinetic evidence for separate systems in transport of D- and L-methionine by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Brachet, P.; Alvarado, F.; Puigserver, A.

    1987-03-01

    The kinetics of D- and L-methionine uptake by rings of everted intestine in vitro are consistent with a saturable Michaelis-Menten component plus a linear, diffusional one. All the data could be fit with a diffusion constant, which was essentially the same, independent of whether it was estimated by iteration or by using the extracellular marker, (/sup 3/H), inulin. Similar results were obtained from in vivo perfusion experiments, except that the diffusional term was negligible. D-(3,4-/sup 14/C)Methionine was found to inhibit L-methionine uptake by intestinal rings according to fully noncompetitive kinetics. Another set of experiments with jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles showed that D-methionine uptake is dependent on a Na/sup +/ gradient and is significantly inhibited by L-(/sup 35/S) methionine and L-prolie, but not by ..beta..-alanine and ..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid. The results indicate that, in rat jejunum, D-methionine is taken up through a Na/sup +/-dependent pathway distinct from the neutral amino acid (L-methionine) carrier and from the amino acid (L-proline,..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid, ..beta..-alanine) carrier.

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? A risk factor is anything that changes ... Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Be Prevented? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  5. What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? It’s important to have honest, open discussions ... Doctor About Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma? More In Small Intestine Cancer About Small Intestine Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, ...

  6. Correction of enhanced Na(+)-H+ exchange of rat small intestinal brush-border membranes in streptozotocin-induced diabetes by insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeja, P.K.; Wali, R.K.; Klitzke, A.; Sitrin, M.D.; Brasitus, T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Diabetes was induced in rats by administration of a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body wt). After 7 d, diabetic rats were further treated with insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D3) for an additional 5-7 d. Control, diabetic, diabetic + insulin, and diabetic + 1,25(OH)2D3 rats were then killed, their proximal small intestines were removed, and villus-tip epithelial cells were isolated and used to prepare brush-border membrane vesicles. Preparations from each of these groups were then analyzed and compared with respect to their amiloride-sensitive, electroneutral Na(+)-H+ exchange activity, using {sup 22}Na uptake as well as acridine orange techniques. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (a) H+ gradient-dependent {sup 22}Na uptake as well as Na+ gradient-dependent transmembrane H+ fluxes were significantly increased in diabetic vesicles compared to their control counterparts, (b) kinetic studies demonstrated that this enhanced {sup 22}Na uptake in diabetes was a result of increased maximal velocity (Vmax) of this exchanger with no change in apparent affinity (Km) for Na+, (c) serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 were significantly lower in diabetic animals compared with their control counterparts; and (d) insulin or 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment restored the Vmax alterations to control values, without any significant changes in Km, concomitant with significantly increasing the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 in diabetic animals. These results indicate that Na(+)-H+ activity is significantly increased in proximal small intestinal luminal membranes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Moreover, alterations in the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 may, at least in part, explain this enhanced antiporter activity and its correction by insulin.

  7. Correction of enhanced Na(+)-H+ exchange of rat small intestinal brush-border membranes in streptozotocin-induced diabetes by insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

    PubMed Central

    Dudeja, P K; Wali, R K; Klitzke, A; Sitrin, M D; Brasitus, T A

    1991-01-01

    Diabetes was induced in rats by administration of a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body wt). After 7 d, diabetic rats were further treated with insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3] for an additional 5-7 d. Control, diabetic, diabetic + insulin, and diabetic + 1,25(OH)2D3 rats were then killed, their proximal small intestines were removed, and villus-tip epithelial cells were isolated and used to prepare brush-border membrane vesicles. Preparations from each of these groups were then analyzed and compared with respect to their amiloride-sensitive, electroneutral Na(+)-H+ exchange activity, using 22Na uptake as well as acridine orange techniques. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (a) H+ gradient-dependent 22Na uptake as well as Na+ gradient-dependent transmembrane H+ fluxes were significantly increased in diabetic vesicles compared to their control counterparts, (b) kinetic studies demonstrated that this enhanced 22Na uptake in diabetes was a result of increased maximal velocity (Vmax) of this exchanger with no change in apparent affinity (Km) for Na+, (c) serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 were significantly lower in diabetic animals compared with their control counterparts; and (d) insulin or 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment restored the Vmax alterations to control values, without any significant changes in Km, concomitant with significantly increasing the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 in diabetic animals. These results indicate that Na(+)-H+ activity is significantly increased in proximal small intestinal luminal membranes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Moreover, alterations in the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 may, at least in part, explain this enhanced antiporter activity and its correction by insulin. PMID:1850761

  8. Correction of enhanced Na(+)-H+ exchange of rat small intestinal brush-border membranes in streptozotocin-induced diabetes by insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, P K; Wali, R K; Klitzke, A; Sitrin, M D; Brasitus, T A

    1991-05-01

    Diabetes was induced in rats by administration of a single i.p. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body wt). After 7 d, diabetic rats were further treated with insulin or 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol [1,25(OH)2D3] for an additional 5-7 d. Control, diabetic, diabetic + insulin, and diabetic + 1,25(OH)2D3 rats were then killed, their proximal small intestines were removed, and villus-tip epithelial cells were isolated and used to prepare brush-border membrane vesicles. Preparations from each of these groups were then analyzed and compared with respect to their amiloride-sensitive, electroneutral Na(+)-H+ exchange activity, using 22Na uptake as well as acridine orange techniques. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (a) H+ gradient-dependent 22Na uptake as well as Na+ gradient-dependent transmembrane H+ fluxes were significantly increased in diabetic vesicles compared to their control counterparts, (b) kinetic studies demonstrated that this enhanced 22Na uptake in diabetes was a result of increased maximal velocity (Vmax) of this exchanger with no change in apparent affinity (Km) for Na+, (c) serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 were significantly lower in diabetic animals compared with their control counterparts; and (d) insulin or 1,25(OH)2D3 treatment restored the Vmax alterations to control values, without any significant changes in Km, concomitant with significantly increasing the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 in diabetic animals. These results indicate that Na(+)-H+ activity is significantly increased in proximal small intestinal luminal membranes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Moreover, alterations in the serum levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 may, at least in part, explain this enhanced antiporter activity and its correction by insulin.

  9. The metallohormone cadmium modulates AhR-associated gene expression in the small intestine of rats similar to ethinyl-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Kluxen, Felix M; Diel, Patrick; Höfer, Nicola; Becker, Eugenia; Degen, Gisela H

    2013-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) affects the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-associated genes in rat uterus and elicits estrogen-like activity in vitro. The small intestine is highly exposed to dietary Cd which may mimic or antagonize estrogen action in this tissue. We investigated the effects of Cd and 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE₂) on AhR-associated gene expression after oral exposure of ovariectomized female Wistar rats, and metallothionein (Mt1a) expression as a typical metal-response marker. Mt1a in the small intestine was strongly induced by co-treatment with CdCl₂ at 2 mg/kg b.wt (Cd 2) and 0.1 mg/kg b.wt EE2 than by the single compound (3-day gavage). The Cd 2-induced down-regulation of Cyp1a1, Gsta2, and Nqo1 mRNA was not antagonized by pure anti-estrogen (2.5 mg/kg b.wt ZK191703 s.c., ZK). Interestingly, the EE₂-induced down-regulation of Cyp1a1, Gsta2, and Nqo1 mRNA was antagonized by Cd 2 in vivo and in colon cancer cell lines (HT-29 and CaCo-2, treated 5 days with Cd 1 µM and/or E₂ 0.01 µM) with low or no ER-beta expression. Dose dependency was studied after Cd exposure with drinking water (5 and 50 ppm CdCl₂ equivalent to 0.4 and 4 mg/kg b.wt; Cd 0.4, Cd 4) for 28 days and EE₂ as reference. Intestinal Mt1a expression was dose dependently induced, while AhR target genes were down-regulated by Cd 0.4 similar to EE₂ and more pronounced than by Cd 4. We propose that Cd modulates intestinal AhR-associated gene expression similar to estrogens, but (contrary to its effects in uterus) via ER-independent and/or ER-beta-mediated mechanisms. Our new data suggest interference of Cd with estrogen and AhR signaling in the small intestine.

  10. Sodium/proton antiport in brush-border-membrane vesicles isolated from rat small intestine and kidney.

    PubMed

    Murer, H; Hopfer, U; Kinne, R

    1976-03-15

    Studies on proton and Na+ transport by isolated intestinal and renal brush-border-membrane vesicles were carried out to test for the presence of an Na+/H+-exchange system. Proton transport was evaluated as proton transfer from the intravesicular space to the incubation medium by monitoring pH changes in the membrane suspension induced by sudden addition of cations. Na+ transport was determined as Na+ uptake into the vesicles by filtration technique. A sudden addition of sodium salts (but not choline) to the membrane suspension provokes an acidification of the incubation medium which is abolished by the addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. Pretreatment of the membranes with Triton X-100 prevents the acidification. The acidification is also not observed if the [K+] and proton conductance of the membranes have been increased by the simultaneous addition of valinomycin and carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone to the K+-rich incubation medium. Either valinomycin or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone when added alone do not alter the response of the membranes to the addition of Na+. Na+ uptake by brush-border microvilli is enhanced in the presence of a proton gradient directed from the intravesicular space to the incubation medium. Under these conditions a transient accumulation of Na+ inside the vesicles is observed. It is concluded that intestinal and renal brush-border membranes contain a NA+/H+ antiport system which catalyses an electroneutral exchange of Na+ against protons and consequently can produce a proton gradient in the presence of a concentration difference for Na+. This system might be involved in the active proton secretion of the small intestine and the proximal tubule of the kidney.

  11. Irreversible electroporation on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M A; Narayan, R; Padath, T; Rubinsky, B

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) has recently been conceived as a new minimally invasive ablation method, using microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane bilayer and induce cell death while keeping all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix, intact. Here, we present the first in vivo study that examines the effects of NTIRE on the small intestine, an organ whose collateral damage is of particular concern in the anticipated use of NTIRE for treatment of abdominal cancers. Methods: A typical NTIRE electrical protocol was applied directly to the rat small intestine and histological analysis was used to examine the effect of NTIRE over time. Results: The application of NTIRE led to complete cell ablation in the targeted tissue, but the animal did not show any physiological effects of the procedure and the intestine showed signs of recovery, developing an epithelial layer 3 days post treatment and regenerating its distinct layers within a week. Conclusion: Our results indicate that this novel procedure can be used for abdominal cancer treatment while minimising collateral damage to adjacent tissues because of the unique ability of the NTIRE ablation method to target the cell membrane. PMID:22223084

  12. Short-,moderate-, and long-term treadmill training protocols reduce plasma, fundus, but not small intestine ghrelin concentrations in male rats.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari-Niaki, A; Jafari, A; Moradi, M; Kraemer, R R

    2011-06-01

    It has been suggested that circulating ghrelin levels are upregulated by fasting, hypoglycemic status, and a physical exercise-induced energy deficit. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the timecourse adaptations of the plasma, fundus, and small intestine ghrelin concentrations as well as related hormones and liver ATP levels to 3, 6, and 12 weeks of treadmill endurance running. Thirty-nine male Wistar rats (12-14 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 3 control (C3, no.=5; C6, no.=7 and C12, no.=7) and 3 training groups (E3, no.=6; E6, no.=7 and E12, no.=7). The rats in the 3 training groups were exercised on a motor-driven treadmill at 25 m/min (0% grade) for 60 min/day, 5 days/week for 3, 6, and 12 weeks, respectively. The animals were sacrificed 48 h after the last session of each training program and tissues were analyzed. Total ghrelin concentrations were significantly (p<0.05) lower in trained rat plasma and fundus tissue after all treadmill endurance running programs. Small intestine ghrelin concentrations remained unchanged. Plasma GH concentrations and liver ATP content were significantly higher in E6 and E12 groups. Data indicate that as little as 3 weeks of moderate treadmill exercise reduces plasma and fundus total ghrelin concentrations with elevated plasma GH and liver ATP content occurring after 6 and 12 weeks of training. Exercise training-induced improvement of energy source availability and negative feedback from increased GH levels may play a role in reducing plasma and fundus ghrelin levels.

  13. Evaluation of a canine small intestinal submucosal xenograft and polypropylene mesh as bioscaffolds in an abdominal full-thickness resection model of growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chung, Dai-Jung; Do, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biological scaffold properties of canine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compared to a those of polypropylene mesh in growing rats with full-thickness abdominal defects. SIS is used to repair musculoskeletal tissue while promoting cell migration and supporting tissue regeneration. Polypropylene mesh is a non-resorbable synthetic material that can endure mechanical tension. Canine SIS was obtained from donor German shepherds, and its porous collagen fiber structure was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A 2.50-cm2 section of canine SIS (SIS group) or mesh (mesh group) was implanted in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 1, 2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, the implants were histopathologically examined and tensile load was tested. One month after surgery, CD68+ macrophage numbers in the SIS group were increased, but the number of CD8+ T cells in this group declined more rapidly than that in rats treated with the mesh. In the SIS group, few adhesions and well-developed autologous abdominal muscle infiltration into the SIS collagen fibers were observed. No significant differences in the tensile load test results were found between the SIS and mesh groups at 24 weeks. Canine SIS may therefore be a suitable replacement for artificial biological scaffolds in small animals. PMID:23628657

  14. Evaluation of a canine small intestinal submucosal xenograft and polypropylene mesh as bioscaffolds in an abdominal full-thickness resection model of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, A-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chung, Dai-Jung; Do, Sun Hee; Kim, Hwi-Yool

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biological scaffold properties of canine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compared to a those of polypropylene mesh in growing rats with full-thickness abdominal defects. SIS is used to repair musculoskeletal tissue while promoting cell migration and supporting tissue regeneration. Polypropylene mesh is a non-resorbable synthetic material that can endure mechanical tension. Canine SIS was obtained from donor German shepherds, and its porous collagen fiber structure was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A 2.50-cm(2) section of canine SIS (SIS group) or mesh (mesh group) was implanted in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 1, 2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, the implants were histopathologically examined and tensile load was tested. One month after surgery, CD68+ macrophage numbers in the SIS group were increased, but the number of CD8+ T cells in this group declined more rapidly than that in rats treated with the mesh. In the SIS group, few adhesions and well-developed autologous abdominal muscle infiltration into the SIS collagen fibers were observed. No significant differences in the tensile load test results were found between the SIS and mesh groups at 24 weeks. Canine SIS may therefore be a suitable replacement for artificial biological scaffolds in small animals.

  15. Intraoperative scintigraphy for active small intestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, A.; Palestro, C.; Lewis, B.S.; Katz, L.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Localizing active sites of bleeding within the small intestine remains a difficult task. Endoscopic, angiographic or scintigraphic studies may point to the small intestine as the site of blood loss, but at operation, without a palpable lesion, the exact site of bleeding remains elusive. Patients are managed at laparotomy with intraoperative endoscopy, angiography, multiple enterotomies, blind resections, or placement of an enterostomy. We describe two patients in whom intraoperative scintigraphy accurately identified active sites of bleeding in the small intestine when other modalities failed. Intraoperative scintigraphy is rapid, easy to perform and is an effective means of identifying active sites of bleeding within the small intestine.

  16. Efficacy of royal jelly on methotrexate-induced systemic oxidative stress and damage to small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaynar, Leylagül; Cetin, Aysun; Hacioglu, Sibel K; Eser, Barış; Koçyigit, İsmail; Canöz, Özlem; Tasdemir, Arzu; Karadag, Canan; Kurnaz, Fatih; Saraymen, Recep; Silici, Sibel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this present study is to investigate the mucositis caused by methotrexate (MTX), as well as whether the application of royal jelly (RJ) has a protective effect on oxidative stress. This present study included six groups each consisted of 12 Wistar rats. Distilled water (po: peroral) was given to the 1st group as placebo for 10 days and MTX (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal: ip) on the 7th day. The 2nd group received RJ (50mg/kg, po) for 10 days and normal saline (NS) instead of MTX. RJ (50mg/kg) was given to the 3rd group for 10 days and MTX on the 7th day. The 4th group received RJ (100 mg/kg, po) for 10 days and NS was given intraperitoneally. RJ (100mg/kg) was given to the 5th group for 10 days and a single dose of MTX. Distilled water was given to the 6th (control) group for 10 days and intraperitoneal NS on the 7th day. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were analyzed in blood samples on the 11th day. Morphological and histopathological changes were examined in the intestinal tissue samples. Villus length and mucosal thickness, as well as the villus length/crypt ratio, were significantly decreased with MTX administration, and the semi-quantitative histological evaluation (SQHE) score was measured high (p<0.001). In addition, a decrease in the antioxidant parameters and an increase in the MDA levels were identified. The villus length and SQHE were significantly different in the groups receiving RJ (p<0.001) as compared to the MTX group. Although RJ addition had no effect on the decreased mucosal thickness and villus/crypt ratio in MTX groups, it caused an improvement in the antioxidant levels and a remarkable decrease in MDA levels. Adding RJ has a decreasing effect on the MTX-induced intestinal damage and it has a suppressive effect on MTX-induced oxidative stress by means of increasing antioxidant enzyme activity and decreasing lipid peroxidation.

  17. Effect of colchicine on rat small intestinal absorptive cells. II. Distribution of label after incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose into plasma membrane glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ellinger, A.; Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-12-01

    By means of radioautography the influence was tested of various periods (5, 15, 30, 40 min, 2 hr) of pretreatment with colchicine, administered intraperitoneally to rats at a dosage of 0.5 mg/100 g of body weight, on the intracellular pathway of (/sup 3/H)fucose in absorptive cells of the small intestine. Administration of colchicine for 30 min and longer time intervals causes delay in the insertion of (/sup 3/H)fucose into the oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates in the Golgi apparatus, and results in redistribution of the label apparent over the different portions of the plasma membrane. In controls, at 2 and 4 hr after administration of (/sup 3/H)fucose the apical plasma membrane is strongly labeled. Colchicine causes equalization of the reaction of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane: the number of silver grains attributable to the apical plasma membrane is reduced; following treatment with colchicine, apical portions of the plasma membrane comprise 31.6 +/- 1.8% of the silver grains, 38.6 +/- 3.8% are attributable to basolateral membrane regions. The colchicine-induced equalization of the density of label of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane, in addition to the occurrence of basolateral microvillus borders, suggests microtubules to be important in the maintenance of the polar organization of small intestinal absorptive cells.

  18. Small intestinal goblet cell proliferation induced by ingestion of soluble and insoluble dietary fiber is characterized by an increase in sialylated mucins in rats.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shingo; Takemura, Naoki; Sonoyama, Kei; Morita, Akio; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Aoe, Seiichiro; Morita, Tatsuya

    2012-08-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects of insoluble and soluble fibers on mucin sialylation and sulfation in the small intestine. First, diets containing soluble [konjac mannan (KM), psyllium, or guar gum; 50 g/kg) or insoluble (polystyrene foam, wheat bran, or cornhusk; 80 g/kg) fiber were fed to rats for 13 d. The fiber-fed groups had more goblet cells in the ileum than the fiber-free control group. High-iron diamine/alcian blue staining showed more sialylated mucin-producing cells in the fiber-fed groups than in the control, whereas sulfated mucin-producing cells were fewer (insoluble fibers) or unchanged (soluble fibers). Second, feeding KM (50 g/kg) and beet fiber (BF) (80 g/kg) diets for 7 d yielded a higher ileum Siat4C expression than the control, but Gal3ST2 and Gal3ST4 expression was comparable. Luminal mucin content correlated with sialic acid (r = 0.96; P < 0.001) or sulfate (r = 0.62; P < 0.01), but the slope of the sialic acid-derived equation was greater than that of the sulfate-derived equation, indicating a preferred increase in sialylated mucins. Third, rats were fed the control diet for 10 d while receiving antibiotic treatment. Analysis of the luminal mucin showed that sialylated mucins were more vulnerable to bacterial degradation than sulfated mucins. Finally, a study of bromo-deoxyuridine incorporation in rats fed a BF diet indicated that goblet cell proliferation accompanied by increased sialylated mucin appeared to be related to accelerated ileal epithelial cell migration. We conclude that intestinal goblet cell responses to insoluble and soluble fibers are characterized by increases in sialylated mucin production.

  19. Calcium and glucose uptake in rat small intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles. Modulation by exogenous hypercortisolism and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3.

    PubMed

    Braun, H J; Birkenhäger, J C; De Jonge, H R

    1984-07-11

    The effect of exogenous hypercortisolism and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 on small-intestinal calcium and glucose transport in the rat was studied at the level of brush-border membrane vesicles generated from isolated villous cells by a freeze-thaw procedure. At 5 X 10(-5) M extravesicular calcium, initial uptake rates in vesicles prepared from triamcinolone-treated adult rats were decreased by 30% after 5 days. Since calcium ionophore A23187 virtually abolished the difference in calcium uptake, triamcinolone appeared to affect calcium channel density or activity rather than intravesicular binding capacity. Kinetic analysis showed that a decrease in Vmax of a saturable calcium transport system could entirely account for the diminished rate of vesicular calcium uptake. Calcium transport rates could be partially restored by in vivo administration of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-3 at a dosage which did not affect vesicular calcium uptake in control animals. Conversely, sodium-driven glucose accumulation in brush-border vesicles from triamcinolone-treated rats was stimulated by 50-70% after 36 h and appeared insensitive to vitamin D. A specific triamcinolone action on the glucose carrier itself rather than on the driving force of the sodium gradient was indicated by (i) a similar stimulation of glucose transport under equilibrium exchange conditions and (ii) an opposite effect of triamcinolone on sodium-driven alanine transport. The triamcinolone-induced changes in calcium and glucose uptake were not accompanied by a gross alteration of membrane integrity in vitro or by major alterations in vesicular protein composition, intravesicular glucose space and sucrase or alkaline phosphatase activity. The modification of vesicular transport properties is discussed in relation to the vitamin D-antagonized inhibition of intestinal calcium uptake and the stimulation of glucose absorption in response to supraphysiologic amounts of glucocorticoids observed in intact epithelium.

  20. Protection of radiation-induced damage to the hematopoietic system, small intestine and salivary glands in rats by JNJ7777120 compound, a histamine H4 ligand.

    PubMed

    Martinel Lamas, Diego J; Carabajal, Eliana; Prestifilippo, Juan P; Rossi, Luis; Elverdin, Juan C; Merani, Susana; Bergoc, Rosa M; Rivera, Elena S; Medina, Vanina A

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous data on the histamine radioprotective effect on highly radiosensitive tissues, in the present work we aimed at investigating the radioprotective potential of the H4R ligand, JNJ7777120, on ionizing radiation-induced injury and genotoxic damage in small intestine, salivary glands and hematopoietic tissue. For that purpose, rats were divided into 4 groups. JNJ7777120 and JNJ7777120-irradiated groups received a daily subcutaneous JNJ7777120 injection (10 mg/kg) starting 24 h before irradiation. Irradiated groups received a single dose of 5 Gy on whole-body using Cesium-137 source and were sacrificed 3 or 30 days after irradiation. Tissues were removed, fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin or PAS staining and histological characteristics were evaluated. Proliferative and apoptotic markers were studied by immunohistochemistry, while micronucleus assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Submandibular gland (SMG) function was evaluated by methacholine-induced salivation. Results indicate that JNJ7777120 treatment diminished mucosal atrophy and preserved villi and the number of crypts after radiation exposure (240±8 vs. 165±10, P<0.01). This effect was associated to a reduced apoptosis and DNA damage in intestinal crypts. JNJ7777120 reduced radiation-induced aplasia, preserving medullar components and reducing formation of micronucleus and also it accelerated bone marrow repopulation. Furthermore, it reduced micronucleus frequency in peripheral blood (27±8 vs. 149±22, in 1,000 erythrocytes, P<0.01). JNJ7777120 completely reversed radiation-induced reduced salivation, conserving glandular mass with normal histological appearance and reducing apoptosis and atrophy of SMG. JNJ7777120 exhibits radioprotective effects against radiation-induced cytotoxic and genotoxic damages in small intestine, SMG and hematopoietic tissues and, thus, could be of clinical value for patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  1. Lymphangiectasia of small intestine presenting as intussusception.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Pervez; Bhardwaj, Subhash

    2008-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as telescoping of a segment of gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. In small children, it is the commonest cause of intestinal obstruction. More than 90% of childhood intussusceptions are idiopathic. We report a rare case of localized small intestinal lymphangiectasia, presenting as intussusception in a 6-month-old male child. The child presented with features of acute intestinal obstruction for which he was later operated. The gross examination of excised ileocecal mass revealed intussusception. Histopathologic examination revealed lymphangiectasia of small intestine, which acted as a lead point for ileocecal intussusception. Postoperative period was uneventful.

  2. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  3. Glucose metabolism in the mucosa of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, L. M.; Hübscher, G.

    1966-01-01

    1. The occurrence of five enzymes of the pentose phosphate pathway in cell-free preparations of the mucosa of rat small intestine is described. These enzymes were found to be localized mainly in the supernatant fraction (6240000g-min.). 2. The properties of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase were studied with respect to Km values for substrates and NADP+, pH optima and the effects of p-chloromercuribenzoate and palmitoyl-CoA. Higher total and specific activities of these two dehydrogenases were noted in the proximal half of the small intestine of the rat than in the distal half. 3. The specific activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the mucosa of the small intestine of the rat, cat, rabbit and guinea pig were compared. 4. In the rat the specific activities of ribose 5-phosphate isomerase, transketolase and transaldolase were higher in the supernatant fractions from the intestinal mucosa than in those from the liver. 5. The role of the pentose phosphate pathway is discussed in relation to the metabolism of hexose phosphates in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:4382012

  4. Effects of ε-viniferin, a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, on transepithelial active ion transport and ion permeability in the rat small and large intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ishikawa, Junji; Tomizawa, Yuka; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2016-05-01

    ε-Viniferin is a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, a polyphenol synthesized in many plants, including grapevine. The present study investigated the effects of ε-viniferin and resveratrol on epithelial secretory and barrier functions in isolated rat small and large intestinal mucosa. Mucosa-submucosa tissue preparations of various segments of the rat large and small intestines were mounted on Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (Isc) and tissue conductance (Gt) were continuously measured. The mucosal addition of ε-viniferin (>10(-5) mol/L) and resveratrol (>10(-4) mol/L) to the cecal mucosa, which was the most sensitive region, induced an increase in Isc and a rapid phase decrease (P-1) followed by rapid (P-2) and broad (P-3) peak increases in Gt in concentration-dependent manners. Mucosal ε-viniferin (10(-4) mol/L), but not resveratrol (10(-4) mol/L), increased the permeability of FITC-conjugated dextran (4 kDa). The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked changes in Isc (Cl(-) secretion), but not in Gt, were attenuated by a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 inhibitor and a selective EP4 prostaglandin receptor. The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked increase in Isc was partially attenuated, and P-2, but not P-1 or P-3, change in Gt was abolished by a transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) inhibitor. Moreover, the mucosal ε-viniferin concentration-dependently attenuated the mucosal propionate (1 mmol/L)-evoked increases in Isc and Gt Immunohistochemical studies revealed COX-1-immunoreactive epithelial cells in the cecal crypt. The present study showed that mucosal ε-viniferin modulated transepithelial ion transport and permeability, possibly by activating sensory epithelial cells expressing COX-1 and TRPA1. Moreover, mucosal ε-viniferin decreased mucosal sensitivity to other luminal molecules such as short-chain fatty acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that ε-viniferin modifies intestinal mucosal transport and barrier

  5. Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID).

    PubMed

    Pervez, Shahid; Mumtaz, Khalid; Ullah, Syed Siddiq; Akhtar, Nake; Ali, Naureen; Aaqil, Hina

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the frequency, demographics, clinical presentation, endoscopic findings, histopathological features, treatment and outcome of 'Immunoproliferative small intestinal disease' (IPSID). Archives contained a total of 27 cases of IPSID diagnosed and treated over an 18-year period. A M: F ratio of 2.4:1 was seen with a mean and median ages of 28.7 and 25 years. Most patients (68.8%) presented with abdominal pain and diarrhoea. In the majority (62.5%), duodenum was the primary site of involvement. Endoscopy showed polypoidal, raised or flat lesions. Biopsy findings included blunting or flattening of villi with dense plasma cell infiltrate and lymphoepithelial lesions. Twenty-four cases were categorized as stage A and B (benign and intermediate) and three were categorized as stage C (malignant, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytoid features). Stage A and B patients responded well to antibiotic treatment (tetracycline) with regression of the lesions while for stage C patients standard CHOP chemotherapy was administered.

  6. Mast-cell-releasing tryptase triggers acute lung injury induced by small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by activating PAR-2 in rats.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiaoliang; Liu, Dezhao; Huang, Pinjie; Gao, Wanling; Chen, Xinzhi; Hei, Ziqing

    2012-06-01

    Mast cell has been demonstrated to be involved in the small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IIR) injury, however, the precise role of tryptase released from mast cell on acute lung injury(ALI) induced by IIR remains to be elucidated, our study aimed to observe the roles of tryptase on ALI triggered by IIR and its underlying mechanism. Adult SD rats were randomized into sham-operated group, sole IIR group in which rats were subjected to 75 min superior mesenteric artery occlusion followed by 4 h reperfusion, or IIR being respectively treated with cromolyn sodium, protamine, and compound 48/80. The above agents were, respectively, administrated intravenously 5 min before reperfusion. At the end of experiment, lung tissue was obtained for assays for protein expressions of tryptase and mast cell protease 7 (MCP7) and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). Pulmonary mast cell number and levels of IL-8 were quantified. Lung histologic injury scores and lung water content were measured. IIR resulted in lung injury evidenced as significant increases in lung histological scores and lung water contents, accompanied with concomitant increases of expressions of tryptase and MCP7, and elevations in PAR-2 expressions and IL-8 levels in lungs. Stabilizing mast cell with cromolyn sodium and inhibiting tryptase with protamine significantly reduced IIR-mediated ALI and the above biochemical changes while activating mast cell with compound 48/80 further aggravated IIR-mediated ALI and the increases of above parameters. Tryptase released from mast cells mediates ALI induced by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by activating PAR-2 to produce IL-8.

  7. Biotin absorption by distal rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1987-12-01

    We used the in vivo intestinal loop approach, with short (10-min) and long (3-h) incubations, to examine biotin absorption in proximal jejunum, distal ileum, cecum and proximal colon. In short-term studies, luminal biotin disappearance from rat ileum was about half that observed in the jejunum, whereas absorption by proximal colon was about 12% of that in the jejunum. In 3-h closed-loop studies, the absorption of 1.0 microM biotin varied regionally. Biotin absorption was nearly complete in the small intestine after 3 h; however, only about 15% of the dose had been absorbed in the cecum and 27% in the proximal colon after 3 h. Independent of site of administration, the major fraction of absorbed biotin was recovered in the liver; measurable amounts of radioactive biotin were also present in kidney and plasma. The results support the potential nutritional significance for the rat of biotin synthesized by bacteria in the distal intestine, by demonstrating directly an absorptive capability of mammalian large bowel for this vitamin.

