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Sample records for rats small intestine

  1. Early Adaptation of Small Intestine After Massive Small Bowel Resection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Qin, Zhen; Shan, Hongmei; Xiao, Yongtao; Cai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important that the residual bowel adapts after massive resection. The necessary intestinal adaptation is a progressive recovery from intestinal failure through increase in absorptive surface area and functional capacity and includes both morphological and functional adaptations. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate intestinal morphological and functional adaptations of small bowel syndrome (SBS) model rats (SBS1W) 7 days after bowel resection. Materials and Methods: Male sprague–dawley rats (n = 20/group) underwent either a 75% proximal small bowel resection (SBS1W group) or a control operation (control group). Markers of morphological adaptation were revealed by TEM analysis of H&E-stained tissue samples. The intestinal barrier condition was assessed by BT, and sIgA concentration in intestinal mucus was measured by ELISA. Contractility and the slow wave rhythm of the entire intestinal remnant were measured and recorded. Results: The SBS1W group experienced more weight loss than control group and had a clearly different intestinal morphology as revealed in TEM images. Compared with control rats, the SBS1W group had a lower sIgA concentration in intestinal mucus and higher BT to lymph nodes (70% vs 40%; level I), portal blood (40% vs 10%; level II), and peripheral blood (60% vs 30%; level III). Disorder of spontaneous rhythmic contraction, irregular amplitude, and slow frequency were detected in the SBS1W group by a muscle strips test. Similarly, the slow wave of the entire intestinal remnant in the SBS1W group was irregular and uncoordinated. Conclusions: The finding of intestinal adaptation following massive SBR in SBS1W rats provides more understanding of the mechanisms of progressive recovery from the intestinal failure that underlies SBS. The mechanical, chemical, immunological, and biological barriers were all impaired at 7 days following bowel resection, indicating that the SBS model rats were still in the intestinal

  2. Cholinergic mediation of small intestinal transit in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, P.R.; Ems, B.L.; Pepple, S.C

    1986-03-05

    It has been reported that small intestinal transit (SIT) in the rat is not cholinergically mediated. The geometric mean of a marker may be a more powerful method for SIT studies. Therefore, it was their goal to evaluate the effect of muscarinic blockade in normal and prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 2/)-enhanced SIT using this method. Male, food-fasted rats (190 to 240 g) were first dosed subcutaneously with atropine. 30 min after the atropine the rats received an oral dose of PGE/sub 2/ at 5.0 mg/kg. 5 min after PGE/sub 2/, a /sup 51/Cr-labeled marker was dosed intraduodenally, and a 25 min transit period followed. The results are: (1) 5.0 mg/kg of PGE/sub 2/ significantly stimulates the geometric mean of the marker in agreement with previous findings and (2) atropine is inhibitory at doses as low as 0.20 mg/kg for basal SIT and 0.10 mg/kg for PGE/sub 2/-stimulated SIT. This indicates (1) the rat has cholinergically mediated SIT, and (2) cholinergic activation may be important for PGE/sub 2/ effects on SIT in the rat.

  3. Intestinal mast cells and eosinophils in relation to Strongyloides ratti adult expulsion from the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Shintoku, Y; Kadosaka, T; Kimura, E; Takagi, H; Kondo, S; Itoh, M

    2013-04-01

    Mucosal mast cells (MMC) play a crucial role in the expulsion of Strongyloides ratti adults from the small intestine of mice. We reported the large intestinal parasitism of S. ratti in rats, and there has been no report on MMC in the large intestine of the natural host. We studied kinetics of MMC, together with eosinophils, in the upper and lower small intestines, caecum and colon of infected rats. Two distinct phases of mastocytosis were revealed: one in the upper small intestine triggered by stimulation of 'ordinary' adults, and the other in the colon stimulated by 'immune-resistant' adults that started parasitizing the colon around 19 days post-infection. In all 4 intestinal sites, the MMC peaks were observed 5-7 days after the number of adult worms became the maximum and the height of MMC peaks appeared to be dependent on the number of parasitic adults, suggesting an important role played by worms themselves in the MMC buildup.

  4. Ghrelin in small intestine, its contribution to regulation of food intake and body weight in cross-intestinal parabiotic rats.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hitoshi; Masaki, Takayuki; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin has been shown to be associated with feeding behavior in humans and rodents. It has been suggested that ghrelin may play a role behind the effect of bariatric surgery. Inbred rats were made into parabiotic pairs so that they shared a single abdominal cavity. A further operation is performed later in which the small intestines are transected and re-connected so that one rat continually lost nutrition to its partner. Changes in food intake and body weight were recorded. Seven weeks later, content of ghrelin in the plasma, stomach and upper intestines were measured in the paired rats. Rats which lost nutrients to its counterpart (Loss rats) ingested significantly more food than sham control rats (p<0.001). Rats which gained nutrient (Gain rats) ingested less than controls (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in body weight, blood glucose, insulin, free fatty acids and triglycerides between the paired rats. There was significantly higher levels of ghrelin in the plasma (p<0.008) and the intestine of the Loss rats (p<0.02). There were no difference in ghrelin in the stomach between parabiotic rats and sham operated controls. The ghrelin content of the plasma and intestines were significantly higher in the Loss rats, which ate more, and normal in the Gain rats, which ate less than controls. Because no remarkable changes in the ghrelin content were observed in the stomach, difference in the quality of the chime may affect the local synthesis and release of ghrelin.

  5. Myoelectric activity of the small intestine during morphine dependence and withdrawal in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, D.A.; Sninsky, C.A.; Lynch, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    The authors investigated (1) the effect of morphine dependence on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) of the small intestine, (2) whether bacterial overgrowth developed in morphine-dependent rats, and (3) the effect of naloxone and methylbromide naltrexone, a peripheral opioid antagonist, on the MMC in morphine-naive and morphine-dependent rats. They also evaluated intestinal motility during naloxone-induced withdrawal in animals pretreated with clonidine. Intestinal myoelectric activity was monitored by four indwelling electrodes in unanesthetized, fasted rats. D-(/sup 14/C)xylose breath tests were performed before and after morphine-pellet implantation to evaluate the presence of bacterial overgrowth of the small intestine. Naloxone had no effect on myoelectric activity of the small intestine in morphine-naive rats. Cycling activity fronts were present in morphine-dependent animals, but there was a significant prolongation of activity front periodicity and slowing of the propagation velocity. No significant increase in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ excretion was noted in the morphine-dependent rats. They conclude from their studies that (1) myoelectric activity of the small intestine develops incomplete tolerance to morphine; (2) bacterial overgrowth is not a feature of morphine dependence in the rat; (3) alterations of intestinal myoelectric activity are a component of the opiate withdrawal syndrome, and they appear at least partially mediated by a peripheral mechanism that can be suppressed by an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist.

  6. Effects of dietary pectin and fat on the small intestinal contents and exocrine pancreas of rats.

    PubMed

    Forman, L P; Schneeman, B O

    1980-10-01

    The effects of dietary pectin and fat level on digestive enzyme activities in the pancreas and small intestine and on intestinal bile acid levels were investigated. In unfed rats, dietary pectin did not influence the pancreatic enzymes studied, but a higher level of corn oil in the diet lowered the amylase activity in the pancreas, increased pancreatic lipase activity and slightly lowered the chymotrypsin and trypsin activities. Diet did not change the dry weight of the pancreas. In the fed rats, dietary pectin increased the dry weight of the small gut wash plus the mucosal scraping. Dietary pectin increased the small intestinal lipase and chymotrypsin levels and at the low level of fat only, increased amylase and trypsin activities in the small intestine of fed rats. Intestinal lipase levels were higher and amylase levels lower in rats consuming the high level of corn oil. These results indicate that changes in dietary fat level led to changes in the amylase and lipase content of secreted pancreatic juice and that differences in absorption associated with diets containing pectin could be the result of increased material in the small intestine.

  7. Site differences of Toll-like receptor expression in the mucous epithelium of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Mantani, Y; Kamezaki, A; Udayanga, K G S; Takahara, E-i; Qi, W M; Kawano, J; Yokoyama, T; Hoshi, N; Kitagawa, H

    2011-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns and might function as receptors to detect microbes. In this study, the distribution of TLR-2, -4 and -9 were immunohistochemically investigated in the rat small intestine. As a result, TLR-2 was detected in the striated borders of villous columnar epithelial cells throughout the small intestine, except for the apices of a small number of intestinal villi. TLR-4 and -9 were detected in the striated borders of the villous columnar epithelial cells only in the duodenum. TLR-4-immunopositive minute granules were found in the apical cytoplasms of epithelial cells, subepithelial spaces and blood capillary lumina. TLR-2 and -4 were detected in the striated borders of undifferentiated epithelial cells and in the luminal substances of the intestinal crypts throughout the small intestine, but TLR-9 was not detected in the crypts throughout the small intestine. Only TLR-4 was detected in the secretory granules of Paneth cells in both the jejunal and ileal intestinal crypts. These findings suggest that duodenal TLRs might monitor indigenous bacteria proliferation in the upper alimentary tract, that TLR-2 might also monitor the proliferation of colonized indigenous bacteria throughout the small intestine, that the lack of TLR-2 at the villous apices might contribute to the settlement of indigenous bacteria, and that TLR-2 and -4 are secreted from intestinal crypts.

  8. Intestinal absorption of berberine and 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine and their effects on sugar absorption in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-chao; Dong, Su; Xu, Li-jun; Zhang, Chen-yu

    2014-04-01

    The intestinal absorption of berberine (Ber) and its structural modified compound 8-hydroxy dihydroberberine (Hdber) was compared, and their effects on the intestinal absorption of sugar by perfusion experiment were investigated in order to reveal the mechanism of low dose and high activity of Hdber in the treatment of hyperglycemia. The absorption of Hdber and Ber in rat small intestine was measured by in situ perfusion. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the concentrations of Hdber and Ber. In situ perfusion method was also used to study the effects of Hdber and Ber on sugar intestinal absorption. Glucose oxidase method and UV spectrophotometry were applied to examine the concentrations of glucose and sucrose in the perfusion fluid. The results showed that the absorption rate of Ber in the small intestine was lower than 10%, but that of Hdber was larger than 70%. Both Hdber and Ber inhibited the absorption of glucose and sucrose at the doses of 10 and 20 μg/mL. However, Hdber presented stronger activity than Ber (P<0.01). It is suggested that Hdber is absorbed easily in rat small intestine and that its inhibitory effect on the absorption of sugar is better than Ber.

  9. Sodium-bicarbonate cotransport occurs in rat kidney cortical membranes but not in rat small intestinal basolateral membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Hagenbuch, B; Stange, G; Murer, H

    1987-01-01

    Basolateral membrane vesicles were isolated from rat kidney cortex and small intestinal enterocytes. Both membrane preparations show ATP-dependent calcium uptake and cytochalasin B-sensitive D-glucose transport. In renal membranes, sodium influx is stimulated by bicarbonate; bicarbonate-dependent sodium flux is membrane-potential-dependent and inhibited by 4,4'-di-isothiocyanato-2, 2'-stilbenedisulphanic acid ('DIDS'). Small intestinal basolateral membranes do not show bicarbonate-dependent sodium fluxes. PMID:2825641

  10. Microsomal quercetin glucuronidation in rat small intestine depends on age and segment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity toward the flavonoid quercetin and UGT protein were characterized in 3 equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats, n=8/age using villin to control for enterocyte content. SI microsomal intrinsic clearance of quercetin...

  11. Changes in the expression of small intestine extracellular matrix proteins in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, S S; Genta, S B; Aybar, M J; Honoré, S M; Villecco, E I; Sánchez Riera, A N

    2000-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by anatomical and functional alterations of the intestinal tract. However, the aetiology of these disturbances remains unclear. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effects of diabetes on the expression of laminin-1 and fibronectin in the small intestine of Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. The Western immunoblotting of the extracts from the small intestine revealed that experimental diabetes resulted in a marked increase in the intensity of the bands corresponding to laminin-1 and fibronectin. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated a strong labelling to these two extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the small intestine of diabetic rats, mainly localized in the smooth muscle layer. These results occur together with a thickening of the basement membrane (BM) of the smooth muscle cells, demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We propose that the accumulation of ECM proteins in the smooth muscle layer may be an effect mediated by hyperglycaemia, since insulin treatment of diabetic rats reversed this accumulation. These results could provide information on the potential role of the ECM in the intestine, an organ which is known to exhibit important alterations in diabetes. PMID:11114237

  12. Protective effect of vitamin E against ethanol-induced small intestine damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Barmaki, Hanieh; Khadem Ansari, Mohamadhasan; Lkhanizadeh, BehrouzI; Barmaki, Haleh

    2016-03-01

    The role of oxidative stress and inflammatory reaction has been reported in various ethanol-induced complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-induced structural alteration, oxidative stress, and inflammatory reaction on the small intestine of rats, and plausible protective effect of vitamin E to determine whether it inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in the small intestine. Twenty-four male wistar rats were divided into three groups, namely: Control, ethanol, and vitamin E treated ethanol groups. After six weeks of treatment, the small intestine length, villus height, crypt depth and muscular layer thickness, oxidative stress, and inflammatory parameters showed significant changes in the ethanol treated group compared to the control group. Vitamin E consumption along with ethanol ameliorated structural alteration of the small intestine and reduced the elevated amount of oxidative stress and inflammatory markers such as protein carbonyl, OX-LDL, IL-6, Hcy, and TNF-α. Furthermore, their total antioxidant capacity was increased significantly compared to that of the ethanol group. These findings indicate that ethanol induces the small intestine abnormality by oxidative and inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule.

  13. Light microscopic immunocytochemical localization of hepatic and intestinal types of fatty acid-binding proteins in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Shields, H M; Bates, M L; Bass, N M; Best, C J; Alpers, D H; Ockner, R K

    1986-05-01

    Monospecific antisera to purified hepatic fatty acid-binding protein (hFABP) and gut fatty acid-binding protein (gFABP) have been used to localize these two proteins in the small intestine of fed rats at the light microscopic level. Pieces of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were removed from 4-, 10-, 20-, 22-, and 60-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Both cryostat and paraffin sections were studied for the presence of hFABP or gFABP by the avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Slides were graded blind for the intensity of staining. Despite the structural and immunological differences between these two proteins, we showed no major differences between their staining patterns or their staining intensity throughout the intestine during postnatal development. The staining for both fatty acid-binding proteins was cytoplasmic. No brush border staining was found. Staining was more intense in the proximal rather than distal intestine, in the villus rather than crypt cells, and in the apex rather than the base of intestinal cells. Shifts in staining patterns, and staining intensity occurring during development may be related to variations in dietary fat intake, rates of cell proliferation, intestinal anatomy, and mechanisms for fat absorption.

  14. Protein synthesis of muscle fractions from the small intestine in alcohol fed rats.

    PubMed Central

    Preedy, V R; Peters, T J

    1990-01-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on the amounts and synthesis rates of cytoplasmic, contractile, and stromal protein fractions were investigated in the small intestine of eight pairs of immature and seven pairs of mature rats. Treated rats were fed ethanol as 36% of total energy in a nutritionally adequate liquid diet. Paired controls were fed isovolumetric amounts of the same diet in which ethanol was substituted by isocaloric glucose. After six weeks the total cytoplasmic and contractile protein content in immature rats was reduced by 18% and 31%, respectively (p less than or equal to 0.007). The decline in the stromal protein content (26%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.130). In mature rats the protein contents were also reduced in the cytoplasmic (25%, p = 0.035) and contractile (27%, p = 0.005) protein fractions, though the stromal protein fraction was unaltered (p = 0.913). In immature rats fractional rates of protein synthesis in cytoplasmic and contractile protein fractions of the small intestine were unaltered by chronic ethanol feeding (p less than or equal to 0.853). In mature rats, the synthesis rates of corresponding fractions declined, by 18% and 31%, respectively, but were also not statistically significant (p less than or equal to 0.369). Absolute rates of protein synthesis in immature rats fell by 6% (p = 0.549) in the cytoplasmic and 31% in the contractile protein fraction (p = 0.045). In mature rats, the corresponding reductions were 38% (p = 0.106) and 48% (p = 0.033), respectively. Virtually no radioactivity could be detected in the stromal fraction, signifying very low synthesis rates. Chronic ethanol feeding reduces the amount of protein in the small intestine of the immature and mature rat with the contractile protein fraction showing the greatest decrease. In the absence of statistically significant reductions in fractional synthesis rates a partial adaptation in turnover rates may have occurred. PMID:2323594

  15. Maturation status of small intestine epithelium in rats deprived of dietary nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Ortega, M A; Gil, A; Sánchez-Pozo, A

    1995-01-01

    We describe the changes of several brush-border enzymatic activities in different subpopulations of epithelial cells, separated sequentially from the villus tip-to-crypt axis of the small intestine, induced by deprivation of dietary nucleotides for different periods of time in adult rats. Deprivation of dietary nucleotides lead to a decrease in the content and specific activity of alkaline phosphatase, leucine-aminopeptidase, maltase, sucrase and lactase in the villus tip, but had little effect on the crypt zone. The effect of the nucleotide deprivation on the enzymatic activity progressively increased towards the tip of the villus. Since these enzymes are maturation markers of the intestinal cells, these results support the idea that dietary nucleotides affect the maturation status of small-intestine epithelium.

  16. Human, rat and chicken small intestinal Na+-Cl−-creatine transporter: functional, molecular characterization and localization

    PubMed Central

    Peral, M J; García-Delgado, M; Calonge, M L; Durán, J M; De La Horra, M C; Wallimann, T; Speer, O; Ilundáin, A A

    2002-01-01

    In spite of all the fascinating properties of oral creatine supplementation, the mechanism(s) mediating its intestinal absorption has(have) not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to characterize intestinal creatine transport. [14C]Creatine uptake was measured in chicken enterocytes and rat ileum, and expression of the creatine transporter CRT was examined in human, rat and chicken small intestine by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Northern blot, in situ hybridization, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results show that enterocytes accumulate creatine against its concentration gradient. This accumulation was electrogenic, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, with a probable stoichiometry of 2 Na+: 1 Cl−: 1 creatine, and inhibited by ouabain and iodoacetic acid. The kinetic study revealed a Km for creatine of 29 μm. [14C]Creatine uptake was efficiently antagonized by non-labelled creatine, guanidinopropionic acid and cyclocreatine. More distant structural analogues of creatine, such as GABA, choline, glycine, β-alanine, taurine and betaine, had no effect on intestinal creatine uptake, indicating a high substrate specificity of the creatine transporter. Consistent with these functional data, messenger RNA for CRT was detected only in the cells lining the intestinal villus. The sequences of partial clones, and of the full-length cDNA clone, isolated from human and rat small intestine were identical to previously cloned CRT cDNAs. Immunological analysis revealed that CRT protein was mainly associated with the apical membrane of the enterocytes. This study reports for the first time that mammalian and avian enterocytes express CRT along the villus, where it mediates high-affinity, Na+- and Cl−-dependent, apical creatine uptake. PMID:12433955

  17. Autoradiographic localization of opioid receptor types in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.R.; Sykes, R.M.; Thompson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The selective mu and delta ligands (/sup 3/H)DAGO and (/sup 3/H)DPDPE have been used to investigate the distribution of specific opioid subtypes in the rat small intestine by in vitro autoradiography. There was a greater density of (/sup 3/H)DPDPE binding at regions of the villi and crypts than (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding. These results suggest that the opioid receptors located in these regions are predominantly of the delta subtype.

  18. Effect of diets containing genetically modified potatoes expressing Galanthus nivalis lectin on rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ewen, S W; Pusztai, A

    1999-10-16

    Diets containing genetically modified (GM) potatoes expressing the lectin Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) had variable effects on different parts of the rat gastrointestinal tract. Some effects, such as the proliferation of the gastric mucosa, were mainly due to the expression of the GNA transgene. However, other parts of the construct or the genetic transformation (or both) could also have contributed to the overall biological effects of the GNA-GM potatoes, particularly on the small intestine and caecum.

  19. Digestive enzyme expression and epithelial structure of small intestine in neonatal rats after 16 days spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, M.; Yamasaki, M.; Hazama, A.; Ijiri, K.; Shimizu, T.

    It is important to assure whether digestive system can develop normally in neonates during spaceflight. Because the small intestine changes its function and structure drastically around weaning known as redifferentiation. Lactase expression declines and sucrase increases in small intestine for digestion of solid food before weaning. In this paper, we compared this enzyme transition and structural development of small intestine in neonatal rats after spaceflight. To find digestive genes differentially expressed in fight rats, DNA membrane macroarray was also used. Eight-day old rats were loaded to Space Shuttle Columbia, and housed in the animal facility for 16 days in space (STS-90, Neurolab mission). Two control groups (AGC; asynchronous ground control and VIV; vivarium) against flight group (FLT) were prepared. There was no difference in structure (crypt depth) and cell differentiation of epithelium between FLT and AGC by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that the amount of sucrase mRNA compared to lactase was decreased in FLT by RT-PCR. It reflected the enzyme transition was inhibited. Increase of 5 genes (APO A-I, APO A-IV, ACE, aFABP and aminopeptidase M) and decrease of carboxypeptidase-D were detected in FLT using macroarray. We think nutrition differences (less nourishment and late weaning) during spaceflight may cause inhibition of enzyme transition at least partly. The weightlessness might contribute to the inhibition through behavioral change.

  20. Lymph flow, lymph protein concentration, and protein output from rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S

    1985-06-01

    Lymph flow (JL), lymph protein concentration (CL), and protein output (JP) from the main intestinal lymph duct were determined. The basal JL from the mesenteric pedicle alone was the same as that from the mesenteric pedicle attached with a segment of the nonabsorbing intestine, indicating that the basal JL does not originate from the intestine but is totally from the region of the mesenteric pedicle. The basal CL was 3.5-3.8 g/100 ml. When the intestine was absorbing water, JL increased and CL decreased, but JP increased above the basal JP in the initial 20 min of water absorption and then decreased progressively with time. Furthermore, it was estimated that CL in the "excess lymph" (formed during water absorption) was 1.4 +/- 0.2 g/100 ml in the initial 10 min of water absorption and was zero or nearly so in the later periods. From this and other evidence, it is concluded that under various conditions without net water absorption rat small intestine does not produce lymph and that during water absorption there is no significant increase in capillary permeability or capillary filtration. Therefore, the excess lymph could be mostly derived from the fluid absorbed from the lumen of the intestine.

  1. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine ... Embolus: Blood clots can block one of the arteries supplying the intestine. People who have had a ...

  2. Short-term regulation of glycolysis by vasoactive intestinal peptide in epithelial cells isolated from rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, I; Monge, L; Feliu, J E

    1989-01-01

    In epithelial cells isolated from rat small intestine, we have studied the influence of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neurotransmitter which markedly increases enterocyte cyclic AMP, and of two cyclic AMP analogues (8-bromo cyclic AMP and N6,2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic AMP) on the rate of glycolysis, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate concentration and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity, as well as on the rate of 3-O-methyl-D-[14C]glucose uptake. Our results show that, without affecting the rate of 3-O-methyl-D-[14C]glucose accumulation, VIP and cyclic AMP analogues were able to inhibit glucose consumption and L-lactate formation by isolated rat enterocytes. These effects occurred parallel to a significant decrease in the cellular concentration of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and to a partial inactivation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase. These findings support the hypothesis that VIP inhibits glycolysis in rat enterocytes through a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:2552995

  3. Drug elimination function of rat small intestine: metabolism and intraluminal excretion.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, M; Kurosaki, Y; Kimura, T; Sezaki, H

    1984-10-15

    The metabolic and excretory function of the small intestine was investigated after oral and intravenous administration of drugs having an aromatic amino group to rats. After administration of drugs into the intestinal loop at the initial concentration of 0.1 mM, significant excretion of their N-acetylated forms into the lumen was observed. The amount of N-acetyl forms excreted in the lumen were 39.3 +/- 3.5, 63.5 +/- 20.9 and 18.0 +/- 13.8% of disappeared drugs from the lumen for p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), p-aminosalicylic acid and sulfanilic acid, respectively. The excretion of p-acetamidobenzoic acid (Ac-PABA) after the absorption of PABA was reduced by the coadministration with salicylic acid, benzoic acid and 2,4-dinitrophenol. Salicylic acid noncompetitively inhibited the acetylation of PABA by the intestinal N-acetyltransferase. A good correlation was found between the intestinal N-acetyltransferase activities for drugs and the intraluminal excretion of N-acetyl derivatives after intestinal absorption of drugs. These results indicate that a drug having a higher susceptibility to intestinal N-acetyltransferase would undergo a greater excretion into the lumen in its N-acetyl form after intestinal absorption. After intravenous administration of PABA at a dose of 100 mumole/kg, 4.02 +/- 0.51% of dose was excreted in the lumen as Ac-PABA in 30 min. On the other hand, a significantly smaller fraction (2.72 +/- 0.68% of dose) was excreted in the lumen after intravenous injection of 100 mumole/kg of Ac-PABA. The larger excretion of Ac-PABA after administration of PABA indicates the contribution of intestinal metabolism on the transfer of PABA not only after oral, but also after intravenous administration.

  4. Functional reentry and circus movement arrhythmias in the small intestine of normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Wim J E P; Stephen, B; Karam, S M

    2012-04-01

    In a few recent studies, the presence of arrhythmias based on reentry and circus movement of the slow wave have been shown to occur in normal and diseased stomachs. To date, however, reentry has not been demonstrated before in any other part of the gastrointestinal system. No animals had to be killed for this study. Use was made of materials obtained during the course of another study in which 11 rats were treated with streptozotocin and housed with age-matched controls. After 3 and 7 mo, segments of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum were isolated and positioned in a tissue bath. Slow wave propagation was recorded with 121 extracellular electrodes. After the experiment, the propagation of the slow waves was reconstructed. In 10 of a total of 66 intestinal segments (15%), a circus movement of the slow wave was detected. These reentries were seen in control (n = 2) as well as in 3-mo (n = 2) and 7-mo (n = 6) diabetic rats. Local conduction velocities and beat-to-beat intervals during the reentries were measured (0.42 ± 0.15 and 3.03 ± 0.67 cm/s, respectively) leading to a wavelength of 1.3 ± 0.5 cm and a circuit diameter of 4.1 ± 1.5 mm. This is the first demonstration of a reentrant arrhythmia in the small intestine of control and diabetic rats. Calculations of the size of the circuits indicate that they are small enough to fit inside the intestinal wall. Extrapolation based on measured velocities and rates indicate that reentrant arrhythmias are also possible in the distal small intestine of larger animals including humans.

  5. [Glucose absorption in the rat small intestine in vivo after various levels of local substrate load].

    PubMed

    Gruzdkov, A A; Gromova, L V

    2013-05-01

    In order to evaluate relative roles of various mechanisms of glucose transport in the small intestine at high substrate loads in chronic experiments on rats, we investigated kinetics of glucose absorption in isolated part (-20 cm) of the intestine after its perfusion for 6 and 14 days during 1.5 h per day with 125 mM glucose solution (gr. 1--increased substrate load) or during 45-60 min per day with 25 mM glucose solution (gr. 2--reduced substrate load). The results of the experiments were analyzed by means of mathematical simulation. It was found that in the rats of gr. 1 the regular substrate load was more effective in maintaining a high level of glucose absorption in the isolated part of the intestine. Adaptation of glucose absorption to the increased local glucose load occurs due to enhancement of the secondary active transport via SGLT1. This component in many times exceeds the "unsaturated" component of glucose absorption, which is mainly determined by the facilitated diffusion via GLUT2, both at high and low glucose concentrations in the intestinal lumen.

  6. Toxic effect on the rat small intestine of chronic administration of asbestos in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Delahunty, T J; Hollander, D

    1987-12-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were given a 0.5 g/l Chrysotile asbestos solution in their drinking water (approximately 7 mg/day ingested) for 1.5 years and compared to control rats of the same age. During this time there were no differences in weight or appearance of the asbestos-treated rats in comparison to controls maintained under the same conditions. However, when in vivo intestinal permeability studies were performed using a gavage/urinary collection technique, some significant changes were noted. The recovery of lactulose in the urine of asbestos-treated rats was 0.66 +/- 0.07%, significantly less than that of the controls (1.01 +/- 0.08, P less than 0.005). The recovery of mannitol was similarly decreased (2.2 +/- 0.28 vs. 3.0 +/- 0.17, P less than 0.02), but that of rhamnose was unchanged. Creatinine clearance studies indicated that there was no impairment of kidney function in the asbestos-treated group and polarized light microscopy did not reveal any asbestos fibers in sections of the small bowel. The results suggest that the chronic exposure of rats to asbestos fibers in the drinking water results in a decreased ability of the intestine to absorb some non-metabolizable sugars. PMID:3120357

  7. Vitamin A deficiency and small intestinal secretory function in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Nzegwu, H; Levin, R J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of vitamin A on the functions of the small intestine was examined in rats made vitamin A deficient for 40 days by feeding a special diet after weaning and in pair fed vitamin A deficient rats that were given supplementary vitamin A (240 IU/day) in their drinking water. The basal and stimulated electrogenic secretory and absorptive functions of the jejunum and proximal and distal ileum removed from these rats were examined in vitro using the short circuit current as the index of transport activity. The basal short circuit current in the jejunum and proximal ileum was not significantly different but that of the distal ileum was lower. Electrogenic glucose transfer was not significantly affected by the vitamin deficiency. Cholinergic stimulation using the M1/M2 agonist bethanechol showed a greatly enhanced electrogenic secretion in the jejunum of the deficient rats while secretion stimulated by dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate was significantly greater in their distal ilea compared with the supplemented group. The vitamin deficiency also disrupted the normal higher/lower hierarchical pattern of transport activity between the proximal and distal ileum. The enhanced secretory activity of the vitamin A deficient small intestine offers a putative explanation for the well known relation between vitamin A deficiency and diarrhoea found in humans. PMID:1721598

  8. Transesterification of a series of 12 parabens by liver and small-intestinal microsomes of rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Chieri; Watanabe, Yoko; Uramaru, Naoto; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2014-02-01

    Hydrolytic transformation of parabens (4-hydroxybenzoic acid esters; used as antibacterial agents) to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and alcohols by tissue microsomes is well-known both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated transesterification reactions of parabens catalyzed by rat and human microsomes, using a series of 12 parabens with C1-C12 alcohol side chains. Transesterification of parabens by rat liver and small-intestinal microsomes occurred in the presence of alcohols in the microsomal incubation mixture. Among the 12 parabens, propylparaben was most effectively transesterified by rat liver microsomes with methanol or ethanol, followed by butylparaben. Relatively low activity was observed with longer-side-chain parabens. In contrast, small-intestinal microsomes exhibited higher activity towards moderately long side-chain parabens, and showed the highest activity toward octylparaben. When parabens were incubated with liver or small-intestinal microsomes in the presence of C1-C12 alcohols, ethanol and decanol were most effectively transferred to parabens by rat liver microsomes and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively. Human liver and small-intestinal microsomes also exhibited significant transesterification activities with different substrate specificities, like rat microsomes. Carboxylesterase isoforms, CES1b and CES1c, and CES2, exhibited significant transesterification activity toward parabens, and showed similar substrate specificity to human liver and small-intestinal microsomes, respectively.

  9. Prolactin and Prolactin Receptor Expression in Rat, Small Intestine, Intraepithelial Lymphocytes During Neonatal Developmen

    PubMed Central

    Urtishak, Sandra L.; Mckenna, Elizabeth A.; Mastro, Andrea M.

    2001-01-01

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) are specialized T cells found between the epithelial cells of the small intestine. Because of their location, IEL are the first lymphocytes to contact intestinal bacteria and food antigens. In the neonate, IEL may be the first cells of the immune system to interact with milk-borne hormones including prolactin (PRL). PRL, an endocrine hormone abundant in breast milk, interacts with cells through surface receptors. PRL has been shown to function as an immunoregulator and may affect the development of the newborn's immune system. To determine if PRL plays a role in IEL development, small intestine IEL from rats of various ages were examined for the presence of surface prolactin receptor (PRL-R) and several lymphoid markers by flow cytometry. Between birth and 96 days of age about 80% of IEL were found to express PRL-R. These same cells also expressed the mRNA for PRL. Additionally, all of the IEL subpopulations examined were found to express PRL-R. Analysis of the normal development of rat IEL revealed an age related increase in total IEL, CD4 positive cells as well as a peak in interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression at weaning. In summary, the results indicate that IEL express PRL and PRL-R. In addition, an activation marker, IL-2R, changes in expression during neonatal development. PMID:11785680

  10. Induction of histone acetylation on the CRBPII gene in perinatal rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yuko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2007-09-01

    The expression of genes associated with lipid and vitamin A metabolism is elevated when the small intestinal mucosa is maturing rapidly during the perinatal period. We have previously reported that cellular retinol-binding protein type II (CRBPII) mRNA levels rise abruptly in the rat small intestine during this period. In this study, we examined whether the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 is involved in the intestinal expression of CRBPII during the perinatal stage. The expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 genes, which are markers of cell proliferation, decreased markedly during the perinatal period, whereas expression of CRBPII as well as villin, a marker of intestinal maturation, increased rapidly. Using a ChIP assay, we showed rapid induction of acetylation of the histones H3 and H4 which interacted with the promoter/enhancer region of the CRBPII gene at this time. The binding of CBP and p300, which have histone acetyltransferase activity, as well as binding of retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) increased on the CRBPII promoter/enhancer region during the perinatal period. These results suggest that CRBPII gene expression during the perinatal period is associated with abrupt acetylation of histones H3 and H4 followed by the binding of CBP/p300 and RXRalpha.

  11. A diurnal rhythm in the absorption of glucose and water by isolated rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R B; Gardner, M L

    1976-01-01

    1. Glucose and water absorption by isolated small intestine from rats which have had unrestricted access to food is 50-60% higher at night than during the daytime. 2. When the feeding time is restricted to 06.00-09.00 hr G.M.T. glucose and water absorption rates in the period from 3 to 7 hr after withdrawal of food are almost as high as the rates observed at night-time in the animals with unrestricted feeding. 3. These changes in absorption rates appear to be associated with feeding time and not with the pattern of illumination.

  12. Decrease of lactase activity in the small intestine of jejunum-bypassed rats.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, H; Goda, T; Takase, S

    1992-08-01

    The effect of jejunum-bypass operation on lactase in rat small intestine was examined. Three groups of four or five rats were designated as jejunum-bypassed, sham-operated and normal rats. All animals including normal rats received by pair-feeding 5% glucose/1% NaCl for 5 days following the operation; thereafter they were fed ad libitum the laboratory chow diet. Three weeks after the jejunal bypass operation, the proximal ileum exhibited a hyperplasia as evidenced by a concomitant increase in mucosal contents of both total proteins and DNA. The specific activity of lactase in this segment was significantly lower in the operated rats than sham-operated controls, whereas the specific activity of sucrase in this segment was significantly elevated. The reduction of lactase activity was also evident in the proximal jejunal segment as well as in the distal jejunum which was deprived of luminal nutrition, suggesting that some hormonal factor(s) might be involved in the decrease of lactase activity in jejunum-bypassed animals. Electroimmunoassay revealed that the amount of immunoreactive lactase also declined in the operated rats relative to the sham-operated controls. Our results thus suggest that lactase activity in residual ileum is not only unable to compensate for the loss of digestive-absorptive surface of jejunum, but lactase activity even decreases following jejunum-bypass operation.

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Heat- and Shake-Induced Injury in the Rat Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Peng; Xu, Jianqin; He, Shasha; Liu, Fenghua; Yin, Jie; Wan, Changrong; mei, Chen; Yin, Yulong; Xu, Xiaolong; Xia, Zhaofei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms underlying damage to rat small intestine in heat- and shake-induced stress. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and a 3-day stressed group treated 2 h daily for 3 days on a rotary platform at 35°C and 60 r/min. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained paraffin sections of the jejunum following stress revealed shedding of the villus tip epithelial cells and lamina propria exposure. Apoptosis increased at the villus tip and extended to the basement membrane. Photomicrographs revealed that the microvilli were shorter and sparser; the nuclear envelope invaginated and gaps in the karyolemma increased; and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) swelled significantly. Gene microarray analysis assessed 93 differentially expressed genes associated with apoptosis, ER stress, and autophagy. Relevant genes were compiled from the Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Forty-one genes were involved in the regulation of apoptosis, fifteen were related to autophagy, and eleven responded to ER stress. According to KEGG, the apoptosis pathways, mitogen-activated protein kinase(MAPK) signaling pathway, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, and regulation of autophagy were involved. Caspase3 (Casp3), caspase12 (Casp12), and microtubule-associate proteins 1 light chain 3(LC3) increased significantly at the villus tip while mTOR decreased; phosphorylated-AKT (P-AKT) decreased. ER stress was involved and induced autophagy and apoptosis in rat intestinal damage following heat and shake stress. Bioinformatic analysis will help determine the underlying mechanisms in stress-induced damage in the small intestine. PMID:26636675

  14. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  15. Scintigraphic evaluation of small intestinal transit in the streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Durmus-Altun, G; Vatansever, U; Arzu Vardar, S; Altaner, S; Dirlik, B

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Small intestine (SI) transit in the streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats were examined by using 99mTc-mebrofenin scintigraphy. Materials and methods: Wistar albino rats (mean body weight: 220±12 g) were studied for both control (n=10) and diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=10) groups. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg kg(-1) body weight. SI transit time was assessed by measuring arrival times of 99mTc-mebrofenin from duodenum to caecum. Results: The mean transit time of 99mTc- mebrofenin was 67.8±11 min in control group. The mean transit time of SI was prolonged in STZ induced diabetic animals with (111.9±12.5, p=0.01). There was significant correlation between small intestinal transit time and blood glucose level (r: 0.73, p=0.01). Conclusion: We observed that SI transit was prolonged in diabetic animals using 99mTc- mebrofenin, and additionally this technique is a readily available method for the detection of transit abnormalities in animal experiment. PMID:22435026

  16. Sympathetic axonopathies and hyperinnervation in the small intestine smooth muscle of aged Fischer 344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Powley, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well documented that the intrinsic enteric nervous system of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract sustains neuronal losses and reorganizes as it ages. In contrast, age-related remodeling of the extrinsic sympathetic projections to the wall of the gut is poorly characterized. The present experiment, therefore, surveyed the sympathetic projections to the aged small intestine for axonopathies. Furthermore, the experiment evaluated the specific prediction that catecholaminergic inputs undergo hyperplastic changes. Jejunal tissue was collected from 3-, 8-, 16-, and 24-month-old male Fischer 344 rats, prepared as whole mounts consisting of the muscularis, and processed immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase, the enzymatic marker for norepinephrine, and either the protein CD163 or the protein MHCII, both phenotypical markers for macrophages. Four distinctive sympathetic axonopathy profiles occurred in the small intestine of the aged rat: (1) swollen and dystrophic terminals, (2) tangled axons, (3) discrete hyperinnervated loci in the smooth muscle wall, including at the bases of Peyer's patches, and (4) ectopic hyperplastic or hyperinnervating axons in the serosa/subserosal layers. In many cases, the axonopathies occurred at localized and limited foci, involving only a few axon terminals, in a pattern consistent with incidences of focal ischemic, vascular, or traumatic insult. The present observations underscore the complexity of the processes of aging on the neural circuitry of the gut, with age-related GI functional impairments likely reflecting a constellation of adjustments that range from selective neuronal losses, through accumulation of cellular debris, to hyperplasias and hyperinnervation of sympathetic inputs. PMID:24104187

  17. The mesenterially perfused rat small intestine: A versatile approach for pharmacological testings.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Dominik; Klotz, Markus; Laures, Kerstin; Clasohm, Jasmin; Bischof, Michael; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds enter the body via several major natural gateways; i.e. the lung, the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Drug application during surgical operations can lead to severe impairment of gastrointestinal motility, which can contribute to a paralytic ileus. Here we investigated an ex vivo perfused small intestine model that allows us to ascertain the influence of pharmaceuticals upon the gut. Corresponding segments from the proximal jejunum of adult rats were used. Their mesenteric arteries and veins were cannulated and the jejunal segment excised. The individual segments were placed in a custom designed perfusion chamber and perfusion performed through the intestinal lumen as well as the mesenteric superior artery. Three test drugs, which are commonly used in anesthesiology; i.e. pentobarbital, propofol and ketamine were administered via the blood vessels. Their effects upon gastrointestinal motility patterns were evaluated by optical measurements. Longitudinal and pendular movements were distinguishable and separately analyzed. Pharmacological effects of the individual substances could be investigated. Propofol (50-200 μg/ml) was found to decrease intestinal motility, especially longitudinal movements in a dose dependent manner. Pentobarbital decreased intestinal motility only at high concentrations, above 2.5 mg/ml. A dose of 2.5 mg/ml lead to an increase in longitudinal- and pendular movements in comparison to control, while ketamine (2.5-10 mg/ml) did not alter intestinal motility at all. Histological examination of the perfused segments revealed only minor changes in tissue morphology after perfusion. The perfusion approach shown here allows for the identification of compounds which interfere with gut motility in a highly sophisticated way. It is suitable for characterization of drug and dose specific changes in motility patterns and can be used in drug development and preclinical studies.

  18. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates.

  19. Dietary iron-deficiency up-regulates hephaestin mRNA level in small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Shoji; Aoyama, Yoritaka

    2002-05-17

    Hephaestin is a protein, recently found from the study of sla (sex-linked anemia) mouse. Hephaestin is suggested to transport iron from intestinal enterocytes into the circulation. Iron is essential for living and for humans to maintain a constant total iron concentration in whole body. In this study, it was found that dietary iron-deficiency up-regulated hephaestin mRNA level in the proximal small intestine of rats. Therefore, it is suggested that in dietary iron-deficiency, hephaestin gene expression in proximal small intestine is up-regulated to absorb more iron from diet.

  20. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine. PMID:26564721

  1. Ex vivo perfusion of the isolated rat small intestine as a novel model of Salmonella enteritis.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Erin C; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Braun, Janin; Aepfelbacher, Martin; Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Grassl, Guntram A

    2016-01-15

    Using an ex vivo perfused rat small intestinal model, we examined pathological changes to the tissue, inflammation induction, as well as dynamic changes to smooth muscle activity, metabolic competence, and luminal fluid accumulation during short-term infection with the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. Although few effects were seen upon Yersinia infection, this system accurately modeled key aspects associated with Salmonella enteritis. Our results confirmed the importance of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI1)-encoded type 3 secretion system (T3SS) in pathology, tissue invasion, inflammation induction, and fluid secretion. Novel physiological consequences of Salmonella infection of the small intestine were also identified, namely, SPI-1-dependent vasoconstriction and SPI-1-independent reduction in the digestive and absorptive functions of the epithelium. Importantly, this is the first small animal model that allows for the study of Salmonella-induced fluid secretion. Another major advantage of this model is that one can specifically determine the contribution of resident cell populations. Accordingly, we can conclude that recruited cell populations were not involved in the pathological damage, inflammation induction, fluid accumulation, nutrient absorption deficiency, and vasoconstriction observed. Although fluid loss induced by Salmonella infection is hypothesized to be due to damage caused by recruited neutrophils, our data suggest that bacterial invasion and inflammation induction in resident cell populations are sufficient for fluid loss into the lumen. In summary, this model is a novel and useful tool that allows for detailed examination of the early physiopathological effects of Salmonella infection on the small intestine.

  2. Mechanisms of adaptation in rat small intestine: regional differences in quantitative morphology during normal growth and experimental hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, T M; Carson, F L

    1989-01-01

    The gross and microscopical dimensions of small intestines from three groups of rats were investigated by morphometric (mainly stereological) methods. The groups were chosen to represent relatively 'steady state' situations: normal growth (over a 12 week period) and intestinal hyperplasia due to streptozotocin-diabetes of 12 weeks duration. Four intestinal segments were sampled along each intestine. For normal groups, no interaction effects were found, suggesting that growth affected all regions of the small intestine in the same way. Older rats were heavier and their intestines were longer and narrower. In addition, villous surface area was more extensive and the villi differed in shape. Volumes of crypts, submucosa and muscularis externa were all reduced. Diabetic animals weighed less than age-matched controls and their intestines were wider but not significantly longer. All surface areas and volumes were increased substantially. However, hypertrophy of the muscularis externa was not detected by measuring muscularis thickness. Villi altered their shape. At least for villous height, the effects of diabetes were greater in terminal segments. These findings are discussed in the context of the reported effects of age and experimental hyperplasia (including diabetes) on intestinal architecture and behaviour. PMID:2532638

  3. Regulation of the microvascular circulation in the leg muscles, pancreas and small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hisashi; Kurose, Tomoyuki; Kawamata, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    To study the microvascular circulation, we examined the proportion of open and functioning capillaries in the leg muscles, pancreas and small intestine of anesthetized rats. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled Lycopersicon esculentum lectin was injected into the heart and allowed to circulate for 3 min to label open and functioning capillaries. Specimens were removed, frozen, sectioned and double-immunostained. Using one section, open and functioning capillaries were detected by immunostaining for this lectin bound to endothelial cells, while all capillaries were visualized by immunostaining for platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31). These capillaries were semi-automatically detected and counted by fluorescence microscopy. The percentages of open and functioning capillaries were as follows: the soleus muscle, 93.0 ± 5.5%; superficial zone of the gastrocnemius muscle, 90.8 ± 6.2%; deep zone of the gastrocnemius muscle, 95.6 ± 4.0%; the plantaris muscle, 94.1 ± 2.7%; the pancreas, 86.3 ± 11.7%; and the small intestine, 91.1 ± 4.9% (n = 8, each). There was no significant difference among these data by the Kruskal-Wallis test. This study clearly demonstrated that the proportions of open and functioning capillaries are high and similar among the leg muscles, pancreas and small intestine in spite of their structural and functional differences. This finding agrees with previous studies and supports the notion that the microvascular circulation is mainly controlled by changing of the blood flow in each capillary rather than changing the proportion of open and functioning capillaries. PMID:26140259

  4. Biocompatibility of porcine small intestinal submucosa and rat endothelial progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Jian-Jie; Sang, Hong-Fei; Qian, Ai-Min; Meng, Qing-You; Zhao, Tie-Jun; Li, Xiao-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the biocompatibility of the small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by co-cultivating EPCs and SIS in vitro and observing EPC growth on the SIS. Methods: The porcine SIS was prepared and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) were isolated from 3 or 4-week old male SD rats. Cellular morphology was observed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and viabilities by the MTT assays. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were phenotyped by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Vascular lumen formation was evaluated by the Matrigel tube formation assays. EPCs were seeded onto the SIS and production of angiogenin-1 and endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) by EPCs was examined by ELISA and immunoblotting assays. Results: Light microscopy and SEM showed that the mechanically and chemically treated small intestinal submucosa was composed of cell-free extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry revealed that the EPCs expressed appropriate surface markers including CD34, CD133, and VEGFR-2. Furthermore, the EPCs formed lumen-like structures and the SIS significantly enhanced the growth of EPCs in vitro. Conclusion: SIS has good biocompatibility with EPCs. SIS pre-seeded with EPCs can be potentially applied as an alternative scaffold material in artificial blood vessel prosthesis. PMID:25973012

  5. Whey protein hydrolysates enhance water absorption in the perfused small intestine of anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Noma, Teruyuki; Yamaji, Taketo; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Oda, Munehiro

    2016-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) on the water absorption rate in the small intestine using a rat small intestine perfusion model. The rate was significantly higher with 5 g/L WPH than with 5 g/L soy protein hydrolysates or physiological saline (p < 0.05). WPH dose-dependently increased the water absorption rate in the range of 1.25-10.0 g/L. WPH showed a significantly higher rate than an amino acid mixture whose composition was equal to that of WPH (p < 0.05). The addition of 4-aminomethylbenzoic acid, an inhibitor of PepT1, significantly suppressed WPH's enhancement of water absorption (p < 0.05). The rate of water absorption was significantly correlated with that of peptides/amino acids absorption in WPH (r = 0.82, p < 0.01). These data suggest that WPH have a high water absorption-promoting effect, to which PepT1 contributes.

  6. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  7. Perforin and granzyme B. Cytolytic proteins up-regulated during rejection of rat small intestine allografts.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, S V; Farmer, D G; Kuniyoshi, J S; Robert, M; Khadavi, A; Shaked, A; Busuttil, R W

    1995-03-15

    Perforin and granzyme B are 2 cytolytic proteins specific to activated killer cells, particularly CTL. We have studied the mRNA expression of these 2 proteins by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in a unidirectional model of rat small intestine transplant rejection. The allograft group consisted of Lewis x Brown Norway F1 donors into Lewis recipients. The isograft controls were Lewis donors into Lewis recipients. Grafts were placed heterotopically and no immunosuppression was given. Five animals in each group were killed at postoperative days (POD) 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14. mRNA was extracted and a semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed. For the semiquantitative analysis, we compared scintillation counts from excised bands. Results were expressed as a percent activity compared with beta-actin. From the same tissue samples, a histologic evaluation was made and rejection was graded according to severity. The isograft controls showed no evidence of histologic rejection and a very low expression of mRNA for perforin and granzyme B from POD 3-14. In contrast, the allograft group began to show histologic evidence of mild rejection on POD 5. By day 7, rejection was moderately severe and associated with a significant up-regulation of perforin and granzyme B in the allografts compared with the controls (P < 0.01), which persisted through POD 14. Peak expression for perforin and granzyme B was on POD 10 and 8, respectively. We conclude that the up-regulation of perforin and granzyme B in rat small intestine transplant allografts is a useful marker of clinically important rejection. PMID:7886805

  8. Penile enhancement using a porcine small intestinal submucosa graft in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Leungwattanakij, S; Pummangura, N; Ratana-Olarn, K

    2006-01-01

    Several biodegradable materials have been experimented for penile enhancement, but none show the potential for clinical use. This study was designed to use porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) augmenting the normal tunica albuginea to increase the functional girth of the rat penis. In all, 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats constituted the study population. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 consisted of the control (n=10) and group 2 (n=10) consisted of rats that underwent penile enhancement by a longitudinal I-shaped incision of the tunica albuginea on both sides, and the dissection of the plane between tunica albuginea and cavernosal tissue was carried out (n=10). The incision was then patched with a 3 x 10 mm2 piece of SIS, using a 6/0 nylon suture material. The penile length and mid-circumference were then measured using a Vernier Caliper before and 2 months after surgery. All rat penises underwent histological examination using Masson's trichome and Verhoff's van Giesen's stain for collagen and elastic fibers. The penile length, mid-circumference and degree of fibrosis score were expressed as mean+/-s.e. (standard error) and analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test. A statistical significance was accepted at P-value < or =0.05. Our results showed similar preoperative penile length and circumference in both groups. However, 2 months after the surgery, the mean penile circumference of the SIS group has grown significantly larger than the control group, while the mean penile length remained unchanged. The histological study of the rat penises revealed minimal amounts of fibrosis under the graft, and the elastic fibers of the graft showed orientation in a circular manner. In conclusion, SIS appears promising for material use in a penile enhancement. PMID:16049525

  9. A comparison of absorption of glycerol tristearate and glycerol trioleate by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstedt, S.E.; Hayashi, H.; Kritchevsky, D.; Tso, P. )

    1990-09-01

    Generally, fats rich in saturated fatty acids raise serum cholesterol, whereas fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids lower it. There appear to be exceptions; e.g., stearic acid (18:0)-rich fats have little or no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations. This apparent lack of cholesterolemic effect of stearic acid-rich fat could be because intestinal absorption of fat is poor or subsequent plasma and/or tissue metabolism of fat is different. To investigate mechanisms involved, we compared intestinal digestion, uptake, and lymphatic transport of glycerol tristearate (TS) and glycerol trioleate (TO, 18:1). Two groups of rats bearing intestinal lymph fistulas were used. TO rats were fed intraduodenally for 8 h at a constant rate a lipid emulsion of 25 mumols/h of TO (labeled with glycerol tri(9,10 (n)-3H)oleate), 7.8 mumols of egg phosphatidylcholine, and 57 mumols of sodium taurocholate in 3 ml of phosphate-buffered saline. TS rats were fed the same lipid emulsion except that TS replaced TO and the emulsion was labeled with glyceryl (1,3-14C)tristearate. The lymph triglyceride and radioactivity were determined. After infusion, the luminal and mucosal radioactive lipid content was analyzed. The results showed that there was significantly less lipid transported in the lymph of TS rats compared with TO rats. The results also showed a significant decrease in the absorption of TS as compared with TO. This was due in part to poor lipolysis. In addition, the lipid absorbed by the intestine of the TS rats was transported into lymph less efficiently than in TO rats.

  10. The isolation and properties of epithelial-cell "ghosts" from rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Clark, B; Porteous, J W

    1965-08-01

    1. The preparation of gram quantities of isolated epithelial-cell ;ghosts' from mucosal scrapings of rat small intestine is described. The method involves dispersing the tissue by gentle homogenization in 6% dextran in Krebs-Ringer phosphate, pH7.4, followed by filtration through nylon cloth and sedimentation by low-speed centrifuging. 2. The isolated epithelial-cell ;ghosts' contained all of the DNA, but only 52% of the protein and 53-57% of the RNA of the original homogenate. They contained most of the activity of the following enzymes found in the homogenate: aminopeptidase (71%); alkaline beta-glycerophosphatase (82%); invertase (92%); adenosine triphosphatase (93-116%); acid beta-glycerophosphatase (83%); nonspecific esterase (76%); succinate dehydrogenase (96%). Only small proportions of the total lactate-dehydrogenase (10%) and phosphoglucose-isomerase (2%) activities found in the homogenate were recovered in the isolated cell ;ghosts'. 3. The epithelial-cell ;ghost' preparation did not respire unless cofactors and substrates were added, and did not consume glucose or produce lactic acid from glucose. 4. The effect of varying the composition of the homogenization medium was studied. Concentrations of dextran (mol.wt. 15x10(4)) from 1 to 12%, solutions of dextrans (all at 6%) with mol.wt. varying between 3.6x10(4) and 2x10(6), and a solution of 8% polyethylene glycol (mol.wt. 4000) served equally well for the production of epithelial-cell ;ghosts'. Two of these solutions, however, 12% dextran (mol.wt.15x10(4)) and 6% dextran (mol.wt. 2x10(6)), were too viscous to allow the complete sedimentation of the cell ;ghosts' at low relative centrifugal forces. Omission of either Krebs-Ringer phosphate or dextran from the medium resulted in almost complete cell breakage during the homogenization. 5. The isolated cell ;ghosts' were used as a starting material for subcellular fractionation of rat intestinal mucosa by differential centrifugation. The distributions of

  11. Characterization and localization of the putative 'link' component in rat small-intestinal mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Fahim, R E; Specian, R D; Forstner, G G; Forstner, J F

    1987-01-01

    Rat intestinal mucin is polymerized by a putative 'link' component of Mr 118,000 that can be released from the native mucin by thiol reduction [Fahim, Forstner & Forstner (1983) Biochem. J. 209, 117-124]. To confirm that this component is an integral part of the mucin and independent of the mucin purification technique, rat mucin was purified in the present study by three independent techniques. In all cases, the 118,000-Mr component was released after reduction. The 118 kDa band was electroeluted from SDS/polyacrylamide gels and its composition shown to resemble closely that of the link component of human intestinal mucin [Mantle, Forstner & Forstner (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 345-354]. Carbohydrates were present, including significant (10 mol/100 mol) amounts of mannose, suggesting the presence of N-linked oligosaccharides. Monospecific antibodies prepared against the rat 118,000-Mr component established its tissue localization in intestinal goblet cells. Mucins subjected to SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and Western blots using the same antibody, established that the link components of rat and human intestinal mucin are similar antigenically. Brief exposure (10 min) of native rat mucin to trypsin or Pronase (enzyme/mucin protein, 1:500, w/w) also released a 118,000-Mr component that reacted with the monospecific antibody. Thus the 118,000-Mr component is an integral part of the mucin and, although linked to large glycopeptides by disulphide bonds, this component also has proteinase-sensitive peptide bonds, presumably at terminal locations such that brief treatment with proteinases releases the molecule in a reasonably intact form. Under physiological conditions, therefore, one might expect that, after mucin is secreted into the intestinal lumen, luminal proteinases would rapidly remove the link component, thereby causing the mucin to depolymerize. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3311021

  12. The trophic effect of epidermal growth factor on morphological changes and polyamine metabolism in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, T; Bamba, T; Hosoda, S

    1990-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the morphological changes and polyamine metabolism in the atrophic small intestinal mucosa of rats caused by feeding elemental diet (ED; Elental, Ajinomoto, Tokyo) for several weeks. Four-week-old Wistar male rats were given ad libitum ED (1 kcal/ml) for 4 weeks. The body weight increased to the same extent as the control group fed a pellet diet. However, the small intestine became atrophic: the mucosal wet weight of the jejunum decreased to 70%, while that of the ileum decreased to 60%. EGF (10 micrograms/kg) was subcutaneously injected into these rats every 8 hours. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activities of the jejunal and ileal mucosa rose within 12 hours of the initial EGF administration. Mucosal DNA specific activities tended to increase. Next, EGF (30 micrograms/kg/day) was intraperitoneally administered with a Mini-osmotic pump for one week. The wet weight, protein and DNA contents of the ileal mucosa increased significantly compared with those of the saline administered controls, while the crypt cell production rate (CCPR) also increased. Histologically, increases in both villus height and crypt depth were confirmed. These findings indicate that EGF causes mucosal proliferation through polyamine metabolism even in the atrophic small intestine of mature rats after ED administration for 4 weeks. PMID:2358163

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α suppresses the protein fractional synthesis rate of the small intestine stimulated by glutamine in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JIHONG; FAN, SHENGXIAN; CAO, YACHENG; ZHU, MINGFANG; HAN, YONG; CAO, XUEYING; LI, YOUSHENG

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether and how TNF-α affects glutamine-enhanced protein synthesis and the expression of the amino acid transporter ASCT2 in the small intestine at the mRNA and protein levels. A total of 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups, namely the total parenteral nutrition (TPN; control), glutamine-treated (Gln), and glutamine- and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-treated (TNF-α) groups. At 30 min prior to examination, all rats were mainlined with [L-15N]leucine. The concentration of TNF-α in plasma and of glutamine in plasma and the small intestine was measured. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of protein and the mRNA and protein expression levels of ASCT2 in the small intestine were assessed. The level of TNF-α was highest in the TNF-α group and the glutamine concentration was elevated to a greater extent in the TNF-α group than in the other two groups. However, the FSR of protein in the small intestine was significantly higher in the Gln group compared with that in the TNF-α group. The mRNA and protein expression levels of ASCT2 in the experimental groups were significantly higher that those in the control group, but did not differ significantly between the Gln and TNF-α groups. These results indicate that TNF-α may attenuate glutamine-stimulated protein synthesis in the small intestine in the early stage of sepsis in rats. The mechanism may be that TNF-α inhibits the function of the glutamine transporter in the uptake the glutamine into target cells for protein synthesis. This inhibition may occur at or following protein translation. PMID:25574232

  14. Emu Oil Combined with Lyprinol™ Reduces Small Intestinal Damage in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Lampton, Lorrinne S; Eden, Georgina L; Cheah, Ker Y; Lymn, Kerry A; Bajic, Juliana E; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is characterized by inflammation and ulcerating lesions lining the alimentary tract. Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ have independently demonstrated their therapeutic potential in intestinal inflammatory disorders, including mucositis. We investigated Emu Oil and Lyprinol™ in combination for their further potential to alleviate chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats. Rats were gavaged with (1 ml) water, Olive Oil, Emu Oil + Olive Oil, Lyprinol™ + Olive Oil or Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ from Days 0 to 7, injected with saline (control) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) on Day 5 and euthanized on Day 8. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity (indicative of acute inflammation), histological severity scores, and intestinal architecture were quantified. Myeloperoxidase activity was significantly increased in the jejunum and ileum following 5-FU, compared to saline controls. Both Olive Oil and Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly reduced jejunal MPO levels (1.8-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively), whereas only Emu Oil + Lyprinol™ significantly decreased ileal MPO levels, relative to 5-FU controls. All oil treatments decreased histological severity scores in the jejunum and ileum, and normalized crypt depth in the mid small intestine, relative to 5-FU controls. Emu Oil combined with Lyprinol™ partially reduced acute small intestinal inflammation. Isolating bioactive constituents of these naturally sourced oils could provide a more targeted strategy to protect against intestinal mucositis. PMID:27618153

  15. Effect of vitamin A deficiency on permeability of the small intestinal mucosa for macromolecules in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gmoshinskii, I.V.; Khvylya, S.I.; Kon', I.Ya.

    1987-07-01

    The authors study the effect of experimental vitamin A deficiency on absorption of macromolecules of hen's ovalbumin in the intestine. An electron-microscopic study of permeability of small intestine enterocytes for particles of colloidal lanthanum hydroxide La(OH)/sub 3/ was carried out at the same time. The concentration of unsplit hen's ovalbumin in the blood of the rats used in the experiment was determined by competitive radioimmunoassay. Samples of serum were incubated with indicator doses of /sup 125/I-OA. Radioactivity of the precipitates was measured.

  16. Partial Enteral Nutrition Mitigated Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Damage of Rat Small Intestinal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Wang, Xinying; Jiang, Tingting; Li, Chaojun; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xuejin; Tian, Feng; Li, Ning; Li, Jieshou

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study was designed to investigate a relatively optimum dose of partial enteral nutrition (PEN) which effectively attenuates intestinal barrier dysfunction initiated by ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Methods: In experiment 1, 60 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to intestinal IRI and assigned to six groups according to the different proportion of EN administrations: namely total parenteral nutrition (TPN or 0%EN), 10%EN, 20%EN, 40%EN, 60%EN, and total enteral nutrition (TEN or 100%) groups, the deficits of intraluminal calorie were supplemented by PN. In experiment 2, 50 male SD rats were subjected to intestinal IRI and divided into five groups based on the results of experiment 1: TPN, TEN, 20%EN, TPN plus pretreatment with NF-κB antagonist 30 min before IRI (TPN+PDTC), and TPN plus pretreatment with HIF-1α antagonist 30 min before IRI (TPN+YC-1) groups. Results: In experiment 1, previous IRI combined with subsequent EN shortage disrupted the structure of intestinal epithelial cell and tight junctions (TJs). While 20% dose of EN had an obviously protective effect on these detrimental consequences. In experiment 2, compared with TPN only, 20%EN exerted a significant protection of barrier function of intestinal epithelium. Analogous results were observed when TPN combined with specific NF-κB/HIF-1α inhibitors (PDTC and YC-1). Meanwhile, the expression of NF-κB/HIF-1α had a similar trend among the groups. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that 20%EN is the minimally effective dosage of EN which promotes the recovery of intestinal barrier function after IRI in a rat model. Furthermore, we discreetly speculate that this benefit is, at least partly, related to NF-κB/HIF-1α pathway expression. PMID:27548209

  17. Effect of White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Beldia) on Small Intestine Morphology and Function in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; Bergaoui, Nacef; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Trabelsi, Najoua; Zekri, Sami; Guémira, Fathi; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-12-01

    The chronic ingestion of raw or undercooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) causes functional and morphological derangement in various tissues. The major objectives of this study were to investigate the gavage effects of a raw Beldia bean variety that is widely consumed in Tunisia, on the small intestine morphology and jejunal absorption of water, electrolytes, and glucose in Wistar rats. Twenty young male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 10 rats. The first group served as the control and was gavaged with 300 mg of a rodent pellet flour suspension (RPFS), whereas the second experimental group was challenged with 300 mg of a Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS) for 10 days. Histological studies were performed using light and electron microcopy. The intestinal transport of water, sodium, potassium, and glucose was studied by perfusing the jejunal loops of the small bowels in vivo. The feeding experiments indicated that BBFS did not affect weight gain. Histomorphometric analyses showed that the villus heights, crypt depths, and crypt/villus ratios in the jejunum and ileum were greater in the BBFS-fed rats than controls. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the rats exposed to RPFS exhibited intact intestinal tracts; however, the BBFS-treated rats demonstrated intestinal alterations characterized by abnormal microvillus architectures, with short and dense or long and slender features, in addition to the sparse presence of vesicles near the brush border membrane. BBFS administration did not significantly affect glucose absorption. However, significant decreases were observed in water and electrolyte absorption compared with the uptake of the controls. In conclusion, raw Beldia beans distorted jejunum morphology and disturbed hydroelectrolytic flux.

  18. Effect of White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Beldia) on Small Intestine Morphology and Function in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; Bergaoui, Nacef; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Trabelsi, Najoua; Zekri, Sami; Guémira, Fathi; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-12-01

    The chronic ingestion of raw or undercooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) causes functional and morphological derangement in various tissues. The major objectives of this study were to investigate the gavage effects of a raw Beldia bean variety that is widely consumed in Tunisia, on the small intestine morphology and jejunal absorption of water, electrolytes, and glucose in Wistar rats. Twenty young male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 10 rats. The first group served as the control and was gavaged with 300 mg of a rodent pellet flour suspension (RPFS), whereas the second experimental group was challenged with 300 mg of a Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS) for 10 days. Histological studies were performed using light and electron microcopy. The intestinal transport of water, sodium, potassium, and glucose was studied by perfusing the jejunal loops of the small bowels in vivo. The feeding experiments indicated that BBFS did not affect weight gain. Histomorphometric analyses showed that the villus heights, crypt depths, and crypt/villus ratios in the jejunum and ileum were greater in the BBFS-fed rats than controls. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the rats exposed to RPFS exhibited intact intestinal tracts; however, the BBFS-treated rats demonstrated intestinal alterations characterized by abnormal microvillus architectures, with short and dense or long and slender features, in addition to the sparse presence of vesicles near the brush border membrane. BBFS administration did not significantly affect glucose absorption. However, significant decreases were observed in water and electrolyte absorption compared with the uptake of the controls. In conclusion, raw Beldia beans distorted jejunum morphology and disturbed hydroelectrolytic flux. PMID:26488416

  19. Influence of peppermint oil on absorptive and secretory processes in rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Beesley, A; Hardcastle, J; Hardcastle, P T; Taylor, C J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peppermint oil is used to relieve the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, relaxing intestinal smooth muscle by reducing the availability of calcium, but its effects on intestinal transport are unknown. AIMS: To determine the effect of peppermint oil on intestinal transport processes. METHODS: The influence of peppermint oil on intestinal transport was investigated in rat jejunum using both intestinal sheets mounted in Ussing chambers and brush border membrane vesicles. RESULTS: Mucosal peppermint oil (1 and 5 mg/ml) had no significant effect on basal short circuit current, but inhibited the increase associated with sodium dependent glucose absorption. The increased short circuit current induced by serosal acetylcholine, a reflection of calcium mediated electrogenic chloride secretion, was unaffected by mucosal peppermint oil (5 mg/ml). In contrast, serosal peppermint oil (1 mg/ml) inhibited the response to acetylcholine without reducing the effect of mucosal glucose. In brush border membrane vesicles active glucose uptake was inhibited by extravesicular peppermint oil at concentrations of 0.5 and 1 mg/ml. CONCLUSIONS: Peppermint oil in the intestinal lumen inhibits enterocyte glucose uptake via a direct action at the brush border membrane. Inhibition of secretion by serosal peppermint oil is consistent with a reduced availability of calcium. PMID:8991859

  20. Molecular mechanisms of glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kuhre, Rune E; Frost, Charlotte R; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-02-01

    Glucose is an important stimulus for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but the mechanisms of secretion have not been investigated in integrated physiological models. We studied glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine. Luminal glucose (5% and 20% w/v) stimulated the secretion dose dependently, but vascular glucose was without significant effect at 5, 10, 15, and 25 mmol/L. GLP-1 stimulation by luminal glucose (20%) secretion was blocked by the voltage-gated Ca channel inhibitor, nifedipine, or by hyperpolarization with diazoxide. Luminal administration (20%) of the nonmetabolizable sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) substrate, methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (α-MGP), stimulated release, whereas the SGLT1 inhibitor phloridzin (luminally) abolished responses to α-MGP and glucose. Furthermore, in the absence of luminal NaCl, luminal glucose (20%) did not stimulate a response. Luminal glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was also sensitive to luminal GLUT2 inhibition (phloretin), but in contrast to SGLT1 inhibition, phloretin did not eliminate the response, and luminal glucose (20%) stimulated larger GLP-1 responses than luminal α-MGP in matched concentrations. Glucose transported by GLUT2 may act after metabolization, closing KATP channels similar to sulfonylureas, which also stimulated secretion. Our data indicate that SGLT1 activity is the driving force for glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion and that KATP-channel closure is required to stimulate a full-blown glucose-induced response.

  1. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  2. Permeability of exendin-4-loaded chitosan nanoparticles across MDCK cell monolayers and rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengshu; Zhang, Yong; Sun, Bingxue; Sun, Yanan; Gong, Xin; Wu, Yongge; Zhang, Xizhen; Kong, Wei; Chen, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the permeability of exendin-4-loaded chitosan nanoparticles using the Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayer as an in vitro model and the rat intestine as an ex vivo model of the human intestinal barrier. A series of formulations of sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and chitosan with different molecular weights and degrees of deacetylation was evaluated. The formulation consisting of 0.1% TPP and 0.2% chitosan (400 kDa, 95% degree of deacetylation), which gave optimized monodispersed particle size (303.1±10.36 nm), zeta potential (18.37±1.15 mV) and encapsulation efficiency (38.0±2.6%), was used for further analysis. After determining their biocompatibility, the transport potential of drug-loaded chitosan nanoparticles was evaluated and compared with free exendin-4 using both MDCK cell monolayers and different rat intestinal segments. Mechanisms underlying enhanced transport of exendin-4 in the cell model were also explored. Compared with free exendin-4, the absorption of optimized chitosan nanoparticles was enhanced by 4.7-fold in MDCK cell monolayers and by 2.0-2.78-fold in different rat intestinal segments, with no significant difference between the duodenum, jejunum and ileum. As supported by confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis, the lower enhancement of absorption in the intestine compared to the cell monolayer likely resulted from the chitosan nanoparticle-mediated opening of cellular tight junctions and not through intracellular transport. These findings suggest that the potential application of chitosan nanoparticles as delivery carriers of exendin-4 is limited and may need further modifications.

  3. Region-dependent absorption of faropenem shared with foscarnet, a phosphate transporter substrate, in the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Hiroshi; Sawazaki, Rinako; Oda, Masako; Kobayashi, Michiya

    2008-09-01

    Faropenem, a penem antibiotic, is orally active despite its hydrophilic nature. However, its intestinal absorption has not yet been characterised in detail. This study was undertaken to determine the factors regulating faropenem absorption using intestinal loops prepared in the rat duodenum, jejunum and terminal ileum. Faropenem disappearance was much greater than that of cefotaxime and meropenem, and faropenem disappeared more extensively from the terminal ileum than from the jejunum or duodenum. In contrast to faropenem, the disappearance of ceftibuten was much greater from the duodenum and jejunum than from the terminal ileum. As the accumulation and enzymatic degradation of faropenem was minimal in the intestinal mucosa, faropenem was considered to enter the portal vein smoothly after its disappearance from the intestinal loops. Faropenem disappearance was not significantly influenced by the presence of monocarboxylic acids, amino acids or bile acid. Dipeptides such as L-carnosine and glycylglycine slightly but significantly lowered faropenem disappearance from the terminal ileum. On the other hand, foscarnet exerted a marked inhibitory effect on faropenem disappearance, but the antiviral agent did not modulate ceftibuten absorption. The present results suggest that faropenem is in part absorbed via a phosphate transporter present in the rat small intestine. PMID:18614339

  4. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  5. Hydrolysis-dependent absorption of disaccharides in the rat small intestine (chronic experiments and mathematical modeling).

    PubMed

    Gromova, L V; Gruzdkov, A A

    1999-06-01

    In order to throw light on the mechanisms responsible for the enzyme-dependent absorption of disaccharides membrane hydrolysis of maltose and trehalose and the absorption of glucose (free and that derived from disaccharides) were studied in isolated loops (20 cm) of the rat small intestine in chronic experiments. The rates of glucose absorption were 0.26-0.81 micromol x min(-1) x cm(-1) when the loop was perfused with a 12.5 to 75.0 mmol/l free glucose solution, which is only insignificantly higher than the rates observed during perfusion with equivalent maltose solutions. The coupling coefficient (the ratio of glucose absorption rate to the rate of disaccharide hydrolysis) decreased from 0.90 to 0.60 with the increasing maltose concentrations in the infusate from 6.25 to 37.5 mmol/l, but remained unchanged (approximately 0.95) within the same range of trehalose concentrations. The permeability of the pre-epithelial barrier was equivalent to that of unstirred water layer of less than 40 microm thickness. Fluid absorption was within the range of 0.73-2.55 microl x min(-1) x cm(-1), and it showed a correlation with the rates of glucose absorption. The results agree with a model developed on the assumption that free glucose and that released from disaccharides share the same membrane transporters. It could be concluded that a close coupling of disaccharide hydrolysis with derived glucose absorption in chronic experiments is achieved mainly due to a high activity of glucose transporters, which are presumably not associated with membrane disaccharidases. The transcellular active transport is a predominant mechanism of disaccharide-derived glucose absorption under conditions close to physiological.

  6. The correlation of intragraft cytokine expression with rejection in rat small intestine transplantation.

    PubMed

    McDiarmid, S V; Farmer, D G; Kuniyoshi, J S; Robert, M; Khadavi, A; Shaked, A; Busuttil, R W

    1994-09-27

    Rejection continues to be a major cause of graft loss in small intestine transplantation (SIT). We have studied, by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (rtPCR), the intragraft expression of cytokines relevant to rejection in a rat model. Heterotopic SIT grafts were performed from Lewis x Brown Norway F1 donors into Lewis recipients. The isograft control was Lewis into Lewis. Five animals in each isograft and allograft group were sacrificed on POD 3, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, and 14. mRNA was isolated from portions of the terminal ileum and rtPCR performed to amplify message for interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). Semiquantitative analysis was performed using 32P radionuclide incorporation and scintillation counting. The results were expressed as percent activity compared with beta-actin. Histologic correlation with cytokine expression was made. On POD 3 after SIT there was no evidence of rejection by histology and all cytokines studied showed no difference between the isograft and the allograft. On POD 5 the first evidence of mild rejection was seen on histology and IL-6, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha showed a significant up regulation in the allograft that persisted through POD 14. mRNA for IL-2 was not significantly upregulated until POD 7 and persisted until POD 14. IL-2R was constitutively expressed in both isograft and allograft and was not a reliable predictor of rejection. Histologic rejection was moderately severe by POD 7 and severe between POD 8 and 14 correlating with the increasing expression of IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha. In summary, we have shown that increasing expression of mRNA for IL-6, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha not only correlated with severity of rejection but that upregulation began early when histologic evidence of rejection first occurred. PMID:7940688

  7. Mechanism of nitric oxide-induced contraction in the rat isolated small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, R A; Barthó, L

    1997-01-01

    The contractile response to nitric oxide (NO) in ral ileal myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle strips was pharmacologically analysed.NO (10−7 M) induced only contraction while 10−6 M NO induced contraction followed by relaxation. Methylene blue (up to 10−4 M) did not affect the NO-induced contractions but significantly reduced the relaxation evoked by 10−6 M NO. Administration of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP (10−6–10−4 M) only induced relaxation.Sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10−7–10−5 M) induced concentration-dependent contractions per se; the contractile response to NO, administered within 10 min after SNP, was concentration-dependently reduced. The guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) content of the tissues was not increased during contractions with 10−8 M NO and 10−6 M SNP; it was increased by a factor of 2 during contraction with 10−7 M NO, and by a factor of 12 during relaxation with 3×10−6 M NO.The NO-induced contractions were not affected by ryanodine (3×10−5 M) but were concentration-dependently reduced by nifedipine (10−8–10−7 M) and apamin (3×10−9–3×10−8 M).These results suggest that cyclic GMP is not involved in the NO-induced contraction in the rat small intestine. The NO-induced contraction is related to extracellular Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels, that might be activated in response to the closure of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels. PMID:9138707

  8. Folate-binding protein and the absorption of folic acid in the small intestine of the suckling rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.B.; Selhub, J.

    1988-09-01

    The folate in milk is largely bound to high-affinity folate-binding protein (FBP). With an in vivo intestinal loop technique, we examined the absorption of folic acid bound to FBP (FA-FBP) in the small intestine of the suckling rat. In contrast to unbound folic acid (FA), FA-FBP is absorbed more avidly in the ileum than in the jejunum (p less than 0.025) and its absorption is not inhibited by 1 mmol sulfasalazine/L. Folate-binding activities in the mucosa of the proximal (duodenum and jejunum combined) and distal (ileum) small intestine were also examined and found to be 0.32 and 1.31 pmol/mg protein, respectively (p less than 0.001). A 6-h fast produced a 42% decrease in folate-binding activity in the distal small intestine (p less than 0.01) but did not change activity in the proximal portion. Collectively, these observations suggest that FA-FBP is absorbed by a mechanism that is distinct from that responsible for the absorption of FA and that absorption does not require prior dissociation of the vitamin-binding protein complex.

  9. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections. PMID:27168147

  10. Subacute effects of carbofuran on enzyme functions in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Gera, Nidhi; Kiran, Ravi; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2009-02-01

    The effect of carbofuran administration to rats has been studied on enzymes functions in rat intestine. Carbofuran was administrated 4.0 mg/kg body weight for 7 days or 2.8 mg/kg body weight for 30 days daily by Ryle's tube. Animals given carbofuran for 30 days exhibited retarded growth compared to control group. The activities of sucrase (56%), alkaline phosphatase (62%), leucine aminopeptidase (56%), and gamma-glutamyl trans peptidase (84%) were enhanced in animals given carbofuran for 7 days. Enhancement in the activities of alkaline phosphatase and leucine amino peptidase (92-96%) was also observed in animals exposed to carbofuran for 30 days, but the activities of sucrase (28%) and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (49%) were reduced under these conditions. There was no change in activities of maltase, lactase, and trehalase in pesticide-treated animals for 7 or 30 days. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase was enhanced (p < 0.001) in 7 days and 30 days induced carbofuran toxicity. The activities of glucose-6-phosphatase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase were also enhanced (p < 0.001) in pesticide-treated animals for 7 days, but were reduced by 46% and 26%, respectively, after 30 days of carbofuran exposure. The activity of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase was unaltered in carbofuran toxicity. Kinetic analysis of brush border enzymes revealed a change in V(max) with no change in apparent Km. Western blot analysis of brush border sucrase, alkaline phosphatase, and leucine aminopeptidase corroborated the enzyme activity data. Intestinal histological revealed distruption of the villi, and comet assay showed disintegration of DNA in enterocytes of animals exposed to carbofuran for 30 days. These findings suggest that carbofuran toxicity may modulate digestive functions in rat intestine.

  11. The influence of lactation on L-proline absorption from small intestine in the albino rat.

    PubMed

    Datta, U; Sharma, R K

    1985-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of L-proline was studied in control and lactating rats from jejunum and ileum by in vivo method and presented per unit dry weight and per unit length of the respective segment. L-proline absorption was found to be significantly reduced in lactating animals as compared to the virgin controls. The results were discussed in light of serosal to mucosal ratio. By in vitro method also jejunal and ileal uptake of L-proline were found to be significantly reduced in lactating animals as compared to the virgin controls.

  12. A novel marker glycoprotein for the microvillus membrane of surface colonocytes of rat large intestine and its presence in small-intestinal crypt cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Murine mAbs were produced against purified microvillus membranes of rat colonocytes in order to establish a marker protein for this membrane. The majority of antibodies binding to the colonic microvillus membrane recognized a single protein with a mean apparent Mr of 120 kD in both proximal and distal colon samples. The antigen is membrane bound as probed by phase-partitioning studies using Triton X-114 and by the sodium carbonate extraction procedure and is extensively glycosylated as assessed by endoglycosidase F digestion. Localization studies in adult rats by light and electron microscopy revealed the microvillus membrane of surface colonocytes as the principal site of the immunoreaction. The antigen was not detectable in kidney or liver by immunoprecipitation but was present in the small intestine, where it was predominantly confined to the apical membrane of crypt cells and much less to the microvillus membrane of differentiated enterocytes. During fetal development, the antigen appears first in the colon at day 15 and 1-2 d later in the small intestine. In both segments, it initially covers the whole luminal surface but an adult-like localization pattern develops soon after birth. The antibodies were also used to develop a radiometric assay for the quantification of the antigen in subcellular fractions of colonocytes in order to assess the validity of a previously developed method for the purification of colonic brush-border membranes (Stieger, B., A. Marxer, and H.P. Hauri. 1986. J. Membr. Biol. 91:19-31.). The results suggest that we have identified a valuable marker glycoprotein for the colonic microvillus membrane, which in adult rats may also serve as a marker for early differentiation of enterocyte progenitor cells in small-intestinal crypt cells. PMID:3290221

  13. Experiment K-6-17. Structural changes and cell turnover in the rats small intestine induced by spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, R. W.; Sawyer, H. R.; Smirnov, K. V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that the generalized, whole body decrease in synthetic activity associated with microgravity conditions of space flight as evidenced by negative nitrogen balance and muscle atrophy (Nicogossian and Parker, 1982; Oganov, 1981), as well as inhibited lymphocyte proliferation (Bechler and Cogoli, 1986), would be evident in cells characterized by a rapid rate of turnover. As a model, researchers chose to study the turnover of mucosal cells lining the jejunum of the small intestine, since these cells are among the most rapidly proliferating in the body. Under normal conditions, epithelial cells that line the small intestine are continually produced in the crypts of Lieberkuhn. These cells migrate out of the crypts onto intestinal villi, are progressively pushed up the villus as new crypt cells are formed, and ultimately reach the tip of villi where they are then descquamated. In rats, the entire process, from initial proliferation in crypts to desquamation, takes approximately 2 days (Cairnie et al., 1965; Lipkin, 1973). In this study, researchers determined the mitotic index for mucosal cells lining the proximal, middle, and distal regions of the jejunum in rats from three treatment groups (synchronous control, vivarium control and flight), and measured the depth of the crypts of Lieberkuhn and the length of villi present in each of the three jejunal regions sampled.

  14. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine cancer include unexplained weight loss and abdominal pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... doctor if you have any of the following: Pain or cramps in the middle of the abdomen. Weight loss with no known reason. A lump ...

  15. Small intestinal fungal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Askin; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-04-01

    Small intestinal fungal overgrowth (SIFO) is characterized by the presence of excessive number of fungal organisms in the small intestine associated with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Candidiasis is known to cause GI symptoms particularly in immunocompromised patients or those receiving steroids or antibiotics. However, only recently, there is emerging literature that an overgrowth of fungus in the small intestine of non-immunocompromised subjects may cause unexplained GI symptoms. Two recent studies showed that 26 % (24/94) and 25.3 % (38/150) of a series of patients with unexplained GI symptoms had SIFO. The most common symptoms observed in these patients were belching, bloating, indigestion, nausea, diarrhea, and gas. The underlying mechanism(s) that predisposes to SIFO is unclear but small intestinal dysmotility and use of proton pump inhibitors has been implicated. However, further studies are needed; both to confirm these observations and to examine the clinical relevance of fungal overgrowth, both in healthy subjects and in patients with otherwise unexplained GI symptoms. Importantly, whether eradication or its treatment leads to resolution of symptoms remains unclear; at present, a 2-3-week course of antifungal therapy is recommended and may be effective in improving symptoms, but evidence for eradication is lacking. PMID:25786900

  16. A carrier-mediated transport for folate in basolateral membrane vesicles of rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Said, H M; Redha, R

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of exit of folate from the enterocyte, i.e. transport across the basolateral membrane, is not known. In this study we examined, using basolateral membrane vesicles, the transport of folic acid across the basolateral membrane of rat intestine. Uptake of folic acid by these vesicles represents transport of the substrate into the intravesicular compartment and not binding to the membrane surface. The rate of folic acid transport was linear for the first 1 min of incubation but decreased thereafter, reaching equilibrium after 5 min of incubation. The transport of folic acid was: (1) saturable as a function of concentration with an apparent Km of 0.6 +/- 0.17 microM and Vmax. of 1.01 +/- 0.11 pmol/30 s per mg of protein; (2) inhibited in a competitive manner by the structural analogues 5-methyltetrahydrofolate and methotrexate (Ki = 2 and 1.4 microM, respectively); (4) electroneutral; (5) Na+-independent; (6) sensitive to the effect of the anion exchange inhibitor 4,4'-di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS). These data indicate the existence of a carrier-mediated transport system for folic acid in rat intestinal basolateral membrane and demonstrate that the transport process is electroneutral, Na+-independent and sensitive to the effect of anion exchange inhibition. PMID:3689340

  17. High wholegrain barley β-glucan lowers food intake but does not alter small intestinal macronutrient digestibility in ileorectostomised rats.

    PubMed

    Belobrajdic, Damien P; Hino, Shingo; Kondo, Takashi; Jobling, Stephen A; Morell, Matthew K; Topping, David L; Morita, Tatsuya; Bird, Anthony R

    2016-09-01

    Using barley cultivars differing widely in β-glucan content, we aimed to determine their effects on small intestinal macronutrient digestion in 24 ileorectostomised rats. The rats were fed 1 of 4 experimental diets, each containing a different barley variety, for 11 d. The diets had a content of 0, 2.1, 2.6 and 4.3 g of β-glucan/100 g. Feed intake and faecal excretion of fat, protein, starch, and non-starch polysaccharides were determined in the final 5 d of the study and apparent macronutrient digestibility calculated. Higher dietary levels of β-glucan (2.6% and 4.3%) lowered feed intake (by 15 and 19%, respectively) but final body weight was only lowered by the 4.3% β-glucan diet relative to rats fed the 0% β-glucan diet (all ps < 0.05). Protein, lipid and starch digestibility was unrelated to the dietary β-glucan content. Higher dietary levels of barley β-glucan lower feed intake of ileorectostomised rats, which is independent of intestinal fermentation and unrelated to macronutrient digestibility. PMID:27282074

  18. Identification and Characterization of Phytohemagglutinins from White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Beldia) in the Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Haj Sassi, Fayçal; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lectin toxicity is widely known, its effects in the gastrointestinal tract require further study. This investigation aimed to identify and characterize phytohemagglutinins (PHAs) in the small intestine and sera of rats following oral challenge with ground white beans. Twenty young, adult male rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The control group underwent gavage with a suspension of 300 mg of rodent pellet flour. The experimental group was administered a 300 mg Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS). After 10 days of daily treatment, jejunal rinse liquid (JRL) and ileum rinse liquid and secretions, as well as sera, were collected. All biological fluids were screened for lectin reactivity using competitive inhibition ELISA, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and immunoelectrophoresis techniques. The results revealed the presence of immunogenic intraluminal PHAs 3-4 h after the oral intake of the BBFS in the JRLs as well as in the jejunal and ileal secretions; however, no PHA was detectable in the rat sera. Ingestion of raw Beldia beans may lead to interaction between PHAs and the mucosa of the small intestine, potentially resulting in an inflammatory response.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Phytohemagglutinins from White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. Beldia) in the Rat Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Haj Sassi, Fayçal; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Although kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lectin toxicity is widely known, its effects in the gastrointestinal tract require further study. This investigation aimed to identify and characterize phytohemagglutinins (PHAs) in the small intestine and sera of rats following oral challenge with ground white beans. Twenty young, adult male rats were divided randomly into two groups of 10 animals each. The control group underwent gavage with a suspension of 300 mg of rodent pellet flour. The experimental group was administered a 300 mg Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS). After 10 days of daily treatment, jejunal rinse liquid (JRL) and ileum rinse liquid and secretions, as well as sera, were collected. All biological fluids were screened for lectin reactivity using competitive inhibition ELISA, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and immunoelectrophoresis techniques. The results revealed the presence of immunogenic intraluminal PHAs 3-4 h after the oral intake of the BBFS in the JRLs as well as in the jejunal and ileal secretions; however, no PHA was detectable in the rat sera. Ingestion of raw Beldia beans may lead to interaction between PHAs and the mucosa of the small intestine, potentially resulting in an inflammatory response. PMID:26561877

  20. Indomethacin injury to the rat small intestine is dependent upon biliary secretion and is associated with overgrowth of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara A; Song, Ye K; Cruz, Melissa R; Phan, Tri M; Singh, Kavindra V; Garsin, Danielle A; Murray, Barbara E; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M

    2016-03-01

    NSAIDuse is limited due to the drugs' toxicity to the gastrointestinal mucosa, an action incompletely understood. Lower gut injury induced byNSAIDs is dependent on bile secretion and is reported to increase the growth of a number of bacterial species, including an enterococcal species,Enterococcus faecalis This study examined the relationships between indomethacin (INDO)-induced intestinal injury/bleeding, small bowel overgrowth (SBO) and dissemination of enterococci, and the contribution of bile secretion to these pathological responses. Rats received either a sham operation (SO) or bile duct ligation (BDL) prior to administration of two daily subcutaneous doses of saline orINDO, and 24 h later, biopsies of ileum and liver were collected for plating on selective bacterial media. Fecal hemoglobin (Hb) and blood hematocrit (Hct) were measured to assess intestinal bleeding. Of the four treatment groups, onlySO/INDOrats experienced a significant 10- to 30-fold increase in fecal Hb and reduction in Hct, indicating thatBDLattenuatedINDO-induced intestinal injury/bleeding. Ileal enterococcal colony-forming units were significantly increased (500- to 1000-fold) inSO/INDOrats. Of all groups, only theSO/INDOrats demonstrated gut injury, and this was associated with enterococcal overgrowth of the gut and dissemination to the liver. We also demonstrated thatINDO-induced intestinal injury andE. faecalisovergrowth was independent of the route of administration of the drug, as similar findings were observed in rats orally dosed with theNSAID Bile secretion plays an important role inINDO-induced gut injury and appears to support enterococcal overgrowth of the intestine.NSAID-induced enterococcalSBOmay be involved either as a compensatory response to gut injury or with the pathogenic process itself and the subsequent development of sepsis. PMID:27033447

  1. Indomethacin injury to the rat small intestine is dependent upon biliary secretion and is associated with overgrowth of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sara A; Song, Ye K; Cruz, Melissa R; Phan, Tri M; Singh, Kavindra V; Garsin, Danielle A; Murray, Barbara E; Dial, Elizabeth J; Lichtenberger, Lenard M

    2016-03-01

    NSAIDuse is limited due to the drugs' toxicity to the gastrointestinal mucosa, an action incompletely understood. Lower gut injury induced byNSAIDs is dependent on bile secretion and is reported to increase the growth of a number of bacterial species, including an enterococcal species,Enterococcus faecalis This study examined the relationships between indomethacin (INDO)-induced intestinal injury/bleeding, small bowel overgrowth (SBO) and dissemination of enterococci, and the contribution of bile secretion to these pathological responses. Rats received either a sham operation (SO) or bile duct ligation (BDL) prior to administration of two daily subcutaneous doses of saline orINDO, and 24 h later, biopsies of ileum and liver were collected for plating on selective bacterial media. Fecal hemoglobin (Hb) and blood hematocrit (Hct) were measured to assess intestinal bleeding. Of the four treatment groups, onlySO/INDOrats experienced a significant 10- to 30-fold increase in fecal Hb and reduction in Hct, indicating thatBDLattenuatedINDO-induced intestinal injury/bleeding. Ileal enterococcal colony-forming units were significantly increased (500- to 1000-fold) inSO/INDOrats. Of all groups, only theSO/INDOrats demonstrated gut injury, and this was associated with enterococcal overgrowth of the gut and dissemination to the liver. We also demonstrated thatINDO-induced intestinal injury andE. faecalisovergrowth was independent of the route of administration of the drug, as similar findings were observed in rats orally dosed with theNSAID Bile secretion plays an important role inINDO-induced gut injury and appears to support enterococcal overgrowth of the intestine.NSAID-induced enterococcalSBOmay be involved either as a compensatory response to gut injury or with the pathogenic process itself and the subsequent development of sepsis.

  2. An analysis of cosecretion and coexpression of gut hormones from male rat proximal and distal small intestine.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Berit; Pedersen, Jens; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Hartmann, Bolette; Toräng, Signe; Rehfeld, Jens F; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-03-01

    Gut endocrine cells are generally thought to have distinct localization and secretory products. Recent studies suggested that the cells are highly related and have potential to express more than one hormone. We studied the coexpression and cosecretion of gut hormones in separate segments of rat small intestine. We measured secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), neurotensin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and cholecystokinin (CCK) from proximal and distal half of the small intestine, isolated from male rats and perfused ex vivo. Hormone secretion was stimulated by bombesin, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and peptones. Furthermore, tissue samples collected along the intestine were analyzed for expression, hormone content, and cell densities including colocalization. Most hormones responded to all three stimuli (but no GIP response to bombesin). GLP-1 secretion was similar from proximal and distal intestine, whereas PYY was secreted only from the distal half. CCK and GIP were mainly secreted proximally, whereas neurotensin was equally secreted from both parts. Cell densities, hormone concentrations, and expression patterns were generally parallel, with increasing values distally for GLP-1 and PYY, an exclusively proximal pattern for CCK, even distribution for neurotensin and GIP except for the most distal segments. PYY nearly always colocalized with GLP-1. Approximately 20% of GLP-1 cells colocalized with CCK and neurotensin, whereas GLP-1/GIP colocalization was rare. Our findings indicate that two L cell types exist, a proximal one secreting GLP-1 (and possibly CCK and neurotensin), and a distal one secreting GLP-1 and PYY. GIP seems to be secreted from cells that are not cosecreting other peptides.

  3. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  4. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  5. Diet-induced epigenetic regulation in vivo of the intestinal fructose transporter Glut5 during development of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuji; Douard, Veronique; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2011-04-01

    Metabolic complications arising from excessive fructose consumption are increasing dramatically even in young children, but little is known about ontogenetic mechanisms regulating Glut5 [glucose transporter 5; encoded by the Slc2a5 (solute carrier family 2 member 5) gene]. Glut5 expression is low postnatally and does not increase, unless luminal fructose and systemic glucocorticoids are present, until ≥ 14 days of age, suggesting substrate-inducible age- and hormone-sensitive regulation. In the present study, we perfused intestines of 10- and 20-day-old rats with either fructose or glucose then analysed the binding of Pol II (RNA polymerase II) and GR (glucocorticoid receptor), as well as acetylation of histones H3 and H4 by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Abundance of Glut5 mRNA increased only with fructose perfusion and age, a pattern that matched that of Pol II binding and histone H3 acetylation to the Glut5 promoter. Although many regions of the Glut5 promoter respond to developmental signals, fewer regions perceive dietary signals. Age- but not fructose-dependent expression of Sglt1 [sodium-dependent glucose co-transporter 1 encoded by the Slc5a1(solute carrier family 5 member 1) gene] also correlated with Pol II binding and histone H3 acetylation. In contrast, G6Pase (glucose-6-phosphatase; encoded by the G6pc gene) expression, which decreases with age and increases with fructose, is associated only with age-dependent changes in histone H4 acetylation. Induction of Glut5 during ontogenetic development appears to be specifically mediated by GR translocation to the nucleus and subsequent binding to the Glut5 promoter, whereas the glucocorticoid-independent regulation of Sglt1 by age was not associated with any GR binding to the Sglt1 promoter.

  6. The relation between L-methionine uptake and sodium in rat small intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Newey, H.; Rampone, A. J.; Smyth, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    1. Uptakes of L-methionine and mannitol by rat jejunum in vitro were measured over test periods from 5 to 120 sec after 30 min pre-test periods in the presence or absence of Na. 2. The initial stage in methionine uptake was dependent on the presence of Na+ and to a lesser extent on the K+ concentration. In contrast mannitol uptake was independent of Na and K. 3. The initial stage in methionine uptake can be reactivated 30-60% within 5 sec by replacing an Na-deficient intestine into an Na-containing medium. 4. Initial methionine uptake was greater with a normal intracellular and low medium Na concentration than with a high medium and low intracellular Na concentration. It is suggested that the intracellular Na concentration is a critical factor, more important than the Na gradient, in determining the rate of amino acid transfer across the luminal membrane. PMID:5501050

  7. Effects of 4-nitrophenol on expression of the ER-α and AhR signaling pathway-associated genes in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Juan; Song, Meiyan; Watanabe, Gen; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Rui, Xiaoli; Li, ChunMei

    2016-09-01

    4-Nitrophenol (PNP) is a persistent organic pollutant that was proven to be an environmental endocrine disruptor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling pathway in regulating the damage response to PNP in the small intestine of rats. Wistar-Imamichi male rats (21 d) were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and PNP group. Each group had three processes that were gavaged with PNP or vehicle daily: single dose (1 d), repeated dose (3 consecutive days) (3 d), and repeated dose with recovery (3 consecutive days and 3 recovery days) (6 d). The weight of the body, the related viscera, and small intestine were examined. Histological parameters of the small intestine and the quantity of mucus proteins secreted by small goblet cells were determined using HE staining and PAS staining. The mRNA expression of AhR, ER-α, CYP1A1, and GST was measured by real-time qPCR. In addition, we also analyzed the AhR, ER-α, and CYP1A1 expression in the small intestine by immunohistochemical staining. The small intestines histologically changed in the PNP-treated rat and the expression of AhR, CYP1A1, and GST was increased. While ER-α was significantly decreased in the small intestine, simultaneously, when rats were exposed to a longer PNP treatment, the damages disappeared. Our results demonstrate that PNP has an effect on the expression of AhR signaling pathway genes, AhR, CYP1A1, and GST, and ER-α in the rat small intestine.

  8. Metabolic enzyme activities and drug excretion in the small intestine and in the liver in the rat.

    PubMed

    Almási, A; Bojcsev, Sz; Fischer, T; Simon, H; Perjési, P; Fischer, Emil

    2013-12-01

    The aim of these experiments was the investigation of the correlation between the metabolic enzyme activities and the intestinal and hepatic excretion of p-nitrophenol (PNP) and its metabolites (PNP-glucuronide: PNP-G and PNP-sulfate: PNP-S) in the same group of rats (n = 10). A jejunal loop was perfused with isotonic medium containing PNP in a concentration of 500 μM. The samples were obtained from the luminal perfusion medium and from the bile. For enzyme assays tissue samples were obtained from the liver and jejunum at the end of experiments. Significant differences were calculated by the Student's t-test. The activity of UDP-glucuronyltransferase and sulfotransferase was about three times higher in the liver than in the small intestine. The activity of the ß-glucuronidase was about six times higher, the activity of the arylsulfatase was approximately seven times greater in the liver than in the jejunum. No significant difference was found between the luminal appearance and the biliary excretion of PNP-G. Contrary to these findings, the biliary excretion of PNP-S was significantly higher than the luminal appearance of PNP-sulfate. It can be concluded that no direct correlation exists between the activity of metabolic enzymes and the excretion rate of PNP-metabolites in the liver and in the jejunal segment of the small intestine.

  9. Antispasmodic effects of myrrh due to calcium antagonistic effects in inflamed rat small intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Vissiennon, Cica; Goos, Karl-Heinz; Goos, Ole; Nieber, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Myrrh is the oleo-gum resin of mainly Commiphora molmol and as a powdered substance, one compound in the traditional medicinal product Myrrhinil-Intest®, which has been used for the treatment of unspecific, inflammatory intestinal disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antispasmodic effect of myrrh under healthy and inflamed conditions, and to evaluate a calcium-antagonistic effect as a possible mode of action. Therefore, an ethanolic myrrh extract was tested for its effects on muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contractions in untreated and inflamed rat ileum/jejunum preparations. Inflammation was experimentally induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (10 mM, 30 min). Additionally, the effect of the calcium channel agonist Bay K8644 in the presence of varying myrrh extract concentrations was examined. Myrrh extract (0.99 mg/mL) suppressed the acetylcholine-induced contraction down to 25.8 % in untreated and 15.2 % in inflamed preparations. Myrrh extract (0.15; 0.25 and 0.35 mg/mL) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the Bay K8644 concentration-response curve in untreated and inflamed preparations with a significant EC50 shift. Schild analysis resulted in a pA2 value of 0.93 for untreated preparations. Increasing myrrh extract concentrations induced a concentration-dependent decrease of the agonistic maximum effect in untreated and inflamed preparations down to 15.8 % and 25.8 %, respectively, for the highest concentration leading to a pD2 value of 0.58. Myrrh extract reduced intestinal muscle tone and acetylcholine-induced contraction of untreated and inflamed ileum/jejunum preparations based on dual calcium antagonism characterized by a right shift of the agonistic dose-response curve and a depression of the maximum effect. The resulting reduction of intestinal motility and spasmolytic effects provide a rationale for the symptom treatment of intestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome

  10. Uptake of barbituric acid derivatives in small intestinal brush border membrane vesicles from retinyl palmitate-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Tanii, H; Horie, T

    2000-08-01

    Brush border membrane was prepared from the small intestinal (jejunum) cells along the crypt-villus axis. The fluorescence spectra of 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonic acid and the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene were measured in the brush border membrane vesicle suspension. The hydrophobicity of brush border membrane was found to be in the order villus tip >mid villus >lower villus. The fluidity of brush border membrane was in the order villus tip rats, the fluidity of brush border membrane was found to be higher in the retinyl palmitate-treated rats than in the control rats. However, no significant difference in the uptake of hexobarbital by brush border membrane vesicles was observed between the retinyl palmitate-administered rats and the control rats. Thus, the retinyl palmitate treatment seems unlikely to affect the passively transported ligands like barbituric acid derivatives in brush border membrane vesicles. PMID:10989945

  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Johnston, K L

    1999-03-01

    It is clear that the exact definition of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) needs to be reappraised in veterinary medicine. Antibiotic responsive enteropathies due to SIBO must be distinguished from those that are not associated with SIBO, such as those caused by a lack of immune tolerance. Once appropriate definitions and criteria for diagnosis are in place, the wide variety of diagnostic procedures that may facilitate the diagnosis can be evaluated with respect to their sensitivity and specificity, and statements about the prevalence and significance of this disorder can be made.

  12. The nondigestible disaccharide epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption via rho-associated kinase- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanisms in rat small intestines.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takuya; Nishimukai, Megumi; Takechi, Maki; Taguchi, Hidenori; Hamada, Shigeki; Yokota, Atsushi; Ito, Susumu; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2010-02-10

    We previously showed that epilactose, a nondigestible disaccharide, increased calcium (Ca) absorption in the small intestines of rats. Here, we explored the mechanism(s) underlying the epilactose-mediated promotion of Ca absorption in a ligated intestinal segment of anesthetized rats. The addition of epilactose to the luminal solution increased Ca absorption and chromium (Cr)-EDTA permeability, a paracellular indicator, with a strong correlation (R = 0.93) between these changes. Epilactose induced the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains (MLCs), which is known to activate the paracellular route, without any change in the association of tight junction proteins with the actin cytoskeleton. The epilactose-mediated promotion of the Ca absorption was suppressed by specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). These results indicate that epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption in the small intestine of rats through the induction of MLC phosphorylation via MLCK- and ROCK-dependent mechanisms.

  13. Differential gene expression patterns and colocalization of ATP-gated P2X6/P2X4 ion channels during rat small intestine ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Karla; Gonzalez-Mendoza, David; Berumen, Laura C; Escobar, Jesica E; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadulupe

    2016-07-01

    Gene coding for ATP-gated receptor ion channels (P2X1-7) has been associated with the developmental process in various tissues; among these ion channel subtypes, P2X6 acts as a physiological regulator of P2X4 receptor functions when the two receptors form heteroreceptors. The P2X4 receptor is involved in pain sensation, the inflammatory process, and body homeostasis by means of Mg(2+) absorption through the intestine. The small intestine is responsible for the absorption and digestion of nutrients; throughout its development, several gene expressions are induced that are related to nutrients received, metabolism, and other intestine functions. Previous work has shown a differential P2X4 and P2X6 protein distribution in the small intestine of newborn and adult rats; however, it is not well-known at what age the change in the relationship between the gene and protein expression occurs and whether or not these receptors are colocalized. In this work, we evaluate P2X4 and P2X6 gene expression patterns by qPCR from embryonic (E18, P0, P7, P17, P30) to adult age in rat gut, as well as P2X6/P2X4 colocalization using qRT-PCR and confocal immunofluorescence in proximal and distal small intestine sections. The results showed that P2X6 and P2X4 gene expression levels of both receptors decreased at the embryonic-perinatal transition, whereas from ages P17 to P30 (suckling-weaning transition) both receptors increased their gene expression levels. Furthermore, P2X4 and P2X6 proteins were expressed in a different way during rat small intestine development, showing a higher colocalization coefficient at age P30 in both intestine regions. Those results suggest that purinergic receptors may play a role in intestinal maturation, which is associated with age and intestinal region.

  14. Effects of lactadherin on plasma D-lactic acid and small intestinal MUC2 and claudin-1 expression levels in rats with rotavirus-induced diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    XU, RUI; LEI, YI-HUI; SHI, JUN; ZHOU, YI-JUN; CHEN, YING-WEI; HE, ZHEN-JUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of lactadherin on plasma D-lactic acid and small intestinal mucin (MUC) 2 and claudin-1 expression levels in rats with diarrhea induced by rotavirus (RV) infection. A total of 75 seven-day-old healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following five groups: Control (C), RV infection (RVI), lactadherin before rotavirus infection (LBRI), lactadherin after rotavirus infection (LARI), and blank (B). On day 4 of artificial feeding, the rats in groups RVI, LBRI and LARI were intragastric administered 1×106 PFU RV; whereas the rats in groups C and B were intragastrically administered an equal volume of maintenance solution from the RV supernatant and normal saline, respectively. In the LBRI and LARI groups, rats received daily intragastric administration of 0.25 mg lactadherin for three days prior to and following infection with RV, respectively. The course of diarrheal symptoms was observed in each group and samples were collected on days 1, 4, and 7 post-infection in order to determine the mucosal morphology, plasma D-lactic acid levels and the expression levels of MUC2 and the intracellular junction protein, claudin-1, in the small intestine. On day 4 post-infection, the rats in group RVI demonstrated severely damaged small intestines and typical diarrheal characteristics, as detected by light microscopy; whereas rats in groups LBRI and LARI demonstrated intact small intestinal villi with partial vacuolation of epithelial cells and changes in the position of their nuclei. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the rats in the RVI group had sparse, shortened, disordered intestinal microvilli and widened intercellular junctions; whereas those in groups LBRI and LARI had long intestinal microvilli sparser compared with groups B and C and slightly widened intercellular junctions. Plasma D-lactic acid levels were increased in groups RVI, LBRI and LARI, as compared with groups B and C, and the

  15. Study on the small intestine absorptive kinetics characters of tanshinol and protocatechualdehyde of Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai; Zhai, Shuiting; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Guoquan; Fu, Xiaoyang; Li, Tianxiao

    2016-07-01

    In order to provide scientific basis for clinical selection of drugs, to compare and analyze the effective constitutes and the intestinal absorption in vivo in rats of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills (taken as the representatives). Determine the contents of tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B and tanshinone II A, cryptotanshinone, ginseng saponin Rg1 and Rb1 in the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The intestinal absorption condition of the tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills in rats were detected by intestinal perfusion experiment. Only the intake of protocatechuic aldehyde in the compound salvia tablets was higher than in the compound dropping pills, the intake of the other 6 effective constitutes were all lower than in the compound dropping pills. The intestinal absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was rather complete, while the intestinal absorption of tanshinol and salvianolic acid B were not significant. The duodenum was the main absorption region of these three components. The absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was different in different regions of the intestines. Each intake of the effective constitutes in the tablets and dropping pills were significantly different, and the rat intestinal absorption of part of the components were different. PMID:27592492

  16. Study on the small intestine absorptive kinetics characters of tanshinol and protocatechualdehyde of Salvia miltiorrhiza extracts in rats in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai; Zhai, Shuiting; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Guoquan; Fu, Xiaoyang; Li, Tianxiao

    2016-07-01

    In order to provide scientific basis for clinical selection of drugs, to compare and analyze the effective constitutes and the intestinal absorption in vivo in rats of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills (taken as the representatives). Determine the contents of tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B and tanshinone II A, cryptotanshinone, ginseng saponin Rg1 and Rb1 in the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The intestinal absorption condition of the tanshinol, protocatechuic aldehyde, salvianolic acid B of the compound salvia tablets and compound salvia dropping pills in rats were detected by intestinal perfusion experiment. Only the intake of protocatechuic aldehyde in the compound salvia tablets was higher than in the compound dropping pills, the intake of the other 6 effective constitutes were all lower than in the compound dropping pills. The intestinal absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was rather complete, while the intestinal absorption of tanshinol and salvianolic acid B were not significant. The duodenum was the main absorption region of these three components. The absorption of protocatechuic aldehyde was different in different regions of the intestines. Each intake of the effective constitutes in the tablets and dropping pills were significantly different, and the rat intestinal absorption of part of the components were different.

  17. Changes in messenger RNA of pancreatic enzymes and intestinal cholecystokinin after a 7-day bile-pancreatic juice diversion from the proximal small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Ochi, Y; Kasai, T

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated the bile-pancreatic juice (BPJ)-independent stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion in chronic BPJ-diverted rats. Pancreatic and intestinal adaptation to 7-day BPJ diversion was next examined. Pancreatic enzyme mRNA and cholecystokinin mRNA in the jejunal mucosa were measured in rats with BPJ diverted into the ileum (PBD rats) in comparison with the figures for rats with BPJ returned to the duodenum (normal rats) or laparotomized (Intact) rats under well-nourished conditions. Amylase mRNA in the pancreas was lower and trypsinogen plus chymotrypsinogen mRNA was higher in the PBD rats than in the intact rats. The change in pancreatic mRNA was similar to that in the specific activities of the enzymes after a chronic BPJ diversion. This finding suggests that these pancreatic enzymes were regulated by the mRNA level. The portal concentration of cholecystokinin in the postabsorptive period (exogenously non-stimulated status) was 4-fold higher in the PBD group than in the normal and intact groups. Cholecystokinin mRNA in the jejunal mucosa of PBD rats was somewhat higher than that of intact rats. These results suggest that intestinal cholecystokinin was predominantly increased at the translational or later stage by chronic BPJ diversion.

  18. Measurement of small intestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Satoh, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Many animal models have been devised for investigating the pathogenesis of intestinal lesions and for screening drugs for the treatment of intestinal ulcers in humans. Recently, particular attention has been focused on NSAID-induced intestinal lesions as a result of the development of the capsule endoscope and double-balloon endoscope. Ischemic enteritis, one of the most dramatic abdominal emergencies, is known to cause severe damage to the small intestine by a significant decrease of arterial blood flow in the small intestine. In this unit, two animal models for small intestinal damage induced by NSAIDs or intestinal ischemia are described. Also included are methods for lesion induction and evaluation of the damage as well as the measurement of pathogenic functional and biochemical changes.

  19. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia[PARANDCO1].

  20. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia[PARANDCO1]. PMID:27635197

  1. Repairing effects of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards high dose methotrexate-induced rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yueqin; Zhu, Yanping; Wang, Jinshen; Han, Yanqin; Qin, Daogang; Yang, Qiaozhi; Sun, Xiaojing; Chen, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the efficacy of interleukin 11 (IL-11) towards the high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-concurrent rat small intestinal mucositis and its impacts on the proliferation of the human T-lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cell line. Materials and Methods: 95 Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, the normal control group (A), the methotrexate (MTX) control group (B), the IL-11-pre-treated high-dose group (C), the post-IL-11-treatment high-dose group (D) and the post-IL-11-treatment low-dose group (E). After the intraperitoneal injection of MTX in the groups B-E, the rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The mortality, morphological and ultrastructural changes of small intestine of each group were observed. The cells were then cultured in vitro, and the MTT method was used to investigate the effects of different concentration of IL-11 on CEM proliferation and also on HDMTX-induced mucositis. Results: IL-11 could reduce the intestinal histopathological score, increase the height of small intestinal villi, promote the proliferation of intestinal lacunar cells and reduce the mortality rate of rats. The IL-11 pre-treatment group exhibited the best efficacies, demonstrating significant difference with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the proliferation of CEM was not promoted, indicating that IL-11 could not inhibit HDMTX. Conclusion: IL-11 could reduce the severity of HDMTX-induced intestinal mucositis, and improve the survival rate of experimental rats, and could be safely used as the adjuvant treatment of HDMTX in childhood leukemia. PMID:27746864

  2. Epithelial transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1)-dependent adrenomedullin upregulates blood flow in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Atsushi; Omiya, Yuji; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Ohno, Nagisa; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The functional roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the gastrointestinal tract have garnered considerable attention in recent years. We previously reported that daikenchuto (TU-100), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) via adrenomedullin (ADM) release from intestinal epithelial (IE) cells (Kono T et al. J Crohns Colitis 4: 161–170, 2010). TU-100 contains multiple TRP activators. In the present study, therefore, we examined the involvement of TRP channels in the ADM-mediated vasodilatatory effect of TU-100. Rats were treated intraduodenally with the TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin (CAP), the TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC), or TU-100, and jejunum IBF was evaluated using laser-Doppler blood flowmetry. All three compounds resulted in vasodilatation, and the vasodilatory effect of TU-100 was abolished by a TRPA1 antagonist but not by a TRPV1 antagonist. Vasodilatation induced by AITC and TU-100 was abrogated by anti-ADM antibody treatment. RT-PCR and flow cytometry revealed that an IEC-6 cell line originated from the small intestine and purified IE cells expressed ADM and TRPA1 but not TRPV1. AITC increased ADM release in IEC cells remarkably, while CAP had no effect. TU-100 and its ingredient 6-shogaol (6SG) increased ADM release dose-dependently, and the effects were abrogated by a TRPA1 antagonist. 6SG showed similar TRPA1-dependent vasodilatation in vivo. These results indicate that TRPA1 in IE cells may play an important role in controlling bowel microcirculation via ADM release. Epithelial TRPA1 appears to be a promising target for the development of novel strategies for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23275609

  3. Investigations into the absorption of insulin and insulin derivatives from the small intestine of the anaesthetised rat.

    PubMed

    McGinn, B J; Morrison, J D

    2016-06-28

    Experiments have been undertaken to determine the extent to which cholic acid conjugates of insulin were absorbed from the small intestine of anaesthetised rats by means of the bile salt transporters of the ileum. The measure used to assess the absorption of the cholyl-insulins was the amount of hypoglycaemia following infusion into the small intestine. Control experiments involving infusion of natural insulin into the ileum showed either nil absorption or absorption of a small amount of insulin as indicated by transient dip in the blood glucose concentration. However, when insulin was co-infused with the bile salt taurocholate, this was followed by a marked hypoglycaemic response which was specific to the ileum and did not occur on infusion into the jejunum. When the two cholyl conjugates of insulin were tested viz. B(29)-Lys-cholyl-insulin and B(1)-Phe-cholyl-insulin, both were biologically active as indicated by hypoglycaemic responses on systemic injection, though their potency was about 40% of that of natural insulin. While there was no evidence for the absorption of B(29)-Lys-cholyl-insulin when infused into the ileum, B(1)-Phe-cholyl-insulin did cause a long lasting hypoglycaemic response, indicating that absorption had occurred. Since the hypoglycaemic response was blocked on co-infusion with taurocholate and was absent for infusion of the conjugate into the jejunum, these results were taken as evidence that B(1)-Phe-cholyl-insulin had been taken up by the ileal bile salt transporters. This would indicate that B(1)-Phe-cholyl-insulin is worthy of further investigation for use in an oral insulin formulation.

  4. Role of activation of cholinergic influences in recovery of electrical activity of the stomach and small intestine during the early postoperative period in rats.

    PubMed

    Tropskaya, N S; Solov'yova, G I; Popova, T S

    2007-02-01

    The effects of neostigmine and calcium pantothenate on electrical activity of the stomach and small intestine were studied in chronic experiments on rats after laparotomy with implantation of a probe into the jejunum and electrodes into different portions of the gastrointestinal tract. At the early terms after surgery, stimulation of endogenous acetylcholine release intensified electrical activity of the stomach, duodenum, and jejunum. Treatment with neostigmine and calcium pantothenate did not accelerate the recovery of the migrating myoelectrical complex, but promoted the recovery of the general intensity of action potential generation in the stomach and small intestine. PMID:17970199

  5. Meat proteins had different effects on oligopeptide transporter PEPT1 in the small intestine of young rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjie; Li, Chunbao; Song, Shangxin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-12-01

    The peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1) in the apical membrane of enterocytes is the central mechanism for regulating the absorption of di- and tripeptides. Dietary proteins may affect PEPT1 abundance and peptide absorption. The present study aimed to characterize changes in PEPT1 mRNA and PEPT1 protein levels in the duodenum and jejunum of young rats after 7-day diet intervention with casein (reference), soy, beef, pork, chicken and fish proteins and further evaluate the impact on the epithelial absorption capacity. RT-PCR and western blot analyses showed that: (1) PEPT1 protein level in duodenum was higher (p < 0.05) for soy protein group than that for casein group. However, no difference was observed in jejunal PEPT1 protein level between any two diet groups (p > 0.05). The soy protein group had lower crypt depth and higher V/C ratio in the jejunum (p < 0.05). (2) PEPT1 mRNA levels were lower (p < 0.05) in rat duodenum and jejunum in pork, chicken and fish protein groups, whose trend was contrary to the results of jejunual histological observation with lower crypt depth, greater villus height and higher V/C ratio. In conclusion, different meat proteins alter distinct PEPT1 expression level and absorption capacity as reflected by gut morphology in small intestine.

  6. [FREE CONSUMPTION OF GLUCOSE SOLUTION BY RATS AS A CRITERION FOR EVALUATION ITS ABSORPTION IN THE SMALL INTESTINE (Experimental study and mathematical modeling)].

    PubMed

    Gruzdkov, A A; Gromova, L V; Dmitrieva, Yu V; Alekseeva, A S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the work is to analyze the relationship between consumption of glucose solution by rats and its absorption, and to use this fact for assessment of the absorptive capacity of the small intestine in non anesthetized animals in vivo. Consumption of glucose solution (200 g/l) by fasted rats was recorded in the control, and after administration of phloridzin--inhibitor of glucose active transport- or 3 hours after the restriction stress. On the mathematical model we studied the relative role of factors that can influence the temporal dynamics of glucose consumption by rats. The rate of glucose consumption was observed being decreased in the presence of phloridzin (1 mM), and be increased after the stress. The results of modeling are consistent with the experimental data and show that the rate of consumption of glucose solutions considerably more depends on the transport activity of the small intestine than on glucose concentration in the solution, or on the substrate regulation of the stomach emptying. Analysis of dynamics of consumption of glucose solution by intact rats may be considered as one of promising approaches to assessing the absorptive capacity of the small intestine under natural conditions.

  7. Contribution of solvent drag through intercellular junctions to absorption of nutrients by the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed

    Pappenheimer, J R; Reiss, K Z

    1987-01-01

    The lumen of the small intestine in anesthetized rats was recirculated with 50 ml perfusion fluid containing normal salts, 25 mM glucose and low concentrations of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from creatinine (mol wt 113) to Inulin (mol wt 5500). Ferrocyanide, a nontoxic, quadrupally charged anion was not absorbed; it could therefore be used as an osmotically active solute with reflection coefficient of 1.0 to adjust rates of fluid absorption, Jv, and to measure the coefficient of osmotic flow, Lp. The clearances from the perfusion fluid of all other test solutes were approximately proportional to Jv. From Lp and rates of clearances as a function of Jv and molecular size we estimate (a) the fraction of fluid absorption which passes paracellularly (approx. 50%), (b) coefficients of solvent drag of various solutes within intercellular junctions, (c) the equivalent pore radius of intercellular junctions (50 A) and their cross sectional area per unit path length (4.3 cm per cm length of intestine). Glucose absorption also varied as a function of Jv. From this relationship and the clearances of inert markers we calculate the rate of active transport of glucose, the amount of glucose carried paracellularly by solvent drag or back-diffusion at any given Jv and luminal glucose concentration and the concentration of glucose in the absorbate. The results indicate that solvent drag through paracellular channels is the principal route for intestinal transport of glucose or amino acids at physiological rates of fluid absorption and concentration. In the absence of luminal glucose the rate of fluid absorption and the clearances of all inert hydrophilic solutes were greatly reduced. It is proposed that Na-coupled transport of organic solutes from lumen to intercellular spaces provides the principal osmotic force for fluid absorption and triggers widening of intercellular junctions, thus promoting bulk absorption of nutrients by solvent drag. Further evidence for regulation

  8. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Louise W; Kuhre, Rune E; Janus, Charlotte; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays a central role in modern treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the form of GLP-1 enhancers and GLP-1 mimetics. An alternative treatment strategy is to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells using a targeted approach. The G-protein-coupled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we examined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, perfused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 agonists (TAK-875, AMG 837, AM-1638, and AM-5262) were administered through intraluminal and intra-arterial routes, respectively, and dynamic changes in GLP-1 secretion were evaluated. Vascular administration of 10 μmol/L TAK-875, 10 μmol/L AMG 837, 1 μmol/L and 0.1 μmol/L AM-1638, 1 μmol/L AM-6252, and 1 mmol/L LA, all significantly increased GLP-1 secretion compared to basal levels (P < 0.05), whereas luminal administration of LA and FFAR1 agonists was ineffective. Thus, both natural and small-molecule agonists of the FFAR1 receptor appear to require absorption prior to stimulating GLP-1 secretion, indicating that therapies based on activation of nutrient sensing may be more complex than hitherto expected. PMID:26381015

  9. Vascular, but not luminal, activation of FFAR1 (GPR40) stimulates GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Louise W; Kuhre, Rune E; Janus, Charlotte; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-09-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays a central role in modern treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the form of GLP-1 enhancers and GLP-1 mimetics. An alternative treatment strategy is to stimulate endogenous GLP-1 secretion from enteroendocrine L cells using a targeted approach. The G-protein-coupled receptor, FFAR1 (previously GPR40), expressed on L cells and activated by long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) is a potential target. A link between FFAR1 activation and GLP-1 secretion has been demonstrated in cellular models and small-molecule FFAR1 agonists have been developed. In this study, we examined the effect of FFAR1 activation on GLP-1 secretion using isolated, perfused small intestines from rats, a physiologically relevant model allowing distinction between direct and indirect effects of FFAR1 activation. The endogenous FFAR1 ligand, linoleic acid (LA), and four synthetic FFAR1 agonists (TAK-875, AMG 837, AM-1638, and AM-5262) were administered through intraluminal and intra-arterial routes, respectively, and dynamic changes in GLP-1 secretion were evaluated. Vascular administration of 10 μmol/L TAK-875, 10 μmol/L AMG 837, 1 μmol/L and 0.1 μmol/L AM-1638, 1 μmol/L AM-6252, and 1 mmol/L LA, all significantly increased GLP-1 secretion compared to basal levels (P < 0.05), whereas luminal administration of LA and FFAR1 agonists was ineffective. Thus, both natural and small-molecule agonists of the FFAR1 receptor appear to require absorption prior to stimulating GLP-1 secretion, indicating that therapies based on activation of nutrient sensing may be more complex than hitherto expected.

  10. Comparative toxicogenomic analysis of oral Cr(VI) exposure effects in rat and mouse small intestinal epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Kopec, Anna K.; Thompson, Chad M.; Kim, Suntae; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2012-07-15

    Continuous exposure to high concentrations of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] in drinking water results in intestinal tumors in mice but not rats. Concentration-dependent gene expression effects were evaluated in female F344 rat duodenal and jejunal epithelia following 7 and 90 days of exposure to 0.3–520 mg/L (as sodium dichromate dihydrate, SDD) in drinking water. Whole-genome microarrays identified 3269 and 1815 duodenal, and 4557 and 1534 jejunal differentially expressed genes at 8 and 91 days, respectively, with significant overlaps between the intestinal segments. Functional annotation identified gene expression changes associated with oxidative stress, cell cycle, cell death, and immune response that were consistent with reported changes in redox status and histopathology. Comparative analysis with B6C3F1 mouse data from a similarly designed study identified 2790 differentially expressed rat orthologs in the duodenum compared to 5013 mouse orthologs at day 8, and only 1504 rat and 3484 mouse orthologs at day 91. Automated dose–response modeling resulted in similar median EC{sub 50}s in the rodent duodenal and jejunal mucosae. Comparative examination of differentially expressed genes also identified divergently regulated orthologs. Comparable numbers of differentially expressed genes were observed at equivalent Cr concentrations (μg Cr/g duodenum). However, mice accumulated higher Cr levels than rats at ≥ 170 mg/L SDD, resulting in a ∼ 2-fold increase in the number of differentially expressed genes. These qualitative and quantitative differences in differential gene expression, which correlate with differences in tissue dose, likely contribute to the disparate intestinal tumor outcomes. -- Highlights: ► Cr(VI) elicits dose-dependent changes in gene expression in rat intestine. ► Cr(VI) elicits less differential gene expression in rats compared to mice. ► Cr(VI) gene expression can be phenotypically anchored to intestinal changes. ► Species

  11. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption.

  12. [Intestinal absorption kinetics of flurbiprofen in rats].

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun-Jie; Lin, Cong-Cong; Li, Jiang; Zhu, Zhi-Hong; Yang, Xing-Gang; Pan, Wei-San

    2013-03-01

    To study the in situ intestinal absorption kinetics of flrubiprofen in rats, the absorption of flurbiprofen in small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) and colon of rats was investigated using in situ single-pass perfusion method and the drug content was measured by HPLC. The effects of drug concentration on the intestinal absorption were investigated. The K(a) and P(app) values of flurbiprofen in the small intestine and colon had no significant difference (P > 0.05). Drug concentration (4.0, 10.0 and 16.0 mg x L(-1)) had no significant influence on the K(a) values (P > 0.05). However, when concentration was 4.0 mg x L(-1) and 10.0 mg x L(-1), significant effect on the P(app) values (P < 0.05) was found, but significant effect on the P(app) values was not shown between 10.0 mg x L(-1) and 16.0 mg x L(-1) (P > 0.05). The K(a) and P(app) values of flurbiprofen on the perfusion flow rate had significant difference (P < 0.05). Flurbiprofen could be absorbed at all segments of the intestine in rats and had no special absorption window. The absorption of flurbiprofen complies with the facilitated diffusion in the general intestinal segments, and accompany with the cytopsistransport mechanism probably. The perfusion flow rate had significant effect on the K(a) and P(app).