  8. Ketamine anesthesia reduces intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Carlos Rodrigo; Guzmán, Francisco Javier; Barrera, Ernesto Alexis; Cabello, Andrés Jesús; Garcia, Armando; Fernández, Nancy Esthela; Caballero, Eloy; Ancer, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of ketamine anesthesia on the motility alterations and tissue injury caused by ischemia/reperfusion in rats. METHODS: Thirty male Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g were used. Ischemia was induced by obstructing blood flow in 25% of the total small intestinal length (ileum) with a vascular clamp for 45 min, after which either 60 min or 24 h of reperfusion was allowed. Rats were either anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (50 mg/kg) or ketamine (100 mg/kg). Control groups received sham surgery. After 60 min of reperfusion, the intestine was examined for morphological alterations, and after 24 h intestinal basic electrical rhythm (BER) frequency was calculated, and intestinal transit determined in all groups. RESULTS: The intestinal mucosa in rats that were anesthetized with ketamine showed moderate alterations such as epithelial lifting, while ulceration and hemorrhage was observed in rats that received pentobarbital sodium after 60 min of reperfusion. Quantitative analysis of structural damage using the Chiu scale showed significantly less injury in rats that received ketamine than in rats that did not (2.35 ± 1.14 vs 4.58 ± 0.50, P < 0.0001). The distance traveled by a marker, expressed as percentage of total intestinal length, in rats that received pentobarbital sodium was 20% ± 2% in comparison with 25.9% ± 1.64% in rats that received ketamine (P = 0.017). BER was not statistically different between groups. CONCLUSION: Our results show that ketamine anesthesia is associated with diminished intestinal injury and abolishes the intestinal transit delay induced by ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:18777596

  9. Hymenolepis diminuta: analysis of the expression of Toll-like receptor genes (TLR2 and TLR4) in the small and large intestines of rats. Part II.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, D I; Wojtkowiak-Giera, A; Kolasa, A; Czernomysy-Furowicz, D; Lanocha, N; Wandurska-Nowak, E; Salamatin, R; Jagodzinski, P P

    2013-10-01

    Toll-like receptors in the gastrointestinal tract can influence intestinal homeostasis and play a role in the repair and restitution of intestinal epithelium following tissue damage. In our previous study a statistically significant increase in the level of TLR4 and TLR2 gene expression was observed in rats in early stages of hymenolepidosis. Moreover, the immunopositive cell number and the intensity of immunohistochemical staining (indicating the presence of TLRs within intestinal epithelial cells) increased over the infection period. In this paper, we determined changes in the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 and the number of anaerobic intestinal commensal bacteria in Hymenolepis diminuta infected rats. In the isolated jejunum of infected rats at 16 days post infection (dpi), the expression of TLR4 and TLR2 was significantly higher than uninfected rats. In the colon, a statistically significantly increased expression of TLR2 was observed from 16 to 40 dpi, and TLR4 from 16 to 60 dpi. The jejunum and colon of infected rats contained Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli), Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus) and Candida. The total number of intestinal bacteria was higher in H. diminuta infected rats, but the observed microbiota had only minor effects on the expression of TLR2 and TLR4. Toll-like receptors play a role in maintaining epithelial barrier function in response to enteric pathogens and parasites. In our study, the alteration of TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the infected rats indicates the potential role of the innate immune system in the pathomechanism of this infection.

  10. The regulation of K- and L-cell activity by GLUT2 and the calcium-sensing receptor CasR in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Oliver J; Schindler, Marcus; Patel, Sonal

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (IECs) secrete gut peptides in response to both nutrients and non-nutrients. Glucose and amino acids both stimulate gut peptide secretion. Our hypothesis was that the facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2, could act as a glucose sensor and the calcium-sensing receptor, CasR, could detect amino acids in the intestine to modify gut peptide secretion. We used isolated loops of rat small intestine to study the secretion of gluco-insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) secretion stimulated by luminal perfusion of nutrients or bile acid. Inhibition of the sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) with phloridzin partially inhibited GIP, GLP-1 and PYY secretion by 45%, suggesting another glucose sensor might be involved in modulating peptide secretion. The response was completely abolished in the presence of the GLUT2 inhibitors phloretin or cytochalasin B. Given that GLUT2 modified gut peptide secretion stimulated by glucose, we investigated whether it was involved in the secretion of gut peptide by other gut peptide secretagogues. Phloretin completely abolished gut peptide secretion stimulated by artificial sweetener (sucralose), dipeptide (glycylsarcosine), lipid (oleoylethanolamine), short chain fatty acid (propionate) and major rat bile acid (taurocholate) indicating a fundamental position for GLUT2 in the gut peptide secretory mechanism. We investigated how GLUT2 was able to influence gut peptide secretion mediated by a diverse range of stimulators and discovered that GLUT2 affected membrane depolarisation through the closure of K+ATP-sensitive channels. In the absence of SGLT1 activity (or presence of phloridzin), the secretion of GIP, GLP-1 and PYY was sensitive to K+ATP-sensitive channel modulators tolbutamide and diazoxide. l-Amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), asparagine (Asn), arginine (Arg) and glutamine (Gln) also stimulated GIP, GLP-1 and PYY

  11. Update on small intestinal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-08-07

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration.

  12. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  13. Morphometric study of the small intestinal mucosa in young, adult, and old rats submitted to protein deficiency and rehabilitation.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, M A; de Camargo, J L; Coelho, K I; Montenegro, M R; Angeleli, A Y; Burini, R C

    1985-01-01

    Linear and stereological morphometric methods were applied to the jejunal and ileal mucosa of young, adult, and old male Wistar rats submitted to protein deficiency and rehabilitation. The animals were fed ad libitum a 2% casein diet during 42 days and then received a 20% casein diet for 30 days. Food intake, body weights, and plasma protein concentrations were recorded. In the young protein deficient rats values of mucosal height, surface area, and volume of the lamina propria were significantly lower than those of their age controls in both jejunum and ileum. In adults the differences were less marked and in the old rats all parameters were found to be unaltered by the protein deficient diet. The surface-to-volume ratio showed no significant differences between control and protein deficient in all three age groups, meaning that villus pattern did not change with protein deficiency. On rehabilitation, a striking difference between jejunum and ileum was observed in the young rats; all parameters returned to control levels in the jejunum, while they remained lower than those of their controls in the ileum. PMID:4018648

  14. Basic fibroblast growth factor suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis and TP53 pathway in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Shichijo, Kazuko; Okaichi, Kumio; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Sekine, Ichiro

    2010-07-01

    The effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was studied in radiation-induced apoptosis in rat jejunal crypt cells. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were administered 4 mg/kg bFGF intraperitoneally 25 h before receiving 8 Gy whole-body X rays. The jejunum was removed for analysis from time 0 to 120 h after irradiation. Villus length in control rats declined steadily until 72 h, while in bFGF-treated rats the villi were longer than in the controls until 48 h. Crypt lengths were similar to villi. bFGF treatment increased Ki-67-positive cells in the jejunal crypt at 0, 24 and 48 h. The treatment with bFGF reduced the number of apoptotic cells per jejunal crypt to 23% and 10% of the control values at 3 and 6 h, respectively, and increased numbers of mitotic cells significantly at 48 and 72 h. bFGF decreased the levels of TP53, CDKN1A, Puma and Cleaved caspase 3 at 3 h as detected by Western blot analyses. Our results suggest that bFGF protected against acute radiation-induced injury by suppressing the crypt apoptotic cells including the stem cells and promoted crypt cell proliferation. The inhibition of apoptosis thus might be related to suppression of the TP53 pathway.

  15. The use of bi-layer silk fibroin scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa matrices to support bladder tissue regeneration in a rat model of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeun Goo; Algarrahi, Khalid; Franck, Debra; Tu, Duong D.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Kaplan, David L.; Estrada, Carlos R.; Mauney, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse side-effects associated with enterocystoplasty for neurogenic bladder reconstruction have spawned the need for the development of alternative graft substitutes. Bi-layer silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) matrices were investigated for their ability to support bladder tissue regeneration and function in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Bladder augmentation was performed with each scaffold configuration in SCI animals for 10 wk of implantation and compared to non-augmented control groups (normal and SCI alone). Animals subjected to SCI alone exhibited a 72% survival rate (13/18) while SCI rats receiving SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds displayed respective survival rates of 83% (10/12) and 75% (9/12) over the course of the study period. Histological (Masson’s trichrome analysis) and immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluations demonstrated both implant groups supported de novo formation of smooth muscle layers with contractile protein expression [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and SM22α] as well as maturation of multi-layer urothelia expressing cytokeratin (CK) and uroplakin 3A proteins. Histomorphometric analysis revealed bi-layer SF and SIS scaffolds respectively reconstituted 64% and 56% of the level of α-SMA+ smooth muscle bundles present in SCI-alone controls, while similar degrees of CK+ urothelium across all experimental groups were detected. Parallel evaluations showed similar degrees of vascular area and synaptophysin+ boutons in all regenerated tissues compared to SCI-alone controls. In addition, improvements in certain urodynamic parameters in SCI animals, such as decreased peak intravesical pressure, following implantation with both matrix configurations were also observed. The data presented in this study detail the ability of acellular SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds to support formation of innervated, vascularized smooth muscle and urothelial tissues in a neurogenic bladder model. PMID:24917031

  16. Functional characteristics of the human ortholog of riboflavin transporter 2 and riboflavin-responsive expression of its rat ortholog in the small intestine indicate its involvement in riboflavin absorption.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Misaki; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Murata, Tomoaki; Yasujima, Tomoya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Ohta, Kin-ya; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2010-10-01

    Riboflavin transporter (RFT) 2 has recently been identified as a transporter that may be, mainly based on the functional characteristics of its rat ortholog (rRFT2), involved in the intestinal absorption of riboflavin. The present study was conducted to further examine such a possible role of RFT2, focusing on the functional characteristics of its human ortholog (hRFT2) and the response of rRFT2 expression in the small intestine to deprivation of dietary riboflavin. When transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, hRFT2 could transport riboflavin efficiently in a pH-sensitive manner, favoring acidic pH and without requiring Na(+). Riboflavin transport by hRFT2 was saturable with a Michaelis constant of 0.77 μmol/L at pH 6.0, and inhibited by some riboflavin derivatives, such as lumiflavin. It was also inhibited, to a lesser extent, by some cationic compounds, such as ethidium. Thus, hRFT2 was suggested to, together with a finding that its mRNA is highly expressed in the small intestine, have characteristics as an intestinal RFT. Furthermore, feeding rats a riboflavin-deficient diet caused an upregulation of the expression of rRFT2 mRNA in the small intestine, presumably as an adaptive response to enhance riboflavin absorption, which would involve rRFT2, and its apically localized characteristic was suggested by the observation of rRFT2 tagged with green fluorescent protein stably expressed in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. All these results combined indicate that RFT2 is a transporter involved in the epithelial uptake of riboflavin in the small intestine for its nutritional utilization.

  17. The Effect of DA-6034 on Intestinal Permeability in an Indomethacin-Induced Small Intestinal Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dong Shin; Lee, Oh Young; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-6034 has anti-inflammatory activities and exhibits cytoprotective effects in acute gastric injury models. However, explanations for the protective effects of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability are limited. This study sought to investigate the effect of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury model and its protective effect against small intestinal injury. Methods Rats in the treatment group received DA-6034 from days 0 to 2 and indomethacin from days 1 to 2. Rats in the control group received indomethacin from days 1 to 2. On the fourth day, the small intestines were examined to compare the severity of inflammation. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. Western blotting was performed to confirm the association between DA-6034 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Results The inflammation scores in the treatment group were lower than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Hemorrhagic lesions in the treatment group were broader than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Intestinal permeability was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. DA-6034 enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression, and intestinal permeability was negatively correlated with ERK expression. Conclusions DA-6034 may decrease intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced intestinal injury model via the ERK pathway. PMID:27114435

  18. The effects of age on the overall population and on subpopulations of myenteric neurons in the rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, R. J. R.; SCHEMANN, M.; SANTER, R. M.; COWEN, T.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies on ageing animal and human subjects have demonstrated a significant overall decline in neuronal numbers in the myenteric plexus of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Our study aimed to confirm this observation by counting myenteric neurons stained with the panneuronal markers PGP 9.5 and NADH-diaphorase. We also wished to examine the possibility that particular subpopulations of neurons are vulnerable. Therefore, we have immunostained and counted a number of nerve cell groups within the myenteric plexus of old and young Sprague Dawley rats using markers which reflect some of the neuronal phenotypes present, including ChAT and VIP. The number of neurons demonstrating NADH-diaphorase activity was significantly reduced (P<0.05) by approximately 15% in old rats. However, the number of neurons stained for PGP 9.5 immunohistochemistry was not reduced and demonstrated larger numbers of neurons than the NADH-diaphorase method. None of the other neuronal markers studied showed any significant reductions with age. In contrast to previous work, this study has gathered little evidence for extensive cell loss in the myenteric plexus of the aged rat, either in overall populations, or in any of the principal functional groups of neurons. PMID:9723975

  19. Primary lymphoma of the upper small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Khosrow; Haghighi, Parviz; Bakhshandeh, Kiumars; Haghshenas, Mansour

    1970-01-01

    Seven patients with primary lymphoma involving the upper small intestine and presenting with diarrhoea, non-specific abdominal pain, and clubbing are reported. The disease appears to be more prevalent in young women, and clinical and radiological findings can provide an excellent preliminary diagnosis which is usually confirmed by peroral biopsy of the small intestine. This type of lymphoma is found to be clinically distinguishable both from the primary intestinal lymphomas reported from western countries and also from gastrointestinal involvement as part of a more systemic disease. It appears to be prevalent in the Middle East, and because of clear clinical, radiological, and histological features, it can be singled out from other primary intestinal lymphomas and considered as a distinct clinical entity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4919259

  20. Food proteins and gut mucosal barrier. IV. Effects of acute and chronic ethanol administration on handling and uptake of bovine serum albumin by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, M.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of ethanol exposure on small intestinal handling and uptake of radiolabeled bovine serum albumin were investigated using everted gut sacs. There was less breakdown of BSA after acute ethanol administration in vitro and after acute and chronic in vivo exposure. Thus, the vascular compartment of the small intestine was confronted with more complete and potentially more antigenic material after ethanol. Changes in BSA binding and uptake after acute exposure were shown to be reversible after 4-6 hr. In all groups, there was more BSA binding when the small intestine was exposed to ethanol. This difference was most pronounced after chronic exposure. In the same group, uptake of BSA was correlated with binding and significantly increased. Combined effects of ethanol on the gut mucosal barrier may account for changes in food antigen handling and uptake.

  1. Survival after total body irradiation: Effects of irradiation of exteriorized small intestine. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Kitto, G.; Pelky, T.; Taylor, P.

    1993-12-31

    Rats receiving lethal irradiation to their exteriorized small intestine with pulsed 18 MVp bremsstrahlung radiation live about 4 days longer than rats receiving a dose of total-body irradiation (TBI) causing intestinal death. The LD50 for intestinal irradiation is approximately 6 Gy higher than the LD50 for intestinal death after TBI. Survival time after exteriorized intestinal irradiation can be decreased, by adding abdominal irradiation. Adding thoracic or pelvic irradiation does not alter survival time. Shielding of large intestine improves survival after irradiation of the rest of the abdomen while the small intestine is also shielded. The kinetics of histological changes in small intestinal tissues implicate the release of humoral factors after irradiation of the abdomen. Radiation injury develops faster in the first (proximal) 40 cm of the small intestine and is expressed predominantly as shortening in villus height. In the last (distal) 40 cm of the small intestine, the most pronounced radiation effect is a decrease in the number of crypts per millimeter. Irradiation (20 Gy) of the proximal small intestine causes 92 % mortality (median survival 10 days). Irradiation (20 Gy) of the distal small intestine causes 27% mortality (median survival > 30 days). In addition to depletion of crypt stem cells in the small intestine, other issues (humoral factors, irradiated subsection of the small intestine and shielding of the large intestine) appear to influence radiation-induced intestinal mortality.

  2. Small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Yamamura, Eiichi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  3. Small Intestinal Obstruction Caused by Anisakiasis

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:24455340

  4. [The ratio between the initial stages of assimilation of intact and hydrolyzed dipeptides in rat small intestine].

    PubMed

    Metel'skiĭ, S T

    2013-04-01

    Absorption of amino acids and dipeptides in the intestine may be coupled with sodium or proton, respectively. In both cases, when these nutrients are added to the mucosal solution (solution bathing the mucosa) through the epithelial layer should flow additional electric current. which is the most convenient to register by the short-circuit current method (SCC). It was shown that at pH 8.5, we can observe more efficient dipeptide transport (SCC response amplitudes on dipeptides have greater amplitude then SCC responses to equimolar mixture of the corresponding amino acid). In contrast, at pH 5.5 we observe the reverse situation - the SCC responses to mixture of amino acids are more then SCC responses to dipeptides. Increased with pH sodium dependent component of the stimulating effect of easily hydrolysable dipeptides is due to the membrane digestion. Sodium independent effect of dipeptides assimilation decreasing with pH caused by, apparently, functioning of proton-dependent transporter PepT1 for oligopeptides in the apical membrane of enterocytes. We believe that sequential "conditioning" of the stomach contents in the ever-increasing pH while its moving along the gastrointestinal tract (from stomach to colon) enables optimal use of both the mechanism of absorption of oligodipeptides, which is accompanied by a more complete digestion of oligodipeptides.

  5. Antispasmodic and spasmolytic effects of methanolic extract from seeds of Garcinia kola on isolated rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Udia, P M; Braide, V B; Owu, D U

    2009-12-01

    The antispasmodic and spasmolytic effects of methanolic extract of seeds of Garcinia kola Heckel were studied on smooth muscle preparations in vitro. The influence of the extract on rat duodenum, jejunum and ileum was investigated using acetylcholine and barium chloride as agonists. The extract exhibited dose-dependent antispasmodic effects on contractions induced by acetylcholine, and dose-dependent spasmolytic effects on spasms induced by cumulatively increased concentrations of acetylcholine and barium chloride. The graded log concentration-response curves for acetylcholine were non-parallel but shifted to the right in the presence of the extract. It is concluded that the Garcinia kola extract inhibits smooth muscle activity via other mechanisms but not involving neither cholinergic nor adrenergic receptor interaction.

  6. Berberine attenuates intestinal disaccharidases in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Deng, Yuanxiong; Yu, Sen; Lu, Shousi; Xie, Lin; Liu, Xiaodong

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies demonstrated anti-diabetic effects of berberine. However, the facts that berberine had low bioavailability and poor absorption through the gut wall indicated that berberine might exert its antihyperglycaemic effect in the intestinal tract before absorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether berberine attenuates disaccharidase activities and beta-glucuronidase activity in the small intestine of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Two groups of STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with protamine zinc insulin (10 U/Kg) subcutaneously twice daily and berberine (100 mg/Kg) orally once daily for 4 weeks, respectively. Both age-matched normal rats and diabetic control rats received physiological saline only. Fasting blood glucose levels, body weight, intestinal disaccharidase and beta-glucuronidase activities in duodenum, jejunum and ileum were assessed for changes. Our findings suggested that berberine treatment significantly decreases the activities of intestinal disaccharidases and beta-glucuronidase in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect on intestinal disaccharidases and beta-glucuronidase of berberine might be one of the mechanisms for berberine as an antihyperglycaemic agent.

  7. Characteristics of β-galactosidase in the mucosa of the small intestine of infant rats. Physicochemical properties

    PubMed Central

    Kraml, Jiří; Koldovský, Otakar; Heringová, Aleša; Jirsová, Věra; Kácl, Karel; Ledvina, Miloš; Pelichová, Hana

    1969-01-01

    1. The characteristics of acid and neutral β-galactosidases isolated chromatographically from homogenates of the mucosa of the jejunum and ileum of suckling rats were studied. 2. The minimal molecular weight of the acid β-galactosidase, as estimated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-200, was in the range 83000–105000, whereas for the neutral β-galactosidase the estimated molecular weight was in the range 360000–510000. 3. The acid and neutral β-galactosidases were inhibited competitively by galactono-(1→4)-lactone, with respective Ki values of 0·15mm and 1·1mm. Only the acid β-galactosidase was inhibited competitively by sodium galactonate (Ki 0·17mm). 4. Heat inactivation of both β-galactosidases occurred according to first-order kinetics. The neutral enzyme was more labile, but bovine serum albumin protected acid enzyme only. 5. Urea treatment inactivated both β-galactosidases, the neutral β-galactosidase being more sensitive than the acid β-galactosidase. 6. No differences were found between preparations from the jejunum and ileum. PMID:5820646

  8. Grape seed extract protects IEC-6 cells from chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity and improves parameters of small intestinal mucositis in rats with experimentally-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Yazbeck, Roger; Wright, Tessa H; Whitford, Eleanor J; Payne, Caroline; Butler, Ross N; Bastian, Susan E P

    2009-02-01

    Mucositis is a common side-effect of high-dose chemotherapy regimens. Grape seed extract (GSE) represents a rich source of proanthocyanidins with the potential to decrease oxidative damage and inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract. We evaluated GSE for its capacity to decrease the severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in vitro and in vivo. In vitro: GSE was administered to IEC-6 intestinal epithelial cells prior to damage induced by 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). Cell viability was determined by neutral red assay. In vivo: Female Dark Agouti rats (130-180 g) were gavaged with 1 ml GSE (400 mg/kg) daily (day 3-11) and received 5-FU (150 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection on day nine to induce mucositis. Rats were sacrificed at day 12 and intestinal tissues collected for myeloperoxidase and sucrase activity assays and histological analyses. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA. GSE prevented the decrease in IEC-6 cell viability induced by 5-FU (p < 0.01). Compared with 5-FU controls, GSE significantly reduced myeloperoxidase activity by 86% and 27% in the proximal jejunum (p < 0.001) and distal ileum (p < 0.05) respectively; decreased qualitative histological scores of damage (p < 0.05) in the proximal jejunum; increased villus height in the proximal jejunum (17%; p < 0.05) and distal ileum (50%; p < 0.01), and attenuated the 5-FU-induced reduction of mucosal thickness by 16% in the jejunum (p < 0.05) and 45% in the ileum (p < 0.01). GSE partially protected IEC-6 cells from 5-FU-induced cytotoxicity and ameliorated intestinal damage induced by 5-FU in rats. GSE may represent a promising prophylactic adjunct to conventional chemotherapy for preventing intestinal mucositis.

  9. Biotransformation and metabolic profile of anemoside B4 with rat small and large intestine microflora by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Yu-Zhen; Yuan, Jin-Bin; Yang, Feng-Qing; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Lian-Di; Zhang, Qi-Hui

    2017-05-01

    Pulsatilla chinensis (Bunge) Regel is commonly used in Asia, and anemoside B4 (AB4) is its major saponin, with diverse pharmaceutical effects. Previous studies showed that intestinal flora plays an important role in the metabolism of herbs administered orally. In this study, the metabolic profile of AB4 with microflora in rat small and large intestines in vitro was investigated. Gut microflora was collected from different intestinal segments and anaerobically incubated with AB4 at 37°C for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h, respectively. A total of 10 metabolites were detected and identified by ultra- performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, involving the products of oxygenation and deglycosylation reactions. Gut microflora in the large intestine generated more comprehensive metabolic pathways, which appears to be attributable to the wider range of bacterial types and numbers of bacteria. Human cancer cell lines SMMC-7721, Hela and MCF-7 were treated with metabolite pools by MTT assay, together with M6 as the greatest deglycosylation product. As a result, M6 exhibited a reduction in cell viability of SMMC-7721 with an IC50 value of 22.28 ± 1.26 μg/mL. The present study provided scientific evidence for AB4 metabolism in small and large intestines, which is helpful to reveal the active forms of AB4 in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Dissociation of a ferric maltol complex and its subsequent metabolism during absorption across the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Barrand, M. A.; Callingham, B. A.; Dobbin, P.; Hider, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    1. The fate and disposition of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol after intravenous administration were investigated in anaesthetized rats. Immediate dissociation of ferric iron from maltol took place in the circulation even with high doses of ferric maltol (containing 1 mg elemental iron). In plasma samples withdrawn within 1 min of injection and subjected to gel filtration, 59Fe eluted with the high molecular weight proteins whilst the tritium was associated with low molecular weight material. 2. The rates of elimination of 59Fe and of tritium from the plasma and their ultimate fate were very different. The half life for 59Fe in the plasma was around 70 min and 59Fe appeared mainly in the bone marrow and liver. There was an initial rapid exit of tritium from the plasma with a half life of around 12 min. This was followed either by a plateau or by a rise in tritium levels, involving entry of maltol metabolites into the circulation. These metabolites could be recovered in the urine. 3. Entry of 59Fe and of tritium into the blood plasma after intraduodenal administration of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol was also very different. At low doses of ferric maltol (containing 100 micrograms elemental iron), the tritium appeared in the plasma in highest amounts within seconds and then decreased whilst there was a slow rise in 59Fe levels. At higher doses of ferric maltol (containing 7 mg elemental iron), levels of 59Fe in the plasma were highest at 5 min and then fell whereas tritium levels rose steadily. Mucosal processing of 59Fe prevented further entry of iron at high dose into the circulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1364845

  11. Rat small-intestinal β-galactosidases. Studies on the fractionation of `acid' β-galactosidase with isoelectric focusing, gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Asp, Nils-Georg

    1970-01-01

    1. Different forms of the rat small-intestinal `acid' β-galactosidase were separated by using the isoelectric-focusing technique. The isoelectric points of the different forms were at pH4.2, 4.6, 5.4, 6.1 and approx. 8. 2. The two forms of `acid' β-galactosidase isoelectric at pH4.2 and 4.6 were completely excluded from the Sephadex G-200 gel, whereas the form isoelectric at pH8 had Kav. 0.4. The concentration and pH of the elution buffer influenced the distribution of enzyme activity between different forms. Thus, under certain conditions of ionic strength and pH, the enzyme seems to form high-molecular-weight aggregates with low isoelectric points. These may be homopolymeric aggregates or the result of binding of enzyme to, for example, membrane fragments. The forms isoelectric at pH5.4 and 6.1 are probably aggregates of intermediate size. 3. During ion-exchange chromatography at pH6.0 one fraction of `acid' β-galactosidase was not retained on the column and was isoelectric at pH8 and another fraction was eluted when the buffer concentration in the eluate had increased to about 50mm. The main part of enzyme eluted in this second fraction was also isoelectric at pH8, indicating that the elution of this fraction is not a simple ion-exchange procedure but probably also involves a splitting of high-molecular-weight aggregates, originally retained because of their low isoelectric points. The enzyme subunits have a higher isoelectric point, and are therefore no longer bound to the ion-exchange resin. PMID:5420050

  12. Localization of binding sites for concanavalin A, Ricinus communis I and Helix pomatia lectin in the Golgi apparatus of rat small intestinal absorptive cells.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, M; Ellinger, A

    1985-09-01

    Binding sites for concanvalin A (Con A), Ricinus communis I agglutinin (RCA I), and Helix pomatia lectin (HPA) were localized in the Golgi apparatus of rat small intestinal absorptive cells. A preembedment technique, a modification of the one originally used by Bernhard and Avrameas (Exp Cell Res 64:232, 1971), was employed, with horse-radish peroxidase being used for cytochemical visualization. Incubations were performed on 10 microns thick cryosections of duodenal segments that were fixed in a mixture of 4% formaldehyde and 0.5% glutaraldehyde; fixation was preceded by a 2-min rinse in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate and followed by storage in the same buffer for up to 7 days. Incubation with Con A, which binds preferably to alpha-D-mannose and alpha-D-glucose residues, caused intense reaction of the dilated cisternae of the cis Golgi side; staining was variable in intermediate and trans cisternae. RCA I, recognizing beta-D-galactose residues, could only be demonstrated in intermediate cisternae. Reaction for HPA, which indicates alpha-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues, stained intensely 1 to 2 cisternae of the cis Golgi side, as well as being localized in the peripheral regions of the cisternae of the intermediate compartment of the stacks. Deposits of reaction product covered the luminal surface of the cisternal membranes, but usually left the lumen itself, as well as lipid particles, devoid of reaction. The differences in Con A, RCA I, and HPA reactivity between cis, intermediate, and trans cisternae suggest compositional and structural differences of the carbohydrates in the respective compartments; they may reflect conversion processes that are known to occur in the oligosaccharide side chains of glycoconjugates at the Golgi complex level.

  13. Small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paris, J K; McCandlish, I A P; Schwarz, T; Simpson, J W; Smith, S H

    2013-05-01

    A 9-year-old female neutered collie-cross dog was presented with a 2-month history of persistent diarrhoea, weight loss and intermittent vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed one loop of jejunum with a markedly thickened and multifocally hyperechoic wall, without loss of wall layering. Laparotomies were performed for biopsy and resection of affected intestine. Histopathological examination revealed small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis (GN). The dog recovered well from surgery and the diarrhoea resolved. Eleven months later the dog has gained weight and remains asymptomatic. This is the first report of small intestinal GN affecting a mature dog, in which pathology was localized to the mucosal lamina propria and surgical treatment resulted in a successful outcome.

  14. Effect of cortisone on the developmental pattern of the neutral and the acid β-galactosidases of the small intestine of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Koldovský, Otakar; Sunshine, Philip

    1970-01-01

    1. The developmental pattern and effect of cortisone on acid β-galactosidase and neutral β-galactosidase were studied in postnatal rats by a recently proposed method for their independent determination. 2. After birth the acid β-galactosidase activity increases in the ileum, whereas it decreases slightly in the jejunum. On day 16 after birth the activity in the ileum decreases and in 20-day-old rats activity in both parts of the intestine decreases to adult values. In suckling animals the activity in the ileum exceeds the jejunal activity severalfold and in adult animals the activity in the jejunum is slightly higher than that in the ileum. 3. Neutral β-galactosidase activity is high after birth and decreases in both jejunum and ileum after day 20 after birth. In 12–20-day-old rats activity in both parts is essentially the same, but in adult animals jejunal activity exceeds ileal activity four-to five-fold. 4. Cortisone (0.5, 2.0 or 5.0mg/100g body wt. daily for 4 days) does not influence the activity of either enzyme in 60-day-old rats. Acid β-galactosidase activity is decreased after cortisone treatment in 8-, 12-, 16-and 18-day-old rats, with sensitivity to cortisone increasing with the approach of weaning. No effect of cortisone on acid β-galactosidase is seen in 8-day-old rats. Neutral β-galactosidase activity is increased in the ileum of 8-, 12-, 16- and 18-day old rats, but only in the jejunum of 8-and 12-day-old rats. PMID:5419744

  15. Characteristics of iron(III) uptake by isolated fragments of rat small intestine in the presence of the hydroxypyrones, maltol and ethyl maltol.