  13. Characteristics of reversible absorption-enhancing effect of sodium nitroprusside in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Yusuke; Kishimoto, Hisanao; Kitazato, Takuya; Ishizaka, Haruka; Kamiya, Naomi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Tomita, Mikio; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2013-07-16

    Nitric oxide (NO) donors increase the permeability of water-soluble compounds with neither loss of cell viability nor lactate dehydrogenase release. In addition, the rectal absorption of insulin has been reported to be remarkably enhanced in the presence of NO donors such as 1-Hydroxy-3-(3-aminopropyl)-3-isopropyltriazene 2-oxide (NOC5) and N-Ethyl-2-(1-ethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazino) ethanamine (NOC12). In this study, we examined the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), which is used in clinical situations as a vasodilator, as a model NO donor on the ileal mucosa of rats. We used an in situ closed loop method in rat ileum to study changes in the permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 4000 (FD-4) as a paracellular marker. The effect of SNP (1 and 10mg/kg) on the protein expression level of the claudin family was examined by Western blotting. The membrane permeation of FD-4 was increased but no mucosal lesion was observed upon the administration of SNP. Moreover, the protein expression level of the claudin family was not changed by the administration of SNP. When SNP was removed 2h after its administration, no significant change in the membrane permeation of FD-4 was observed. Moreover, no decrease of ileal membrane resistance or disruption of membrane structure was observed. The absorption-enhancing effect of SNP was associated with low injury and low toxicity. The reversibility of the effect of SNP was observed. Consequently, it was shown that SNP can be a useful absorption enhancer.

  14. Changes in Enteric Neurons of Small Intestine in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Fei, Guijun; Fang, Xiucai; Yang, Xilin; Sun, Xiaohong; Qian, Jiaming; Wood, Jackie D; Ke, Meiyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Physical and/or emotional stresses are important factors in the exacerbation of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several lines of evidence support that a major impact of stress on the gastrointestinal tract occurs via the enteric nervous system. We aimed to evaluate histological changes in the submucosal plexus (SMP) and myenteric plexus (MP) of the distal ileum in concert with the intestinal motor function in a rat model of IBS with diarrhea. Methods The rat model was induced by heterotypic chronic and acute stress (CAS). The intestinal transit was measured by administering powdered carbon by gastric gavage. Double immunohistochemical fluorescence staining with whole-mount preparations of SMP and MP of enteric nervous system was used to assess changes in expression of choline acetyltransferase, vasoactive intestinal peptide, or nitric oxide synthase in relation to the pan neuronal marker, anti-Hu. Results The intestinal transit ratio increased significantly from control values of 50.8% to 60.6% in the CAS group. The numbers of enteric ganglia and neurons in the SMP were increased in the CAS group. The proportions of choline acetyltransferase- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-immunoreactive neurons in the SMP were increased (82.1 ± 4.3% vs. 76.0 ± 5.0%, P = 0.021; 40.5 ± 5.9% vs 28.9 ± 3.7%, P = 0.001), while nitric oxide synthase-immunoreactive neurons in the MP were decreased compared with controls (23.3 ± 4.5% vs 32.4 ± 4.5%, P = 0.002). Conclusions These morphological changes in enteric neurons to CAS might contribute to the dysfunction in motility and secretion in IBS with diarrhea. PMID:26645247

  15. Luminal leptin inhibits L-glutamine transport in rat small intestine: involvement of ASCT2 and B0AT1.

    PubMed

    Ducroc, Robert; Sakar, Yassine; Fanjul, Carmen; Barber, Ana; Bado, André; Lostao, Maria Pilar

    2010-07-01

    L-glutamine is the primary metabolic fuel for enterocytes. Glutamine from the diet is transported into the absorptive cells by two sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporters present at the apical membrane: ASCT2/SLC1A5 and B(0)AT1/SLC6A19. We have demonstrated that leptin is secreted into the stomach lumen after a meal and modulates the transport of sugars after binding to its receptors located at the brush border of the enterocytes. The present study was designed to address the effect of luminal leptin on Na(+)-dependent glutamine (Gln) transport in rat intestine and identify the transporters involved. We found that 0.2 nM leptin inhibited uptake of Gln and phenylalanine (Phe) (substrate of B(0)AT1) using everted intestinal rings. In Ussing chambers, 10 mM Gln absorption followed as Na(+)-induced short-circuit current was inhibited by leptin in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition at 10 nM; I(C50) = approximately 0.1 nM). Phe absorption was also decreased by leptin. Western blot analysis after 3-min incubation of the intestinal loops with 10 mM Gln, showed marked increase of ASCT2 and B(0)AT1 protein in the brush-border membrane that was reduced by rapid preincubation of the intestinal lumen with 1 nM leptin. Similarly, the increase in ASCT2 and B(0)AT1 gene expression induced by 60-min incubation of the intestine with 10 mM Gln was strongly reduced after a short preincubation period with leptin. Altogether these data demonstrate that, in rat, leptin controls the active Gln entry through reduction of both B(0)AT1 and ASCT2 proteins traffic to the apical plasma membrane and modulation of their gene expression.

  16. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  17. Low-methoxyl pectin stimulates small intestinal mucin secretion irrespective of goblet cell proliferation and is characterized by jejunum Muc2 upregulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shingo; Sonoyama, Kei; Bito, Hiroyuki; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Aoe, Seiichiro; Morita, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Generally, soluble fibers increase small intestinal mucin secretion by increasing the number of goblet cells in a viscosity-dependent manner. The present study aimed to examine the mechanism by which low-methoxyl pectin (LPC) affects mucin secretion in the small intestine. First, diets containing 50 g/kg of low-viscosity fiber (LPC, gum arabic, guar gum, low-molecular konjac mannan, arabinogalactan, sodium alginate) or high-molecular konjac mannan (KMH) were fed to Wistar rats for 10 d. Luminal mucin was greater in the LPC and KMH groups than in the fiber-free control group, but only the KMH group had more goblet cells in the ileum compared with the other groups. Next, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed LPC, KMH, or high-methoxyl pectin (HPC) diets (50 g/kg) for 10 d. The KMH and LPC groups, but not the HPC group, had greater luminal mucin than the control group, whereas jejunum Muc2 expression was higher only in the LPC group. Sprague-Dawley rats fed the LPC diet for 1 or 3 d had greater luminal mucin and jejunum Muc2 expression than those fed the control diet. In vitro studies using HT-29MTX cells showed that, of the various fibers studied, only LPC and HPC affected mucin secretion. Finally, Wistar rats were fed the LPC diet with or without neomycin in drinking water for 10 d; neomycin treatment did not compromise the effect of LPC on mucin secretion. We conclude that LPC does not affect the number of goblet cells but can interact directly with the epithelium and stimulate small intestinal mucin secretion.

  18. Stages of Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine cancer include unexplained weight loss and abdominal pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... doctor if you have any of the following: Pain or cramps in the middle of the abdomen. Weight loss with no known reason. A lump ...

  19. General Information about Small Intestine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Small Intestine Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Intestine Cancer Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  20. Kinetic evidence for separate systems in transport of D- and L-methionine by rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Brachet, P.; Alvarado, F.; Puigserver, A.

    1987-03-01

    The kinetics of D- and L-methionine uptake by rings of everted intestine in vitro are consistent with a saturable Michaelis-Menten component plus a linear, diffusional one. All the data could be fit with a diffusion constant, which was essentially the same, independent of whether it was estimated by iteration or by using the extracellular marker, (/sup 3/H), inulin. Similar results were obtained from in vivo perfusion experiments, except that the diffusional term was negligible. D-(3,4-/sup 14/C)Methionine was found to inhibit L-methionine uptake by intestinal rings according to fully noncompetitive kinetics. Another set of experiments with jejunal brush-border membrane vesicles showed that D-methionine uptake is dependent on a Na/sup +/ gradient and is significantly inhibited by L-(/sup 35/S) methionine and L-prolie, but not by ..beta..-alanine and ..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid. The results indicate that, in rat jejunum, D-methionine is taken up through a Na/sup +/-dependent pathway distinct from the neutral amino acid (L-methionine) carrier and from the amino acid (L-proline,..cap alpha..-methylaminoisobutyric acid, ..beta..-alanine) carrier.

  1. Leiomyosarcoma in leiomyomatosis of the small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    el-Omar, M.; Davies, J.; Gupta, S.; Ross, H.; Thompson, R.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple leiomyomata of the small intestine are rare. We report one such case where a leiomyosarcoma had arisen from a leiomyoma in the small intestine 8 years after presentation. The possible origin of the leiomyomata is discussed and it is concluded that small intestinal leiomyomatosis should be regarded as a premalignant condition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7971636

  2. Extrusion decreases the negative effects of kidney bean on enzyme and transport activities of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Marzo, F; Milagro, F I; Urdaneta, E; Barrenetxe, J; Ibañez, F C

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of raw and extruded kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Pinto) consumption on the gut physiology of young growing rats. The intestinal enzyme activity (sucrase, maltase, Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase IV, alkaline phosphatase) and the uptake of sugar (d-galactose) and amino acids (l-leucine) were measured in brush border membrane vesicles. Five groups of growing male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum for 15 days on five different 10% protein diets: one containing casein as the main source of protein (Control, C), and four containing raw (RKB1, RKB6) or extruded kidney bean (EKB1, EKB6) at 1% and 6% of total protein content respectively. Extrusion treatment significantly reduced the content of bioactive factors (phytates, tannins) and abolished lectins, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and α-amylase inhibitory activities. Rats fed raw beans (especially RKB6) showed lower growth rate and food intake as compared to those fed extruded legumes, probably due to the high levels of lectins and other anti-nutritive factors in the raw beans. Gut enzymatic activities and uptake of d-galactose and l-leucine were lower in RKB6 and RKB1-fed animals, although they significantly improved in the groups fed extruded beans. Enzymatic activity and uptake in EKB1 were similar to those of casein-fed rats, whereas the uptake and growth rate of EKB6 were different to the control. This is attributable to the higher non-thermolabile biofactor content in the EKB6 diet, especially phytates and tannins, than in EKB1. This article shows the dose-dependent toxicological effects of bioactive factors contained in kidney beans on gut function. The extrusion process reduced their adverse impact on gut physiology and growth rate.

  3. Extrusion decreases the negative effects of kidney bean on enzyme and transport activities of the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Marzo, F; Milagro, F I; Urdaneta, E; Barrenetxe, J; Ibañez, F C

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of raw and extruded kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Pinto) consumption on the gut physiology of young growing rats. The intestinal enzyme activity (sucrase, maltase, Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, aminopeptidase N, dipeptidylpeptidase IV, alkaline phosphatase) and the uptake of sugar (d-galactose) and amino acids (l-leucine) were measured in brush border membrane vesicles. Five groups of growing male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum for 15 days on five different 10% protein diets: one containing casein as the main source of protein (Control, C), and four containing raw (RKB1, RKB6) or extruded kidney bean (EKB1, EKB6) at 1% and 6% of total protein content respectively. Extrusion treatment significantly reduced the content of bioactive factors (phytates, tannins) and abolished lectins, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and α-amylase inhibitory activities. Rats fed raw beans (especially RKB6) showed lower growth rate and food intake as compared to those fed extruded legumes, probably due to the high levels of lectins and other anti-nutritive factors in the raw beans. Gut enzymatic activities and uptake of d-galactose and l-leucine were lower in RKB6 and RKB1-fed animals, although they significantly improved in the groups fed extruded beans. Enzymatic activity and uptake in EKB1 were similar to those of casein-fed rats, whereas the uptake and growth rate of EKB6 were different to the control. This is attributable to the higher non-thermolabile biofactor content in the EKB6 diet, especially phytates and tannins, than in EKB1. This article shows the dose-dependent toxicological effects of bioactive factors contained in kidney beans on gut function. The extrusion process reduced their adverse impact on gut physiology and growth rate. PMID:21114542

  4. Crypts, villi and microvilli in the small intestine of the rat. A stereological study of their variability within and between animals.

    PubMed Central

    Mayhew, T M; Middleton, C

    1985-01-01

    Small intestines from normal adult rats were quantified by optical and electron microscopy using stereological principles devised for the purpose. Five segments per bowel were examined. Baseline data characterising villi, microvilli and crypts of Lieberkühn were used to study differences between segments and between animals. Intestines fixed by in situ perfusion had, on average, 100 cm2 of primary mucosa. This basic surface was amplified to 500 cm2 by villi and to 1 m2 by the microvilli of enterocytes. Villous and microvillous surface areas may scale to body weight in the same way as metabolic requirements. Proximodistal gradients in mucosal architecture existed for the volumes and surface areas of villi and for the numbers, lengths, diameters and surface areas of microvilli. Most variables were higher proximally and declined towards the terminal ileum. The volume of crypts stayed constant throughout the entire intestine and ratios between villous dimensions (volumes and surface areas) and crypt volume did not vary between animals. Findings are discussed in the context of regional differences in bowel function and of their relevance to studies of epithelial kinetics. PMID:4077708

  5. Evaluation of a canine small intestinal submucosal xenograft and polypropylene mesh as bioscaffolds in an abdominal full-thickness resection model of growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A-Jin; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chung, Wook-Hun; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Chung, Dai-Jung; Do, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biological scaffold properties of canine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) compared to a those of polypropylene mesh in growing rats with full-thickness abdominal defects. SIS is used to repair musculoskeletal tissue while promoting cell migration and supporting tissue regeneration. Polypropylene mesh is a non-resorbable synthetic material that can endure mechanical tension. Canine SIS was obtained from donor German shepherds, and its porous collagen fiber structure was identified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A 2.50-cm2 section of canine SIS (SIS group) or mesh (mesh group) was implanted in Sprague-Dawley rats. At 1, 2, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, the implants were histopathologically examined and tensile load was tested. One month after surgery, CD68+ macrophage numbers in the SIS group were increased, but the number of CD8+ T cells in this group declined more rapidly than that in rats treated with the mesh. In the SIS group, few adhesions and well-developed autologous abdominal muscle infiltration into the SIS collagen fibers were observed. No significant differences in the tensile load test results were found between the SIS and mesh groups at 24 weeks. Canine SIS may therefore be a suitable replacement for artificial biological scaffolds in small animals. PMID:23628657

  6. An investigation into the relationship between small intestinal fluid secretion and systemic arterial blood pressure in the anesthetized rat

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Michael L; Morrison, James D

    2015-01-01

    The effects of changes in the steady level of diastolic blood pressure on fluid flux across the jejunum has been investigated in the anesthetized rat during perfusion with a nutrient-free and Na+-free solution. Diastolic blood pressure was manipulated by intravenous infusions, during the jejunal perfusions, of vasodilators (vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, acetyl-β-methylcholine, and phentolamine) and a vasoconstrictor (arginine vasopressin), each of which acts through a different cellular mechanism. The outcome was that fluid flux was related by a parabolic relationship with diastolic blood pressure in which net secretion occurred over the range 40–100 mmHg, whereas net absorption was recorded at diastolic pressures exceeding 100 mmHg and below 40 mmHg. Against a background of normal absorption promoted by perfusion with 145 mmol L−1 Na+/5 mmol L−1 glucose solution, reductions in diastolic blood pressure markedly reduced the mean rate of fluid absorption by 58% overall, whereas the rate of glucose absorption remained unchanged. Our results were explained on the basis that vasodilatation led to increased capillary pressure and then to net filtration of fluid from the mesenteric capillary bed. Experiments in which Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin was added to the jejunal perfusate confirmed the absence of a secretory response, which was consistent with the absence of effect of the toxin on diastolic blood pressure. PMID:26019291

  7. Effect of colchicine on rat small intestinal absorptive cells. II. Distribution of label after incorporation of (/sup 3/H)fucose into plasma membrane glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ellinger, A.; Pavelka, M.; Gangl, A.

    1983-12-01

    By means of radioautography the influence was tested of various periods (5, 15, 30, 40 min, 2 hr) of pretreatment with colchicine, administered intraperitoneally to rats at a dosage of 0.5 mg/100 g of body weight, on the intracellular pathway of (/sup 3/H)fucose in absorptive cells of the small intestine. Administration of colchicine for 30 min and longer time intervals causes delay in the insertion of (/sup 3/H)fucose into the oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates in the Golgi apparatus, and results in redistribution of the label apparent over the different portions of the plasma membrane. In controls, at 2 and 4 hr after administration of (/sup 3/H)fucose the apical plasma membrane is strongly labeled. Colchicine causes equalization of the reaction of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane: the number of silver grains attributable to the apical plasma membrane is reduced; following treatment with colchicine, apical portions of the plasma membrane comprise 31.6 +/- 1.8% of the silver grains, 38.6 +/- 3.8% are attributable to basolateral membrane regions. The colchicine-induced equalization of the density of label of apical and basolateral regions of the plasma membrane, in addition to the occurrence of basolateral microvillus borders, suggests microtubules to be important in the maintenance of the polar organization of small intestinal absorptive cells.

  8. A novel mechanism for the promotion of quercetin glycoside absorption by megalo α-1,6-glucosaccharide in the rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Shinoki, Aki; Lang, Weeranuch; Thawornkuno, Charin; Kang, Hee-Kwon; Kumagai, Yuya; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Kimura, Atsuo; Ishizuka, Satoshi; Hara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-15

    The presence of an α-1,6-glucosaccharide enhances absorption of water-soluble quercetin glycosides, a mixture of quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucoside (Q3G, 31.8%), mono (23.3%), di (20.3%) and more d-glucose adducts with α-1,4-linkage to a d-glucose moiety of Q3G, in a ligated small intestinal loop of anesthetized rats. We prepared α-1,6-glucosaccharides with different degrees of polymerization (DP) enzymatically and separated them into a megalo-isomaltosaccharide-containing fraction (M-IM, average DP=11.0) and an oligo-isomaltosaccharide-containing fraction (O-IM, average DP=3.6). Luminal injection of either saccharide fraction promoted the absorption of total quercetin-derivatives from the small intestinal segment and this effect was greater for M-IM than O-IM addition. M-IM also increased Q3G, but not the quercetin aglycone, concentration in the water-phase of the luminal contents more strongly than O-IM. The enhancement of Q3G solubilization in the luminal contents may be responsible for the increases in the quercetin glucoside absorption promoted by α-1,6-glucosaccharides, especially that by M-IM. These results suggest that the ingestion of α-1,6-glucosaccharides promotes Q3G bioavailability.

  9. Small intestinal goblet cell proliferation induced by ingestion of soluble and insoluble dietary fiber is characterized by an increase in sialylated mucins in rats.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shingo; Takemura, Naoki; Sonoyama, Kei; Morita, Akio; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Aoe, Seiichiro; Morita, Tatsuya

    2012-08-01

    The study aimed to examine the effects of insoluble and soluble fibers on mucin sialylation and sulfation in the small intestine. First, diets containing soluble [konjac mannan (KM), psyllium, or guar gum; 50 g/kg) or insoluble (polystyrene foam, wheat bran, or cornhusk; 80 g/kg) fiber were fed to rats for 13 d. The fiber-fed groups had more goblet cells in the ileum than the fiber-free control group. High-iron diamine/alcian blue staining showed more sialylated mucin-producing cells in the fiber-fed groups than in the control, whereas sulfated mucin-producing cells were fewer (insoluble fibers) or unchanged (soluble fibers). Second, feeding KM (50 g/kg) and beet fiber (BF) (80 g/kg) diets for 7 d yielded a higher ileum Siat4C expression than the control, but Gal3ST2 and Gal3ST4 expression was comparable. Luminal mucin content correlated with sialic acid (r = 0.96; P < 0.001) or sulfate (r = 0.62; P < 0.01), but the slope of the sialic acid-derived equation was greater than that of the sulfate-derived equation, indicating a preferred increase in sialylated mucins. Third, rats were fed the control diet for 10 d while receiving antibiotic treatment. Analysis of the luminal mucin showed that sialylated mucins were more vulnerable to bacterial degradation than sulfated mucins. Finally, a study of bromo-deoxyuridine incorporation in rats fed a BF diet indicated that goblet cell proliferation accompanied by increased sialylated mucin appeared to be related to accelerated ileal epithelial cell migration. We conclude that intestinal goblet cell responses to insoluble and soluble fibers are characterized by increases in sialylated mucin production.

  10. Synthetic Small Intestinal Scaffolds for Improved Studies of Intestinal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Cait M.; Hongpeng, Jia; Shaffiey, Shahab; Yu, Jiajie; Jain, Nina K.; Hackam, David

    2014-01-01

    In vitro intestinal models can provide new insights into small intestinal function, including cellular growth and proliferation mechanisms, drug absorption capabilities, and host-microbial interactions. These models are typically formed with cells cultured on 2D scaffolds or transwell inserts, but it is widely understood that epithelial cells cultured in 3D environments exhibit different phenotypes that are more reflective of native tissue. Our focus was to develop a porous, synthetic 3D tissue scaffold with villous features that could support the culture of epithelial cell types to mimic the natural microenvironment of the small intestine. We demonstrated that our scaffold could support the co-culture of Caco-2 cells with a mucus-producing cell line, HT29-MTX, as well as small intestinal crypts from mice for extended periods. By recreating the surface topography with accurately sized intestinal villi, we enable cellular differentiation along the villous axis in a similar manner to native intestines. In addition, we show that the biochemical microenvironments of the intestine can be further simulated via a combination of apical and basolateral feeding of intestinal cell types cultured on the 3D models. PMID:24390638

  11. The role of inter-segmental differences in P-glycoprotein expression and activity along the rat small intestine in causing the double-peak phenomenon of substrate plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Wada, Sho; Kano, Takashi; Mita, Suzune; Idota, Yoko; Morimoto, Kaori; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2013-01-01

      Conflicting results have been reported on segmental differences in expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) along the small intestine of animals and humans. In this study, we investigated P-gp mRNA and protein levels within each of nine segments of rat small intestine. In addition, P-gp activity in each segment was evaluated in terms of permeability of rhodamine123 (Rho123), a typical P-gp substrate, using the serial intestinal non-everted sac method. The P-gp mRNA levels tended to increase from the duodenum to the ileum, with peaks in the upper and lower ileum, while P-gp protein level reached its maximum in the middle ileum. The activity of P-gp was also the highest in the middle ileum, and was highly correlated with P-gp protein level. The double-peaked plasma concentration profile that was observed following oral administration of Rho123 to rats could be well reproduced by an intestinal compartmental kinetic model incorporating inter-segmental differences of absorption and excretion rate constants. Our results suggest that the heterogeneous distribution of P-gp along the small intestine plays a key role in causing the double-peak of plasma concentration of P-gp substrates following oral administration to rats.

  12. Effects of ε-viniferin, a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, on transepithelial active ion transport and ion permeability in the rat small and large intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Shin-Ichiro; Ishikawa, Junji; Tomizawa, Yuka; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2016-05-01

    ε-Viniferin is a dehydrodimer of resveratrol, a polyphenol synthesized in many plants, including grapevine. The present study investigated the effects of ε-viniferin and resveratrol on epithelial secretory and barrier functions in isolated rat small and large intestinal mucosa. Mucosa-submucosa tissue preparations of various segments of the rat large and small intestines were mounted on Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (Isc) and tissue conductance (Gt) were continuously measured. The mucosal addition of ε-viniferin (>10(-5) mol/L) and resveratrol (>10(-4) mol/L) to the cecal mucosa, which was the most sensitive region, induced an increase in Isc and a rapid phase decrease (P-1) followed by rapid (P-2) and broad (P-3) peak increases in Gt in concentration-dependent manners. Mucosal ε-viniferin (10(-4) mol/L), but not resveratrol (10(-4) mol/L), increased the permeability of FITC-conjugated dextran (4 kDa). The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked changes in Isc (Cl(-) secretion), but not in Gt, were attenuated by a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 inhibitor and a selective EP4 prostaglandin receptor. The mucosal ε-viniferin-evoked increase in Isc was partially attenuated, and P-2, but not P-1 or P-3, change in Gt was abolished by a transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) inhibitor. Moreover, the mucosal ε-viniferin concentration-dependently attenuated the mucosal propionate (1 mmol/L)-evoked increases in Isc and Gt Immunohistochemical studies revealed COX-1-immunoreactive epithelial cells in the cecal crypt. The present study showed that mucosal ε-viniferin modulated transepithelial ion transport and permeability, possibly by activating sensory epithelial cells expressing COX-1 and TRPA1. Moreover, mucosal ε-viniferin decreased mucosal sensitivity to other luminal molecules such as short-chain fatty acids. In conclusion, these results suggest that ε-viniferin modifies intestinal mucosal transport and barrier

  13. Clinical radiology of the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Herlinger, H.; Maglinte, D.

    1989-01-01

    This book discussed embryology, anatomy, physiology, and immunology of the small intestine. Radiographic procedures in the small intestine especially enterolysis are presented. Focus is on the role of other types of imaging techniques including sonography, computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, angiography, biopsy, and enteroscopy.

  14. Hymenolepis diminuta: analysis of the expression of Toll-like receptor genes (TLR2 and TLR4) in the small and large intestines of rats. Part II.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, D I; Wojtkowiak-Giera, A; Kolasa, A; Czernomysy-Furowicz, D; Lanocha, N; Wandurska-Nowak, E; Salamatin, R; Jagodzinski, P P

    2013-10-01

    Toll-like receptors in the gastrointestinal tract can influence intestinal homeostasis and play a role in the repair and restitution of intestinal epithelium following tissue damage. In our previous study a statistically significant increase in the level of TLR4 and TLR2 gene expression was observed in rats in early stages of hymenolepidosis. Moreover, the immunopositive cell number and the intensity of immunohistochemical staining (indicating the presence of TLRs within intestinal epithelial cells) increased over the infection period. In this paper, we determined changes in the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 and the number of anaerobic intestinal commensal bacteria in Hymenolepis diminuta infected rats. In the isolated jejunum of infected rats at 16 days post infection (dpi), the expression of TLR4 and TLR2 was significantly higher than uninfected rats. In the colon, a statistically significantly increased expression of TLR2 was observed from 16 to 40 dpi, and TLR4 from 16 to 60 dpi. The jejunum and colon of infected rats contained Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli), Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lactobacillus) and Candida. The total number of intestinal bacteria was higher in H. diminuta infected rats, but the observed microbiota had only minor effects on the expression of TLR2 and TLR4. Toll-like receptors play a role in maintaining epithelial barrier function in response to enteric pathogens and parasites. In our study, the alteration of TLR2 and TLR4 expression in the infected rats indicates the potential role of the innate immune system in the pathomechanism of this infection.

  15. [Intestinal hemorrhage due to multiple phlebectasias of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Hammentgen, R; Kober, R; Beckmann, W; Lützeler, J

    1987-03-13

    A 37-year-old man had recurrent intestinal bleeding and resulting chronic anemia from multiple phlebectasias of the small intestine. Contrast medium studies and endoscopy of the intestine were negative. Abdominal angiography, however, demonstrated phlebectasias in the region supplied by the jejunal arteries. At operation and on examination of a resected portion of the jejunum, these multiple phlebectasias were demonstrated. Resection of the worst affected portion of the jejunum with end-to-end anastomosis was without complications postoperatively, the benzidine test on faeces was negative, and the blood-hemoglobin level gradually rose. Since radiological examination with contrast media and endoscopy are often negative in bleedings from vascular malformations of the intestine, abdominal angiography should be performed in case of intestinal bleedings not diagnosed by other methods.

  16. The regulation of K- and L-cell activity by GLUT2 and the calcium-sensing receptor CasR in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Mace, Oliver J; Schindler, Marcus; Patel, Sonal

    2012-06-15

    Intestinal enteroendocrine cells (IECs) secrete gut peptides in response to both nutrients and non-nutrients. Glucose and amino acids both stimulate gut peptide secretion. Our hypothesis was that the facilitative glucose transporter, GLUT2, could act as a glucose sensor and the calcium-sensing receptor, CasR, could detect amino acids in the intestine to modify gut peptide secretion. We used isolated loops of rat small intestine to study the secretion of gluco-insulinotropic peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY) secretion stimulated by luminal perfusion of nutrients or bile acid. Inhibition of the sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) with phloridzin partially inhibited GIP, GLP-1 and PYY secretion by 45%, suggesting another glucose sensor might be involved in modulating peptide secretion. The response was completely abolished in the presence of the GLUT2 inhibitors phloretin or cytochalasin B. Given that GLUT2 modified gut peptide secretion stimulated by glucose, we investigated whether it was involved in the secretion of gut peptide by other gut peptide secretagogues. Phloretin completely abolished gut peptide secretion stimulated by artificial sweetener (sucralose), dipeptide (glycylsarcosine), lipid (oleoylethanolamine), short chain fatty acid (propionate) and major rat bile acid (taurocholate) indicating a fundamental position for GLUT2 in the gut peptide secretory mechanism. We investigated how GLUT2 was able to influence gut peptide secretion mediated by a diverse range of stimulators and discovered that GLUT2 affected membrane depolarisation through the closure of K+(ATP)-sensitive channels. In the absence of SGLT1 activity (or presence of phloridzin), the secretion of GIP, GLP-1 and PYY was sensitive to K+(ATP)-sensitive channel modulators tolbutamide and diazoxide. L-amino acids phenylalanine (Phe), tryptophan (Trp), asparagine (Asn), arginine (Arg) and glutamine (Gln) also stimulated GIP, GLP-1 and

  17. Update on small intestinal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tesori, Valentina; Puglisi, Maria Ausiliatrice; Lattanzi, Wanda; Gasbarrini, Giovanni Battista; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Among somatic stem cells, those residing in the intestine represent a fascinating and poorly explored research field. Particularly, somatic stem cells reside in the small intestine at the level of the crypt base, in a constant balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Aim of the present review is to delve into the mechanisms that regulate the delicate equilibrium through which intestinal stem cells orchestrate intestinal architecture. To this aim, special focus will be addressed to identify the integrating signals from the surrounding niche, supporting a model whereby distinct cell populations facilitate homeostatic vs injury-induced regeneration. PMID:23922464

  18. Intestinal tolerability of nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, S; Rafi, S; Jacob, M; Sigthorsson, G; Mahmud, T; Sherwood, R; Price, A B; Macpherson, A; Scott, D; Wrigglesworth, J M; Bjarnason, I

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide derivatives of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are thought to be much less ulcerogenic than their parent compounds. AIM: To compare the effect and potency of flurbiprofen and nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen to uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (an early pathogenic event in NSAID enteropathy), increase intestinal permeability (transitional stage), and cause macroscopic small intestinal damage. METHODS: In vitro uncoupling potency was assessed using isolated coupled rat liver mitochondria and in vivo by electron microscopy of rat small intestinal mucosa (two hours after the drugs). A dose-response study with flurbiprofen (single doses of 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) and equimolar doses of nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen was performed; assessing their effect on intestinal permeability (at 18-20 hours), with 51Cr EDTA, and the number of pointed (< 5 mm) and longitudinal (> 5 mm) small intestinal ulcers at 24 hours. RESULTS: Flurbiprofen, but not nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen, stimulated coupled respiration in vitro. Both drugs, however, uncoupled in vivo; in the case of nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen possibly because hydrolysis of its ester bond released free flurbiprofen. Intestinal permeability was uniformly and equally increased with both drugs compared with controls. The number of small intestinal ulcers, pointed and longitudinal, was significantly reduced with nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen apart from the number of longitudinal ulcers with the highest dose. CONCLUSIONS: These studies show that nitroxybutyl-flurbiprofen is associated with significantly less macroscopic damage in the small intestine than flurbiprofen but was associated with mitochondrial damage in vivo and caused similar increases in permeability of the small intestine, suggesting that its beneficial effect is on the later pathogenic stages of the damage. Images PMID:9203938

  19. Small intestine dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Justyna; Szlufik, Stanisław; Nieciecki, Michał; Charzyńska, Ingeborga; Królicki, Leszek; Smektała, Piotr; Friedman, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the small bowel transit time in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD with no gastrointestinal complaints and ten healthy control subjects were investigated using single photon emission computed tomography fused with computed tomography after swallowing of a specially prepared capsule containing technetium 99m, which allowed visualization of the passage in the intestines. Preliminary results show that the small intestine passage in PD patients was prolonged compared to controls.

  20. Glucose stimulates neurotensin secretion from the rat small intestine by mechanisms involving SGLT1 and GLUT2, leading to cell depolarization and calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Bechmann, Louise Ellegaard; Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob; Hartmann, Bolette; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-06-15

    Neurotensin (NT) is a neurohormone produced in the central nervous system and in the gut epithelium by the enteroendocrine N cell. NT may play a role in appetite regulation and may have potential in obesity treatment. Glucose ingestion stimulates NT secretion in healthy young humans, but the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Here, we show that rats express NT in the gut and that glucose gavage stimulates secretion similarly to oral glucose in humans. Therefore, we conducted experiments on isolated perfused rat small intestine with a view to characterize the cellular pathways of secretion. Luminal glucose (20% wt/vol) stimulated secretion but vascular glucose (5, 10, or 15 mmol/l) was without effect. The underlying mechanisms depend on membrane depolarization and calcium influx, since the voltage-gated calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine and the KATP channel opener diazoxide, which causes hyperpolarization, eliminated the response. Luminal inhibition of the sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1) (by phloridzin) eliminated glucose-stimulated release as well as secretion stimulated by luminal methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (20% wt/vol), a metabolically inactive SGLT1 substrate, suggesting that glucose stimulates secretion by initial uptake by this transporter. However, secretion was also sensitive to GLUT2 inhibition (by phloretin) and blockage of oxidative phosphorylation (2-4-dinitrophenol). Direct KATP channel closure by sulfonylureas stimulated secretion. Therefore, glucose stimulates NT secretion by uptake through SGLT1 and GLUT2, both causing depolarization either as a consequence of sodium-coupled uptake (SGLT1) or by closure of KATP channels (GLUT2 and SGLT1) secondary to the ATP-generating metabolism of glucose.

  1. The use of bi-layer silk fibroin scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa matrices to support bladder tissue regeneration in a rat model of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeun Goo; Algarrahi, Khalid; Franck, Debra; Tu, Duong D.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Kaplan, David L.; Estrada, Carlos R.; Mauney, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse side-effects associated with enterocystoplasty for neurogenic bladder reconstruction have spawned the need for the development of alternative graft substitutes. Bi-layer silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) matrices were investigated for their ability to support bladder tissue regeneration and function in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Bladder augmentation was performed with each scaffold configuration in SCI animals for 10 wk of implantation and compared to non-augmented control groups (normal and SCI alone). Animals subjected to SCI alone exhibited a 72% survival rate (13/18) while SCI rats receiving SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds displayed respective survival rates of 83% (10/12) and 75% (9/12) over the course of the study period. Histological (Masson’s trichrome analysis) and immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluations demonstrated both implant groups supported de novo formation of smooth muscle layers with contractile protein expression [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and SM22α] as well as maturation of multi-layer urothelia expressing cytokeratin (CK) and uroplakin 3A proteins. Histomorphometric analysis revealed bi-layer SF and SIS scaffolds respectively reconstituted 64% and 56% of the level of α-SMA+ smooth muscle bundles present in SCI-alone controls, while similar degrees of CK+ urothelium across all experimental groups were detected. Parallel evaluations showed similar degrees of vascular area and synaptophysin+ boutons in all regenerated tissues compared to SCI-alone controls. In addition, improvements in certain urodynamic parameters in SCI animals, such as decreased peak intravesical pressure, following implantation with both matrix configurations were also observed. The data presented in this study detail the ability of acellular SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds to support formation of innervated, vascularized smooth muscle and urothelial tissues in a neurogenic bladder model. PMID:24917031

  2. The Effect of DA-6034 on Intestinal Permeability in an Indomethacin-Induced Small Intestinal Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Dong Shin; Lee, Oh Young; Lee, Kang Nyeong; Jun, Dae Won; Lee, Hang Lak; Yoon, Byung Chul; Choi, Ho Soon

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims DA-6034 has anti-inflammatory activities and exhibits cytoprotective effects in acute gastric injury models. However, explanations for the protective effects of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability are limited. This study sought to investigate the effect of DA-6034 on intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced small intestinal injury model and its protective effect against small intestinal injury. Methods Rats in the treatment group received DA-6034 from days 0 to 2 and indomethacin from days 1 to 2. Rats in the control group received indomethacin from days 1 to 2. On the fourth day, the small intestines were examined to compare the severity of inflammation. Intestinal permeability was evaluated by using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. Western blotting was performed to confirm the association between DA-6034 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Results The inflammation scores in the treatment group were lower than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Hemorrhagic lesions in the treatment group were broader than those in the control group, but the difference was statistically insignificant. Intestinal permeability was lower in the treatment group than in the control group. DA-6034 enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase expression, and intestinal permeability was negatively correlated with ERK expression. Conclusions DA-6034 may decrease intestinal permeability in an indomethacin-induced intestinal injury model via the ERK pathway. PMID:27114435

  3. A case of small intestinal endometrioid adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Shiomi, Akio; Kagawa, Hiroyasu; Yamakawa, Yushi; Numata, Masakatsu; Furutani, Akinobu; Abe, Masakazu

    2016-12-01

    Endometriosis generally occurs in the ovary. Intestinal endometriosis is rare. About 1 % of all endometriosis cases become malignant. Malignant transformation of small intestinal endometriosis is very rare. A 55-year-old woman who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and omentectomy for endometriosis 7 years ago presented to her primary care doctor with melena. A tumor was detected in the right lower abdomen by ultrasonography. The doctor referred her to our hospital. Computed tomography demonstrated a lobulated tumor ventral to the right common iliac vessels. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that the tumor had heterogeneous intensity on T2-weighted images. Several small cysts with high intensity were observed caudal to the tumor on T2-weighted images. We performed partial small intestinal resection for the lesion. The tumor was diagnosed as endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the small intestine. She has been relapse-free for 5 years after surgery. Only three cases of malignant transformation of small intestinal endometriosis have been reported previously. It is very rare for long-term survival to be obtained with surgery alone, as in our case. This case report highlights the imaging findings for malignant transformation of intestinal endometriosis. PMID:27624553

  4. Characterization of an endoprotease from rat small intestinal mucosal secretory granules which generates somatostatin-28 from prosomatostatin by cleavage after a single arginine residue.

    PubMed

    Beinfeld, M C; Bourdais, J; Kuks, P; Morel, A; Cohen, P

    1989-03-15

    We have extracted, characterized, and partially purified an enzyme from secretory granules from rat small intestinal mucosa which cleaves a synthetic prosomatostatin substrate on the carboxyl side of a single arginine residue. This substrate Leu-Gln-Arg-Ser-Ala-Asn-Ser-NH2 contains the monobasic site at which mammalian prosomatostatin is cleaved in vivo to generate somatostatin-28. This activity was released from the granules by osmotic shock followed by extraction with 500 mM KCl. The enzyme had a molecular weight of about 55,000, a pH optimum of about 7.5, and a Km for the synthetic substrate of 20 microM. It was partially inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, iodoacetate, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and EDTA. It was also very sensitive to aprotinin (complete inhibition at 25 micrograms/ml) but was not inhibited by bestatin, pepstatin, or p-chloromercuribenzoate. This endoprotease was unable to cleave three small trypsin and kallikrein substrates (N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine ethyl ester, N alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide, and N alpha-benzoyl-L-arginine 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin). It was unable to cleave either the Arg-Asp bond in CCK 12 or the Arg-Glu and Arg-Met bonds of synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences of anglerfish prosomatostatin II situated upstream from the somatostatin-28 domain. These observations together suggest that adjacent amino acids play a role in determining the conformational specificity of the monobasic cleavage. This soluble enzyme was also able to cleave three synthetic substrates containing dibasic residues (Arg-Lys or Lys-Arg) on the carboxyl side of the arginine, although it did so less rapidly than at the monobasic cleavage sites. When incubated with partially purified prosomatostatin from anglerfish pancreas, significant quantities of somatostatin-28 II were produced. All these cleavages were completely blocked by preincubation with aprotinin. Although further work is required to

  5. Survival after total body irradiation: Effects of irradiation of exteriorized small intestine. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Vigneulle, R.M.; Kitto, G.; Pelky, T.; Taylor, P.

    1993-12-31

    Rats receiving lethal irradiation to their exteriorized small intestine with pulsed 18 MVp bremsstrahlung radiation live about 4 days longer than rats receiving a dose of total-body irradiation (TBI) causing intestinal death. The LD50 for intestinal irradiation is approximately 6 Gy higher than the LD50 for intestinal death after TBI. Survival time after exteriorized intestinal irradiation can be decreased, by adding abdominal irradiation. Adding thoracic or pelvic irradiation does not alter survival time. Shielding of large intestine improves survival after irradiation of the rest of the abdomen while the small intestine is also shielded. The kinetics of histological changes in small intestinal tissues implicate the release of humoral factors after irradiation of the abdomen. Radiation injury develops faster in the first (proximal) 40 cm of the small intestine and is expressed predominantly as shortening in villus height. In the last (distal) 40 cm of the small intestine, the most pronounced radiation effect is a decrease in the number of crypts per millimeter. Irradiation (20 Gy) of the proximal small intestine causes 92 % mortality (median survival 10 days). Irradiation (20 Gy) of the distal small intestine causes 27% mortality (median survival > 30 days). In addition to depletion of crypt stem cells in the small intestine, other issues (humoral factors, irradiated subsection of the small intestine and shielding of the large intestine) appear to influence radiation-induced intestinal mortality.

  6. Primary lymphoma of the upper small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Khosrow; Haghighi, Parviz; Bakhshandeh, Kiumars; Haghshenas, Mansour

    1970-01-01

    Seven patients with primary lymphoma involving the upper small intestine and presenting with diarrhoea, non-specific abdominal pain, and clubbing are reported. The disease appears to be more prevalent in young women, and clinical and radiological findings can provide an excellent preliminary diagnosis which is usually confirmed by peroral biopsy of the small intestine. This type of lymphoma is found to be clinically distinguishable both from the primary intestinal lymphomas reported from western countries and also from gastrointestinal involvement as part of a more systemic disease. It appears to be prevalent in the Middle East, and because of clear clinical, radiological, and histological features, it can be singled out from other primary intestinal lymphomas and considered as a distinct clinical entity. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4919259

  7. Small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuichi; Gomi, Kuniyo; Endo, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Reika; Hayashi, Masashi; Nakanishi, Toru; Tateno, Ayumi; Yamamura, Eiichi; Asonuma, Kunio; Ino, Satoshi; Kuroki, Yuichiro; Nagahama, Masatsugu; Inoue, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Small intestinal anisakiasis is a rare disease that is very difficult to diagnose, and its initial diagnosis is often surgical. However, it is typically a benign disease that resolves with conservative treatment, and unnecessary surgery can be avoided if it is appropriately diagnosed. This case report is an example of small intestinal obstruction caused by anisakiasis that resolved with conservative treatment. A 63-year-old man admitted to our department with acute abdominal pain. A history of raw fish (sushi) ingestion was recorded. Abdominal CT demonstrated small intestinal dilatation with wall thickening and contrast enhancement. Ascitic fluid was found on the liver surface and in the Douglas pouch. His IgE (RIST) was elevated, and he tested positive for the anti-Anisakis antibodies IgG and IgA. Small intestinal obstruction by anisakiasis was highly suspected and conservative treatment was performed, ileus tube, fasting, and fluid replacement. Symptoms quickly resolved, and he was discharged on the seventh day of admission. Small intestinal anisakiasis is a relatively uncommon disease, the diagnosis of which may be difficult. Because it is a self-limiting disease that usually resolves in 1-2 weeks, a conservative approach is advisable to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:24455340

  8. Systematic studies on the paracellular permeation of model permeants and oligonucleotides in the rat small intestine with chenodeoxycholate as enhancer.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Keiko; Li, S Kevin; Hymas, Richard V; Teng, Ching-Leou; Tillman, Lloyd G; Hardee, Gregory E; Higuchi, William I; Ho, Norman F H

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to mechanistically and quantitatively analyze chenodeoxycholate-enhanced paracellular transport of polar permeants and oligonucleotides in the rat jejunum and ileum. Micellar chenodeoxycholate solutions were used to perturbate the tight junctions. Supporting studies included assessment of the aqueous boundary layer (ABL) with ABL-controlled permeants, measurements of the permeability coefficients and fluxes of the bile acid in dilute and micellar concentrations, and determinations of pore sizes with paracellular probes (urea, mannitol, and raffinose). The paracellular permeability coefficients, P(para), of two model oligonucleotides (ON3 and ON6; 12- and 24-mers with 11 and 23 negative charges, respectively) were determined. The enhanced permeabilities paralleled the increased fluxes of micellar bile salt solutions into mesenteric blood and the opening of the tight junctions as compared to controls. As the pore radius increased from 0.7 nm to a maximum of 2.4 nm in the jejunum and ileum, the absorption of ON3 was enhanced up to sixfold in the jejunum and about 14-fold in the ileum with P(para) values between 0.5 x 10(-6) and 6 x 10(-6) cm/s, whereas ON6 was enhanced up to twofold in the jejunum and fivefold in the ileum with permeabilities between 0.3 x 10(-6) and 2 x 10(-6) cm/s. PMID:17847071

  9. Rat small-intestinal β-galactosidases. Studies on the fractionation of `acid' β-galactosidase with isoelectric focusing, gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Asp, Nils-Georg

    1970-01-01

    1. Different forms of the rat small-intestinal `acid' β-galactosidase were separated by using the isoelectric-focusing technique. The isoelectric points of the different forms were at pH4.2, 4.6, 5.4, 6.1 and approx. 8. 2. The two forms of `acid' β-galactosidase isoelectric at pH4.2 and 4.6 were completely excluded from the Sephadex G-200 gel, whereas the form isoelectric at pH8 had Kav. 0.4. The concentration and pH of the elution buffer influenced the distribution of enzyme activity between different forms. Thus, under certain conditions of ionic strength and pH, the enzyme seems to form high-molecular-weight aggregates with low isoelectric points. These may be homopolymeric aggregates or the result of binding of enzyme to, for example, membrane fragments. The forms isoelectric at pH5.4 and 6.1 are probably aggregates of intermediate size. 3. During ion-exchange chromatography at pH6.0 one fraction of `acid' β-galactosidase was not retained on the column and was isoelectric at pH8 and another fraction was eluted when the buffer concentration in the eluate had increased to about 50mm. The main part of enzyme eluted in this second fraction was also isoelectric at pH8, indicating that the elution of this fraction is not a simple ion-exchange procedure but probably also involves a splitting of high-molecular-weight aggregates, originally retained because of their low isoelectric points. The enzyme subunits have a higher isoelectric point, and are therefore no longer bound to the ion-exchange resin. PMID:5420050

  10. Accurate measurement of intestinal transit in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.S.; Galligan, J.J.; Burks, T.F.

    1981-11-01

    A new method for quantifying intestinal transit was evaluated by comparison with two other popular techniques. The distribution of radiochromium (51Cr) throughout the small intestine of rats previously treated with saline (1.0 ml/kg s.c.), capsaicin (10 mg/kg s.c.), hexamethonium (20 mg/kg i.p.), D-ala2-met-enkephalinamide (1.0 microgram i.c.v.), or neostigmine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) was quantified by (1) measuring the most distal intestinal segment reached by chromium, (2) calculating the slope produced by linear regression analysis on cumulative percent chromium that had passed through each segment, and (3) determining the geometric center of the distribution of chromium throughout the small intestine. It was concluded that the geometric center methods for quantifying intestinal transit provides the most sensitive and reliable measure of intestinal transit. Less sensitive techniques often fail to detect important effects of drugs on intestinal transit.

  11. Innate immunity in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This manuscript reviews the most recent publications on innate immunity in the small intestine. We will go over the innate immune receptors that act as sensors of microbial presence or cell injury, Paneth cells as the main epithelial cell type that secrete antimicrobial peptides, and mucosal production of IgA. In addition, we will give an update on examples of imbalance of the innate immune response resulting in clinical disease with the most relevant example being Crohn’s disease. Recent findings Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are involved in B-cell homing to the intestine, rejection of small intestinal allografts and recruitment of mast cells. The TLR adaptor TRIF is necessary to activate innate immunity after Yersinia enterocolitica infection. Moreover, MyD88 is required to keep the intestinal microbiota under control and physically separated from the epithelium and RegIIIγ is responsible for the bacterial segregation from the lining epithelial cells. In Crohn’s disease, ATG16L1 T300A variant promotes a pro-inflammatory response; and miR-196 downregulates a protective IRGM polymorphism leading to impaired clearance of adherent Escherichia coli in the intestine. Summary The intestine is continuously exposed to dietary and microbial antigens. The host has to maintain intestinal homeostasis to keep the commensal and pathogenic bacteria under control. Some of the mechanisms to do so are by expression of innate immune receptors, production of antimicrobial peptides, secretion of IgA or autophagy of intracellular bacteria. Unfortunately, in some cases the innate immune response fails to protect the host and chronic inflammation, transplant rejection, or other pathologies may occur. PMID:22241076

  12. Epidemiology of cancer of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sai Yi; Morrison, Howard

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the small intestine is very uncommon. There are 4 main histological subtypes: adenocarcinomas, carcinoid tumors, lymphoma and sarcoma. The incidence of small intestine cancer has increased over the past several decades with a four-fold increase for carcinoid tumors, less dramatic rises for adenocarcinoma and lymphoma and stable sarcoma rates. Very little is known about its etiology. An increased risk has been noted for individuals with Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, adenoma, familial adenomatous polyposis and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Several behavioral risk factors including consumption of red or smoked meat, saturated fat, obesity and smoking have been suggested. The prognosis for carcinomas of the small intestine cancer is poor (5 years relative survival < 30%), better for lymphomas and sarcomas, and best for carcinoid tumors. There has been no significant change in long-term survival rates for any of the 4 histological subtypes. Currently, with the possible exceptions of obesity and cigarette smoking, there are no established modifiable risk factors which might provide the foundation for a prevention program aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of cancers of the small intestine. More research with better quality and sufficient statistical power is needed to get better understanding of the etiology and biology of this cancer. In addition, more studies should be done to assess not only exposures of interest, but also host susceptibility. PMID:21461167

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Small Intestine Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine cancer include unexplained weight loss and abdominal pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... doctor if you have any of the following: Pain or cramps in the middle of the abdomen. Weight loss with no known reason. A lump ...

  14. Influence of trichlorfon and fractionated irradiation on hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas and intestinal tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Koćmierska-Grodzka, D

    1976-03-01

    Investigations into the hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas and intestinal tissues (small intestine and colon) of rats after fractionated irradiation (5 X 150 R) were carried out. There was found marked postirradiation enhancement of lipase activity in pancreas and duodenal part of intestine and increase of B-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase activity in nearly all parts of the examined intestinal tissues. Fractionated irradiation resulted in an increase of pancreatic catheptic (proteolytic) activity causing simultaneous decrease of proteolytic activity in intestine and colon. Preventive administration of Trichlorfon (ten days before irradiation) in the dose of 10 mg or 30 mg/kg evoked modification of hydroproteolytic activity in intestinal tissues of healthy and irradiated rats. Trichlorfon applied in the dose of 30 mg/kg exerted antilipolytic and anticatheptic effects in pancreas and intestinal tissues of irradiated rats. PMID:1258099

  15. [Intestinal absorption kinetics of Polygonum capitatum extract in rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Hou, Jia; Lu, Yuan; Chen, Peng-cheng; Liao, Shang-gao; Huang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    A UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was used to determinate the main active fractions gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, myricetrin, hyperoside and quercitrin in Polygonum capitatum extracts by in situ intestinal perfusion models; the absorption rate constants and cumulative penetration rate of absorption were calculated. The effect of different drug concentrations, different intestine segments, bile and P-gp inhibitors on the absorption mechanism of Gallic acid and other compositions in P. capitatum extracts. The experimental results showed that gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, myricetrin and quercitrin were observed saturated at high concentration (P < 0.05). Bile had significant inhibition effect on protocatechuic acid absorption and had promotion effect on myricetrin and hyperoside absorption (P < 0.05). P-gp inhibitor verapamil could significantly enhance the absorption of Protocatechuic acid (P < 0.05). The overall trend for absorption of various compositions was that small intestine > colon. This indicated that the absorption mechanism of P. capitatum extracts in rat intestine was in line with fist-order kinetics characteristics. The composition could be absorbed in all of the different intestinal segments, and the absorption was mainly concentrated in small intestine. The protocatechuic acid may be the substrate of P-gp.

  16. [Intestinal absorption kinetics of Polygonum capitatum extract in rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Hou, Jia; Lu, Yuan; Chen, Peng-cheng; Liao, Shang-gao; Huang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    A UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was used to determinate the main active fractions gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, myricetrin, hyperoside and quercitrin in Polygonum capitatum extracts by in situ intestinal perfusion models; the absorption rate constants and cumulative penetration rate of absorption were calculated. The effect of different drug concentrations, different intestine segments, bile and P-gp inhibitors on the absorption mechanism of Gallic acid and other compositions in P. capitatum extracts. The experimental results showed that gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, myricetrin and quercitrin were observed saturated at high concentration (P < 0.05). Bile had significant inhibition effect on protocatechuic acid absorption and had promotion effect on myricetrin and hyperoside absorption (P < 0.05). P-gp inhibitor verapamil could significantly enhance the absorption of Protocatechuic acid (P < 0.05). The overall trend for absorption of various compositions was that small intestine > colon. This indicated that the absorption mechanism of P. capitatum extracts in rat intestine was in line with fist-order kinetics characteristics. The composition could be absorbed in all of the different intestinal segments, and the absorption was mainly concentrated in small intestine. The protocatechuic acid may be the substrate of P-gp. PMID:27071271

  17. Flow and mixing by small intestine villi.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y F; de Loubens, C; Love, R J; Lentle, R G; Janssen, P W M

    2015-06-01

    Flow and mixing in the small intestine are multi-scale processes. Flows at the scale of the villi (finger-like structures of ≈500 μm length) are poorly understood. We developed a three-dimensional lattice-Boltzmann model to gain insight into the effects of villous movements and the rheology of digesta on flow, mixing and absorption of nutrients at the periphery of the intestinal lumen. Our model simulated the hydrodynamic consequences of villi movements that resulted from folding of the mucosa during longitudinal contractions. We found that cyclic approximation and separation of groups of villi generated laminar eddies at the edges of the group and augmented mass transfers in the radial direction between the inter-villous space and the intestinal lumen which improved the absorption of nutrients and mixing at the periphery of the lumen. This augmentation was greater with highly diffusible nutrients and with high levels of shear-thinning (pseudoplasticity) of the fluid. We compared our results with bulk flows simulations done by previous workers and concluded that villous movements during longitudinal contractions is a major radial mixing mechanism in the small intestine and increases mixing and absorption around the mucosa despite adverse rheology.

  18. Dietary grape seed tannins: effects of nutritional balance and on some enzymic activities along the crypt-villus axis of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Vallet, J; Rouanet, J M; Besançon, P

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the nutritional and intestinal effects of grape seed tannins. For this purpose, tannins were incorporated in diets of rats at levels of 0.2 or 2.0% for 31 days in comparison to a control diet. The animals were pair-fed. Nutritional balances were not affected by feeding 0.2% tannins. At the highest dose (2%) grape seed tannins reduced growth as well as dry matter (DM) and nitrogen (N) digestibility. In rats fed protein-free diets, 2% tannins significantly increased endogenous fecal N. Starch and fat were well digested in all groups of rats. No changes in organ weights were observed. Duodenal alkaline phosphatase activity (AP) was never affected by tannins. On the other hand, in the jejunum, along the vilus-crypt unit, a reduction of AP and sucrase appeared at the tip villus which was balanced by an enhancement of 3H-thymidine incorporation in the middle of the crypt zone, giving evidence of endogenous N loss. This study did not reveal a major toxic effect of tannins except a reduced DM and N digestibility; nevertheless tannins directly interfere with mucosal proteins, thereby stimulating the cell renewal.

  19. [Snow white small intestinal villi in hypobetalipoproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Goerg, K J; Borchard, F; Luley, C; Schubert, G E

    1996-09-01

    In contrast to the severe clinical picture of abetalipoproteinemia patients with hypobetalipoproteinemia are often asymptomatic. We demonstrate a 52-years-old female patient with a white mucosa of the small intestine casually observed by endoscopy. The white appearance of the mucosa was limited to the villi. As demonstrated by light and transmission electron microscopy this was caused by fat loaded enterocytes similar to the picture of abetalipoproteinemia. Fasting serum lipids and apolipoproteins were only if the lower norm level for some parameters, but no increase of the serum lipids was observed after an oral fat load. Because of the missing symptoms, the typical histomorphology and laboratory findings the snow white mucosa of the small intestine is due by the hetocygote form of the autosomal dominant hypobetalipoproteinemia with fat loaded enterocytes.

  20. Further investigations of enhancing effect of medium-chain triglycerides on d-alpha-tocopherol acetate absorption from lecithin-dispersed preparations in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Fukui, E; Tabuchi, H; Kurosaki, Y; Nakayama, T; Kimura, T

    1989-12-01

    The effect of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTG) in lecithin-dispersed d-alpha-tocopherol acetate (VEA) preparation on intestinal absorption of VEA was investigated in rats using the in situ loop experiment. When VEA preparations containing soybean phosphatidylcholine (PC) and various amounts of MCTG were administered, the amount of VEA absorbed in 2 h was not significantly different among them. However, the amounts of total VE, sum of VEA and d-alpha-tocopherol (VE), remaining in the luminal fluid and the intestinal tissue were dependent on the MCTG content. Total VE remaining in the intestinal tissue after the administration of a VEA/PC/MCTG (5/16/1 by weight) preparation was nearly twice of VEA/PC (5/16) preparation, although the effect of MCTG varied with the increase or decrease in the MCTG content. Moreover, the increased tissue accumulation of total VE by the VEA/PC/MCTG (5/16/1) preparation resulted in an increase in the plasma VE concentration after the removal of the luminal fluid. No effect of pretreatment with PC/MCTG (1/1) dispersion on the tissue accumulation of total VE from VEA/PC (5/16) preparation was observed. Furthermore, the plasma concentration of VE from VEA and/or VE taken up in the tissue from the VEA/PC preparation was not increased by the treatment with the PC/MCTG dispersion. These results suggest that MCTG should coexist in the luminal VEA preparation to enhance the mucosal uptake. A similar enhancing effect was also observed by the addition of the metabolite of MCTG, a medium-chain fatty acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Age-related increases in F344 rat intestine microsomal quercetin glucuronidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to establish the extent age modifies intestinal quercetin glucuronidation capacity. Pooled microsomal fractions of three equidistant small intestine (SI) segments from 4, 12, 18, and 28 mo male F344 rats (n=8/group) were employed to model the enzyme kinetics of UDP-gl...

  2. Effect of Tributyrin on Electrical Activity in the Small Intestine during Early Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Tropskaya, N S; Kislyakova, E A; Popova, T S

    2015-12-01

    The effect of enteral administration of tributyrin on electrical activity in the upper segments of the small intestine was examined in rats on the model of postoperative ileus. This postoperative state is characterized with pronounced and long-term disturbances in generation of migrating myoelectric complex of the small intestine. The enteral administration of tributyrin in the early postoperative period aimed to suppress the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic influences and activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways is an effective procedure to normalize the migrating myoelectric complex and therefore the coordinated propulsive peristalsis in the small intestine.

  3. Small intestinal submucosa seeded with intestinal smooth muscle cells in a rodent jejunal interposition model

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Harry H.; Dunn, James C.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a porcine-derived, acellular, collagen-based matrix that has been tested without seeded smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for intestinal tissue engineering. We examined the expression patterns of contractile proteins of SIS with SMCs implanted in an in vivo rodent model. Materials and methods Intestinal SMCs were isolated from Lewis rat pups. Four-ply tubular SMCs-seeded SIS or blank SIS scaffolds were implanted in an adult rat jejunal interposition model. Recipients were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks following the implantation. The retrieved specimens were examined using antibodies against contractile proteins of SMCs. Results Cultured intestinal SMCs expressed α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and less smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC) in vitro. Cell-seeded SIS scaffolds contracted significantly over 8 weeks of implantation but were comparable to SIS scaffolds without cell seeding. Implanted cell-seeded SIS scaffolds at 2 weeks expressed extensive α-SMA, some calponin, and minimal SM-MHC. At 4 weeks, α-SMA-expressing cells decreased significantly, whereas calponin or SM-MHC expressing cells were rarely detected. A small number of α-SMA-expressing cells were present at 8 weeks, whereas more calponin or SM-MHC expressing cells emerged in proximity with the anastomotic interface. Conclusions Cell-seeded SIS contracted significantly after implantation, but the expressions of contractile proteins were present at the site of SIS interposition. No organized smooth muscle was formed at the site of implantation. A better scaffold design is needed to produce structured smooth muscle. PMID:21937060

  4. Hydroxycitric acid delays intestinal glucose absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Wielinga, Peter Y; Wachters-Hagedoorn, Renate E; Bouter, Brenda; van Dijk, Theo H; Stellaard, Frans; Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G; Verkade, Henkjan J; Scheurink, Anton J W

    2005-06-01

    In this study, we investigated in rats if hydroxycitric acid (HCA) reduces the postprandial glucose response by affecting gastric emptying or intestinal glucose absorption. We compared the effect of regulator HCA (310 mg/kg) and vehicle (control) on the glucose response after an intragastric or intraduodenal glucose load to investigate the role of altered gastric emptying. Steele's one-compartment model was used to investigate the effect of HCA on systemic glucose appearance after an intraduodenal glucose load, using [U-(13)C]-labeled glucose and d-[6,6-(2)H(2)]-labeled glucose. Because an effect on postabsorptive glucose clearance could not be excluded, the effect of HCA on the appearance of enterally administered glucose in small intestinal tissue, liver, and portal and systemic circulation was determined by [U-(14)C]glucose infusion. Data show that HCA treatment delays the intestinal absorption of enterally administered glucose at the level of the small intestinal mucosa in rats. HCA strongly attenuated postprandial blood glucose levels after both intragastric (P < 0.01) and intraduodenal (P < 0.001) glucose administration, excluding a major effect of HCA on gastric emptying. HCA delayed the systemic appearance of exogenous glucose but did not affect the total fraction of glucose absorbed over the study period of 150 min. HCA treatment decreased concentrations of [U-(14)C]glucose in small intestinal tissue at 15 min after [U-(14)C]glucose administration (P < 0.05), in accordance with the concept that HCA delays the enteral absorption of glucose. These data support a possible role for HCA as food supplement in lowering postprandial glucose profiles. PMID:15604199

  5. [Video capsule endoscopy in the diagnostics of small intestine diseases].

    PubMed

    Nakatis, Ia A; Borisov, A E; Kashchenko, V A; Sishkova, E A; Raspereza, D V; Lobach, S M; Tiniakova, T V; Pavlov, A V

    2008-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy is a safe and noninvasive, well-endurable method of the direct visual inspection of the whole of the small intestine. The most frequent indications for video capsule endoscopy are the diagnostics of latent gastro-intestinal bleedings, angiodysplasias, Crohn disease, celiac disease, syndromes of hereditary polyposis and tumors of the small intestine. The authors describe the first experience of using this new method in the domestic clinical practice. Data concerning the diagnostics of lesions of the small intestine by the method of video capsule endoscopy as well as the wide range of lesions of the mucous membrane in different diseases of the small intestine are presented.

  6. Influence of local peripheral temporary ischaemia on biochemical and histological effects in small intestine and serum of rats following abdominal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Przybyszewski, W M; Walichiewicz, P; Widel, M; Polaniak, R; Snietura, M; Maniakowski, Z; Jacheć, W

    2008-01-01

    The local temporary ischaemia effect on radiation-induced lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase isoenzyme activities, and intestinal crypt number was estimated in male WAG-strain rats in vivo. The animals were irradiated in the abdomen area with doses of 2 Gy for ten consecutive days using a Philips 60Co source. The calculated dose rate was 0.595 Gy/min. Local temporary ischaemia was induced by clamping the tail base before each irradiation. The parameters evaluated were: TBA-RS level and enzymatic activities of CuZnSOD, MnSOD in serum and jejunum. The number of jejunum crypts was assigned as a histopathologic parameter. The results showed a clear protection by ischaemic preconditioning for crypt survival. The difference in the number of crypts in irradiated animals with and without local temporary ischaemia was statistically significant (Student's t-test P < 0.05). Also, significant enhancement of TBA-RS was observed in the serum of irradiated animals. Local temporary ischaemia application diminished the concentration of radiation- induced TBA-RS. The differences in the levels of TBA-RS in the serum were statistically significant (ANOVA P < 0.002). In contrast, there was no evident effect on the level of TBA-RS in tissue homogenates in any investigated groups. Some fluctuation of CuZnSOD isoenzyme activity in intestinal tissue was noted; however, the differences were not significant. Local temporary ischaemia had no influence on Mn- SOD activity in serum, and in both irradiated groups the behaviour of this isoenzyme was similar. Also, there were no differences in MnSOD activity measured in tissue homogenates. These findings support results of our previous in vivo studies, suggesting that local temporary ischaemia can prevent oxidative effects of fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:19393129

  7. Intestinal absorption of aspartame decomposition products in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lipton, W E; Li, Y N; Younoszai, M K; Stegink, L D

    1991-12-01

    The dipeptide sweetener aspartame (N-L-alpha-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine, 1-methyl ester; alpha-APM) is relatively stable in dry powder form. However, when exposed to elevated temperature, extremes of pH and/or moisture, alpha-APM is converted into a variety of products. In aqueous solution alpha-APM decomposes to yield methanol, two isomeric forms of L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine (Asp-Phe) [alpha-Asp-Phe and beta-Asp-Phe], and APM's diketopiperazine cyclo-Asp-Phe. Depending on beverage storage conditions, individuals drinking alpha-APM-sweetened beverages may consume small quantities of these three compounds. Relatively little has been published about the metabolism of beta-Asp-Phe and cyclo-Asp-Phe. We compared the absorption and metabolism of alpha-Asp-Phe, beta-Asp-Phe, and cyclo-Asp-Phe with that of L-phenylalanine (Phe) in adult rats. Steady-state perfusion studies of rat jejunum indicated rapid carrier-assisted uptake of Phe and alpha-Asp-Phe, but only slow passive diffusion of beta-Asp-Phe and cyclo-Asp-Phe from the lumen. Homogenates of rat intestinal mucosa, liver, and cecal contents, as well as homogenates of pure cultures of Escherichia coli B, catalyzed the hydrolysis of alpha-Asp-Phe, but not cyclo-Asp-Phe. Homogenates of E coli and rat cecal contents, but not homogenates of rat liver or intestinal mucosa catalyzed the hydrolysis of beta-Asp-Phe.

  8. Intestinal folate binding protein (FBP) and folate absorption in the suckling rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.B.; Selhub, J.

    1986-03-01

    The folate in milk is bound to high affinity FBPs but it is unknown whether this binding affects intestinal transport of milk folate in the suckling rat. The authors examined the FBP activity of segments of the GI tract in fed and fasting states. Under fed conditions, the FBP activity in the mucosa of the stomach and proximal small intestine were similar (0.28 and 0.32 pMole folic acid binding/mg protein, N.S.). Both demonstrated less activity than the mucosa of the distal small intestine (1.31 pMole/mg protein, P < .001). A 6 hr fast produced no change in the FBP activity in the stomach or proximal small intestine but resulted in a 42% decrease in the distal small intestine (p < .01). Intestinal transport of unbound and FB-bound H/sup 3/pteryolmonoglutamate (H/sup 3/PGA) was examined in suckling rats by the intestinal loop model. Unbound H/sup 3/PGA demonstrated greater lumenal disappearance in the proximal segment of the small intestine compared to the distal segment (79% vs. 56%, P < .001) whereas the bound H/sup 3/PGA demonstrated greater lumenal disappearance in the distal segment (36% vs. 21%, p < .005). That porton of FBP activity in the distal small intestine that disappears with fasting may represent FBP absorbed from the lumen of the intestine. The FBP-bound folate in milk appears to be absorbed in the suckling rat by a mechanism that favors the distal small intestine and is different from the mechanism responsible for absorption of the unbound folate.

  9. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  10. Biaxial mechanical modeling of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Chiara; Glass, Paul; Sitti, Metin; Di Martino, Elena S

    2011-11-01

    Capsule endoscopes are pill-size devices provided with a camera that capture images of the small intestine from inside the body after being ingested by a patient. The interaction between intestinal tissue and capsule endoscopes needs to be investigated to optimize capsule design while preventing tissue damage. To that purpose, a constitutive model that can reliably predict the mechanical response of the intestinal tissue under complex mechanical loading is required. This paper describes the development and numerical validation of a phenomenological constitutive model for the porcine duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Parameters characterizing the mechanical behavior of the material were estimated from planar biaxial test data, where intestinal tissue specimens were simultaneously loaded along the circumferential and longitudinal directions. Specimen-specific Fung constitutive models were able to accurately predict the planar stress-strain behavior of the tested samples under a wide range of loading conditions. To increase model generality, average anisotropic constitutive relationships were also generated for each tissue region by fitting average stress-strain curves to the Fung potential. Due to the observed variability in the direction of maximum stiffness, the average Fung models were less anisotropic than the specimen-specific models. Hence, average isotropic models in the Neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin forms were attempted, but they could not adequately describe the degree of nonlinearity in the tissue. Values of the R2 for the nonlinear regressions were 0.17, 0.44 and 0.93 for the average Neo-Hookean, Mooney-Rivlin and Fung models, respectively. Average models were successfully implemented into FORTRAN routines and used to simulate capsule deployment with a finite element method analysis. PMID:22098873

  11. Hyperosmolarity in the small intestine contributes to postprandial ghrelin suppression

    PubMed Central

    Overduin, Joost; Tylee, Tracy S.; Frayo, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Plasma levels of the orexigenic hormone ghrelin are suppressed by meals with an efficacy dependent on their macronutrient composition. We hypothesized that heterogeneity in osmolarity among macronutrient classes contributes to these differences. In three studies, the impact of small intestinal hyperosmolarity was examined in Sprague-Dawley rats. In study 1, isotonic, 2.5×, and 5× hypertonic solutions of several agents with diverse absorption and metabolism properties were infused duodenally at a physiological rate (3 ml/10 min). Jugular vein blood was sampled before and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, and 300 min after infusion. Plasma ghrelin was suppressed dose dependently and most strongly by glucose. Hyperosmolar infusions of lactulose, which transits the small intestine unabsorbed, and 3-O-methylglucose (3-O-MG), which is absorbed like glucose but remains unmetabolized, also suppressed ghrelin. Glucose, but not lactulose or 3-O-MG, infusions increased plasma insulin. In study 2, intestinal infusions of hyperosmolar NaCl suppressed ghrelin, a response that was not attenuated by coinfusion with the neural blocker lidocaine. In study 3, we reconfirmed that the low-osmolar lipid emulsion Intralipid suppresses ghrelin more weakly than isocaloric (but hypertonic) glucose. Importantly, raising Intralipid's osmolarity to that of the glucose solution by nonabsorbable lactulose supplementation enhanced ghrelin suppression to that seen after glucose. Hyperosmolar ghrelin occurred particularly during the initial 3 postinfusion hours. We conclude that small intestinal hyperosmolarity 1) is sufficient to suppress ghrelin, 2) may combine with other postprandial mechanisms to suppress ghrelin, 3) might contribute to altered ghrelin regulation after gastric bypass surgery, and 4) may inform dietary modifications for metabolic health. PMID:24789208

  12. Diaphragm disease of the small intestine: an interesting case report.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Sana; Ajab, Shereen; Rao, Rajashekhar; Raghunathan, Girish; DaCosta, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Diaphragm disease of small intestine usually presents with nonspecific clinical features. Radiological investigations often fail to differentiate it from small intestinal tumors and inflammatory bowel disease. It is therefore diagnosed on final histology after surgical resection. We hereby report an interesting case of a suspected small bowel tumor later diagnosed as diaphragm disease on histology.

  13. Radioautographic visualization of differences in the pattern of (/sup 3/H)uridine and (/sup 3/H)orotic acid incorporation into the RNA of migrating columnar cells in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M.; Altmann, G.G.; Leblond, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    The epithelium of rat small intestine was radioautographed to examine whether RNA is synthesized by the salvage pathway as shown after (/sup 3/H)uridine injection or by the de novo pathway as shown after (/sup 3/H)orotic acid injection. The two modes of RNA synthesis were thus investigated during the migration of columnar cells from crypt base to villus top, and the rate of synthesis was assessed by counting silver grains over the nucleolus and nucleoplasm at six levels along the duodenal epithelium - that is, in the base, mid, and top regions of the crypts and in the base, mid, and top regions of the villi. Concomitant biochemical analyses established that, after injection of either (5-/sup 3/H)uridine or (5-/sup 3/H)orotic acid: (a) buffered glutaraldehyde fixative was as effective as perchloric acid or trichloroacetic acid in insolubilizing the nucleic acids of rat small intestine; (b) a major fraction of the nucleic acid label was in RNA, that is, 91% after (/sup 3/H)uridine and 72% after (/sup 3/H)orotic acid, with the rest in DNA; and (c) a substantial fraction of the RNA label was in poly A/sup +/ RNA (presumed to be messenger RNA). In radioautographs of duodenum prepared after (/sup 3/H)uridine injection, the count of silver grains was high over nucleolus and nucleoplasm in crypt base cells and gradually decreased at the upper levels up to the villus base. In the rest of the villus, the grain count over the nucleolus was negligible, while over the nucleoplasm it was low but significant.

  14. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  15. Gastrin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihao; Luo, Yongli; Cheng, Yunjiu; Zou, Dezhi; Zeng, Aihong; Yang, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a devastating complication when the blood supply is reflowed in ischemic organs. Gastrin has critical function in regulating acid secretion, proliferation, and differentiation in the gastric mucosa. We aimed to determine whether gastrin has an effect on intestinal I/R damage. Intestinal I/R injury was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were induced to be hypergastrinemic by pretreated with omeprazole or directly injected with gastrin. Some hypergastrinemic rats were injected with cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist prior to I/R operation. After the animal surgery, the intestine was collected for histological analysis. Isolated intestinal epithelial cells or crypts were harvested for RNA and protein analysis. CCK-2 receptor expression, intestinal mucosal damage, cell apoptosis, and apoptotic protein caspase-3 activity were measured. We found that high gastrin in serum significantly reduced intestinal hemorrhage, alleviated extensive epithelial disruption, decreased disintegration of lamina propria, downregulated myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and caspase-3 activity, and lead to low mortality in response to I/R injury. On the contrary, CCK-2 receptor antagonist L365260 could markedly impair intestinal protection by gastrin on intestinal I/R. Severe edema of mucosal villi with severe intestinal crypt injury and numerous intestinal villi disintegrated were observed again in the hypergastrinemic rats with L365260. The survival in the hypergastrinemic rats after intestinal I/R injury was shortened by L365260. Finally, gastrin could remarkably upregulated intestinal CCK-2 receptor expression. Our data suggest that gastrin by omeprazole remarkably attenuated I/R induced intestinal injury by enhancing CCK-2 receptor expression and gastrin could be a potential mitigator for intestinal I/R damage in the clinical setting. PMID

  16. Trefoil peptide gene expression in small intestinal Crohn's disease and dietary adaptation.

    PubMed

    Poulsom, R; Chinery, R; Sarraf, C; Van Noorden, S; Stamp, G W; Lalani, E N; Elia, G; Wright, N A

    1993-01-01

    We examined the patterns of trefoil peptide gene expression in the ulcer-associated cell lineage (UACL) and mucosa adjacent to Crohn's disease in humans and during gastrointestinal adaptation to enteral feeding in rats. In the UACL, human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP) mRNA and peptide are present in the acinar and proximal duct cells, whereas pS2 mRNA and peptide are found in the distal duct cells and in the surface cells. In mucosa adjacent to UACL, pS2 mRNA and peptide are expressed ectopically by goblet cells and neuroendocrine cells. Intestinal crypts associated with the UACL showed marked neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia. Ultrastructural immunolocalization showed pS2 to be copackaged in the mucous cell and neuroendocrine granules. The copackaging of a secretory protein in both mucous and neuroendocrine granules, which have different functions, is unusual and indicates an important role for pS2 in the secretory process itself or as a ligand delivered to its receptor via multiple routes. We also cloned the newest trefoil peptide, intestinal trefoil factor (ITF), from human and rat intestinal mucosa. Using in situ hybridization we demonstrated its synthesis by normal rat intestinal goblet cells. RNAse protection analysis revealed that the level of mRNA for rat ITF in small and large intestine was affected by the process of enteral feeding. We conclude that trefoil peptides are widely distributed in the intestine in human inflammatory bowel disease and are of considerable potential functional importance.

  17. Protective effect of the traditional Chinese medicine xuesaitong on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuan; Li, Dengxiao; Gao, Hong; Gao, Yuejin; Zhang, Long; Du, Yuling; Wu, Jian; Gao, Pengfei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effect of xuesaitong on intestinal barrier dysfunction and related mechanisms in a rat model for intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Methods: Rats were divided into sham-operated, disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated groups. In the disease-model and Xuesaitong-treated rats an intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) model was introduced, which was created by a temporary obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The xuesaitong group was pre-treated with injections into the abdominal cavity prior to the generation of the IRI model. Tissue changes were evaluated using H&E staining and electron microscopy. Samples were analyzed at 0, 3 and 24 h post IRI. Ascites volumes as well as small intestinal mucosa bleeding, injury scores, wet to dry weight ratios, and propulsions were evaluated. Apoptotic rates were determined with TUNNEL assays. Blood serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels were measured using ELISA, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression in small intestinal mucosa measured using immunohistochemistry. Results: We determined a significant increase of pathological damage to small intestinal tissues, intestinal wet to dry ratios, ascites volume, TNF-α levels, apoptosis rates of small intestinal mucosa, and expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3 proteins in the disease-model group compared to the sham-operated group (P < 0.001), and intestinal motility was significantly decreased (P < 0.001). However, comparisons between disease-model and xuesaitong pre-treated animals revealed, that in the treatment group these changes occurred in significant less severities. Conclusions: Xuesaitong can effectively alleviate intestinal barrier dysfunction caused by ischemia-reperfusion injury by reducing TNF-α, up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating caspase-3 expression, in addition to increasing peristalsis. PMID:25932105

  18. Intestinal elimination of sparfloxacin, fleroxacin, and ciprofloxacin in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, E; Dautrey, S; Farinoti, R; St Julien, L; Ramon, J; Carbon, C

    1995-01-01

    The intestinal transepithelial elimination of sparfloxacin and fleroxacin was compared with that of ciprofloxacin in a rat model following a single parenteral administration of 25 mg of each of the antibiotics per kg of body weight. All three fluoroquinolones were eliminated through the small intestine. Ciprofloxacin was eliminated in the proximal jejunum at a rate of 1.97 +/- 0.70 micrograms/cm2, while the elimination rates of fleroxacin and sparfloxacin were 0.64 +/- 026 and 0.21 +/- 0.10 micrograms/cm2, respectively, over a 90-min collection period. In the ileum, the elimination rates of ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and sparfloxacin over the same period were 1.44 +/- 0.77, 1.00 +/- 0.33, and 0.41 +/- 0.26 micrograms/mc2, respectively. These data suggest that these fluoroquinolones undergo a transepithelial elimination process in the small intestine. This route of elimination may be important in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea. PMID:7695338

  19. Transepithelial transport of glutathione in isolated perfused small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.M.; Jones, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    Uptake of GSH was studied in isolated perfused segment of jejunum in the adult rat. Krebs-Henseleit buffer was infused through the superior mesenteric artery and fractions were collected from the portal vein. The maintenance of vascular and epithelial integrity was established by lack of transfer of /sup 14/C-inulin or /sup 14/C-polyethylene glycol from the lumen to the perfusate. (glycine-2-/sup 3/H)GSH was introduced in the lumen and perfusate fractions collected every min. With 1 mM GSH and 10 mM Gly in the lumen, transport into the perfusate was 220 nmol/min. Analysis by HPLC showed that 80% was at the intact tripeptide, GSH. No cysteinylgylcine was detected in the perfusate. Pretreatment of the segment with 0.25 mM acivicin and 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine had no significant effect on GSH transport rate, thus showing that degradation and resynthesis of GSH did not contribute to the appearance of GSH in the perfusate. GSH transport was inhibited 50% by replacing lumenal NaCl with choline Cl. Addition of 10 mM ..gamma..-Clu-Glu or 10 mM ophthalmic acid decreased the rat of transport by 60-70%. These results establish that transepithelial transport of intact GSH occurs in rat small intestine. This may allow utilization of dietary GSH or reutilization of biliary GSH. In addition, the results suggest that oral GSH may be of therapeutic benefit.

  20. Intestinal calcium absorption in rats is stimulated by dietary lactulose and other resistant sugars.

    PubMed

    Brommage, R; Binacua, C; Antille, S; Carrié, A L

    1993-12-01

    Lactulose is a disaccharide analogue of lactose that is resistant to metabolism in the small intestine but not in the large intestine. The effects of lactulose and other sugars on intestinal Ca absorption were determined from the decrease in the 47Ca:47 Sc ratio between diet and feces after feeding male rats diets containing these sugars during a single night. Dietary lactulose was more potent than lactose in stimulating Ca absorption and was effective between 5 and 38 wk of age. The component sugars of lactulose, galactose and fructose, did not influence Ca absorption when provided together at concentrations equimolar to that of lactulose. The stimulation of Ca absorption by dietary lactulose increased as dietary Ca concentration was raised and was not influenced by prior injections of calcitriol. Lactulose must be present in the same meal as Ca to stimulate Ca absorption, but this stimulation was lost if the rats were fed lactulose continuously for 2 or 7 d prior to the test diet. Other sugars thought to be poorly absorbed in the small intestine (xylitol, lactobionate, arabinose, raffinose, pyroglutamate, sorbitol, gluconate and raftilose) stimulated Ca absorption to an identical extent as lactulose. Cecectomy did not influence the enhancement of Ca absorption by lactulose. These results indicate that sugars resistant to metabolism and absorption in the small intestine but not the large intestine stimulate Ca absorption in the small intestine.

  1. Unconjugated bilirubin and the bile from light exposed Gunn rats inhibit intestinal water and electrolyte absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Guandalini, S; Fasano, A; Albini, F; Marchesano, G; Nocerino, A; De Curtis, M; Rubaltelli, F F; Pettenazzo, A; Rubino, A

    1988-01-01

    Jaundiced babies undergoing phototherapy often develop diarrhoea. The cause of it is still uncertain. Increasing evidence supports a role of a secretory mechanism for the diarrhoea. We therefore studied the effects of bile from congenitally jaundiced rats undergoing phototherapy and of unconjugated bilirubin on rat small intestine in vivo and in vitro. Results suggest that: (1) the bile from homozygous Gunn rats under phototherapy has an anti-absorptive effect when tested in the perfused jejunum of normal Wistar rats; (2) unconjugated bilirubin has a dose dependent secretory effect on the intestinal transport of water and electrolytes, when tested in the same system. Alteration of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP, known intracellular mediators of secretion, was not observed. We conclude that free bilirubin is an intestinal secretagogue acting by an as yet unknown mechanism, that may mediate the secretory type of diarrhoea in jaundiced neonates undergoing phototherapy. PMID:3356369

  2. Three-Dimensional Coculture Of Human Small-Intestine Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David; Spaulding, Glen; Goodwin, Thomas J.; Prewett, Tracy

    1994-01-01

    Complex three-dimensional masses of normal human epithelial and mesenchymal small-intestine cells cocultured in process involving specially designed bioreactors. Useful as tissued models for studies of growth, regulatory, and differentiation processes in normal intestinal tissues; diseases of small intestine; and interactions between cells of small intestine and viruses causing disease both in small intestine and elsewhere in body. Process used to produce other tissue models, leading to advances in understanding of growth and differentiation in developing organisms, of renewal of tissue, and of treatment of myriad of clinical conditions. Prior articles describing design and use of rotating-wall culture vessels include "Growing And Assembling Cells Into Tissues" (MSC-21559), "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662), and "In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids" (MSC-21843).

  3. Chromium absorption in the vascularly perfused rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, H.J.; Offenbacher, E.G.; Pi-Sunyer, F.X.

    1986-03-01

    The mechanism of chromium (Cr) absorption by the rat small intestine was investigated using a double perfusion technique wherein the luman of the small intestine and the vasculature supplying it were separately perfused. The intestinal perfusate (IP) was a nutrient-rich tissue culture medium (TCM) with added inorganic Cr and /sup 51/Cr. The vascular perfusate (VP) was a Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution (KRB) containing 4.7% dextran, 0.1% glucose and 5% human serum. Cr absorption was calculated by the amount of /sup 51/Cr detected in the VP. To determine the transport mechanism for Cr, its absorption into the VP was measured at various Cr concentrations of the IP ranging from 10-400 ppb CrCl/sub 3/. The amount of Cr absorbed into the blood rose linearly with the intestinal Cr concentration suggesting a process of simple diffusion. Manipulations of the VP and IP constituents were made to investigate their effects on Cr absorption. When serum was omitted from the VP, Cr adsorption was suppressed, suggesting that serum component(s) are necessary for optimal Cr absorption. When either of 2 plasma transport proteins (apo-transferrin, albumin) were added to the serum-free VP at physiological levels, Cr absorption returned to, but did not exceed, control levels. When the TCM was replaced with a KRB solution; Cr absorption was suppressed indicating that there are nutrient(s) of the TCM which facilitate Cr absorption. Further suppression occurred when a Cr concentration gradient opposing Cr absorption was created (IP at 100 ppb Cr, VP at 400 ppb Cr).

  4. A Revised Model for Dosimetry in the Human Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    John Poston; Nasir U. Bhuiyan; R. Alex Redd; Neil Parham; Jennifer Watson

    2005-02-28

    A new model for an adult human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) has been developed for use in internal dose estimations to the wall of the GIT and to the other organs and tissues of the body from radionuclides deposited in the lumenal contents of the five sections of the GIT. These sections were the esophasgus, stomach, small intestine, upper large intestine, and the lower large intestine. The wall of each section was separated from its lumenal contents.

  5. Distinct human stem cell populations in small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Julie M; Thompson, Timothy; Geskin, Albert; LaFramboise, William; Lagasse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The intestine is composed of an epithelial layer containing rapidly proliferating cells that mature into two regions, the small and the large intestine. Although previous studies have identified stem cells as the cell-of-origin for intestinal epithelial cells, no studies have directly compared stem cells derived from these anatomically distinct regions. Here, we examine intrinsic differences between primary epithelial cells isolated from human fetal small and large intestine, after in vitro expansion, using the Wnt agonist R-spondin 2. We utilized flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, gene expression analysis and a three-dimensional in vitro differentiation assay to characterize their stem cell properties. We identified stem cell markers that separate subpopulations of colony-forming cells in the small and large intestine and revealed important differences in differentiation, proliferation and disease pathways using gene expression analysis. Single cells from small and large intestine cultures formed organoids that reflect the distinct cellular hierarchy found in vivo and respond differently to identical exogenous cues. Our characterization identified numerous differences between small and large intestine epithelial stem cells suggesting possible connections to intestinal disease.

  6. The transit of dosage forms through the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Kah-Hay

    2010-08-16

    The human small intestine, with its enormous absorptive surface area, is invariably the principal site of drug absorption. Hence, the residence time of a dosage form in this part of the gut can have a great influence on the absorption of the contained drug. Various methods have been employed to monitor the gastrointestinal transit of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but the use of gamma-scintigraphy has superceded all the other methods. However, careful consideration of the time interval for image acquisition and proper analysis of the scintigraphic data are important for obtaining reliable results. Most studies reported the mean small intestinal transit time of various dosage forms to be about 3-4h, being closely similar to that of food and water. The value does not appear to be influenced by their physical state nor the presence of food, but the timing of food intake following administration of the dosage forms can influence the small intestinal transit time. While the mean small intestinal transit time is quite consistent among dosage forms and studies, individual values can vary widely. There are differing opinions regarding the effect of density and size of dosage forms on their small intestinal transit properties. Some common excipients employed in pharmaceutical formulations can affect the small intestinal transit and drug absorption. There is currently a lack of studies regarding the effects of excipients, as well as the timing of food intake on the small intestinal transit of dosage forms and drug absorption.

  7. Identification of the Paneth cells in chicken small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Li, J; Li, J; Li, R X; Lv, C F; Li, S; Mi, Y L; Zhang, C Q

    2016-07-01

    The Paneth cells are highly specialized cells in the epithelium of the small intestine of many vertebrate species. These cells reside at the base of crypts of the Lieberkühn and contain abundant secretory granules. Previous studies suggesting the existence of Paneth cells in the chicken (Gallus gallus) remained controversial. Here we seek to identify the Paneth cells in the chicken small intestine through morphological examination and specific gene expression. Histological staining and transmission electron microscope confirmed the presence of granulated secretory cells at the base of the crypts in the chicken small intestine. Western blotting experiment also manifested the expression of lysozyme protein, which is specifically secreted by the Paneth cells in the small intestine. Moreover, lysozyme c and lysozyme g mRNAs were expressed in the small intestine of chickens at different ages. Lysozyme c mRNA, in particular, was located at the base of the small intestinal crypts as displayed by in situ hybridization. Collectively, we provide evidences that the Paneth cells indeed exist in the small intestine of the chicken.

  8. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling.

    PubMed

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine.

  9. The quantitative assessment of normal canine small intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hart, I R; Kidder, D E

    1978-09-01

    Quanitative methods of assessing the architecture of small intestinal mucosa have been applied to biopsy material from normal dogs. Mucosal samples taken from four predetermined sites show that there are significant quantitative differences between the various levels of the small bowel. Animals of one year of age and older show no correlation between age or weight and mucosal dimensions. The significance of these findings, in relation to examination of biopsy material from cases of clinical small intestinal disease, is discussed. PMID:364574

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Ponziani, Francesca Romana; Gerardi, Viviana; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    A huge number of bacteria are hosted in the gastrointestinal tract, following a gradient increasing towards the colon. Gastric acid secretion and intestinal clearance provide the qualitative and quantitative partitioning of intestinal bacteria; small intestinal bacteria overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when these barrier mechanisms fail. Diagnosis of SIBO is challenging due to the low specificity of symptoms, the frequent association with other diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and the absence of optimal objective diagnostic tests. The therapeutic approach to SIBO is oriented towards resolving predisposing conditions, and is supported by antibiotic treatment to restore the normal small intestinal microflora and by modifications of dietary habits for symptomatic relief. In the near future, metagenomics and metabolomics will help to overcome the uncertainties of SIBO diagnosis and the pitfalls of therapeutic management, allowing the design of a personalized strategy based on the direct insight into the small intestinal microbial community. PMID:26636484

  11. [Motility disorders of the small intestine in functional intestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Wingate, D

    1989-02-15

    Functional digestive disorders have their origin in disturbances of the digestive motility control. This control ensured primarily by the "gut brain", which is able to integrate sensitive information from mucosal receptors and to organize an appropriate motor response from a choice of predetermined "programs". The gut brain is in close relationship with the central nervous system (CNS) which collects in fact most of the information and modulates the sensitive integration and the motor response of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Thus, a perturbation of the CNS, such as stress, may induce a dysfunctioning of the ENS, resulting in motor disturbances and finally functional digestive disorders. In a first study involving fasting healthy volunteers, we showed that stress produces a significant reduction of the intestinal migrating motor complexes (MMC). In a second study, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were subjected to stress and compared to patients with inflammatory bowel disease and to healthy controls. All subjects exhibited a decrease of MMC; however, total depletion was observed in numerous IBS patients, together with a characteristic irregular motor activity which was associated with symptoms. Finally, 24-hour recordings of the intestinal motility in these patients showed an entirely normal pattern during sleep and when abnormalities just awakening in association with symptoms. Stress-induced perturbation of the CNS in IBS patients seems to provoke an inappropriate modulation of the motor activity programmed by the ENS, resulting in motor disturbances and finally in the symptoms of the disease. PMID:2522225

  12. Effect of hypokinesia on invertase activity of the mucosa of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdusattarov, A.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prolonged hypokinesia on the enzyme activity of the middle portion of the small intestine was investigated. Eighty-four mongrel white male rats weighing 170-180 g were divided into two equal groups. The experimental group were maintained in single cages under 30 days of hypokinetic conditions and the control animals were maintained under ordinary laboratory conditions. It is concluded that rates of invertase formation and its inclusion in the composition if the cellular membrane, if judged by the enzyme activity studied in sections of the small intestine, are subject to phase changes in the course of prolonged hypokinesia.

  13. Diagnosis and pharmacological management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bushra A; Xie, Yuan Y; Wine, Eytan; Huynh, Hien Q

    2011-01-01

    The present article provides a general overview of the possible diagnostic procedures available for the management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in pediatric patients with intestinal failure. The focus is to address current diagnostic tools and understand their associated advantages and disadvantages based on a literature search. Culture of small intestinal aspirates, noninvasive breath tests and an emerging interest in quantitative bacterial DNA fingerprinting are discussed. Proper management is critical for preventing the recurrence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and its related complications. Antibiotic prophylaxis is one approach to the treatment of bacterial overgrowth in intestinal failure patients. Although treatment trials can be challenging in such a vulnerable population, more investigative clinical studies examining early diagnosis, more effective control of recurrence and the prevention of associated complications must be conducted. PMID:21258668

  14. Effects of phorbol esters on fluid transport and blood flow in the small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Sjoeqvist, A.; Henderson, L.S.; Fondacaro, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Studies were designed to examine the effects of phorbol esters on intestinal fluid transport and blood flow in the anesthetized cat and enteropooling in the conscious rat. Intraluminal administration of phorbol ester into a segment of isolated small bowel produced a copious intestinal secretion and a concomitant mesenteric hyperemia in the cat. Net fluid movement in the intestine was converted from absorption in the control state to secretion following phorbol ester administration. Intravenous atropine reduced the phorbol ester-induced secretion by 56%; clonidine abolished the remaining secretory response. In the rat, intragastric administration of phorbol ester produced enteropooling comparable to that of other potent intestinal secretagogues. Since phorbol esters are known to activate protein kinase C, these suggest that activation of protein kinase C in the small intestine may lead to a full secretory response. The evidence suggests that this secretion is accompanied by a metabolic hyperemia. These results suggest that protein kinase C plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal fluid transport.

  15. Localization of motilin-immunopositive cells in the rat intestine by light microscopic immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sakai, T; Satoh, M; Koyama, H; Iesaki, K; Umahara, M; Fujikura, K; Itoh, Z

    1994-01-01

    Motilin-immunopositive cells (Mo cells) are known to exist in the upper small intestine of many species including man. However, the possible presence of Mo cells in the rat gastrointestine has remained obscure because antiserum against it raised in rabbit was found not to cross-react with motilin in the rat gastrointestine. The present study was designed to investigate the distribution of Mo cells in the rat gastrointestine by the peroxidase-conjugated second antibody method using newly raised chicken anti-motilin serum (CPV3). This antiserum was suggested to recognize the N-terminal region of the motilin molecule by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and immunocytochemical absorption test. Mo cells detected in the rat gastrointestine by immunocytochemistry were found to be distributed in the duodenum (1.5 cells/mm2), jejunum (2.2 cells/mm2), and ileum (0.028 cells/mm2), and no positive cells were found in the gastric body, gastric antrum, cecum, colon, or pancreas. The immunopositive cells in the rat intestine were spindle shaped or polygonal, scattered throughout the epithelium of the villi and crypts, and similar to those commonly observed in the upper small intestine of other species. These results indicate for the first time that motilin-immunopositive cells do exist in the rat intestine.

  16. Advances in small bowel neuroendocrine neoplasia Banck and Small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Banck, Michaela S.; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review this review aims at summarizing progress in clinical trials and basic science redefining the diagnosis and treatment of well differentiated small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NET). Recent findings Two clinical trials demonstrated antitumor activity of the long-acting somatostatin analogues octreotide LAR and lanreotide for advanced SI-NET. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus is another treatment option for patients with SI-NET, but awaits definitive proof of benefit in the ongoing RADIANT-4 study. Two whole exome/genome-sequencing studies reported in the past year provided the first genome-wide analysis of large sets of SI-NET at nucleotide resolution. Candidate therapeutically relevant alterations were found to affect SRC, SMAD genes, AURKA, EGFR, HSP90, and PDGFR as well as mutually exclusive amplification of AKT1 or AKT2 and other alterations of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling genes. The gene CDKN1B is inactivated by small insertions/deletions in 8% of patients with SI-NET suggesting cell cycle inhibitors as new candidate drugs for SI-NET. Circulating tumor cells and tumor-derived RNA in the blood are promising clinical tests for SI-NET. Summary Clinical and genomic research may merge in the near future to re-shape clinical trials and to define the ‘personalized’ treatment options for patients with SI-NET. PMID:24441281

  17. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shu-Guang; Wu, Wan-Chun; Han, Zhen; Wang, Meng-Ya

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress. METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15% vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g, P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g, P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VIP levels between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine. PMID:15655834

  18. [The absorption and metabolism of oxymatrine in rat intestine].

    PubMed

    Cai, Li-yun; Wu, Li-li; Yu, Xiao-ming; Liu, Jun-jin; Han, Wei-chao; Wei, Qiang; Tang, Lan

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to systematically investigate the characteristics of absorption and metabolism of oxymatrine (OMT) using rat intestinal perfusion model. Ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI(+)-Q-TOF-MS) were used to test absorption of OMT in intestine at 100, 200 and 400 µmol · L(-1). The absorption rate and permeability of OMT is not dependent on concentration, but through passive absorption in intestine (P > 0.05). In the rat intestine, the absorbed amount of OMT was significantly different in four sections of the intestine in an order of duodenum > jejunum > ileum > colon (P < 0.05). OMT is metabolized into two metabolites in duodenum and jejunum, and matrine (MT) is the major one.

  19. Effects of growth hormone on intestinal morphology of genetically dwarf rats.

    PubMed Central

    Beer, V J; Warren, M A; Cope, G H; Baillie, H S

    1995-01-01

    Three groups of Lewis rat were studied: dwarf rats, genetically deficient in growth hormone; rehabilitated dwarf rats treated with exogenous growth hormone (GH); and normal wild-type rats. The small intestine of each animal was removed and simple random transverse sections were taken from the proximal and distal regions. The profile areas of villi, crypt and muscle were estimated by point count analysis and combined with intestinal length measurements to obtain absolute volumes. Villus and primary mucosal surface areas were estimated from intersection counts and linear measurements were made of epithelial cell height. Distally, villous volume and surface area were reduced by 42% and 39%, respectively, in the dwarfs compared with controls. These features were significantly smaller (P < 0.01) in dwarfs distally than proximally. Crypt volume and epithelial cell height were decreased equally in both proximal and distal regions of the intestine of dwarf rats. Following GH administration both features increased, crypt volume overshooting control values. These results indicate that GH deficiency has a subtle effect on intestinal morphology and that the intestine is more sensitive distally than proximally. Reconstitution with GH is capable of reversing many of these changes. Images Fig PMID:7649824

  20. Distinct alterations in ATP-binding cassette transporter expression in liver, kidney, small intestine, and brain in adjuvant-induced arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Atsushi; Norikane, Sari; Okada, Ayaka; Adachi, Mamiko; Kato, Yukio; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    Pathophysiological changes of infection or inflammation are associated with alterations in the production of numerous absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion-related proteins. However, little information is available on the effects of inflammation on the expression levels and activities of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. We examined the effect of acute (on day 7) and chronic (on day 21) inflammation on the expression of ABC transporters in some major tissues in rat. Adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) in rats was used as an animal model for inflammation. The mRNA levels of mdr1a and mdr1b encoding P-glycoprotein (P-gp) decreased significantly in livers of AA rats on day 21. Hepatic protein levels of P-gp, Mrp2, and Bcrp decreased significantly in membranes but not homogenates of AA rats after 7 days and after 21 days of treatment with adjuvant. Contrary to liver, protein levels of P-gp and Mrp2, but not Bcrp in kidney, increased significantly in membranes. The biliary excretion of rhodamine 123 was decreased in rats with chronic inflammation owing to decreases in efflux activities of P-gp. Our results showed that the expression of transporters in response to inflammation was organ dependent. In particular, hepatic and renal P-gp and Mrp2 exhibited opposite changes in membrane protein levels.

  1. The role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Bove, Francesco; Gabrielli, Maurizio; Petracca, Martina; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Ragazzoni, Enzo; Barbaro, Federico; Piano, Carla; Fortuna, Serena; Tortora, Annalisa; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Campanale, Mariachiara; Gigante, Giovanni; Lauritano, Ernesto Cristiano; Navarra, Pierluigi; Marconi, Stefano; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with gastrointestinal motility abnormalities favoring the occurrence of local infections. The aim of this study was to investigate whether small intestinal bacterial overgrowth contributes to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations. Thirty-three patients and 30 controls underwent glucose, lactulose, and urea breath tests to detect small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients also underwent ultrasonography to evaluate gastric emptying. The clinical status and plasma concentration of levodopa were assessed after an acute drug challenge with a standard dose of levodopa, and motor complications were assessed by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-IV and by 1-week diaries of motor conditions. Patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth were treated with rifaximin and were clinically and instrumentally reevaluated 1 and 6 months later. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was significantly higher in patients than in controls (54.5% vs. 20.0%; P = .01), whereas the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was not (33.3% vs. 26.7%). Compared with patients without any infection, the prevalence of unpredictable fluctuations was significantly higher in patients with both infections (8.3% vs. 87.5%; P = .008). Gastric half-emptying time was significantly longer in patients than in healthy controls but did not differ in patients based on their infective status. Compared with patients without isolated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, patients with isolated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth had longer off time daily and more episodes of delayed-on and no-on. The eradication of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth resulted in improvement in motor fluctuations without affecting the pharmacokinetics of levodopa. The relapse rate of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth at 6 months was 43%. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. PMID:23712625

  2. [Rectal impalement with rupture of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Wahnschaff, F; Gerstorfer, M; Roder, J

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old farmer who fell from a ladder onto the handle of a wheelbarrow and sustained a rectal impalement with rupture of the small intestine. After the clinical diagnostics an emergency laparotomy was carried out with primary suturing of the rectal perforation. Furthermore there were two perforations of the small intestine which were treated with an ileostomy. The replacement of the ileostomy was carried out after 7 weeks. PMID:21113567

  3. The role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Bove, Francesco; Gabrielli, Maurizio; Petracca, Martina; Zocco, Maria Assunta; Ragazzoni, Enzo; Barbaro, Federico; Piano, Carla; Fortuna, Serena; Tortora, Annalisa; Di Giacopo, Raffaella; Campanale, Mariachiara; Gigante, Giovanni; Lauritano, Ernesto Cristiano; Navarra, Pierluigi; Marconi, Stefano; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2013-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with gastrointestinal motility abnormalities favoring the occurrence of local infections. The aim of this study was to investigate whether small intestinal bacterial overgrowth contributes to the pathophysiology of motor fluctuations. Thirty-three patients and 30 controls underwent glucose, lactulose, and urea breath tests to detect small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients also underwent ultrasonography to evaluate gastric emptying. The clinical status and plasma concentration of levodopa were assessed after an acute drug challenge with a standard dose of levodopa, and motor complications were assessed by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-IV and by 1-week diaries of motor conditions. Patients with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth were treated with rifaximin and were clinically and instrumentally reevaluated 1 and 6 months later. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was significantly higher in patients than in controls (54.5% vs. 20.0%; P = .01), whereas the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was not (33.3% vs. 26.7%). Compared with patients without any infection, the prevalence of unpredictable fluctuations was significantly higher in patients with both infections (8.3% vs. 87.5%; P = .008). Gastric half-emptying time was significantly longer in patients than in healthy controls but did not differ in patients based on their infective status. Compared with patients without isolated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, patients with isolated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth had longer off time daily and more episodes of delayed-on and no-on. The eradication of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth resulted in improvement in motor fluctuations without affecting the pharmacokinetics of levodopa. The relapse rate of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth at 6 months was 43%. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Fasting stimulates 2-AG biosynthesis in the small intestine: role of cholinergic pathways

    PubMed Central

    DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Igarashi, Miki; Narayanaswami, Vidya; Murray, Conor; Gancayco, Joseph; Russell, Amy; Jung, Kwang-Mook

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoids are lipid-derived signaling molecules that control feeding and energy balance by activating CB1-type cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Previous studies have shown that oral exposure to dietary fat stimulates endocannabinoid signaling in the rat small intestine, which provides positive feedback that drives further food intake and preference for fat-rich foods. We now describe an unexpectedly broader role for cholinergic signaling of the vagus nerve in the production of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG), in the small intestine. We show that food deprivation increases levels of 2-AG and its lipid precursor, 1,2-diacylglycerol, in rat jejunum mucosa in a time-dependent manner. This response is abrogated by surgical resection of the vagus nerve or pharmacological blockade of small intestinal subtype-3 muscarinic acetylcholine (m3 mAch) receptors, but not inhibition of subtype-1 muscarinic acetylcholine (m1 mAch). We further show that blockade of peripheral CB1 receptors or intestinal m3 mAch receptors inhibits refeeding in fasted rats. The results suggest that food deprivation stimulates 2-AG-dependent CB1 receptor activation through a mechanism that requires efferent vagal activation of m3 mAch receptors in the jejunum, which, in turn, may promote feeding after a fast. PMID:26290104

  5. Intestinal absorption of biotin in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.B.; Selhub, J.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-07-01

    We examined the absorption of biotin using the in vivo intestinal loop technique. Jejunal segments from male rats were filled with solutions containing (/sup 3/H)biotin and (/sup 14/C)inulin in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Absorption was determined on the basis of luminal tritium disappearance after correction for inulin recovery. At biotin concentrations of 0.1 and 5.0 microM, luminal biotin disappearance was linear for at least 10 min. At biotin concentrations ranging from 2.3 nM to 75 microM, 10-28% of the administered dose was absorbed in 10 min. The concentration dependence of luminal biotin disappearance is consistent with the presence of both saturable and nonsaturable (linear) components of biotin uptake, with estimated Km = 9.6 microM and Jmax = 75.2 pmol/(2.5 cm loop X min). The rate constant for nonsaturable uptake is 3.1 pmol/(2.5 cm loop X min X microM). We conclude that at biotin concentrations less than 5 microM, biotin absorption proceeds largely by the saturable process, whereas at concentrations above 25 microM, nonsaturable uptake predominates. Additional studies demonstrated significantly less biotin uptake in the ileum than in the jejunum, a finding in agreement with previous in vitro studies.

  6. Intestinal absorption of serrapeptase (TSP) in rats.

    PubMed

    Moriya, N; Nakata, M; Nakamura, M; Takaoka, M; Iwasa, S; Kato, K; Kakinuma, A

    1994-08-01

    A sensitive sandwich enzyme immunoassay (e.i.a.) for serrapeptase (TSP), an orally available anti-inflammatory proteinase, was established using affinity-purified anti-TSP rabbit IgG and its Fab' fragment conjugated with horseradish peroxidase as the first and the second antibodies respectively. TSP in the plasma was determined by the e.i.a. after its oral administration (100 mg/kg) to rats. The peak concentration was observed between 30 min and 2 h after administration. TSP in the plasma samples was trapped on a microtitre plate coated with the affinity-purified anti-TSP rabbit IgG, and the hydrolysis of a synthetic fluorogenic substrate, butoxycarbonyl-Glu(benzyloxy)-Ala-Arg-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide, by the trapped TSP was fluorometrically measured (proteinase assay). The values obtained by the e.i.a. and those obtained by the proteinase assay correlated well for various plasma samples. These results indicate that orally administered TSP was absorbed from the intestinal tract and transferred into the circulation in an enzymically active form.

  7. In Vivo Physiological Experiments in the Random Positioning Macine: A Study on the Rat Intestinal Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peana, A. T.; Marzocco, S.; Bianco, G.; Autore, G.; Pinto, A.; Pippia, P.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the rat intestinal transit as well as the expression of enzymes involved in this process and in gastrointestinal homeostasis as ciclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2), the inducibile isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), ICAM-1 and heat shock proteins HSP70 and HSP90. The modeled microgravity conditions were performed utilizing a three-dimensional clinostat, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). Our results indicate that modeled microgravity significantly reduce rat intestinal transit. Western blot analysis on small intestine tissues of RPM rats reveals a significant increase in iNOS expression, a significant reduction in COX-2 levels, while COX-1 expression remains unaltered, and a significant increase in ICAM-1 and HSP 70 expression. Also a significant increase in HSP 90 stomach expression indicates a strong effect of simulated low g on gastrointestinal homeostasis.

  8. [An inhibitory analysis of the role of the enterocyte cytoskeleton in the absorption of food substances in the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I A; Verina, T Iu

    1993-06-01

    The effect of colchicine and cytochalasin B and D on the process of glucose and plant oil absorption in the small intestine of rats was studied using the light and electron microscopy and biochemical methods. The colchicine and CB, CD action on the elements of enterocytes' apical contractile complex and cytoskeleton inhibited the absorption thus suggesting the major role of endocytosis in the process of nutrients absorption in the small intestine.

  9. Cancer Statistics: Cancer of the Small Intestine

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 10,090 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,330 % of All Cancer ... intestine cancer is rare. Common Types of Cancer Estimated New Cases 2016 Estimated Deaths 2016 1. Breast ...

  10. [Diagnosis of chronic hemorrhage in diseases of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Romashov, F N; Savov, A M; Abashkin, Iu A; Tishchenkova, V S

    1996-01-01

    In a period of 10 years 38 patients received treatment in the clinic for iron deficiency anemia in whom the source of chronic blood loss was revealed in the small intestine. The radionuclide method for detecting concealed blood loss was most informative for the diagnosis (98%) of chronic intestinal hemorrhages, and was particularly important in cases with iron deficiency anemia of unclear genesis. Oral enterography was the most available method and sufficiently informative (32%) in the diagnosis of chronic hemorrhages from the small intestine. In 3-4 day, blood loss of more than 10 ml/24 h from the gastrointestinal tract verified by the radionuclide method but with the source of the bleeding not identified by instrumental methods, the indications for diagnostic laparotomy must be widened for careful examination of the small intestine.

  11. The effect of small intestine heterogeneity on irreversible electroporation treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is an ablation modality that utilizes microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. This results in selective cell death while preserving all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix. Here, finite element analysis and experimental results are utilized to examine the effect of NTIRE on the small intestine due to concern over collateral damage to this organ during NTIRE treatment of abdominal cancers. During previous studies, the electrical treatment parameters were chosen based on a simplified homogeneous tissue model. The small intestine, however, has very distinct layers, and a more realistic model is needed to further develop this technology for precise clinical applications. This study uses a two-dimensional finite element solution of the Laplace and heat conduction equations to investigate how small intestine heterogeneities affect the electric field and temperature distribution. Experimental results obtained by applying NTIRE to the rat small intestine in vivo support the heterogeneous effect of NTIRE on the tissue. The numerical modeling indicates that the electroporation parameters chosen for this study avoid thermal damage to the tissue. This is supported by histology obtained from the in vivo study, which showed preservation of extracellular structures. The finite element model also indicates that the heterogeneous structure of the small intestine has a significant effect on the electric field and volume of cell ablation during electroporation and could have a large impact on the extent of treatment. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue should be accounted for in clinical treatment planning.

  12. Normal and abnormal electrical propagation in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, W J E P

    2015-02-01

    As in other muscular organs, small intestinal motility is determined to a large degree by the electrical activities that occur in the smooth muscle layers of the small intestine. In recent decades, the interstitial cells of Cajal, located in the myenteric plexus, have been shown to be responsible for the generation and propagation of the electrical impulse: the slow wave. It was also known that the slow waves as such do not cause contraction, but that the action potentials ('spikes') that are generated by the slow waves are responsible for the contractions. Recording from large number of extracellular electrodes simultaneously is one method to determine origin and pattern of propagation of these electrical signals. This review reports the characteristics of slow wave propagation through the intestinal tube, the occurrence of propagation blocks along its length, which explains the well-known decrease in frequency, and the specific propagation pattern of the spikes that follow the slow waves. But the value of high-resolution mapping is highest in discovering and analysing mechanisms of arrhythmias in the gut. Most recently, circus movements (also called 're-entries') have been described in the small intestine in several species. Moreover, several types of re-entries have now been described, some similar to what may occur in the heart, such as functional re-entries, but others more unique to the small intestine, such as circumferential re-entry. These findings seem to suggest the possibilities of hitherto unknown pathologies that may be present in the small intestine.

  13. Hymenolepis diminuta: analysis of the expression of Toll-like receptor genes and protein (TLR3 and TLR9) in the small and large intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, Danuta I; Wojtkowiak-Giera, Agnieszka; Kolasa, Agnieszka; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Lanocha, Natalia; Wandurska-Nowak, Elzbieta; Izabela, Gutowska; Salamatin, Ruslan; Jagodzinski, Paweł P

    2014-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a fundamental role in the rapid activation of innate immune responses to a variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In a previous study we observed an increase in the level of expression of TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA in the jejunum and colon during experimental hymenolepidosis in rats. In this study, we performed a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of TLR3 and TLR9 receptors during experimental hymenolepidosis in rats. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of TLR3 and TLR9 in the jejunum had increased at 16 days post Hymenolepis diminuta infection (dpi) in the case of TLR3 and at 16 and 25 dpi in the case of TLR9. In the colon the expression of TLR3 and TLR9 had increased at 16, 25 and 40 dpi. The results of the immunohistochemical reactions showed that H. diminuta infected rats (16, 25, 40 and 60 dpi) exhibited changes in TLR3 and TLR9 localization and intensity in the epithelial cells of the jejunum and colon. The changes in the level of TLR3 and TLR9 expression may confirm involvement of the innate immune system in the pathomechanism of hymenolepidosis.

  14. Effect of reserpine on the histochemical and biochemical properties of rat intestinal mucin

    SciTech Connect

    Forstner, J.; Roomi, N.; Khorasani, R.; Kuhns, W.; Forstner, G. )

    1991-04-01

    Biochemical and histochemical parameters of intestinal mucins were examined in control and reserpine-treated rats. An assay for intestinal mucin sulfotransferase was developed and the activity shown to increase 3.4 times over control levels in rats given intraperitonal reserpine (0.5 mg/kg body wt) daily for 7 days. Histochemical staining of intestinal sections revealed an increase in sulfomucins in goblet cells of reserpine-treated rats. The effects were prominent as early as 1 day following injection, particularly in the distal third of the small intestine, and during the next 6 days these changes spread progressively to the middle and proximal thirds. After 3 days of treatment mucins were purified from each intestinal segment and compared to control mucins with respect to composition and (35S)NaSO{sub 4} incorporation. Although individual amino acid and carbohydrate molar ratios were unchanged, the total carbohydrate and sulfate content of mucins in treated animals was elevated (two to three times above control) in the middle and distal thirds of the intestine. In vivo ({sup 35}S)SO{sub 4} incorporation into these mucins was also proportionaltely elevated, and was targetted to O-linked oligosaccharide side chains. These findings are consistent with an action of reserpine causing an increased production of mucin which is enriched in glycoprotein components bearing sulfated oligosaccharide chains. The relevance of these findings to the production of hypersulfated and hyperglycosylated mucins in cystic fibrosis is discussed.

  15. Altered systemic bioavailability and organ distribution of azathioprine in methotrexate-induced intestinal mucositis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Karbelkar, Sadaf A.; Majumdar, Anuradha S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Intestinal mucositis is a significant problem haunting clinicians for decades. One of the major reasons for its occurrence is high-dose chemotherapy. The study is aimed at investigating effect of intestinal mucositis on pharmacokinetics, organ distribution, and bioavailability of azathioprine (AZA) (6-mercaptopurine). Materials and Methods: Intestinal mucositis was induced with methotrexate (MTX) (2.5 mg/kg). The oral absorption of AZA and 6-mercaptopurine (metabolite) levels were determined in control and MTX-treated rats: ex vivo (noneverted sac technique) and in vivo (pharmacokinetics and organ-distribution) using high-performance liquid chromatography. Immunohistochemistry was conducted to evaluate peptide transporter expression on luminal membrane of small intestine. Results: Intestinal permeation of AZA into systemic circulation of rats was lower after MTX administration, widely found in intestinal segments of mucositis-induced rats leading to decline in systemic bioavailability of AZA. Immunohistochemistry findings indicated diminution of peptide transporter expression representing hampered absorption of drugs absorbed via this transporter. Conclusion: Study outcome has thrown light on altered fate of AZA when administered to individuals with mucositis which suggests modified drug therapy. These findings can further be investigated in different drug classes which might be administered concomitantly in mucositis and study outcome can be further confirmed in mucositis patients in clinical practice also. PMID:27298491

  16. Nonlinear intestinal absorption kinetics of cefuroxime axetil in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Balaguer, N; Nacher, A; Casabo, V G; Merino, M

    1997-01-01

    Cefuroxime is commercially available for parenteral administration as a sodium salt and for oral administration as cefuroxime axetil, the 1-(acetoxy)ethyl ester of the drug. Cefuroxime axetil is a prodrug of cefuroxime and has little, if any, antibacterial activity until hydrolyzed in vivo to cefuroxime. In this study, the absorption of cefuroxime axetil in the small intestines of anesthetized rats was investigated in situ, by perfusion at four concentrations (11.8, 5, 118 and 200 microM). Oral absorption of cefuroxime axetil can apparently be described as a specialized transport mechanism which obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Parameters characterizing absorption of prodrug in free solution were obtained: maximum rate of absorption (Vmax) = 289.08 +/- 46.26 microM h-1, and Km = 162.77 +/- 31.17 microM. Cefuroxime axetil transport was significantly reduced in the presence of the enzymatic inhibitor sodium azide. On the other hand, the prodrug was metabolized in the gut wall through contact with membrane-bound enzymes in the brush border membrane before absorption occurred. This process reduces the prodrug fraction directly available for absorption. From a bioavailability point of view, therefore, the effects mentioned above can explain the variable and poor bioavailability following oral administration of cefuroxime axetil. Thus, future strategies in oral cefuroxime axetil absorption should focus on increasing the stability of the prodrug in the intestine by modifying the prodrug structure and/or targeting the compound to the absorption site. PMID:9021205

  17. Effect of Candida albicans on Intestinal Ischemia-reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lei; Wu, Chun-Rong; Wang, Chen; Yang, Chun-Hui; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammation is supposed to play a key role in the pathophysiological processes of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IIRI), and Candida albicans in human gut commonly elevates inflammatory cytokines in intestinal mucosa. This study aimed to explore the effect of C. albicans on IIRI. Methods: Fifty female Wistar rats were divided into five groups according to the status of C. albicans infection and IIRI operation: group blank and sham; group blank and IIRI; group cefoperazone plus IIRI; group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and IIRI (CCI); and group C. albicans plus cefoperazone and sham. The levels of inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and diamine oxidase (DAO) measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to evaluate the inflammation reactivity as well as the integrity of small intestine. Histological scores were used to assess the mucosal damage, and the C. albicans blood translocation was detected to judge the permeability of intestinal mucosal barrier. Results: The levels of inflammatory factors TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in serum and intestine were higher in rats undergone both C. albicans infection and IIRI operation compared with rats in other groups. The levels of DAO (serum: 44.13 ± 4.30 pg/ml, intestine: 346.21 ± 37.03 pg/g) and Chiu scores (3.41 ± 1.09) which reflected intestinal mucosal disruption were highest in group CCI after the operation. The number of C. albicans translocated into blood was most in group CCI ([33.80 ± 6.60] ×102 colony forming unit (CFU)/ml). Conclusion: Intestinal C. albicans infection worsened the IIRI-induced disruption of intestinal mucosal barrier and facilitated the subsequent C. albicans translocation and dissemination. PMID:27411459

  18. Recombinant Thrombomodulin (Solulin) Ameliorates Early Intestinal Radiation Toxicity in a Preclinical Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rupak; Wang, Junru; Garg, Sarita; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Intestinal radiation toxicity occurs during and after abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Endothelial cells play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced intestinal damage. We demonstrated that the endothelial cell surface receptor thrombomodulin (TM), a protein with anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, mitigates radiation-induced lethality in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether recombinant TM (Solulin) can protect the intestine from toxicity in a clinically relevant rat model. A 4 cm loop of rat small bowel was exposed to fractionated 5 Gy X radiation for 9 consecutive days. The animals were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle or Solulin (3 mg/kg/day or 10 mg/kg/day) for 27 days starting 4 days before irradiation. Early intestinal injury was assessed two weeks after irradiation by quantitative histology, morphometry, immunohistochemistry and luminol bioluminescence imaging. Solulin treatment significantly ameliorated intestinal radiation injury, made evident by a decrease in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) immunoreactivity, collagen-I deposition, radiation injury score (RIS) and intestinal serosal thickening. These findings indicate the need for further development of Solulin as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic agent to mitigate radiation-induced intestinal damage. PMID:27459702

  19. Ischemic postconditioning provides protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in intestines of rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, Weiwei; Li, Sheng; Wang, Shanwei; Yan, Aili; Nie, Lei

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective role of ischemic postconditioning (IPOST) against intestine ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operation group (S), I/R group (I/R), ischemic preconditioning group (IPC), ischemic postconditioning group (IPOST). After reperfusion, small intestines were resected for histopathologic evaluations. To evaluate DNA fragmentation, resolving agarose gel electrophoresis was performed. To measure cellular apoptotic rates in intestine tissues, we performed TUNEL staining. To examine lipid peroxidation, production of superoxide radicals and tissue neutrophil infiltration, we tested the content of malondialdehyde and activities of superoxidase dismutase and myeloperoxidase in intestine tissues, respectively. Under light microscope, intestinal mucosal impairment in IPOST and IPC groups was found milder than that in I/R group (P < 0.05). The number of apoptosis cells in I/R group was significantly higher than that in IPOST and IPC groups (P < 0.05). The content of malondialdehyde and activity of myeloperoxidase were significantly reduced in IPOST group and IPC group compared with I/R group, but the activity of superoxidase dismutase in IPOST group and IPC group was enhanced compared with I/R group (P < 0.05). These results suggest that IPOST results in protection against intestine I/R injury, which may be related to reduced production of reactive oxygen species, enhanced activities of antioxidant systems and inhibited apoptosis of intestinal mucosal cells.

  20. Recombinant Thrombomodulin (Solulin) Ameliorates Early Intestinal Radiation Toxicity in a Preclinical Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Wang, Junru; Garg, Sarita; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal radiation toxicity occurs during and after abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Endothelial cells play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced intestinal damage. We demonstrated that the endothelial cell surface receptor thrombomodulin (TM), a protein with anticoagulant, antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, mitigates radiation-induced lethality in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether recombinant TM (Solulin) can protect the intestine from toxicity in a clinically relevant rat model. A 4 cm loop of rat small bowel was exposed to fractionated 5 Gy X radiation for 9 consecutive days. The animals were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle or Solulin (3 mg/kg/day or 10 mg/kg/day) for 27 days starting 4 days before irradiation. Early intestinal injury was assessed two weeks after irradiation by quantitative histology, morphometry, immunohistochemistry and luminol bioluminescence imaging. Solulin treatment significantly ameliorated intestinal radiation injury, made evident by a decrease in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) immunoreactivity, collagen-I deposition, radiation injury score (RIS) and intestinal serosal thickening. These findings indicate the need for further development of Solulin as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic agent to mitigate radiation-induced intestinal damage. PMID:27459702

  1. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids.

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Freeman, Jennifer J; Wieck, Minna M; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Spence, Jason R

    2015-10-12

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue.

  2. Generation of tissue-engineered small intestine using embryonic stem cell-derived human intestinal organoids

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Stacy R.; Freeman, Jennifer J.; Wieck, Minna M.; El-Nachef, Wael; Altheim, Christopher H.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Huang, Sha; Dyal, Rachel; White, Eric S.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.; Spence, Jason R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by poor nutrient absorption due to a deficit of healthy intestine. Current treatment practices rely on providing supportive medical therapy with parenteral nutrition; while life saving, such interventions are not curative and are still associated with significant co-morbidities. As approaches to lengthen remaining intestinal tissue have been met with only limited success and intestinal transplants have poor survival outcomes, new approaches to treating SBS are necessary. Human intestine derived from embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), called human intestinal organoids (HIOs), have the potential to offer a personalized and scalable source of intestine for regenerative therapies. However, given that HIOs are small three-dimensional structures grown in vitro, methods to generate usable HIO-derived constructs are needed. We investigated the ability of hESCs or HIOs to populate acellular porcine intestinal matrices and artificial polyglycolic/poly L lactic acid (PGA/PLLA) scaffolds, and examined the ability of matrix/scaffolds to thrive when transplanted in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the acellular matrix alone is not sufficient to instruct hESC differentiation towards an endodermal or intestinal fate. We observed that while HIOs reseed acellular porcine matrices in vitro, the HIO-reseeded matrices do not thrive when transplanted in vivo. In contrast, HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds thrive in vivo and develop into tissue that looks nearly identical to adult human intestinal tissue. Our results suggest that HIO-seeded PGA/PLLA scaffolds are a promising avenue for developing the mucosal component of tissue engineered human small intestine, which need to be explored further to develop them into fully functional tissue. PMID:26459240

  3. Intestinal absorption and metabolism of homoursodeoxycholic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, T; Moriwaki, S; Kawamoto, K; Hoshita, T

    1987-07-01

    Intestinal absorption, hepatic biotransformation and intestinal bacterial modification of the C25 homolog of ursodeoxycholic acid, homoursodeoxycholic acid, and its glycine conjugate, glycohomoursodeoxycholic acid, were studied in rats. Homoursodeoxycholic acid, like ursodeoxycholic acid, was efficiently absorbed from the intestine and rapidly excreted into the bile. Most (greater than 95%) of the absorbed homoursodeoxycholic acid was found to undergo beta-oxidation to form two C23 bile acids, norursodeoxycholic acid and nor-beta-muricholic acid during passage through the liver. Bacterial modification of homoursodeoxycholic acid was very similar to that of ursodeoxycholic acid. In the rat intestinal tract, glycohomoursodexycholic acid was deconjugated to form unconjugated homoursodeoxycholic acid which was then 7 beta-dehydroxylated to form homolithocholic acid.