    PubMed

    Levey, J A; Barrand, M A; Callingham, B A; Hider, R C

    1988-05-15

    Accumulation of radioactive iron (59Fe) into isolated fragments of rat small intestine in the presence of two hydroxypyrones, maltol and ethyl maltol, was compared with that in the presence of another chelator of iron(III), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA). The characteristics of uptake were similar with all three ligands. Between 10(-6) and 10(-4) M, iron uptake showed saturable kinetics. The uptake was partially inhibited by metabolic inhibitors. Above 10(-4) M a non-saturable uptake, unaffected by metabolic inhibitors became evident in the presence of the pyrones. The distribution of 59Fe after uptake was determined by gel filtration. At low iron concentrations (10(-6) M), 35-40% of absorbed iron was associated with proteins of molecular weights similar to those of ferritin and transferrin. At high concentrations (10(-3) M), the majority of 59Fe was found in a low molecular weight fraction. At each concentration, a small amount of 59Fe was bound to a membrane fraction. 5% Polyethylene glycol, which reduces glycocalyx viscosity enhanced uptake at low iron concentrations (10(-6) M) but did not affect the non-saturable diffusion seen at higher concentrations (10(-3) M). The iron(II) chelator, bathophenanthroline sulphonate (10(-3) M), decreased uptake at low iron concentrations but did not affect the non-saturable uptake. It is suggested that conversion of iron(III) to iron(II) may take place at the mucosal cell surface before uptake via the saturable system. Apparent Km values for iron uptake via the saturable system were higher in the presence of maltol and ethyl maltol than in the presence of NTA, presumably since the iron binds more avidly to the hydroxypyrones and so is less readily donated. Excess ligand, either pyrone or NTA, reduced the rate at which 59Fe was donated to the uptake system. The Vmax value for uptake from the pyrones was greater than from NTA. It is concluded that maltol, ethyl maltol and NTA can hold iron(III) in solution and donate it to an

  16. Structural and mechanical architecture of the intestinal villi and crypts in the rat intestine: integrative reevaluation from ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Yasue; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2005-08-01

    The ultrastructure of the rat intestinal interstitium was analyzed from the viewpoint of mechanical dynamics to stabilize the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal folds. In the rat, the small intestine lacks circular folds, but the large intestine possesses spiral folds. The intestinal villi, the largest in the duodenum, decreased in size in the jejunum and ileum successively, and were absent in the large intestine. The intestinal interstitium consisted of lamina propria mucosae (LPM) and tela submucosa (TSM) separated by muscularis mucosae (MM), the LPM was subdivided into an upper part within the villi and a lower part among the crypts in the small intestine. The light microscopic density of interstitium in the intestinal wall was lowest in the upper LPM, moderately dense in the lower LPM and highest in the TSM, and that among the intestinal region was highest in the duodenum and decreased successively in the jejunum and ileum. In the large intestine, the TSM bulged to form spiral folds with very low density. The intestinal epithelium in the villi possessed wide intercellular spaces and that in the crypts had closed intercellular spaces. At electron microscopic level, the upper and lower LPM contained subepithelial supportive meshwork that consisted of collagen fibrils and myofibroblast processes. The lower LPM and TSM contained conspicuous bundles of collagen fibrils and, in addition, TSM contained minor populations of scattered collagen fibrils near the smooth muscle layer (SML). The diameter of collagen fibrils was the largest in the bundles of TSM, and decreased from the duodenum through the jejunum and ileum to the large intestine. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesize that the intestinal villi are mechanically stabilized by the balance between the expansive interstitial pressure and inward pull by the subepithelial supportive meshwork. This hypothesis explains the hitherto neglected fact that the intestinal epithelium possesses wide

  17. Teaching intestinal transplantation in the rat for medical student.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Flávio Henrique Ferreira; Bacchella, Telesforo; Cerqueira Machado, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Technical difficulties hamper the widespread use of intestinal transplantation in rats. We evaluated the feasibility in training this microsurgical model for medical students. Thirty eight students were assessed. After information about intestinal transplantation in rats, they spontaneously agreed to be trained for this procedure. The course consisted of 4-h weekly lessons during 4-month period. The teaching process includes assessment in four phases: I) conception of intestinal transplantation and rat anatomy; II) basic microsurgery training; III) donor operation; IV) donor/recipient operation. Wistar rats were used as donors and recipients in one-step small bowel transplantation. All students (100%) reached phase II, seven students (18.42%) reached phase III and two students (5.26%) reached phase IV. Decreased interest about the theme, lack of time and patience, frustration and/or inability were all reasons given by the student that may have contributed to the low rate of success. Medical students achieved a low rate of completion for training in rat intestinal transplantation microsurgical procedures.

  18. [Determination method of muscone in rat intestinal perfusate by GC-MS/MS and its intestinal absorption kinetic characteristics in rats].

    PubMed

    Zou, Liang; Lin, Junzhi; Wang, Zhanguo; Xu, Lijia; Wang, Ping; Zhao, Gang; Luo, Jieying

    2012-08-01

    To establish the method for determining muscone in rat intestinal perfusate by GC-MS/MS and study its intestinal absorption kinetic characteristics in rats. The GC-MS/MS method was used to determine the content of muscone in rat intestinal circulation fluid. In situ intestinal circulation perfusion was adopted to study absorption kinetics of muscone in rats. Muscone was proved to be well absorbed in each section of small intestine. Its absorption rate constants (Ka) and the absorption rate (A) in the rat intestine showed duodenum > jejunum (P < 0.05) , duodenum > ileum (P < 0.01). Its Ka, A and t1/2 in rat small intestine was 0.990 h(-1) , 43.58% and 0.705h, respectively. Muscone was well absorbed in each intestinal section, with duodenum better than jejunum (Ka, T1/2, P < 0.05) significantly better than ileum (Ka, T1/2, P < 0.01; A, P < 0.05). There is no obvious statistical difference between jejunum and ileum.

  19. Enhanced small intestinal absorption of beta-lactam antibiotics in rats in the presence of monodesmosides isolated from pericarps of Sapindus mukurossi (Enmei-hi).

    PubMed

    Yata, N; Sugihara, N; Yamajo, R; Murakami, T; Higashi, Y; Kimata, H; Nakayama, K; Kuzuki, T; Tanaka, O

    1986-02-01

    Monodesmoside, saponin A, B and C, isolated from pericarps of Sapindus mukurossi (Enmei-hi) have been shown to promote absorption of poorly absorbed beta-lactam antibiotics by the small intestine using an in situ loop method. Monodesmosides were solubilized with ginseng crude saponin extract, a mixture of bisdesmosides, saponin X, Y1 and Y2 which were isolated also from Sapindus mukurossi. These solubilizing agents were demonstrated not to influence the absorption promoting effect of monodesmosides. Among the monodesmosides, saponin B showed the greatest effect. No influence of osmolarity of the administered solution on the absorption promoting action was observed. The promoting functions of the three monodesmosides for the small intestinal absorption of antibiotics were suppressed by Ca2+ ion coexisting in the administered solution.

  20. Flow and mixing by small intestine villi.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y F; de Loubens, C; Love, R J; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M

    2015-06-01

    Flow and mixing in the small intestine are multi-scale processes. Flows at the scale of the villi (finger-like structures of ≈500 μm length) are poorly understood. We developed a three-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann model to gain insight into the effects of villous movements and the rheology of digesta on flow, mixing and absorption of nutrients at the periphery of the intestinal lumen. Our model simulated the hydrodynamic consequences of villi movements that resulted from folding of the mucosa during longitudinal contractions. We found that cyclic approximation and separation of groups of villi generated laminar eddies at the edges of the group and augmented mass transfers in the radial direction between the inter-villous space and the intestinal lumen which improved the absorption of nutrients and mixing at the periphery of the lumen. This augmentation was greater with highly diffusible nutrients and with high levels of shear-thinning (pseudoplasticity) of the fluid. We compared our results with bulk flows simulations done by previous workers and concluded that villous movements during longitudinal contractions is a major radial mixing mechanism in the small intestine and increases mixing and absorption around the mucosa despite adverse rheology.

  1. Bile loss in the acute intestinal radiation syndrome in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Dunston, S.G.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Holeski, C.; Eaton, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of bile duct ligation (BDL), choledochostomy, bile acid sequestering within the intestinal lumen by cholestyramine, and fluid and electrolyte replacement on survival time and development of diarrhea after whole-body exposure to doses of ionizing radiation that result in death from acute intestinal injury were studied. BDL significantly prolonged survival and delayed the onset of diarrhea after exposure to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays, fission neutrons, or cyclotron-produced neutrons in the range of doses that produce intestinal death or death from a combination of intestinal and hematopoietic injuries. Cannulation of the bile duct with exteriorized bile flow (choledochostomy) to protect the irradiated intestine from the mucolytic action of bile salts did not duplicate the effect of BDL in increasing survival time. Choledochostomy without fluid replacement eliminated the occurrence of diarrhea in 15.4 Gy irradiated rats. Diarrhea did occur in irradiated animals with choledochostomy if they received duodenal injections of fluid and electrolytes to replace the fluid lost as a result of bile drainage. Duodenal injection of fluid and electrolytes had no significant effect on survival time in irradiated rats. Injection of fluid and electrolytes into the peritoneal cavity of irradiated rats resulted in an increase in survival time that was comparable to that observed after BDL. Addition of antibiotics to the peritoneally injected fluid and electrolytes further increased survival time (up to 9 days). This survival time approached that seen in animals receiving the same radiation dose but which had the intestine exteriorized and shielded to minimize radiation injury to the intestine. Postmortem histological examinations of the irradiated small intestine showed mucosal regeneration in these long-term survivors receiving fluid and antibiotic therapy.

  2. Polyamine and intestinal properties in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Deloyer, P; Dandrifosse, G; Bartholomeus, C; Romain, N; Klimek, M; Salmon, J; Gérard, P; Goessens, G

    1996-10-01

    We questioned whether polyamines coming from the diet or produced by intestinal microflora or by intracellular metabolism influence intestinal functions. Therefore, we compared pathogen-free rats and germ-free rats receiving a diet with low polyamine content and either treated or not treated with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and/or methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG). Wet weight, protein content, DNA content, sucrase (EC 3.2.1.48), maltase (EC 3.2.1.20) and lactase (EC 3.2.1.23) specific activities, amounts of putrescine, spermidine and spermine were measured in the mucosa of the proximal and distal intestine. Body weight was also determined. Rats without microflora had a higher specific activity of maltase and higher amounts of spermidine and spermine but lower lactase specific activity than pathogen-free animals; the low-polyamine diet given to germ-free rats had little effect on the functional variables measured (decrease of maltase and lactase specific activities) and did not modify the amounts of polyamines. DFMO and/or MGBG administered to germ-free rats receiving a low-polyamine diet induced modifications of most of the variables studied. Body weight and wet weight of proximal and distal intestine decreased, disaccharidase specific activities decreased, and amounts of polyamines changed according to the inhibitor used. Thus, our results showed that the deprivation of polyamine supply from microflora or from the diet failed, under our experimental conditions, to affect the intestinal properties analysed but exogenous and endogenous polyamine restriction altered general properties of the organism as well as intestinal functions.

  3. Iron absorption by small intestine of chickens.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, M P; Martí, M T; Mitjavila, M T; Planas, J

    1993-01-01

    Iron (Fe) absorption by three segments (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) of the small intestine of chickens was studied by a perfusion technique in vivo in closed circuit using 59Fe Cl3 and was related to the histological characteristics of each segment. The serosal transfers of Fe for the duodenum and jejunum were the same (14%/cm), but significantly different (p < 0.05) from those of the ileum (9%/cm), which may be explained by the morphological and histological properties of the gut of chickens. However, the presence of Fe in blood and in liver was significantly lower after perfusion of the jejunum and ileum than after perfusion of the duodenum. It is concluded that chickens show an early adaptation of small intestine to Fe absorption in response to the considerable loss of Fe suffered during the laying process.

  4. Glucagon effects on the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Patel, G K; Whalen, G E; Soergel, K H; Wu, W C; Meade, R C

    1979-07-01

    In healthy volunteers, the effects of intravenously administered glucagon on small intestinal function was investigated. Bolus doses resulting in plasma glucagon concentrations of greater than 800 pg/ml (5 min after injection) abolished jejunal contractions for 4.4 +/- 0.4 (SEM) min after a latency period of 49 +/- 4 sec. During continuous intravenous glucagon infusion, jejunal dilatation and increase in mean transit time (MTT) occurred at plasma levels greater than 720 pg/ml, while inhibition of water and electrolyte absorption was observed only with plasma glucagon concentrations of 1760 +/- 114 pg/ml. Under these conditions, the propulsion of fasting intestinal contents was slowed without change in flow rate. The observed effects cannot be attributed to the simultaneously occurring rise in plasma insulin and glucose concentrations. Short-term increases in circulating glucagon concentration inhibit intestinal tone, contractions, and propulsion with only a minor effect on water and electrolyte absorption limited to a narrow concentration range of plasma glucagon. Neither effect occurs at glucagon levels likely to occur under physiologic concentrations. The latency period preceding the abolition of jejunal contractions suggests that glucagon does not act directly on intestinal smooth muscle cells.

  5. [The effect of a lyophilized extract of the mucosa of the proximal small intestine on kidney water- and salt-excretory functions in rats].

    PubMed

    Iaremenko, M S; Popovych, I L; Kharlamova, O M

    1995-01-01

    Experiments on Wistar rats injected intragastrically deionized water (1 % of the body weight) and intra-abdominally 0.1 mg/kg of the lyophilized water extract (LWE) from the thin intestine have shown that under these conditions diuresis and excretion of K+ with the urine increase and retention of Na+ excretion decreases. After intragastric injection of isotonic NaCl solution, the LWE has exerted only the K-excretion effect. An increase in the LWE doses from 1 to 10 mg/kg has weakened all these reactions. It has been found in experiments in vitro that the LWE has exerted an activatory dose-dependent effect on Na, K-ATPase from the kidney cortex cells.

  6. Species differences in in vitro and in vivo small intestinal metabolism of CYP3A substrates.

    PubMed

    Komura, Hiroshi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2008-05-01

    Intestinal first-pass metabolism has a great impact on the bioavailability of CYP3A substrates in humans, and the in vivo impact has quantitatively been evaluated using CYP3A inhibitors or inducers. In vitro and in vivo preclinical investigations for intestinal metabolism are essential in clarifying pharmacokinetic behavior in animal species and predicting the effect of intestinal metabolism in the human. In this review, we will discuss species differences in intestinal CYP3A enzymes, and CYP3A-mdediated intestinal elimination. Identical CYP3A4 enzyme is expressed in human intestine and liver, but different CYP3A enzymes in both tissues of the mouse and rat are found, that is, respective intestinal enzyme is considered as cyp3a13 and CYP3A62. There is little information on CYP3A enzymes in the monkey and dog intestine, unlike the liver. In vitro metabolic activities of midazolam and nisoldipine are higher in the human and monkey than in the rat. In vivo assessment of cyclosporine, midazolam, nifedipine, tacrolimus, and verapamil has been reported in various species (monkey, rat, mouse, and/or dog) including the human. For midazolam, the monkey shows significant in vivo intestinal metabolism, as evidenced in the human. The monkey might be an appropriate animal model for evaluating small intestinal first-pass metabolism of CYP3A substrates.

  7. Biaxial mechanical modeling of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Chiara; Glass, Paul; Sitti, Metin; Di Martino, Elena S

    2011-11-01

    Capsule endoscopes are pill-size devices provided with a camera that capture images of the small intestine from inside the body after being ingested by a patient. The interaction between intestinal tissue and capsule endoscopes needs to be investigated to optimize capsule design while preventing tissue damage. To that purpose, a constitutive model that can reliably predict the mechanical response of the intestinal tissue under complex mechanical loading is required. This paper describes the development and numerical validation of a phenomenological constitutive model for the porcine duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Parameters characterizing the mechanical behavior of the material were estimated from planar biaxial test data, where intestinal tissue specimens were simultaneously loaded along the circumferential and longitudinal directions. Specimen-specific Fung constitutive models were able to accurately predict the planar stress-strain behavior of the tested samples under a wide range of loading conditions. To increase model generality, average anisotropic constitutive relationships were also generated for each tissue region by fitting average stress-strain curves to the Fung potential. Due to the observed variability in the direction of maximum stiffness, the average Fung models were less anisotropic than the specimen-specific models. Hence, average isotropic models in the Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin forms were attempted, but they could not adequately describe the degree of nonlinearity in the tissue. Values of the R2 for the nonlinear regressions were 0.17, 0.44 and 0.93 for the average Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Fung models, respectively. Average models were successfully implemented into FORTRAN routines and used to simulate capsule deployment with a finite element method analysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary regulation of rat intestinal cholecystokinin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, R A; Carter, J D; McDonald, A R

    1988-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone produced by discrete endocrine cells in the upper small intestine and released after ingestion of a meal. The present study was designed to determine if enhanced CCK secretion is associated with increases in intestinal CCK mRNA levels. Rats, prepared with indwelling intraduodenal cannulae, were first fed an elemental diet that did not stimulate CCK release. Next, as a means of stimulating CCK secretion, soybean trypsin inhibitor was perfused for up to 24 h. Trypsin inhibitor administration increased plasma CCK levels from 0.9 +/- 0.1 to approximately 5 pmol/liter. RNA was prepared from the proximal small intestine at various times after trypsin inhibitor perfusion and mRNA levels analyzed by hybridization with a CCK cDNA probe. After 12 and 24 h of trypsin inhibitor treatment there were three- and fourfold increases, respectively, in CCK mRNA levels. In comparison, there was no change in beta-actin mRNA levels. To determine if regulation of CCK mRNA was at the level of CCK gene transcription, labeled transcripts from nuclear run-on incubations were hybridized to immobilized CCK cDNA. In trypsin inhibitor-treated rats, a two- to threefold increase in transcriptional activity was observed, whereas beta-actin gene transcription levels were unaltered. These studies indicate that stimulation of CCK secretion is associated with an increase in intestinal CCK mRNA content resulting from an increase in CCK gene transcription. Images PMID:2454954

  9. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  10. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  11. Improved purification of rat intestinal lactase.

    PubMed

    Nsi-Emvo, E; Launay, J F; Raul, F

    1986-02-01

    A rapid and improved method to obtain purified lactase from rat intestine is described. The purification procedure involved only two chromatographic steps. The degree of purification was far above (500 fold) the values reached with classical methods. Rabbit antisera raised to the purified lactase were characterized using conventional immunological techniques. The specificity of the lactase antibodies was confirmed by the lack of interference on maltase, aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase activities measured after papain extraction of the membrane proteins.

  12. Expression and Function of Intestinal Hexose Transporters after Small Intestinal Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Corey W.; Fatima, Javairiah; Duenes, Judith; Houghton, Scott G.; Kasparek, Michael S.; Sarr, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of neural regulation in expression and function of intestinal hexose transporters is unknown. Aim To determine the role of intestinal innervation in gene expression and function of the membrane hexose transporters, SGLT1, GLUT2, and GLUT5 in the enterocyte. Hypothesis Denervation of the small intestine decreases expression of hexose transporters leading to decreased glucose absorption. Methods Six groups of Lewis rats were studied (n=6 each): control, 1 wk after sham laparotomy, 1 and 8 wk after syngeneic (no immune rejection) orthotopic small bowel transplantation (SBT) (SBT1, SBT8) to induce complete extrinsic denervation, and 1 and 8 wk after selective disruption of intrinsic neural continuity to jejunoileum by gut transection and reanastomosis (T/A1, T/A8). All tissue was harvested between 8AM and 10AM. In duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, mucosal mRNA levels were quantitated by real time PCR, protein by Western blotting, and transporter-mediated glucose absorption using the everted sleeve technique. Results Across the six groups, relative gene expression of hexose transporter mRNA and protein levels were unchanged and no difference in transporter-mediated glucose uptake was evident in any region. Glucose transporter affinity (Km) and functional transporter levels (Vmax) calculated for duodenum and jejunum showed no difference between the six groups. Conclusion Baseline regulation of hexose transporter function is not mediated tonically by intrinsic or extrinsic neural continuity to the jejunoileum. PMID:19541015

  13. Misoprostol in the intestinal lumen protects against radiation injury of the mucosa of the small bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.P.; Bonsack, M.E.; Felemovicius, I. )

    1994-03-01

    Systemically administered misoprostol, a PGE analog, has been shown to be an intestinal radioprotector. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of misoprostol into the intestinal lumen can also reduce the severity of acute radiation enteritis. The rat small bowel was operatively exteriorized and segmented by means of suture ties. The remainder of the intestine and the rat were shielded in a lead box. Misoprostol was introduced into the lumen in various doses. After 30 min exposure to misoprostol, the isolated, exteriorized, segmented bowel was subjected to 11 Gy X irradiation. Five days later the animals were sacrificed and the intestines harvested for evaluation. Surviving crypt numbers per circumference and mucosal height were the criteria used for quantification of damage. Mucosa exposed to misoprostol at the time of radiation delivery showed significantly increased crypt numbers and mucosal height compared to adjacent saline-filled intestine. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. [Effect of electro-acupuncture at zusanli (ST36) on the expression of ghrelin and HMGB1 in the small intestine of sepsis rats].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Nong; Wu, Wan; Jiang, Rong-Lin; Zhu, Mei-Fei; Lei, Shu; Lu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    To explore the expression of Ghrelin and high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) in the serum and the intestinal tissue of sepsis model rats, and to evaluate the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) at Zusanli (ST36) on the expression of HMGB1 and Ghrelin. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, i.e., the sham-operation (sham), the cecal ligation and puncture group (CLP), the CLP + EA at Zusanli (ST36) group (EA), and the CLP + Ghrelin receptor blocking agent + EA group (GHSRA), 12 in each group. A sepsis rat model was prepared by CLP. The incision of the abdominal wall was immediately sutured along the ventral midline for rats in the Sham group. In the EA group EA at Zusanli (ST36) was performed 20 min after CLP surgery with the constant voltage (2 - 100 Hz, 2 mA) for 30 min. In the GHSRA group, Ghrelin receptor blocking agent, [D-Arg1, D-Phe5, D-Trp79, Leu11]-substance P (700 nmol/kg), was administered through intravenous injection immediately after CLP, and 20 min later, EA at Zusanli (ST36) was performed in the same way as for rats in the EA group. Blood samples were withdrawn 12 h after CLP. The serum levels of Ghrelin and HMGB1 were detected using ELISA. Ghrelin expressions and the number of Ghrelin immunopositive cell in the jejunum were determined by immunohistochemistry. HMGB1 contents of the jejunum tissue were detected by Western blotting. Compared with the Sham group, the number of serum immunopositive cells and the expression of HMGB1 in the jejunum tissue significantly increased and levels of Ghrelin and the expression rate of immunopositive cells significantly decreased in the CLP group (P < 0.05). Compared with the CLP group, the number of serum immunopositive cells and the expression of HMGB1 in the jejunum tissue significantly decreased, but levels of Ghrelin and the expression rate of immunopositive cells significantly increased in the EA group (P < 0.05). Compared with the EA group, the number of serum immunopositive

  15. Intestinal folate binding protein (FBP) and folate absorption in the suckling rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.B.; Selhub, J.

    1986-03-01

    The folate in milk is bound to high affinity FBPs but it is unknown whether this binding affects intestinal transport of milk folate in the suckling rat. The authors examined the FBP activity of segments of the GI tract in fed and fasting states. Under fed conditions, the FBP activity in the mucosa of the stomach and proximal small intestine were similar (0.28 and 0.32 pMole folic acid binding/mg protein, N.S.). Both demonstrated less activity than the mucosa of the distal small intestine (1.31 pMole/mg protein, P < .001). A 6 hr fast produced no change in the FBP activity in the stomach or proximal small intestine but resulted in a 42% decrease in the distal small intestine (p < .01). Intestinal transport of unbound and FB-bound H/sup 3/pteryolmonoglutamate (H/sup 3/PGA) was examined in suckling rats by the intestinal loop model. Unbound H/sup 3/PGA demonstrated greater lumenal disappearance in the proximal segment of the small intestine compared to the distal segment (79% vs. 56%, P < .001) whereas the bound H/sup 3/PGA demonstrated greater lumenal disappearance in the distal segment (36% vs. 21%, p < .005). That porton of FBP activity in the distal small intestine that disappears with fasting may represent FBP absorbed from the lumen of the intestine. The FBP-bound folate in milk appears to be absorbed in the suckling rat by a mechanism that favors the distal small intestine and is different from the mechanism responsible for absorption of the unbound folate.

  16. Inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase by valienamine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-Guo; Shentu, Xu-Ping; Shen, Yin-Chu

    2005-02-01

    Valienamine, an aminocyclitol, has been isolated from the enzymolysis broth of validamycins. The absolute configuration of valienamine is similar to that of alpha-D-glucose. The inhibitory effect of this amino-sugar analog of alpha-D-glucose, valienamine, on porcine small intestinal sucrase was examined. Valienamine was found to be potent, competitive reversible inhibitor of porcine small intestinal sucrase in vitro with an IC50 value of 1.17 x 10(-3)M. Valienamine also exhibited dose-dependent, instantaneous inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase. The inhibition of porcine small intestinal sucrase by valienamine was pH-independent.

  17. Erythritol reduces small intestinal glucose absorption, increases muscle glucose uptake, improves glucose metabolic enzymes activities and increases expression of Glut-4 and IRS-1 in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Mopuri, Ramgopal; Nagiah, Savania; Chuturgoon, Anil Amichund; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-08-02

    Studies have reported that erythritol, a low or non-glycemic sugar alcohol possesses anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic potentials but the underlying mode of actions is not clear. This study investigated the underlying mode of actions behind the anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic potentials of erythritol using different experimental models (experiment 1, 2 and 3). Experiment 1 examined the effects of increasing concentrations (2.5-20%) of erythritol on glucose absorption and uptake in isolated rat jejunum and psoas muscle, respectively. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the effects of a single oral dose of erythritol (1 g/kg bw) on intestinal glucose absorption, gastric emptying and postprandial blood glucose increase, glucose tolerance, serum insulin level, muscle/liver hexokinase and liver glucose-6 phosphatase activities, liver and muscle glycogen contents and mRNA and protein expression of muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 in normal and type 2 diabetic animals. Experiment 1 revealed that erythritol dose dependently enhanced muscle glucose ex vivo. Experiment 2 demonstrated that erythritol feeding delayed gastric emptying and reduced small intestinal glucose absorption as well as postprandial blood glucose rise, especially in diabetic animals. Experiment 3 showed that erythritol feeding improved glucose tolerance, muscle/liver hexokinase and liver glucose-6 phosphatase activities, glycogen storage and also modulated expression of muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 in diabetic animals. Data suggest that erythritol may exert anti-hyperglycemic effects not only via reducing small intestinal glucose absorption, but also by increasing muscle glucose uptake, improving glucose metabolic enzymes activity and modulating muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 mRNA and protein expression. Hence, erythritol may be a useful dietary supplement for managing hyperglycemia, particularly for T2D.

  18. Polydatin Alleviates Small Intestine Injury during Hemorrhagic Shock as a SIRT1 Activator

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Chen, Zhongqing; Xu, Siqi; Song, Rui; Yang, Hong; Zhao, Ke-seng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the role of SIRT1 in small intestine damage following severe hemorrhagic shock and to investigate whether polydatin (PD) can activate SIRT1 in shock treatment. Research Design and Methods. The severe hemorrhagic shock model was reproduced in Sprague Dawley rats. Main Outcome Measures. Two hours after drug administration, half of the rats were assessed for survival time evaluation and the remainder were used for small intestinal tissue sample collection. Results. Bleeding and swelling appeared in the small intestine with epithelial apoptosis and gut barrier disturbance during hemorrhagic shock. SIRT1 activity and PGC-1α protein expression of the small intestine were decreased, which led to an increase in acetylated SOD2 and decreases in the expression and activity of SOD2, resulting in severe oxidative stress. The decreased SIRT1 activity and expression were partially restored in the PD administration group, which showed reduced intestine injury and longer survival time. Notably, the effect of PD was abolished after the addition of Ex527, a selective inhibitor of SIRT1. Conclusions. The results collectively suggest a role for the SIRT1-PGC-1α-SOD2 axis in small intestine injury following severe hemorrhagic shock and that PD is an effective SIRT1 activator for the shock treatment. PMID:26301045

  19. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  20. STUDIES ON SMALL INTESTINAL CRYPT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Jerry S.

    1963-01-01

    Small intestinal crypt epithelium obtained from normal fasting humans by peroral biopsy of the mucosa was studied with the electron microscope. Paneth cells were identified at the base of the crypts by their elaborate highly organized endoplasmic reticulum, large secretory granules, and small lysosome-like dense bodies within the cytoplasm. Undifferentiated cells were characterized by smaller cytoplasmic membrane-bounded granules which were presumed to be secretory in nature, a less elaborate endoplasmic reticulum, many unattached ribosomes and, in some cells, the presence of glycogen. Some undifferentiated cells at the base of the crypts contained lobulated nuclei and striking paranuclear accumulations of mitochondria. Membrane-bounded cytoplasmic fragments, probably originating from undifferentiated and Paneth cells, were frequently apparent within crypt lumina. Of the goblet cells, some were seen actively secreting mucus. In these, apical mucus appeared to exude into the crypt lumen between gaps in the microvilli. The membrane formerly surrounding the apical mucus appeared to fuse with and become part of the plasma membrane of the cell, suggesting a merocrine secretory mechanism. Enterochromaffin cells were identified by their location between the basal regions of other crypt cells and by their unique intracytoplasmic granules. PMID:14064112

  1. Oral exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide, Monocrotophos induces intestinal dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Vismaya; Rajini, P S

    2014-09-01

    There is limited experimental evidence to imply the role of organophosphorus insecticides on intestinal dysfunctions. Residues of Monocrotophos (MCP), above maximum residue limits (MRL), have been reported in fruits and vegetables from various parts of India. Hence, in this study, we investigated the potential of MCP to induce intestinal dysfunction in rats. MCP was administered orally to rats at sublethal doses (0.45, 0.9 and 1.8 mg/kgb.w/d) for 30 days. MCP at the highest dose significantly increased the unit weight of the small intestine. MCP increased the activities of intestinal brush border disaccharidases, intestinal alkaline phosphatase, glycyl-glycine dipeptidase, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase while it decreased cholesterol: phospholipid ratio. Histology and scanning electron microscopy of small intestine of MCP treated rats revealed disruption in terms of congestion, increased length of villi, goblet cell hyperplasia, infiltration of inflammatory cells and necrotic villi tip. Further, the intestinal transit rate was found to be increased in MCP treated rats. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that repeated oral intake of MCP has the propensity to alter small intestinal structure and functions, which might lead to intestinal dysfunctions and abnormal nutrient uptake and thereby affect the human health. Although we have employed doses, which are higher than those likely to be encountered as residues, we speculate that further studies should be performed to determine whether MCP residues in foods in the long-term will interfere with the digestive capacity of the small intestine and thus exert adverse effects on the health of human.

  2. Role of dietary fiber in formation and prevention of small intestinal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic techniques such as capsule endoscopy have revealed that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) often cause ulcers in the small intestine in humans, but there are few effective agents for treatment of small intestinal ulcers. Although the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcer has been widely studied, dietary factors have seldom been considered. In the present review, the role of dietary fiber (DF) in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal ulcers is discussed. In previous studies, small intestinal lesions were not observed when NSAIDs were administered to fasted rats, dogs, and cats, but were observed in conventionally-fed animals, suggesting the importance of feeding in the formation of intestinal lesions induced by NSAIDs. However, in animals fed diets containing low or no DF, indomethacin (IND) did not produce lesions in the small intestine, but did produce lesions in animals fed diets supplemented with insoluble dietary fiber (IDF, cellulose). The results suggest that IDF in the diet plays an important role in the formation of NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. On the other hand, addition of soluble dietary fibers (SDFs) such as pectin or mucin to regular diet markedly decreased NSAID-induced intestinal lesions. Thus, IDF and SDF have opposing effects on IND-induced intestinal lesions, i.e., IDF is harmful while SDF is protective. SDFs potentially represent a novel and safe means for protecting the small intestine against NSAID-induced intestinal lesions.

  3. Influence of the Gut Microflora and of Biliary Constituents on Morphological Changes in the Small Intestine in Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Quraishy, M. Saeed; Chescoe, Dawn; Mullervy, Jenny; Coates, Marie; Hinton, Richard H.

    1996-01-01

    Increased amounts of intestinal endotoxin are absorbed in obstructive jaundice. The precise mechanism is not known but the increased absorption may arise from alterations in the luminal contents, in the intestinal flora, in the gut wall or in interactions between all three. To examine the effects of the intestinal flora we have compared the morphological changes in the small intestine in obstructive jaundice in germ free and conventional rats while the effects of bile constituents have been examined by addition of bile constituents to the diet of bile duct ligated rats. Changes in the intestine were examined, histologically, by enzyme histochemistry, and by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed no differences in response between germ free and conventional rats. Feeding of diets containing bile salts exacerbated the lesion. Feeding of diets containing cholesterol, however, reduced the degree of intestinal changes produced by cholestasis and completely antagonised the increase in damage caused by feeding of bile salts. PMID:9187547

  4. [An influence of fungi spores consumption with food on intestinal microflora in rats].

    PubMed

    Batishcheva, S Iu; Kuznetsova, G G; Bykova, I B; Efimochkina, N R; Sheveleva, S A

    2009-01-01

    In experiments in rats it is set, that peroral introduction with the feed of mould spores in a doze 10(3) CFU/g results in a disbalance of microbiocenosis of intestine. It shows up violation of localization of bifido- and enterobacteria and their increased growth in a small intestine. Thus, also antagonistic activity of an aerobic component of microflora is reduced and frequency of detection of potential-pathogenic types of enterobacteriaceae is increased. Entering of fungi spores at a dose 10(6) CFU level is accompanied by more expressed infringements of aerobic populations of intestinal microflora in rats.

  5. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-14

    To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14(th) day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats' activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P < 0.01). The increasing levels of the aforementioned markers were more significant in the obstructive jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P < 0.01). GLP-2 reduces intestinal mucosal injuries in obstructive jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin.

  6. Transepithelial transport of glutathione in isolated perfused small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.M.; Jones, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Uptake of GSH was studied in isolated perfused segment of jejunum in the adult rat. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was infused through the superior mesenteric artery and fractions were collected from the portal vein. The maintenance of vascular and epithelial integrity was established by lack of transfer of /sup 14/C-inulin or /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol from the lumen to the perfusate. (glycine-2-/sup 3/H)GSH was introduced in the lumen and perfusate fractions collected every min. With 1 mM GSH and 10 mM Gly in the lumen, transport into the perfusate was 220 nmol/min. Analysis by HPLC showed that 80% was at the intact tripeptide, GSH. No cysteinylgylcine was detected in the perfusate. Pretreatment of the segment with 0.25 mM acivicin and 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine had no significant effect on GSH transport rate, thus showing that degradation and resynthesis of GSH did not contribute to the appearance of GSH in the perfusate. GSH transport was inhibited 50% by replacing lumenal NaCl with choline Cl. Addition of 10 mM ..gamma..-Clu-Glu or 10 mM ophthalmic acid decreased the rat of transport by 60-70%. These results establish that transepithelial transport of intact GSH occurs in rat small intestine. This may allow utilization of dietary GSH or reutilization of biliary GSH. In addition, the results suggest that oral GSH may be of therapeutic benefit.

  7. Trichostatin A protects against intestinal injury in rats with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Fan; Li, Xun; Zhang, Hai-Yue; Chu, Xiao-Gang; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Lu-Wen; Gong, Zuo-Jiong

    2016-09-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been widely applied in the clinic as anticancer drugs against multiple neoplasms and proved their anti-inflammation under different pathology recently. Trichostatin A (TSA) is an HDAC inhibitor specific in class I and II HDAC enzymes. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the protective effects of TSA on acute liver failure (ALF) in rats and its potential mechanism. A total of 18 female Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into control, model, and TSA groups. We used Western blotting to determine the expression of HDACs, inflammatory cytokines, and acetylation of histone in liver and small intestine. The gene expression of inflammatory factors and Cox-2 was detected by a polymerase chain reaction. Colonic motility was assessed by spatiotemporal mapping. Histologic analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed. Intestinal permeability examination and levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and total bilirubin were also observed. ALF procedure caused harm to histology of liver and small intestine, increased the intestinal permeability and serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and total bilirubin. It also interrupted the normal organization of colonic motor patterns by hurting enteric nervous system and pacemaker cells. Along with the decrease of inflammatory factors in ALF rats by TSA administration, all the damage to the liver, the small intestine, and the colon was repaired. TSA alleviates the lesion in liver, as well as in small intestine and colon in ALF rats by directly inhibiting inflammatory response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased small intestinal apoptosis in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Moss, S F; Attia, L; Scholes, J V; Walters, J R; Holt, P R

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coeliac disease (CD) mucosa is flattened despite epithelial hyperproliferation. AIMS: To establish mechanisms of cell loss in CD. PATIENTS: 14 controls, 17 active CD patients, and 16 maintained with gluten free diet. METHODS: Programmed cell death was examined in small intestinal biopsy specimens by staining fragmented DNA using terminal uridine deoxynucleotidyl nick end labelling (TUNEL), in comparison with haematoxylin and eosin stained adjacent sections. Double staining with anti-CD45 antibodies determined the origin of apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was graded from 1-3 (< 5, 5-20, > 20% respectively). Proliferating cells, immunostained by Ki-67 (MIB-1) antibody, were counted. RESULTS: Apoptotic cells were seen rarely by haematoxylin and eosin but more readily by TUNEL. In controls, 1.4 +/- 0.2% of epithelial cells were apoptotic (mean grade 1.1), mainly located in the upper villus. In active CD, frequent apoptotic cells were distributed throughout the crypt-villus unit (mean grade 2.4), decreasing after treatment to 1.1 (p < 0.001) even when still histologically abnormal. CD45 antibodies rarely stained apoptotic cells in active CD. The number of TUNEL positive cells correlated with proliferating cell number (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Enterocyte apoptosis is greatly increased in untreated CD, correlates with proliferation, and falls to normal with a gluten free diet, before histological improvement. Increased apoptosis may be responsible for villous atrophy in CD. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9038662

  9. Three-Dimensional Coculture Of Human Small-Intestine Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David; Spaulding, Glen; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Prewett, Tracy

    1994-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional masses of normal human epithelial and mesenchymal small-intestine cells cocultured in process involving specially designed bioreactors. Useful as tissued models for studies of growth, regulatory, and differentiation processes in normal intestinal tissues; diseases of small intestine; and interactions between cells of small intestine and viruses causing disease both in small intestine and elsewhere in body. Process used to produce other tissue models, leading to advances in understanding of growth and differentiation in developing organisms, of renewal of tissue, and of treatment of myriad of clinical conditions. Prior articles describing design and use of rotating-wall culture vessels include "Growing And Assembling Cells Into Tissues" (MSC-21559), "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662), and "In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids" (MSC-21843).

  10. Gastrin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihao; Luo, Yongli; Cheng, Yunjiu; Zou, Dezhi; Zeng, Aihong; Yang, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a devastating complication when the blood supply is reflowed in ischemic organs. Gastrin has critical function in regulating acid secretion, proliferation, and differentiation in the gastric mucosa. We aimed to determine whether gastrin has an effect on intestinal I/R damage. Intestinal I/R injury was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were induced to be hypergastrinemic by pretreated with omeprazole or directly injected with gastrin. Some hypergastrinemic rats were injected with cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist prior to I/R operation. After the animal surgery, the intestine was collected for histological analysis. Isolated intestinal epithelial cells or crypts were harvested for RNA and protein analysis. CCK-2 receptor expression, intestinal mucosal damage, cell apoptosis, and apoptotic protein caspase-3 activity were measured. We found that high gastrin in serum significantly reduced intestinal hemorrhage, alleviated extensive epithelial disruption, decreased disintegration of lamina propria, downregulated myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and caspase-3 activity, and lead to low mortality in response to I/R injury. On the contrary, CCK-2 receptor antagonist L365260 could markedly impair intestinal protection by gastrin on intestinal I/R. Severe edema of mucosal villi with severe intestinal crypt injury and numerous intestinal villi disintegrated were observed again in the hypergastrinemic rats with L365260. The survival in the hypergastrinemic rats after intestinal I/R injury was shortened by L365260. Finally, gastrin could remarkably upregulated intestinal CCK-2 receptor expression. Our data suggest that gastrin by omeprazole remarkably attenuated I/R induced intestinal injury by enhancing CCK-2 receptor expression and gastrin could be a potential mitigator for intestinal I/R damage in the clinical setting. PMID

  11. Macrophage Isolation from the Mouse Small and Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Harusato, Akihito; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate responses to the normal microbiota as well as pathogens. One of the most important steps in beginning to understand the functions of these cells is the ability to effectively isolate them from the complex intestinal environment. Here, we detail methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages from the mouse small and large intestine. PMID:27246032

  12. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  13. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  14. The transit of dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kah-Hay

    2010-08-16

    The human small intestine, with its enormous absorptive surface area, is invariably the principal site of drug absorption. Hence, the residence time of a dosage form in this part of the gut can have a great influence on the absorption of the contained drug. Various methods have been employed to monitor the gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but the use of gamma-scintigraphy has superceded all the other methods. However, careful consideration of the time interval for image acquisition and proper analysis of the scintigraphic data are important for obtaining reliable results. Most studies reported the mean small intestinal transit time of various dosage forms to be about 3-4h, being closely similar to that of food and water. The value does not appear to be influenced by their physical state nor the presence of food, but the timing of food intake following administration of the dosage forms can influence the small intestinal transit time. While the mean small intestinal transit time is quite consistent among dosage forms and studies, individual values can vary widely. There are differing opinions regarding the effect of density and size of dosage forms on their small intestinal transit properties. Some common excipients employed in pharmaceutical formulations can affect the small intestinal transit and drug absorption. There is currently a lack of studies regarding the effects of excipients, as well as the timing of food intake on the small intestinal transit of dosage forms and drug absorption. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-2 protects impaired intestinal mucosal barriers in obstructive jaundice rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Dong, Jia-Tian; Li, Xiao-Jing; Gu, Ye; Cheng, Zhi-Jian; Cai, Yuan-Kun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) on the intestinal barrier of rats with obstructive jaundice and determine the possible mechanisms of action involved in the protective effect. METHODS: Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham operation group, an obstructive jaundice group, and a GLP-2 group; each group consisted of 12 rats. The GLP-2 group was treated with GLP-2 after the day of surgery, whereas the other two groups were treated with the same concentration of normal saline. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin, and endotoxin levels were recorded at 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 d. Furthermore, on the 14th day, body weight, the wet weight of the small intestine, pathological changes of the small intestine and the immunoglobulin A (IgA) expressed by plasma cells located in the small intestinal lamina propria were recorded for each group. RESULTS: In the rat model, jaundice was obvious, and the rats’ activity decreased 4-6 d post bile duct ligation. Compared with the sham operation group, the obstructive jaundice group displayed increased yellow staining of abdominal visceral serosa, decreased small intestine wet weight, thinning of the intestinal muscle layer and villi, villous atrophy, uneven height, fusion, partial villous epithelial cell shedding, substantial inflammatory cell infiltration and significantly reduced IgA expression. However, no significant gross changes were noted between the GLP-2 and sham groups. With time, the levels of ALT, endotoxin and bilirubin in the GLP-2 group were significantly increased compared with the sham group (P < 0.01). The increasing levels of the aforementioned markers were more significant in the obstructive jaundice group than in the GLP-2 group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: GLP-2 reduces intestinal mucosal injuries in obstructive jaundice rats, which might be attributed to increased intestinal IgA and reduced bilirubin and endotoxin. PMID:25593463

  16. Protective effect of the traditional Chinese medicine xuesaitong on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuan; Li, Dengxiao; Gao, Hong; Gao, Yuejin; Zhang, Long; Du, Yuling; Wu, Jian; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effect of xuesaitong on intestinal barrier dysfunction and related mechanisms in a rat model for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: Rats were divided into sham-operated, disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated groups. In the disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated rats an intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) model was introduced, which was created by a temporary obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The xuesaitong group was pre-treated with injections into the abdominal cavity prior to the generation of the IRI model. Tissue changes were evaluated using H&E staining and electron microscopy. Samples were analyzed at 0, 3 and 24 h post IRI. Ascites volumes as well as small intestinal mucosa bleeding, injury scores, wet to dry weight ratios, and propulsions were evaluated. Apoptotic rates were determined with TUNNEL assays. Blood serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured using ELISA, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression in small intestinal mucosa measured using immunohistochemistry. Results: We determined a significant increase of pathological damage to small intestinal tissues, intestinal wet to dry ratios, ascites volume, TNF-α levels, apoptosis rates of small intestinal mucosa, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 proteins in the disease-model group compared to the sham-operated group (P < 0.001), and intestinal motility was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). However, comparisons between disease-model and xuesaitong pre-treated animals revealed, that in the treatment group these changes occurred in significant less severities. Conclusions: Xuesaitong can effectively alleviate intestinal barrier dysfunction caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing TNF-α, up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating caspase-3 expression, in addition to increasing peristalsis. PMID:25932105

  17. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling

    PubMed Central

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G.; Patankar, Jay V.; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E.; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [3H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [3H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine. PMID:23220585

  18. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling.

    PubMed

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine.

  19. INTESTINAL TRIGLYCERIDE ABSORPTION IN THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Cardell, Robert R.; Badenhausen, Susan; Porter, Keith R.

    1967-01-01

    This report provides information on the morphology of fat absorption in rat intestinal epithelial cells. Three types of experiments were performed: (a) intubation of corn oil into fasted rats, (b) injection of physiological fatty-chyme prepared from fat-fed donor rats into ligated segments of jejunum of fasted animals, and (c) administration of electron-opaque particles in corn oil and markers given concurrently with the fat. These results support the hypothesis that fat is absorbed by selective diffusion of monoglycerides and fatty acids from micelles rather than by pinocytosis of unhydrolized triglycerides. Evidence is presented that the pits between the microvilli, previously believed to function in the transport of fat, are not involved in this process. Instead they appear to contribute their contents to lysosomes in the apical cytoplasm. Arguments are offered that the monoglycerides and fatty acids diffuse from the micelle while the latter is associated with the microvillous membrane of the absorptive cell. These micellar components penetrate the plasma membrane and diffuse into the cytoplasmic matrix where they encounter the SER. Triglyceride synthesis occurs in the SER and results in the deposition of fat droplets within its lumina. The synthesis of triglycerides and their sequestration into the SER establishes an inward diffusion gradient of monoglycerides and fatty acids. PMID:6033529

  20. Intestinal sucrase inhibitors and bile acid absorption in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, C.T.; Harnett, K.M.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were carried out to determine if bile acid absorption is perturbed by the intestinal sucrase inhibitors, Acarbose and BAY m 1099 (1,5-dideoxy-1.5((2-hydroxy-ethyl) imino-)-D-glucitol). The intestinal absorption of taurocholic acid (TA) in male Wistar rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital (50mg/ig, i.p.), was assessed from its excretion rate in bile. In acute studies, 15 cm of distal ileum was perfused in vivo for 70 min with /sup 14/C-TA (0.1 mM, 5 ..mu.. Ci/mmol) in 0.154 M NaCl, 0.01 M phosphate (pH 6.8) and in some studies 20 mM sucrose. From 70-140 min the perfusate was unchanged or contained Acarbose (150, 1500 ..mu..g/ml) or BAY m 1099 (10, 25 ..mu..g/ ml). Neither drug without sucrose altered TA biliary excretion. With sucrose, BAY m 1099 (10 and 25 ..mu.. g/ml) reduced TA excretion by 11 and 22%; no greater effect occurred with 60..mu..g/ml. In subchronic studies rats were fed Acarbose (40 mg/100 g diet) or BAY m 1099 (10, 20, 40 mg/100 g diet) in AIN-76A (50% cornstarch, 15% sucrose) and after 8 wk /sup 14/C-TA (10 mg/kg, 0.08 ..mu..Ci/mg, 3 mg/ml 0.9% NaCl) was injected into the proximal small intestine. Neither drug affected the biliary excretion of TA, measured every 20 min for 4-5 hr. These studies indicate that neither acute nor subchronic regimes of Acarbose or BAY m 1099 affect the intestinal absorption of TA. A possible effect in the presence of sucrose is being explored.

  1. Effects of starvation on the maximal activities of some glycolytic and citric acid-cycle enzymes and glutaminase in mucosa of the small intestine of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Leszek; Challis, R. A. John; Newsholme, Eric A.

    1982-01-01

    Starvation decreases activities of some glycolytic and citric acid-cycle enzymes, and increases those of glucose 6-phosphatase and fructose bisphosphatase, whereas that of glutaminase is unchanged. These findings may be of significance for the control of glucose metabolism in the absorptive cells of the intestine. PMID:7126190

  2. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  3. Effects of phorbol esters on fluid transport and blood flow in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoeqvist, A.; Henderson, L.S.; Fondacaro, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Studies were designed to examine the effects of phorbol esters on intestinal fluid transport and blood flow in the anesthetized cat and enteropooling in the conscious rat. Intraluminal administration of phorbol ester into a segment of isolated small bowel produced a copious intestinal secretion and a concomitant mesenteric hyperemia in the cat. Net fluid movement in the intestine was converted from absorption in the control state to secretion following phorbol ester administration. Intravenous atropine reduced the phorbol ester-induced secretion by 56%; clonidine abolished the remaining secretory response. In the rat, intragastric administration of phorbol ester produced enteropooling comparable to that of other potent intestinal secretagogues. Since phorbol esters are known to activate protein kinase C, these suggest that activation of protein kinase C in the small intestine may lead to a full secretory response. The evidence suggests that this secretion is accompanied by a metabolic hyperemia. These results suggest that protein kinase C plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal fluid transport.

  4. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shu-Guang; Wu, Wan-Chun; Han, Zhen; Wang, Meng-Ya

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress. METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15% vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g, P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g, P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VIP levels between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine. PMID:15655834

  5. Retrospective Comparison of Gastrosplenic Entrapment of the Small Intestine to Other Strangulating Small Intestinal Lesions in Adult Horses.

    PubMed

    Bergren, Amanda L; Credille, Brent C; Epstein, Kira L; Giguère, Steeve

    2015-07-01

    To compare clinical data of horses with entrapment of the small intestine by the gastrosplenic ligament (ESIGL) to clinical data of horses with other strangulating small intestinal lesions. Retrospective case series. Medical records (January 2001-December 2011) of horses that had exploratory celiotomy for acute abdominal pain associated with strangulating small intestinal lesions were reviewed. Signalment, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic variables, surgical findings and surgical procedures performed, postoperative data and short-term survival were recorded. Clinical findings included excessive nasogastric reflux and abnormal abdominal fluid. Horses with ESIGL were significantly more likely to require intestinal resection and anastomosis and produced significantly less reflux postoperatively than horses with other strangulating small intestinal obstructions. Geldings were significantly more likely to develop ESIGL than mares or stallions. Quarter Horse or Quarter Horse type breeds were predisposed to ESIGL. Survival to hospital discharge in horses with ESIGL (16/22; 72.7%) was significantly higher than that of horses with other strangulating small intestinal obstructions (92/183; 50%). ESIGL was more prevalent in this population of horses evaluated for acute abdominal pain than in previous studies, accounting for 10.7% of all horses with strangulating small intestinal lesions. Geldings and Quarter Horse or Quarter Horse related breeds are predisposed to this condition. The prognosis for survival to hospital discharge was fair to good. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Thiamine transport across the rat intestine. I. Normal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hoyumpa, A M; Middleton, H M; Wilson, F A; Schenker, S

    1975-05-01

    The characteristics of normal thiamine transport across the intestine were studied in rats using intact intestinal loops and everted jejunal segments. In vivo studies with [35-S]-thiamine hydrochloride revealed, in all segments of small intestine, saturation kinetics for low thiamine concentrations (0.06 to 1.5 muM), but a linear relationship between high concentrations (2 to 560 muM) and absorption. Moreover, in vitro studies of net transmural flux using everted jejunal sacs demonstrated movement of [14-C]-thiamine hydrochloride against a concentration gradient only when low, but not when high, thiamine concentration was used, so that the serosal to mucosal ratio became significantly greater than the initial value of one. Pyrithiamine, 2 muM, dinitrophenol, 200 muM, norethylmaleimide, 100 muM, and ouabain, 10 muM, reduced the net transmural flux of 0.2 muM thiamine. In contrast, these inhibitors had no effect on 20 muM thiamine. When unidirectional flux across the jejunum was measured, saturation kinetics was again demonstrated for low thiamine concentrations. This phenomenon, however, was abolished by the addition of pyrithiamine, which exerted competitive inhibition on thiamine absorption. Anoxia and sodium lack reduced intestinal uptake of 0.5 muM thiamine to 58% and 74% of normal, respectively, but did not affect uptake of 50 muM thiamine. Lowering the marked with low thiamine concentrations (O10, 1.648) than with high concentration (Q10, 1.127). Stirring of the water layer reduced Km to 59% of unstirred value, while Vmax and permeability coefficient remained unchanged. Finally, movement of low concentration thiamine against an electrical gradient was observed under conditions of electrical short circuiting and zero potential difference. In contrast, no such effect was seen with high concentrations. These studies suggest that there exists in the rat a dual system of intestinal thiamine transport. At low concentrations, thiamine is absorbed by an active process

  7. A Multicellular Approach Forms a Significant Amount of Tissue-Engineered Small Intestine in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Frédéric G.; Matthews, Jamil A.; Speer, Allison L.; Torashima, Yasuhiro; Barthel, Erik R.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) has successfully been used to rescue Lewis rats after massive small bowel resection. In this study, we transitioned the technique to a mouse model, allowing investigation of the processes involved during TESI formation through the transgenic tools available in this species. This is a necessary step toward applying the technique to human therapy. Multicellular organoid units were derived from small intestines of transgenic mice and transplanted within the abdomen on biodegradable polymers. Immunofluorescence staining was used to characterize the cellular processes during TESI formation. We demonstrate the preservation of Lgr5- and DcamKl1-positive cells, two putative intestinal stem cell populations, in proximity to their niche mesenchymal cells, the intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts (ISEMFs), at the time of implantation. Maintenance of the relationship between ISEMF and crypt epithelium is observed during the growth of TESI. The engineered small intestine has an epithelium containing a differentiated epithelium next to an innervated muscularis. Lineage tracing demonstrates that all the essential components, including epithelium, muscularis, nerves, and some of the blood vessels, are of donor origin. This multicellular approach provides the necessary cell population to regenerate large amounts of intestinal tissue that could be used to treat short bowel syndrome. PMID:21395443

  8. Chromium absorption in the vascularly perfused rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, H.J.; Offenbacher, E.G.; Pi-Sunyer, F.X.

    1986-03-01

    The mechanism of chromium (Cr) absorption by the rat small intestine was investigated using a double perfusion technique wherein the luman of the small intestine and the vasculature supplying it were separately perfused. The intestinal perfusate (IP) was a nutrient-rich tissue culture medium (TCM) with added inorganic Cr and /sup 51/Cr. The vascular perfusate (VP) was a Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution (KRB) containing 4.7% dextran, 0.1% glucose and 5% human serum. Cr absorption was calculated by the amount of /sup 51/Cr detected in the VP. To determine the transport mechanism for Cr, its absorption into the VP was measured at various Cr concentrations of the IP ranging from 10-400 ppb CrCl/sub 3/. The amount of Cr absorbed into the blood rose linearly with the intestinal Cr concentration suggesting a process of simple diffusion. Manipulations of the VP and IP constituents were made to investigate their effects on Cr absorption. When serum was omitted from the VP, Cr adsorption was suppressed, suggesting that serum component(s) are necessary for optimal Cr absorption. When either of 2 plasma transport proteins (apo-transferrin, albumin) were added to the serum-free VP at physiological levels, Cr absorption returned to, but did not exceed, control levels. When the TCM was replaced with a KRB solution; Cr absorption was suppressed indicating that there are nutrient(s) of the TCM which facilitate Cr absorption. Further suppression occurred when a Cr concentration gradient opposing Cr absorption was created (IP at 100 ppb Cr, VP at 400 ppb Cr).

  9. Collagenous colitis associated with small intestinal villous atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, I; Sanders, S; Hopwood, D; Bouchier, I A

    1986-01-01

    Two patients diagnosed as having small intestinal hyperplastic villous atrophy and being treated with a gluten free diet were investigated because of persistent watery diarrhoea. Both were found to have collagenous colitis. Previous reports of this condition have emphasised the presence of normal small intestinal mucosal architecture and the association of collagenous colitis with intestinal villous atrophy has not previously been reported. Both cases responded to oral steroid therapy, but not to other previously recommended treatment regimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3792923

  10. Gastric and small intestine gastrointestinal stromal tumors: Do outcomes differ?

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Katherine; Nagarajan, Neeraja; Canner, Joseph; Najafian, Alireza; Wolfgang, Christopher; Schneider, Eric; Meyer, Christian; Lennon, Anne Marie; Johnston, Fabian M; Ahuja, Nita

    2017-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Previous literature has suggested that small intestine GISTs are more aggressive than gastric GISTs. Our primary objective was to compare the outcomes of gastric and small intestine GISTs in the decade after approval of imatinib for treatment. The SEER database was queried for cases of gastric and small intestine GIST between the years 2002 and 2012, using the ICD-O-3 histology code 8936. Survival analysis was performed using generalized gamma models for time to cause-specific mortality (CSM). CSM was 14.0% for the 3,759 gastric GIST patients and 14.3% for the 1,848 small intestine GIST patients. Five-year survival was 82.2% and 83.3% for gastric and small intestine patients, respectively. The number of diagnosed cases of GIST increased over the course of this study, especially for tumors <5 cm in size and in patients over age 50 years. In this large nation-wide study, we found that patients with gastric and small intestine GISTs had similar outcomes, in contrast to previous reports. The diagnosis of GIST has significantly increased in the last decade, which may reflect the increased recognition of this entity and frequent use of imaging. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:351-357. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mucositis and non-invasive markers of small intestinal function.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S; Butler, Ross N

    2009-05-01

    Mucositis is a common and debilitating side effect of chemotherapy that manifests due to the inability of chemotherapy agents to discriminate between normal and neoplastic cells. This results in ulcerating lesions lining the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, the development of efficacious treatments for small intestinal mucositis has been hindered as the pathobiology of mucositis is still not fully understood. The small intestine is an extensive organ which is largely inaccessible by conventional means. Non-invasive biomarkers such as small intestinal permeability, H(2) breath tests, serum citrulline tests and the (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) have emerged as potential markers of small intestinal function. The SBT is emerging as the more appropriate biomarker to assess chemotherapy-induced mucositis in cancer patients and animal models, where it measures the decrease in sucrase activity associated with villus blunting and crypt disruption. The SBT has been successfully applied to detect mucositis induced by different classes of chemotherapy agents and has been used successfully to monitor small intestinal function with a range of candidate anti-mucositis treatments. We propose the SBT a superior biomarker of small intestinal function that could be successfully applied in clinical practice for monitoring the development of mucositis in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  12. Colonization by lactobacilli of piglet small intestinal mucus.

    PubMed

    Rojas, M; Conway, P L

    1996-11-01

    The colonization potential of lactobacilli was investigated using small intestinal mucus extracts from 35-d-old pigs. Mucus-secreting tissue from the small intestine of piglets was gently rinsed to remove contents and then shaken in buffer to release mucus from the surface. Numbers of lactobacilli in different portions of the small intestine of 35-d-old pigs were enumerated. Also, mucus isolated from the small intestine of pigs was investigated for its capacity to support the growth of lactobacilli. Results indicated that Lactobacillus spp. inhabit the mucus layer of the small intestine and can grow and adhere to ileal mucus. From adhesion studies of Lactobacillus fermentum 104R to mucus analysed by Scatchard plot, it is suggested that an associating system showing positive cooperativity is involved. Proteinaceous compounds(s) involved in the adhesion to mucus were detected in the spent culture fluid from the growth of strain 104R. Studies are continuing in order to identify and characterize the adhesion-promoting protein(s). From the data, it is proposed that lactobacilli colonize the mucus layer of the small intestine of pigs.

  13. Hypersensitivity reactions in small intestine. I Thymus dependence of experimental 'partial villous atrophy'.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A; Jarrett, E E

    1975-01-01

    Rats infected with the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis have crypt hyperplasia with villous atrophy in affected areas of the small intestine. In thymus-deprived (B) rats the course of infection is prolonged but, despite the presence of many worms in the intestinal lumen, villi and crypts appear largely normal. This suggests that the tissue damaged associated with N. brasilliensis infection is caused, not by the worms, but by a local thymus-dependent immune reaction. There is some evidence to implicate lymphocytes rather than antibodies in this reaction. It is already know that T-cell-associated damage to the small intestine, such as occurs in allograft rejection, produces subtotal villous atrophy. The present findings suggest that when T cell react locally with helminth antigens a similar type of damage occurs. The presence of a local cell-mediated immune reaction may be the common factor which causes villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia in many small intestinal diseases, eg, viral enteritis, giardiasis, cow's milk allergy, and coeliac disease. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:1079195

  14. Normal and abnormal electrical propagation in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, W J E P

    2015-02-01

    As in other muscular organs, small intestinal motility is determined to a large degree by the electrical activities that occur in the smooth muscle layers of the small intestine. In recent decades, the interstitial cells of Cajal, located in the myenteric plexus, have been shown to be responsible for the generation and propagation of the electrical impulse: the slow wave. It was also known that the slow waves as such do not cause contraction, but that the action potentials ('spikes') that are generated by the slow waves are responsible for the contractions. Recording from large number of extracellular electrodes simultaneously is one method to determine origin and pattern of propagation of these electrical signals. This review reports the characteristics of slow wave propagation through the intestinal tube, the occurrence of propagation blocks along its length, which explains the well-known decrease in frequency, and the specific propagation pattern of the spikes that follow the slow waves. But the value of high-resolution mapping is highest in discovering and analysing mechanisms of arrhythmias in the gut. Most recently, circus movements (also called 're-entries') have been described in the small intestine in several species. Moreover, several types of re-entries have now been described, some similar to what may occur in the heart, such as functional re-entries, but others more unique to the small intestine, such as circumferential re-entry. These findings seem to suggest the possibilities of hitherto unknown pathologies that may be present in the small intestine.

  15. [Capsule endoscopy for the diagnostics of small intestine tumours].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Márta; Pák, Péter; Pák, Gábor; Fehér, János

    2008-10-19

    Three to six percent of all gastrointestinal tumours and one to two percent of all malignant gastrointestinal tumours develop in the small intestine. These occur more frequently in men than in women and the peak of occurrence is at the age of 50 to 60 years. According to epidemiological investigations to date the most frequently developing primary tumours in the small intestine are adenocarcinomas, carcinoid tumours, lymphomas and small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumours. Clinical appearance of the tumours is the same, independent of their histological type. Fifty percent of the benign tumours is asymptomatic and is only discovered incidentally at autopsy. In comparison, 80% of malignant tumours is symptomatic. The prognosis of small intestine malignant tumours is very poor as at the time of diagnosis they have already formed metastases in 45-75% and at the time of surgery they are in 20-50% irresectable. The reason for the late diagnosis is on the one hand the non-specific nature of the symptoms, on the other hand, the limited visualisation of the entire small intestine via traditional radiological and endoscopic methods. Capsule endoscopy (CE) revolutionised the diagnostics of the small intestine by enabling non-invasive, pain-free investigation of the entire small intestine. The timely application of CE may replace a range of expensive assays with limited diagnostic value. Initial results indicate a higher prevalence of small intestine tumours than it had been estimated based on earlier epidemiological investigations. The new method provides an early diagnosis, enabling a definitive therapy, eventually significantly improving patient survival.

  16. Simultaneously multiparametric spectroscopic monitoring of tissue viability in the brain and small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolmasov, Michael; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Mayevsky, Avraham

    2007-02-01

    Under body O II imbalance, the Autonomic Nervous System is responsible for redistribution of blood flow with preference to the most vital organs (brain, heart), while the less vital organs (intestine, GI tract) are hypoperfused. The aim of this study was to develop and use an animal model for real time monitoring of tissue viability in the brain, and the small intestine, under various levels of oxygen and blood supply. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized, the brain cortex and intestinal serosa were exposed and connected by optical fibers to the Multi-Site Multi-Parametric (MSMP) monitoring system. Tissue blood flow (TBF) and mitochondrial NADH redox state were monitored simultaneously in the two organs. The rats were subjected to short anoxia, 20 minutes hypoxia or epinephrine (2& 8μg/kg I.V.). Under oxygen deficiency, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was elevated, whereas intestinal TBF was reduced. Mitochondrial NADH was significantly elevated in both organs. Systemic injection of Adrenaline showed a dose-depended increase in systemic blood pressure and CBF response whereas, intestinal TBF similarly decreased in both doses. In addition, NADH was elevated (reduced form) in the intestine whereas oxidation was observed in the brain. In conclusion, our preliminary results may imply the ability of using of the MSMP for monitoring non-vital organs in order to detect early changes in the balance between oxygen supply and demand in the body.