  4. Pancreatic digestive enzyme blockade in the small intestine prevents insulin resistance in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Frank A; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is associated with metabolic defects, including hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, but the mechanisms are unknown. We recently demonstrated that reduction of the extracellular domain of the insulin receptor by degrading proteases may lead to a reduced ability to maintain normal plasma glucose values. In shock, transfer of digestive enzymes from the lumen of the intestine into the systemic circulation after breakdown of the intestinal mucosal barrier causes inflammation and organ dysfunction. Suppression of the digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine with protease inhibitors is effective in reducing the level of the inflammatory reactions. To determine the degree to which blockade of digestive enzymes affects insulin resistance in shock, rats were exposed to acute hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg for 2 h) at which time all shed blood volume was returned. Digestive proteases in the intestine were blocked with a serine protease inhibitor (tranexamic acid in polyethylene glycol and physiological electrolyte solution), and the density of the insulin receptor was measured with immunohistochemistry in the mesentery microcirculation. The untreated rat without enzyme blockade had significantly attenuated levels of insulin receptor density as compared with control and treated rats. Blockade of the digestive proteases after 60 min of hypotension in the lumen of the small intestine led to a lesser decrease in insulin receptor density compared with controls without protease blockade. Glucose tolerance test indicates a significant increase in plasma glucose levels 2 h after hemorrhagic shock, which are reduced to control values in the presence of protease inhibition in the lumen of the intestine. The transient reduction of the plasma glucose levels after an insulin bolus is significantly attenuated after shock but is restored when digestive enzymes in the lumen of the intestine are blocked. These results suggest that in

  5. Dai Huang Fu Zi Tang could ameliorate intestinal injury in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock by regulating intestinal blood flow and intestinal expression of p-VASP and ZO-1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dai Huang Fu Zi Tang (DHFZT), an oriental herbal formula, has long been used clinically in treatment of intestinal obstruction, acute pancreatitis, cholecystalgia and chronic diarrhea for thousands of years. Recent studies have demonstrated that DHFZT can reduce intestinal pathological injury and the concentration of enterogenous endotoxin in an animal model. But the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Methods SD male rats in adult were used to model HS and treated with DHFZT. The serum concentration of endotoxin were analyzed by dynamic turbidimetric method. In addition, the blood flow of small intestine were measured using laser speckle technique. Phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (p-VASP) and zonula occludens (ZO)-1 protein, intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) were measured by Western Blotting, RT-PCR, ELISA respectively. Results Present study showed that DHFZT markedly elevated the blood flow of small intestine, protected the intestinal barrier function by up-regulating the expression of ZO-1 protein and down-regulating expression of p-VASP, and notely decreased serum concentration of IFABP and endotoxin in HS. Conclusions These results reveal that DHFZT improves intestinal blood flow, protects the intestinal barrier function, and ameliorates intestinal endotoxaemia in rats with HS. PMID:24580804

  6. Sterol carrier protein2-like activity in rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, A; Wadsworth, J A; Chanderbhan, R; Wiesenfeld, P; Noland, B; Scallen, T; Vahouny, G V; Gallo, L L

    1988-03-01

    A sterol carrier protein2 (SCP2)-like activity has been demonstrated in rat intestinal mucosal homogenates and in isolated intestinal cells from both crypt and villus zones. The results indicate the presence of a protein with similar molecular weight and antigenicity to that of authentic SCP2 purified from rat liver cytosol. Like liver SCP2, mucosal cytosol stimulates pregnenolone production in rat adrenal mitochondria and acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase activity of liver and mucosal microsomes. The distribution of SCP2-like activity as determined by radioimmunoassay indicates high levels in mitochondria and cytosol and relatively lower levels in microsomes and in brush-border membranes. The widespread distribution of SCP2-like protein in the intestine is consistent with potential transfer functions in all phases of cholesterol processing. PMID:3379341

  7. Characteristics of Small Intestinal Diseases on Single-Balloon Enteroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Zhang; Liu, G.X.; Cai, L.; Yu, H.; Min, X.J.; Gan, H.T.; Yang, K.; SQ, Li; Yan, J.; Chen, L.; Tan, Q.H.; Wu, J.C.; Huang, X.L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small intestine has been considered inaccessible for a long term. The development of single-balloon endoscopy has greatly improved the diagnosis and treatment possibilities for small intestinal diseases. In this study, we aimed to explore the demographic characteristics and small intestinal diseases of patients who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy between 2009 and 2014 at our endoscopy center. We determined the enteroscopic findings for each small intestinal disease and the most susceptible age groups. In total, 186 patients were included in the study. Their mean age was 45.87 ± 15.77 years. Patients who underwent single-balloon enteroscopy were found to have neoplasms (most common age group: 14–45 years, most common lesion location: jejunum), lymphoma (46–59 and 60–74 years, ileum), protuberant lesions (45–59 years, jejunum), inflammation (14–45 and 46–59 years, ileum), benign ulcers (14–45 years, jejunum), diverticulum (14–45 years, ileum), vascular malformations (60–74 years, jejunum), polyps (14–45 years, jejunum), Crohn's disease (14–45 years, jejunum), hookworm infection (14–45 years, jejunum), lipid pigmentation (14–45 and 46–59 years, jejunum), undetermined bleeding (46–59 years, ileum), or undetermined stenosis (31 years, duodenum). Each small intestinal disease had distinct enteroscopic findings. PMID:26496270

  8. The migrating myoelectric complex of the small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Gordon L.; Sarna, Sushil K.

    1991-10-01

    Gastric and small intestinal myoelectric and motor activity is divided into two main patterns, fed and fasted. During fasting, the predominant pattern of activity is the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC), a cyclically occurring pattern of electric and mechanical activity that is initiated in the stomach and duodenum almost simultaneously and, from there, propagates the length of the small intestine. Cyclic motor activity also occurs in the lower esophageal sphincter, the gallbladder, and the sphincter of Oddi with a duration that is related to the MMC in the small intestine. Of the possible mechanisms for initiation of the MMC in the small intestine (extrinsic neural control, intrinsic neural control, and hormonal control), intrinsic neural control via a series of coupled is the most likely. The keep this sentence in! hormone motilin also plays a role in the initiation of MMCs. After a meal, in man the MMC is disrupted and replaced by irregular contractions. The physiologic role of the MMC is to clear the stomach and small intestine of residual food, secretions, and desquamated cells and propel them to the colon. Disruption of the MMC cycle is associated with bacterial overgrowth in some patients, an observation that supports the proposed cleansing function of the MMC cycle.

  9. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-11-01

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed.

  10. Paneth cells: maestros of the small intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Clevers, Hans C; Bevins, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    Paneth cells are highly specialized epithelial cells of the small intestine, where they coordinate many physiological functions. First identified more than a century ago on the basis of their readily discernible secretory granules by routine histology, these cells are located at the base of the crypts of Lieberkühn, tiny invaginations that line the mucosal surface all along the small intestine. Investigations over the past several decades determined that these cells synthesize and secrete substantial quantities of antimicrobial peptides and proteins. More recent studies have determined that these antimicrobial molecules are key mediators of host-microbe interactions, including homeostatic balance with colonizing microbiota and innate immune protection from enteric pathogens. Perhaps more intriguing, Paneth cells secrete factors that help sustain and modulate the epithelial stem and progenitor cells that cohabitate in the crypts and rejuvenate the small intestinal epithelium. Dysfunction of Paneth cell biology contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:23398152

  11. Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase Is Protective to the Preterm Rat Pup Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Heinzerling, Nathan P.; Liedel, Jennifer L.; Welak, Scott R.; Fredrich, Katherine; Biesterveld, Ben E.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Gourlay, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common surgical emergency in neonates, with a mortality rate between 10 and 50%. The onset of necrotizing enterocolitis is highly variable and associated with numerous risk factors. Prior research has shown enteral supplementation with intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) decreases the severity of NEC. The aim of this study is to investigate whether IAP is protective to the preterm intestine in the presence of formula feeding and in the absence of NEC. Methods Preterm rat pups were fed formula with or without supplementation with IAP, and intestine was obtained on day of life 3 for analysis of IAP activity, mRNA expression of TNF-a, IL-6 and iNOS and permeability and cytokine expression after LPS. exposure. Results There was no difference in the absolute and intestine specific alkaline phosphatase activity in both groups. Rat pups fed IAP had decreased mRNA expression of the inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-6 and iNOS. Pups supplemented with IAP had decreased permeability and inflammatory cytokine expression after exposure to LPS ex vivo when compared to formula fed controls. Conclusions Our results support that IAP is beneficial to preterm intestine and decreases intestinal injury and inflammation caused by LPS. PMID:24888842

  12. Normal and abnormal electrical propagation in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, W J E P

    2015-02-01

    As in other muscular organs, small intestinal motility is determined to a large degree by the electrical activities that occur in the smooth muscle layers of the small intestine. In recent decades, the interstitial cells of Cajal, located in the myenteric plexus, have been shown to be responsible for the generation and propagation of the electrical impulse: the slow wave. It was also known that the slow waves as such do not cause contraction, but that the action potentials ('spikes') that are generated by the slow waves are responsible for the contractions. Recording from large number of extracellular electrodes simultaneously is one method to determine origin and pattern of propagation of these electrical signals. This review reports the characteristics of slow wave propagation through the intestinal tube, the occurrence of propagation blocks along its length, which explains the well-known decrease in frequency, and the specific propagation pattern of the spikes that follow the slow waves. But the value of high-resolution mapping is highest in discovering and analysing mechanisms of arrhythmias in the gut. Most recently, circus movements (also called 're-entries') have been described in the small intestine in several species. Moreover, several types of re-entries have now been described, some similar to what may occur in the heart, such as functional re-entries, but others more unique to the small intestine, such as circumferential re-entry. These findings seem to suggest the possibilities of hitherto unknown pathologies that may be present in the small intestine. PMID:25156937

  13. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against acrylamide toxicity in liver and small and large intestine tissues.

    PubMed

    Altinoz, E; Turkoz, Y; Vardi, N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of N-acetylcysteine against acrylamide toxicity in liver and small and large intestine tissues in rats.The rats were divided into four groups. Acrylamide administration increased MDA levels in all tissues significantly (p < 0.05). But acrylamide+NAC administration decreased MDA levels significantly as compared to the acrylamide group, and lowered it to a level close to the control group values (p < 0.05). GSH levels in liver and small intestine tissues reduced significantly in the acrylamide group (p < 0.05). But acrylamide+NAC administration increased GSH levels significantly in all tissues. Whereas GST activity decreased significantly in the acrylamide group in liver and small intestine tissues as compared to the other groups (p < 0.05), the GST activity increased significantly in the acrylamide+NAC group in all tissues as compared to the acrylamide group (p < 0.05). Liver histopathology showed that the liver epithelial cells were damaged significantly in the acrylamide group. Small intestine histopathology showed that the intestinal villous epithelial cells were damaged significantly in the acrylamide group.Our results indicate that a high level of acrylamide causes oxidative damage in liver and small and large intestine tissues, while N-acetylcysteine administration in a pharmacological dose shows to have an antioxidant effect in preventing this damage (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 66).

  14. How Is Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal bowel movement and is flushed away. Double-balloon enteroscopy (endoscopy) Regular upper endoscopy cannot look very ... goes forward a small distance, and then a balloon at its end is inflated to anchor it. ...

  15. Small intestinal obstruction due to phytobezoar: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Patients with mechanical small-bowel obstructions usually present with abdominal pain, vomiting, absolute constipation and varying degrees of abdominal distention. Causes can be classified as benign or malignant, or as extra- or intraluminal. A bezoar occurs most commonly in patients with impaired gastrointestinal motility. In edentulous older patients with abnormal food habits, it can also be an intestinal concretion that fails to pass along the alimentary canal. Small bowel phytobezoars are rare and almost always obstructive. In a normal stomach, vegetable fibres that cannot pass through the pylorus undergo hydrolysis within the stomach, which softens them enough to go through the small bowel. We present an unusual case of small intestinal obstruction caused by a phytobezoar in a patient who had neither a history of gastric surgery nor of intestinal pathology. Case presentation A 70-year-old Iraqi Kurdish man was hospitalized due to abdominal pain, vomiting and dehydration. Investigations concluded small intestinal obstruction. Subsequent laparotomy revealed that the cause of the obstruction was an eggplant phytobezoar. Conclusion Many types of bezoar can be removed endoscopically, but some will require operative intervention. Subsequently, prevention of any recurrence should be emphasized. PMID:20062741

  16. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing (/sup 3/H)-biotin and (/sup 14/C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 ..mu..M biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host.

  17. Edaravone ameliorates the adverse effects of valproic acid toxicity in small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S; Alev, B; Tunali, S; Emekli-Alturfan, E; Tunali-Akbay, T; Koc-Ozturk, L; Yanardag, R; Yarat, A

    2015-06-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a drug used for the treatment of epilepsy, bipolar psychiatric disorders, and migraine. Previous studies have reported an increased generation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the toxic mechanism of VPA. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger for clinical use, can quench free radical reaction by trapping a variety of free radical species. In this study, effect of edaravone on some small intestine biochemical parameters in VPA-induced toxicity was investigated. Thirty seven Sprague Dawley female rats were randomly divided into four groups. The groups include control group, edaravone (30 mg(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA (0.5 g(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) given group, VPA + edaravone (in same dose) given group. Edaravone and VPA were given intraperitoneally for 7 days. Biochemical parameters such as malondialdehyde, as an index of lipid peroxidation(LPO), sialic acid (SA), glutathione levels and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tissue factor (TF) activities were determined in small intestine samples by colorimetric methods. Decreased small intestine antioxidant enzyme activities, increased LPO and SA levels, and increased activities of ALP and TF were detected in the VPA group. Based on our results edaravone may be suggested to reverse the oxidative stress and inflammation due to VPA-induced small intestine toxicity.

  18. Small intestine diverticula: Is there anything new?

    PubMed Central

    Mantas, Dimitris; Kykalos, Stylianos; Patsouras, Dimitris; Kouraklis, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To globally approach the clinical entity of small bowel diverticulosis and, at the same time, set out the treatment options. METHODS: We analysed 77 cases of diverticula located in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum that were treated in our department, evaluating the symptoms, diagnostic approach and offered treatment. RESULTS: Almost half of the diverticula (46.7%) were incidentally discovered and Meckel’s diverticula represented the majority (43%) that were actually the only true diverticula. A high complication rate (53%) which included inflammation with or without perforation (22%), bleeding (10%) or obstructive ileus (12%) due to small bowel diverticulosis was reported. The preoperative diagnosis was often impossible (44% of complicated cases). CONCLUSION: Although small bowel diverticulosis has a low incidence, it should be in the clinician’s mind in order to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:21528094

  19. Effects of ceftriaxone-induced intestinal dysbacteriosis on dendritic cells of small intestine in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Weihua; Wen, Shu; Liu, Yinhui; Tang, Li

    2013-08-01

    Intestinal microflora plays a pivotal role in the development of the innate immune system and is essential in shaping adaptive immunity. Dysbacteriosis of intestinal microflora induces altered immune responses and results in disease susceptibility. Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen-presenting cells, have gained increasing attention because they connect innate and adaptive immunity. They generate both immunity in response to stimulation by pathogenic bacteria and immune tolerance in the presence of commensal bacteria. However, few studies have examined the effects of intestinal dysbacteriosis on DCs. In this study, changes of DCs in the small intestine of mice under the condition of dysbacteriosis induced by ceftriaxone sodium were investigated. It was found that intragastric administration of ceftriaxone sodium caused severe dysteriosis in mice. Compared with controls, numbers of DCs in mice with dysbacteriosis increased significantly (P = 0.0001). However, the maturity and antigen-presenting ability of DCs were greatly reduced. In addition, there was a significant difference in secretion of IL-10 and IL-12 between DCs from mice with dysbacteriosis and controls. To conclude, ceftriaxone-induced intestinal dysbacteriosis strongly affected the numbers and functions of DCs. The present data suggest that intestinal microflora plays an important role in inducing and maintaining the functions of DCs and thus is essential for the connection between innate and adaptive immune responses.

  20. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    PubMed

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

  1. Cideb facilitates the lipidation of chylomicrons in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Jun; Wang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Wu, Jie; Liu, Fang; Li, Le; Gao, Xing; Zhao, Yuan-Lin; Hu, Pei-Zhen; Li, Peng; Ye, Jing

    2014-07-01

    Cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector b (Cideb), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- and lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein, has been shown to play a critical role in maintaining hepatic lipid homeostasis by promoting the lipidation and maturation of VLDL particles. Here, we observed that Cideb is expressed in the jejunum and ileum sections of the small intestine, and its expression was induced by high-fat diet. Intragastric gavage with lipids resulted in the retention of lipids in the intestine in Cideb-deficient mice. In addition, we observed that mice with Cideb deficiency exhibited reduced intestinal chylomicron-TG secretion and increased lipid accumulation in the enterocytes. The sizes of chylomicrons secreted from the small intestine of Cideb-deficient mice were also smaller than those from wild-type mice. Furthermore, the overexpression of Cideb increased TG secretion and reduced lipid accumulation in the enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. In addition, we proved that Cideb was localized to the ER and LDs and could interact with ApoB48 in Caco-2 cells. Overall, these data revealed that Cideb plays an important role in controlling intestinal chylomicron lipidation.

  2. Giant primary angiosarcoma of the small intestine showing severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mizuna; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Domen, Hiromitsu; Yamabuki, Takumi; Komuro, Kazuteru; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Hirano, Satoshi; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-11-21

    Primary malignant tumors of the small intestine are rare, comprising less than 2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. An 85-year-old woman was admitted with fever of 40 °C and marked abdominal distension. Her medical history was unremarkable, but blood examination showed elevated inflammatory markers. Abdominal computed tomography showed a giant tumor with central necrosis, extending from the epigastrium to the pelvic cavity. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine communicating with the gastrointestinal tract or with superimposed infection was suspected. Because no improvement occurred in response to antibiotics, surgery was performed. Laparotomy revealed giant hemorrhagic tumor adherent to the small intestine and occupying the peritoneal cavity. The giant tumor was a solid tumor weighing 3490 g, measuring 24 cm × 17.5 cm × 18 cm and showing marked necrosis. Histologically, the tumor comprised spindle-shaped cells with anaplastic large nuclei. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for vimentin, CD31, and factor VIII-related antigen, but negative for c-kit and CD34. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed. Although no postoperative complications occurred, the patient experienced enlargement of multiple metastatic tumors in the abdominal cavity and died 42 d postoperatively. The prognosis of small intestinal angiosarcoma is very poor, even after volume-reducing palliative surgery.

  3. Small intestinal model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to propose a small intestine model for electrically propelled capsule endoscopy. The electrical stimulus can cause contraction of the small intestine and propel the capsule along the lumen. The proposed model considered the drag and friction from the small intestine using a thin walled model and Stokes' drag equation. Further, contraction force from the small intestine was modeled by using regression analysis. From the proposed model, the acceleration and velocity of various exterior shapes of capsule were calculated, and two exterior shapes of capsules were proposed based on the internal volume of the capsules. The proposed capsules were fabricated and animal experiments were conducted. One of the proposed capsules showed an average (SD) velocity in forward direction of 2.91 ± 0.99 mm/s and 2.23 ± 0.78 mm/s in the backward direction, which was 5.2 times faster than that obtained in previous research. The proposed model can predict locomotion of the capsule based on various exterior shapes of the capsule. PMID:22177218

  4. Local actions of trimebutine maleate in canine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Daniel, E E; Kostolanska, F; Allescher, H D; Ahmad, S; Fox, J E

    1988-06-01

    A study of the local actions of trimebutine (TMB) maleate and its N-diesmethyl metabolite (TMB-M) was carried out in the gastrointestinal tract of anesthetized dogs. In the unstimulated small intestine, but not in the stomach or colon, i.a. TMB and TMB-M caused activation of circular muscle. Like the activation by i.a. [Met5]-enkephalin, this was antagonized by naloxone. In field-stimulated segments of stomach and small intestine circular muscle, TMB or TMB-M, like dynorphin-1-13 or [Met5]-enkephalin, inhibited the phasic and tonic contractions which were mediated mostly by cholinergic, postganglionic nerves. However, the inhibitory effects of dynorphin-1-13 or [Met5]-enkephalin on small intestine were antagonized by naloxone whereas those of TMB sometimes or those of TMB-M usually were not. TMB or TMB-M did not affect responses to i.a. acetylcholine, but high doses reduced the contractile responses to subsequent field stimulation and excitatory responses to [Met5]-enkephalin. We concluded that the excitatory local actions of TMB or TMB-M on small intestine involved opioid receptors probably of the mu or delta types. Inhibitory local actions on nerve-mediated responses, however, may not have involved opioid receptors. Comparison of these data to results when TMB or TMB-M were given i.v. suggests that these agents also have peripheral actions to affect gastrointestinal motility at sites outside the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:2898521

  5. Intestinal permeability of metformin using single-pass intestinal perfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Nai-Ning; Li, Quan-Sheng; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the intestinal transport and mechanism of metformin in rats and to investigate whether or not metformin is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp). METHODS: The effective intestinal permeability of metformin was investigated using single-pass intestinal perfusion (SPIP) technique in male Waster rats. SPIP was performed in three isolated intestinal segments (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) at the same concentration of metformin (50 μg/mL) to test if the intestinal transport of metformin exhibited site-dependent changes, and in a same isolated intestinal segment (duodenal segment) at three different concentrations of metformin (10, 50, 200 μg/mL) to test if the intestinal transport of metformin exhibited concentration-dependent changes. Besides, P-gp inhibitor verapamil (400 μg/mL) was co-perfused with metformin (50 μg/mL) in the duodenum segment to find out if the intestinal absorption of metformin was affected by P-gp exiting along the gastrointestinal track. Stability studies were conducted to ensure that the loss of metformin could be attributed to intestinal absorption. RESULTS: The effective permeability values (Peff) of metformin in the jejunum and ileum at 50 μg/mL were significantly lower than those in the duodenum at the same concentration. Besides, Peff values in the duodenum at high concentration (200 μg/mL) were found to be significantly lower than those at low and medium concentrations (10 and 50 μg/mL). Moreover the co-perfusion with verapamil did not increase the Peff value of metformin at 50 μg/mL in the duodenum. CONCLUSION: Metformin could be absorbed from the whole intestine, with the main absorption site at duodenum. This concentration-dependent permeability behavior in the duodenum indicates that metformin is transported by both passive and active carrier-mediated saturable mechanism. The Peff value can not be increased by co-perfusion with verapamil, indicating that absorption of metformin is not efficiently transported

  6. Hormone induced changes in lactase glycosylation in developing rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-11-01

    Lactase exists in both soluble and membrane-bound forms in suckling rat intestine. The distribution of lactase and its glycosylated isoforms in response to thyroxine or cortisone administration has been studied in suckling rats. 75% of lactase activity was detected, associated with brush borders, compared to 24% in the soluble fraction of 8-day-old rats. Thyroxine treatment enhanced soluble lactase activity to 34%, whereas particulate fraction was reduced to 67% compared to controls. Cortisone administration reduced soluble lactase activity from 24% in controls to 12% with a concomitant increase in membrane-bound activity to 89%. Western blot analysis revealed lactase signal, corresponding to 220 kDa in both the soluble and membrane fractions, which corroborated the enzyme activity data. The elution pattern of papain solubilized lactase from agarose-Wheat Germ agglutinin, or Concanavalin A or Jacalin agglutinin columns was different in the suckling and adult rat intestines. Also the elution profile of lactase activity from agarose-lectin columns was modulated in cortisone, thyroxine, and insulin injected pups, which suggests differences in glycosylated isoforms of lactase under these conditions. These findings suggest the role of these hormones in inducing changes in lactase glycosylation during postnatal development of intestine, which may contribute to adult-type hypolactasia in rats.

  7. [Circadian rhythm of intestinal glucose absorption in fasting and fed rats].

    PubMed

    Voloshenovich, M I; Labusheva, M A; Ugolev, A M; Pishak, V P

    1993-01-01

    Under conditions of chronic experiment the circadian cycle of glucose transport was determined. An isolated proximal area of the small intestine was perfused by glucose, fructose, medical bile and Ringer's solutions in various intervals of the 24 hour period. The circadian cycle of glucose absorption is disturbed in the fasting rats. Various substrates differently alter their amplitude and acro-phase of absorption. Ringer's solution perfusion shifts the acro-phase absorption to evening time, while that of fructose occurs during day time and that of bile takes place at night. The circadian cycle of the fed rats is less subject to shifts. Fasting is a powerful exogenous factor causing structural changes in the small intestine and altering the circadian cycle of glucose absorption.

  8. Characterization of the diffuse mucosal associated lymphoid tissue of feline small intestine.

    PubMed

    Roccabianca, P; Woo, J C; Moore, P F

    2000-06-30

    Characterization of the feline intestinal mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) will facilitate investigation of intestinal disease in the cat and promote the cat as an animal model for a range of human diseases which involve the intestinal lymphoid tissue. This includes inflammatory bowel disease, viral and non-viral associated intestinal lymphomas and immunodeficiency associated syndromes. Morphologic and phenotypic characterization of the normal small intestinal diffuse MALT in 22 SPF cats was performed using flow cytometry and cytology on isolated intestinal leukocytes from the intra-epithelial and lamina proprial compartments, as well as immunohistology on tissues from the feline duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The intra-epithelial compartment (IEC) was dominated by lymphocytes (>85%) which frequently contained intracytoplasmic granules. The most striking findings in the IEC were the elevated percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (40%), presumed to express CD8 alpha alpha chains, and CD4-/CD8- (double negative) lymphocytes (44%), and the consistent presence of a minor subpopulation of CD3+/CD11d+ IELs (6%). Small percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (10%) were observed such that the IEL CD4:CD8 ratio (0.25) was low. The LPC also contained a majority of T cells and few plasma cells. However, this compartment had reduced percentages of CD8 alpha+ lymphocytes (28%) and increased percentages of CD4+ lymphocytes (27%) relative to the IEC. However, the LPL CD4:CD8 ratio (1.0) remained low compared with the ratio in peripheral blood. In feline MALT, MHC class II expression was lower than in other peripheral lymphoid compartments. The results of this study provide important reference values for future investigations involving feline intestinal lymphocytes and demonstrates that the leukocyte distribution and phenotypic characteristics of the feline diffuse MALT appear largely similar to the murine, rat and human counterparts.

  9. Breath Testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should We Bother?

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen breath test is based on following breath hydrogen levels after the administration of a carbohydrate (most commonly lactulose) to a patient with suspected small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The test is based on the interaction between the administered carbohydrate and the intestinal bacteria. The resulting fermentation produces hydrogen. A positive breath test is based on a breath hydrogen rise prior to the expected arrival time in the highly microbial cecum. Despite renewed enthusiasm for breath testing in recent years due to associations with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, breath testing poses many challenges. In this argument against breath testing, several pitfalls that complicate breath testing will be described. PMID:26902227

  10. Cancer of the small intestine in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Daijiro; Futami, Kitaro; Kojima, Daibo; Futatsuki, Ryo; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Maekawa, Takafumi; Yano, Yutaka; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Iwashita, Akinori

    2013-07-01

    Due to an increase in the number of long-term cases of Crohn's disease, the risk of combined cancer in these patients has been assessed in numerous articles. Most of these reports have involved patients with cancer of the large intestine, while cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease are very rare. We experienced two cases of cancer of the small intestine combined with Crohn's disease. In both cases, the patients had suffered from Crohn's disease for over 10 years and a second operation was performed after a long period without treatment following the first operation, which had achieved a favorable outcome. In both cases of combined cancer, the patients experienced ileus; however, it was difficult to discern this from ileus due to the presence of Crohn's disease. Therefore, making a definitive diagnosis of combined cancer was not possible before surgery, and the definitive diagnosis was obtained based on an intraoperative pathological diagnosis. It is thought that tumor markers transition in a manner parallel to the progression of cancer, providing a clue for cancer diagnosis. In patients with Crohn's disease, there is a pressing need to establish a method for diagnosing cancer of the small intestine at an early stage.

  11. Intestinal microbial flora after feeding phytohemagglutinin lectins (Phaseolus vulgaris) to rats.

    PubMed Central

    Banwell, J G; Howard, R; Cooper, D; Costerton, J W

    1985-01-01

    Incorporation of purified phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lectins derived from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the diet of weanling rats will cause growth failure, malabsorption of nutrients, and bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine. These effects are not caused by feeding a similar quantity of PHA to germfree rats. To define the morphological and bacterial changes on the mucosal surfaces of the jejunum, ileum, and cecum in greater detail, we pair fed two groups of weanling rats isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with or without 0.5% PHA protein. On the jejunal surfaces of control rats, the mucous layer was a confluent covering with sparsely scattered bacteria and protozoa. In PHA-treated rats, the mucous layer was thin and discontinuous, and the microvillous surface of the tissue was extensively populated by bacterial cells of two distinct morphotypes--a gram-negative rod and a gram-positive coccobacillus. In all PHA-treated animals, these bacteria formed adherent monospecific or mixed adherent microcolonies on the tissue surface. Tissue damage was observed in PHA-exposed jejunal tissue as evidenced by vesiculation of the microvillous plasma membrane and by damage to the brush border membrane. On the ileal surfaces of control rats, there was a thick mucous layer within which small numbers of bacteria and protozoa were seen. Segmented filamentous bacteria were anchored in the tissue surface. In PHA-treated rats, the ileal surface was only incompletely covered by a mucous layer, and the overlying mucosal surface was extensively covered by large numbers of protozoan cells (predominantly Hexamita muris). Most of the ileal surfaces not covered by the mucous layer were occupied and virtually occluded by an overgrowth of these protozoan cells with occasional cells of Giardia muris and the tissue-associated segmented bacillus. In the ceca of control rats, the mucosa was incompletely covered by a discontinuous mucous layer and colonized by an unnamed Spirillum sp

  12. Small intestine histomorphometry of beef cattle with divergent feed efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The provision of feed is a major cost in beef production. Therefore, the improvement of feed efficiency is warranted. The direct assessment of feed efficiency has limitations and alternatives are needed. Small intestine micro-architecture is associated with function and may be related to feed efficiency. The objective was to verify the potential histomorphological differences in the small intestine of animals with divergent feed efficiency. Methods From a population of 45 feedlot steers, 12 were selected with low-RFI (superior feed efficiency) and 12 with high-RFI (inferior feed efficiency) at the end of the finishing period. The animals were processed at 13.79 ± 1.21 months of age. Within 1.5 h of slaughter the gastrointestinal tract was collected and segments from duodenum and ileum were harvested. Tissue fragments were processed, sectioned and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Photomicroscopy images were taken under 1000x magnification. For each animal 100 intestinal crypts were imaged, in a cross section view, from each of the two intestinal segments. Images were analyzed using the software ImageJ®. The measurements taken were: crypt area, crypt perimeter, crypt lumen area, nuclei number and the cell size was indirectly calculated. Data were analyzed using general linear model and correlation procedures of SAS®. Results Efficient beef steers (low-RFI) have a greater cellularity (indicated by nuclei number) in the small intestinal crypts, both in duodenum and ileum, than less efficient beef steers (high-RFI) (P < 0.05). The mean values for the nuclei number of the low-RFI and high-RFI groups were 33.16 and 30.30 in the duodenum and 37.21 and 33.65 in the ileum, respectively. The average size of the cells did not differ between feed efficiency groups in both segments (P ≥ 0.10). A trend was observed (P ≤ 0.10) for greater crypt area and crypt perimeter in the ileum for cattle with improved feed efficiency. Conclusion

  13. [Unusual presentation of malignant melanoma of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Ramadan, E; Mittelman, M; Kyzer, S; Chaimoff, C

    1992-05-15

    2 patients with unusual presentations of malignant melanoma involving the small intestine, a 75-year-old woman and a 78-year-old man, are described. One underwent laparotomy for diagnosis and removal of a retroperitoneal mass, with no preoperative evidence of the primary disease. The other underwent emergency laparotomy for small bowel obstruction due to intussusception, which was found to result from a metastatic melanoma. A melanoma had been completely resected from the patient's thigh a month previously, but full investigation before the operation for intussusception failed to establish the diagnosis. Malignant melanoma tends to spread to the small intestine, but tumors of this organ are very rare. Preoperative diagnosis is important since it may improve the outcome of surgical intervention, as well as the prognosis in general. PMID:1526541

  14. Rat intestinal mast cell amines are released during nitric oxide synthase inhibition in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Northover, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase increases microvascular permeability in rat small intestinal villi. To determine the mechanism(s) whereby this occurs we have perfused the vasculature of rat isolated small intestines with a gelatin-containing physiological salt solution. Inclusion of N-nitro-L-argintne methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 μM) or indomethacin (1 μM) in the perfusate increased leakage of injected colloidal carbon into microvessel walls. Pre-treatment with sodium nitroprusside (10 μM) significantly reduced the effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin, whereas carbacyclin (1 μM) only reduced the effects of indomethacin. PD151242 (1 μM) showed some antagonism towards the effects of L-NAME, but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (3 μM) was inactive. Pre-tment with cyproheptadine (10 μM) reduced the effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin, and also significantly reduced background (control) colloidal carbon leakage. Small intestines from polymixin B-treated rats showed significantly reduced colloidal carbon leakage in response to L-NAME. This suggests that the leakage-enhancing effects of both L-NAME and indomethacin in this preparation may be mediated by mast cell-derived amines. PMID:18475694

  15. Effect of poly-L-arginine on intestinal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Tsutomu; Uchida, Masaki; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Shimazaki, Yohei; Ohtake, Kazuo; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Jun; Ogihara, Masahiko; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    We have already reported that poly-L-arginine (PLA) remarkably enhanced the in vivo nasal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules without producing any significant epithelial damage in rats. In the present study, we examined whether PLA could enhance the absorption of a model hydrophilic macromolecule, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-4), across the intestinal mucosa, as well as the nasal mucosa, by an in situ closed-loop method using the rat intestine. PLA was found to enhance the intestinal absorption of FD-4 in a concentration-dependent manner within the concentrations investigated in this study, but segment-specific differences were found to be associated with this effect (ileum>jejunum>duodenum≧colon). The factors responsible for the segment-specific differences were also investigated by intestinal absorption studies using aprotinin, a trypsin inhibitor, and an analysis of the expression of occludin, a tight junction protein. In the small intestine, the differences in the effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the enzymatic degradation of PLA. In the colon, the reduced effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the smaller surface area for absorption and the higher expression of occludin compared with other segments.

  16. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ze-yu; Sun, Bin-bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-shi; Tang, Xian-ge; Ling, Zhao-li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-zhu; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Results: Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineintestinesmall intestine, and particularly in ileal valve. Furthermore, ciprofloxacin (10–2000 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited β-glucuronidase activity in distal small intestine content or E coli incubated in vitro, but did not affect that in proximal small intestine content or bovine liver incubated in vitro. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, typical enteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Conclusion: Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via

  17. Digestion modeling in the small intestine: impact of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Taghipoor, M; Barles, G; Georgelin, C; Licois, J R; Lescoat, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the modeling of the digestion in the small intestine is developed by investigating specifically the effects of dietary fiber. As our previous model, this new version takes into account the three main phenomena of digestion: transit of the bolus, degradation of feedstuffs and absorption through the intestinal wall. However the two main physiochemical characteristics of dietary fiber, namely viscosity and water holding capacity, lead us to substantially modify our initial model by emphasizing the role of water and its intricated dynamics with dry matter in the bolus. Various numerical simulations given by this new model are qualitatively in agreement with the positive effect of insoluble dietary fiber on the velocity of bolus and on its degradation all along the small intestine. These simulations reproduce the negative effect of soluble dietary fiber on digestion as it has been experimentally observed. Although, this model is generic and contains a large number of parameters but, to the best of our knowledge, it is among the first qualitative dynamical models of fiber influence on intestinal digestion.

  18. Insights into Embryo Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Egg Mass Ingestion Affects Rat Intestine Morphology and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Eduardo J.; Heras, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Background The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF) ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology. Methodology/Principal Findings Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days. Conclusions/Significance Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to

  19. Diversity of human small intestinal Streptococcus and Veillonella populations.

    PubMed

    van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Erkus, Oylum; Boekhorst, Jos; de Goffau, Marcus; Smid, Eddy J; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-08-01

    Molecular and cultivation approaches were employed to study the phylogenetic richness and temporal dynamics of Streptococcus and Veillonella populations in the small intestine. Microbial profiling of human small intestinal samples collected from four ileostomy subjects at four time points displayed abundant populations of Streptococcus spp. most affiliated with S. salivarius, S. thermophilus, and S. parasanguinis, as well as Veillonella spp. affiliated with V. atypica, V. parvula, V. dispar, and V. rogosae. Relative abundances varied per subject and time of sampling. Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates were cultured using selective media from ileostoma effluent samples collected at two time points from a single subject. The richness of the Streptococcus and Veillonella isolates was assessed at species and strain level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and genetic fingerprinting, respectively. A total of 160 Streptococcus and 37 Veillonella isolates were obtained. Genetic fingerprinting differentiated seven Streptococcus lineages from ileostoma effluent, illustrating the strain richness within this ecosystem. The Veillonella isolates were represented by a single phylotype. Our study demonstrated that the small intestinal Streptococcus populations displayed considerable changes over time at the genetic lineage level because only representative strains of a single Streptococcus lineage could be cultivated from ileostoma effluent at both time points.

  20. Diagnosis and management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Matthew; Siwiec, Robert M; Wo, John M

    2013-06-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can result from failure of the gastric acid barrier, failure of small intestinal motility, anatomic alterations, or impairment of systemic and local immunity. The current accepted criteria for the diagnosis of SIBO is the presence of coliform bacteria isolated from the proximal jejunum with >10(5) colony-forming units/mL. A major concern with luminal aspiration is that it is only one random sampling of the small intestine and may not always be representative of the underlying microbiota. A new approach to examine the underlying microbiota uses rapid molecular sequencing, but its clinical utilization is still under active investigation. Clinical manifestations of SIBO are variable and include bloating, flatulence, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Severe cases may present with nutrition deficiencies due to malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The current management strategies for SIBO center on identifying and correcting underlying causes, addressing nutrition deficiencies, and judicious utilization of antibiotics to treat symptomatic SIBO. PMID:23614961

  1. AMPK in the small intestine in normal and pathophysiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Elodie; Grenier, Emilie; Bendjoudi Ouadda, Ali; El Chebly, Mounib; Ziv, Ehud; Beaulieu, Jean François; Sané, Alain; Spahis, Schohraya; Laville, Martine; Levy, Emile

    2014-03-01

    The role of AMPK in regulating energy storage and depletion remains unexplored in the intestine. This study will to define its status, composition, regulation and lipid function, as well as to examine the impact of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes on intestinal AMPK activation, insulin sensitivity, and lipid metabolism. Caco-2/15 cells and Psammomys obesus (P. obesus) animal models were experimented. We showed the predominance of AMPKα1 and the prevalence of α1/β2/γ1 heterotrimer in Caco-2/15 cells. The activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside and metformin resulted in increased phospho(p)-ACC. However, the down-regulation of p-AMPK by compound C and high glucose lowered p-ACC without affecting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Administration of metformin to P. obesus with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes led to 1) an up-regulation of intestinal AMPK signaling pathway typified by ascending p-AMPKα(-Thr172); 2) a reduction in ACC activity; 3) an elevation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1; 4) a trend of increase in insulin sensitivity portrayed by augmentation of p-Akt and phospho-glycogen synthetase kinase 3β; 5) a reduced phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and ERK1/2; and 6) a decrease in diabetic dyslipidemia following lowering of intracellular events that govern lipoprotein assembly. These data suggest that AMPK fulfills key functions in metabolic processes in the small intestine.

  2. [The redox potentials and morphological features of the pancreas, small intestines and liver under early enteral nutrition via micro-jejunostomy in modeling of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Khatchapuridze, G; Leonov, V

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates morphological changes in pancreas, liver, and small intestine after early enteral nutrition in Vistar rats after modeling of acute pancreatitis and creation of jejunostomy. Morphological changes and redox potential measurements show that early enteral nutrition via micro-jejunostomy slows down the development of pathological processes in Vistar rats. PMID:24523337

  3. Spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations in the rabbit small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kito, Yoshihiko; Kurahashi, Masaaki; Mitsui, Retsu; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2014-11-01

    Four types of electrical activity were recorded and related to cell structure by intracellular recording and dye injection into impaled cells in muscles of rabbit small intestine. The specific cell types from which recordings were made were longitudinal smooth muscle cells (LSMCs), circular smooth muscle cells (CSMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal distributed in the myenteric region (ICC-MY) and fibroblast-like cells (FLCs). Slow waves (slow wavesSMC) were recorded from LSMCs and CSMCs. Slow waves (slow wavesICC) were of greatest amplitude (>50 mV) and highest maximum rate of rise (>10 V s(-1)) in ICC-MY. The dominant activity in FLCs was spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations (STHs), with maximum amplitudes above 30 mV. STHs were often superimposed upon small amplitude slow waves (slow wavesFLC). STHs displayed a cyclical pattern of discharge irrespective of background slow wave activity. STHs were inhibited by MRS2500 (3 μm), a P2Y1 antagonist, and abolished by apamin (0.3 μm), a blocker of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. Small amplitude STHs (<15 mV) were detected in smooth muscle layers, whereas STHs were not resolved in cells identified as ICC-MY. Electrical field stimulation evoked purinergic inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs) in CSMCs. Purinergic IJPs were not recorded from ICC-MY. These results suggest that FLCs may regulate smooth muscle excitability in the rabbit small intestine via generation of rhythmic apamin-sensitive STHs. Stimulation of P2Y1 receptors modulates the amplitudes of STHs. Our results also suggest that purinergic inhibitory motor neurons regulate the motility of the rabbit small intestine by causing IJPs in FLCs that conduct to CSMCs. PMID:25217377

  4. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) alleviates arsenic-induced damages to DNA and intestinal tissues in rat and in situ intestinal loop by reinforcing antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Sajed Ali, Sk; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-09-01

    This study elucidates the protective role of Green tea (Camellia sinensis or CS) against arsenic-induced mutagenic DNA-breakage/intestinal (small) damages in female rats. Intestinal epithelial cells receive ingested arsenic initially. Though, the possibility of damages in this tissue is immense and the therapeutic strategies against this damage are of great concern, reports on either issue are scanty. Our earlier study on arsenic-exposed human unveils a link between carcinogenesis and mutagenic DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that supplementation of CS-extract (10 mg/mL water) with NaAsO2 (0.6 ppm)/100 g b.w. for 28 days to rats offered a significant protection against arsenic-induced oxidative damages to DNA and intestinal (small) tissues by buttressing antioxidant systems. Necrotic and apoptotic damages and their CS-protection are shown in DNA-fragmentation, comet-assay, and histoarchitecture (hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-schiff staining) results. Only arsenic exposure significantly decreased intestinal superoxide dismutase, catalase activities, and level of soluble thiol with a concomitant increase in malondialdehyde/conjugated dienes. Alteration of serum necrotic marker lactate dehydrogenase and the metabolic inflammatory marker c-reactive protein also indicate the impairment may be occurring at transcription and/or cellular signal transduction level. In addition, in situ incubation in rat intestinal loop filled for 24 h with NaAsO2 alone (250 µM) or with aqueous CS-extract (250 mg/mL) suggests that small intestinal epithelial cells are significantly protected by CS against arsenic-associated necrotic/mutagenic damages, which is observed in DNA-breakage studies. In conclusion, besides intensifying endogenous antioxidant system, CS polyphenols also offer a direct role on free radical scavenging activity that is associated to the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakages and prevention of tissue necrosis/carcinogenesis generated by arsenic.

  5. A Sensitive Medium-Throughput Method to Predict Intestinal Absorption in Humans Using Rat Intestinal Tissue Segments.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Laís Cristina; Da Silva, Taynara Lourenço; Antunes, Alisson Henrique; Rezende, Kênnia Rocha

    2015-09-01

    A range of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo approaches are currently used for drug development. Highly predictive human intestinal absorption models remain lagging behind the times because of numerous variables concerning permeability through gastrointestinal tract in humans. However, there is a clear need for a drug permeability model early in the drug development process that can balance the requirements for high throughput and effective predictive potential. The present study developed a medium throughput screening Snapwell (MTS-Snapwell) ex vivo model to provide an alternative method to classify drug permeability. Rat small intestine tissue segments were mounted in commercial Snapwell™ inserts. Unidirectional drug transport (A-B) was measured by collecting samples at different time points. Viability of intestinal tissue segments was measured by examining transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) and phenol red and caffeine transport. As a result, the apparent permeability (Papp; ×10(-6) cm/s) was determined for atenolol (10.7 ± 1.2), caffeine (17.6 ± 3.1), cimetidine (6.9 ± 0.1), metoprolol (12.6 ± 0.7), theophylline (15.3 ± 1.6) and, ranitidine (3.8 ± 0.4). All drugs were classified in high/low permeability according to Biopharmaceutics Classification System showing high correlation with human data (r = 0.89). These findings showed a high correlation with human data (r = 0.89), suggesting that this model has potential predictive capacity for paracellular and transcellular passively absorbed molecules.

  6. Age characteristics of changes in invertase activity of the mucous membrane of the small intestine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakhimov, K. R.; Aleksandrova, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    Rats of varying ages were subjected to stress from heat, cold, and hydrocortisone injection. Invertase activity in homogenates of small intestine mucous membranes was studied following sacrifice. Invertase activity was low in young animals, but increased sharply in 30 day old ones, remaining at a relatively constant level until old age. The study concludes that the stress hormone (corticosteroids, etc.) levels in the blood, which affects the formation of enteric enzyme levels and activities, and that age related peculiarities in invertase activity are a consequence of altered hormone status and epitheliocyte sensitivity.

  7. Role of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in severe small intestinal damage in chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug users.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Motoko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Machida, Hirohisa; Okazaki, Hirotoshi; Sogawa, Mitsue; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Enteric bacteria play a significant role in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced small intestinal damage. However, the association between small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and NSAID-induced small intestinal damage remains unclear. The aim of the study was to examine the association between SIBO and the presence of NSAID-induced severe small intestinal damage or its symptoms in chronic NSAID users. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Forty-three patients who had been using NSAIDs for over 3 months were enrolled. They were examined by capsule endoscopy and a lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT). We defined severe small intestinal damage as the presence of more than four small erosions or large erosions/ulcers. The LHBT result was considered positive if there was an increase in the level of breath hydrogen gas of >20 ppm above baseline. RESULTS. Out of 43 patients, 22 (51%) had severe small intestinal damage. The LHBT was positive in 5 of 21 patients (24%) without severe small intestinal damage and in 13 of 21 patients (59%) with severe small intestinal damage. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that an LHBT-positive result was significantly associated with increased odds ratio for severe small intestinal damage (OR, 6.54; 95% CI, 1.40-30.50). There was no significant difference in the presence of symptoms between the LHBT-positive and LHBT-negative patients with severe small intestinal damage. CONCLUSION. SIBO might have a role in the development of severe small intestinal damage in chronic NSAID users. PMID:24417613

  8. Investigations on the estrogenic activity of the metallohormone cadmium in the rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Nicola; Diel, Patrick; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael; Kluxen, Felix M; Degen, Gisela H

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal and an important environmental pollutant, is now also regarded as potential endocrine disruptor. Its estrogenic effects have been examined so far just in classical target tissues, e.g. uterus, and mostly upon intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of CdCl(2). Yet, estrogen receptors are also expressed in the gut, and food is the main source of cadmium intake in the general population. Therefore, possible estrogenic effects were now investigated in the intestine of ovariectomized Wistar rats after oral short- and long-term administration of CdCl(2) (0.05-4 mg/kg bw on 3 days by gavage and 0.4-9 mg/kg bw for 4 weeks in drinking water) or upon i.p. injection (0.00005-2 mg CdCl(2)/kg bw), and compared to steroid estrogen (estradiol or ethinylestradiol) treated groups. Analysis of Cd in kidneys and small intestine by atomic absorption spectrometry showed dose-dependent increases in tissue levels with rather high Cd concentrations in the gut, both after oral and i.p. administration. Expression of metallothionein (MT1a), a typical metal response parameter, was clearly induced in kidney and small intestine of several CdCl(2) treated groups, but also notably increased by steroid estrogens. Levels of estrogen-regulated genes, i.e. pS2/TFF1, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ER alpha/beta) were studied as parameters of hormonal activity: The intestinal mRNA expression of pS2/TFF1 was significantly decreased in the estrogen reference groups, but also after single i.p. injection and oral long-term administration of CdCl(2). In contrast, the mRNA and protein expression of the VDR were unaffected by long-term administration of Cd via drinking water. We detected expression of ERbeta, but not ERalpha in the small intestine of OVX rats. ERbeta mRNA and protein expression were significantly down-regulated by Cd, similar to the ethinylestradiol reference group. The mRNA expression and immunostaining of proliferating cell

  9. Superoxide dismutase activity in the intestine of the streptozotocin-diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Loven, D P; Schedl, H P; Oberley, L W; Wilson, H D; Bruch, L; Niehaus, C L

    1982-09-01

    Insulin stimulates the production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in various tissues. Hydrogen peroxide has been proposed to be an intracellular second messenger for insulin and a moderator of cellular proliferation and differentiation. We previously found that cell proliferation is increased in small intestinal mucosa of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. The current study was undertaken to determine if superoxide dismutase (SOD), the enzyme that converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, is altered in the mucosa of the alimentary tract and renal cortex of the diabetic rat, and if so, whether SOD responds to insulin treatment. Total SOD and cyanide-insensitive [manganese-containing SOD (Mn SOD)] SOD were measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium inhibition assay. We studied ad libitum fed animals, where diabetics are hyperphagic and pair-fed animals, where hyperphagia is not present. Since cyclic nucleotides appear to control cell proliferation in some tissues, we also measured cAMP and cGMP in mucosa of the small intestine. In ad libitum fed animals, total SOD was depressed in the mucosa of duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, but not in the cecum or colon of the streptozotocin-diabetic rats. The level of Mn-SOD was not affected by diabetes or insulin treatment, but the cyanide-sensitive [copper- and zinc containing SOD (Cu-Zn SOD] SOD was depressed in the small intestine and colon of diabetic rats. Insulin treatment restored total and Cu-Zn SOD activity in the small intestine to normal and increased Cu-Zn SOD activity in the colon to normal. Pair-fed animals showed the same changes in the SOD activity of jejunal mucosa that were found in ad libitum fed animals. In renal cortex, diabetes did not alter total SOD, but increased Mn SOD and decreased Cu-Zn SOD. Both responses were reversed by insulin treatment. Cyclic nucleotide concentrations were not affected by diabetes. We conclude that SOD enzymes re altered in diabetes, at least in proliferating tissues. Responses are

  10. Nature of elevated rat intestinal carbohydrase activities after high-carbohydrate diet feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuboi, K.K.; Kwong, L.K.; Yamada, K.; Sunshine, P.; Koldovsky, O.

    1985-10-01

    Adult rats that were maintained on a low-carbohydrate intake showed rapid increase in the activities of sucrase, maltase, and lactase along the length of the small intestine when they were fed a high-starch diet. In the present study, the authors have identified these activity increases, and showed that they reflect proportional accumulations in enzyme-protein of sucrase-isomaltase, maltase-glucoamylase, and neutral lactase. It was determined that each of these enzymes exists in adult rat intestine in single immunoreactive form and accounts as a group for all sucrase, cellobiase, and most maltase and lactase activities. Dietary change from low to high carbohydrate (starch) resulted in an increase in (TH)leucine accumulation in each of the enzymes, without a change in the amount of label accumulation in total intestinal proteins. The increase in label accumulation in the brush-border carbohydrase pools was matched generally by proportional elevation in the pool concentrations of sucrase-isomaltase and lactase but not maltase. These studies suggest that the elevation of intestinal carbohydrase concentrations induced by high-carbohydrate feeding may involve selective stimulation of their synthesis.

  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, A E; Blomquist, L; Nord, C E; Midtvedt, T; Uribe, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the microflora of the upper small intestine in patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a combination of microbial cultivation and tests for microbial metabolic activity. METHODS--Twenty five patients with seropositive RA, 12 achlorhydric control subjects, and 11 control subjects with normal gastric acid secretion were investigated. Disease activity was evaluated in the patients with RA by three different indices. Eight (32%) of the patients with RA had hypochlorhydria or achlorhydria. The acid secretory capacity was determined with pentagastrin stimulation. A modified Crosby capsule was used to obtain biopsy specimens and samples of intestinal fluid from the proximal jejunum; aerobic and anaerobic microbial cultivation of mucosal specimens/intestinal fluid was carried out, and gas production and microflora associated characteristics in jejunal fluid were determined. Additionally, a bile acid deconjugation breath test was performed. RESULTS--Subjects with at least one of the following findings were considered to have bacterial overgrowth: positive bile acid deconjugation test; growth of Enterobacteriaceae; positive gas production; or low tryptic activity. By these criteria half of the patients with RA with hypochlorhydria or achlorhydria and half of the achlorhydric controls had bacterial overgrowth. Thirty five per cent of the patients with RA with normal gastric acid secretion had bacterial overgrowth compared with none of the normal controls. Disease activity indices and rheumatoid factor titres were significantly higher in patients with RA with bacterial overgrowth than in those without. CONCLUSIONS--A high frequency of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was found in patients with RA; it was associated with a high disease activity and observed in patients with hypochlorhydria or achlorhydria and in those with normal acid secretion. PMID:8346978

  12. Gastric emptying and intestinal absorption of ingested water and saline by hypovolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Edward M; Bykowski, Michael R; Hossler, Carrie A Smith; Curtis, Kathleen S; Smith, James C

    2009-12-01

    Recent experiments showed that in a one-bottle test conducted 16h after sc injection of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution, hypovolemic rats consumed water or 0.30 M NaCl in an initial drinking episode but did not empty the ingested fluid from the stomach or absorb it from the small intestine very rapidly, certainly not as rapidly as when 0.15M NaCl was consumed (Smith et al., Am J Physiol 292: R2089-R2099, 2007). The present experiments examined the patterns of water and 0.30 M NaCl ingestion and the movement of consumed fluid through the gastrointestinal tract when PEG-treated rats were given a two-bottle delayed-access test. We found that both fluids always were consumed in the first drinking episode, that the fluid mixture ingested was equivalent to 0.10-0.15M NaCl, and that gastric emptying rate and net fluid absorption from the small intestine usually were much faster than when PEG-treated rats drank either water or hypertonic saline alone. Thus, ingestion of water and 0.30 M NaCl by hypovolemic rats in the same episode adaptively facilitated the movement into the circulation of a near-isotonic fluid that is ideal for restoring plasma volume deficits.

  13. Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David W; Liu, Xiaowen; Holst, Jens J; Raybould, Helen E; Ney, Denise M

    2006-11-01

    Small bowel resection stimulates intestinal adaptive growth by a neuroendocrine process thought to involve both sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation and enterotrophic hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated whether capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal growth. Rats received systemic or perivagal capsaicin or ganglionectomy before 70% midjejunoileal resection or transection and were fed orally or by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 7 days after surgery. Growth of residual bowel was assessed by changes in mucosal mass, protein, DNA, and histology. Both systemic and perivagal capsaicin significantly attenuated by 48-100% resection-induced increases in ileal mucosal mass, protein, and DNA in rats fed orally. Villus height was significantly reduced in resected rats given capsaicin compared with vehicle. Sucrase specific activity in jejunal mucosa was not significantly different; ileal mucosal sucrase specific activity was significantly increased by resection in capsaicin-treated rats. Capsaicin did not alter the 57% increase in ileal proglucagon mRNA or the 150% increase in plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2 resulting from resection in orally fed rats. Ablation of spinal/splanchnic innervation by ganglionectomy failed to attenuate resection-induced adaptive growth. In TPN rats, capsaicin did not attenuate resection-induced mucosal growth. We conclude that vagal afferents are not essential for GLP-2 secretion when the ileum has direct contact with luminal nutrients after resection. In summary, vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptation through a mechanism that appears to involve stimulation by luminal nutrients.

  14. [Primary volvulus of the small intestine: vascular-like acute abdomen].

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Ruscazio, M; Ciulla, A; Miceli, G; Tomasello, G

    1998-01-01

    The Authors discuss etiology, clinical picture, diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of intestinal volvulus, an uncommon disease in Europe, thinking of a case of primitive small intestine volvulus, recently observed, and considering the literature. The Authors have come to the conclusion that in all the cases of intestinal occlusion, in emergency hospitalization, it is important to suspect the intestinal volvulus and to operate on the patient urgently to avoid the raise of postoperative mortality in all the cases complicated with intestinal gangrene.

  15. Cytokine gene expression during postnatal small intestinal development: regulation by glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, C; Diab-Assef, M; Plateroti, M; Laurent-Huck, F; Reimund, J; Kedinger, M; Foltzer-Jourdainn..., C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In the intestinal mucosa, numerous cytokines produced by the epithelium, fibroblasts, and immune cells were shown to affect epithelial differentiation and proliferation through epithelial-mesenchymal and epithelial-immune cell interactions. To date, the importance of cytokines in postnatal development of the rat small intestine has not been established.
AIM—To investigate the developmental changes in expression of mucosal cytokines in the postnatal maturation of the rat small intestinal epithelium and their regulation by glucocorticoids (GC).
METHODS—Mucosal maturation was assessed by the onset of sucrase-isomaltase (SI) mRNA, analysed by in situ hybridisation. The amount of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), β2 (TGF-β2), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and TGF-α was analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in mucosal extracts from weaning (14-21 days old) and adult rats, or one day after an injection of hydrocortisone (HC) in 11 day old rats. Similarly, expression of cytokines and the regulatory effect of GC were studied on cultured subepithelial myofibroblasts cloned from postnatal jejunum and ileum cultured in the absence or presence of dexamethasone (DX).
RESULTS—TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and IL-1β decreased during the third week of life while levels of TNF-α increased and TGF-α remained constant. In parallel, SI transcripts increased and showed a progressive accumulation in the apical part of the enterocytes first localised at the base of the villi from 18 days onwards. Interestingly, precocious induction of SI mRNA by HC paralleled the decrease in expression of TGF-β isoforms and of IL-1β. All cytokines were expressed in the myofibroblast cell lines. In addition, the results showed that TNF-α was differentially expressed in basal culture conditions and after DX stimulation in jejunal and ileal myofibroblasts. DX decreased IL-1β but not the TGF-β isoforms, similar

  16. Modulation of small intestinal homeostasis along with its microflora during acclimatization at simulated hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Adak, Atanu; Ghosh; Mondal, Keshab Chandra

    2014-11-01

    At high altitude (HA) hypobaric hypoxic environment manifested several pathophysiological consequences of which gastrointestinal (GI) disorder are very common phenomena. To explore the most possible clue behind this disorder intestinal flora, the major player of the GI functions, were subjected following simulated hypobaric hypoxic treatment in model animal. For this, male albino rats were exposed to 55 kPa (approximately 4872.9 m) air pressure consecutively for 30 days for 8 h/day and its small intestinal microflora, their secreted digestive enzymes and stress induced marker protein were investigated of the luminal epithelia. It was observed that population density of total aerobes significantly decreased, but the quantity of total anaerobes and Escherichia coli increased significantly after 30 days of hypoxic stress. The population density of strict anaerobes like Bifidobacterium sp., Bacteroides sp. and Lactobacillus sp. and obligate anaerobes like Clostridium perfringens and Peptostreptococcus sp. were expanded along with their positive growth direction index (GDI). In relation to the huge multiplication of anaerobes the amount of gas formation as well as content of IgA and IgG increased in duration dependent manner. The activity of some luminal enzymes from microbial origin like a-amylase, gluco-amylase, proteinase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase were also elevated in hypoxic condition. Besides, hypoxia induced in formation of malondialdehyde along with significant attenuation of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase activity and lowered GSH/GSSG pool in the intestinal epithelia. Histological study revealed disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier with higher infiltration of lymphocytes in lamina propia and atrophic structure. It can be concluded that hypoxia at HA modified GI microbial imprint and subsequently causes epithelial barrier dysfunction which may relate to the small intestinal dysfunction at HA.

  17. Small intestinal eosinophils regulate Th17 cells by producing IL-1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Reiko; Lee, Eun-Jung; Jang, Min Seong; Jeun, Eun-Ji; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Park, Areum; Yun, Chang Ho; Hong, Sung-Wook; Kim, You-Me; Seoh, Ju-Young; Jung, YunJae; Surh, Charles D.; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophils play proinflammatory roles in helminth infections and allergic diseases. Under steady-state conditions, eosinophils are abundantly found in the small intestinal lamina propria, but their physiological function is largely unexplored. In this study, we found that small intestinal eosinophils down-regulate Th17 cells. Th17 cells in the small intestine were markedly increased in the ΔdblGATA-1 mice lacking eosinophils, and an inverse correlation was observed between the number of eosinophils and that of Th17 cells in the small intestine of wild-type mice. In addition, small intestinal eosinophils suppressed the in vitro differentiation of Th17 cells, as well as IL-17 production by small intestinal CD4+ T cells. Unlike other small intestinal immune cells or circulating eosinophils, we found that small intestinal eosinophils have a unique ability to constitutively secrete high levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), a natural inhibitor of IL-1β. Moreover, small intestinal eosinophils isolated from IL-1Ra−deficient mice failed to suppress Th17 cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that small intestinal eosinophils play a pivotal role in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis by regulating Th17 cells via production of IL-1Ra. PMID:26951334

  18. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Chintala, Madhu; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  19. Changes in carboxypeptidase A, dipeptidase and Na+/K+ ATPase activities in the intestine of rats orally exposed to different doses of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Eriyamremu, G E; Asagba, S O; Onyeneke, E C; Adaikpoh, M A

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cadmium on some protein digestive and absorption enzymes in rats. Thirty-six rats were grouped into three groups of 12 animals each; one group received deionised water and acted as control. One group received 445 microM Cd and the last group received 890 microM Cd in their drinking water for a period of one month. The results obtained indicate that increasing the level of cadmium from 445 microM to 890 microM in the drinking water of the rats led to 29% and 23% increase in accumulated cadmium in the proximal and distal small intestine respectively. The body weight gain of rats exposed to 445 microM and 890 microM Cd was decreased by about 24% and 43% respectively when compared with the control. The activities of carboxypeptidase A, dipeptidase and Na+/K+ ATPase were reduced in the mucosa of the proximal end of the small intestine of cadmium exposed rats. The reduction was dose dependent; with the 890 microM Cd exposed rats displaying the least activities. In the distal small intestine, the activities of these enzymes were restored in the 445 microM Cd exposed rats to levels that were not statistically different (P > 0.05) from those observed in the controls. In the 890 microM Cd exposed rats, dipeptidase activity improved by about 80% compared with the activity of the enzyme in the proximal small intestine. Likewise, Na+/K+ ATPase activity increased by about 125% compared with the observed level in the proximal small intestine. The study suggests that cadmium given to rats in drinking water compromise protein digestion and absorption of nutrients particularly in the proximal region of small intestine and could account for weight reduction associated with cadmium toxicity.

  20. SIM2 maintains innate host defense of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Jung; Lizaso, Analyn; Lee, Ying-Hue

    2014-12-01

    The single-minded 2 (SIM2) protein is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor regulating central nervous system (CNS) development in Drosophila. In humans, SIM2 is located within the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21 and may be involved in the development of mental retardation phenotype in Down syndrome. In this study, knockout of SIM2 expression in mice resulted in a gas distention phenotype in the gastrointestinal tract. We found that SIM2 is required for the expression of all cryptdins and numerous other antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed in the small intestine. The mechanism underlying how SIM2 controls AMP expression involves both direct and indirect regulations. For the cryptdin genes, SIM2 regulates their expression by modulating transcription factor 7-like 2, a crucial regulator in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, while for other AMP genes, such as RegIIIγ, SIM2 directly activates their promoter activity. Our results establish that SIM2 is a crucial regulator in controlling expression of intestinal AMPs to maintain intestinal innate immunity against microbes.

  1. The effect of concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin on the ultrastructure and permeability of rat intestine. A possible model for an intestinal allergic reaction.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, A; Magnusson, K E; Latkovic, S

    1984-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to lectins, either concanavalin A (Con A) or wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). The lectins were instilled into a ligated segment of the distal small intestine together with permeability markers, fluoresceinated dextran (MW 3,000) or a mixture of differently sized polyethylene glycols (MW 400, 600 and 1,000). WGA-treated rats showed a decreased permeability to small molecules (MW less than 600) of polyethylene glycol but an increase for a larger dextran molecule (MW 3,000). These effects as well as the morphological findings might mimic the situation in patients with food allergy or celiac disease. Con A-treated rats had decreased intestinal permeability to the larger dextran molecules (MW 3,000), whereas the passage of small molecules was unaffected and the ultrastructural effects were minute. The Con A-induced changes could result from a mucotractive effect, associated with a low-grade gut allergy. These observations suggest that lectins can affect both the ultrastructure and the permeability of the intestine, in a way assumed to mimic allergic reactions to food constituents.