  17. Medicinal foodstuffs. X. Structures of new triterpene glycosides, gymnemosides-c, -d, -e, and -f, from the leaves of Gymnema sylvestre R. Br.: influence of gymnema glycosides on glucose uptake in rat small intestinal fragments.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, M; Murakami, T; Matsuda, H

    1997-12-01

    Following the characterization of gymnemosides-a and -b, new triterpene glycosides, gymnemosides-c, -d, -e, and -f, were isolated from the leaves of Gymnema (G.) sylvestre R. BR. Their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence as follows: 21-O-benzoyl-28-O-acetylgymnemagenin 3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (gymnemoside-c), 23-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] gymnestrogenin (gymnemoside-d), 23-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D- glucopyranosyl]-28-O-[beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] 23-hydroxylongispinogenin (gymnemoside-e), 23-O-[beta-D-xylopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl]-28-O-[beta-O-glucopyranosyl (1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranosyl] 3 beta,16 beta,23,28-tetrahydroxyolean-18-ene (gymnemoside-f). The inhibitory effects of gymnemosides-c, -d, -e, and -f and principal triterpene glycosides from G. sylvestre on glucose uptake in rat small intestinal fragments were examined, and gymnemic acids II, III, and IV, gymnemasaponin V, and gymnemoside-f were found to exhibit the inhibitory activity.

  18. Effects of Physical Exercise on the Intestinal Mucosa of Rats Submitted to a Hypothalamic Obesity Condition.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J R; Freitas, J R; Grassiolli, S

    2016-10-01

    The small intestine plays a role in obesity as well as in satiation. However, the effect of physical exercise on the morphology and function of the small intestine during obesity has not been reported to date. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of physical exercise on morphological aspects of the rat small intestine during hypothalamic monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity. The rats were divided into four groups: Sedentary (S), Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), Exercised (E), and Exercised Monosodium Glutamate (EMSG). The MSG and EMSG groups received a daily injection of monosodium glutamate (4 g/kg) during the 5 first days after birth. The S and E groups were considered as control groups and received injections of saline. At weaning, at 21 days after birth, the EMSG and E groups were submitted to swimming practice 3 times a week until the 90th day, when all groups were sacrificed and the parameters studied recorded. Exercise significantly reduced fat deposits and the Lee Index in MSG-treated animals, and also reduced the thickness of the intestinal wall, the number of goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity. However, physical activity alone increased the thickness and height of villi, and the depth of the crypts. In conclusion, regular physical exercise may alter the morphology or/and functions of the small intestine, reducing the prejudicial effects of hypothalamic obesity. Anat Rec, 299:1389-1396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Avoidance of small intestine injury in gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, N.

    1983-09-01

    The evolution of systematized operative staging and radical surgical procedures in the management of gynecologic cancer has increased the complexities of integrating radiation therapy. High dose irradiation to large treatment volumes has been associated with an increased incidence of small intestine injury. This complication is morbid and often fatal. Although predisposing factors have been extensively studied, there has been a paucity of reports evaluating preventative measures. Between 1975 and 1980, 140 patients with gynecologic cancer were treated at the Valley Presbyterian Hospital in the Division of Radiation Therapy. Twenty-six patients with cervix cancer received definitive irradiation and seven received adjunct irradiation. Seventy-two with corpus cancer received adjunct irradiation, seven received definitive irradiation and three palliative irradiation. Eleven patients with ovarian cancer received adjunct irradiation and 15 palliative irradiation. Eight-five patients were at potential risk for small intestine injury and had treatment planning small intestine x rays. Fixation was observed in 7/39 (18%) without prior pelvic surgery and 30/46 (65%) with prior pelvic surgery. Information from the small intestine x rays were used in 41 patients to make 60 treatment modifications. Twenty-five of 140 (17%) had a reduction of total dose, 26/140 (18%) had exclusion of the small intestine by shrinking fields, or patient positioning and 13/140 (9%) had displacement of the small intestine by distension of the bladder. No patient developed small intestine injury. The disease free survival for cervix cancer 27/33 (82%), corpus cancer 68/79 (86%) and ovarian cancer 5/11 (45%).

  20. [The absorption kinetics of oleanolic acid self-microemulsion in rat stomach and intestine].

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Su, Le-Qun; Huang, Xin

    2008-11-01

    To study the absorption kinetics of oleanolic acid self-microemulsion in rat stomach and intestine. The absorption kinetics were obtained by using the in situ perfusion method in rat. The absorption of drug was determinated by the decrease in stomach and intestine with the HPLC as the detection method. The absorption percent of oleanolic acid microemulsion for 2 hours was 10.15% in stomach; The absorption rate constants of oleanolic acid microemulsion and micelle were 0.0901/h and 0.0486/h in small intestine, respectively; The best absorption segment in intestine was duodenum, ileum, jejunum and colon by turns. The oleanolic acid self-microemulsifying system significantly enhances the absorption of oleanolic acid in the gastrointestinal tract and improves its bioavailability.

  1. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  2. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  3. Hymenolepis diminuta: analysis of the expression of Toll-like receptor genes and protein (TLR3 and TLR9) in the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Lanocha, Natalia; Wandurska-Nowak, Elzbieta; Izabela, Gutowska; Salamatin, Ruslan; Jagodzinski, Paweł P

    2014-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a fundamental role in the rapid activation of innate immune responses to a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In a previous study we observed an increase in the level of expression of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA in the jejunum and colon during experimental hymenolepidosis in rats. In this study, we performed a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of TLR3 and TLR9 receptors during experimental hymenolepidosis in rats. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of TLR3 and TLR9 in the jejunum had increased at 16 days post Hymenolepis diminuta infection (dpi) in the case of TLR3 and at 16 and 25 dpi in the case of TLR9. In the colon the expression of TLR3 and TLR9 had increased at 16, 25 and 40 dpi. The results of the immunohistochemical reactions showed that H. diminuta infected rats (16, 25, 40 and 60 dpi) exhibited changes in TLR3 and TLR9 localization and intensity in the epithelial cells of the jejunum and colon. The changes in the level of TLR3 and TLR9 expression may confirm involvement of the innate immune system in the pathomechanism of hymenolepidosis.

  4. Intestinal absorption of biotin in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.B.; Selhub, J.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-07-01

    We examined the absorption of biotin using the in vivo intestinal loop technique. Jejunal segments from male rats were filled with solutions containing (/sup 3/H)biotin and (/sup 14/C)inulin in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Absorption was determined on the basis of luminal tritium disappearance after correction for inulin recovery. At biotin concentrations of 0.1 and 5.0 microM, luminal biotin disappearance was linear for at least 10 min. At biotin concentrations ranging from 2.3 nM to 75 microM, 10-28% of the administered dose was absorbed in 10 min. The concentration dependence of luminal biotin disappearance is consistent with the presence of both saturable and nonsaturable (linear) components of biotin uptake, with estimated Km = 9.6 microM and Jmax = 75.2 pmol/(2.5 cm loop X min). The rate constant for nonsaturable uptake is 3.1 pmol/(2.5 cm loop X min X microM). We conclude that at biotin concentrations less than 5 microM, biotin absorption proceeds largely by the saturable process, whereas at concentrations above 25 microM, nonsaturable uptake predominates. Additional studies demonstrated significantly less biotin uptake in the ileum than in the jejunum, a finding in agreement with previous in vitro studies.

  5. Small intestinal nematode infection of mice is associated with increased enterobacterial loads alongside the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Fischer, André; Heimesaat, Markus M; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Hartmann, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are potent modulators of immune reactivity in mice and men. Intestinal nematodes live in close contact with commensal gut bacteria, provoke biased Th2 immune responses upon infection, and subsequently lead to changes in gut physiology. We hypothesized that murine nematode infection is associated with distinct changes of the intestinal bacterial microbiota composition. We here studied intestinal inflammatory and immune responses in mice following infection with the hookworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri and applied cultural and molecular techniques to quantitatively assess intestinal microbiota changes in the ileum, cecum and colon. At day 14 post nematode infection, mice harbored significantly higher numbers of γ-Proteobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae and members of the Bacteroides/Prevotella group in their cecum as compared to uninfected controls. Abundance of Gram-positive species such as Lactobacilli, Clostridia as well as the total bacterial load was not affected by worm infection. The altered microbiota composition was independent of the IL-4/-13 - STAT6 signaling axis, as infected IL-4Rα(-/-) mice showed a similar increase in enterobacterial loads. In conclusion, infection with an enteric nematode is accompanied by distinct intestinal microbiota changes towards higher abundance of gram-negative commensal species at the small intestinal site of infection (and inflammation), but also in the parasite-free large intestinal tract. Further studies should unravel the impact of nematode-induced microbiota changes in inflammatory bowel disease to allow for a better understanding of how theses parasites interfere with intestinal inflammation and bacterial communities in men.

  6. In Vivo Physiological Experiments in the Random Positioning Macine: A Study on the Rat Intestinal Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peana, A. T.; Marzocco, S.; Bianco, G.; Autore, G.; Pinto, A.; Pippia, P.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the rat intestinal transit as well as the expression of enzymes involved in this process and in gastrointestinal homeostasis as ciclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2), the inducibile isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), ICAM-1 and heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90. The modeled microgravity conditions were performed utilizing a three-dimensional clinostat, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). Our results indicate that modeled microgravity significantly reduce rat intestinal transit. Western blot analysis on small intestine tissues of RPM rats reveals a significant increase in iNOS expression, a significant reduction in COX-2 levels, while COX-1 expression remains unaltered, and a significant increase in ICAM-1 and HSP 70 expression. Also a significant increase in HSP 90 stomach expression indicates a strong effect of simulated low g on gastrointestinal homeostasis.

  7. Intestinal anisakiasis as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Gotaro; Usuki, Shinichiro; Mizokami, Ken; Tanabe, Marianne; Machi, Junji

    2013-09-01

    Anisakiasis, a parasitic infection by larvae of the nematode Anisakis found in raw or undercooked saltwater fish, mostly involves stomach but rarely small intestine. We report a rare case of a 61-year-old man who presented with abdominal pain and developed small bowel obstruction caused by intestinal anisakiasis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed segmental edema of the intestinal wall with proximal dilatation. The patient underwent urgent laparotomy because strangulated small bowel obstruction was suspected. A localized portion of the intestine around jejunoileal junction was found to be erythematous, edematous, and hardened, which was resected. The resected specimen showed a linear whitish worm, Anisakis simplex, penetrating into the intestinal mucosa. It is often clinically challenging to consider intestinal anisakiasis in the differential diagnosis because of its nonspecific abdominal symptoms and findings. Although gastrointestinal anisakiasis is still rare in the United States, the incidence is expected to rise given the growing popularity of Japanese cuisine such as sushi or sashimi. Anisakiasis should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in patients with nonspecific abdominal symptoms after consumption of raw or undercooked fish.

  8. The migrating myoelectric complex of the small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Gordon L.; Sarna, Sushil K.

    1991-10-01

    Gastric and small intestinal myoelectric and motor activity is divided into two main patterns, fed and fasted. During fasting, the predominant pattern of activity is the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC), a cyclically occurring pattern of electric and mechanical activity that is initiated in the stomach and duodenum almost simultaneously and, from there, propagates the length of the small intestine. Cyclic motor activity also occurs in the lower esophageal sphincter, the gallbladder, and the sphincter of Oddi with a duration that is related to the MMC in the small intestine. Of the possible mechanisms for initiation of the MMC in the small intestine (extrinsic neural control, intrinsic neural control, and hormonal control), intrinsic neural control via a series of coupled is the most likely. The keep this sentence in! hormone motilin also plays a role in the initiation of MMCs. After a meal, in man the MMC is disrupted and replaced by irregular contractions. The physiologic role of the MMC is to clear the stomach and small intestine of residual food, secretions, and desquamated cells and propel them to the colon. Disruption of the MMC cycle is associated with bacterial overgrowth in some patients, an observation that supports the proposed cleansing function of the MMC cycle.

  9. Characteristics of Small Intestinal Diseases on Single-Balloon Enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhang; Liu, G.X.; Cai, L.; Yu, H.; Min, X.J.; Gan, H.T.; Yang, K.; SQ, Li; Yan, J.; Chen, L.; Tan, Q.H.; Wu, J.C.; Huang, X.L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small intestine has been considered inaccessible for a long term. The development of single-balloon endoscopy has greatly improved the diagnosis and treatment possibilities for small intestinal diseases. In this study, we aimed to explore the demographic characteristics and small intestinal diseases of patients who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy between 2009 and 2014 at our endoscopy center. We determined the enteroscopic findings for each small intestinal disease and the most susceptible age groups. In total, 186 patients were included in the study. Their mean age was 45.87 ± 15.77 years. Patients who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy were found to have neoplasms (most common age group: 14–45 years, most common lesion location: jejunum), lymphoma (46–59 and 60–74 years, ileum), protuberant lesions (45–59 years, jejunum), inflammation (14–45 and 46–59 years, ileum), benign ulcers (14–45 years, jejunum), diverticulum (14–45 years, ileum), vascular malformations (60–74 years, jejunum), polyps (14–45 years, jejunum), Crohn's disease (14–45 years, jejunum), hookworm infection (14–45 years, jejunum), lipid pigmentation (14–45 and 46–59 years, jejunum), undetermined bleeding (46–59 years, ileum), or undetermined stenosis (31 years, duodenum). Each small intestinal disease had distinct enteroscopic findings. PMID:26496270

  10. Endurance exercise training programs intestinal lipid metabolism in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu‐Han; Linden, Melissa A.; Gordon, Alicia; Scott Rector, R.; Buhman, Kimberly K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Endurance exercise has been shown to improve metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes; however, the physiological and molecular mechanisms for these benefits are not completely understood. Although endurance exercise has been shown to decrease lipogenesis, promote fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increase mitochondrial biosynthesis in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver, its effects on intestinal lipid metabolism remain unknown. The absorptive cells of the small intestine, enterocytes, mediate the highly efficient absorption and processing of nutrients, including dietary fat for delivery throughout the body. We investigated how endurance exercise altered intestinal lipid metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long‐Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. We assessed mRNA levels of genes associated with intestinal lipid metabolism in nonhyperphagic, sedentary Long‐Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (L‐Sed), hyperphagic, sedentary OLETF rats (O‐Sed), and endurance exercised OLETF rats (O‐EndEx). O‐Sed rats developed hyperphagia‐induced obesity (HIO) and type 2 diabetes compared with L‐Sed rats. O‐EndEx rats gained significantly less weight and fat pad mass, and had improved serum metabolic parameters without change in food consumption compared to O‐Sed rats. Endurance exercise resulted in dramatic up‐regulation of a number of genes in intestinal lipid metabolism and mitochondrial content compared with sedentary rats. Overall, this study provides evidence that endurance exercise programs intestinal lipid metabolism, likely contributing to its role in improving metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:25602012

  11. Endurance exercise training programs intestinal lipid metabolism in a rat model of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Han; Linden, Melissa A; Gordon, Alicia; Rector, R Scott; Buhman, Kimberly K

    2015-01-01

    Endurance exercise has been shown to improve metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes; however, the physiological and molecular mechanisms for these benefits are not completely understood. Although endurance exercise has been shown to decrease lipogenesis, promote fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and increase mitochondrial biosynthesis in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver, its effects on intestinal lipid metabolism remain unknown. The absorptive cells of the small intestine, enterocytes, mediate the highly efficient absorption and processing of nutrients, including dietary fat for delivery throughout the body. We investigated how endurance exercise altered intestinal lipid metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. We assessed mRNA levels of genes associated with intestinal lipid metabolism in nonhyperphagic, sedentary Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats (L-Sed), hyperphagic, sedentary OLETF rats (O-Sed), and endurance exercised OLETF rats (O-EndEx). O-Sed rats developed hyperphagia-induced obesity (HIO) and type 2 diabetes compared with L-Sed rats. O-EndEx rats gained significantly less weight and fat pad mass, and had improved serum metabolic parameters without change in food consumption compared to O-Sed rats. Endurance exercise resulted in dramatic up-regulation of a number of genes in intestinal lipid metabolism and mitochondrial content compared with sedentary rats. Overall, this study provides evidence that endurance exercise programs intestinal lipid metabolism, likely contributing to its role in improving metabolic outcomes in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  12. In vivo effects of s-pantoprazole, polaprenzinc, and probiotic blend on chronic small intestinal injury induced by indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Byun, S J; Lim, T J; Lim, Y J; Seo, J G; Chung, M J

    2016-11-30

    Treatment and prevention methods for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced enteropathy have not yet been established. We tested the preventive effects of s-pantoprazole sodium trihydrate (PAN), polaprezinc (PZ), and probiotics on an indomethacin (Indo)-induced small intestinal injury in a rat model. Rats were randomised into 6 groups to receive: normal saline (control), Indo (6 mg/kg), PZ plus Indo, PAN plus Indo, or probiotics plus Indo (at 10(8) and 10(9) cfu/head) for 2 weeks. We measured body weight, food intake, severity of small intestinal damage, haemoglobin (Hb) levels in the small intestinal fluid, intestinal inflammatory cytokines, and a few groups of faecal bacteria. The experimental groups were found to have the following survival rates: 0% for the Indo, PZ, and PAN groups; 50% for both probiotic groups; and 100% for control. Treatment with probiotics of different concentrations reduced small intestinal lesion scores and intestinal fluid Hb as compared with the Indo group, while these parameters did not reduce in the PZ and PAN groups. The anti-inflammatory marker interleukin 10 increased in both probiotic groups. Analysis of a few groups of faecal bacteria revealed that Indo-induced a significant increase in Gram-negative bacteria and decreases in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. Similar changes were also observed in the PZ and PAN groups. However, opposite effects were found in both probiotic groups. The use of probiotics appeared to be beneficial in preventing Indo-induced chronic small intestinal injury.

  13. PANCREATIC DIGESTIVE ENZYME BLOCKADE IN THE SMALL INTESTINE PREVENTS INSULIN RESISTANCE IN HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK

    PubMed Central

    DeLano, Frank A.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 hours) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution) and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared to control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine lead to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared to controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels two hours after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock, but is restored in when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  14. Pancreatic digestive enzyme blockade in the small intestine prevents insulin resistance in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Frank A; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 h) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution), and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared with control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine led to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared with controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels 2 h after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock but is restored when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  15. Viability of the vascularly perfused, recirculating rat intestine and intestine-liver preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Hirayama, H.; Xu, X.; Pang, K.S. )

    1989-08-01

    Function and stability of vascularly perfused, recirculating in situ rat intestine (I) and intestine-liver (IL) preparations were evaluated in fasted and nonfasted rats because these techniques may be readily applied in drug metabolism studies. The rat intestine was perfused with blood medium (7.5 ml/min) via the superior mesenteric artery, with the venous outflow draining into the portal vein, which, together with hepatic arterial flow (2.5 ml/min), constituted the total blood flow (10 ml/min) to the liver. Maintenance of intestinal membrane integrity was observed. Rapid ({sup 14}C)glucose absorption against a concentration gradient and a lack of ({sup 3}H)-polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG 4000, less than 4%) and Evans blue absorption by the recirculating I and IL preparations resulted after bolus injections of these markers into the pyloric end of the duodenum. Other indexes that revealed stable intestinal and liver functions were the following: preservation of reservoir perfusate volume, constancy in perfusion pressure, bile flow, and hemoglobin concentrations, evidence of intestinal glucose utilization and liver glucose production, and a lack of significant leakage of serum glutamic oxalic transaminase. The intestine and liver consumed oxygen at relatively constant rates, but the consumption rates for the fasted tissues (I or L) were significantly higher than those for nonfasted tissues. These results indicate that the vascularly perfused I and IL preparations were maintained in a viable and stable state for a 2-h perfusion period.

  16. Remodeling intestinal flora with sleeve gastrectomy in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaofei; Weng, Pan; Zhang, Huixin; Lu, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    As a complicated symbiotic system, intestinal flora is reported closely related to the development of type 2 diabetes recently. Sleeve gastrectomy is one of the approaches of bariatric surgery and could improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes patients. This study was to explore the relationship between remodeled intestinal flora and glucose metabolism in diabetic rats. 20 male diabetic rats were operated; 10 of them underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 10 of them underwent sham operation. Meanwhile 10 male normal rats underwent sleeve gastrectomy as control. The animals' weight and FBG had been measured. The composition changes of intestinal flora were detected by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. In diabetic rats, weight and fasting blood glucose decreased significantly after sleeve gastrectomy. However, there was no significant change for weight and blood glucose in normal rats after operation. The intestinal flora of diabetic rats reduced in the proportion of Firmicutes and increased in the proportion of Bacteroidetes after sleeve gastrectomy. The change of dominant microorganisms in intestinal flora might play an important role in the glucose metabolism.

  17. Remodeling Intestinal Flora with Sleeve Gastrectomy in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaofei; Weng, Pan; Zhang, Huixin; Lu, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Objective. As a complicated symbiotic system, intestinal flora is reported closely related to the development of type 2 diabetes recently. Sleeve gastrectomy is one of the approaches of bariatric surgery and could improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes patients. This study was to explore the relationship between remodeled intestinal flora and glucose metabolism in diabetic rats. Methods. 20 male diabetic rats were operated; 10 of them underwent sleeve gastrectomy, and 10 of them underwent sham operation. Meanwhile 10 male normal rats underwent sleeve gastrectomy as control. The animals' weight and FBG had been measured. The composition changes of intestinal flora were detected by 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Results. In diabetic rats, weight and fasting blood glucose decreased significantly after sleeve gastrectomy. However, there was no significant change for weight and blood glucose in normal rats after operation. The intestinal flora of diabetic rats reduced in the proportion of Firmicutes and increased in the proportion of Bacteroidetes after sleeve gastrectomy. Conclusion. The change of dominant microorganisms in intestinal flora might play an important role in the glucose metabolism. PMID:25165722

  18. Adhesive mucous gel layer and mucus release as intestinal barrier in rats.

    PubMed

    Iiboshi, Y; Nezu, R; Cui, L; Chen, K; Khan, J; Yoshida, H; Sando, K; Kamata, S; Takagi, Y; Okada, A

    1996-01-01

    Although it has been reported that total parenteral nutrition induces an increased intestinal permeability and a decreased mucous gel layer covering the intestinal epithelium, the role of mucous gel on intestinal permeability has not been well understood. We examined the in vivo effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) as mucolytic agent and colchicine as suppressant of the mucus production on the intestinal transmission of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 70,000 (FITC-dextran). Rats were divided into four groups. In each group, FITC-dextran (750 mg/kg) with or without NAC (3000 mg/kg) was injected into the small intestinal lumen 3 hours after intraperitoneal injection of saline or colchicine (Col, 10 mg/kg). Thirty minutes after injection of FITC-dextran, blood samples were taken from portal vein to analyze plasma fluorescein concentration by fluorescence spectrometry. Samples of small intestine were sectioned in a cryostat for fluorescence microscopy, and the identical sections were stained by periodic acid-Schiff reaction. Plasma FITC-dextran level in NAC group was higher than that in control group (p < .01), that in Col + NAC group was higher than that in Col group (p < .01) and that in Col + NAC group was higher than that in NAC group (p < .05). The spaces between villi were filled with mucous gel in the control and Col groups, whereas those were not entirely filled with mucous gel in NAC and Col + NAC groups. FITC-dextran and mucous gel showed complementary distribution in all rats. The villous interstitial edema was recognized in NAC group and the villi were disrupted in Col + NAC group. These results suggest that intestinal permeability is possibly affected not only by the mucous gel covering the intestinal epithelium but also by mucus release from goblet cells of the small intestine.

  19. Cryptosporidium, chronic diarrhoea and the proximal small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A D; Thomas, A G; Walker-Smith, J A

    1992-01-01

    The association between Cryptosporidium, chronic diarrhoea and a proximal small intestinal mucosal enteropathy was reviewed over a six and a half year period. One hundred and twenty three children with cryptosporidiosis and no clinical evidence of immune deficiency were identified. 50% of children excreting only Cryptosporidium had chronic diarrhoea. Most cases (63%) of chronic diarrhoea occurred in the first two years of life. A mild to moderate enteropathy was present in all nine children undergoing a small intestinal biopsy and seven showed the presence of Cryptosporidium adhering to villous epithelium. All patients eventually recovered spontaneously. Cryptosporidium is a cause of chronic diarrhoea and a proximal small intestinal mucosal enteropathy in children without immune deficiency. Screening for the parasite should be part of the investigative procedures in children with chronic diarrhoea. Images Figure 4 PMID:1398230

  20. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed. PMID:25386070

  1. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-11-07

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed.

  2. Diagnosis and management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Matthew; Siwiec, Robert M; Wo, John M

    2013-06-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can result from failure of the gastric acid barrier, failure of small intestinal motility, anatomic alterations, or impairment of systemic and local immunity. The current accepted criteria for the diagnosis of SIBO is the presence of coliform bacteria isolated from the proximal jejunum with >10(5) colony-forming units/mL. A major concern with luminal aspiration is that it is only one random sampling of the small intestine and may not always be representative of the underlying microbiota. A new approach to examine the underlying microbiota uses rapid molecular sequencing, but its clinical utilization is still under active investigation. Clinical manifestations of SIBO are variable and include bloating, flatulence, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Severe cases may present with nutrition deficiencies due to malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The current management strategies for SIBO center on identifying and correcting underlying causes, addressing nutrition deficiencies, and judicious utilization of antibiotics to treat symptomatic SIBO.

  3. Developmental morphology of the small intestine of African ostrich chicks.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Peng, K M

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the morphological development of the small intestine of African ostrich chicks and to examine the changes in the number of goblet cells therein by observing the gross anatomy and performing histochemistry and morphometry. The BW; length, height, and width of the villi; muscle thickness; depth of the crypts; and number of goblet cells in the intestinal villi and crypts were measured on neonatal d 1, 45, 90, and 334. Our results revealed that the weights of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum (relative to the BW) peaked on d 90, 45, and 45, respectively, and tended to decline thereafter. The villus height and width and muscle thickness in the small intestine were positively correlated with the age of the birds. The ratio of the villus height to the crypt depth differed among the segments of the small intestine and at the different time points. The number of goblet cells in the intestinal villi and crypts increased rapidly up to postnatal d 45 and then decreased rapidly between d 45 and 90. The number of goblet cells in the villi was greatest in the jejunum on d 1 and in the ileum on d 45, whereas that in the crypt was greatest in the ileum on d 1 and 90 and in the duodenum on d 45. These results suggest that the small intestine develops gradually from postnatal d 1 to 90 and that the period up to postnatal d 45 is marked by significant developmental changes in the parameters reflective of the digestive capacity, such as the weight, length, and surface area of the intestine and the number of goblet cells. Therefore, in reared African ostrich chicks, feed management should be enhanced between postnatal d 1 and 45.

  4. Altered systemic bioavailability and organ distribution of azathioprine in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karbelkar, Sadaf A.; Majumdar, Anuradha S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Intestinal mucositis is a significant problem haunting clinicians for decades. One of the major reasons for its occurrence is high-dose chemotherapy. The study is aimed at investigating effect of intestinal mucositis on pharmacokinetics, organ distribution, and bioavailability of azathioprine (AZA) (6-mercaptopurine). Materials and Methods: Intestinal mucositis was induced with methotrexate (MTX) (2.5 mg/kg). The oral absorption of AZA and 6-mercaptopurine (metabolite) levels were determined in control and MTX-treated rats: ex vivo (noneverted sac technique) and in vivo (pharmacokinetics and organ-distribution) using high-performance liquid chromatography. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to evaluate peptide transporter expression on luminal membrane of small intestine. Results: Intestinal permeation of AZA into systemic circulation of rats was lower after MTX administration, widely found in intestinal segments of mucositis-induced rats leading to decline in systemic bioavailability of AZA. Immunohistochemistry findings indicated diminution of peptide transporter expression representing hampered absorption of drugs absorbed via this transporter. Conclusion: Study outcome has thrown light on altered fate of AZA when administered to individuals with mucositis which suggests modified drug therapy. These findings can further be investigated in different drug classes which might be administered concomitantly in mucositis and study outcome can be further confirmed in mucositis patients in clinical practice also. PMID:27298491

  5. Effect of reserpine on the histochemical and biochemical properties of rat intestinal mucin

    SciTech Connect

    Forstner, J.; Roomi, N.; Khorasani, R.; Kuhns, W.; Forstner, G. )

    1991-04-01

    Biochemical and histochemical parameters of intestinal mucins were examined in control and reserpine-treated rats. An assay for intestinal mucin sulfotransferase was developed and the activity shown to increase 3.4 times over control levels in rats given intraperitonal reserpine (0.5 mg/kg body wt) daily for 7 days. Histochemical staining of intestinal sections revealed an increase in sulfomucins in goblet cells of reserpine-treated rats. The effects were prominent as early as 1 day following injection, particularly in the distal third of the small intestine, and during the next 6 days these changes spread progressively to the middle and proximal thirds. After 3 days of treatment mucins were purified from each intestinal segment and compared to control mucins with respect to composition and (35S)NaSO{sub 4} incorporation. Although individual amino acid and carbohydrate molar ratios were unchanged, the total carbohydrate and sulfate content of mucins in treated animals was elevated (two to three times above control) in the middle and distal thirds of the intestine. In vivo ({sup 35}S)SO{sub 4} incorporation into these mucins was also proportionaltely elevated, and was targetted to O-linked oligosaccharide side chains. These findings are consistent with an action of reserpine causing an increased production of mucin which is enriched in glycoprotein components bearing sulfated oligosaccharide chains. The relevance of these findings to the production of hypersulfated and hyperglycosylated mucins in cystic fibrosis is discussed.

  6. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and substance P receptors in human colon and small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Korman, L.Y.; Sayadi, H.; Bass, B.; Moody, T.W.; Harmon, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and substance P are found in neurons in the lamina propria and submucosa and muscularis propria of human small intestine and colon. VIP receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase are present on epithelial, smooth muscle, and mononuclear cells. This study analyzes the distribution of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding and (/sup 125/I)substance P in human colon and small intestine using autoradiographic techniques. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was present in high density in the mucosal layer of colon and small intestine. (/sup 125/I)VIP binding was not significantly greater than nonspecific binding in smooth muscle layers or the lymphoid follicles. In contrast, (/sup 125/I)substance P binding was present in high density over the colonic muscle but was not present over the mucosal layer. In human colon cancer, (/sup 125/I)VIP grain density over the malignant tissue was only slightly higher than background. These autoradiographic studies of (/sup 125/I)VIP binding indicate that the highest density of VIP receptors was found in the small intestine and superficial colonic mucosa, whereas the density of substance P receptors was highest over the smooth muscle layers. These findings suggest a mismatch between immunochemical content of the peptide and autoradiographic density of the receptor.

  7. Fenofibrate reduces intestinal damage and improves intestinal recovery following intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat.