  2. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rashidul; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Alam, Masud; Lu, Miao; Kabir, Mamun; Kakon, Shahria Hafiz; Islam, Bushra Zarin; Afreen, Sajia; Musa, Abu; Khan, Shaila Sharmeen; Colgate, E. Ross; Carmolli, Marya P.; Ma, Jennie Z.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO’s pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO’s association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-year-olds monitored since birth from an impoverished neighborhood. SIBO was diagnosed via glucose hydrogen breath testing, with a cutoff of a 12-ppm increase over baseline used for SIBO positivity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate SIBO predictors. Differences in concomitant inflammation and permeability between SIBO-positive and -negative children were compared with multiple comparison adjustment. A total of 16.7% (15/90) of the children had SIBO. The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60) and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62). Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02) and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004) were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups. These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation. PMID:26758185

  3. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.

  4. Carbon Monoxide Inhalation Protects Rat Intestinal Grafts from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Atsunori; Kimizuka, Kei; Stolz, Donna B.; Neto, Joao Seda; Kaizu, Takashi; Choi, Augustine M. K.; Uchiyama, Takashi; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Nalesnik, Michael A.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Murase, Noriko

    2003-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a byproduct of heme catalysis by heme oxygenases, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory effects. This study examines the cytoprotective efficacy of inhaled CO during intestinal cold ischemia/reperfusion injury associated with small intestinal transplantation. Orthotopic syngenic intestinal transplantation was performed in Lewis rats after 6 hours of cold preservation in University of Wisconsin solution. Three groups were examined: normal untreated controls, control intestinal transplant recipients kept in room air, and recipients exposed to CO (250 ppm) for 1 hour before and 24 hours after surgery. In air grafts, mRNA levels for interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1), and inducible nitric oxide synthase rapidly increased after intestinal transplant. Histopathological analysis revealed severe mucosal erosion, villous congestion, and inflammatory infiltrates. CO effectively blocked an early up-regulation of these mediators, showed less severe histopathological changes, and resulted in significantly improved animal survival of 92% from 58% in air-treated controls. CO also significantly reduced mRNA for proapoptotic Bax, while it up-regulated anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. These changes in CO-treated grafts correlated with well-preserved CD31+ vascular endothelial cells, less frequent apoptosis/necrosis in intestinal epithelial and capillary endothelial cells, and improved graft tissue blood circulation. Protective effects of CO in this study were mediated via soluble guanylyl cyclase, because 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole (4,3-α) quinoxaline-1-one (soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor) completely reversed the beneficial effect conferred by CO. Perioperative CO inhalation at a low concentration resulted in protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury to intestinal grafts with prolonged cold preservation. PMID:14507665

  5. Bile secretion in rats with indomethacin-induced intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Hoshino, M; Hayakawa, T; Kamiya, Y; Ohhara, H; Mizuno, K; Yamada, H; Nakazawa, T; Inagaki, T; Uchida, A; Miyaji, M; Takeuchi, T

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the bile secretion, including the composition of biliary bile acids, bile salt pool size, and transcytotic vesicle transport, in a rat model of subacute intestinal inflammation induced by indomethacin. Indomethacin treatment significantly decreased bile acid-independent bile flow and biliary secretion of bile acid and cholesterol, while increasing biliary phospholipid output in vivo. Although indomethacin treatment did not change the bile salt pool size in vivo, alpha- and beta-muricholic acids were significantly deceased and hyodeoxycholic and deoxycholic acids were increased in bile. Bile flow and the transport maximum of taurocholate did not decrease, and biliary horseradish peroxidase output was significantly enhanced in isolated perfused livers from indomethacin-treated rats. Endotoxin in the portal blood was significantly increased in rats treated with indomethacin. Clindamycin slightly reduced intestinal inflammation but significantly prevented decreases in bile flow, bile acid output, and transport maximum of taurocholate. We conclude that, although biliary secretory function was apparently decreased in vivo, that of hepatocyte function was maintained in this model.

  6. Zinc treatment ameliorates diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in undernourished rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background WHO guidelines recommend zinc supplementation as a key adjunct therapy for childhood diarrhea in developing countries, however zinc’s anti-diarrheal effects remain only partially understood. Recently, it has been recognized that low-grade inflammation may influence stunting. In this study, we examined whether oral zinc supplementation could improve weight, intestinal inflammation, and diarrhea in undernourished weanling rats. Methods Rats were undernourished using a northeastern Brazil regional diet (RBD) for two weeks, followed by oral gavage with a saturated lactose solution (30 g/kg) in the last 7 days to induce osmotic diarrhea. Animals were checked for diarrhea daily after lactose intake. Blood was drawn in order to measure serum zinc levels by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were euthanized to harvest jejunal tissue for histology and cytokine profiles by ELISA. In a subset of animals, spleen samples were harvested under aseptic conditions to quantify bacterial translocation. Results Oral zinc supplementation increased serum zinc levels following lactose-induced osmotic diarrhea. In undernourished rats, zinc improved weight gain following osmotic diarrhea and significantly reduced diarrheal scores by the third day of lactose intake (p < 0.05), with improved jejunum histology (p < 0.0001). Zinc supplementation diminished bacterial translocation only in lactose-challenged undernourished rats (p = 0.03) compared with the untreated challenged controls and reduced intestinal IL-1β and TNF-α cytokines to control levels. Conclusion Altogether our findings provide novel mechanisms of zinc action in the setting of diarrhea and undernutrition and support the use of zinc to prevent the vicious cycle of malnutrition and diarrhea. PMID:25095704

  7. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption. PMID:27228994

  8. Defective small intestinal anion secretion, dipeptide absorption, and intestinal failure in suckling NBCe1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Yongjian; Riederer, Brigitte; Li, Taolang; Tian, De-An; Tuo, Biguang; Shull, Gary; Seidler, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    The electrogenic Na(+)HCO3 (-) cotransporter NBCe1 (Slc4a4) is strongly expressed in the basolateral enterocyte membrane in a villous/surface predominant fashion. In order to better understand its physiological function in the intestine, isolated mucosae in miniaturized Ussing chambers and microdissected intestinal villi or crypts loaded with the fluorescent pH-indicator BCECF were studied from the duodenum, jejunum, and colon of 14- to 17-days-old slc4a4-deficient (KO) and WT mice. NBCe1 was active in the basal state in all intestinal segments under study, most likely to compensate for acid loads imposed upon the enterocytes. Upregulation of other basolateral base uptake mechanism occurs, but in a segment-specific fashion. Loss of NBCe1 resulted in severely impaired Cl(-) and fluid secretory response, but not HCO3 (-) secretory response to agonist stimulation. In addition, NBCe1 was found to be active during transport processes that load the surface enterocytes with acid, such as Slc26a3 (DRA)-mediated luminal Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange or PEPT1-mediated H(+)/dipeptide uptake. Possibly because of the high energy demand for hyperventilation in conjunction with the fluid secretory and nutrient absorptive defects and the relative scarcity of compensatory mechanisms, NBCe1-deficient mice developed progressive jejunal failure, worsening of metabolic acidosis, and death in the third week of life. Our data suggest that the electrogenic influx of base via NBCe1 maintains enterocyte anion homeostasis and pHi control. Its loss impairs small intestinal Cl(-) and fluid secretion as well as the neutralization of acid loads imposed on the enterocytes during nutrient and electrolyte absorption.

  9. Orazipone, a locally acting immunomodulator, ameliorates intestinal radiation injury: A preclinical study in a novel rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Richter, Konrad K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is relevant to cancer treatment, as well as to radiation accidents and radiation terrorism scenarios. This study assessed the protective efficacy of orazipone, a locally-acting small molecule immunomodulator. Methods and Materials: Male rats were orchiectomized, a 4-cm segment of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum, a proximal anteperistaltic ileostomy was created for intraluminal drug administration, and intestinal continuity was re-established by end-to-side anastomosis. After three weeks postoperative recovery, the intestine in the 'scrotal hernia' was exposed locally to single-dose or fractionated X-radiation. Orazipone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered daily through the ileostomy, either during and after irradiation, or only after irradiation. Structural, cellular, and molecular aspects of intestinal radiation toxicity were assessed two weeks after irradiation. Results: Orazipone significantly ameliorated histologic injury and transforming growth factor-{beta} immunoreactivity levels, both after single-dose and fractionated irradiation. Intestinal wall thickness was significantly reduced after single-dose and nonsignificantly after fractionated irradiation. Mucosal surface area and numbers of mast cells were partially restored by orazipone after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This work (1) demonstrates the utility of the ileostomy rat model for intraluminal administration of response modifiers in single-dose and fractionated radiation studies; (2) shows that mucosal immunomodulation during and/or after irradiation ameliorates intestinal toxicity; and (3) highlights important differences between single-dose and fractionated radiation regimens.

  10. Transfer of cadmium through the rat's intestinal wall

    SciTech Connect

    Gruden, N.

    1982-08-01

    The transfer of /sup 115//sup m/Cd through the wall of the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum in 6-week-old male albino rats was studied by the in vitro method of the ''everted gut sac.'' Cadmium transport through the duodenal and jejunal wall was practically the same, but it was significantly lower through the ileum. Although being highest in the duodenal wall, cadmium retention did not depend significantly on any particular intestinal segment. No cadmium transport against a chemical gradient seems to have taken place through the wall of any segment.

  11. Temporal profile of intestinal tissue expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in a rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Ana Leda Bertoncini; Figueira, Rebeca Lopes; Gonçalves, Frances Lilian Lanhellas; Mitidiero, Luís Felipe Tsuyoshi; Silva, Orlando Castro e; Peiró, José Luis; Sbragia, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Necrotizing enterocolitis is a severe multifactorial intestinal disorder that primarily affects preterm newborns, causing 20-40% mortality and morbidity. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein has been reported to be a biomarker for the detection of intestinal injuries. Our aim was to assess intestinal tissue injury and the molecular expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein over time in a necrotizing enterocolitis model. METHODS: A total of 144 Newborn rats were divided into two groups: 1) Control, which received breastfeeding (n=72) and 2) Necrotizing Enterocolitis, which received formula feeding and underwent hypoxia and hypothermia (n=72). A total of six time points of ischemia (2 times a day for 3 days; 12 pups for each time point) were examined. Samples were collected for analysis of body weight, morphological and histological characteristics, intestinal weight, intestinal weight/body weight ratio, injury grade, and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein levels. RESULTS: Body and intestinal weights were lower in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005 and p<0.0005, respectively). The intestinal weight/body weight ratio was higher in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005) only at the sixth ischemia time point. The Necrotizing Enterocolitis group displayed higher expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (p<0.0005) and showed greater tissue damage than the Control group. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein was an efficient marker of ischemic injury to the intestine and a good correlation was demonstrated between the time of ischemic injury and the grade of intestinal injury. PMID:27464299

  12. The effect of probiotics for preventing radiation-induced morphological changes in intestinal mucosa of rats.

    PubMed

    Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Wontaek; Cho, Heunglae; Ahn, Kijung; Choi, Youngmin; Kim, Dongwon

    2014-10-01

    Radiation therapy is an important treatment modality for abdominal or pelvic cancer, but there is a common and serious complication such as radiation-induced enteritis. Probiotics is reported to have positive effects against radiation-induced enteropathy. In this study, morphological changes of bowel mucosa were analyzed in rats to presume the effect of probiotics on radiation-induced enteritis and its correlation with radiation dose. A total of 48 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received a solution containing 1.0×10(8) colony-forming units of Lactiobacillus acidophilus or water once daily for 10 days. Each of two groups was divided into three subgroups and abdomino-pelvic area of each subgroup was irradiated with 10, 15, and 20 Gy, respectively on the seventh day of feeding the solutions. All rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation and the mucosal thickness and villus height of jejunum, ileum and colon were measured. The morphological parameters of the small intestine represented significant differences between two solution groups irradiated 10 or 15 Gy, except for villus height of jejunum in 15 Gy-subgroup (P=0.065). There was no significant morphometric difference between two groups irradiated with 20 Gy of radiation. Probiotics appear to be effective for the morphological shortening of small intestinal mucosa damaged by radiation less than or equal to 15 Gy. PMID:25368490

  13. Pediatric Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Low-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R.; Petri, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted GI motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions that do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitat may be an under recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world. PMID:25486880

  14. Pediatric small intestine bacterial overgrowth in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted gastrointestinal (GI) motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions who do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitats may be an under-recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world.

  15. Pediatric small intestine bacterial overgrowth in low-income countries.

    PubMed

    Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) occurs when colonic quantities of commensal bacteria are present in the small bowel. SIBO is associated with conditions of disrupted gastrointestinal (GI) motility leading to stasis of luminal contents. Recent data show that SIBO is also found in children living in unsanitary conditions who do not have access to clean water. SIBO leads to impaired micronutrient absorption and increased GI permeability, both of which may contribute to growth stunting in children. SIBO also disrupts mucosal immunity and has been implicated in oral vaccination underperformance and the development of celiac disease. SIBO in the setting of the impoverished human habitats may be an under-recognized cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality in the developing world. PMID:25486880

  16. Hydrolysis of pyrethroids by human and rat tissues: Examination of intestinal, liver and serum carboxylesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, J. Allen; Borazjani, Abdolsamad; Potter, Philip M.; Ross, Matthew K. . E-mail: mross@cvm.msstate.edu

    2007-05-15

    Hydrolytic metabolism of pyrethroid insecticides in humans is one of the major catabolic pathways that clear these compounds from the body. Rodent models are often used to determine the disposition and clearance rates of these esterified compounds. In this study the distribution and activities of esterases that catalyze pyrethroid metabolism have been investigated in vitro using several human and rat tissues, including small intestine, liver and serum. The major esterase in human intestine is carboxylesterase 2 (hCE2). We found that the pyrethroid trans-permethrin is effectively hydrolyzed by a sample of pooled human intestinal microsomes (5 individuals), while deltamethrin and bioresmethrin are not. This result correlates well with the substrate specificity of recombinant hCE2 enzyme. In contrast, a sample of pooled rat intestinal microsomes (5 animals) hydrolyze trans-permethrin 4.5-fold slower than the sample of human intestinal microsomes. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that pooled samples of cytosol from human or rat liver are {approx} 2-fold less hydrolytically active (normalized per mg protein) than the corresponding microsomal fraction toward pyrethroid substrates; however, the cytosolic fractions do have significant amounts ({approx} 40%) of the total esteratic activity. Moreover, a 6-fold interindividual variation in carboxylesterase 1 protein expression in human hepatic cytosols was observed. Human serum was shown to lack pyrethroid hydrolytic activity, but rat serum has hydrolytic activity that is attributed to a single CE isozyme. We purified the serum CE enzyme to homogeneity to determine its contribution to pyrethroid metabolism in the rat. Both trans-permethrin and bioresmethrin were effectively cleaved by this serum CE, but deltamethrin, esfenvalerate, alpha-cypermethrin and cis-permethrin were slowly hydrolyzed. Lastly, two model lipase enzymes were examined for their ability to hydrolyze pyrethroids. However, no hydrolysis products could be

  17. Obstruction of the small intestine caused by a hairball in 2 young beef calves.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Radostits, Otto M

    2004-04-01

    Two beef calves, with a history of anorexia and absence of feces, were dehydrated and bloated on presentation. Intestinal obstruction was suspected based on clinical and laboratory findings. Hairballs obstructing the small intestine were removed surgically and the calves recovered. Intestinal obstruction due to hairballs has not been described before.

  18. Obstruction of the small intestine caused by a hairball in 2 young beef calves

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Two beef calves, with a history of anorexia and absence of feces, were dehydrated and bloated on presentation. Intestinal obstruction was suspected based on clinical and laboratory findings. Hairballs obstructing the small intestine were removed surgically and the calves recovered. Intestinal obstruction due to hairballs has not been described before. PMID:15144107

  19. Transport of nattokinase across the rat intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Hong, K; Ito, Y; Misawa, S; Takeuchi, N; Kariya, K; Nishimuro, S

    1995-09-01

    Intraduodenal administration of nattokinase (NK) at a dose of 80 mg/kg, resulted in the degradation of fibrinogen in plasma suggesting transport of NK across the intestinal tract in normal rats. The action of NK on the cleavage of fibrinogen in the plasma from blood samples drawn at intervals after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme was investigated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis with an anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody. The 270 kDa fragment carrying antigenic sites for the binding of the anti-fibrinogen gamma chain antibody appeared within 0.5 h and was then degraded gradually to a 105 kDa fragment via a 200 kDa fragment. This suggests that fibrinogen was degraded to a 105 kDa fragment via several intermediates (270 and 200 kDa). In parallel with the degradation process, plasma recalcification times were remarkably prolonged NK was also detected in the plasma from blood samples drawn 3 and 5 h after administration of the enzyme by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis with an anti-NK antibody. The results indicate that NK is absorbed from the rat intestinal tract and that NK cleaves fibrinogen in plasma after intraduodenal administration of the enzyme.

  20. Increased Intestinal Absorption of Genistein by Coadministering Verapamil in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Baogang; Wang, Huiyun; Zou, Huiqin; Liu, Yalan; Kong, Xiangyu; Fang, Xiuzhong

    2016-10-01

    Combination of genistein (GT) and verapamil, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor, can increase GT absorption in situ perfusion technology in rat. To date, little information is yet available about the effect of verapamil on oral absorption of GT in vivo. In this study, a simple and reproducible HPLC-UV method was developed and validated for determination of total GT in rat plasma. Based on this, a pharmacokinetic experiment was designed to characterize biopharmaceutical properties of GT with or without coadministration of verapamil (10.0, 20.0, 30.0 mg/kg) in rats. The coadministration of verapamil (30.0 mg/kg) with GT caused a significant increase of the maximum GT plasma concentration (1.31-fold vs. GT, P < 0.05) and area under the curve (1.39-fold vs. GT, P < 0.05). Our data show that verapamil would increase intestinal absorption of GT in rat, suggesting there is some drug-nutrition interaction between verapamil and GT. PMID:27604118

  1. Intestinal distribution and excretion of sesaminol and its tetrahydrofuranoid metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Jan, Kuo-Ching; Ku, Kuo-Lung; Chu, Yan-Hwa; Hwang, Lucy Sun; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2011-04-13

    Sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum L.) are unique because of potent and various physiological activities imparted by their bioactive lignans. This investigation studied the intestinal distribution and excretion of sesaminol in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. To investigate the distribution of sesaminol (per oral 220 mg/kg), the changes in concentration of sesaminol and its metabolites were determined in the intestines and plasma within the 24 h period after tube feeding of sesaminol to SD rats. Results show that the epimerization of sesaminol appeared to be catalyzed by acid in the simulated gastric fluids. The major sesaminol epimer was characterized as 2-episesaminol using 2D-NMR. These findings indicate that sesame sesaminol and its epimer are poorly absorbed prior to reaching the rectum and that substantial amounts pass from the small to the large intestine, where they are metabolized by the colonic microflora to tetrahydrofuranoid metabolites. Sesaminol in plasma was largely present as phase II conjugates, and the seven metabolites were detected as the 2-episesaminol, sesaminol-6-catechol, methylated sesaminol-catechol, R,R-hydroxymethylsesaminol-tetrahydrofuran, S,R-hydroxymethylsesaminol-tetrahydrofuran, enterolactone, and enterodiol. Excretions of sesaminol in urine and feces within the 24 h period were equivalent to 0.02 and 9.33% of the amount ingested, respectively.

  2. Heterogeneous expression of melatonin receptor MT1 mRNA in the rat intestine under control and fasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Soták, Matús; Mrnka, Libor; Pácha, Jirí

    2006-09-01

    Melatonin is found in mammalian central nervous system and various peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract (GIT) where it participates in the regulation of intestinal motility, blood flow, immunomodulation, ion transport, cell proliferation and scavenging of free radicals. Some of these effects are achieved via melatonin binding to specific receptors, MT1 and MT2. As no thorough study on the expression of these receptors in the GIT has yet been done, the aim of this study was to determine the MT1 mRNA expression in the rat intestine under both control and fasting conditions. Our results suggest that MT1 mRNA is present in epithelial as well as subepithelial layer, with higher expression in the latter in all intestinal segments studied. The highest signal of the MT1 transcript along the rostro-caudal intestinal axis was found both in epithelial and subepithelial layers of the duodenum. Nevertheless, duodenal MT1 mRNA expression did not reach the level found in pituitary gland. In a 12:12-hr light:dark cycle a MT1 receptor expression in the subepithelial layer of rat distal colon did not manifest a significant diurnal rhythm. Short-term fasting increased the expression of MT1 transcript in the subepithelial layer of both the small and large intestine. During long-term fasting the increase persisted only in distal colon while a return to control levels was observed in small intestinal segments. In conclusion we demonstrated heterogeneous expression of MT1 receptor in the rat intestine and showed that its expression is up-regulated by nutritional deprivation.

  3. The mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model: application to the assessment of intestinal lymphatic drug transport.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Hu, Luojuan; Caliph, Suzanne M; Han, Sifei; Porter, Christopher J H

    2015-03-06

    The intestinal lymphatic system plays key roles in fluid transport, lipid absorption and immune function. Lymph flows directly from the small intestine via a series of lymphatic vessels and nodes that converge at the superior mesenteric lymph duct. Cannulation of the mesenteric lymph duct thus enables the collection of mesenteric lymph flowing from the intestine. Mesenteric lymph consists of a cellular fraction of immune cells (99% lymphocytes), aqueous fraction (fluid, peptides and proteins such as cytokines and gut hormones) and lipoprotein fraction (lipids, lipophilic molecules and apo-proteins). The mesenteric lymph duct cannulation model can therefore be used to measure the concentration and rate of transport of a range of factors from the intestine via the lymphatic system. Changes to these factors in response to different challenges (e.g., diets, antigens, drugs) and in disease (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, diabetes) can also be determined. An area of expanding interest is the role of lymphatic transport in the absorption of orally administered lipophilic drugs and prodrugs that associate with intestinal lipid absorption pathways. Here we describe, in detail, a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model which enables evaluation of the rate and extent of lipid and drug transport via the lymphatic system for several hours following intestinal delivery. The method is easily adaptable to the measurement of other parameters in lymph. We provide detailed descriptions of the difficulties that may be encountered when establishing this complex surgical method, as well as representative data from failed and successful experiments to provide instruction on how to confirm experimental success and interpret the data obtained.

  4. Subacute stress and chronic stress interact to decrease intestinal barrier function in rats.

    PubMed

    Lauffer, Adriana; Vanuytsel, Tim; Vanormelingen, Christophe; Vanheel, Hanne; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Tack, Jan; Fornari, Fernando; Farré, Ricard

    2016-01-01

    Psychological stress increases intestinal permeability, potentially leading to low-grade inflammation and symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We assessed the effect of subacute, chronic and combined stress on intestinal barrier function and mast cell density. Male Wistar rats were allocated to four experimental groups (n = 8/group): 1/sham; 2/subacute stress (isolation and limited movement for 24 h); 3/chronic crowding stress for 14 days and 4/combined subacute and chronic stress. Jejunum and colon were collected to measure: transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER; a measure of epithelial barrier function); gene expression of tight junction molecules; mast cell density. Plasma corticosterone concentration was increased in all three stress conditions versus sham, with highest concentrations in the combined stress condition. TEER in the jejunum was decreased in all stress conditions, but was significantly lower in the combined stress condition than in the other groups. TEER in the jejunum correlated negatively with corticosterone concentration. Increased expression of claudin 1, 5 and 8, occludin and zonula occludens 1 mRNAs was detected after subacute stress in the jejunum. In contrast, colonic TEER was decreased only after combined stress, and the expression of tight junction molecules was unaltered. Increased mast cell density was observed in the chronic and combined stress condition in the colon only. In conclusion, our data show that chronic stress sensitizes the gastrointestinal tract to the effects of subacute stress on intestinal barrier function; different underlying cellular and molecular alterations are indicated in the small intestine versus the colon.

  5. Inhibition of Intestinal Thiamin Transport in Rat Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Sassoon, Catherine S.; Zhu, Ercheng; Fang, Liwei; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Thiamin deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with sepsis, but the mechanism by which sepsis induces thiamin deficiency is unknown. This study aimed to determine the influence of various severity of sepsis on carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake, level of expressions of thiamin transporters (thiamin transporter-1 (THTR-1) and thiamin transporter-2 (THTR-2)), and mitochondrial thiamin pyrophosphate transporter (MTPPT). Design Randomized, controlled study Setting Research laboratory at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center Subjects Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into controls, mild, moderate and severe sepsis with equal number of animals in each group. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture with the cecum ligated below the cecal valve at 25 %, 50 % and 75 % of cecal length, defined as severe, moderate and mild sepsis, respectively. Control animals underwent laparotomy only. After 2 days of induced sepsis, carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake was measured using [3H]thiamin. Expressions of THTR-1, THTR-2, and MTPPT proteins and mRNA were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were also measured. Sepsis inhibited [3H]thiamin uptake and the inhibition was a function of sepsis severity. Both cell membranes thiamin transporters and MTPPT expression levels were suppressed; also levels of ATP in the intestine of animals with moderate and severe sepsis were significantly lower than that of sham operated controls. Conclusions For the first time we demonstrated that sepsis inhibited carrier-mediated intestinal thiamin uptake as a function of sepsis severity, suppressed thiamin transporters and MTPPT, leading to ATP depletion. PMID:27065466

  6. Blood and small intestine cell kinetics under radiation exposures: Mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O. A.

    2009-12-01

    Mathematical models which describe the dynamics of two vital body systems (hematopoiesis and small intestinal epithelium) in mammals exposed to acute and chronic radiation are developed. These models, based on conventional biological theories, are implemented as systems of nonlinear differential equations. Their variables and constant parameters have clear biological meaning, that provides successful identification and verification of the models in hand. It is shown that the predictions of the models qualitatively and quantitatively agree with the respective experimental data for small laboratory animals (mice, rats) exposed to acute/chronic irradiation in wide ranges of doses and dose rates. The explanation of a number of radiobiological effects, including those of the low-level long-term exposures, is proposed proceeding from the modeling results. All this bears witness to the validity of employment of the developed models, after a proper identification, in investigation and prediction of radiation effects on the hematopoietic and small intestinal epithelium systems in various mammalian species, including humans. In particular, the models can be used for estimating effects of irradiation on astronauts in the long-term space missions, such as Lunar colonies and Mars voyages.

  7. Microbial communities in the human small intestine: coupling diversity to metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Booijink, Carien C G M; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Willem M

    2007-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is the main site where the conversion and absorption of food components takes place. The host-derived physiological processes and the residing microorganisms, especially in the small intestine, contribute to this nutrient supply. To circumvent sampling problems of the small intestine, several model systems have been developed to study microbial diversity and functionality in the small intestine. In addition, metagenomics offers novel possibilities to gain insight into the genetic potential and functional properties of these microbial communities. Here, an overview is presented of the most recent insights into the diversity and functionality of the microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract, with a focus on the small intestine.

  8. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca; Stecca, Laura

    2015-06-23

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO{sub 2} NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO{sub 2} NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO{sub 2} NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm{sup 2} levels of TiO{sub 2} NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO{sub 2} NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  9. In vivo and in vitro toxicological effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on small intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassinari, Roberta; La Rocca, Cinzia; Stecca, Laura; Tait, Sabrina; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Iosi, Francesca; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Martinelli, Andrea; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-06-01

    In European Union, titanium dioxide (TiO2) as bulk material is a food additive (E171) and - as nanoparticle (NP) - is used as a white pigment in several products (e.g. food, cosmetics, drugs). E171 contains approximately 36% of particles less than 100 nm in at least one dimension and TiO2 NP exposure is estimated fairly below 2.5 mg/person/day. The gastrointestinal tract is a route of entry for NPs, thus representing a potential target of effects. In in vivo study, the effects of TiO2 NP in adult rat small intestine have been evaluated by oral administration of 0 (CTRL), 1 and 2 mg/kg body weight per day - relevant to human dietary intake. Detailed quali/quantitative histopathological analyses were performed on CTRL and treated rat samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed on small intestine. An in vitro study on Caco-2 cells was also used in order to evaluate the potential cytotoxic effects directly on enterocytes through the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. Suspensions of TiO2 NPs for in vitro and in vivo study were characterized by EM. Histomorphometrical data showed treatment-related changes of villus height and widths in male rats. Significantly different from CTRL decreased LDH levels in the medium were detected in vitro at 24h with 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 µg/cm2 levels of TiO2 NPs. SEM analysis showed no damaged areas. Overall the results showed that enterocytes may represent a target of TiO2 NP toxicity by direct exposure both in vivo and in vitro models.

  10. Intestinal morphology and cytokinetics in pancreatic insufficiency. An experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hauer-Jensen, M; Skjonsberg, G; Moen, E; Clausen, O P

    1995-10-01

    Intraluminal pancreatic enzymes influence intestinal function, adaptation, and susceptibility to injury. These effects may be mediated partly through changes in the rate of epithelial cell turnover. We assessed intestinal morphology and cytokinetics in a rat model of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency that does not alter anatomic relationships or animal growth. Pancreatic duct occlusion was performed by applying metal clips on both sides along the common bile duct. Control animals underwent sham-operation with exposure and manipulation of the pancreas without duct occlusion. Twelve days later, pulse labeling with tritiated thymidine was performed, and mitotic arrest was induced with colcemid. Groups of animals were sacrificed at 0 and 2 hr after colcemid injection. Specimens for histopathology, morphometry, and autoradiography were obtained from duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum. Labeling index, grain counts, mitoses per crypt, cells per crypt, cells per villus, crypt depth, villus height, and number of goblet cells per villus were used as end points. Pancreatic duct occlusion resulted in increased labeling index across intestinal segments relative to sham-operated controls (P < 0.01) and increased labeling index and mitotic rate in distal compared to proximal intestine (P < 0.05). Grain-count histograms were similar in the two experimental groups. There were no significant morphologic differences between pancreatic duct-occluded animals and controls. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency increases crypt cell proliferation in distal small intestine but does not alter the duration of S phase. These changes are most likely due to an increase in the size of the proliferative compartment and may be partly responsible for changes in small bowel function and response to injury.

  11. Delayed small-intestinal transit in tropical malabsorption.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G C

    1978-01-01

    The time of breath hydrogen appearance (T) after oral lactulose was determined in 98 patients in London who had been to the tropics. Fifty-six controls from three different ethnic groups had no evidence of gastrointestinal disease; 23 had tropical malabsorption, which was severe in 10; and 19 had chronic diarrhoea without malabsorption. Mean T was significantly delayed in patients with tropical malabsorption compared with controls, indicating that their mouth-caecum transit rate was abnormally slow. In six patients with tropical malabsorption who were reinvestigated after treatment a fall in the value for T seemed to parallel clinical improvement. Three patients with diarrhoea due to chronic colonic disease had delayed T. Patients with tropical malabsorption have bacterial colonisation of the small intestine, which is important in the pathogenesis of the disease. Bacterial overgrowth, which sometimes occurs after infective diarrhoea in the tropics and gives rise to tropical sprue, is a result of stasis. PMID:678884

  12. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic.

    PubMed

    Torfs, Sara C; Maes, An A; Delesalle, Catherine J; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M; Deprez, Piet

    2015-02-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in pre- and post-operative samples from surgical SI colic horses compared to controls. However, no association with postoperative ileus or non-survival could be demonstrated at any time point. In this clinical study, plasma serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic.

  13. Radiothelemetric monitoring of hydrogen ion levels of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Alday, E S; Goldsmith, H S

    1975-10-01

    A radiotelemetric technique was used to document the pH level within the intact small intestine of the dog. It was found that the pH in the area of the upper part of the jejunum ranged in a neutral zone between 6 to 7 in the fasting dog. Stimulation of the Thiry-Vella loop in these dogs, with either acid or alkaline solution, always resulted in the pH rising toward a higher level, the highest pH level being recorded as 8.2. All dogs demonstrated a lowering of this pH level toward a neutral range of 6 to 7 within three hours after Thiry-Vella loop challenge.

  14. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Patil, Anant D

    2014-05-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO. PMID:24944923

  15. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic

    PubMed Central

    Torfs, Sara C.; Maes, An A.; Delesalle, Catherine J.; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M.; Deprez, Piet

    2015-01-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P < 0.01) in pre- and post-operative samples from surgical SI colic horses compared to controls. However, no association with postoperative ileus or non-survival could be demonstrated at any time point. In this clinical study, plasma serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic. PMID:25694668

  16. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anant D.

    2014-01-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO. PMID:24944923

  17. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells. PMID:25573173

  18. Human and mouse tissue-engineered small intestine both demonstrate digestive and absorptive function.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christa N; Mojica, Salvador Garcia; Sala, Frederic G; Hill, J Ryan; Levin, Daniel E; Speer, Allison L; Barthel, Erik R; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Zachos, Nicholas C; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2015-04-15

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a devastating condition in which insufficient small intestinal surface area results in malnutrition and dependence on intravenous parenteral nutrition. There is an increasing incidence of SBS, particularly in premature babies and newborns with congenital intestinal anomalies. Tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) offers a therapeutic alternative to the current standard treatment, intestinal transplantation, and has the potential to solve its biggest challenges, namely donor shortage and life-long immunosuppression. We have previously demonstrated that TESI can be generated from mouse and human small intestine and histologically replicates key components of native intestine. We hypothesized that TESI also recapitulates native small intestine function. Organoid units were generated from mouse or human donor intestine and implanted into genetically identical or immunodeficient host mice. After 4 wk, TESI was harvested and either fixed and paraffin embedded or immediately subjected to assays to illustrate function. We demonstrated that both mouse and human tissue-engineered small intestine grew into an appropriately polarized sphere of intact epithelium facing a lumen, contiguous with supporting mesenchyme, muscle, and stem/progenitor cells. The epithelium demonstrated major ultrastructural components, including tight junctions and microvilli, transporters, and functional brush-border and digestive enzymes. This study demonstrates that tissue-engineered small intestine possesses a well-differentiated epithelium with intact ion transporters/channels, functional brush-border enzymes, and similar ultrastructural components to native tissue, including progenitor cells, whether derived from mouse or human cells.

  19. Gamma/delta intraepithelial lymphocytes in the mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masaki; Itoh, Tsunetoshi

    2016-09-01

    Although many studies of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) have been reported, most of them have focused on αβ-IELs; little attention has been paid to γδ-IELs. The function of γδ-IELs remains largely unclear. In this article, we briefly review a number of reports on γδ-IELs, especially those in the small intestine, along with our recent studies. We found that γδ-IELs are the most abundant (comprising >70 % of the) IELs in the duodenum and the jejunum, implying that it is absolutely necessary to investigate the function(s) of γδ-IELs when attempting to delineate the in vivo defense system of the small intestine. Intraperitoneal injection of anti-CD3 mAb stimulated the γδ-IELs and caused rapid degranulation of them. Granzyme B released from their granules induced DNA fragmentation of duodenal and jejunal epithelial cells (paracrine) and of the IELs themselves (autocrine). However, perforin (Pfn) was not detected, and DNA fragmentation was induced even in Pfn-knockout mice; our system was therefore found to present a novel type of in vivo Pfn-independent DNA fragmentation. We can therefore consider γδ-IELs to be a novel type of large granular lymphocyte without Pfn. Fragmented DNA was repaired in the cells, indicating that DNA fragmentation alone cannot be regarded as an unambiguous marker of cell death or apoptosis. Finally, since the response was so rapid and achieved without the need for accessory cells, it seems that γδ-IELs respond readily to various stimuli, are activated only once, and die 2-3 days after activation in situ without leaving their site. Taken together, these results suggest that γδ-IELs are not involved in the recognition of specific antigen(s) and are not involved in the resulting specific killing or exclusion of the relevant antigen(s).

  20. In vivo characterization of ischemic small intestine using bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Strand-Amundsen, R J; Tronstad, C; Kalvøy, H; Gundersen, Y; Krohn, C D; Aasen, A O; Holhjem, L; Reims, H M; Martinsen, Ø G; Høgetveit, J O; Ruud, T E; Tønnessen, T I

    2016-02-01

    The standard clinical method for the assessment of viability in ischemic small intestine is still visual inspection and palpation. This method is non-specific and unreliable, and requires a high level of clinical experience. Consequently, viable tissue might be removed, or irreversibly damaged tissue might be left in the body, which may both slow down patient recovery. Impedance spectroscopy has been used to measure changes in electrical parameters during ischemia in various tissues. The physical changes in the tissue at the cellular and structural levels after the onset of ischemia lead to time-variant changes in the electrical properties. We aimed to investigate the use of bioimpedance measurement to assess if the tissue is ischemic, and to assess the ischemic time duration. Measurements were performed on pigs (n = 7) using a novel two-electrode setup, with a Solartron 1260/1294 impedance gain-phase analyser. After induction of anaesthesia, an ischemic model with warm, full mesenteric arterial and venous occlusion on 30 cm of the jejunum was implemented. Electrodes were placed on the serosal surface of the ischemic jejunum, applying a constant voltage, and measuring the resulting electrical admittance. As a control, measurements were done on a fully perfused part of the jejunum in the same porcine model. The changes in tan δ (dielectric parameter), measured within a 6 h period of warm, full mesenteric occlusion ischemia in seven pigs, correlates with the onset and duration of ischemia. Tan δ measured in the ischemic part of the jejunum differed significantly from the control tissue, allowing us to determine if the tissue was ischemic or not (P < 0.0001, F = (1,75.13) 188.19). We also found that we could use tan δ to predict ischemic duration. This opens up the possibility of real-time monitoring and assessment of the presence and duration of small intestinal ischemia. PMID:26805916

  1. Dietary L-arginine supplementation reduces Methotrexate-induced intestinal mucosal injury in rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arginine (ARG) and nitric oxide maintain the mucosal integrity of the intestine in various intestinal disorders. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of oral ARG supplementation on intestinal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis following methotrexate (MTX)-induced intestinal damage in a rat. Methods Male rats were divided into four experimental groups: Control rats, CONTR-ARG rats, were treated with oral ARG given in drinking water 72 hours before and 72 hours following vehicle injection, MTX rats were treated with a single dose of methotrexate, and MTX-ARG rats were treated with oral ARG following injection of MTX. Intestinal mucosal damage, mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined 72 hours following MTX injection. RT-PCR was used to determine bax and bcl-2 mRNA expression. Results MTX-ARG rats demonstrated greater jejunal and ileal bowel weight, greater ileal mucosal weight, greater ileal mucosal DNA and protein levels, greater villus height in jejunum and ileum and crypt depth in ileum, compared to MTX animals. A significant decrease in enterocyte apoptosis in the ileum of MTX-ARG rats (vs MTX) was accompanied by decreased bax mRNA and protein expression and increased bcl-2 protein levels. Conclusions Treatment with oral ARG prevents mucosal injury and improves intestinal recovery following MTX- injury in the rat. PMID:22545735

  2. Intestinal transport of hexoses in the rat following chronic heat exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1979-01-01

    The study examines intestinal transport of sugars (D-glucose and D-galactose) in vitro and assesses organ maintenance in chronically heat-exposed rats. The results suggest that the response of intestinal absorption to heat exposure in the rat involves changes in intestinal weight and in glucose utilization. Despite the reduction in total intestinal weight, the ability of intestinal tissue to transport hexose per unit weight remains stable. Differences in intestinal weight and glucose utilization between pair-fed and heat-exposed animals suggest that the intestinal response to chronic heat exposure is not solely a function of the amount of food consumed. Alterations of hexose transport appear to be related to altered glucose metabolism and not altered transport capacity.

  3. P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated efflux limits intestinal absorption of the Hsp90 inhibitor SNX-2112 in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongming; Sun, Hua; Wu, Zhufeng; Zhang, Xingwang; Wu, Baojian

    2014-08-01

    1. The promising anticancer agent SNX-2112 (a novel Hsp90 inhibitor) is poorly bioavailable after oral administration. Here, we aim to determine the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the intestinal absorption of SNX-2112. 2. We found that SNX-2112 significantly stimulated P-gp ATPase activity in in vitro ATPase assay with a small EC50 (the half-maximal effective concentration) value of 0.32 µM. 3. In the single-pass perfused rat intestine model, absorption of SNX-2112 was not favored in the small intestine with a [Formula: see text] (the wall permeability) value of 0.38-0.64. By contrast, the compound was well absorbed in the colon with a [Formula: see text] value of 1.19. The P-gp inhibitors cyclosporine and elacridar (i.e. GF120918A) markedly enhanced SNX-2112 absorption in all four intestinal segments (i.e. duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon) and the fold change ranged from 3.1 to 14.1. Pharmacokinetic study revealed that cyclosporine increased the systemic exposure of SNX-2112 by a 2.5-fold after oral administration. 4. This is the first report that P-gp-mediated efflux is a limiting factor for intestinal absorption of SNX-2112 in rats.

  4. Protective role of adiponectin in a rat model of intestinal ischemia reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xu-Hui; Yang, Yue-Wu; Dai, Hai-Tao; Cai, Song-Wang; Chen, Rui-Han; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the potential protective role of adiponectin in intestinal ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury. METHODS: A rat model of intestinal I/R injury was established. The serum level of adiponectin in rats with intestinal I/R injury was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The serum levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were also measured by ELISA. Apoptosis of intestinal cells was detected using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and villous injury scores were also measured. RESULTS: Adiponectin was downregulated in the serum of rats with intestinal I/R injury compared with sham rats. No significant changes in the expression of adiponectin receptor 1 and adiponectin receptor 2 were found between sham and I/R rats. Pre-treatment with recombinant adiponectin attenuated intestinal I/R injury. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α, in rats with intestinal I/R injury was reduced by adiponectin pre-treatment. The production of MDA was inhibited, and the release of SOD was restored by adiponectin pre-treatment in rats with intestinal I/R injury. Adiponectin pre-treatment also inhibited cell apoptosis in these rats. Treatment with the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway inhibitor, compound C, or the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inhibitor, Snpp, attenuated the protective effects of adiponectin against intestinal I/R injury. CONCLUSION: Adiponectin exhibits protective effects against intestinal I/R injury, which may involve the AMPK/HO-1 pathway. PMID:26715807

  5. Activation of cycasin to a mutagen for Saccharomyces cerevisiae by rat intestinal flora.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, V W; Goin, C J

    1983-01-01

    Genetic test systems involving microorganisms and liver enzyme preparations may be insufficient to detect compounds that require breakdown by enzymes provided by the microbial flora of the intestinal tract. A method is described for providing such activation and for simultaneously testing the potential genetic activity of breakdown products in an indicator organism. Parabiotic chambers containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetic test organisms in one chamber were separated by a membrane filter from rat cecal organisms and test chemical contained in the other chamber. The genetic activities of cycasin breakdown products for mutation, gene conversion, and mitotic crossing-over in samples incubated aerobically are reported. Samples containing cycasin alone had a small but clearly increased frequency of genetic damage. Samples containing rat cecal organisms without cycasin showed no increase in genetic activity. Anaerobic incubation resulted in no increase in genetic activity in any of the samples. PMID:6338830

  6. Absorption enhancing effects of chitosan oligomers on the intestinal absorption of low molecular weight heparin in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hailong; Mi, Jie; Huo, Yayu; Huang, Xiaoyan; Xing, Jianfeng; Yamamoto, Akira; Gao, Yang

    2014-05-15

    Absorption enhancing effects of chitosan oligomers with different type and varying concentration on the intestinal absorption of low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) were examined by an in situ closed loop method in different intestinal sections of rats. Chitosan hexamer with the optimal concentration of 0.5% (w/v) showed the highest absorption enhancing ability both in the small intestine and large intestine. The membrane toxicities of chitosan oligomers were evaluated by morphological observation and determining the biological markers including amount of protein and activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released from intestinal epithelium cells. There was no obvious change both in levels of protein and LDH and morphology in the intestinal membrane between control and various chitosan oligomers groups, suggesting that chitosan oligomers did not induce any significant membrane damage to the intestinal epithelium. In addition, zeta potentials became less negative and amount of free LMWH gradually decreased when various chitosan oligomers were added to LMWH solution, revealing that electrostatic interaction between positively charged chitosan oligomers and negative LMWH was included in the absorption enhancing mechanism of chitosan oligomers. In conclusion, chitosan oligomers, especially chitosan hexamer, are safe and efficient absorption enhancers and can be used promisingly to improve oral absorption of LMWH.

  7. Three dimensional human small intestine models for ADME-Tox studies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiajie; Carrier, Rebecca L; March, John C; Griffith, Linda G

    2014-10-01

    In vitro human small intestine models play a crucial part in preclinical drug development. Although conventional 2D systems possess many advantages, such as facile accessibility and high-throughput capability, they can also provide misleading results due to their relatively poor recapitulation of in vivo physiology. Significant progress has recently been made in developing 3D human small intestine models, suggesting that more-reliable preclinical results could be obtained by recreating the 3D intestinal microenvironment in vitro. Although there are still many challenges, 3D human small intestine models have the potential to facilitate drug screening and drug development. PMID:24853950

  8. Mixing and Transport in the Small Intestine: A Lattice-Boltzmann Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banco, Gino; Brasseur, James; Wang, Yanxing; Aliani, Amit; Webb, Andrew

    2007-11-01

    The two primary functions of the small intestine are absorption of nutrients into the blood stream and transport of material along the gut for eventual evacuation. The primary transport mechanism is peristalsis. The time scales for absorption, however, rely on mixing and transport of molecules between the bulk flow and epithelial surface. Two basic motions contribute to mixing: peristalsis and repetitive segmental contraction of short segments of the gut. In this study we evaluate the relative roles of peristalsis vs. segmental contraction on the degree of mixing and time scales of nutrient transport to the epithelium using a two-dimensional model of flow and mixing in the small intestine. The model uses the lattice-Boltzmann framework with second-order moving boundary conditions and passive scalar (Sc = 10). Segmental and peristaltic contractions were parameterized using magnetic resonance imaging data from rat models. The Reynolds numbers (1.9), segment lengths (33 mm), max radii (2.75 mm) and occlusion ratios (0.33) were matched for direct comparison. Mixing is quantified by the rate of dispersion of scalar from an initial concentration in the center of the segment. We find that radial mixing is more rapid with segmental than peristaltic motion, that radial dispersion is much more rapid than axial, and that axial is comparable between the motions.

  9. Intestinal epithelial HuR modulates distinct pathways of proliferation and apoptosis and attenuates small intestinal and colonic tumor development.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Antonina; Blanc, Valerie; Montenegro, Grace; Klos, Coen; Xie, Yan; Kennedy, Susan; Luo, Jianyang; Chang, Sung-Hee; Hla, Timothy; Nalbantoglu, Ilke; Dharmarajan, Sekhar; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2014-09-15

    HuR is a ubiquitous nucleocytoplasmic RNA-binding protein that exerts pleiotropic effects on cell growth and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the impact of conditional, tissue-specific genetic deletion of HuR on intestinal growth and tumorigenesis in mice. Mice lacking intestinal expression of HuR (Hur (IKO) mice) displayed reduced levels of cell proliferation in the small intestine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin-induced acute intestinal injury, as evidenced by decreased villus height and a compensatory shift in proliferating cells. In the context of Apc(min/+) mice, a transgenic model of intestinal tumorigenesis, intestinal deletion of the HuR gene caused a three-fold decrease in tumor burden characterized by reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased expression of transcripts encoding antiapoptotic HuR target RNAs. Similarly, Hur(IKO) mice subjected to an inflammatory colon carcinogenesis protocol [azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) administration] exhibited a two-fold decrease in tumor burden. Hur(IKO) mice showed no change in ileal Asbt expression, fecal bile acid excretion, or enterohepatic pool size that might explain the phenotype. Moreover, none of the HuR targets identified in Apc(min/+)Hur(IKO) were altered in AOM-DSS-treated Hur(IKO) mice, the latter of which exhibited increased apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, where elevation of a unique set of HuR-targeted proapoptotic factors was documented. Taken together, our results promote the concept of epithelial HuR as a contextual modifier of proapoptotic gene expression in intestinal cancers, acting independently of bile acid metabolism to promote cancer. In the small intestine, epithelial HuR promotes expression of prosurvival transcripts that support Wnt-dependent tumorigenesis, whereas in the large intestine epithelial HuR indirectly downregulates certain proapoptotic RNAs to attenuate colitis-associated cancer. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5322-35. ©2014 AACR.

  10. Metabolism of green tea catechins by the human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Schantz, Markus; Erk, Thomas; Richling, Elke

    2010-10-01

    Numerous studies have shown that green tea polyphenols can be degraded in the colon, and there is abundant knowledge about the metabolites of these substances that appear in urine and plasma after green tea ingestion. However, there is very little information on the extent and nature of intestinal degradation of green tea catechins in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine in detail the microbial metabolism and chemical stability of these polyphenols in the small intestine using a well-established ex vivo model. For this purpose, fresh ileostomy fluids from two probands were incubated for 24 h under anaerobic conditions with (+)-catechin (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate (ECG), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatchin 3-O-gallate (EGCG) and gallic acid (GA). After lyophilisation and extraction, metabolites were separated, identified and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and HPLC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of EC and C (3', 4', 5'-trihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone and 3', 4'-dihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone) were identified. In addition, 3', 4', 5'-trihydroxyphenyl-γ-valerolactone was detected as a metabolite of EGC, and (after 24-h incubation) pyrogallol as a degradation product of GA. Cleavage of the GA esters of EGCG and ECG was also observed, with variations dependent on the sources (probands) of the ileal fluids, which differed substantially microbiotically. The results provide new information about the degradation of green tea catechins in the gastrointestinal tract, notably that microbiota-dependent liberation of GA esters may occur before these compounds reach the colon.

  11. Failure of d-psicose absorbed in the small intestine to metabolize into energy and its low large intestinal fermentability in humans.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Noriko; Yamada, Takako; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Miyazato, Shoko; Kishimoto, Yuka; Okuma, Kazuhiro; Tokuda, Masaaki; Izumori, Ken

    2010-02-01

    Experiments with rats have produced data on the metabolism and energy value of d-psicose; however, no such data have been obtained in humans. The authors assessed the availability of d-psicose absorbed in the small intestine by measuring carbohydrate energy expenditure (CEE) by indirect calorimetry. They measured the urinary excretion rate by quantifying d-psicose in urine for 48 hours. To examine d-psicose fermentation in the large intestine, the authors measured breath hydrogen gas and fermentability using 35 strains of intestinal bacteria. Six healthy subjects participated in the CEE test, and 14 participated in breath hydrogen gas and urine tests. d-Psicose fermentation subsequent to an 8-week adaptation period was also assessed by measuring hydrogen gas in 8 subjects. d-Psicose absorbed in the small intestine was not metabolized into energy, unlike glucose, because CEE did not increase within 3 hours of d-psicose ingestion (0.35 g/kg body weight [BW]). The accumulated d-psicose urinary excretion rates were around 70% for 0.34, 0.17, and 0.08 g/kg BW of ingested d-psicose. Low d-psicose fermentability was observed in intestinal bacteria and breath hydrogen gas tests, in which fructooligosaccharide (0.34, 0.17, and 0.08 g/kg BW) was used as a positive control because its available energy is known to be 8.4 kJ/g. Based on the results of the plot of breath hydrogen concentration vs calories ingested, the energy value of d-psicose was expected to be less than 1.6 kJ/g. Incremental d-psicose fermentability subsequent to an adaptation period was not observed.

  12. Breath testing for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: maximizing test accuracy.

    PubMed

    Saad, Richard J; Chey, William D

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has increased considerably owing to a growing recognition of its association with common bowel symptoms including chronic diarrhea, bloating, abdominal distention, and the irritable bowel syndrome. Ideally, an accurate and objective diagnosis of SIBO should be established before initiating antibiotic treatment. Unfortunately, no perfect test exists for the diagnosis of SIBO. The current gold standard, small-bowel aspiration and quantitative culture, is limited by its high cost, invasive nature, lack of standardization, sampling error, and need for dedicated infrastructure. Although not without shortcomings, hydrogen breath testing provides the simplest noninvasive and widely available diagnostic modality for suspected SIBO. Carbohydrates such as lactulose and glucose are the most widely used substrates in hydrogen breath testing, with glucose arguably providing greater testing accuracy. Lactose, fructose, and sorbitol should not be used as substrates in the assessment of suspected SIBO. The measurement of methane in addition to hydrogen can increase the sensitivity of breath testing for SIBO. Diagnostic accuracy of hydrogen breath testing in SIBO can be maximized by careful patient selection for testing, proper test preparation, and standardization of test performance as well as test interpretation.

  13. Breath testing for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: maximizing test accuracy.

    PubMed

    Saad, Richard J; Chey, William D

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has increased considerably owing to a growing recognition of its association with common bowel symptoms including chronic diarrhea, bloating, abdominal distention, and the irritable bowel syndrome. Ideally, an accurate and objective diagnosis of SIBO should be established before initiating antibiotic treatment. Unfortunately, no perfect test exists for the diagnosis of SIBO. The current gold standard, small-bowel aspiration and quantitative culture, is limited by its high cost, invasive nature, lack of standardization, sampling error, and need for dedicated infrastructure. Although not without shortcomings, hydrogen breath testing provides the simplest noninvasive and widely available diagnostic modality for suspected SIBO. Carbohydrates such as lactulose and glucose are the most widely used substrates in hydrogen breath testing, with glucose arguably providing greater testing accuracy. Lactose, fructose, and sorbitol should not be used as substrates in the assessment of suspected SIBO. The measurement of methane in addition to hydrogen can increase the sensitivity of breath testing for SIBO. Diagnostic accuracy of hydrogen breath testing in SIBO can be maximized by careful patient selection for testing, proper test preparation, and standardization of test performance as well as test interpretation. PMID:24095975

  14. Diagnosis of small intestinal intussuception by transabdominal ultrasonography in 2 adult horses.

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine-Rodgerson, G; Rodgerson, D H

    2001-01-01

    Transabdominal ultrasonography is frequently used to diagnose small intestinal intussusceptions in foals. We demonstrate that transabdominal ultrasonography also provides a rapid and accurate diagnosis of small intestinal intussusception in adult horses. A detailed description of the ultrasonographic appearance is provided. Images Figure 1a. Figure 1b. Figure 2. PMID:11360861

  15. Alterations in rat intestinal mucin patterns following luminal infusion of acetylsalicylic acid and prostaglandin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Satchithanandam, S; Cassidy, M M; Kharroubi, A T; Calvert, R J; Leeds, A R; Vahouny, G V

    1990-12-01

    The secretion of gastrointestinal mucin and/or the formation of mucoid caps have been implicated in cytoprotective or repair mechanisms related to mucosal injury models. In this study, rats were treated with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or prostaglandins (PG), and their effects on the synthesis and secretion of small intestinal mucin were examined. A newly developed polyclonal antibody to rat intestinal mucin was used for immunoassay of rat intestinal luminal and tissue mucin. The mucin antigen source was obtained by vacuum aspiration of luminal mucus. A high-molecular-weight glycoprotein (2 x 10(6) Da) fraction injected into rabbits produced a primary mucin antibody. A sensitive and quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed that yielded a highly reproducible and linear response with mucin aliquots containing 0-20 ng of protein/ml. Incorporation of the plasma tracers ([3H]glucose and [35S]sodium sulfate) into mucin derived from hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide precipitation after treatment with ASA (100 mg/kg body wt) decreased, although administration of dimethylprostaglandin E2 (100 micrograms/kg body wt) significantly increased the specific tracer incorporation values for the sialomucin and sulfomucin indices in luminal mucin fractions. The immunoassay data pattern for the ELISA technique was virtually identical to the results of the radiolabeled tracer method obtained for the same pharmacologic treatments. These experiments demonstrate that the estimation of synthesized mucin (tissue source) or secreted mucin (luminal source) as determined by the ELISA technique is similar to that obtained by the time-consuming and labor-intensive tracer incorporation methodology. PMID:1701376

  16. Net fluxes of electrolytes in the rat intestine infected with Moniliformis dubius (Acanthocephala).

    PubMed

    Mettrick, D F; Budziakowski, M E; Podesta, R B

    1979-08-01

    The effect of Moniliformis dubius on fluxes of Na+, K+, Cl-, and HCO3-in the rat intestine was determined using a conventional in vivo single-pass perfusion technique. Results for ion and water movements in the uninfected gut were in agreement with previous studies. In the parasitized intestine the jejunal pH was significantly lower than that in control animals, matching the restriction of the parasites to this region of the small intestine. While parasitism did not affect Na+ transport in the distal ileum, Na+ absorption was reduced (pH 7.0), or secretion enhanced (pH 6.0), in the two proximal regions. Cl-absorption was reduced in the distal ileum, but secretion was enhanced in the other two segments. Parasitism also enhanced K+ secretion in all segments. Net H2O absorption was reduced at pH 7.0; at pH 7.0; at pH 6.0 net secretion was also reduced. These changes clearly indicate that a parasite restricted to the jejunum may significantly affect the absorptive and secretory activity of the intestine distal to the site of infection. The results are discussed in the light of current concepts of electrolyte transport. The effect of the parasites on mucosal function distal to their site of attachment is discussed in terms of the release by the parasite of toxin-like substances, changes in the physical-chemical characteristics of the intestinal lumen, and interference with neurohormonal control of gastrointestinal function.

  17. Consequences of Mrp2 deficiency for diclofenac toxicity in the rat intestine ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van de Vegte, Dennis; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Sekine, Shuichi; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2015-02-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) has a high prevalence of intestinal side effects in humans and rats. It has been reported that Mrp2 transporter deficient rats (Mrp2) are more resistant to DCF induced intestinal toxicity. This was explained in vivo by impaired Mrp2-dependent biliary transport of DCF-acylglucuronide (DAG), leading to decreased intestinal exposure to DAG and DCF. However, it is not known to what extent adaptive changes in the Mrp2 intestine itself influence its sensitivity to DCF toxicity without the influence of liver metabolites. To investigate this, DCF toxicity and disposition were studied ex vivo by precision-cut intestinal slices and Ussing chamber using intestines from wild type(WT) and Mrp2 rats. The results show that adaptive changes due to Mrp2 deficiency concerning Mrp2, Mrp3 and BCRP gene expression, GSH content and DAG formation were different between liver and intestine. Furthermore, Mrp2 intestine was intrinsically more resistant to DCF toxicity than its WT counterpart ex vivo. This can at least partly be explained by a reduced DCF uptake by the Mrp2 intestine, but isnot related to the other adaptive changes in the intestine. The extrapolation of this data to humans with MRP2 deficiency is uncertain due to species differences in activity and regulation of transporters.

  18. Proximal small intestinal mucosal injury. Maintenance of glucose and glucose polymer absorption, attenuation of disaccharide absorption.

    PubMed

    Palacios, M; Madariaga, H; Heitlinger, L; Lee, P C; Lebenthal, E

    1989-03-01

    The effect of chronic intragastric infusion of hypertonic mannitol on small intestinal mucosal structure and function was studied in adult rats. Animals were gavage-fed 20% mannitol (1300 mosm) at a dose of 5 ml/100 g body weight daily for seven days. Control animals were gavage-fed tap water on the same schedule. On day 8, the animals were anesthetized, the duodenum cannulated, and a test sugar (glucose, glucose polymer, lactose, sucrose, or maltose) was infused at a dose of 0.5 g/kg body weight in 2.5 ml distilled water over less than 1 min. Portal vein glucose was measured at 30-min intervals from 0 to 120 min. Mannitol treatment resulted in histologic and biochemical alterations (reduced lactase, sucrase, maltase) limited to the proximal small intestine compared to the control group. The absorption of glucose and glucose polymers was similar in mannitol-treated and control animals. In contrast, digestion and absorption of lactose, sucrose, and maltose was significantly diminished in mannitol-treated animals when compared to controls. No changes in permeability to polyethylene glycol 4000 or Na+-coupled glucose transport were observed in mannitol-treated animals compared to controls. These data suggest that when the intestinal mucosa is exposed to hyperosmolar loads that the digestive capacity for disaccharides is suppressed more than its glucose absorptive capacities. Furthermore, glucose oligomers may be more readily digested and absorbed than disaccharides, in this setting, due, in part, to the proximal injury and less pronounced proximal-distal gradient for glucoamylase than other brush-border carbohydrases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Tissue engineering of the small intestine by acellular collagen sponge scaffold grafting.

    PubMed

    Hori, Y; Nakamura, T; Matsumoto, K; Kurokawa, Y; Satomi, S; Shimizu, Y

    2001-01-01

    Tissue engineering of the small intestine will prove a great benefit to patients suffering from short bowel disease. However cell seeding in tissue engineering, such as fetal cell use, is accompanied by problems of ethical issues, rejection, and short supply. To overcome these problems, we carried out an experimental study on tissue engineering of the small intestine by acellular collagen sponge scaffold grafting. We resected the 5 cm long jejunum from beagle dogs and reconstructed it by acellular collagen sponge grafting with a silicon tube stent. The graft was covered with the omentum. At 1 month after operation, the silicon stent was removed endoscopically. Animals were sacrificed 1 and 4 months after operation, and were examined microscopically. Neo-intestinal regeneration was observed and the intestinal mucosa covered the luminal side of the regenerated intestine across the anastomosis. Thus, the small intestine was regenerated by tissue engineering technology using an acellular collagen sponge scaffold.

  20. Ultrasonography of small intestinal inflammatory and neoplastic diseases in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Gaschen, Lorrie

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasonography, which has become a mainstay of diagnosing intestinal diseases in dogs and cats, is often one of the first diagnostic tools used to differentiate inflammatory from neoplastic infiltration of the small intestine. Although overlap in the sonographic appearances of inflammatory and neoplastic infiltration make a definitive diagnosis difficult, awareness of features of both diseases is important for the accurate interpretation of the sonographic findings. Full-thickness intestinal biopsy remains the gold standard for differentiating inflammatory from neoplastic disease of the small intestine.

  1. The Relationship between Small-Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Intestinal Permeability in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong Il; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Won, Kyoung Hee; Park, Soon Min

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a frequent finding in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Many patients with IBS also have abnormal intestinal permeability, which is probably due to low-grade inflammation in the intestinal mucosa. Our aim was to verify the relationship between SIBO and small-intestinal permeability in IBS patients. Methods A cohort of 38 IBS patients (20 women and 18 men; age range 16-70 years; mean age 40.2 years) with symptoms that fulfilled Rome-II criteria, and 12 healthy controls (5 women and 7 men; age range 25-52 years; mean age: 37.8 years) were recruited. All subjects underwent lactulose breath tests (LBTs) and intestinal permeability tests using the polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350/400 retrieval ratio. Results A positive LBT was found in 18.4% (7/38) of patients with IBS and 8.3% (1/12) of control subjects. Intestinal permeability was significantly increased in patients with IBS compared with the normal controls (0.82±0.09 vs 0.41±0.05 [mean±SD], respectively; p<0.05). However, the intestinal permeability did not differ significantly between IBS patients with a positive LBT and those with a negative LBT (0.90±0.13 and 0.80±0.11, respectively; p>0.05). Conclusions Intestinal permeability was increased in patients with IBS, but this finding did not correlated with the occurrence of SIBO. PMID:20431742

  2. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van der Bij, Hendrik A; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. Firstly, PCIS were incubated with 0-200 μM diclofenac (DCF), one of the most intensively studied NSAIDs, to investigate whether they could correctly reflect the toxic mechanisms. DCF induced intestinal toxicity in PCIS was shown by morphological damage and ATP depletion. DCF induced endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial injury and oxidative stress were reflected by up-regulated HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) and BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene expression, caspase 9 activation, GSH (glutathione) depletion and HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) gene up-regulation respectively. Furthermore, DCF intestinal metabolites, which gave rise to protein adduct but not toxicity, were detected in PCIS. Secondly, PCIS were incubated with various concentrations of five NSAIDs. Typical NSAID-induced morphological changes were observed in PCIS. The ex vivo toxicity ranking (diflunisal> diclofenac = indomethacin > naproxen ≫ aspirin) showed good correlation with published in vitro and in vivo data, with diflunisal being the only exception. In conclusion, PCIS correctly reflect the various mechanisms of DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, and can serve as an ex vivo model for the prediction of NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. PMID:25014874

  3. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van der Bij, Hendrik A; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. Firstly, PCIS were incubated with 0-200 μM diclofenac (DCF), one of the most intensively studied NSAIDs, to investigate whether they could correctly reflect the toxic mechanisms. DCF induced intestinal toxicity in PCIS was shown by morphological damage and ATP depletion. DCF induced endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial injury and oxidative stress were reflected by up-regulated HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) and BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene expression, caspase 9 activation, GSH (glutathione) depletion and HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) gene up-regulation respectively. Furthermore, DCF intestinal metabolites, which gave rise to protein adduct but not toxicity, were detected in PCIS. Secondly, PCIS were incubated with various concentrations of five NSAIDs. Typical NSAID-induced morphological changes were observed in PCIS. The ex vivo toxicity ranking (diflunisal> diclofenac = indomethacin > naproxen ≫ aspirin) showed good correlation with published in vitro and in vivo data, with diflunisal being the only exception. In conclusion, PCIS correctly reflect the various mechanisms of DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, and can serve as an ex vivo model for the prediction of NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity.