    PubMed

    Sukhotnik, I; Nissimov, N; Ben Shahar, Y; Moati, D; Bitterman, N; Pollak, Y; Berkowitz, D; Coran, A G; Bitterman, A

    2016-12-01

    Fenofibrate (FEN) is known as a nuclear receptor activator which regulates many pathophysiological processes, such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and leukocyte endothelium interactions. Recent studies have demonstrated an anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-ischemic role of FEN in the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in the kidney, liver, brain, and heart. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of FEN on intestinal recovery and enterocyte turnover after intestinal IR injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups: (1) sham rats underwent laparotomy, (2) sham-FEN rats underwent laparotomy and were treated with intraperitoneal (IP) FEN (20 mg/kg); (3) IR rats underwent occlusion of both the superior mesenteric artery and the portal vein for 30 min followed by 24 h of reperfusion, and (4) IR-FEN rats underwent IR and were treated with IP FEN immediately before abdominal closure. Intestinal structural changes, Park's injury score, enterocyte proliferation, and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 24 h following IR. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, p-ERK, and caspase-3 in the intestinal mucosa was determined using real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Treatment with FEN resulted in a significant decrease in Park's injury score in jejunum (32 %) and ileum (33 %) compared to IR animals. IR-FEN rats also demonstrated a significant increase in mucosal weight in jejunum (23 %) and ileum (22 %), mucosal DNA (38 %) and protein (65 %) in jejunum, villus height in jejunum (17 %) and ileum (21 %), and crypt depth in ileum (14 %) compared to IR animals. IR-FEN rats also experienced significant proliferation rates as well as lower apoptotic indices in jejunum and ileum which was accompanied with higher Bcl-2 levels compared to IR animals. Treatment with fenofibrate prevents intestinal mucosal damage and stimulates intestinal epithelial cell turnover following intestinal IR

  8. Nonlinear intestinal absorption kinetics of cefuroxime axetil in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Balaguer, N; Nacher, A; Casabo, V G; Merino, M

    1997-01-01

    Cefuroxime is commercially available for parenteral administration as a sodium salt and for oral administration as cefuroxime axetil, the 1-(acetoxy)ethyl ester of the drug. Cefuroxime axetil is a prodrug of cefuroxime and has little, if any, antibacterial activity until hydrolyzed in vivo to cefuroxime. In this study, the absorption of cefuroxime axetil in the small intestines of anesthetized rats was investigated in situ, by perfusion at four concentrations (11.8, 5, 118 and 200 microM). Oral absorption of cefuroxime axetil can apparently be described as a specialized transport mechanism which obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Parameters characterizing absorption of prodrug in free solution were obtained: maximum rate of absorption (Vmax) = 289.08 +/- 46.26 microM h-1, and Km = 162.77 +/- 31.17 microM. Cefuroxime axetil transport was significantly reduced in the presence of the enzymatic inhibitor sodium azide. On the other hand, the prodrug was metabolized in the gut wall through contact with membrane-bound enzymes in the brush border membrane before absorption occurred. This process reduces the prodrug fraction directly available for absorption. From a bioavailability point of view, therefore, the effects mentioned above can explain the variable and poor bioavailability following oral administration of cefuroxime axetil. Thus, future strategies in oral cefuroxime axetil absorption should focus on increasing the stability of the prodrug in the intestine by modifying the prodrug structure and/or targeting the compound to the absorption site. PMID:9021205

  9. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal bowel movement and is flushed away. Double-balloon enteroscopy (endoscopy) Regular upper endoscopy cannot look very ... goes forward a small distance, and then a balloon at its end is inflated to anchor it. ...

  10. Ischemic postconditioning provides protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Weiwei; Li, Sheng; Wang, Shanwei; Yan, Aili; Nie, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective role of ischemic postconditioning (IPOST) against intestine ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operation group (S), I/R group (I/R), ischemic preconditioning group (IPC), ischemic postconditioning group (IPOST). After reperfusion, small intestines were resected for histopathologic evaluations. To evaluate DNA fragmentation, resolving agarose gel electrophoresis was performed. To measure cellular apoptotic rates in intestine tissues, we performed TUNEL staining. To examine lipid peroxidation, production of superoxide radicals and tissue neutrophil infiltration, we tested the content of malondialdehyde and activities of superoxidase dismutase and myeloperoxidase in intestine tissues, respectively. Under light microscope, intestinal mucosal impairment in IPOST and IPC groups was found milder than that in I/R group (P < 0.05). The number of apoptosis cells in I/R group was significantly higher than that in IPOST and IPC groups (P < 0.05). The content of malondialdehyde and activity of myeloperoxidase were significantly reduced in IPOST group and IPC group compared with I/R group, but the activity of superoxidase dismutase in IPOST group and IPC group was enhanced compared with I/R group (P < 0.05). These results suggest that IPOST results in protection against intestine I/R injury, which may be related to reduced production of reactive oxygen species, enhanced activities of antioxidant systems and inhibited apoptosis of intestinal mucosal cells.

  11. Recombinant Thrombomodulin (Solulin) Ameliorates Early Intestinal Radiation Toxicity in a Preclinical Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Wang, Junru; Garg, Sarita; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal radiation toxicity occurs during and after abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Endothelial cells play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced intestinal damage. We demonstrated that the endothelial cell surface receptor thrombomodulin (TM), a protein with anticoagulant, antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, mitigates radiation-induced lethality in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether recombinant TM (Solulin) can protect the intestine from toxicity in a clinically relevant rat model. A 4 cm loop of rat small bowel was exposed to fractionated 5 Gy X radiation for 9 consecutive days. The animals were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle or Solulin (3 mg/kg/day or 10 mg/kg/day) for 27 days starting 4 days before irradiation. Early intestinal injury was assessed two weeks after irradiation by quantitative histology, morphometry, immunohistochemistry and luminol bioluminescence imaging. Solulin treatment significantly ameliorated intestinal radiation injury, made evident by a decrease in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) immunoreactivity, collagen-I deposition, radiation injury score (RIS) and intestinal serosal thickening. These findings indicate the need for further development of Solulin as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic agent to mitigate radiation-induced intestinal damage. PMID:27459702

  12. Absorption sites of orally administered drugs in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo

    2017-09-17

    In pharmacotherapy, drugs are mostly taken orally to be absorbed systemically from the small intestine, and some drugs are known to have preferential absorption sites in the small intestine. It would therefore be valuable to know the absorption sites of orally administered drugs and the influencing factors. Areas covered:In this review, the author summarizes the reported absorption sites of orally administered drugs, as well as, influencing factors and experimental techniques. Information on the main absorption sites and influencing factors can help to develop ideal drug delivery systems and more effective pharmacotherapies. Expert opinion: Various factors including: the solubility, lipophilicity, luminal concentration, pKa value, transporter substrate specificity, transporter expression, luminal fluid pH, gastrointestinal transit time, and intestinal metabolism determine the site-dependent intestinal absorption. However, most of the dissolved fraction of orally administered drugs including substrates for ABC and SLC transporters, except for some weakly basic drugs with higher pKa values, are considered to be absorbed sequentially from the proximal small intestine. Securing the solubility and stability of drugs prior to reaching to the main absorption sites and appropriate delivery rates of drugs at absorption sites are important goals for achieving effective pharmacotherapy.

  13. Role of intestinal cytochrome p450 enzymes in diclofenac-induced toxicity in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Qing-Yu

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of small intestinal (SI) cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes in the metabolic activation of diclofenac (DCF), a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and DCF-induced intestinal toxicity. DCF induces intestinal ulcers in humans and mice, but the underlying mechanisms, including the necessity for drug bioactivation in the target tissues and the sources and identities of reactive intermediates, are not fully understood. We found that the number of DCF-induced (at 50 mg/kg p.o.) intestinal ulcers was significantly smaller in an intestinal epithelium (IE)-specific P450 reductase (CPR) knockout (IE-Cpr-null) mouse model, which has little P450 activity in the IE, than in wild-type (WT) mice, determined at 14 h after DCF administration. The involvement of intestinal P450 enzymes was confirmed by large reductions (>80-90%) in the rates of in vitro formation, in SI microsomal reactions, of hydroxylated DCF metabolites and reactive intermediates, trapped as DCF-glutathione (GSH) conjugates, in the IE-Cpr-null, compared with WT mice. The SI levels of DCF-GSH conjugates (at 4 h after dosing) and DCF-protein adducts (at 14 h after dosing) were significantly lower in IE-Cpr-null than in WT mice. In additional experiments, we found that pretreatment of mice with grapefruit juice, which is known to inhibit SI P450 activity, ameliorated DCF-induced intestinal toxicity in WT mice. Our results not only strongly support the notion that SI P450 enzymes play an important role in DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, but also illustrate the possibility of preventing DCF-induced intestinal toxicity through dietary intervention.

  14. Transfer across mucosal epithelium, tissue content and metabolic fate of 125I-(ipodate-sodium) on isolated everted segments of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Komp, B; Forth, W

    1980-04-01

    1. Transfer and tissue content of 125I-radioactivity was measured after administration of 125I-(ipodate-sodium) to everted rat jejunal segments. 2. After having administered 10(-5) M 125I-(ipodate-sodium) on both sides of the everted sacs the S/M ratio of the concentration of 125I-radioactivity was 1.5 in jejunal segments and 2.3 in ileal segments. The tissue content was nearly equal for both segments. According to the apparent partition coefficient for ipodate-sodium at pH 7, the 125I-radioactivity is accumulated in the tissue about 10-fold. 3. Lowering of the temperature of the incubation medium from 37 degrees C to 15 degrees C prevents the building up of a concentration gradient between the serosal and the mucosal side on either jejunal and ileal segments whereas the tissue content of 125I-radioactivity was nearly unchanged. 4. With increasing concentrations (1.6--10(-6)--9.6-10(-4) M) of 125I-(ipodate-sodium) administered on the mucosal side the transfer and the tissue content of 125I-radioactivity were decreased. This appears to be a toxic effect since in jejunal segments also the S/M ratio for the concentration of glucose decreases. 5. The analysis of the 125I-radioactivity in the serosal fluid of jejunal segments showed that the bulk of the 125I-radioactivity was present in the aqueous phase and only 33% as the unchanged ipodate-sodium in the organic phase. 10% of the 125I-radioactivity must be attributed to inorganic iodine. The concentration of 125I-(ipodate-sodium) administered in the mucosal fluid only was 3.2-10(-6) M. At lower temperature (7 degrees C) the bulk of the 125I-radioactivity in the serosal fluid was found in the organic phase, i.e. as unchanged ipodate-sodium. 6. After the incubation of the aqueous phase with beta-glucuronidase or NaOH about 97% of the 125I-radioactivity could be extracted into the organic phase. This means that the bulk of the 125I-radioactivity in the aqueous phase is present as a conjugate, e.g. ester glucuronide of the

  15. Modulation of rat intestinal nuclear factor NF-kappaB by gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Wapnir, Raul A; Sherry, Barbara; Codipilly, Champa N; Goodwin, Leslie O; Vancurova, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that in an animal model of cathartic-induce intestinal dysfunction the proabsorptive effects of gum arabic (GA) could be associated with modulation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and with reduction of the inflammatory response caused by cathartics, as evidenced by intestinal mucosa cytokine production and gene expression. Juvenile male rats were given a phenolphthalein-magnesium citrate solution for 6 days, by itself or supplemented with either 10 or 20 g L(-1) GA, as a sole source of fluid. The controls given were tap water alone or with added 20 g L(-1) GA. The animals were euthanized and small-intestinal mucosa nuclear fractions and RNA were isolated. NF-kappaB p65 activity was highest after administration of cathartics, lowest in controls, and intermediate in GA-treated rats. Mucosal IL-1beta was overexpressed in tissues from cathartic-treated rats and from rats given high-GA solutions. Gene-array analysis revealed a complex pattern of gene regulation by cathartics which selectively upregulated several subfamilies of cytochrome P-450 family 2 genes. Co-administration of GA did not block this effect. These findings suggest that local anti-inflammatory effects on the small intestine could be obtained by administration of a nonabsorbable proteoglycan such as GA.

  16. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against acrylamide toxicity in liver and small and large intestine tissues.

    PubMed

    Altinoz, E; Turkoz, Y; Vardi, N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine against acrylamide toxicity in liver and small and large intestine tissues in rats.The rats were divided into four groups. Acrylamide administration increased MDA levels in all tissues significantly (p < 0.05). But acrylamide+NAC administration decreased MDA levels significantly as compared to the acrylamide group, and lowered it to a level close to the control group values (p < 0.05). GSH levels in liver and small intestine tissues reduced significantly in the acrylamide group (p < 0.05). But acrylamide+NAC administration increased GSH levels significantly in all tissues. Whereas GST activity decreased significantly in the acrylamide group in liver and small intestine tissues as compared to the other groups (p < 0.05), the GST activity increased significantly in the acrylamide+NAC group in all tissues as compared to the acrylamide group (p < 0.05). Liver histopathology showed that the liver epithelial cells were damaged significantly in the acrylamide group. Small intestine histopathology showed that the intestinal villous epithelial cells were damaged significantly in the acrylamide group.Our results indicate that a high level of acrylamide causes oxidative damage in liver and small and large intestine tissues, while N-acetylcysteine administration in a pharmacological dose shows to have an antioxidant effect in preventing this damage (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 66).

  17. Peptide hydrolase activities of the mucosa of human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, William D.; Laster, Leonard

    1969-01-01

    Few studies have been published on peptide hydrolase activities of human small intestine mucosa. We developed methods to screen tissue extracts for such enzymes and to quantitate hydrolase activities for dipeptides containing the aromatic amino acid L-phenylalanine. The screening procedure indicated glycyl-L-proline hydrolase activity was reduced in biopsy specimens from patients with flattened intestinal mucosa. To explore this further, we established optimal assay conditions for hydrolase activities (a) glycyl-L-proline, (b) L-phenylalanyl-L-proline, (c) L-alanyl-L-phenylalanine, and (d) L-phenylalanylglycine. Biopsy specimens from patients with various intestinal disorders, but without flattened mucosa, and from three patients with flattened mucosa, showed a disproportionate reduction in activities (a) and (b), with the reduction being significantly more marked in the latter patients. We suggest that intestinal imidopeptide hydrolase activities, such as (a) and (b), are sensitive to changes in intestinal disease generally, particularly to the altered physiology associated with flattening of the mucosa, and are secondary to, rather than a cause of, the intestinal pathology. Our finding that intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity tended to parallel imidopeptide hydrolase activity, and that activity (a) was partially localized to the particulate fraction of mucosal homogenate, suggested that imidopeptide hydrolase activities may be located in the microvilli of the intestinal epithelium and that, like alkaline phosphatase activity, they may be reduced in flattened mucosae, in part at least because of the pathologic changes in the microvilli. In our studies of control subjects we did not detect peptide hydrolase activity deficiency analogous to asymptomatic disaccharidase deficiency. Images PMID:5765024

  18. Giant primary angiosarcoma of the small intestine showing severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mizuna; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Domen, Hiromitsu; Yamabuki, Takumi; Komuro, Kazuteru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Hirano, Satoshi; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-11-21

    Primary malignant tumors of the small intestine are rare, comprising less than 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. An 85-year-old woman was admitted with fever of 40 °C and marked abdominal distension. Her medical history was unremarkable, but blood examination showed elevated inflammatory markers. Abdominal computed tomography showed a giant tumor with central necrosis, extending from the epigastrium to the pelvic cavity. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine communicating with the gastrointestinal tract or with superimposed infection was suspected. Because no improvement occurred in response to antibiotics, surgery was performed. Laparotomy revealed giant hemorrhagic tumor adherent to the small intestine and occupying the peritoneal cavity. The giant tumor was a solid tumor weighing 3490 g, measuring 24 cm × 17.5 cm × 18 cm and showing marked necrosis. Histologically, the tumor comprised spindle-shaped cells with anaplastic large nuclei. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for vimentin, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen, but negative for c-kit and CD34. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed. Although no postoperative complications occurred, the patient experienced enlargement of multiple metastatic tumors in the abdominal cavity and died 42 d postoperatively. The prognosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma is very poor, even after volume-reducing palliative surgery.

  19. Small intestinal model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose a small intestine model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy. The electrical stimulus can cause contraction of the small intestine and propel the capsule along the lumen. The proposed model considered the drag and friction from the small intestine using a thin walled model and Stokes' drag equation. Further, contraction force from the small intestine was modeled by using regression analysis. From the proposed model, the acceleration and velocity of various exterior shapes of capsule were calculated, and two exterior shapes of capsules were proposed based on the internal volume of the capsules. The proposed capsules were fabricated and animal experiments were conducted. One of the proposed capsules showed an average (SD) velocity in forward direction of 2.91 ± 0.99 mm/s and 2.23 ± 0.78 mm/s in the backward direction, which was 5.2 times faster than that obtained in previous research. The proposed model can predict locomotion of the capsule based on various exterior shapes of the capsule. PMID:22177218

  20. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon

    PubMed Central

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P.; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein–coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. PMID:26551552

  1. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    PubMed

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

  2. Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced oleoylethanolamide signaling in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jin; Dipatrizio, Nicholas V; Guijarro, Ana; Schwartz, Gary J; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele

    2011-04-13

    Ingestion of dietary fat stimulates production of the small-intestinal satiety factors oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and N-palmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NPPE), which reduce food intake through a combination of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) actions. Previous studies have shown that sympathetic innervation of the gut is necessary for duodenal infusions of fat to induce satiety, suggesting that sympathetic activity may engage small-intestinal satiety signals such as OEA and NPPE. In the present study, we show that surgical resection of the sympathetic celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex, which sends projections to the upper gut, abolishes feeding-induced OEA production in rat small-intestinal cells. These effects are accounted for by suppression of OEA biosynthesis, and are mimicked by administration of the selective β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist ICI-118,551. We further show that sympathetic ganglionectomy or pharmacological blockade of β2-adrenergic receptors prevents NPPE release into the circulation. In addition, sympathetic ganglionectomy increases meal frequency and lowers satiety ratio, and these effects are corrected by pharmacological administration of OEA. The results suggest that sympathetic activity controls fat-induced satiety by enabling the coordinated production of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) satiety signals in the small intestine.

  3. Sympathetic activity controls fat-induced OEA signaling in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jin; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Guijarro, Ana; Schwartz, Gary J; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of dietary fat stimulates production of the small-intestinal satiety factors oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and N-palmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (NPPE), which reduce food intake through a combination of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) actions. Previous studies have shown that sympathetic innervation of the gut is necessary for duodenal infusions of fat to induce satiety, suggesting that sympathetic activity may engage small-intestinal satiety signals such as OEA and NPPE. In the present study, we show that surgical resection of the sympathetic celiac superior mesenteric ganglion, which sends projections to the upper gut, abolishes feeding-induced OEA production in rat small-intestinal cells. These effects are accounted for by suppression of OEA biosynthesis, and are mimicked by administration of the selective β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, ICI-118,551. We further show that sympathetic ganglionectomy or pharmacological blockade of β2-adrenergic receptors prevents NPPE release into the circulation. In addition, sympathetic ganglionectomy increases meal frequency and lowers satiety ratio, and these effects are corrected by pharmacological administration of OEA. The results suggest that sympathetic activity controls fat-induced satiety by enabling the coordinated production of local (OEA) and systemic (NPPE) satiety signals in the small intestine. PMID:21490214

  4. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  5. Can a Small Intestine Segment Be an Alternative Biological Conduit for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration?

    PubMed

    Arda, Mehmet S; Koçman, Emre A; Özkara, Emre; Söztutar, Erdem; Özatik, Orhan; Köse, Aydan; Çetin, Cengiz

    2017-05-05

    Autologous nerve grafts are used to bridge peripheral nerve defects. Limited sources and donor site morbidity are the major problems with peripheral nerve grafts. Although various types of autologous grafts such as arteries, veins and muscles have been recommended, an ideal conduit has not yet been described. To investigate the effectiveness of a small intestinal conduit for peripheral nerve defects. Animal experimentation. Twenty-one rats were divided into three groups (n=7). Following anaesthesia, sciatic nerve exploration was performed in the Sham group. The 10 mm nerve gap was bridged with a 15 mm ileal segment in the small intestinal conduit group and the defect was replaced with orthotopic nerve in autologous nerve graft group. The functional recovery was tested monthly by walking-track analysis and the sciatic functional index. Histological evaluation was performed on the 12th week. Sciatic functional index tests are better in autologous nerve graft group (-55.09±6.35); however, during follow-up, progress in sciatic functional index was demonstrated, along with axonal regeneration and innervation of target muscles in the small intestinal conduit group (-76.36±12.08) (p<0.05). In histologic sections, distinctive sciatic nerve regeneration was examined in the small intestinal conduit group. The expression of S-100 and neurofilament was observed in small intestinal conduit group but was less organised than in the autologous nerve graft group. Although the counted number (7459.79±1833.50 vs. 4226.51±1063.06 mm2), measured diameter [2.19 (2.15-2.88) vs. 1.74 (1.50-2.09) µm] and myelin sheath thickness [1.18 (1.09-1.44) vs. 0.66 (0.40-1.07) µm] of axons is significantly high in the middle sections of autologous nerve graft compared to the small intestinal conduit group, respectively (p<0.05), the peripheral nerve regeneration was also observed in the small intestinal conduit group. Small intestinal conduit should not be considered as an alternative to

  6. Spontaneous free perforation of the small intestine in adults

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous free perforation of the small intestine is uncommon, especially if there is no prior history of visceral trauma. However, free, even recurrent, perforation may complicate a defined and established clinical disorder, such as Crohn’s disease. In addition, free perforation may be the initial clinical presentation of an occult intestinal disorder, such as a lymphoma complicating celiac disease, causing diffuse peritonitis and an acute abdomen. Initial diagnosis of the precise cause may be difficult, but now has been aided by computerized tomographic imaging. The site of perforation may be helpful in defining a cause (e.g., ileal perforation in Crohn’s disease, jejunal perforation in celiac disease, complicated by lymphoma or collagenous sprue). Urgent surgical intervention, however, is usually required for precise diagnosis and treatment. During evaluation, an expanding list of other possible causes should be considered, even after surgery, as subsequent management may be affected. Free perforation may not only complicate an established intestinal disorder, but also a new acute process (e.g., caused by different infectious agents) or a longstanding and unrecognized disorder (e.g., congenital, metabolic and vascular causes). Moreover, new endoscopic therapeutic and medical therapies, including use of emerging novel biological agents, have been complicated by intestinal perforation. Recent studies also support the hypothesis that perforation of the small intestine may be genetically-based with different mutations causing altered connective tissue structure, synthesis and repair. PMID:25110427

  7. Functional disorders of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kellow, J E; Bennett, E

    1996-10-01

    Sensorimotor disturbances of the small bowel are implicated increasingly in the pathogenesis of the functional gastrointestinal disorders. In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), alterations in both interdigestive and postprandial motility have been described, for example, the specific peristaltic contractions that are normally present in the ileum appear to occur more frequently and to be associated with abdominal pain in some patients. The latter finding is likely to be related to the selective mechanoreceptor hypersensitivity that has been demonstrated in the small bowel of IBS patients. The level of this afferent dysfunction has, however, not been established; some evidence suggests that personality traits, which predispose to a more severe and prolonged sympathetic response to stressors, may hasten the development of such sensorimotor disturbances.

  8. Acute ethanol administration inhibits Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway in rat intestinal epithelia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Zhao, Ji; Li, Jing; Wang, Haiying; Tang, Chengwei

    2013-05-01

    Excess alcohol intake, as in binge drinking, increases susceptibility to microbial pathogens. Alcohol impairs macrophage function by suppression of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway. This study investigated the effects of acute ethanol intake on the TLR4 pathway in rat intestinal epithelia, which usually encounters luminal antigens at first and participates in the development of intestinal immunity. Twenty Wistar rats were randomly assigned to an ethanol group given ethanol as a 25% (v/v) solution in water at 7.5 g/kg, or a control group given saline, by oral gavage daily for 3 days. The epithelial histology and ultrastructure, the intestinal microflora, peripheral and portal venous plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, and somatostatin (SST) levels in the peripheral plasma and small intestine were evaluated. Somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), TLR4, TANK binding kinase-1 (TBK1), activated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the intestinal mucosa were assayed. LPS responsiveness with or without SST pretreatment was assayed in vitro by quantification of TLR4, TBK1, activated NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia. Mucosal damage was observed in the ethanol group by light and electron microscopy. Escherichia coli cultures were unchanged in rat intestine of the ethanol group compared with controls, but lactobacilli cultures were reduced (p < 0.05). LPS levels increased in peripheral and portal venous plasma (p < 0.05), but mucosal TLR4, TBK1, nuclear NF-κB, IFN-γ and TNF-α were unchanged in the ethanol group. LPS treatment in vitro up-regulated the level of TLR4, TBK1 and nuclear NF-κB as well as the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α in isolated intestinal epithelia in the control (p < 0.05), but not the ethanol group. The stimulatory effects of LPS on intestinal epithelia isolated from the control group were significantly inhibited by SST pretreatment (p < 0.05). The

  9. [Metabolism of paeoniflorin by rat intestinal flora in vitro].

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhong-Cheng; Yang, Nan; Hou, Xue-Feng; Wang, Ai-Dong; Feng, Liang; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2016-10-01

    In order to clarify the effect of intestinal flora on the absorption and metabolism of paeoniflorin in vivo, the metabolism of paeoniflorin by rat intestinal flora was studied under the in vitro anaerobic condition. Paeoniflorin was incubated with rat anaerobic intestinal flora for 48 h, and UPLC was used to detect the changes of paeoniflorin at different incubation time points under the following chromatographic conditions:WelchromTM C₁₈ chromatographic column (4.6 mm×100 mm, 5 μm), with 0.1% formic acid(A)-acetonitrile(B) as the mobile phase for gradient elution. The flow rate was 0.4 mL•min⁻¹, and column temperature was 30 ℃. UPLC-Q-TOF-MS with positive ion mode(ESI ion source) was applied to investigate the structural characterization of metabolic products. The structures of the metabolites were identified by accurate molecular weight, TOF-MS/MS fragmentation information, combined with retention time and literature data review, and the intestinal metabolic rules were then analyzed. After incubation for 24 h, the paeoniflorin was metabolized completely, and the resulting metabolites(albiflorin, albiflorinaglycone, deacylate albiflorin, deacylate albiflorin aglycone and paeonilactone-B) were detected in rat intestinal flora. The metabolic pathway analysis showed that the isolated rat intestinal flora first transformed peoniflorin into albiflorin, and then further metabolized by glucose removal, phenyl group removal, or four-membered ring pyrolysis and rearrangement. Paeoniflorin was gradually transformed into more hydrophobic metabolites with smaller molecular mass, which were better absorbed by the intestinal tract. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  10. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  11. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Is Protective to the Preterm Rat Pup Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Liedel, Jennifer L.; Welak, Scott R.; Fredrich, Katherine; Biesterveld, Ben E.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Gourlay, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common surgical emergency in neonates, with a mortality rate between 10 and 50%. The onset of necrotizing enterocolitis is highly variable and associated with numerous risk factors. Prior research has shown enteral supplementation with intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) decreases the severity of NEC. The aim of this study is to investigate whether IAP is protective to the preterm intestine in the presence of formula feeding and in the absence of NEC. Methods Preterm rat pups were fed formula with or without supplementation with IAP, and intestine was obtained on day of life 3 for analysis of IAP activity, mRNA expression of TNF-a, IL-6 and iNOS and permeability and cytokine expression after LPS. exposure. Results There was no difference in the absolute and intestine specific alkaline phosphatase activity in both groups. Rat pups fed IAP had decreased mRNA expression of the inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6 and iNOS. Pups supplemented with IAP had decreased permeability and inflammatory cytokine expression after exposure to LPS ex vivo when compared to formula fed controls. Conclusions Our results support that IAP is beneficial to preterm intestine and decreases intestinal injury and inflammation caused by LPS. PMID:24888842

  12. Characterization of the diffuse mucosal associated lymphoid tissue of feline small intestine.

    PubMed

    Roccabianca, P; Woo, J C; Moore, P F

    2000-06-30

    Characterization of the feline intestinal mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) will facilitate investigation of intestinal disease in the cat and promote the cat as an animal model for a range of human diseases which involve the intestinal lymphoid tissue. This includes inflammatory bowel disease, viral and non-viral associated intestinal lymphomas and immunodeficiency associated syndromes. Morphologic and phenotypic characterization of the normal small intestinal diffuse MALT in 22 SPF cats was performed using flow cytometry and cytology on isolated intestinal leukocytes from the intra-epithelial and lamina proprial compartments, as well as immunohistology on tissues from the feline duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The intra-epithelial compartment (IEC) was dominated by lymphocytes (>85%) which frequently contained intracytoplasmic granules. The most striking findings in the IEC were the elevated percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (40%), presumed to express CD8 alpha alpha chains, and CD4-/CD8- (double negative) lymphocytes (44%), and the consistent presence of a minor subpopulation of CD3+/CD11d+ IELs (6%). Small percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (10%) were observed such that the IEL CD4:CD8 ratio (0.25) was low. The LPC also contained a majority of T cells and few plasma cells. However, this compartment had reduced percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (28%) and increased percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (27%) relative to the IEC. However, the LPL CD4:CD8 ratio (1.0) remained low compared with the ratio in peripheral blood. In feline MALT, MHC class II expression was lower than in other peripheral lymphoid compartments. The results of this study provide important reference values for future investigations involving feline intestinal lymphocytes and demonstrates that the leukocyte distribution and phenotypic characteristics of the feline diffuse MALT appear largely similar to the murine, rat and human counterparts.

  13. Quantitation of small intestinal permeability during normal human drug absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the quantitative relationship between a drug’s physical chemical properties and its rate of intestinal absorption (QSAR) is critical for selecting candidate drugs. Because of limited experimental human small intestinal permeability data, approximate surrogates such as the fraction absorbed or Caco-2 permeability are used, both of which have limitations. Methods Given the blood concentration following an oral and intravenous dose, the time course of intestinal absorption in humans was determined by deconvolution and related to the intestinal permeability by the use of a new 3 parameter model function (“Averaged Model” (AM)). The theoretical validity of this AM model was evaluated by comparing it to the standard diffusion-convection model (DC). This analysis was applied to 90 drugs using previously published data. Only drugs that were administered in oral solution form to fasting subjects were considered so that the rate of gastric emptying was approximately known. All the calculations are carried out using the freely available routine PKQuest Java (http://www.pkquest.com) which has an easy to use, simple interface. Results Theoretically, the AM permeability provides an accurate estimate of the intestinal DC permeability for solutes whose absorption ranges from 1% to 99%. The experimental human AM permeabilities determined by deconvolution are similar to those determined by direct human jejunal perfusion. The small intestinal pH varies with position and the results are interpreted in terms of the pH dependent octanol partition. The permeability versus partition relations are presented separately for the uncharged, basic, acidic and charged solutes. The small uncharged solutes caffeine, acetaminophen and antipyrine have very high permeabilities (about 20 x 10-4 cm/sec) corresponding to an unstirred layer of only 45 μm. The weak acid aspirin also has a large AM permeability despite its low octanol partition at pH 7.4, suggesting

  14. Breath hydrogen concentration and small intestinal malabsorption in calves.

    PubMed

    Holland, R E; Herdt, T H; Refsal, K R

    1986-09-01

    Breath hydrogen concentrations were measured to assess intestinal carbohydrate malabsorption in preruminating calves. Oral administration of 1.25 g of lactulose (a nonabsorbable carbohydrate)/kg to calves produced breath hydrogen concentrations significantly (P less than 0.001) higher than values determined after calves were fed milk and before the treatment was given. This indicates that, in the calf, fermentation of nonabsorbed carbohydrates results in increased breath hydrogen values. To induce small intestinal malabsorption, chloramphenicol was administered orally at 50 mg/kg, 2 times a day, to 5 calves for 3 days. Before therapy was started, each calf was fitted with a duodenal cannula to facilitate collection of intestinal mucosal biopsy samples during treatment. Chloramphenicol therapy significantly (P less than 0.001) increased breath hydrogen concentrations from those values measured after calves were fed milk alone. Concurrently, chloramphenicol administration significantly decreased intestinal villous length (P less than 0.001) and D-xylose absorption (P less than 0.05), compared with those values before treatment was given. These results demonstrate that decreased intestinal absorptive capacity is associated with an increase in breath hydrogen concentrations and that breath hydrogen may be useful in evaluating malabsorption in calves with naturally occurring enteric disease.

  15. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  16. Digestion modeling in the small intestine: impact of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Taghipoor, M; Barles, G; Georgelin, C; Licois, J R; Lescoat, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the modeling of the digestion in the small intestine is developed by investigating specifically the effects of dietary fiber. As our previous model, this new version takes into account the three main phenomena of digestion: transit of the bolus, degradation of feedstuffs and absorption through the intestinal wall. However the two main physiochemical characteristics of dietary fiber, namely viscosity and water holding capacity, lead us to substantially modify our initial model by emphasizing the role of water and its intricated dynamics with dry matter in the bolus. Various numerical simulations given by this new model are qualitatively in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fiber on the velocity of bolus and on its degradation all along the small intestine. These simulations reproduce the negative effect of soluble dietary fiber on digestion as it has been experimentally observed. Although, this model is generic and contains a large number of parameters but, to the best of our knowledge, it is among the first qualitative dynamical models of fiber influence on intestinal digestion.

  17. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing (/sup 3/H)-biotin and (/sup 14/C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 ..mu..M biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host.

  18. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Haque, Rashidul; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Alam, Masud; Lu, Miao; Kabir, Mamun; Kakon, Shahria Hafiz; Islam, Bushra Zarin; Afreen, Sajia; Musa, Abu; Khan, Shaila Sharmeen; Colgate, E Ross; Carmolli, Marya P; Ma, Jennie Z; Petri, William A

    2016-01-12

    Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO's pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO's association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-year-olds monitored since birth from an impoverished neighborhood. SIBO was diagnosed via glucose hydrogen breath testing, with a cutoff of a 12-ppm increase over baseline used for SIBO positivity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate SIBO predictors. Differences in concomitant inflammation and permeability between SIBO-positive and -negative children were compared with multiple comparison adjustment. A total of 16.7% (15/90) of the children had SIBO. The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60) and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62). Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02) and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004) were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups. These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation. A total of 165 million children worldwide are considered stunted, which is associated with increased risk of death prior to age 5 years and cognitive disability. Stunting has, in part, been attributed to

  19. Ultrasonographic examination of the small intestine, large intestine and greater omentum in 30 Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Steininger, K; Tschuor, A; Hässig, M

    2011-09-01

    The small and large intestine of 30 healthy Saanen goats were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0 MHz-linear transducer. The goats were examined on the right side, from the eighth rib to the caudal aspect of the flank. The small and large intestine could be easily differentiated. The descending duodenum could be imaged in 19 goats, and the jejunum and ileum seen in all goats. The jejunum and ileum were most often seen in cross-section and rarely in longitudinal section in the ventral region of the right flank. The intestinal contents were usually homogenously echoic, and active motility was observed in all the goats. The diameter of the small intestine was 0.8-2.7 cm (1.6 [0.33] cm). The spiral ansa of the colon was imaged in all the goats, and in 21 the caecum was also seen. Both these sections of large intestine were most commonly seen in the dorsal region of the right flank. The spiral ansa of the colon was easily identified by its spiral arrangement of centripetal and centrifugal gyri, which had a garland-like appearance. Because of intraluminal gas, only the wall of the colon closest to the transducer could be imaged. The diameter of the spiral colon ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 cm (1.1 [0.24] cm). Usually only the wall of the caecum closest to the transducer could be imaged and it appeared as a thick, echoic, slightly undulating line. The greater omentum could be seen in all the goats.

  20. [Segmental ischemic lesions of the mesenteric small intestine].

    PubMed

    Maurano, A; Cirillo, L C; de Lutio di Castelguidone, E; Fondacaro, R

    1987-01-01

    Segmental ischemic disease consists of segmental infarctions and ischemic stenoses. Vasculitis (LES, polyarteritis nodosa, Schönlein-Henoch syndrome), thrombosis, arteriosclerotic changes, mechanical obstructions (adhesions, hernia, volvulus, traumas), hemorrhagic disorders are the most common causes of these intestinal lesions. The authors report their experience achieved during three years on 428 small bowel examinations; among these, 197 were double contrast enemas. Ten patients showed roentgenographic features referred to vascular diseases: 1 LES, 1 Schönlein-Henoch syndrome, 3 polyarteritis nodosa, 5 spontaneous hemorrhagic disorders or due to treatment with anticoagulants. The authors, after a review of the radiological findings, emphasize the high sensitivity and low specificity of double contrast small bowel enema. Furthermore they underline the usefulness of this method in demonstrating and monitoring intestinal pathologic changes.

  1. Transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, S S; Hardy, J G; Fara, J W

    1986-01-01

    The gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms has been measured in 201 studies in normal subjects using gamma scintigraphy. Solutions, small pellets, and single units (matrix tablets and osmotic pumps) were administered with different amounts of food in the stomach, ranging from fasted state to heavy breakfast. Gastric emptying was affected by the nature of the dosage form and the presence of food in the stomach. Solutions and pellets were emptied even when the stomach was in the digestive mode, while single units were retained for long periods of time, depending on the size of the meal. In contrast, measured intestinal transit times were independent of the dosage form and fed state. The small intestinal transit time of about three hours (mean +/- 1 h SEM) has implications for the design of dosage forms for the sustained release of drugs in specific positions in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3732895

  2. Cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor and studies of its expression in intestinal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Puppi, M.; Henning, S.J.

    1995-05-01

    A long-term goal of our laboratory is to establish a rat model to study the feasibility of using the intestinal tract as a site for somatic gene therapy. As a step toward that goal, the current study reports the cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor (EcoR) cDNA and the study of various aspects of its expression in the intestinal cDNA library with mouse EcoR cDNA. A clone of approximately 7 kb, designated MP10, was obtained. Partial sequencing of MP10 from the 5{prime} end revealed a level of similarity of 92% compared with mouse EcoR. The presence of a 5{prime} untranslated region and a 3{prime} poly(A)tract, together with the overall size of the cDNA, suggest that is very close to being a full-length cDNA for this large transcript. Northern blots with MP10 showed an RNA of approximately 7.9 kb present along the entire length of the small intestine and somewhat less abundant in the colon. Developmental studies showed high levels of EcoR in fetal rat intestine, a decline in the early postnatal period, then a gradual rise to adulthood. Caco-2 cells were used to assess the expression of EcoR in proliferating compared with differentiated intestinal epithelial cells. EcoR mRNA was found to be very much more abundant in nondifferentiated cells and declined to low levels as the cells underwent spontaneous differentiation. These patterns of EcoR expression indicate that ecotropic retroviruses should be suitable vectors with which to attempt gene transfer into the intestinal epithelium. In addition, since the endogenous role of EcoR is as the y{sup +} cationic amino acid transporter, these data have significance for understanding patterns of amino acid transport in the intestinal epithelium. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Hormone induced changes in lactase glycosylation in developing rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-11-01

    Lactase exists in both soluble and membrane-bound forms in suckling rat intestine. The distribution of lactase and its glycosylated isoforms in response to thyroxine or cortisone administration has been studied in suckling rats. 75% of lactase activity was detected, associated with brush borders, compared to 24% in the soluble fraction of 8-day-old rats. Thyroxine treatment enhanced soluble lactase activity to 34%, whereas particulate fraction was reduced to 67% compared to controls. Cortisone administration reduced soluble lactase activity from 24% in controls to 12% with a concomitant increase in membrane-bound activity to 89%. Western blot analysis revealed lactase signal, corresponding to 220 kDa in both the soluble and membrane fractions, which corroborated the enzyme activity data. The elution pattern of papain solubilized lactase from agarose-Wheat Germ agglutinin, or Concanavalin A or Jacalin agglutinin columns was different in the suckling and adult rat intestines. Also the elution profile of lactase activity from agarose-lectin columns was modulated in cortisone, thyroxine, and insulin injected pups, which suggests differences in glycosylated isoforms of lactase under these conditions. These findings suggest the role of these hormones in inducing changes in lactase glycosylation during postnatal development of intestine, which may contribute to adult-type hypolactasia in rats.

  4. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  5. Small intestinal mucosal abnormalities in post-perinatal deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Variend, S; Sunderland, R

    1984-01-01

    Examination of small intestinal mucosa from cases of post-perinatal death in Sheffield between September 1980 and September 1981 showed mucosal changes before death in 18 of 78 cases (20%). There was no significant difference in prevalence between explained and unexplained deaths, nor was there any positive association with viral isolation from the small intestine. The lesion was much more common in males than females and showed a strong association with bottle feeding--no infant wholly breast fed showed an enteropathy. There was a low incidence of symptoms referrable to the gastrointestinal tract among affected infants, and no appreciable evidence of failure to thrive, as reflected by the postmortem body weight, was present. Mucosal changes of the small intestine in cases of sudden infant death syndrome have previously been reported and attributed to heatstroke. Although the finding of similar lesions in infants who died explicably does not appear to support this view, overheating is difficult to exclude as most of the explained deaths with a mucosal lesion occurred at home. Images PMID:6699191

  6. Adherence targets of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in human small intestines.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Yokota, T

    1989-01-01

    Formalin-fixed human small intestinal mucosa with mucus coating, villi, and lymphoid follicle epithelium at the mucosal surface was used to test the adherence sites of clinically isolated (Kanagawa phenomenon-positive) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 3 h at 37 degrees C possessed various levels of cell-associated hemagglutinins (HAs) which were detected with human or guinea pig erythrocytes. The observed adherence abilities of V. parahaemolyticus strains to human small intestinal mucosa correlated roughly with the HA levels of the strains. Under the test conditions, ileal lymphoid follicle epithelium (especially M cells) provided the best adherence target for V. parahaemolyticus. Adherence to villus absorptive cells or to mucus coating was observed at lower levels. In addition, all 3-h-grown V. parahaemolyticus strains tested produced high levels of HAs as detected with rabbit erythrocytes. The strains were all strikingly motile. In contrast, V. parahaemolyticus strains grown on CFA agar (supplemented with 3% NaCl) for ca. 20 h at 37 degrees C had much lower levels of HAs, adherence abilities, and motility. In contrast to the above observations, piliation of V. parahaemolyticus was more extensive at ca. 20 h of incubation at 37 degrees C than at ca. 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. The remarkable ability of V. parahaemolyticus to adhere to lymphoid follicle epithelium was also confirmed by using rabbit small intestinal mucosa. Images PMID:2568344

  7. Histochemical features of the Muscovy duck small intestine during development.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bao An; Pirone, Andrea; Lenzi, Carla; Xiaoming, Nie; Baglini, Alessandro; Romboli, Isabella

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrated for the first time the distribution and morphology of argyrophil and of goblet cells in the mucosa of the small intestine of the Muscovy duck during development using the Grimelius silver staining and alcian blue/periodic acid-Schiff (AB/PAS) staining technique. The argyrophil cells distribution was variable over the length of the small intestine from embryonic day 24 (24E) to post-hatching day 13 (13d). In the villi most argyrophil cells belonged to the open-type, while in the crypts they belonged to the closed-type. In the duodenum the density of argyrophil cells was highest at hatching, while in the jejunum and in the ileum the highest density value was at hatching and 13d. AB/PAS-positive goblet cells appeared on the villi and crypts of the duodenum and jejunum at 30E, and in the ileum at hatching. The density of AB/PAS-positive cells was the highest in the three segments at hatching. The AB-positive cells, compared with the PAS-positive cells, predominated in villi and crypts of the three segments, moreover the rate of AB-positive cells to PAS-positive cells significantly decreased from 30E to 9d. An increase in argyrophil and goblet cells number during the later incubation and at hatching, could indicate the small intestine in that period is being prepared to face a new diet.

  8. Prophylactic Ozone Administration Reduces Intestinal Mucosa Injury Induced by Intestinal Ischemia-Reperfusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Ozkan; Yetisir, Fahri; Sarer, A. Ebru Salman; Zeybek, N. Dilara; Onal, C. Oztug; Yurekli, Banu; Celik, H. Tugrul; Sirma, Ayse; Kılıc, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with mucosal damage and has a high rate of mortality. Various beneficial effects of ozone have been shown. The aim of the present study was to show the effects of ozone in ischemia reperfusion model in intestine. Material and Method. Twenty eight Wistar rats were randomized into four groups with seven rats in each group. Control group was administered serum physiologic (SF) intraperitoneally (ip) for five days. Ozone group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days. Ischemia Reperfusion (IR) group underwent superior mesenteric artery occlusion for one hour and then reperfusion for two hours. Ozone + IR group was administered 1 mg/kg ozone ip for five days and at sixth day IR model was applied. Rats were anesthetized with ketamine∖xyzlazine and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Intestinal tissue samples were examined under light microscope. Levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathioneperoxidase (GSH-Px), malondyaldehide (MDA), and protein carbonyl (PCO) were analyzed in tissue samples. Total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were analyzed in blood samples. Data were evaluated statistically by Kruskal Wallis test. Results. In the ozone administered group, degree of intestinal injury was not different from the control group. IR caused an increase in intestinal injury score. The intestinal epithelium maintained its integrity and decrease in intestinal injury score was detected in Ozone + IR group. SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT values were high in ozone group and low in IR. TOS parameter was highest in the IR group and the TAC parameter was highest in the ozone group and lowest in the IR group. Conclusion. In the present study, IR model caused an increase in intestinal injury.In the present study, ozone administration had an effect improving IR associated tissue injury. In the present study, ozone therapy prevented

  9. Dietary soy protein is associated with reduced intestinal mucosal polyamine concentration in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Higuchi, C M

    2000-07-01

    Quantitation of polyamine levels has been correlated with biomarkers of proliferation in the colon mucosa where dysregulated epithelial hyperproliferation is associated with colorectal cancer risk. This study was performed to assess the response of polyamine measurements to dietary factors in an animal model. Male Wistar rats were fed purified diet or diets substituted by 20% lard fat, 20% beet fiber and 20% soy protein. After 2 wk, mucosal polyamines were measured along intestinal tracts by HPLC. In rats fed the control diet (n = 10), mucosal polyamines were found at high levels in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum but at low levels in the cecum, colon and rectum. Compared with rats fed the control diet, those fed the 20% lard diet showed greater polyamine levels in the large intestine (P < 0.05, n = 10), but those fed the 20% fiber diet exhibited lower polyamine levels in the small intestine (P < 0.05, n = 9). However, rats fed the 20% soy protein diet had lower polyamine levels in both small and large intestines (P < 0.05, n = 15). Significant linear correlations were observed between rectal polyamine levels and the dietary energy intakes in these four diet groups (r = 0.972-0.991, P < 0.001). Supplementation of 0.1% soy isoflavones to the basal diet or 0.3% DL-methionine to the 20% soy protein diet for 4 wk did not affect polyamine levels. The results indicate that soy protein reduced mucosal polyamine levels, at least in part, through reduction of energy intakes. Further studies are warranted to verify that polyamine levels in intestinal mucosa are useful as an intermediate endpoint of the dietary risk factors.

  10. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in intestinal injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Zhu, Bing

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in premature neonates. The pathogenesis of NEC remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic change and role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in neonatal rats with intestinal injury. Wistar rats, <24 h in age, received an intraperitoneal injection with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Ileal tissues were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h following the LPS challenge for histological evaluation of NEC and for measurements of COX-2 mRNA. The correlation between the degree of intestinal injury and expression of COX-2 mRNA was determined. The LPS-injected pups showed a significant increase in injury scores compared to the control, and the most deteriorating change was at 12 h. COX-2 mRNA expression was upregulated following LPS injection. There was a significantly positive correlation between COX-2 mRNA and the grade of intestinal injury within 12 h, whereas COX-2 mRNA expression had a significantly negative correlation with the severity of intestinal injury at 24 h. COX-2 plays an important role in LPS-induced intestinal injury and the repair processes. Caution should be exerted concerning the potential therapeutic uses of COX-2 inhibitors or promoters in NEC.

  11. The Effect of Infliximab on Intestinal Anastomosis Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Karaköse, Oktay; Eken, Hüseyin; Ulusoy, Ali Naki; Topgül, Hüseyin Koray; Bilgin, Mehmet; Yürüker, Saim Savaş; Gülbahar, Mustafa Yavuz

    Intestinal anastomosis healing is a complex physiological process in which many local and systemic factors play a role. One of the significant cytokines in this process is TNF-α. Infliximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody which binds to TNF-α with high affinity. Although this agent is used in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, intestinal surgery may be required in these patients. In this study it was aimed to determine whether or not there was any negative effect of preoperative single dose infliximab treatment on intestinal anastomosis healing. Two groups of 10 rats were formed. One of these groups was administered with a single dose of infliximab 8 mg/kg as a 20-minute intravenous infusion from the femoral vein. Four days after the infusion, a full layer incision was made to the colon and anastomosis was applied to all the rats. At 7 days after anastomosis, the subjects were sacrificed. The anastomosis segment was removed and the bursting pressure was measured. Tissue samples were taken from this segment for hydroxyproline concentration and histopathological examination. A blood sample was taken to measure TNF-α values. No statistically significant difference was determined between the groups in terms of bursting pressure, tissue hydroxyproline concentration or histopathological scoring. A single dose of 8 mg/kg infliximab administered 4 days preoperatively was not found to have any negative effect on intestinal anastomosis healing in rats.

  12. Rat intestinal mast cell amines are released during nitric oxide synthase inhibition in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Northover, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase increases microvascular permeability in rat small intestinal villi. To determine the mechanism(s) whereby this occurs we have perfused the vasculature of rat isolated small intestines with a gelatin-containing physiological salt solution. Inclusion of N-nitro-L-argintne methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μM) or indomethacin (1 μM) in the perfusate increased leakage of injected colloidal carbon into microvessel walls. Pre-treatment with sodium nitroprusside (10 μM) significantly reduced the effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin, whereas carbacyclin (1 μM) only reduced the effects of indomethacin. PD151242 (1 μM) showed some antagonism towards the effects of L-NAME, but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (3 μM) was inactive. Pre-tment with cyproheptadine (10 μM) reduced the effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin, and also significantly reduced background (control) colloidal carbon leakage. Small intestines from polymixin B-treated rats showed significantly reduced colloidal carbon leakage in response to L-NAME. This suggests that the leakage-enhancing effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin in this preparation may be mediated by mast cell-derived amines. PMID:18475694

  13. Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated (Sar1, Ile8)ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides.

  14. Effect of poly-L-arginine on intestinal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Tsutomu; Uchida, Masaki; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Shimazaki, Yohei; Ohtake, Kazuo; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Jun; Ogihara, Masahiko; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    We have already reported that poly-L-arginine (PLA) remarkably enhanced the in vivo nasal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules without producing any significant epithelial damage in rats. In the present study, we examined whether PLA could enhance the absorption of a model hydrophilic macromolecule, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-4), across the intestinal mucosa, as well as the nasal mucosa, by an in situ closed-loop method using the rat intestine. PLA was found to enhance the intestinal absorption of FD-4 in a concentration-dependent manner within the concentrations investigated in this study, but segment-specific differences were found to be associated with this effect (ileum>jejunum>duodenum≧colon). The factors responsible for the segment-specific differences were also investigated by intestinal absorption studies using aprotinin, a trypsin inhibitor, and an analysis of the expression of occludin, a tight junction protein. In the small intestine, the differences in the effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the enzymatic degradation of PLA. In the colon, the reduced effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the smaller surface area for absorption and the higher expression of occludin compared with other segments.

  15. Involvement of concentrative nucleoside transporter 1 in intestinal absorption of trifluorothymidine, a novel antitumor nucleoside, in rats.

    PubMed

    Okayama, Takashige; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Kuwata, Keizo; Komuro, Masahito; Ohta, Shigeru; Nagayama, Sekio

    2012-02-01

    ααα-Trifluorothymidine (TFT), an anticancer nucleoside analog, is a potent thymidylate synthase inhibitor. TFT exerts its antitumor activity primarily by inducing DNA fragmentation after incorporation of the triphosphate form of TFT into the DNA. Although an oral combination of TFT and a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor has been clinically developed, there is little information regarding TFT absorption. Therefore, we investigated TFT absorption in the rat small intestine. After oral administration of TFT in rats, more than 75% of the TFT was absorbed. To identify the uptake transport system, uptake studies were conducted by using everted sacs prepared from rat small intestines. TFT uptake was saturable, significantly reduced under Na(+)-free conditions, and strongly inhibited by the addition of an endogenous pyrimidine nucleoside. From these results, we suggested the involvement of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs) in TFT absorption into rat small intestine. In rat small intestines, the mRNAs coding for rat CNT1 (rCNT1) and rCNT2, but not for rCNT3, were predominantly expressed. To investigate the roles of rCNT1 and rCNT2 in TFT uptake, we conducted uptake assays by using Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with rCNT1 complementary RNA (cRNA) and rCNT2 cRNA. TFT uptake by X. laevis oocytes injected with rCNT1 cRNA, and not rCNT2 cRNA, was significantly greater than that by water-injected oocytes. In addition, in situ single-pass perfusion experiments performed using rat jejunum regions showed that thymidine, a substrate for CNT1, strongly inhibited TFT uptake. In conclusion, TFT is absorbed via rCNT1 in the intestinal lumen in rats.

  16. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ze-yu; Sun, Bin-bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-shi; Tang, Xian-ge; Ling, Zhao-li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-zhu; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Results: Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineintestinesmall intestine, and particularly in ileal valve. Furthermore, ciprofloxacin (10–2000 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited β-glucuronidase activity in distal small intestine content or E coli incubated in vitro, but did not affect that in proximal small intestine content or bovine liver incubated in vitro. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, typical enteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Conclusion: Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via

  17. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ze-Yu; Sun, Bin-Bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-Shi; Tang, Xian-Ge; Ling, Zhao-Li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-Jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-Zhu; Liu, Xiao-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineintestinesmall intestine, and particularly in ileal valve. Furthermore, ciprofloxacin (10-2000 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited β-glucuronidase activity in distal small intestine content or E coli incubated in vitro, but did not affect that in proximal small intestine content or bovine liver incubated in vitro. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, typical enteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via the inhibition of intestinal

  18. Volvulus of small intestine: rare complication of mesenteric pseudocyst.

    PubMed

    Fan, H-L; Chen, T-W; Hong, Z-J; Hsieh, C-B; Chan, D-C; Chen, C-J; Liu, Y-C; Yu, J-C

    2009-12-01

    Mesenteric cyst is a rare intra-abdominal lesion. Most patients with mesenteric cysts are asymptomatic. Symptomatic mesenteric cysts are associated with cyst size, cyst location, and complications, including infection, rupture, hemorrhage, and intestinal obstruction. Volvulus is a rare complication of mesenteric cyst. We report a 50-year-old woman with colicky epigastric pain for three days. The symptoms exacerbated in the supine position and were relieved in the sitting position. Computed tomography of her abdomen revealed a huge cystic lesion with a whirl sign of mesentery vessels. She had the history of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Segmental resection of the small intestine with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Histology indicated a hemorrhagic pseudocyst. The patient recovered well after surgery. Mesenteric pseudocyst rarely results in volvulus of small intestine. Our case is the eleventh case reported in the English literature. Atypical presentation of epigastric pain while lying down may lead to mis-diagnosis. This case reminds the clinicians this rare complication.

  19. Differential effects of cooked beans and cooked lentils on protein metabolism in intestine and muscle in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Pirman, Tatjana; Combe, Etiennette; Ribeyre, Marie Claude; Prugnaud, Jacques; Stekar, Jasna; Patureau Mirand, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The effect of diets based on cooked beans or lentils on protein metabolism in intestines and muscles was studied in rats. The cooked seeds were used as the unique protein source in balanced diets (containing 229 and 190 g of crude protein per kg dry matter) fed to young growing rats for 20 days. Their effects were compared with those of the control casein diet in pair-fed rats. Protein synthesis rates in small and large intestines and in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were determined in vivo, in a fed state, by the flooding dose method, using 13C-valine. In the small and large intestine tissues of the legume fed groups, protein, RNA relative masses (mg.100 g BM(-1)) and protein synthesis rates (FSR and ASR) were higher than in the control rats (p < 0.05). In gastrocnemius and soleus muscles,protein and RNA contents (in mg) and protein synthesis rates were significantly (p < 0.05) lower in the legume-fed groups than in the control rats. The chronic intake of cooked legumes increased protein synthesis rates in intestinal tissues and decreased them in muscles. This effect was greater for beans than for lentils in the large intestine and in gastrocnemius muscle. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor and studies of its expression in intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Puppi, M; Henning, S J

    1995-05-01

    A long-term goal of our laboratory is to establish a rat model to study the feasibility of using the intestinal tract as a site for somatic gene therapy. As a step toward that goal, the current study reports the cloning of the rat ecotropic retroviral receptor (EcoR) cDNA and the study of various aspects of its expression in the intestinal tissues. The cDNA for rat EcoR was cloned by screening a size-selected rat intestinal cDNA library with mouse EcoR cDNA. A clone of approximately 7 kb, designated MP10, was obtained. Partial sequencing of MP10 from the 5' end revealed a level of similarity of 92% compared with mouse EcoR. The presence of a 5' untranslated region and a 3' poly(A) tract, together with the overall size of the cDNA, suggest that is very close to being a full-length cDNA for this large transcript. Northern blots with MP10 showed an RNA of approximately 7.9 kb present along the entire length of the small intestine and somewhat less abundant in the colon. Developmental studies showed high levels of EcoR in fetal rat intestine, a decline in the early postnatal period, then a gradual rise to adulthood. Caco-2 cells were used to assess the expression of EcoR in proliferating compared with differentiated intestinal epithelial cells. EcoR mRNA was found to be very much more abundant in nondifferentiated cells and declined to low levels as the cells underwent spontaneous differentiation. These patterns of EcoR expression indicate that ecotropic retroviruses should be suitable vectors with which to attempt gene transfer into the intestinal epithelium. In addition, since the endogenous role of EcoR is as the y+ cationic amino acid transporter, these data have significance for understanding patterns of amino acid transport in the intestinal epithelium.

  1. Age characteristics of changes in invertase activity of the mucous membrane of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakhimov, K. R.; Aleksandrova, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    Rats of varying ages were subjected to stress from heat, cold, and hydrocortisone injection. Invertase activity in homogenates of small intestine mucous membranes was studied following sacrifice. Invertase activity was low in young animals, but increased sharply in 30 day old ones, remaining at a relatively constant level until old age. The study concludes that the stress hormone (corticosteroids, etc.) levels in the blood, which affects the formation of enteric enzyme levels and activities, and that age related peculiarities in invertase activity are a consequence of altered hormone status and epitheliocyte sensitivity.

  2. Expression of sweet receptor components in equine small intestine: relevance to intestinal glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kristian; Al-Rammahi, Miran; Arora, Daleep K; Moran, Andrew W; Proudman, Christopher J; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2012-07-15

    The heteromeric sweet taste receptor T1R2-T1R3 is expressed on the luminal membrane of certain populations of enteroendocrine cells. Sensing of sugars and other sweet compounds by this receptor activates a pathway in enteroendocrine cells, resulting in secretion of a number of gut hormones, including glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2). This subsequently leads to upregulation in the expression of intestinal Na(+)/glucose cotransporter, SGLT1, and increased intestinal glucose absorption. On the basis of the current information available on the horse genome sequence, it has been proposed that the gene for T1R2 (Tas1R2) is absent in the horse. We show here, however, that horses express both the mRNA and protein for T1R2. Equine T1R2 is most closely homologous to that in the pig and the cow. T1R2 protein, along with T1R3, α-gustducin, and GLP-2 proteins are coexpressed in equine intestinal endocrine cells. Intravenous administration of GLP-2, in rats and pigs, leads to an increase in the expression of SGLT1 in absorptive enterocytes and enhancement in blood glucose concentrations. GLP-2 receptor is expressed in enteric neurons, excluding the direct effect of GLP-2 on enterocytes. However, electric stimulation of enteric neurons generates a neural response leading to SGLT1 upregulation, suggesting that sugar in the intestine activates a reflex increase in the functional expression of SGLT1. Horses possess the ability to upregulate SGLT1 expression in response to increased dietary carbohydrates, and to enhance the capacity of the gut to absorb glucose. The gut sweet receptor provides an accessible target for manipulating the equine gut to absorb glucose (and water), allowing greater energy uptake and hydration for hard-working horses.

  3. Effects of glutamine on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation in TPN-rats with endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Show

    2003-06-01

    To evaluate the protective effect and mechanism of glutamine on the intestinal barrier function in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) rats with trauma or endotoxemia. To perform prospective, randomized and controlled animal experimentation of rats with surgical trauma, TPN and endotoxemia, thirty-four male, adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control group (n=8), TPN group (n=9), trauma and endotoxemia group (LPS, n=8) and trauma plus endotoxemia supplemented with glutamine in TPN solution group (Gln.group, n=9). All groups except the control group were given TPN solutions in 7-day experimental period. For Gln group, 1 000 mg/kg/d of glutamine was added to TPN solution during day 1-6. On the 7(th) day all the animals were gavaged with lactulose (66 mg) and mannitol (50 mg) in 2 ml of normal saline. Then 24 h urine with preservative was collected and kept at -20 degrees. On day 8, under intra-peritoneal anesthesia using 100 mg/kg ketamin, the intestine, liver, mesenteric lymph nodes and blood were taken for examination. The body weight of LPS group decreased most among the four groups. The structure of small intestinal mucosa in TPN group, LPS group and Gln group showed impairments of different degrees, and the damage of small intestinal mucosa in Gln group was remarkably alleviated. The concentrations of interleukins in small intestine mucosa were lower (for IL-4 and IL-6) or the lowest (IL-10) in Gln group. The IgA level in the blood plasma and the mucosa of Gln group was the highest among all of the groups. The urine lactulose/mannitol test showed that the intestinal permeability in LPS group was lower than that in TPN group (P<0.001), but there was no difference between LPS group and Gln group. The rate of bacterial translocation in Gln group was lower than that in LPS group (P<0.02). Prophylactic treatment with glutamine could minimize the increments of intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation caused by trauma and endotoxemia in

  4. Effects of glutamine on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation in TPN-rats with endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Show

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect and mechanism of glutamine on the intestinal barrier function in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) rats with trauma or endotoxemia. METHODS: To perform prospective, randomized and controlled animal experimentation of rats with surgical trauma, TPN and endotoxemia, thirty-four male, adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control group (n = 8), TPN group (n = 9), trauma and endotoxemia group (LPS, n = 8) and trauma plus endotoxemia supplemented with glutamine in TPN solution group (Gln.group, n = 9). All groups except the control group were given TPN solutions in 7-day experimental period. For Gln group, 1000 mg/kg/d of glutamine was added to TPN solution during day 1-6. On the 7th day all the animals were gavaged with lactulose (66 mg) and mannitol (50 mg) in 2 mL of normal saline. Then 24 h urine with preservative was collected and kept at -20 °C. On day 8, under intra-peritoneal anesthesia using 100 mg/kg ketamin, the intestine, liver, mesenteric lymph nodes and blood were taken for examination. RESULTS: The body weight of LPS group decreased most among the four groups. The structure of small intestinal mucosa in TPN group, LPS group and Gln group showed impairments of different degrees, and the damage of small intestinal mucosa in Gln group was remarkably alleviated. The concentrations of interleukins in small intestine mucosa were lower (for IL-4 and IL-6) or the lowest (IL-10) in Gln group. The IgA level in the blood plasma and the mucosa of Gln group was the highest among all of the groups. The urine lactulose/mannitol test showed that the intestinal permeability in LPS group was lower than that in TPN group (P < 0.001), but there was no difference between LPS group and Gln group. The rate of bacterial translocation in Gln group was lower than that in LPS group (P < 0.02). CONCLUSION: Prophylactic treatment with glutamine could minimize the increments of intestinal permeability and bacterial

  5. Mucosal projections of enteric neurons in the porcine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hens, J; Schrödl, F; Brehmer, A; Adriaensen, D; Neuhuber, W; Scheuermann, D W; Schemann, M; Timmermans, J P

    2000-06-05

    In the present study, a combination of immunohistochemistry and retrograde 1,1;-didodecyl-3,3,3;,3;-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) tracing was used to unravel the morphology, distribution, and neurochemical coding of submucous and myenteric neurons with axonal projections to the mucosa of the porcine small intestine. The majority of traced neurons was located in the inner submucous plexus (ISP; 78%), whereas the remaining part was distributed between the outer submucous plexus (OSP; 10%) and myenteric plexus (MP; 12%). Among these traced neurons, some distinct neuronal populations could be distinguished according to their morphologic and neurochemical properties. In the ISP, several types of traced neurons were detected: 1) morphologic type II neurons expressing choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunoreactivity, and substance P (SP) immunoreactivity; 2) ChAT/SP-immunoreactive (-IR) small neurons; 3) vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) -IR small neurons; and 4) multidendritic ChAT/somatostatin (SOM) -IR neurons. The traced neuronal populations of the OSP and MP were similar to each other. In both plexuses, the following DiI-labelled neurons were found: 1) ChAT/CGRP/(SP)-IR type II neurons; 2) multidendritic ChAT/SP-IR neurons; and 3) multidendritic ChAT/SOM-IR neurons. Comparison of the present findings with previously obtained data concerning the mucosal innervation pattern of the intestine of small mammals, revealed significant species differences with respect to the morphologic and neurochemical features of the involved enteric neuronal classes. Although not identical, a closer resemblance between pig and human enteric nervous system seems to be at hand, as far as the anatomic organization and the presence of neurochemically identified neuronal subtypes within the enteric nervous system are concerned.