  4. Morphometric characteristics of the small and large intestines of Mus musculus during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Wołczuk, K; Wilczyńska, B; Jaroszewska, M; Kobak, J

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the size of the small and large intestine in postnatal development of Mus musculus mice. The gut was obtained from 2-, 4-, 6-, and 12-week-old animals. The morphometric analysis was performed at microscopic level. Measurements and calculations included dimensions of villi (height, diameter) and their number per 1 mm(2) surface area in the proximal, middle, and distal section of the small intestine, as well as the length and surface area (external and internal) of the small and large intestines. To find the allometric relationship between the size of the small and large intestines and body mass, reduced major axis regression was applied. The length and surface area of both intestinal segments gradually increased with age. The increase in the internal surface area of the small intestine was the result of lengthening of the intestine and increasing diameter of the villi in its proximal and middle sections. No increase in villus height during the studied period was detected. A marked increase in the size of the intestinal segments was observed between the 2(nd) and 4(th) weeks of life, when the length doubled and the surface area tripled in size. Allometric analysis revealed that the increase in length and internal surface area of the small and large intestines was more rapid than the body mass increase during the weaning period, while it was not different from isometry after the weaning. In conclusion, the greatest changes in the structure and size of the small and large intestines of mice occurred in the weaning period. During this period these two segments of intestine grew faster than the rest of the body and reached adult proportions.

  5. Intravenous administration of tetramethylpyrazine reduces intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Štefan; Pekárová, Tímea; Varga, Ján; Tóth, Štefan; Tomečková, Vladimíra; Gál, Peter; Veselá, Jarmila; Guzy, Juraj

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IIRI) is a life-threatening condition requiring prompt medical intervention. Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is a biologically active alkaloid isolated from Ligusticum wallichii. Previously, it was shown that TMP causes vasodilatation and inhibition of platelet aggregation as well as exhibits significant antioxidant effects. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate possible therapeutic effects of TMP in the prevention of IIRI. Wistar rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into eight experimental groups and subjected to a 1 h occlusion of cranial mesenteric artery followed by 0, 1, 12, and 24 h period of reperfusion. Thirty minutes before the IIRI animals received either TMP (30 mg/kg, i.v.) or identical volume of saline. In addition, a control group of 10 animals was not exposed to IIRI. Intestine morphology was evaluated by using histopathological injury index examination (HII), goblet and Paneth cells quantification as well as by applying immunofluorescent methods such as InSitu TUNEL and caspase-3 positivity assessment. Here we showed that preconditioning with TMP prior IIRI decreases the grade of injury. Significant reduction of HII was detected in TMP pretreated groups after 0, 1, and 12 h of reperfusion where injury reduction up to 75% was found. Lower histopathological damage in preconditioned groups was accompanied with increased number of secretory epithelial cells and decreased number of apoptotic cells. These results demonstrate the protective effect of TMP on the small intestine mucosa, suggesting administration of TMP as a molecule for pharmacological intervention against IIRI. PMID:23895154

  6. Regional Morphology and Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Rat Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Dallin; Bond, Tanner; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal permeability of PAMAM dendrimers has been observed, giving rationale for their use in oral drug delivery as potential carriers of associated molecules. This study assessed the apparent permeability coefficients (Papp) of dendrimers across isolated rat intestinal regional mucosae, along with estimation of the maximum non-toxic concentration. Caco-2 monolayers were also used to assess the comparative Papp values between isolated mucosae and cell culture models. Concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM of anionic and cationic dendrimers were tested in mucosae to assess their Papp, membrane TEER, [(14)C]-mannitol Papp, and histology. 0.1 mM concentrations of dendrimers were assessed over 120 min in Caco-2 cell monolayers as concentrations above that were cytotoxic. Jejunal transport of dendrimers was higher than transport in colonic epithelium. Monolayer Papp values of dendrimers were comparable to those of jejunal mucosae. Mucosae exposed to dendrimer concentrations of 10 mM for 120 min caused significant reduction in TEER and changes in tissue morphology; however, G3.5 was the only analogue that caused significant TEER reduction and morphological changes at 1 mM concentrations. Transport in jejunal mucosae appears to be the greatest indicating that the small intestinal will be the most likely region to target for oral drug delivery using PAMAM dendrimers.

  7. Calcium absorption in rat large intestine in vivo: availability of dietary calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Ammann, P.; Rizzoli, R.; Fleisch, H.

    1986-07-01

    Calcium absorption in the large intestine of the rat was investigated in vivo. After a single injection of /sup 45/CaCl/sub 2/ into the cecum, 26.0 +/- 2.5% (mean +/- SE, n = 9) of the /sup 45/CaCl/sub 2/ injected disappeared. This absorption was modulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, increased to 64.0 +/- 4.2% under a low-Ca diet, and increased under low-Pi diet. In contrast, when the difference of nonradioactive Ca in the cecal content and the feces was measured, only 4.1 +/- 4.6% (not significant) was absorbed. Secretion of intravenously injected /sup 45/Ca into the lumen was small and not altered by any of the conditions tested. When cecum contents were placed into duodenal tied loops, 14 +/- 6.2% were absorbed in situ when /sup 45/Ca was given orally, whereas when /sup 45/Ca was directly added to the content 35.6 +/- 4.6% were absorbed (P less than 0.02). These results indicate that the large intestine has an important vitamin D-dependent Ca absorptive system detectable if /sup 45/Ca is injected into the cecum. However, it is not effective in vivo because the Ca arriving in the large intestine appears to be no longer in an absorbable form.

  8. Intestinal absorption of dietary fat from a liquid diet perfused in rats at a submaximum level

    SciTech Connect

    Simko, V.; Kelley, R.E.

    1988-02-01

    The small intestine of rats was perfused in vivo for 2 h with a nutritionally complete liquid diet (68% calories from fat as corn oil). As the perfusion increased from 106 mg/2 h, the intestinal disappearance of the /sup 14/C-triolein marker remained proportional to the load up to 2359 mg fat/2 h. Despite a decrease in absorption from 70 to 17%, this represents a very large fat intake. Fat absorption improved when medium-chain triglycerides or octanoic acid replaced corn oil (both p less than 0.01). Linoleic acid was absorbed from the diet less than corn oil (p less than 0.01). Dry ox bile reduced fat absorption (p less than 0.05); lipase and an antacid had no effect. Corn oil perfused alone was absorbed better than from the diet (p less than 0.01). Data with /sup 14/C-triolein was confirmed by dry-weight disappearance of the diet and by net intestinal water balance. Usual feeding underutilizes a large reserve for fat absorption. This reserve should be considered in therapeutic nutrition.

  9. Morphometric study of the layers of the canine small intestine at five sampling sites.

    PubMed

    Sarriá, R; Latorre, R; Henroteaux, M; Henroteaux, N; Soria, F; Pérez-Cuadrado, E; López Albors, O

    2012-06-01

    The histology of the canine intestine has not been accurately defined. To establish the precise thickness of its different layers, whole wall samples of the small intestine were removed from 41 cadavers at five standardised sampling sites (duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, proximal ileum and distal ileum). The total thickness was estimated by morphometry, as was the thickness of the mucosa, muscularis mucosae, submucosa and muscularis externa. In addition, the size of the lymphoid aggregates in the submucosa and the thickness of the circular and longitudinal layers within both the muscularis mucosae and the muscularis externa were estimated. The total intestinal thickness depended very much upon the thickness of the mucosa and submucosa. The mucosa decreased progressively from proximal to distal parts of the small intestine (47% reduction). The thickness of the submucosa, however, changed little from the duodenum to the distal jejunum, but increased significantly in the ileum; this change was positively correlated with the amount of lymphoid tissue. Sex influenced the thickness of the intestinal wall, with males displaying higher thickness values along the small intestine. Conversely, no correlation between bodyweight and intestinal thickness was found for any of the five sampling sites. This study gives absolute and relative values for the thickness of the layers of the dog intestine which might help in the diagnosis of small intestinal pathology from postmortem samples and/or endoscopic biopsies.

  10. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus.

    PubMed

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75-5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF.

  11. Hypertonic saline releases the attached small intestinal cystic fibrosis mucus

    PubMed Central

    Ermund, Anna; Meiss, Lauren N; Scholte, Bob J; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2015-01-01

    Hypertonic saline inhalation has become a cornerstone in the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF), but its effect on CF mucus is still not understood. In CF, mucus stagnates in the airways, causing mucus plugging, and forming a substrate for bacterial invasion. Using horizontal Ussing-type chambers to allow easy access to the tissue, we have recently shown that the small intestinal mucus of CF mice is attached to the epithelium and not freely movable as opposed to normal mucus, thus pointing to a similarity between the CF mucus in the ileum and airways. In the same type of system, we investigated how hypertonic saline affects mucus thickness, attachment and penetrability to fluorescent beads the size of bacteria in ileal explants from the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant (ΔF508) mouse, in order to characterize how this common therapy affects mucus properties. Hypertonic saline (1.75–5%) detached the mucus from the epithelium, but the mucus remained impenetrable to beads the size of bacteria. This approach might be used to test other mucolytic interventions in CF. PMID:25311799

  12. Heavy ion induced changes in small intestinal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, K. E.; McCullough, J. S.; Brennan, P.; Hayes, T. L.; Ainsworth, E. J.; Nelson, A. C.

    1994-10-01

    The effects on 17 different structural parameters of mouse small intestine three days after treatment with three types of heavy ion (neon, iron and niobium) are compared, the first two being of particular relevance to space flight. The data for niobium are given in full, showing that changes after niobium ion treatment are not standard and are concentrated in the epithelial compartment, with few of the parameters having a response which is dose dependent. When comparisons are made for the three types of heavy ion, the damage is greatest after neon ion irradiation, implying that the additional non-epithelial damage produced as LET rises from X rays through neutrons to neon ions is not necessarily maintained as LET continues to rise. Further understanding is therefore needed of the balance between changes affecting the vascular and absorptive components of the organ. Variation from group to group is also important, as is variation of strain or gastrointestinal status. All such factors are important in the understanding of changes in multicellular organs after exposure to heavy ion radiation.

  13. Pinin modulates expression of an intestinal homeobox gene, Cdx2, and plays an essential role for small intestinal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jeong-Hoon; Taxter, Timothy J.; Munguba, Gustavo C.; Kim, Yong H.; Dhaduvai, Kanthi; Dunn, Nicholas W.; Degan, William J.; Oh, S. Paul; Sugrue, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Pinin (Pnn), a nuclear speckle-associated protein, has been shown to function in maintenance of epithelial integrity through altering expression of several key adhesion molecules. Here we demonstrate that Pnn plays a crucial role in small intestinal development by influencing expression of an intestinal homeobox gene, Cdx2. Conditional inactivation of Pnn within intestinal epithelia resulted in significant downregulation of a caudal type homeobox gene, Cdx2, leading to obvious villus dysmorphogenesis and severely disrupted epithelial differentiation. Additionally, in Pnn-deficient small intestine, we observed upregulated Tcf/Lef reporter activity, as well as misregulated expression/distribution of β-catenin and Tcf4. Since regulation of Cdx gene expression has been closely linked to Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, we explored the possibility of Pnn’s interaction with β-catenin, a major effector of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Pnn, together with its interaction partner CtBP2, a transcriptional co-repressor, was in a complex with β-catenin. Moreover, both of these proteins were found to be recruited to the proximal promoter area of Cdx2. Taken together, our results suggest that Pnn is essential for tight regulation of Wnt signaling and Cdx2 expression during small intestinal development. PMID:20637749

  14. [Intestinal absorption and urinary excretion of triethylenetetramine for Wilson's disease in rat].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Sugawara, M; Saitoh, H; Iseki, K; Miyazaki, K

    1990-10-01

    Triethylenetetramine.2.HCl (trientine, TE) is an orphan drug for the treatment of Wilson's disease. There has been no reports regarding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in the body. In the current study, the absorption and excretion of TE in rats were examined. The observed mean percentage amount of TE absorbed at the jejunum and ileum with the loop method for 1 h was 42.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Tight junction blocking agent inhibited the absorption of TE from the jejunum loop with 27%, but the absorption of TE from the ileum loop was not affected by this blocking agent. Therefore, the main absorption route for TE might be permeation across the plasma membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. TE and amikacin, a polycationic compound like TE, bound to the brush border membrane (BBM) of rat small intestine in the absence of inorganic ions such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and Cu2+. But the binding of TE to BBM was inhibited markedly under the physiological concentration of these ions. The bioavailability of TE was below 10% and the plasma levels of TE in non-fasted rats were significantly lower than that observed in fasted rats. The urinary excretion of unchanged TE during 24 h was only 3.5% of the orally administered dose. However, the urinary excretion of total TE including metabolites, though they have not been identified, was 35.7%. These results suggest that low bioavailability of TE might be due to the rapid metabolism in the body after absorption from the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Uptake mechanism of trientine by rat intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, R; Kobayashi, M; Sugawara, M; Iseki, K; Miyazaki, K

    1996-05-01

    The uptake characteristics of trientine by rat intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles were studied. The uptake characteristics of trientine were similar to those of the physiological polyamines with respect to the excessive accumulation in vesicles, the pH dependency, the temperature dependency and the ineffectiveness of K+ diffusion potential (inside negative). The initial uptake of trientine was saturable with a K(m) value of 1.13 mM, which was larger than that of spermine and spermidine. Furthermore, the uptake rate of trientine was dose-dependently inhibited by spermine and spermidine. Spermine competitively inhibited the uptake of trientine with a Ki value of 18.6 microM, and it was close to the K(m) value for spermine (30.4 microM). These data suggested that the uptake of trientine was similar to that of spermine and spermidine in rat small intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles, and these polyamines seem to inhibit the absorption of trientine from the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences.

  17. Efficient entrapment of large and small compounds during vesiculation of intestinal microvilli.

    PubMed Central

    van Dommelen, F S; Hamer, C M; De Jonge, H R

    1986-01-01

    An efficient method is described permitting the encapsulation of membrane-impermeable compounds at the interior of intestinal microvilli during vesicle formation. Rat intestinal epithelial cells were isolated by high-frequency vibration and exposed transiently to iso-osmotic medium containing 5 mM-EDTA. Vesiculation of microvilli was effected by freeze-thawing instead of mechanical fragmentation or hypo-osmotic lysis. Solutes to be entrapped were mixed with the extracellular medium before freezing in liquid N2. Microvillous vesicles were isolated from thawed cell suspensions by Ca2+- or Mg2+-aggregation of contaminants and differential centrifugation. The yield, purity, orientation and transport properties of the vesicles were similar, or superior, to preparations described in the literature. A high loading efficiency was demonstrated for small impermeants (cyclic GMP, ATP, Arsenazo III) as well as proteins (albumin); in contrast, loading of isolated vesicles by hypo-osmotic shock was only partially effective (cyclic GMP, ATP) or ineffective (albumin). Entrapment of an ATP-regenerating system could partially block a Mg2+-dependent conversion of intravesicular ATP into ADP. No evidence was obtained for the contribution of a proton pump to the intrinsic Mg2+-ATPase of the vesicle. Potential applications of the vesicle-loading technique in studies of brush-border transport regulation by intramicrovillar factors are discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3024625

  18. Investigation of coco-glucoside as a novel intestinal permeation enhancer in rat models.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Tanira A S; Rosa, Mónica; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Coulter, Ivan; Brayden, David J

    2014-11-01

    Due to instability in the GI tract and low intestinal permeability, peptides invariably have oral bioavailabilities below 1% and this has prevented the development of oral formulations. A mild plant-derived naturalalkyl polyglycoside (APG), coco-glucoside (CG), was studied for its capacity to enable rat intestinal permeation of the paracellular sugar marker, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000 (FD4), across isolated rat jejunal and colonic mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers, as well as the polypeptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT) following intra-intestinal instillations in rats. 0.1% (w/v) CG enabled a 2.9-fold increase in the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of FD4 over the basal Papp across colonic mucosae, but it was without effect in jejunal mucosae. In situ intestinal instillations revealed that although sCT was absorbed across rat colonic loops to a greater extent than jejunal, CG still improved sCT absolute bioavailability(F) from both segments. Histopathology of rat intestinal mucosae following exposure to CG indicated only minor perturbation with adequate maintenance of secretory function. High content analysis(HCA) on Caco-2 showed that acute and chronic exposure to a range of concentrations of CG did not cause sub-lethal damage at concentrations at which it was effective as an enhancer. Overall, CG increased bioavailability of sCT across rat jejunal and colonic loops without indication of tissue damage. Thus, CG has potential as a safe and effective intestinal enhancer for oral delivery of proteins and peptides.

  19. Increased intestinal barrier function in the small intestine of formula-fed neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Huygelen, V; De Vos, M; Willemen, S; Tambuyzer, B; Casteleyn, C; Knapen, D; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2012-12-01

    Within-litter birth weight variation is adversely correlated to piglet survival and postnatal growth. A less efficient epithelial barrier function in light piglets may partly explain this inverse relationship between birth weight and zootechnical performance. A compromised epithelial barrier increases paracellular permeability; consequently, toxins, allergenic compounds, or bacteria may enter systemic circulation and induce inflammatory responses. Dietary effects on function of gut epithelium of piglet are largely unknown. This study investigated epithelial barrier function of the small intestine of normal birth weight (NBW) piglets (1.46 ± 0.10 kg) and low birth weight (LBW) piglets (<1 kg at birth) in relation to their diet. Sixteen pairs of 3-d-old LBW and NBW piglets were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a sow-fed control group euthanized at day 3 of age (SOW3), piglets sow fed until day 10 (SOW10), and formula-fed piglets fed formula from day 3 until day 10 (FOR10). To measure gut permeability, piglets were dosed intragastrically with 0.75 g lactulose/kg BW and 0.3 g mannitol/kg BW 4 h before euthanasia. Urinary sugar excretion was measured using enzymatic spectrophotometry. Irrespective of birth weight, lactulose levels of FOR10 (4.4 ± 2.3 mmol/L) tended to be lower (P = 0.07) than SOW10 (26.4 ± 10.2 mmol/L) indicating a reduced paracellular intestinal permeability in FOR10. This reduction was associated with a 6-fold elevated (P < 0.01) protein expression of occludin, an important tight junction protein, in FOR10 compared to SOW10. Mannitol levels in FOR10 (31.0 ± 18.2 mmol/L) did not differ (P = 0.28) from SOW10 (61.1 ± 10.2 mmol/L). However, shorter villi (P < 0.01) in FOR10 indicated a reduced absorptive capacity. In conclusion, formula feeding caused minor symptoms of gastrointestinal dysfunction compared to sow-fed piglets irrespective of their birth weight.

  20. Differential response to DNA damage may explain different cancer susceptibility between small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Turner, Nancy D; Carroll, Raymond J; Chapkin, Robert S; Lupton, Joanne R

    2005-07-01

    Although large intestine (LI) cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, small intestine (SI) cancer is relatively rare. Because oxidative DNA damage is one possible initiator of tumorigenesis, we investigated if the SI is protected against cancer because of a more appropriate response to oxidative DNA damage compared with the LI. Sixty rats were allocated to three treatment groups: 3% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, a DNA-oxidizing agent) for 48 hrs, withdrawal (DSS for 48 hrs + DSS withdrawal for 48 hrs), or control (no DSS). The SI, compared with the LI, showed greater oxidative DNA damage (P < 0.001) as determined using a quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of 8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The response to the DNA adducts in the SI was greater than in the LI. The increase of TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptosis after DSS treatment was greater in the SI compared with the LI (P < 0.001), and there was a positive correlation (P = 0.031) between DNA damage and apoptosis in the SI. Morphologically, DSS caused an extensive loss of crypt structure shown in lower crypt height (P = 0.006) and the number of intact crypts (P = 0.0001) in the LI, but not in the SI. These data suggest that the SI may be more protected against cancer by having a more dynamic response to oxidative damage that maintains crypt morphology, whereas the response of the LI makes it more susceptible to loss of crypt architecture. These differential responses to oxidative DNA damage may contribute to the difference in cancer susceptibility between these two anatomic sites of the intestine.

  1. Mechanical Characteristics of a Polymer Spring Device used to Lengthen Small Intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberger, Douglas J.

    Short Bowel Syndrome (SBS) is a condition that occurs due to an insufficient amount of small intestine needed for nutrient absorption and water regulation of the body. A compression spring device is being developed in order to provide a mechanical stimulus to the tissue, as this type of force has been shown to promote lengthening of the tissue. The research completed in this thesis investigated the mechanical characteristics of the spring device and attempted to relate it to the functionality in rat and porcine intestinal tissue. Results from the evaluation of the springs show that Poly(epsilon-caprolactone), or PCL, is a sufficient polymer to use for creating a biodegradable device as the spring dimensions can be adjusted through variations in the diameter, thickness, and band size in order to provide an adequate spring constant for multiple animal types. Design of the springs, however, need to take into account the size of the gelatin capsule used, the amount of plastic deformation and creep behavior of the spring under compression for an extended time period, and the variation in the mechanical properties of the animal soft tissue that requires lengthening. Integration of the spring in-continuity requires a feature that will provide a mechanical resistance to force that is greater than the force of the spring in the compressed state. The spring still requires further development and any design should also take into account the possibility of intestinal perforations or obstructions. The polymer spring device provides a good means towards developing a treatment option for SBS, and other potential soft tissue lengthening needs of the body.

  2. Compensation by the residual intestine after intestinal resection in the rat. I. Influence of amount of tissue removed.

    PubMed

    Hanson, W R; Osborne, J W; Sharp, J G

    1977-04-01

    Thirty days after resection of 10 to 80% of the midportion of the small intestine, excluding the duodenum, several cell kinetic parameters were investigated in the residual intestine. The degree of intestinal response increased in a stepwise fashion as the amount of tissue removed was increased. The response involved marked increases in: DNA synthesis per crypt expressed as disintegrations per minute of tritium (3H) reflecting (3H)thymidine incorporation, cells per crypt column, 3H-labelled cells per crypt column, cells per villus column, and thickness of all intestinal wall components. These changes occureed throughout the small intestine even at lesser resections. "Crypt profiles'' reflected changes in cell counts, but when the labeling frequency of proliferative cells was expressed as a percentage of the total crypt height, there was no change. The total number of crypts in the duodenum remained unchanged and the total number of cyrpts in the residual jejunum plus ileum decreased proportionally to the amount of tissue removed. Intestinal compensation occurred by increasing the size of the structures present in the residual intestine, not by increasing the number of structural units. PMID:838224

  3. Effect of honey consumption on intestinal motility in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Alagwu, E A; Egwurugwu, J N; Nneli, R O; Oguike, F; Osim, E E

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of honey on intestinal motility and transit using twenty (20) male albino rats of Wistar strain weighing 210-220g. The rats were randomly grouped into control and honey-fed (test) groups of ten (10) rats each. The control group was fed on normal rat chow ( Pfizer Company, Nigeria ) and water while the test group was fed on rat feed, water and honey ( 1 ml of honey to every 10 ml initial drinking water daily) for twenty two (22) weeks after which the rats were starved over night before the experiment and sacrificed by stunning. Laparatomy was immediately performed, proximal and distal portions of the intestine identified, cut and put in aerated tyrode solution. Cut sections of the ileum (2-3cm) were mounted on organ bath instrument for motility experiment with varying concentrations of acetylcholine and carbachol. Contractions were recorded as well as the intestinal transit in each group and lengths of intestine with total mean values calculated. Results obtained showed that honey significantly decreased (p<0.01 ) intestinal transit in the test group (21.15±0.75 ) compared with the control group ( 35.96±1.15); decreased intestinal motility in the test group compared with the control and caused significant percentage reduction of intestinal motility with varied concentrations of acetylcholine and carbachol in the test group ( Ach-75.00±0.75%; Carbachol-79.00±0.28%) compared with the control group (Ach-62.00±0.39%; Carbachol-51.00±0.39%). In conclusion, unprocessed Nigerian honey decreased intestinal transit, caused intestinal smooth muscle inhibition and motility and reduced sensitivity of gastrointestinal tract to cholinergic agents. PMID:24937393

  4. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Bioavailability Regulates Angiogenesis and Intestinal Stem and Progenitor Cell Proliferation during Postnatal Small Intestinal Development

    PubMed Central

    Holoyda, Kathleen A.; Hou, Xiaogang; Fowler, Kathryn L.; Grikscheit, Tracy C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly conserved, master regulatory molecule required for endothelial cell proliferation, organization, migration and branching morphogenesis. Podocoryne carnea and drosophila, which lack endothelial cells and a vascular system, express VEGF homologs, indicating potential roles beyond angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. The role of VEGF in the development and homeostasis of the postnatal small intestine is unknown. We hypothesized regulating VEGF bioavailability in the postnatal small intestine would exhibit effects beyond the vasculature and influence epithelial cell stem/progenitor populations. Methods VEGF mutant mice were created that overexpressed VEGF in the brush border of epithelium via the villin promotor following doxycycline treatment. To decrease VEGF bioavailability, sFlt-1 mutant mice were generated that overexpressed the soluble VEGF receptor sFlt-1 upon doxycycline administration in the intestinal epithelium. Mice were analyzed after 21 days of doxycycline administration. Results Increased VEGF expression was confirmed by RT-qPCR and ELISA in the intestine of the VEGF mutants compared to littermates. The VEGF mutant duodenum demonstrated increased angiogenesis and vascular leak as compared to littermate controls. The VEGF mutant duodenum revealed taller villi and increased Ki-67-positive cells in the transit-amplifying zone with reduced Lgr5 expression. The duodenum of sFlt-1 mutants revealed shorter villi and longer crypts with reduced proliferation in the transit-amplifying zone, reduced expression of Dll1, Bmp4 and VE-cadherin, and increased expression of Sox9 and EphB2. Conclusions Manipulating VEGF bioavailability leads to profound effects on not only the intestinal vasculature, but epithelial stem and progenitor cells in the intestinal crypt. Elucidation of the crosstalk between VEGF signaling in the vasculature, mesenchyme and epithelial stem/progenitor cell populations may direct future

  5. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  6. Prevalence of intestinal and blood parasites among wild rats in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti Shafiyyah, C O; Jamaiah, I; Rohela, M; Lau, Y L; Siti Aminah, F

    2012-12-01

    A survey was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of intestinal and blood parasites among wild rats in urban area of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of 137 stool and blood samples were collected from wild rats from Sentul and Chow Kit areas. Five species of rats were captured and supplied by Kuala Lumpur City Hall. The most common was Rattus rattus diardii (Malayan Black rat), 67%, followed by Rattus norvegicus (Norway rat), 10%, Rattus argentiventer (rice-field rat), 10%, Rattus tiomanicus (Malaysian field rat), 9% and Rattus exulans (Polynesian rat), 4%. Rattus rattus diardii is commonly known to live in human environment and they are normally identified as pests to human community. More male rats were captured (61%) compared to female (39%). Out of 137 samples, 81.8% samples were positive with intestinal parasites, with 86.2% from Sentul area and 78.5% from Chow Kit area. Six different parasites were detected. The most common intestinal helminth parasite detected was Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (80.3%), followed by Hymenolepis nana (23.4%), Capillaria hepatica (13.9%) and Hymenolepis diminuta (2.9%). Intestinal protozoan detected was Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (8.8%). Trypanosoma lewisi (1.5%) was the only blood parasite detected.

  7. The Effects of Boron Derivatives on Lipid Absorption from the Intestine and on Bile Lipids and Bile Acids of Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Iris H.; Reynolds, David J.; Wong, O. T.; Sood, A.; Spielvogel, B. F.

    1995-01-01

    N,N-dimethyl-n-octadecylamine borane 1 at 8 mg/kg/day, tetrakis-u-(trimethylamine boranecarboxylato)-bis(trimethyl-carboxyborane)-dicopper(II) 2 at 2.5 mg/kg/day and trimethylamine-carboxyborane 3 at 8 mg/kg/day were evaluated for their effects on bile lipids, bile acids, small intestinal absorption of cholesterol and cholic acid and liver and small intestinal enzyme activities involved in lipid metabolism. The agent administered orally elevated rat bile excretion of lipids, e.g. cholesterol and phospholipids, and compounds 2 and 3 increased the bile flow rate. These agents altered the composition of the bile acids, but there was no significant increase in lithocholic acid which is most lithogenic agent in rats. The three agents did decrease cholesterol absorption from isolated in situ intestinal duodenum loops in the presence of drug. Hepatic and small intestinal mucosa enzyme activities, e.g. ATP-dependent citrate lyase, acyl CoA cholesterol acyl transferase, cholsterol-7-α -hydroxylase, sn glycerol-3-phosphate acyl transferase, phosphatidylate phosphohydrolase, and lipoprotein lipase, were reduced. However, the boron derivatives 1 and 3 decreased hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activity, the regulatory enzyme for cholesterol synthesis, but the compounds had no effects on small intestinal mucosa HMG-CoA reductase activity. There was no evidence of hepatic cell damage afforded by the drugs based on clinical chemistry values which would induce alterations in bile acid concentrations after treatment of the rat. PMID:18472747

  8. Intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid in rats immunized with protein-sulfanilic acid conjugate.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Kawaratani, T; Kawashima, K; Hashida, M; Sezaki, H

    1990-07-01

    Intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid was examined by means of an in vitro everted sac technique in rats immunized with a bovine gamma-globulin-sulfanilic acid conjugate. At a low concentration of sulfanilic acid, the intestinal transport of sulfanilic acid was decreased in rats immunized with bovine gamma-globulin-sulfanilic acid conjugate. This phenomenon was dose dependent and antigen specific, since there was no difference in the transport of sulfanilic acid at a high concentration and of an unrelated hapten. These results suggested that parenteral immunization impaired not only the intestinal transport of macromolecular antigens, as previously shown, but also the transport of the low molecular weight hapten, sulfanilic acid.

  9. Oral treatment of Fischer 344 rats with weathered crude oil and a dispersant influences intestinal metabolism and microbiota.

    PubMed

    George, S E; Nelson, G M; Kohan, M J; Warren, S H; Eischen, B T; Brooks, L R

    2001-06-22

    When oil is spilled into aquatic systems, chemical dispersants frequently are applied to enhance emulsification and biological availability. In this study, a mammalian model system was used to determine the effect of Bonnie Light Nigerian crude oil, weathered for 2 d with continuous spraying and recirculation, and a widely used dispersant, Corexit (Cx) 9527, on intestinal microbial metabolism and associated populations. To determine the subchronic dose, concentrated or diluted (1:2, 1:5, 1:10, 1:20) Cx9527 or oil was administered by gavage to Fischer 344 rats and the effect on body weight was determined. Next, rats were treated for 5 wk with oil, dispersant, or dispersant + oil. Body and tissue weights, urine mutagenicity, and the impact on the intestinal microflora and three microbial intestinal enzymes linked to bioactivation were determined in the small and large intestines and cecum. Two tested dispersants, Cx9527 and Cx9500, were toxic in vitro (1:1,000 dilution), and oil was not mutagenic in strains TA98 and TA100(+/-S9). None of the treated rats produced urine mutagens detected by TA98 or TA100. Undiluted dispersant was lethal to rats, and weight changes were observed depending on the dilution, whereas oil generally was not toxic. In the 5-wk study, body and tissue weights were unaffected at the doses administered. Small-intestinal levels of azoreductase (AR), beta-glucuronidase (BG), and nitroreductase (NR) were considerably lower than cecal and large-intestinal activities at the same time point. A temporal increase in AR activity was observed in control animals in the 3 tissues examined, and large-intestinal BG activity was elevated in 3-wk controls. No significant changes in cecal BG activity were observed. Oil- or dispersant-treated rats had mixed results with reduced activity at 3 wk and elevated activity at 5 wk compared to controls. However, when the dispersant was combined with oil at 3 wk, a reduction in activity was observed that was similar to

  10. Sleeve gastrectomy does not cause hypertrophy and reprogramming of intestinal glucose metabolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mumphrey, Michael B.; Hao, Zheng; Townsend, R. Leigh; Patterson, Laurel M.; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Clinical studies have shown similar rapid improvements in body mass and glycemic control after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG). Evidence suggests that adaptive intestinal tissue growth and reprogramming of intestinal glucose disposal plays a key role in the beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis after RYGB, but it is not known whether such adaptive changes also occur after sleeve gastrectomy. METHODS High-fat diet-induced obese rats were subjected to either VSG or RYGB and intestinal growth and functional adaptations were assessed by using morphometric, immunohistochemical and immuno-blot techniques, 3 months after surgery or sham surgery. RESULTS The cross-sectional areas of the Roux and common limbs are significantly increased after RYGB compared with sham surgery (Roux limb: 17.1 ± 4.0 vs. 5.5 ± 0.1 mm2; common limb: 11.7 ± 0.6 vs. 5.1 ± 0.5 mm2; p < 0.01), but the cross-sectional area of the corresponding jejunum is not different from controls after VSG. Similarly, mucosal thickness and the number of GLP-1 cells are not increased after VSG. Protein expression of hexokinase II is increased four-fold (p <0.01) in the Roux limb after RYGB, but not in the jejunum after VSG. CONCLUSIONS Adaptive hypertrophy and reprogramming of glucose metabolism in the small intestine are not necessary for VSG to improve body composition and glycemic control. The similar beneficial effects of VSG and RYGB on glucose homeostasis might be mediated by different mechanisms. PMID:25566744

  11. Melatonin Immunoreactivity in Malignant Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Rasmusson, Annica J.; Ali, Abir; Stridsberg, Mats; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are derived from enterochromaffin cells. After demonstrating melatonin in enterochromaffin cells, we hypothesized that SI-NETs may express and secrete melatonin, which may have an impact on clinical factors and treatment response. Methods Tumour tissue from 26 patients with SI-NETs, representing paired sections of primary tumour and metastasis, were immunohistochemically stained for melatonin and its receptors, MT1 and MT2. Plasma melatonin and immunoreactivity (IR) for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 in tumour cells were compared to other tumour markers and clinical parameters. Melatonin was measured at two time points in fasting morning plasma from 43 patients with SI-NETs. Results Melatonin IR was found in all SI-NETS. Melatonin IR intensity in primary tumours correlated inversely to proliferation index (p = 0.022) and patients reported less diarrhoea when melatonin IR was high (p = 0.012). MT1 IR was low or absent in tumours. MT2 expression was medium to high in primary tumours and generally reduced in metastases (p = 0.007). Plasma-melatonin ranged from 4.5 to 220.0 pg/L. Higher levels were associated with nausea at both time points (p = 0.027 and p = 0.006) and flush at the second sampling. In cases with disease stabilization or remission (n = 34), circulating melatonin levels were reduced in the second sample (p = 0.038). Conclusion Immunoreactive melatonin is present in SI-NETs. Circulating levels of melatonin in patients with SI-NETs are reduced after treatment. Our results are congruent with recent understanding of melatonin’s endocrine and paracrine functions and SI-NETs may provide a model for further studies of melatonin function. PMID:27736994

  12. Crosslinking Decreases the Hemocompatibility of Decellularized, Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, Jeremy J.; Polsin, Elizabeth G.; Hinds, Monica T.

    2014-01-01

    Decellularized tissues have been widely used as scaffolds for biomedical applications due to their presentation of adhesion peptide sequences and growth factors, which facilitate integration with surrounding tissue. One of the most commonly used decellularized tissue is derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). In some applications, SIS is crosslinked to modulate the mechanical properties or degradation rate of the scaffold. Despite the widespread use of SIS, there has been no mechanistic characterization of blood reactions with SIS, nor how crosslinking affects these reactions. Therefore, we characterized the effect of SIS and carbodiimide-crosslinked SIS (cSIS) on plasma coagulation, including targeted assessments of the intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways, and thrombus formation using flowing whole blood. SIS inhibited plasma coagulation initiated by recalcification, as well as low concentrations of thrombin or tissue factor. SIS prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time by 14.3±1.54 sec, indicating inhibition of the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Carbodiimide crosslinking abrogated all anticoagulant effects of SIS, as did heparinase I and III treatment, suggesting heparin and heparan sulfate are predominantly responsible for SIS anticoagulant effects. Inhibiting contact activation of the intrinsic pathway prevented cSIS-mediated coagulation. When tubular SIS devices were connected to a nonhuman primate arteriovenous shunt loop, which enables whole blood to flow across devices without the use of anticoagulants, SIS demonstrated remarkably limited platelet accumulation and fibrinogen incorporation, while cSIS initiated significantly higher platelet and fibrinogen accumulation. These results demonstrate that SIS is a thromboresistant material and crosslinking markedly reduces the hemocompatibility of SIS. PMID:25463505

  13. Parameterization of small intestinal water volume using PBPK modeling.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Anil; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Edginton, Andrea

    2015-01-25

    To facilitate accurate predictions of oral drug disposition, mechanistic absorption models require optimal parameterization. Furthermore, parameters should maintain a biological basis to establish confidence in model predictions. This study will serve to calculate an optimal parameter value for small intestinal water volume (SIWV) using a model-based approach. To evaluate physiologic fidelity, derived volume estimates will be compared to experimentally-based SIWV determinations. A compartmental absorption and transit (CAT) model, created in Matlab-Simulink®, was integrated with a whole-body PBPK model, developed in PK-SIM 5.2®, to provide predictions of systemic drug disposition. SIWV within the CAT model was varied between 52.5mL and 420mL. Simulations incorporating specific SIWV values were compared to pharmacokinetic data from compounds exhibiting solubility induced non-proportional changes in absorption using absolute average fold-error. Correspondingly, data pertaining to oral administration of acyclovir and chlorothiazide were utilized to derive estimates of SIWV. At 400mg, a SIWV of 116mL provided the best estimates of acyclovir plasma concentrations. A similar SIWV was found to best depict the urinary excretion pattern of chlorothiazide at a dose of 100mg. In comparison, experimentally-based estimates of SIWV within adults denote a central tendency between 86 and 167mL. The derived SIWV (116mL) represents the optimal parameter value within the context of the developed CAT model. This result demonstrates the biological basis of the widely utilized CAT model as in vivo SIWV determinations correspond with model-based estimates.

  14. Crosslinking decreases the hemocompatibility of decellularized, porcine small intestinal submucosa.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Jeremy J; Polsin, Elizabeth G; Hinds, Monica T

    2015-03-01

    Decellularized tissues have been widely used as scaffolds for biomedical applications due to their presentation of adhesion peptide sequences and growth factors, which facilitate integration with surrounding tissue. One of the most commonly used decellularized tissues is derived from porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). In some applications, SIS is crosslinked to modulate the mechanical properties or degradation rate of the scaffold. Despite the widespread use of SIS, there has been no mechanistic characterization of blood reactions with SIS, or how crosslinking affects these reactions. Therefore, we characterized the effect of SIS and carbodiimide-crosslinked SIS (cSIS) on plasma coagulation, including targeted assessments of the intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways, and thrombus formation using flowing whole blood. SIS inhibited plasma coagulation initiated by recalcification, as well as low concentrations of thrombin or tissue factor. SIS prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time by 14.3 ± 1.54s, indicating inhibition of the intrinsic coagulation pathway. Carbodiimide crosslinking abrogated all anticoagulant effects of SIS, as did heparinase I and III treatment, suggesting that heparin and heparan sulfate are predominantly responsible for SIS anticoagulant effects. Inhibiting contact activation of the intrinsic pathway prevented cSIS-mediated coagulation. When tubular SIS devices were connected to a nonhuman primate arteriovenous shunt loop, which enables whole blood to flow across devices without the use of anticoagulants, SIS demonstrated remarkably limited platelet accumulation and fibrinogen incorporation, while cSIS initiated significantly higher platelet and fibrinogen accumulation. These results demonstrate that SIS is a thromboresistant material and crosslinking markedly reduces the hemocompatibility of SIS. PMID:25463505

  15. Absorption of thiamine and nicotinic acid in the rat intestine during fasting and immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirilyuk, O. G.; Khmelevskiy, Y. V.

    1980-01-01

    By perfusion of isolated sections of intestine with a solution containing thiamine at a concentration of 3.1 micromole, it was established that thiamine absorption in animals fasted for 72 hours decreased by 28 percent, whereas absorption increased by 12 percent in rats after 24 hour immobilization. After immobilization, absorption of label in the intestinal mucosa increased. Na K ATPase activity in the intestinal mucosa decreased by 10 percent during fasting, and it increased with immobilization of the animals. Activity of Na K ATPase in the intestinal mucosa cells determined the absorption rate of thiamine and nicotinic acid at the level of vitamin transport through the plasma membranes of the enterocytes.

  16. Hormone induced expression of brush border lactase in suckling rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Kamaljit Kaur; Mahmood, Safrun; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2008-05-01

    The postnatal development of intestine is associated with a decline in brush border lactase activity in rodents. This is similar to adulthood hypolactasia, a phenomenon prevalent in humans worldwide. In the present study, the effect of luminal proteases from adult rat intestine was studied in vitro on intestinal lactase activity in saline control, thyroxine, insulin and cortisone treated rat pups. Lactase levels were determined by enzyme analysis and Western blotting. mRNA levels encoding lactase were determined by Northern blotting. Administration of thyroxine for 4 days reduced (P<0.05) lactase activity, but insulin treatment had no effect in 8-day-old rat intestine. However, cortisone administration augmented (P<0.01) lactase activity, under these conditions. Western blot analysis showed decreased lactase signal corresponding to 220-kDa protein band in thyroxine treated animals. However, the intensity of lactase signal was high in cortisone treated animals compared to controls. mRNA levels encoding lactase showed a 6.8-kb mRNA transcript in saline and hormone treated rats. mRNA levels encoding lactase were increased in cortisone treated animals but were reduced in thyroxine injected pups compared to controls. Microvillus membranes from saline (P<0.01) and thyroxine (P<0.05) or insulin (P<0.01) treated rats upon incubation with luminal wash from adult rat intestine showed a significant decline in lactase activity. These findings suggest that thyroxine, insulin or cortisone induced changes in lactase expression in suckling rat intestine make it susceptible to luminal proteases, which may in part be responsible for observed maturational decline in lactase activity in adult rat intestine.

  17. Intestinal mucosal mast cells in normal and nematode-infected rat intestines are in intimate contact with peptidergic nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Stead, R H; Tomioka, M; Quinonez, G; Simon, G T; Felten, S Y; Bienenstock, J

    1987-01-01

    Inflammatory or allergic conditions, as well as situations where healing and repair processes occur, are characterized by the presence of increased numbers of mast cells. Previous work on the effect of neuropeptides on mast cell mediator release showed that only substance P caused such release from intestinal mucosal mast cells [Shanahan, F., Denburg, J. A., Fox, J., Bienenstock, J. & Befus, A. D. (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 1331-1337]. Accordingly, we investigated the microanatomical relationship between mast cells and enteric nerves in normal rat intestine and parasite-infected rat intestine, in which mucosal mast cell hyperplasia occurs. Combined immunohistochemistry for neuron-specific enolase and staining with alcian blue at pH 0.5 was employed on paraffin-embedded sections of normal and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rat jejunum. Sixty-seven percent of intestinal mucosal mast cells were touching subepithelial nerves, and an additional 20% were within 2 micron of nerves. Assessment of the proportion of the lamina propria occupied by mast cells (12.5%), the average mast cell area (121 +/- 28 microns 2), and the density of enteric nerves (one per 788 +/- 151 microns 2) suggested that the association was 5 times greater than would be expected by chance alone (P less than 0.0001). In consecutive sections, the nerves in contact with mast cells were also shown to contain substance P and/or calcitonin-gene-related peptide. Electron microscopy confirmed this association: 8% of the mast cells in infected rats exhibited membrane-membrane contact with unmyelinated axons containing 70- to 170-nm dense-core vesicles, and an additional 31% were situated less than 250 nm from nerves. Other mast cells appeared to embrace nerve bundles through the projection of lamellopodia. These data provide systematic quantitative evidence that a structural foundation for communication between the immune and nervous systems exists in the rat gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:2437589

  18. Intestinal transport of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose, a major active component of Polygala tenuifolia, using Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Steinmetz, André; Liao, Yonghong; Wang, Ning; Peng, Bo; Chang, Qi

    2013-10-01

    3,6'-Disinapoylsucrose is a major active component of the herb Polygala tenuifolia which has long been used for relieving tranquilization, uneasiness of the mind, and improving learning and memory. Our previous study found that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had a very low oral bioavailability. Its mechanisms of absorption in the small intestine have so far been unclear. In the present study, the absorption mechanisms of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose were investigated by using the Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models. The 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose concentration was determined by an LC/MS/MS method. In a Caco-2 cell transport study, the results showed that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had very limited intestinal permeability with average apparent permeability coefficient values around (1.11-1.34) × 10(-7) cm/s from the apical (A) to the basolateral (B) side and (1.37-1.42) × 10(-7) cm/s from B to A, at concentrations of 5, 20, and 33 µM. No concentration dependence in the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport was observed. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose (5 µM) from A to B greatly increased to 4.49 × 10(-7) and 1.81 × 10(-7) cm/s, respectively, when the cells were preincubated with EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM). No significant effect on the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport by the inhibitors including verapamil, cyclosporine A, and sodium azide was observed. Similar results were found in the small intestinal perfusion study. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose greatly increased from 3.97 × 10(-6) to 23.4 × 10(-6) and 20.0 × 10(-6) cm/s in the presence of EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM), respectively, in perfusion buffer. An in vitro stability evaluation of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose in the gastrointestinal tract showed that it was relatively stable both in the stomach and small intestine contents, while it was found to be more instable in the colon contents. All of the

  19. Intestinal transport of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose, a major active component of Polygala tenuifolia, using Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Liu, Xinmin; Pan, Ruile; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Steinmetz, André; Liao, Yonghong; Wang, Ning; Peng, Bo; Chang, Qi

    2013-10-01

    3,6'-Disinapoylsucrose is a major active component of the herb Polygala tenuifolia which has long been used for relieving tranquilization, uneasiness of the mind, and improving learning and memory. Our previous study found that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had a very low oral bioavailability. Its mechanisms of absorption in the small intestine have so far been unclear. In the present study, the absorption mechanisms of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose were investigated by using the Caco-2 cell monolayer and in situ rat intestinal perfusion models. The 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose concentration was determined by an LC/MS/MS method. In a Caco-2 cell transport study, the results showed that 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose had very limited intestinal permeability with average apparent permeability coefficient values around (1.11-1.34) × 10(-7) cm/s from the apical (A) to the basolateral (B) side and (1.37-1.42) × 10(-7) cm/s from B to A, at concentrations of 5, 20, and 33 µM. No concentration dependence in the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport was observed. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose (5 µM) from A to B greatly increased to 4.49 × 10(-7) and 1.81 × 10(-7) cm/s, respectively, when the cells were preincubated with EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM). No significant effect on the 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose transport by the inhibitors including verapamil, cyclosporine A, and sodium azide was observed. Similar results were found in the small intestinal perfusion study. The apparent permeability coefficient value of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose greatly increased from 3.97 × 10(-6) to 23.4 × 10(-6) and 20.0 × 10(-6) cm/s in the presence of EDTA (17 mM) and sodium caprate (5.14 mM), respectively, in perfusion buffer. An in vitro stability evaluation of 3,6'-disinapoylsucrose in the gastrointestinal tract showed that it was relatively stable both in the stomach and small intestine contents, while it was found to be more instable in the colon contents. All of the

  20. Ascites Drainage Leading to Intestinal Adhesions at the Mesentery of the Small Intestine with Fatal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kettler, B.; Schrem, H.; Klempnauer, J.; Grannas, G.

    2014-01-01

    A common problem in patients with chronic liver diseases and liver cirrhosis is the development of ascites. First line therapy for ascites is the restriction of sodium intake and a diuretic treatment. Paracentesis is indicated in patients with large compromising volumes of ascites. In selected cases, permanent drainage of ascites over prolonged periods of time may be indicated. In the case presented here, a 66-year-old male patient, who was hospitalized with liver cirrhosis caused by alcoholic abuse, required permanent drainage of ascites. After three weeks of continuous ascites drainage, he developed bacterial peritonitis. Conventional attempts to remove the catheter by transcutaneous pulling failed and we thus decided to perform a median laparotomy to remove the catheter surgically. Intraoperatively an adhesion of the ascites drain (a so called ‘basket catheter’) to the mesentery very close to the small intestine was found, approximately 50 mm distal of the ligament suspensorium duodeni (ligament of Treitz). The basket catheter used for this patient was especially designed to drain infections, not fluids. We solved the adhesion, removed the basket catheter, placed a new surgical drain and finished the operation. The patient developed a rupture of his abdominal fascia suture 12 days later, which was caused by massive ascites and complicated by hepatorenal syndrome type I. The patient was taken to the operating theater again. After the second operation, the chronic liver failure decompensated and the patient died. Ascites caused by liver cirrhosis is still a medical challenge. The indication for the use of the correct percutaneous catheter for permanent paracentesis should be carefully considered. Some catheters are obviously not suited to drain ascites and may lead to fatal outcomes. PMID:24453504

  1. Contribution of the distal small intestine to metabolic improvement after bariatric/metabolic surgery: Lessons from ileal transposition surgery.

    PubMed

    Oh, Tae Jung; Ahn, Chang Ho; Cho, Young Min

    2016-04-01

    Roux-en Y gastric bypass is a highly effective bariatric/metabolic surgical procedure that can induce robust weight loss and even remission of type 2 diabetes. One of the characteristic consequences of Roux-en Y gastric bypass is the expedited nutrient delivery to the distal small intestine, where L-cells are abundant and bile acid reabsorption occurs. To examine the role of the distal small intestine in isolation from other components of Roux-en Y gastric bypass, the ileal transposition (IT) surgery has been used in various rat models. IT relocates the distal ileal segment to the upper jejunum distal to the ligament of Treitz without any other alterations in the gastrointestinal anatomy. Therefore, IT exposes the distal ileal tissue to ingested nutrients after a meal faster than the normal condition. Although there is some inconsistency in the effect of IT according to different types of rat models and different types of surgical protocols, IT typically improved glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity and induced weight loss, and the findings were more prominent in obese diabetic rats. Suggested mechanisms for the metabolic improvements after IT include increased L-cell secretion (e.g., glucagon-like peptides and peptide YY), altered bile acid metabolism, altered host-microbial interaction, attenuated metabolic endotoxemia and many others. Based on the effect of IT, we can conclude that the contribution of the distal small intestine to the metabolic benefits of bariatric/metabolic surgery is quite considerable. By unveiling the mechanism of action of IT, we might revolutionize the treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  2. The protective role of montelukast against intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shenbao; Zhu, Xuxing; Jin, Zhonghai; Tong, Xiuping; Zhu, Liqin; Hong, Xiaofei; Zhu, Xianfei; Liu, Pengfei; Shen, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Several drugs are effective in attenuating intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI); however little is known about the effect of montelukast. Fifty rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups: model group (operation with clamping), sham group (operation without clamping), and study group (operation with clamping and 0.2, 2 and 20 mg/kg montelukast pretreatment). Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion was performed by occlusion (clamping) of the arteria mesenterica anterior for 45 min, followed by 24 h reperfusion. Intestinal IRI in the model group led to severe damage of the intestinal mucosa, liver and kidney. The Chiu scores of the intestines from the study group (2 and 20 mg/kg) were lower than that of the model group. Intestinal IRI induced a marked increase in CysLTR1, Caspase-8 and -9 expression in intestine, liver and kidney, which were markedly reduced by preconditioning with 2 mg/kg montelukast. Preconditioning with 2 g/kg montelukast significantly attenuated hepatic tissue injury and kidney damage, and decreased plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in plasma after intestinal IRI. In conclusion, preconditioning with montelukast could attenuate intestinal IRI and the subsequent systemic inflammatory response in rats. PMID:26497763

  3. Intestinal ischemic preconditioning reduces liver ischemia reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    XUE, TONG-MIN; TAO, LI-DE; ZHANG, JIE; ZHANG, PEI-JIAN; LIU, XIA; CHEN, GUO-FENG; ZHU, YI-JIA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate whether intestinal ischemic preconditioning (IP) reduces damage to the liver during hepatic ischemia reperfusion (IR). Sprague Dawley rats were used to model liver IR injury, and were divided into the sham operation group (SO), IR group and IP group. The results indicated that IR significantly increased Bax, caspase 3 and NF-κBp65 expression levels, with reduced expression of Bcl-2 compared with the IP group. Compared with the IR group, the levels of AST, ALT, MPO, MDA, TNF-α and IL-1 were significantly reduced in the IP group. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2 and Bax indicated that Bcl-2 expression in the IP group was significantly increased compared with the IR group. In addition, IP reduced Bax expression compared with the IR group. The average liver injury was worsened in the IR group and improved in the IP group, as indicated by the morphological evaluation of liver tissues. The present study suggested that IP may alleviates apoptosis, reduce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, ameloriate reductions in liver function and reduce liver tissue injury. To conclude, IP provided protection against hepatic IR injury. PMID:26821057

  4. Phosphate transport by rat intestinal basolateral-membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, F K; Kikuchi, K; Arab, N

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of phosphate transport across intestinal basolateral membranes of the rat were determined by using enriched preparations in which uphill Na+-dependent D-glucose transport could not be demonstrated, but ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport was present. Phosphate transport was saturable, Na+-dependent and exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Vmax. was 51.1 +/- 4.2 pmol/10 s per mg of protein and Km was 14 +/- 3.9 microM. The transport process was electroneutral. Tracer-exchange experiments and counter-transport studies confirmed the presence of a Na+-Pi carrier at the basolateral membrane. The presence of inside-positive membrane potential did not enhance phosphate uptake, indicating that the Na+ effect is secondary to the presence of the Na+-Pi carrier rather than an induction of positive membrane potential. The stoichiometry of this carrier at pH 7.4 was 2 Na+:1 phosphate, as shown by direct studies utilizing the static-head method. These studies are the first to determine the presence of a phosphate carrier at the basolateral membrane. PMID:3663094

  5. Starches of varied digestibilities differentially modify intestinal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Lajvardi, A; Mazarin, G I; Gillespie, M B; Satchithanandam, S; Calvert, R J

    1993-12-01

    Starches of different digestibilities may enter the colon to different extents and alter colonic function. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed diets containing 25% cooked potato starch, arrowroot starch, high amylose cornstarch or raw potato starch for 6 wk. Fecal weight, transit time, colonic thymidine kinase activity (a marker for cell proliferation), and weight, starch content and pH of the cecum and proximal and distal colon were measured. Raw potato starch was much less completely digested than high amylose cornstarch, resulting in a 32-fold greater amount of undigested starch entering the cecum in the raw potato starch group. Both the high amylose cornstarch and raw potato starch diets significantly enhanced fecal weight and produced large intestinal hypertrophy, effects that were greatest in the raw potato starch group. Raw potato starch feeding was associated with the highest level of thymidine kinase activity, although the differences in thymidine kinase activity among the four groups were not significant. This diet also produced a 50% longer transit time. Entry of a large amount of raw potato starch into the colon resulted in greater luminal acidity, greater luminal bulk and slower transit. A much smaller amount of starch entered the colon in the high amylose cornstarch group and resulted in fecal bulking but no alteration in transit. PMID:8263598

  6. Starches of varied digestibilities differentially modify intestinal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Lajvardi, A; Mazarin, G I; Gillespie, M B; Satchithanandam, S; Calvert, R J

    1993-12-01

    Starches of different digestibilities may enter the colon to different extents and alter colonic function. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed diets containing 25% cooked potato starch, arrowroot starch, high amylose cornstarch or raw potato starch for 6 wk. Fecal weight, transit time, colonic thymidine kinase activity (a marker for cell proliferation), and weight, starch content and pH of the cecum and proximal and distal colon were measured. Raw potato starch was much less completely digested than high amylose cornstarch, resulting in a 32-fold greater amount of undigested starch entering the cecum in the raw potato starch group. Both the high amylose cornstarch and raw potato starch diets significantly enhanced fecal weight and produced large intestinal hypertrophy, effects that were greatest in the raw potato starch group. Raw potato starch feeding was associated with the highest level of thymidine kinase activity, although the differences in thymidine kinase activity among the four groups were not significant. This diet also produced a 50% longer transit time. Entry of a large amount of raw potato starch into the colon resulted in greater luminal acidity, greater luminal bulk and slower transit. A much smaller amount of starch entered the colon in the high amylose cornstarch group and resulted in fecal bulking but no alteration in transit.

  7. Adult stem cells in the small intestine are intrinsically programmed with their location-specific function.

    PubMed

    Middendorp, Sabine; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Wiegerinck, Caroline L; Mokry, Michal; Akkerman, Ronald D L; van Wijngaarden, Simone; Clevers, Hans; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S

    2014-05-01

    Differentiation and specialization of epithelial cells in the small intestine are regulated in two ways. First, there is differentiation along the crypt-villus axis of the intestinal stem cells into absorptive enterocytes, Paneth, goblet, tuft, enteroendocrine, or M cells, which is mainly regulated by WNT. Second, there is specialization along the cephalocaudal axis with different absorptive and digestive functions in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum that is controlled by several transcription factors such as GATA4. However, so far it is unknown whether location-specific functional properties are intrinsically programmed within stem cells or if continuous signaling from mesenchymal cells is necessary to maintain the location-specific identity of the small intestine. Using the pure epithelial organoid technique, we show that region-specific gene expression profiles are conserved throughout long-term cultures of both mouse and human intestinal stem cells and correlated with differential Gata4 expression. Furthermore, the human organoid culture system demonstrates that Gata4-regulated gene expression is only allowed in absence of WNT signaling. These data show that location-specific function is intrinsically programmed in the adult stem cells of the small intestine and that their differentiation fate is independent of location-specific extracellular signals. In light of the potential future clinical application of small intestine-derived organoids, our data imply that it is important to generate GATA4-positive and GATA4-negative cultures to regenerate all essential functions of the small intestine.

  8. VIP and PHI coexist with an NPY-like peptide in intramural neurones of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, E; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1984-12-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) are neuropeptides present in all layers of the small intestine. NPY-immunoreactive fibres in the gut seem to derive from two sources. One population is of extramural (sympathetic) origin and contains noradrenaline, another is of intramural origin and does not contain noradrenaline. In the present study of mouse, rat and pig, immunocytochemistry showed immunoreactive PHI to coexist completely with immunoreactive VIP. This was predictable, since VIP and PHI derive from the same precursor. In addition, however, VIP and PHI were found to coexist with immunoreactive NPY in non-adrenergic (but not in adrenergic) nerve fibres and nerve cell bodies. This coexistence was unexpected, since the VIP precursor does not contain NPY-like sequences.

  9. The permeability of the plasma-lymph barrier of the small intestine of various species to macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Vogel, G; Martensen, I

    1982-03-01

    The filtration coefficients of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) of molecular weight 10,000-110,000 were measured at the plasma-lymph barrier of the upper small intestine of rabbits, rats and cats. For this purpose the animals were given intravenous injections or infusions of PVP in such a way as to produce a constant blood level; PVP concentrations were measured in lymph obtained by cannulating the mesenteric duct and also in the plasma. In these species low molecular weight PVP had a filtration coefficient of 0.85-0.64, while high molecular weight PVP (MW 110,000) either had a very low filtration coefficient - 0.22 - or was not detectable in the intestinal lymph. The three species, representing herbivores, omnivores and carnivores, showed no differences in the penetration behavior of PVP, i.e., in the permeability of the plasma-lymph barrier to macromolecules.

  10. Effect of the acupoints ST-36 (Zusanli) and SP-6 (Sanyinjiao) on intestinal myoelectric activity of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Tabosa, A; Yamamura, Y; Forno, E R; Mello, L E A M

    2002-06-01

    Despite its ancient use as a therapeutic tool to treat several ailments, acupuncture still faces the challenge of scrutiny by Western science both in terms of its efficacy and in terms of the characterization of its effects and mechanisms of actions underlying these effects. We investigated under well-controlled and carefully characterized conditions the influence of electrical stimulation of acupuncture points ST-36 (Zusanli) and SP-6 (Sanyinjiao) on the myoelectric activity of the small intestine of 38 adult male Wistar rats. Electrical recordings obtained by means of four electrodes chronically implanted in the small intestine were used to assess the effects of acupuncture (electroacupuncture stimulation set at 2 Hz, intermittent stimulation, 1 V, for 30 min). Immobilization of the animals was associated with a consistent decrease (-8 +/- 7%) in the myoelectric activity of the small intestine as measured by means of the root mean square. Conversely, acupuncture was able to significantly increase (overshoot) this activity compared to baseline (+44 +/- 7%). In contrast, immobilized animals subjected to sham acupuncture had only modest (nonsignificant) increases in myoelectric activity (+9 +/- 6%). Using carefully controlled conditions we confirmed previous noncontrolled studies on the ability of acupuncture to alter intestinal motility. The characterization of the topographic and temporal profiles of the effects observed here represents a basis for future dissection of the physiological and pharmacological systems underlying these effects.

  11. Effect of dietary calcium: Phosphorus ratio on bone mineralization and intestinal calcium absorption in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Moyuru; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Uehara, Mariko; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the effect of dietary calcium:phosphorus (Ca:P) ratio on bone mineralization and intestinal Ca absorption in ovariectomized (OVX) rat models of osteoporosis and sham-operated rats. Thirty 12-wk-old female Wistar rats were divided into three groups of OVX rats and three groups of sham rats. Thirty days after the adaptation period, OVX rats and sham rats were fed a diet formulated Ca:P, 1:0.5, 1:1 or 1:2 (each diet containing 0.5% Ca), respectively for 42 d. In both sham and OVX rats, serum osteocalcin, a marker of bone turnover, was increased by decreasing Ca:P ratio (1:2). In contrast, rats fed the Ca:P = 1:0.5 diet (dietary P restriction) suppressed the increased serum parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin and urinary deoxypyridinoline, and increased Ca absorption in both sham and OVX rats compared to the Ca:P = 1:1 and 1:2 diets. Especially, in OVX rats, the decreased bone mineral density of the fifth lumbar was also suppressed when rats were fed the Ca:P = 1:0.5 diet. These results indicated that the elevation of dietary Ca:P ratio may inhibit bone loss and increase intestinal Ca absorption in OVX rats.