  6. Inhibitory effect and mechanism of acarbose combined with gymnemic acid on maltose absorption in rat intestine

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong; Wang, Le Feng; Imoto, Toshiaki; Hiji, Yasutake

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To compare the combinative and individual effect of acarbose and gymnemic acid (GA) on maltose absorption and hydrolysis in small intestine to determine whether nutrient control in diabetic care can be improved by combination of them. METHODS: The absorption and hydrolysis of maltose were studied by cyclic perfusion of intestinal loops in situ and motility of the intestine was recorded with the intestinal ring in vitro using Wistar rats. RESULTS: The total inhibitory rate of maltose absorption was improved by the combination of GA (0.1 g/L-1.0 g/L) and acarbose (0.1 mmol/L-2.0 mmol/L) throughout their effective duration (P < 0.05, U test of Mann-Whitney), although the improvement only could be seen at a low dosage during the first hour. With the combination, inhibitory duration of acarbose on maltose absorption was prolonged to 3 h and the inhibitory effect onset of GA was fastened to 15 min. GA suppressed the intestinal mobility with a good correlation (r = 0.98) to the inhibitory effect of GA on maltose absorption and the inhibitory effect of 2 mmol/L (high dose) acarbose on maltose hydrolysis was dual modulated by 1 g/L GA in vivo indicating that the combined effects involved the functional alteration of intestinal barriers. CONCLUSION: There are augmented effects of acarbose and GA, which involve pre-cellular and paracellular barriers. Diabetic care can be improved by employing the combination. PMID:11819725

  7. Dab2, megalin, cubilin and amnionless receptor complex might mediate intestinal endocytosis in the suckling rat.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Carretero, María D; Palomo, Marta; García-Miranda, Pablo; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Peral, María J; Calonge, María L; Ilundain, Anunciación A

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed that Dab2 participates in the endocytosis of milk macromolecules in rat small intestine. Here we investigate the receptors that may mediate this endocytosis by studying the effects of age and diet on megalin, VLDLR, and ApoER2 expression, and that of age on the expression of cubilin and amnionless. Of megalin, VLDLR and ApoER2, only the megalin expression pattern resembles that of Dab2 previously reported. Thus the mRNA and protein levels of megalin and Dab2 are high in the intestine of the suckling rat, down-regulated by age and up-regulated by milk diet, mainly in the ileum. Neither age nor diet affect ApoER2 mRNA levels. The effect of age on VLDLR mRNA levels depends on the epithelial cell tested but they are down-regulated by milk diet. In the suckling rat, the intestinal expressions of both cubilin and amnionless are similar to that of megalin and megalin, cubilin, amnionless and Dab2 co-localize at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus. Co-localization of Dab2 with ApoER2 and VLDLR at the microvilli and in the apical endocytic apparatus is also observed. This is the first report showing intestinal co-localization of: megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2, VLDLR/Dab2 and ApoER2/Dab2. We conclude that the megalin/cubilin/amnionless/Dab2 complex/es participate in intestinal processes, mainly during the lactation period and that Dab2 may act as an adaptor in intestinal processes mediated by ApoER2 and VLDLR.

  8. Food intake regulates oleoylethanolamide formation and degradation in the proximal small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jin; Astarita, Giuseppe; Gaetani, Silvana; Kim, Janet; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Mackie, Ken; Piomelli, Daniele

    2007-01-12

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is a lipid mediator that inhibits food intake by activating the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha. In the rodent small intestine OEA levels decrease during food deprivation and increase upon refeeding, suggesting that endogenous OEA may participate in the regulation of satiety. Here we show that feeding stimulates OEA mobilization in the mucosal layer of rat duodenum and jejunum but not in the serosal layer from the same intestinal segments in other sections of the gastrointestinal tract (stomach, ileum, colon) or in a broad series of internal organs and tissues (e.g. liver, brain, heart, plasma). Feeding also increases the levels of other unsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEs) (e.g. linoleoylethanolamide) without affecting those of saturated FAEs (e.g. palmitoylethanolamide). Feeding-induced OEA mobilization is accompanied by enhanced accumulation of OEA-generating N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs) increased activity and expression of the OEA-synthesizing enzyme NAPE-phospholipase D, and decreased activity and expression of the OEAdegrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase. Immunostaining studies revealed that NAPE-phospholipase D and fatty acid amide hydrolase are expressed in intestinal enterocytes and lamina propria cells. Collectively, these results indicate that nutrient availability controls OEA mobilization in the mucosa of the proximal intestine through a concerted regulation of OEA biosynthesis and degradation.

  9. Insights into embryo defenses of the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata: egg mass ingestion affects rat intestine morphology and growth.

    PubMed

    Dreon, Marcos S; Fernández, Patricia E; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Heras, Horacio

    2014-06-01

    The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF) ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology. Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days. Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to the toxic effect of plant antipredator strategies. This defense

  10. Insights into Embryo Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Egg Mass Ingestion Affects Rat Intestine Morphology and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Eduardo J.; Heras, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Background The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF) ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology. Methodology/Principal Findings Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days. Conclusions/Significance Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to

  11. Activation of rat intestinal mucosal mast cells by fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Yang, Qing; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Yoder, Stephanie; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have linked certain types of gut mucosal immune cells with fat intake. We determined whether fat absorption activates intestinal mucosal mast cells (MMC), a key component of the gut mucosal immune system. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated, and the intraduodenal (i.d.) tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic concentrations of histamine, rat MMC protease II (RMCPII), a specific marker of rat intestinal MMC degranulation, and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) were measured by ELISA. Intestinal MMC degranulation was visualized by immunofluorescent microscopy of jejunum sections taken at 1 h after Liposyn II gavage. Intraduodenal bolus infusion of Liposyn II 20% (4.4 kcal/3 ml) induced approximately a onefold increase in lymphatic histamine and PGD(2), ∼20-fold increase in lymphatic RMCPII, but only onefold increase in peripheral serum RMCPII concentrations. Release of RMCPII into lymph increased dose dependently with the amount of lipid fed. In addition, i.d. infusion of long-chain triacylglycerol trilinolein (C18:2 n-6, the major composite in Liposyn II) significantly increased the lymphatic RMCPII concentration, whereas medium-chain triacylglycerol tricaprylin (C8:0) did not alter lymph RMCPII secretion. Immunohistochemistry image revealed the degranulation of MMC into lamina propria after lipid feeding. These novel findings indicate that intestinal MMC are activated and degranulate to release MMC mediators to the circulation during fat absorption. This action of fatty acid is dose and chain length dependent.

  12. Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vy; Su, Jidong; Koprowski, Stacy; Hsu, Anna; Tweddell, James S.; Rafiee, Parvaneh; Gross, Garrett J.; Salzman, Nita H.; Baker, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Signals from the intestinal microbiota are important for normal host physiology; alteration of the microbiota (dysbiosis) is associated with multiple disease states. We determined the effect of antibiotic-induced intestinal dysbiosis on circulating cytokine levels and severity of ischemia/reperfusion injury in the heart. Treatment of Dahl S rats with a minimally absorbed antibiotic vancomycin, in the drinking water, decreased circulating leptin levels by 38%, resulted in smaller myocardial infarcts (27% reduction), and improved recovery of postischemic mechanical function (35%) as compared with untreated controls. Vancomycin altered the abundance of intestinal bacteria and fungi, measured by 16S and 18S ribosomal DNA quantity. Pretreatment with leptin (0.12 μg/kg i.v.) 24 h before ischemia/reperfusion abolished cardioprotection produced by vancomycin treatment. Dahl S rats fed the commercially available probiotic product Goodbelly, which contains the leptin-suppressing bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, also resulted in decreased circulating leptin levels by 41%, smaller myocardial infarcts (29% reduction), and greater recovery of postischemic mechanical function (23%). Pretreatment with leptin (0.12 μg/kg i.v.) abolished cardioprotection produced by Goodbelly. This proof-of-concept study is the first to identify a mechanistic link between changes in intestinal microbiota and myocardial infarction and demonstrates that a probiotic supplement can reduce myocardial infarct size.—Lam, V., Su, J., Koprowski, S., Hsu, A., Tweddell, J. S., Rafiee, P., Gross, G. J., Salzman, N. H., Baker, J. E. Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats. PMID:22247331

  13. Diagnosis of intestinal ischemia in the rat using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, A; Towner, R A; Langer, J C

    1993-01-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of persistent ischemia after intestinal revascularization has remained an elusive goal. Because magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect changes in tissue water, we studied its efficacy in differentiating ischemic from perfused intestine in an animal model. Six-week-old rats were subjected to (1) 30-min superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion and reperfusion, (2) permanent SMA ligation, or (3) sham operation, and were then imaged for 90 min using a small-animal MRI scanner with T1 weighting (TR = 1000 msec, TE = 25 msec). In an additional group of rats, the experiment was repeated using a new contrast technique consisting of oral ferrite to decrease luminal signal and intravenous gadolinium to increase bowel wall signal. Mean abdominal intensity over the scanning period was calculated for each animal (n = 5 rats per experimental group). Definition of individual bowel loops was subjectively improved in animals scanned with intravenous and oral contrast. Mean abdominal intensity was significantly lower in ligated vs sham rats (43.90 +/- 8 vs 59.63 +/- 6 and 46.19 +/- 6 vs 54.26 +/- 6, with and without contrast, respectively). There was no significant difference in intensity between reperfused and sham animals. MRI differentiated persistently ischemic bowel from viable bowel in this model, both with and without the use of contrast. These data suggest that MRI may have a potential role in the noninvasive diagnosis of persistent intestinal ischemia.

  14. Catabolism of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin by rat intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Takagaki, Akiko; Nanjo, Fumio

    2013-05-22

    Catabolism of (+)-catechin (+C) and (-)-epicatechin (EC) by rat intestinal microbiota was examined in vitro. +C and EC metabolites isolated were identified by LC-MS and NMR analyses. As a result, 4-hydroxy-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)valeric acid (C-5 and EC-5), 4-oxo-5-(3,4-dihydorxyphenyl)valeric acid (EC-7), 4-oxo-5-(3-hydorxyphenyl)valeric acid (EC-8), and 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(2,4,6-trihydroxyphenyl)propan-2-ol (EC-13) were identified as new metabolites of +C or EC. From the measurement of optical rotation, each of the +C and EC metabolites possessing the same chemical structure and chiral carbon was inferred to have an enantiomeric relationship to each other and to maintain the configurations at the 3-position of the original catechins. On the basis of these findings together with previous information, the proposed metabolic pathway of +C and EC by rat intestinal microbiota was updated.

  15. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Yang, Bo-Gie; Jang, Myoung Ho

    2016-04-04

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4(+)T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra-deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra.

  16. Comparative effect of distal and proximal intestinal resection and bypass on the rat exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Carreras, O; Carrillo, J C; Murillo, M L; Delgado, M J

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of small-bowel resection and bypass on pancreatic function in rats subjected to a 50% distal resection (DR), a 50% proximal resection (PR), a 50% jejunal bypass (BP) or an intestinal transection (SH) (controls). Duodenal contents were collected after cannulation (under basal conditions). Afterwards, an in vivo duodenal perfusion was made using a glucose/saline solution and perfusate was collected for 1 h. Following this, a cholecystokinin (CCK) solution was injected into the jugular vein (1 U/kg body wt.) and perfusion continued for another 1 h. Basal duodenal volume only increased in rats with a PR, and no significant changes occurred in protein content. In basal conditions, no decreases in amylase, lipase, trypsin, or chymotrypsin activities after DR, PR or BP were detected. When animals were subjected to a perfusion and CCK stimulation, no significant changes occurred in animals with BP; the volume was maintained in rats with PR and DR but a decrease in protein and enzymatic contents was found. We concluded that, in basal conditions, the lack (resections) or exclusion (BP) of 50% of the small bowel does not negatively affect the digestive function. When however, a sustained activity is required, the extirpation of intestinal surface provokes a fall in enzymatic activities and is not modified if only the intestinal transit is suppressed, as occurs in the cases of BP.

  17. Modulation of small intestinal homeostasis along with its microflora during acclimatization at simulated hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Adak, Atanu; Ghosh; Mondal, Keshab Chandra

    2014-11-01

    At high altitude (HA) hypobaric hypoxic environment manifested several pathophysiological consequences of which gastrointestinal (GI) disorder are very common phenomena. To explore the most possible clue behind this disorder intestinal flora, the major player of the GI functions, were subjected following simulated hypobaric hypoxic treatment in model animal. For this, male albino rats were exposed to 55 kPa (approximately 4872.9 m) air pressure consecutively for 30 days for 8 h/day and its small intestinal microflora, their secreted digestive enzymes and stress induced marker protein were investigated of the luminal epithelia. It was observed that population density of total aerobes significantly decreased, but the quantity of total anaerobes and Escherichia coli increased significantly after 30 days of hypoxic stress. The population density of strict anaerobes like Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroides sp. and Lactobacillus sp. and obligate anaerobes like Clostridium perfringens and Peptostreptococcus sp. were expanded along with their positive growth direction index (GDI). In relation to the huge multiplication of anaerobes the amount of gas formation as well as content of IgA and IgG increased in duration dependent manner. The activity of some luminal enzymes from microbial origin like a-amylase, gluco-amylase, proteinase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase were also elevated in hypoxic condition. Besides, hypoxia induced in formation of malondialdehyde along with significant attenuation of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activity and lowered GSH/GSSG pool in the intestinal epithelia. Histological study revealed disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier with higher infiltration of lymphocytes in lamina propia and atrophic structure. It can be concluded that hypoxia at HA modified GI microbial imprint and subsequently causes epithelial barrier dysfunction which may relate to the small intestinal dysfunction at HA.

  18. Lubiprostone Accelerates Intestinal Transit and Alleviates Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients With Chronic Constipation.

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, Irene; Bashashati, Mohammad; Alvarez, Alicia; Hall, Mark; Shankar, Nagasri; Gomez, Yvette; McCallum, Richard W; Sarosiek, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    Lubiprostone is an effective treatment for chronic constipation (CC). The mechanism of action of lubiprostone is through increasing fluid secretion and lubrication of the intestinal lumen. The effects of lubiprostone on gastrointestinal transit and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) have not been adequately explored. The current study was designed to investigate whether lubiprostone (1) alters gastrointestinal transit and (2) affects SIBO in patients with constipation. A total of 29 female patients (mean age = 39 years; range: 19-64) with CC received 2 weeks of lubiprostone (24mcg b.i.d., P.O.). Stool consistency based on Bristol stool scale and the frequency of bowel movements (BMs) were recorded. Gastric emptying time, small bowel transit time, colon transit time (CTT), combined small and large bowel transit time (SLBTT) and whole gut transit time were measured using wireless motility capsule. The SIBO status was assessed by the lactulose breath test. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank, Mann-Whitney U, Spearman׳s rank correlation and Chi-square tests. Lubiprostone significantly softened the stool and increased the frequency of BM from median of 2 to 4times per week. The CTT and SLBTT were significantly shorter in responders to lubiprostone (i.e., those with ≥ 2 times increase in the number of their weekly BM) compared with nonresponders. The higher frequency of BM after treatment was significantly correlated with the acceleration of CTT, SLBTT and whole gut transit time. In all, 17 out of 25 (68%) patients, who were tested for SIBO at baseline, were positive. In addition, 7 out of 17 (41%) SIBO-positive patients became SIBO-negative after lubiprostone treatment (P < 0.05). In CC, lubiprostone improves the frequency of BMs, softens the stool, accelerates intestinal transit and decreases accompanying SIBO. The improvement of SIBO could be explained by the cleansing effect of increased intestinal fluid and mucus combined with enhanced intestinal

  19. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rashidul; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Alam, Masud; Lu, Miao; Kabir, Mamun; Kakon, Shahria Hafiz; Islam, Bushra Zarin; Afreen, Sajia; Musa, Abu; Khan, Shaila Sharmeen; Colgate, E. Ross; Carmolli, Marya P.; Ma, Jennie Z.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO’s pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO’s association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-year-olds monitored since birth from an impoverished neighborhood. SIBO was diagnosed via glucose hydrogen breath testing, with a cutoff of a 12-ppm increase over baseline used for SIBO positivity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate SIBO predictors. Differences in concomitant inflammation and permeability between SIBO-positive and -negative children were compared with multiple comparison adjustment. A total of 16.7% (15/90) of the children had SIBO. The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60) and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62). Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02) and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004) were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups. These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation. PMID:26758185

  20. Stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function in the rat: reversal by wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Tomoo; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Sokabe, Masahiro

    2006-07-24

    Our previous studies demonstrated that wood creosote (Seirogan) inhibits intestinal secretion and normalizes the transport of electrolytes and water in rats subjected to restraint stress. The goal of the present study was to examine whether wood creosote has a protective effect against stress-induced breakdown of intestinal barrier function. F-344 rats were subjected to 90-min water avoidance stress (WAS) with wood creosote (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administered intragastrically 30 min prior to WAS. Sham stressed rats received wood creosote or vehicle treatment but did not experience the WAS. All rats were euthanized at the end of the WAS or sham-stress and the jejunum and colon were isolated. Epithelial transport was studied in modified Ussing chambers. Spontaneous secretion was assessed by electrophysiological measurement of the short circuit current (I(sc)) while electrical conductance (G) was calculated from the potential difference (PD) and I(sc) using Ohm's law. Intestinal permeability was defined by the mucosal-to-serosal flux of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). WAS significantly elevated basal I(sc) and G and increased epithelial permeability to HRP in the jejunum but not in the colon. Wood creosote resulted in a significant reduction of the stress-induced increase in I(sc), G and the mucosal-to-serosal flux of HRP compared to the vehicle-treated group. Wood creosote caused no significant effects in sham-stressed rats. The results suggest that oral administration of wood creosote may prevent stress-induced diarrhea by preventing aversive effects on small intestinal secretion and barrier function.

  1. Bone Marrow Derivation of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Small Intestine Following Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dengqun; Wang, Fengchao; Zou, Zhongmin; Dong, Shiwu; Wang, Junping; Ran, Xinze; Li, Chunxue; Shi, Chunmeng; Su, Yongping

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in gastrointestinal tract are specialized cells serving as pacemaker cells. The origin of ICCs is currently not fully characterized. In this work, we aimed to study whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) could contribute to the origin of ICCs in the muscular plexus of small intestine using GFP-C57BL/6 chimeric mice.Engraftment of BMDCs in the intestine was investigated for GFP expression. GFP positive bone marrow mononuclear cells reached a proportion of 95.65% ± 3.72% at different times in chimerism. Donor-derived cells distributed widely in all the layers of the gastrointestinal tract. There were GFP positive BMDCs in the myenteric plexus, which resembled characteristics of ICCs, including myenteric location, c-Kit positive staining, and ramified morphology. Donor-derived ICCs in the myenteric plexus contributed to a percentage ranging 9.25% ± 4.9% of all the ICCs in the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, here we described that donor-derived BMDCs might differentiate into gastrointestinal ICCs after radiation injury, which provided an alternative source for the origin of the ICCs in the muscular plexus of adult intestine. These results further identified the plasticity of BMDCs and indicated therapeutic implications of BMDCs for the gastrointestinal dysmotility caused by ICCs disorders. PMID:20396598

  2. Postprandial increase of oleoylethanolamide mobilization in small intestine of the Burmese python (Python molurus).

    PubMed

    Astarita, Giuseppe; Rourke, Bryan C; Andersen, Johnnie B; Fu, Jin; Kim, Janet H; Bennett, Albert F; Hicks, James W; Piomelli, Daniele

    2006-05-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator that inhibits feeding in rats and mice by activating the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha). In rodents, intestinal OEA levels increase about threefold upon refeeding, a response that may contribute to the induction of between-meal satiety. Here, we examined whether feeding-induced OEA mobilization also occurs in Burmese pythons (Python molurus), a species of ambush-hunting snakes that consume huge meals after months of fasting and undergo massive feeding-dependent changes in gastrointestinal hormonal release and gut morphology. Using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), we measured OEA levels in the gastrointestinal tract of fasted (28 days) and fed (48 h after feeding) pythons. We observed a nearly 300-fold increase in OEA levels in the small intestine of fed compared with fasted animals (322 +/- 121 vs. 1 +/- 1 pmol/mg protein, n = 3-4). In situ OEA biosynthesis was suggested by the concomitant increase of N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine species that serve as potential biosynthetic precursors for OEA. Furthermore, we observed a concomitant increase in saturated, mono- and diunsaturated, but not polyunsaturated fatty-acid ethanolamides (FAE) in the small intestine of fed pythons. The identification of OEA and other FAEs in the gastrointestinal tract of Python molurus suggests that this class of lipid messengers may be widespread among vertebrate groups and may represent an evolutionarily ancient means of regulating energy intake.

  3. Investigations on the estrogenic activity of the metallohormone cadmium in the rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Nicola; Diel, Patrick; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael; Kluxen, Felix M; Degen, Gisela H

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal and an important environmental pollutant, is now also regarded as potential endocrine disruptor. Its estrogenic effects have been examined so far just in classical target tissues, e.g. uterus, and mostly upon intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of CdCl(2). Yet, estrogen receptors are also expressed in the gut, and food is the main source of cadmium intake in the general population. Therefore, possible estrogenic effects were now investigated in the intestine of ovariectomized Wistar rats after oral short- and long-term administration of CdCl(2) (0.05-4 mg/kg bw on 3 days by gavage and 0.4-9 mg/kg bw for 4 weeks in drinking water) or upon i.p. injection (0.00005-2 mg CdCl(2)/kg bw), and compared to steroid estrogen (estradiol or ethinylestradiol) treated groups. Analysis of Cd in kidneys and small intestine by atomic absorption spectrometry showed dose-dependent increases in tissue levels with rather high Cd concentrations in the gut, both after oral and i.p. administration. Expression of metallothionein (MT1a), a typical metal response parameter, was clearly induced in kidney and small intestine of several CdCl(2) treated groups, but also notably increased by steroid estrogens. Levels of estrogen-regulated genes, i.e. pS2/TFF1, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ER alpha/beta) were studied as parameters of hormonal activity: The intestinal mRNA expression of pS2/TFF1 was significantly decreased in the estrogen reference groups, but also after single i.p. injection and oral long-term administration of CdCl(2). In contrast, the mRNA and protein expression of the VDR were unaffected by long-term administration of Cd via drinking water. We detected expression of ERbeta, but not ERalpha in the small intestine of OVX rats. ERbeta mRNA and protein expression were significantly down-regulated by Cd, similar to the ethinylestradiol reference group. The mRNA expression and immunostaining of proliferating cell

  4. Laparoscopic Herniorrhaphy with Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Using mesh or a synthetic prosthesis during the laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias has been demonstrated to be safe and effective. A new material, porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS mesh), has been successfully used in canine and rodent animal models with excellent results. This mesh is degradable and resorbable with a marked decrease in the possibility of becoming infected. However, the amount of fibroblast ingrowth is equal to that with polypropylene mesh. Methods: A comparison was made between this new SIS mesh to repair 15 inguinal hernias in 12 patients and polypropylene mesh used in 12 similar patients. A preperitoneal approach with balloon dissection was used in all patients. Results: Demographics were similar in both groups. The results were excellent and compared equally. Complications (seroma, discomfort) were minimal in both groups and were similar. Conclusions: Porcine small intestinal submucosa, SIS mesh, can be used for laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernias. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:12166756

  5. Quercetin attenuates the ischemia reperfusion induced COX-2 and MPO expression in the small intestine mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Štefan; Jonecová, Zuzana; Čurgali, Kristína; Maretta, Milan; Šoltés, Ján; Švaňa, Martin; Kalpadikis, Theodore; Caprnda, Martin; Adamek, Mariusz; Rodrigo, Luis; Kruzliak, Peter

    2017-08-28

    Quercetin, the active substance of tea, fruits and vegetables, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have potential therapeutic application. The present study was designed to investigate the beneficial effect of quercetin against experimental ischemia- reperfusion (IR) injury of the small intestine in rats. Quercetin was administrated intraperitoneally 30min before 1h ischemia of superior mesenteric artery with following reperfusion periods lasting 1, 4 and 24h. The male specific pathogen-free Charles River Wistar rats were used (n=45). In acute phase, 4h after start of reperfusion, the quercetin induced a significant decrease in mucosal injury index (p<0.05) accompanied by a significant decrease in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the epithelial lining of the intestinal villi in comparison with the control group (p<0.01). In the epithelium of the intestinal glands, COX-2 expression resulting from IR injury significantly increased regardless quercetin application (in control group p<0.001; in quercetin group p<0.05), but in quercetin group, significant decrease in it during 24h of reperfusion in a late phase of IR injury was detected (p<0.001). Based on morphology of COX-2 positive cells, the COX-2 positivity was found particularly in goblet cells of the intestinal villi epithelium and enteroendocrine cells respectively, in the glandular epithelium. We concluded that quercetin application attenuated mucosal damage from IR injury by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration which was demonstrated by a lower number of myeloperoxidase positive cells in the lamina propria during both phases of IR injury and the significant decrease in that in a late phase after 24h of reperfusion (p<0.05). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Ontogenic timing mechanism initiates the expression of rat intestinal sucrase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, K.Y.; Holt, P.R.

    1986-03-01

    Morphologic and enzymic differentiation occurs in rat small intestinal epithelium during 16-20 days of postnatal life. This change is considered to be initiated by an ontogenic timing mechanism and is modulated by extrinsic systemic and luminal factors. The importance of the ontogenic timing was tested directly using a transplantation technique in which jejunal isografts from newborn (day 0) and 5-day-old (day 5) rats were implanted under the skin of newborn (day 0) hosts. Isografts showing cryptvillus architecture were obtained in 44% and 21% of transplants, respectively. Day 0 isografts and host intestine expressed sucrase activity at about 16-18 days of age and showed similar crypt cell labeling and epithelial migration after (3H)thymidine injection. Day 5 isografts expressed sucrase activity when the hosts were 13 days of age, whereas host intestine showed no detectable sucrase activity. Isograft lactase activities in both experimental transplant models were significantly higher than host intestinal lactase up to 28 days of age, suggesting that luminal factors are important in modulating lactase activity during the first 4 wk of postnatal life. It is concluded that (a) no systemic factors at day 13 inhibit the expression of sucrase activity and (b) an ontogenic timing mechanism in the jejunum initiates the expression of sucrase activity.

  7. Nature of elevated rat intestinal carbohydrase activities after high-carbohydrate diet feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuboi, K.K.; Kwong, L.K.; Yamada, K.; Sunshine, P.; Koldovsky, O.

    1985-10-01

    Adult rats that were maintained on a low-carbohydrate intake showed rapid increase in the activities of sucrase, maltase, and lactase along the length of the small intestine when they were fed a high-starch diet. In the present study, the authors have identified these activity increases, and showed that they reflect proportional accumulations in enzyme-protein of sucrase-isomaltase, maltase-glucoamylase, and neutral lactase. It was determined that each of these enzymes exists in adult rat intestine in single immunoreactive form and accounts as a group for all sucrase, cellobiase, and most maltase and lactase activities. Dietary change from low to high carbohydrate (starch) resulted in an increase in (TH)leucine accumulation in each of the enzymes, without a change in the amount of label accumulation in total intestinal proteins. The increase in label accumulation in the brush-border carbohydrase pools was matched generally by proportional elevation in the pool concentrations of sucrase-isomaltase and lactase but not maltase. These studies suggest that the elevation of intestinal carbohydrase concentrations induced by high-carbohydrate feeding may involve selective stimulation of their synthesis.

  8. [Coordination of the myoelectrical activity of the large and small intestine].

    PubMed

    Lychkova, A E

    2012-01-01

    Coordination of the myoelectrical activity of the large and small intestine was studied. Pacemaker cells of intestine are predominantly located at the proximal divisions of large and small intestine and have an increased spontaneous slow-wave activity, which ensures the distribution of excitation in smooth muscle underlying intestines. Due to the ileocecal coordination by sequential motor activity of small and large intestine is provided. The distal direction gradient of slow waves frequency reduction was established. Pacemaker cells possess certain structural specificity and is specialized in the spontaneous bioelectric activity.

  9. Pediatric small intestine bacterial overgrowth in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted gastrointestinal (GI) motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions who do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitats may be an under-recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effect of rat intestinal flora on in vitro metabolic transformation of pumiloside].

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Li, Meng-Xuan; Li, Hai-Bo; Liu, Wen-Jun; Meng, Zhao-Qing; Huang, Wen-Zhe; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To study the metabolic transformation of pumiloside by rat intestinal flora in vitro and identify its metabolites. Pumiloside was incubated in the rat intestinal flora in vitro. HPLC was used to monitor the metabolic process, and HPLC-Q-TOF-MS was used to identify the structures of biotransformation products. In vitro, pumiloside was easily metabolized by rat intestinal flora, and with the prolongation of metabolic time, pumiloside was transformed into several metabolites. Three metabolites were initially identified in this experiment. The study indicated that pumiloside could be extensively metabolized in the rat intestinal flora in vitro. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  11. Gastric emptying and intestinal absorption of ingested water and saline by hypovolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Edward M; Bykowski, Michael R; Hossler, Carrie A Smith; Curtis, Kathleen S; Smith, James C

    2009-12-07

    Recent experiments showed that in a one-bottle test conducted 16h after sc injection of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution, hypovolemic rats consumed water or 0.30 M NaCl in an initial drinking episode but did not empty the ingested fluid from the stomach or absorb it from the small intestine very rapidly, certainly not as rapidly as when 0.15M NaCl was consumed (Smith et al., Am J Physiol 292: R2089-R2099, 2007). The present experiments examined the patterns of water and 0.30 M NaCl ingestion and the movement of consumed fluid th