  12. Plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible individuals: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIUHUI; HU, XINGBIN; XIA, AIJUN; YI, JING; AN, QUNXING; ZHANG, XIANQING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the application of plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO blood type-incompatible patients. A small intestinal transplantation case between ABO-incompatible individuals is hereby presented and analyzed. The main treatment included plasma exchange, splenectomy and immunosuppression. The patient undergoing small intestinal transplantation exhibited stable vital signs. A mild acute rejection reaction developed ~2 weeks after the surgery, which the patient successfully overcame. The subsequent colonoscopy and pathological examination revealed no signs of acute rejection. In conclusion, plasma exchange in combination with anti-immune rejection therapy proved to be an effective scheme for the management of small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible patients. PMID:24649066

  13. In vivo longitudinal cellular imaging of small intestine by side-view endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jinhyo; Choe, Kibaek; Wang, Taejun; Hwang, Yoonha; Song, Eunjoo; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-10-01

    Visualization of cellular dynamics in the gastrointestinal tract of living mouse model to investigate the pathophysiology has been a long-pursuing goal. Especially, for chronic disease such as Crohn's disease, a longitudinal observation of the luminal surface of the small intestine in the single mouse is highly desirable to investigate the complex pathogenesis in sequential time points. In this work, by utilizing a micro-GRIN lens based side-view endomicroscope integrated into a video-rate confocal microscopy system, we successfully performed minimally-invasive in vivo cellular-level visualization of various fluorescent cells and microvasculature in the small intestinal villi. Also, with a transgenic mouse universally expressing photoconvertible protein, Kaede, we demonstrated repetitive cellular-level confocal endoscopic visualization of same area in the small intestinal lumen of a single mouse, which revealed the continuous homeostatic renewal of the small intestinal epithelium. PMID:26504646

  14. In vivo longitudinal cellular imaging of small intestine by side-view endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jinhyo; Choe, Kibaek; Wang, Taejun; Hwang, Yoonha; Song, Eunjoo; Kim, Ki Hean; Kim, Pilhan

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of cellular dynamics in the gastrointestinal tract of living mouse model to investigate the pathophysiology has been a long-pursuing goal. Especially, for chronic disease such as Crohn’s disease, a longitudinal observation of the luminal surface of the small intestine in the single mouse is highly desirable to investigate the complex pathogenesis in sequential time points. In this work, by utilizing a micro-GRIN lens based side-view endomicroscope integrated into a video-rate confocal microscopy system, we successfully performed minimally-invasive in vivo cellular-level visualization of various fluorescent cells and microvasculature in the small intestinal villi. Also, with a transgenic mouse universally expressing photoconvertible protein, Kaede, we demonstrated repetitive cellular-level confocal endoscopic visualization of same area in the small intestinal lumen of a single mouse, which revealed the continuous homeostatic renewal of the small intestinal epithelium. PMID:26504646

  15. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, H.J.; Pitman, K.; Starr, G.; Wood, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were investigated in the piebald mouse model for Hirschsprung's disease. These mice exhibited aganglionosis of the terminal segment of the large intestine. This condition was accompanied by fecal stasis and megacolon. Gastric emptying of saline or milk meals was slower in the mice with aganglionic or induced megacolon than in the normal mice, but the rate of emptying was faster than after administration of morphine (10 mg/kg). In the small intestine, the distribution of the radiolabeled marker and the advancing edge of the marker profile were abnormal in the mice with megacolon. There were small differences between the megacolonic and normal mice in the distance traversed by the advancing edge of the intraluminal profile of the marker. These results are evidence for disturbances of gastric and small intestinal motor function that occur in mice secondary to development of megacolon.

  16. The effects of probiotic, prebiotic and synbiotic diets containing Bacillus coagulans and inulin on rat intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Abhari, Kh; Shekarforoush, S. S; Sajedianfard, J; Hosseinzadeh, S; Nazifi, S

    2015-01-01

    An in vivo experiment was conducted to study the effects of probiotic Bacillus coagulans spores, with and without prebiotic, inulin, on gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota of healthy rats and its potentiality to survive in the GI tract. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=12) and fed as follows: standard diet (control), standard diet supplied with 5% w/w long chain inulin (prebiotic), standard diet with 109/day spores of B. coagulans by orogastric gavage (probiotic), and standard diet with 5% w/w long chain inulin and 109 spores/day of B. coagulans by orogastric gavage (synbiotic). Rats were fed the diets for 30 days. At day 10, 20 and 30 of experiment, 24 h post administration, four rats from each group were randomly selected and after faecal collection were sacrificed. Small intestine, cecum, and colon were excised from each rat and used for microbial analysis. Administration of synbiotic and probiotic diets led to a significant (P<0.05) increment in lactic acid bacteria (LAB), total aerobic and total anaerobic population compared the prebiotic and control diets. A significant decrease in Enterobacteriaceae counts of various segments of GI tract (except small intestine) in synbiotic, probiotic and prebiotic fed groups were also seen. The obvious decline in spores count through passing GI tract and high surviving spore counts in faecal samples showed that spores are not a normal resident of GI microbiota and affect intestinal microbiota by temporary proliferation. In conclusion, the present study clearly showed probiotic B. coagulans was efficient in beneficially modulating GI microbiota and considering transitional characteristics of B. coagulans, daily consumption of probiotic products is necessary for any long-term effect. PMID:27175187

  17. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Xuan; Wu, Wan-Chun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal dysfunction and small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa under psychological stress. METHODS: Sixty mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. Each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 10), bacteria group (n = 10), and D-xylose administered to stomach group (n = 10). An animal model with psychological stress was established housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (Escherichia coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). The quantitation of bacteria was expressed as log10(colony forming units/g). D-xylose levels in plasma were measured for estimating the damage of small intestinal mucosa. RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (39.80±9.50% vs 58.79±11.47%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared with the controls. Psychological stress resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli). There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora (1.78±0.30 log10(CFU/g) vs 1.37±0.21 log10(CFU/g), P<0.01), and there was decrease in relative proportion of Lactobacilli and E. coli of stressed mice (0.53±0.63 vs 1.14±1.07, P<0.05), while there was no significant difference in the anaerobes (Lactobacilli) between the two groups (2.31±0.70 log10(CFU/g) vs 2.44±0.37 log10(CFU/g), P>0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in psychological stress mice were significantly higher than those in the control group (2.90±0.89 mmol/L vs 0.97±0.33 mmol/L, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Small intestinal dysfunction under psychological stress may be related to the

  18. Phytohemagglutinin derived from red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a cause for intestinal malabsorption associated with bacterial overgrowth in the rat.

    PubMed

    Banwell, J G; Boldt, D H; Meyers, J; Weber, F L

    1983-03-01

    Plant lectins or carbohydrate binding proteins interact with membrane receptors on cellular surfaces but their antinutritional effects are poorly defined. Studies were conducted to determine the effects of phytohemagglutinin, a lectin derived from raw red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), on small intestinal absorptive function and morphology, and on the intestinal microflora. Phytohemagglutinin was isolated in purified form by thyroglobulin-sepharose 4B affinity chromatography. Red kidney bean and phytohemagglutinin (6% and 0.5%, respectively, of dietary protein) were fed in a purified casein diet to weanling rats for up to 21 days. Weight loss, associated with malabsorption of lipid, nitrogen, and vitamin B12, developed in comparison with animals pair-fed isonitrogenous casein diets. Antinutritional effects of red kidney bean were reversible on reinstitution of a purified casein diet. An increase in bacterial colonization of the jejunum and ileum occurred in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutin-fed animals. When antibiotics were included in the diet, malabsorption of [3H]triolein and 57Co-vitamin B12 in red kidney bean-fed animals was partially reversed and, in germ-free animals, purified phytohemagglutinin had no demonstrable antinutritional effect. Mucosal disaccharidase activity was reduced in red kidney bean- and phytohemagglutinin-fed animals, but intestinal mucosal morphology was unchanged. Dietary administration of phytohemagglutinin, alone or as a component of red kidney bean, caused intestinal dysfunction, which was associated with, and dependent upon, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Adherence of enteric bacteria to the mucosal surface was enhanced by phytohemagglutinin which may have facilitated small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. PMID:6822324

  19. Effect of rhubarb pre-treatment on intestinal microcirculation in septic rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yun-Liang; Wang, Lv; Tian, Zhao-Tao; Lin, Zhao-Fen; Chen, De-Chang

    2014-01-01

    The intestine plays a vital role in the pathophysiology of sepsis development. The objective of the present study was to explore the effects of rhubarb on intestinal microcirculation in septic rats. We used moorFLPI laser speckle imaging to detect the blood flow of the intestinal mucosa and wall. Using an ELISA, we assayed the concentration of lactate (L) and pyruvic acid (P) in the intestinal tissue to calculate the ratio of lactate to pyruvic acid (L/P ratio). To observe the intestinal mucosal capillaries, gelatin and ink were perfused into the intestine and subsequently stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) to measure the ratio of the vessel area. We then used immunohistochemistry to measure CD31 expression. Using an MTT assay, the effect of the rhubarb extract on the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was analyzed. The blood flow in the intestinal wall and mucosa of the control, sham and rhubarb-treated groups was significantly higher, while the sepsis group had relatively low blood flow. The L/P ratio in the intestinal tissue was larger in the sepsis group than in the other three groups. The microvascular area (MVA) in the sepsis group was smaller than in the control group, sham group or rhubarb group. Positive expression for CD31 was observed in the cytoplasm of vascular endothelial cells. The intestinal mucosal capillaries were reduced in septic rats as compared to the other three groups. HUVEC proliferation was enhanced by the rhubarb extract monomers at 1 μmol/L, but suppressed at higher concentrations of 10 to 100 μmol/L. These results suggest that pre-treatment with rhubarb prior to sepsis induction promotes the expansion of the intestinal mucosal capillaries, protects intestinal mucosal capillary endothelial cells and increases the number of functional intestinal capillaries. PMID:25176604

  20. Ileocolonic transfer of solid chyme in small intestinal neuropathies and myopathies

    SciTech Connect

    Greydanus, M.P.; Camilleri, M.; Colemont, L.J.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess gastric emptying, small bowel transit and colonic filling in patients with motility disorders, with particular attention to the patterns of colonic filling. Gastrointestinal transit was assessed using a previously validated radiolabeled mixed meal. Fourteen patients with clinical and manometric features of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction classified as intestinal neuropathy and 6 as intestinal myopathy, were studied. The results were compared with those from 10 healthy controls studied similarly. Gastric emptying and small bowel transit of solids were significantly slower in both groups of patients than in healthy controls (P less than 0.05). In health, the ileocolonic transit of solid chyme was characterized by intermittent bolus transfers. The mean size of boluses transferred to the colon (expressed as a percentage of ingested radiolabel) was significantly less (P less than 0.05) in patients with intestinal myopathy (10% +/- 4% (SEM)) than in healthy controls (25% +/- 4%) or in patients with intestinal neuropathy (25% +/- 4%). The intervals between bolus transfer of solids (plateaus in the colonic filling curve) were longer (P less than 0.05) in myopathies (212 +/- 89 minutes) than in health (45 +/- 7 minutes) or neuropathies (53 +/- 11 minutes). Thus, gastric emptying and small bowel transit were delayed in small bowel neuropathies and myopathies. Bolus filling of the colon was less frequent and less effective in patients with myopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction, whereas bolus transfer was preserved in patients with neuropathic intestinal pseudoobstruction.

  1. [The pneumodynamic barium x-ray study of small intestine adhesions (a preliminary report)].

    PubMed

    Baev, S; Nikolov, P

    1990-01-01

    Small-intestinal adhesions are not very rare, but on conventional X-ray examination are frequently missed because of their poor semiotics. By the method of pneumodynamic-barium X-ray examination, which allows to obtain high-quality double-contrast image, in addition to the better visualized classical symptoms--exostotic rebounds, diverticulum-like deformities, peristaltic spasms, spastic contractions etc, one may evince also the following new criteria: when inflated the intestines do not freely increase their volume, as is normal, are not unplaited along the entire abdomen, but remain amassed in a definite zone (usually in the left half); On external pressure the inflated loops do not move, as do the ones without adhesions, but remain fixed, so that their structure remains unchanged. The intestinal loops are crooked with acute angles; when in a normally inflated state, they are not crooked, but long. A frequent finding in small intestinal adhesions are the V-shaped figures in whose bottom there is barium meal over which air passes. A study of the small-intestinal cannon contraction reveals insufficiency in the hydrodynamics of the intestinal passage, marked by delayed evacuation, in spite of the strong peristalsis. This method allows a more precise elucidation than the conventional X-ray examination of the abdominal status in small-intestinal adhesions and better orientates the surgeon to choose conservative or operative treatment.

  2. Impaired function of the intestinal barrier in a novel sub-health rat model

    PubMed Central

    FENG, SISI; LIU, WEIDONG; ZUO, SHENGNAN; XIE, TINGYAN; DENG, HUI; ZHANG, QIUHUAN; ZHONG, BAIYUN

    2016-01-01

    Sub-health is a state featuring a deterioration in physiological function between health and illness, and the sub-health condition has surfaced as life-threatening in humans. The aim of the present study was to establish a sub-health model in rats, and investigate the function of the intestinal barrier in the sub-health rats and rats following intervention. To establish a sub-health model, the rats were subjected to a high-fat and sugar diet, motion restriction and chronic stress. Their serum glucose and triglyceride levels, immune function and adaptability were then measured. The levels of diamine oxidase and D-lactic acid in the plasma were analyzed as markers of the intestinal permeability. The protein and mRNA expression levels of anti-apoptotic YWHAZ in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemical and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses In the present study, the sub-health rat model was successfully established, and sub-health factors increased the intestinal permeability and reduced the expression of YWHAZ. Providing sub-health rats with normal living conditions did not improve the function of the intestinal barrier. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that intestinal disorders in the sub-health rat model may result from the damage caused by reduce intestinal barrier function as well as the decreased expression levels of YWHAZ. Additionally, rats in the sub-health condition did not recover following subsequent exposure to normal living conditions, suggesting that certain exercises or medical intervention may be necessary to improve sub-health symptoms. PMID:26957295

  3. Impaired function of the intestinal barrier in a novel sub-health rat model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sisi; Liu, Weidong; Zuo, Shengnan; Xie, Tingyan; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Qiuhuan; Zhong, Baiyun

    2016-04-01

    Sub-health is a state featuring a deterioration in physiological function between health and illness, and the sub-health condition has surfaced as life-threatening in humans. The aim of the present study was to establish a sub-health model in rats, and investigate the function of the intestinal barrier in the sub-health rats and rats following intervention. To establish a sub‑health model, the rats were subjected to a high‑fat and sugar diet, motion restriction and chronic stress. Their serum glucose and triglyceride levels, immune function and adaptability were then measured. The levels of diamine oxidase and D‑lactic acid in the plasma were analyzed as markers of the intestinal permeability. The protein and mRNA expression levels of anti‑apoptotic YWHAZ in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemical and reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses In the present study, the sub‑health rat model was successfully established, and sub‑health factors increased the intestinal permeability and reduced the expression of YWHAZ. Providing sub‑health rats with normal living conditions did not improve the function of the intestinal barrier. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that intestinal disorders in the sub‑health rat model may result from the damage caused by reduce intestinal barrier function as well as the decreased expression levels of YWHAZ. Additionally, rats in the sub‑health condition did not recover following subsequent exposure to normal living conditions, suggesting that certain exercises or medical intervention may be necessary to improve sub-health symptoms. PMID:26957295

  4. Effect of experimental diabetes and insulin replacement on intestinal metabolism and excretion of 4-nitrophenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Emil; Almási, Attila; Bojcsev, Sztojan; Fischer, Tamás; Kovács, Noémi Piroska; Perjési, Pál

    2015-06-01

    Luminal appearance of 4-nitrophenol (PNP) metabolites (4-nitrophenol-β-glucuronide (PNP-G) and 4-nitrophenol-sulfate (PNP-S)) and activity of the related metabolic enzymes have been investigated in control and experimental diabetic rats. Experimental diabetes was induced by administration of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg i.v.). PNP (500 μmol/L) was luminally perfused in the small intestine and the metabolites were determined in the perfusion solution. Effect of insulin replacement was also investigated in the diabetic rats. It was found that experimental diabetes increased the luminal appearance of PNP-G, which could be completely compensated by rapid-acting insulin administration (1 U/kg i.v.). Activities of the enzymes involved in PNP-G production (UDP-glucuronyltransferase and β-glucuronidase) were also elevated; however, these changes were only partially compensated by insulin. Luminal appearance of PNP-S was not significantly changed by administration of streptozotocin and insulin. Activities of the enzymes of PNP-S production (sulfotransferases and arylsulfatases) did not change in the diabetic rats. The results indicate that experimental diabetes can provoke changes in intestinal drug metabolism. It increased intestinal glucuronidation of PNP but did not influence sulfate conjugation. No direct correlation was found between the changes of metabolic enzyme activities and the luminal appearance of the metabolites. PMID:25939089

  5. Effect of experimental diabetes and insulin replacement on intestinal metabolism and excretion of 4-nitrophenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Emil; Almási, Attila; Bojcsev, Sztojan; Fischer, Tamás; Kovács, Noémi Piroska; Perjési, Pál

    2015-06-01

    Luminal appearance of 4-nitrophenol (PNP) metabolites (4-nitrophenol-β-glucuronide (PNP-G) and 4-nitrophenol-sulfate (PNP-S)) and activity of the related metabolic enzymes have been investigated in control and experimental diabetic rats. Experimental diabetes was induced by administration of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg i.v.). PNP (500 μmol/L) was luminally perfused in the small intestine and the metabolites were determined in the perfusion solution. Effect of insulin replacement was also investigated in the diabetic rats. It was found that experimental diabetes increased the luminal appearance of PNP-G, which could be completely compensated by rapid-acting insulin administration (1 U/kg i.v.). Activities of the enzymes involved in PNP-G production (UDP-glucuronyltransferase and β-glucuronidase) were also elevated; however, these changes were only partially compensated by insulin. Luminal appearance of PNP-S was not significantly changed by administration of streptozotocin and insulin. Activities of the enzymes of PNP-S production (sulfotransferases and arylsulfatases) did not change in the diabetic rats. The results indicate that experimental diabetes can provoke changes in intestinal drug metabolism. It increased intestinal glucuronidation of PNP but did not influence sulfate conjugation. No direct correlation was found between the changes of metabolic enzyme activities and the luminal appearance of the metabolites.

  6. Relationship between dietary-induced changes in intestinal commensal microflora and duodenojejunal myoelectric activity monitored by radiotelemetry in the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lesniewska, V; Rowland, I; Laerke, H N; Grant, G; Naughton, P J

    2006-01-01

    Interdigestive intestinal motility, and especially phase III of the migrating myoelectric/motor complex (MMC), is responsible for intestinal clearance and plays an important role in prevention of bacterial overgrowth and translocation in the gut. Yet previous results from gnotobiotic rats have shown that intestinal microflora can themselves affect the characteristics of the myoelectric activity of the gut during the interdigestive state. Given that the composition of the intestinal microflora can be altered by dietary manipulations, we investigated the effect of supplementation of the diet with synbiotics on intestinal microflora structure and the duodenojejunal myoelectric activity in the rat. To reduce animal distress caused by restraint and handling, which can itself affect GI motility, we applied radiotelemetry for duodenojejunal EMG recordings in conscious, freely moving rats. Thirty 16-month-old Spraque-Dawley rats were used. The diet for 15 rats (E group) was supplemented with chicory inulin, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis. The remaining 15 rats were fed control diet without supplements (C group). Three rats from each group were implanted with three bipolar electrodes positioned at 2, 14 and 28 cm distal to the pylorus. After recovery, two 6 h recordings of duodenojejunal EMG were carried out on each operated rat. Subsequently, group C rats received feed supplements and group E rats received only control diet for 1 week, and an additional two 6 h recordings were carried out on each of these rats. Non-operated C and E rats were killed and samples of GI tract were collected for microbiological analyses. Supplementation of the diet with the pro- and prebiotics mixture increased the number of bifidobacteria, whereas it decreased the number of enterobacteria in jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon. In both caecum and colon, the dietary supplementation increased the number of total anaerobes and lactobacilli. Treatment with synbiotics increased

  7. Chk1 deficiency in the mouse small intestine results in p53-independent crypt death and subsequent intestinal compensation.

    PubMed

    Greenow, K R; Clarke, A R; Jones, R H

    2009-03-19

    Chk1 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by a wide range of DNA-damaging agents to slow the cell cycle during S phase and G2/M. Abrogation of these cell-cycle checkpoints using Chk1 inhibitors results in hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in vitro and may provide a potential therapeutic tool to sensitize tumour cells in vivo. We have generated a Cre-Lox-based mouse model in which Chkl can be inducibly deleted from somatic epithelial cells in the adult mouse small intestine and liver. Loss of Chk1 in the liver is tolerated with no apparent phenotype. In contrast, the loss of Chk1 within the small intestine results in immediate DNA damage and high levels of p53-independent apoptosis leading to crypt death. However, the intestine is able to compensate for this death by undergoing complete re-population with Chk1-proficient cells. These data therefore show that Chk1 deficiency is cell lethal, but the intestine can tolerate such lethality at the organ level.

  8. Effect of Ischemia on the Canine Large Bowel: A Comparison with the Small Intestine1

    PubMed Central

    Takeyoshi, Izumi; Zhang, Shimin; Nakamura, Kenjiro; Ikoma, Akira; Zhu, Yue; Starzl, Thomas E.; Todo, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Mucosal injury caused by ischemia and reperfusion has been well documented with the small intestine, but little is known about the colon. In the present study, the effect of warm and cold ischemia on the canine colon was studied and compared to that on the small intestine. After in situ flushing, the small intestine and the colon from six beagle dogs were removed and stored for 0.5, 1.5, and 3 hr at 37°C (warm ischemia) or for 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hr at 4°C (cold ischemia). Electrophysiology, permeability, biochemistry, and histopathology of the specimens at each ischemic period and after reperfusion in the Ussing chamber were determined. Warm and cold ischemia induced duration-dependent suppression of electrophysiology in both organs, but the colonic mucosa retained higher activity of absorptive enterocytes and cryptic cells than the small intestine. Only the colon showed increased permeability of FITC-conjugated Dextran from the mucosal surface to the submucosal layer after prolonged ischemia. Changes in adenine nucleotides and purine catabolites were not markedly different between the organs. Histopathologic abnormalities during ischemia and after reperfusion were more serious with the small intestine than with the colon. Compared to warm ischemia, hypothermia lessened or delayed these morphofunctional derangements in both organs, which became universally worsened after reperfusion. Colonic mucosa receives morphofunctional derangements from ischemia and reperfusion, but the severity of the damage was much less severe in the colon than in the small intestine. PMID:8606507

  9. Cytokines induce small intestine and liver injury after renal ischemia or nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Won; Chen, Sean W.C.; Kim, Mihwa; Brown, Kevin M.; Kolls, Jay K.; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Lee, H. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently suffer from extra-renal complications including hepatic dysfunction and systemic inflammation. We aimed to determine the mechanisms of AKI induced hepatic dysfunction and systemic inflammation. Mice subjected to AKI [renal ischemia reperfusion (IR) or nephrectomy] rapidly developed acute hepatic dysfunction and suffered significantly worse hepatic IR injury. After AKI, rapid peri-portal hepatocyte necrosis, vacuolization, neutrophil infiltration and pro-inflammatory mRNA upregulation were observed suggesting an intestinal source of hepatic injury. Small intestine histology after AKI demonstrated profound villous lacteal capillary endothelial apoptosis, disruption of vascular permeability and epithelial necrosis. After ischemic or non-ischemic AKI, plasma TNF-α, IL-17A and IL-6 increased significantly. Small intestine appears to be the source of IL-17A as IL-17A levels were higher in the portal circulation and small intestine compared to the levels measured from the systemic circulation and liver. Wild type mice treated with neutralizing antibodies against TNF-α, IL-17A or IL-6 or mice deficient in TNF-α, IL-17A, IL-17A receptor or IL-6 were protected against hepatic and small intestine injury due to ischemic or non-ischemic AKI. For the first time, we implicate the increased release of IL-17A from small intestine together with induction of TNF-α and IL-6 as a cause of small intestine and liver injury after ischemic or non-ischemic AKI. Modulation of the inflammatory response and cytokine release in the small intestine after AKI may have important therapeutic implications in reducing complications arising from AKI. PMID:20697374

  10. Exogenous leptin controls the development of the small intestine in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Woliński, J; Biernat, M; Guilloteau, P; Weström, B R; Zabielski, R

    2003-05-01

    Leptin, a hormone produced and secreted by adipose tIssue, muscles and stomach, is involved in the regulation of adipose tIssue mass, food intake and body weight in neonatal animals. It is also produced in the mammary glands and secreted into the colostrum and milk. Since leptin receptors are widely distributed in the small intestine mucosa, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of exogenous leptin on the development of the small intestine in neonatal piglets. Male neonatal piglets were fed with sow's milk or artificial milk formula. Every 8 h the latter received either vehicle or leptin (2 or 10 microg/kg body weight). The animals were either killed after 6 days of treatment and the small intestine sampled for histology and brush border enzyme activities or were tested for marker molecule (Na-fluorescein and BSA) absorption in vivo. Feeding milk formula slowed the maturation of small intestinal mucosa compared with feeding sow's milk. However, after leptin treatment the length of the small intestine was increased, and intestinal villi length, but not crypt size, was reduced compared with controls. The mitotic index was increased and the percentage of vacuolated enterocytes was reduced in the entire small intestine. Enterocyte brush border protease and lactase activities were reduced in the jejunum. Na-fluorescein marker molecule absorption did not change but that of BSA was reduced 3.8-fold. In conclusion, exogenous leptin administered in physiological doses reversed the maturation of the small intestinal mucosa to the range found in sow-reared piglets.

  11. Changes in mRNA expression of ABC and SLC transporters in liver and intestines of the adjuvant-induced arthritis rat.

    PubMed

    Uno, Satoshi; Uraki, Misato; Ito, Ayami; Shinozaki, Yuki; Yamada, Ayano; Kawase, Atsushi; Iwaki, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the effects of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) on the amounts of mRNA of 12 types of rat ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporters in the liver and small intestine, 7 (D7) and 21 days (D21) after the injection of adjuvant. There were no significant differences in mRNA levels of ABC and SLC transporters between the livers of AA and control rats on D7, except in the case of Mdr1a. However, levels of Mdr1a, Mrp2 and Oatp SLC transporters were significantly lower in AA than in the control livers on D21. In contrast, the mRNA levels of several ABC and SLC transporters, especially Mrp2, Bcrp, LAT2 and Oatp1a5, were significantly lower in the small intestines of AA rats compared with the controls on D7, though there were no significant differences by D21. The time-dependent alterations in mRNA levels of the pregnane X receptor, but not the constitutive androstane receptor, in the liver and intestine were similar to the changes in mRNA levels of most transporters examined. The present study showed that AA was associated with reduced mRNA expression of several ABC and SLC transporters in the liver and small intestine, but that the time courses of the effects of AA on mRNA expression differed between the liver and small intestine. These results raise the possibility of a functional change of the transporters of liver and intestine in AA rats.

  12. Effect of clarification techniques and rat intestinal extract incubation on phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of black currant juice.

    PubMed

    Pinelo, Manuel; Landbo, Anne-Katrine R; Vikbjerg, Anders F; Meyer, Anne S

    2006-09-01

    This study examined the phenolic composition and the antioxidant potencies of black currant juices that had been experimentally clarified with acidic proteases and pectinases to retain the phenolics and which had been subjected to rat intestinal mucosa extract incubation to mimic gut cell mediated biotransformation of phenolics. When compared at equimolar levels of 2.5 microM gallic acid equivalents, the black currant juice samples prolonged the induction time of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation in vitro by 2.6-3.6 times, and the order of antioxidant potency of differently clarified black currant juices was centrifuged juice > gelatin silica sol clarified juice > enzymatically clarified juice approximately raw juice. No immediate relationship between the, almost similar, phenolic profiles of the juice samples and their relative antioxidant activities could be established. Incubation of juices with a rat small intestine cell extract for 19 h promoted significant decreases in the contents of the anthocyanin 3-O-beta-glucosides (cyanidin 3-O-beta-glucoside and delphinidin 3-O-beta-glucoside), but did not affect the anthocyanin 3-O-beta-rutinosides (cyanidin 3-O-beta-rutinoside and delphinidin 3-O-beta-rutinoside) of the black currant juice. Black currant juice samples subjected to such intestinal cell extract incubation had approximately 30% decreased antioxidant capacity. Incubation of juices with the rat small intestine cell extracts at neutral pH appeared to decrease the levels of delphinidin glucosides more than the levels of cyanidin glucosides. The results provide an explanation for the predominant detection of anthocyanin rutinosides, and not anthocyanin glucosides, in plasma and urine in in vivo studies and provide important clues to better understand the complex mechanisms affecting dietary phenols in the gut. PMID:16939310

  13. [Report on 16 cases of small intestine ascariasis diagnosed by capsule endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Li, Rong-Zhi; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2013-06-01

    The clinical data and capsule endoscopy image of 16 adult patients with small intestine ascariasis were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively from June 2006 to June 2012 in West China Hospital. Among the 16 patients, 15 cases manifested as gastrointestinal bleeding, 15 cases showed anemia (3 severe, 10 moderate, and 2 mild), 2 had hypoalbuminemia, 1 had peripheral blood eosinophilia. All the cases were found to be fecal occult blood positive, but no Ascaris eggs found in the feces. Capsule endoscopy showed they were infected with Ascaris worms. The worms were found in the proximal small intestine in 14 patients and 2 in the distal intestine. Mucosal erythema and erosions around the worm were observed in 3 cases, and 7 cases were found with active bleeding or old haemorrhage in small intestine.

  14. Increased 18F-FDG uptake of heterotopic pancreatitis in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Maomei; Liu, Min; Cheng, Lingxiao; Xie, Wenhui; Chen, Libo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Backgroud: Heterotopic pancreas (HP), a relatively uncommon congenital anomaly, is rarely noted during 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scan. Methods: A 60-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to a 10-day history of abdominal pain with elevated levels of serum amylase and lipase. Abdominal CT and ultrasound examinations were negative. In order to search for the cause, an 18F-FDG PET/CT whole body scan was suggested to an old woman revealing the presence of 18F-FDG accumulating nodule in small intestine. Results: Surgical findings and pathologic results confirmed the diagnosis of small intestinal heterotopic pancreas with active chronic inflammation. Conclusion: This uncommon case underscores the necessity of considering heterotopic pancreatitis in small intestine with focal 18F-FDG uptake as a possible differential diagnosis in intestinal tumor and tuberculosis. PMID:27603341

  15. Role of GATA factors in development, differentiation, and homeostasis of the small intestinal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Boaz E.; Stapleton, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium develops from embryonic endoderm into a highly specialized layer of cells perfectly suited for the digestion and absorption of nutrients. The development, differentiation, and regeneration of the small intestinal epithelium require complex gene regulatory networks involving multiple context-specific transcription factors. The evolutionarily conserved GATA family of transcription factors, well known for its role in hematopoiesis, is essential for the development of endoderm during embryogenesis and the renewal of the differentiated epithelium in the mature gut. We review the role of GATA factors in the evolution and development of endoderm and summarize our current understanding of the function of GATA factors in the mature small intestine. We offer perspective on the application of epigenetics approaches to define the mechanisms underlying context-specific GATA gene regulation during intestinal development. PMID:24436352

  16. The metabolic profile of acteoside produced by human or rat intestinal bacteria or intestinal enzyme in vitro employed UPLC-Q-TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingling; Pan, Yingni; Xu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Wenjie; Wu, Xiao; Qu, Shouhe; Liu, Xiaoqiu

    2016-03-01

    Acteoside, the main and representative phenylethanoid glycosides of Herba Cistanches, possesses wide bioactivities but low oral bioavailability. It may serve as the prodrug and be converted into the active forms in gastrointestinal tract, which mainly occurred in intestinal tract composed of intestinal bacteria and intestinal enzyme. Intestinal bacteria, a new drug target, take a significant role on exerting pharmacological effects of drugs by oral administration. In this paper, acteoside was incubated with human or rat intestinal bacteria or rat intestinal enzyme for 36 h to seek metabolites responsible for pharmacodynamics. The samples were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Besides the parent compound, 14 metabolites were detected and identified based on their retention times and fragmentation patterns in their MS spectra including 8 degradation metabolites, 2 isomers in intestinal bacteria and intestinal enzyme samples and 4 parent metabolites only found in intestinal enzymes. The metabolic pathway of acteoside was thus proposed. Identification of these metabolites of acteoside by the intestinal bacteria or intestinal enzyme gave an insight to clarify pharmacological mechanism of traditional Chinese medicines and identify the real active molecules.

  17. [Comparative studies on the enzymatic absorption of protein hydrolysates in the small intestine of the rat. 3. The absorption trypsins thermatatic and trypsin-thermatatic hydrolysates of a fava bean protein isolate compared to an equimolar mixture of free amino acids].

    PubMed

    Proll, J; Friedrich, M; Noack, J; Noack, R

    1985-01-01

    Tryptic, thermitatic, and tryptic-thermitatic Faba bean protein hydrolyzates as well as their equimolar mixture of amino acids were perfused through proximal and distal parts of the intestine (10 cm length) of non-narcotized rats. The total amino-acid concentration of the perfused solution was 50 mM. The absorption of nitrogen and total amino acids from the tryptic and tryptic-thermitatic hydrolyzates was lower than that from the amino-acid mixture, the absorption from the thermitatic hydrolyzate was in accordance with that from the amino-acid mixture. The absorption pattern of the amino acids which preferably undergo a peptidic absorption is similar with the three hydrolyzates: in the proximal intestinal part this concerns glutamic acid and serine, in the distal intestinal part--methionine, alanine, glycin, and serine. The absorption pattern of the amino acids is different between the three hydrolyzates and the amino-acid mixture. Between the absorption pattern of the amino acids from the three hydrolyzates little differences were evident only in the proximal intestinal part. The coefficients of variation of the tryptic-thermitatic hydrolyzates are in accordance with those of the amino-acid mixture, whereas that of the thermitatic hydrolyzates is significantly lower. In the distal intestinal part all supplied forms are more rapidly absorbed than in the proximal part of the intestine.

  18. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intestine. Bromelain was administered orally to piglets and K88+ ETEC attachment to small intestine was measured at 50 cm intervals using an enzyme immunoassay. K88+ ETEC attachment to intestinal sections that were not treated with bromelain varied appreciably between sampling sites. Variability in receptor activity along the intestinal surface is though to be caused by the localised effects of endogenous proteases. Oral administration of exogenous protease inhibited K88+ ETEC attachment to pig small intestine in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). Attachment of K88+ ETEC was negligible after treatment, resembling the levels of attachment of K88 to piglets of the genetically determined non-adhesive phenotype, which are resistant to K88+ ETEC infection. Serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of treated piglets showed no adverse effects of the bromelain treatment. It is concluded that administration of bromelain can inhibit ETEC receptor activity in vivo and may therefore be useful for prevention of K88+ ETEC induced diarrhoea. PMID:8566855

  19. The development of a method for the preparation of rat intestinal epithelial cell primary cultures.

    PubMed

    Evans, G S; Flint, N; Somers, A S; Eyden, B; Potten, C S

    1992-01-01

    We describe a reproducible method for growing small intestinal epithelium (derived from the suckling rat intestine) in short-term (primary) cultures. Optimal culture conditions were determined by quantitative assays of proliferation (i.e. changes in cellularity and DNA synthesis). Isolation of the epithelia and, significantly, preservation of its three-dimensional integrity was achieved using a collagenase/dispase digestion technique. Purification of the epithelium was also facilitated by the use of a simple differential sedimentation method. The results presented below support the idea that proliferation of normal gut epithelium ex vivo is initially dependent upon the maintenance of the structural integrity of this tissue and upon factors produced by heterologous mesenchymal cells. Proliferation in vitro was also critically dependent upon the quality of the medium and constituents used. Cultures reached confluence within 10-14 days and consisted of epithelial colonies together with varying amounts of smooth-muscle-like cells. Cultures have been maintained for periods up to one month, but the longer-term potential for growth by sub-culturing has not been examined. Strategies for reducing the proliferation of these non-epithelial cells are also described.

  20. Transgenic 6F tomatoes act on the small intestine to prevent systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia caused by Western diet and intestinally derived lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Navab, Mohamad; Hough, Greg; Buga, Georgette M; Su, Feng; Wagner, Alan C; Meriwether, David; Chattopadhyay, Arnab; Gao, Feng; Grijalva, Victor; Danciger, Janet S; Van Lenten, Brian J; Org, Elin; Lusis, Aldons J; Pan, Calvin; Anantharamaiah, G M; Farias-Eisner, Robin; Smyth, Susan S; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Fogelman, Alan M

    2013-12-01

    We recently reported that levels of unsaturated lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the small intestine significantly correlated with the extent of aortic atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-null (LDLR⁻/⁻) mice fed a Western diet (WD). Here we demonstrate that WD increases unsaturated (but not saturated) LPA levels in the small intestine of LDLR⁻/⁻ mice and causes changes in small intestine gene expression. Confirmation of microarray analysis by quantitative RT-PCR showed that adding transgenic tomatoes expressing the apoA-I mimetic peptide 6F (Tg6F) to WD prevented many WD-mediated small intestine changes in gene expression. If instead of feeding WD, unsaturated LPA was added to chow and fed to the mice: i) levels of LPA in the small intestine were similar to those induced by feeding WD; ii) gene expression changes in the small intestine mimicked WD-mediated changes; and iii) changes in plasma serum amyloid A, total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol levels, and the fast-performance liquid chromatography lipoprotein profile mimicked WD-mediated changes. Adding Tg6F (but not control tomatoes) to LPA-supplemented chow prevented the LPA-induced changes. We conclude that: i) WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia may be in part due to WD-induced increases in small intestine LPA levels; and ii) Tg6F reduces WD-mediated systemic inflammation and dyslipidemia by preventing WD-induced increases in LPA levels in the small intestine. PMID:24085744

  1. Soluble polysaccharide and biomass of red microalga Porphyridium sp. alter intestinal morphology and reduce serum cholesterol in rats.

    PubMed

    Dvir, I; Chayoth, R; Sod-Moriah, U; Shany, S; Nyska, A; Stark, A H; Madar, Z; Arad, S M

    2000-10-01

    The present study investigated the effects of the red microalga Porphyridium sp. on gastrointestinal physiology and lipid metabolism in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Diets containing dietary fibre from pelleted red microalgal cells (biomass) or their sulfated polysaccharide, pectin or cellulose (control) were fed to rats for a period of 30 d. All three fibre-supplemented diets increased the length of both the small intestine and colon, with a significantly greater effect in rats fed the algal polysaccharide. The polysaccharide also increased mucosa and muscularis cross-sectional area of the jejunum, and caused hypertrophy in the muscularis layer. The algal biomass significantly lowered gastrointestinal transit time by 44% in comparison with the control rats. Serum and mucosal cholecystokinin levels were lower in rats on the pectin and polysaccharide diets, while cholecystokinin levels in rats fed algal biomass were not different from those in the control animals. In comparison with the control diet, all the experimental diets significantly lowered serum cholesterol levels (22-29%). Feeding of non-fermentable algal polysaccharide or biomass significantly increased faecal weight and bile acid excretion compared with pectin-fed or control rats. The algal polysaccharide and biomass were thus shown to be potent hypocholesterolaemic agents active at low concentrations in the diet. Both metabolic and morphological changes were observed following consumption of algae, suggesting several possible mechanisms by which the alga affects lipid metabolism. The results presented in the present study encourage the use of red microalga as a functional food.

  2. Prenatal Intestinal Obstruction Affects the Myenteric Plexus and Causes Functional Bowel Impairment in Fetal Rat Experimental Model of Intestinal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Khen-Dunlop, Naziha; Sarnacki, Sabine; Victor, Anais; Grosos, Celine; Menard, Sandrine; Soret, Rodolphe; Goudin, Nicolas; Pousset, Maud; Sauvat, Frederique; Revillon, Yann; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Neunlist, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal atresia is a rare congenital disorder with an incidence of 3/10 000 birth. About one-third of patients have severe intestinal dysfunction after surgical repair. We examined whether prenatal gastrointestinal obstruction might effect on the myenteric plexus and account for subsequent functional disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a rat model of surgically induced antenatal atresia, comparing intestinal samples from both sides of the obstruction and with healthy rat pups controls. Whole-mount preparations of the myenteric plexus were stained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to analyze mRNAs for inflammatory markers. Functional motility and permeability analyses were performed in vitro. Phenotypic studies were also performed in 8 newborns with intestinal atresia. In the experimental model, the proportion of nNOS-immunoreactive neurons was similar in proximal and distal segments (6.7±4.6% vs 5.6±4.2%, p = 0.25), but proximal segments contained a higher proportion of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons (13.2±6.2% vs 7.5±4.3%, p = 0.005). Phenotypic changes were associated with a 100-fold lower concentration-dependent contractile response to carbachol and a 1.6-fold higher EFS-induced contractile response in proximal compared to distal segments. Transcellular (p = 0.002) but not paracellular permeability was increased. Comparison with controls showed that modifications involved not only proximal but also distal segments. Phenotypic studies in human atresia confirmed the changes in ChAT expression. Conclusion Experimental atresia in fetal rat induces differential myenteric plexus phenotypical as well as functional changes (motility and permeability) between the two sides of the obstruction. Delineating these changes might help to identify markers predictive of motility dysfunction and to define guidelines for post-surgical care. PMID:23667464

  3. High-resolution 3D analysis of mouse small-intestinal stroma.

    PubMed

    Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2016-09-01

    Here we detail a protocol for whole-mount immunostaining of mouse small-intestinal villi that can be used to generate high-resolution 3D images of all gut cell types, including blood and lymphatic vessel cells, neurons, smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts and immune cells. The procedure describes perfusion, fixation, dissection, immunostaining, mounting, clearing, confocal imaging and quantification, using intestinal vasculature as an example. As intestinal epithelial cells prevent visualization with some antibodies, we also provide an optional protocol to remove these cells before fixation. In contrast to alternative current techniques, our protocol enables the entire villus to be visualized with increased spatial resolution of cell location, morphology and cell-cell interactions, thus allowing for easy quantification of phenotypes. The technique, which takes 7 d from mouse dissection to microscopic examination, will be useful for researchers who are interested in most aspects of intestinal biology, including mucosal immunology, infection, nutrition, cancer biology and intestinal microbiota. PMID:27560169

  4. Importance of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency in small intestine for urinary orotic acid excretion: analysis of OTC-deficient spf-ash mice with OTC transgene.

    PubMed

    Saheki, T; Mori, K; Kobayashi, K; Horiuchi, M; Shige, T; Obara, T; Suzuki, S; Mori, M; Yamamura, K

    1995-01-25

    We report the effect of the ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) transgene composed of 1.3 kb of the 5' flanking region of the rat OTC gene fused to rat OTC cDNA on urinary orotic acid excretion in OTC-deficient spf-ash (sparse-fur with abnormal skin and hair) mice during overnight-starvation and nitrogen loading. During starvation, spf-ash mice with about 6% and 2% of control levels of OTC activity in the liver and small intestine excreted a large amount of orotic acid in the urine. Transgenic spf-ash mice with about 10% and 30% of the control OTC activities in the liver and small intestine did not excrete more than the normal level of orotic acid. Accidental parasitization of transgenic spf-ash mice with ticks (Myocoptes musculinus) resulted in decrease of the OTC activities in the liver and small intestine to the levels in spf-ash mice, and increased excretion of orotic acid. During extermination of the ticks, the mice showed varied levels of OTC activity and orotic acid excretion. On nitrogen loading, transgenic spf-ash mice as well as spf-ash mice excreted larger amounts of orotic acid, while control mice showed no increase in its excretion. The levels of urinary orotic acid were inversely correlated to the logarithms of the OTC activities in the liver and small intestine, the correlation being significantly higher with intestinal OTC than with hepatic OTC activity. These results suggest that the level of OTC activity in the small intestine is important for production of orotic acid.

  5. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  6. Intestinal GPS: bile and bicarbonate control cyclic di-GMP to provide Vibrio cholerae spatial cues within the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Benjamin J; Waters, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous phenotypes in response to environmental stimuli to enable bacteria to transition between different lifestyles. Here we discuss our recent findings that the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae recognizes 2 host-specific signals, bile and bicarbonate, to regulate intracellular c-di-GMP. We have demonstrated that bile acids increase intracellular c-di-GMP to promote biofilm formation. We have also shown that this bile-mediated increase of intracellular c-di-GMP is negated by bicarbonate, and that this interaction is dependent on pH, suggesting that V. cholerae uses these 2 environmental cues to sense and adapt to its relative location in the small intestine. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP by bile is attributed to increased c-di-GMP synthesis by 3 diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and decreased expression of one phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the presence of bile. The molecular mechanisms by which bile controls the activity of the 3 DGCs and the regulators of bile-mediated transcriptional repression of the PDE are not yet known. Moreover, the impact of varying concentrations of bile and bicarbonate at different locations within the small intestine and the response of V. cholerae to these cues remains unclear. The native microbiome and pharmaceuticals, such as omeprazole, can impact bile and pH within the small intestine, suggesting these are potential unappreciated factors that may alter V. cholerae pathogenesis. PMID:25621620

  7. Nitroreduction and formation of hemoglobin adducts in rats with a human intestinal microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Straetemans, M.M.E.; Koopman, J.P.; Bos, R.P.

    1994-10-01

    In the covalent binding of nitroarenes to macromolecules, nitroreduction is an important step. The intestinal microflora represents an enormous potential of bacterial nitroreductase activity. As a consequence, the in vivo nitroreduction of orally administerednitroarenes is primarily located in the intestine. In this study, we have investigated the nitroreduction of 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF) by a human microflora in female Wistar rats. Germ-free (FG) rats were equipped with a bacterial flora derived from human feces. Nontreated GF rats and GF animals equipped with a conventional rat flora were used as controls. The composition of the human and the conventional microflora isolated from the rats were consistent with the microflora of the administered feces. In the rats receiving only sunflower seed oil, no adducts were detected. The animals equipped with a human or rat microflora that received 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) formed 2-AF hemoglobin (Hb)-adducts at average levels mean {+-} 0.003 and 0.043 {+-} 0.010 {mu}mole/g Hb, respectively. In the FG rats, an adduct level of 0.57 {+-} 0.09 was determined after 2-AF administration and non adducts were detected after 2-NF administration. The results show that nitroreduction by an acquired human intestinal microflora and subsequent adduct formation can be studied in the rate in vivo. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  9. Differences in Radiation Dose Response between Small and Large Intestinal Crypts.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Suzuki, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    The protection of intestinal epithelial cells from the lethal effects induced by high-dose radiation is an important issue in radiotherapy and in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome. However, the effects of middle- and low-dose radiation on intestinal epithelial cells remain unclear. Because the accumulation of DNA damage in intestinal stem cells may be crucial for the development of cancer-initiating cells, it is important to understand the kinetics of DNA repair and tissue response (which are involved in the elimination of damaged cells and tissue injury repair) to middle- to low-dose irradiation. In this study, mice were X-ray irradiated with 0.1, 1 or 4 Gy, after which the small intestine (duodenum and ileum) and colon were harvested from the animals. DNA damage repair and the elimination of damaged cells were quantified by measuring the number of foci of 53BP1, a surrogate marker for DNA double-strand breaks. Tissue-proliferative response was evaluated by determining the number of Ki-67(+) and mitotic cells. Intra-crypt response differed considerably between the small intestine and the colon. In the small intestine, 53BP1 foci were detected immediately after irradiation, but rapidly disappeared thereafter, especially noticeable in Lgr5(+) stem cells. Cellular growth was temporally arrested; however, cell numbers and mitotic cell numbers in the crypt did not change. The kinetics of DNA damage repair in Lgr5(+) stem cells were similar to those in the small intestines, while the colon was more susceptible to radiation-induced damage. Preferential cell loss in the lower crypt was clearly observed in the colon; and after low-dose X-ray irradiation, only the colon exhibited considerably reduced cell numbers and dramatic induction of mitosis. These results suggest that differences in radiation dose response between the small and the large intestine may depend on the growth activity of stem cells after DNA repair.

  10. Differences in Radiation Dose Response between Small and Large Intestinal Crypts.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Suzuki, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    The protection of intestinal epithelial cells from the lethal effects induced by high-dose radiation is an important issue in radiotherapy and in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome. However, the effects of middle- and low-dose radiation on intestinal epithelial cells remain unclear. Because the accumulation of DNA damage in intestinal stem cells may be crucial for the development of cancer-initiating cells, it is important to understand the kinetics of DNA repair and tissue response (which are involved in the elimination of damaged cells and tissue injury repair) to middle- to low-dose irradiation. In this study, mice were X-ray irradiated with 0.1, 1 or 4 Gy, after which the small intestine (duodenum and ileum) and colon were harvested from the animals. DNA damage repair and the elimination of damaged cells were quantified by measuring the number of foci of 53BP1, a surrogate marker for DNA double-strand breaks. Tissue-proliferative response was evaluated by determining the number of Ki-67(+) and mitotic cells. Intra-crypt response differed considerably between the small intestine and the colon. In the small intestine, 53BP1 foci were detected immediately after irradiation, but rapidly disappeared thereafter, especially noticeable in Lgr5(+) stem cells. Cellular growth was temporally arrested; however, cell numbers and mitotic cell numbers in the crypt did not change. The kinetics of DNA damage repair in Lgr5(+) stem cells were similar to those in the small intestines, while the colon was more susceptible to radiation-induced damage. Preferential cell loss in the lower crypt was clearly observed in the colon; and after low-dose X-ray irradiation, only the colon exhibited considerably reduced cell numbers and dramatic induction of mitosis. These results suggest that differences in radiation dose response between the small and the large intestine may depend on the growth activity of stem cells after DNA repair. PMID:27556352

  11. Adipose tissue-derived stem cell-seeded small intestinal submucosa for tunica albuginea grafting and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Yang, Yijun; Sikka, Suresh C.; Kadowitz, Philip J.; Ignarro, Louis J.; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) has been widely used in tunica albuginea (TA) reconstructive surgery. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) can repair damaged tissue, augment cellular differentiation, and stimulate release of multiple growth factors. The aim of this rat study was to assess the feasibility of seeding ADSCs onto SIS grafts for TA reconstruction. Here, we demonstrate that seeding syngeneic ADSCs onto SIS grafts (SIS-ADSC) resulted in significant cavernosal tissue preservation and maintained erectile responses, similar to controls, in a rat model of bilateral incision of TA, compared with sham-operated animals and rats grafted with SIS graft (SIS) alone. In addition to increased TGF-β1 and FGF-2 expression levels, cross-sectional studies of the rat penis with SIS and SIS-ADSC revealed mild to moderate fibrosis and an increase of 30% and 40% in mean diameter in flaccid and erectile states, respectively. SIS grafting induced transcriptional up-regulation of iNOS and down-regulation of endothelial NOS, neuronal NOS, and VEGF, an effect that was restored by seeding ADCSs on the SIS graft. Taken together, these data show that rats undergoing TA incision with autologous SIS-ADSC grafts maintained better erectile function compared with animals grafted with SIS alone. This study suggests that SIS-ADSC grafting can be successfully used for TA reconstruction procedures and can restore erectile function. PMID:22308363

  12. Laminin α5 influences the architecture of the mouse small intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Zhen X.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The mammalian intestine displays two distinct patterns of mucosal organization. The small intestine contains mucosal epithelial invaginations called crypts of Lieberkühn that are continuous with evaginations into the lumen called villi. The colon also contains crypts, but its epithelial surface is lined by flat surface cuffs. The epithelial cells of both organs communicate with the underlying mesenchyme through a basement membrane that is composed of a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, including members of the laminin family. The basement membranes of the small intestine and colon contain distinct laminin subtypes; notably, the villus basement membrane is rich in laminin α5. Here we show that diminution of laminin α5 in a mouse model led to a compensatory deposition of colonic laminins that resulted in a transformation from a small intestinal to a colonic mucosal architecture. The alteration in mucosal architecture was associated with reduced levels of nuclear p27Kip1, a cell cycle regulator, and altered intestinal epithelial cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Our results suggest that laminin α5 plays a crucial role in establishing and maintaining the specific mucosal pattern of the mouse small intestine. PMID:18628307

  13. Characteristic and Functional Analysis of a Newly Established Porcine Small Intestinal Epithelial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Hu, Guangdong; Lin, Zhi; He, Lei; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal surface of intestine is continuously exposed to both potential pathogens and beneficial commensal microorganisms. Recent findings suggest that intestinal epithelial cells, which once considered as a simple physical barrier, are a crucial cell lineage necessary for maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. Therefore, establishing a stable and reliable intestinal epithelial cell line for future research on the mucosal immune system is necessary. In the present study, we established a porcine intestinal epithelial cell line (ZYM-SIEC02) by introducing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into small intestinal epithelial cells derived from a neonatal, unsuckled piglet. Morphological analysis revealed a homogeneous cobblestone-like morphology of the epithelial cell sheets. Ultrastructural indicated the presence of microvilli, tight junctions, and a glandular configuration typical of the small intestine. Furthermore, ZYM-SIEC02 cells expressed epithelial cell-specific markers including cytokeratin 18, pan-cytokeratin, sucrase-isomaltase, E-cadherin and ZO-1. Immortalized ZYM-SIEC02 cells remained diploid and were not transformed. In addition, we also examined the host cell response to Salmonella and LPS and verified the enhanced expression of mRNAs encoding IL-8 and TNF-α by infection with Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Results showed that IL-8 protein expression were upregulated following Salmonella invasion. TLR4, TLR6 and IL-6 mRNA expression were upregulated following stimulation with LPS, ZYM-SIEC02 cells were hyporeponsive to LPS with respect to IL-8 mRNA expression and secretion. TNFα mRNA levels were significantly decreased after LPS stimulation and TNF-α secretion were not detected challenged with S. Typhimurium neither nor LPS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ZYM-SIEC02 cells retained the morphological and functional characteristics typical of primary swine intestinal epithelial

  14. Effects of mosapride on motility of the small intestine and caecum in normal horses after jejunocaecostomy.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Kouichi; Sasaki, Naoki; Kikuchi, Takuya; Murata, Aya; Lee, Inhyung; Yamada, Haruo; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prokinetic effects of mosapride with non-invasive assessment of myoelectrical activity in the small intestine and caecum of healthy horses after jejunocaecostomy. Six horses underwent celiotomy and jejunocaecostomy, and were treated with mosapride (treated group) at 1.5 mg/kg per osos once daily for 5 days after surgery. The other six horses did not receive treatment and were used as controls (non-treated group). The electrointestinography (EIG) maximum amplitude was used to measure intestinal motility. Motility significantly decreased following surgery. In the treated group, the EIG maximum amplitude of the small intestine was significantly higher than in the controls from day 6 approximately 31 after treatment. These findings clearly indicate that mosapride could overcome the decline of intestinal motility after jejunocaecostomy in normal horses. PMID:19461212

  15. Effects of mosapride on motility of the small intestine and caecum in normal horses after jejunocaecostomy

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kouichi; Kikuchi, Takuya; Murata, Aya; Lee, Inhyung; Yamada, Haruo; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prokinetic effects of mosapride with non-invasive assessment of myoelectrical activity in the small intestine and caecum of healthy horses after jejunocaecostomy. Six horses underwent celiotomy and jejunocaecostomy, and were treated with mosapride (treated group) at 1.5 mg/kg per osos once daily for 5 days after surgery. The other six horses did not receive treatment and were used as controls (non-treated group). The electrointestinography (EIG) maximum amplitude was used to measure intestinal motility. Motility significantly decreased following surgery. In the treated group, the EIG maximum amplitude of the small intestine was significantly higher than in the controls from day 6~31 after treatment. These findings clearly indicate that mosapride could overcome the decline of intestinal motility after jejunocaecostomy in normal horses. PMID:19461212

  16. Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nikki; Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Weeda, Viola B; Bading, James R; Houdijk, Alexander P J; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2015-01-01

    Malignancies induce disposal of arginine, an important substrate for the immune system. To sustain immune function, the tumor-bearing host accelerates arginine's intestinal-renal axis by glutamine mobilization from skeletal muscle and this may promote cachexia. Glutamine supplementation stimulates argi-nine production in healthy subjects. Arginine's intestinal-renal axis and the effect of glutamine supplementation in cancer cach-exia have not been investigated. This study evaluated the long-term adaptations of the interorgan pathway for arginine production following the onset of cachexia and the metabolic effect of glutamine supplementation in the cachectic state. Fischer-344 rats were randomly divided into a tumor-bearing group (n = 12), control group (n = 7) and tumor-bearing group receiving a glutamine-enriched diet (n = 9). Amino acid fluxes and net fractional extractions across intestine, kidneys, and liver were studied. Compared to controls, the portal-drained viscera of tumor-bearing rats took up significantly more glutamine and released significantly less citrulline. Renal metabolism was unchanged in the cachectic tumor-bearing rats compared with controls. Glutamine supplementation had no effects on intestinal and renal adaptations. In conclusion, in the cachectic state, an increase in intestinal glutamine uptake is not accompanied by an increase in renal arginine production. The adaptations found in the cachectic, tumor-bearing rat do not depend on glutamine availability.

  17. From Intestinal Permeability to Dysmotility: The Biobreeding Rat as a Model for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vanheel, Hanne; Masaoka, Tatsuhiro; Salim Rasoel, Shadea; Tóth, Joran; Houben, Els; Verbeke, Kristin; De Hertogh, Gert; Berghe, Pieter Vanden; Tack, Jan; Farré, Ricard

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired intestinal barrier function, low-grade inflammation and altered neuronal control are reported in functional gastrointestinal disorders. However, the sequence of and causal relation between these events is unclear, necessitating a spontaneous animal model. The aim of this study was to describe the natural history of intestinal permeability, mucosal and neuromuscular inflammation and nitrergic motor neuron function during the lifetime of the BioBreeding (BB) rat. Methods Normoglycemic BB-diabetes prone (DP) and control rats were sacrificed at different ages and jejunum was harvested to characterize intestinal permeability, inflammation and neuromuscular function. Results Both structural and functional evidence of increased intestinal permeability was found in young BB-DP rats from the age of 50 days. In older animals, starting in the mucosa from 70 days and in half of the animals also in the muscularis propria from 110 days, an inflammatory reaction, characterized by an influx of polymorphonuclear cells and higher myeloperoxidase activity, was observed. Finally, in animals older than 110 days, coinciding with a myenteric ganglionitis, a loss of nitrergic neurons and motor function was demonstrated. Conclusion In the BB-rat, mucosal inflammatory cell infiltration is preceded by intestinal barrier dysfunction and followed by myenteric ganglionitis and loss of nitrergic function. This sequence supports a primary role for impaired barrier function and provides an insightful model for the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25354336

  18. [Study on intestinal absorption of formononetin in Millettia nitita var. hirsutissima in rats].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Xiong, Xian-Bing; Su, Dan; Song, Yong-Gui; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Shi-Lin

    2013-10-01

    To use the single-pass intestine perfusion (SPIP) model and HPLC to determine the concentration of formononetin, the effect of quality concentrations of formononetin, different intestinal segments and P-glycoprotein inhibitor on intestinal absorption of formononetin, in order to observe the intestinal absorption mechanism of formononetin from Millettia nitita var. hirsutissima in rats. The experimental results showed that the qulaity concentration of formononetin in the perfusate had no significant effect on the absorption rate constant (K(a)) and the apparent absorption coefficient (P(app)); K(a) and P(app) of formononetin in duodenum, jejunum and ileum showed no significant difference. However, K(a) was significantly higher than that in colon (P < 0.05), with significant difference between that in intestinum tenue and colon. P-glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil showed significant difference in K(a) and P(app) in intestinal segments (P < 0.05). This indicated that the absorption mechanism of formononein in rat intestinal tracts passive diffusion, without any saturated absorption. Formononein is absorbed well in all intestines. Their absorption windows were mainly concentrated in the intestinum tenue, without specific absorption sites. Formononein may be the substrate of P-glycoprotein. PMID:24490575

  19. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    PubMed

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes.

  20. A comparative study on the metabolism of Epimedium koreanum Nakai-prenylated flavonoids in rats by an intestinal enzyme (lactase phlorizin hydrolase) and intestinal flora.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Chen, Yan; Wang, Ying; Gao, Xia; Qu, Ding; Liu, Congyan

    2013-12-24

    The aim of this study was to compare the significance of the intestinal hydrolysis of prenylated flavonoids in Herba Epimedii by an intestinal enzyme and flora. Flavonoids were incubated at 37 °C with rat intestinal enzyme and intestinal flora. HPLC-UV was used to calculate the metabolic rates of the parent drug in the incubation and LC/MS/MS was used to determine the chemical structures of metabolites generated by different flavonoid glycosides. Rates of flavonoid metabolism by rat intestinal enzyme were quicker than those of intestinal flora. The sequence of intestinal flora metabolic rates was icariin>epimedin B>epimedin A>epimedin C>baohuoside I, whereas the order of intestinal enzyme metabolic rates was icariin>epimedin A>epimedin C>epimedin B>baohuoside I. Meanwhile, the LC/MS/MS graphs showed that icariin produced three products, epimedin A/B/C had four and baohuoside I yielded one product in incubations of both intestinal enzyme and flora, which were more than the results of HPLC-UV due to the fact LC/MS/MS has lower detectability and higher sensitivity. Moreover, the outcomes indicated that the rate of metabolization of flavonoids by intestinal enzyme were faster than those of intestinal flora, which was consistent with the HPLC-UV results. In conclusion, the metabolic pathways of the same components by intestinal flora and enzyme were the same. What's more, an intestinal enzyme such as lactase phlorizin hydrolase exhibited a more significant metabolic role in prenylated flavonoids of Herba Epimedi compared with intestinal flora.

  1. Intestinal elimination of ofloxacin enantiomers in the rat: evidence of a carrier-mediated process.

    PubMed Central

    Rabbaa, L; Dautrey, S; Colas-Linhart, N; Carbon, C; Farinotti, R

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine the mechanism involved in intestinal elimination of the two optical isomers of ofloxacin in the rat. An intestinal segment was isolated in situ and perfused with saline, while drug solution was administered via the carotid artery. Blood samples and intestinal effluents were collected and analyzed by a high-performance liquid chromatography method. We observed saturable and stereoselective intestinal elimination of the ofloxacin enantiomers. The elimination process favored the R-(+) form of the molecule. After a parenteral dose of 20 mg of racemic ofloxacin per kg of body weight, intestinal clearances were 0.23 +/- 0.03 versus 0.30 +/- 0.03 ml/min for S-(-)- and R-(+)-ofloxacin, respectively. Ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin interfered with ofloxacin elimination and significantly reduced the intestinal clearance of S-(-)- and R-(+)-ofloxacin. With concomitant ciprofloxacin, intestinal clearances became 0.13 +/- 0.02 versus 0.17 +/- 0.03 ml/min and 0.14 +/- 0.01 versus 0.19 +/- 0.05 ml/min with pefloxacin for S-(-)- and R-(+)-ofloxacin, respectively. Those findings argue for the presence of a common transport system in the rat intestine with variable affinities for fluoroquinolones. In addition, verapamil and quinidine, two P-glycoprotein blockers, significantly reduced the intestinal elimination of both ofloxacin isomers (with concomitant verapamil, intestinal clearances were 0.12 +/- 0.02 versus 0.18 +/- 0.03 ml/min for S-(-)- and R-(+)-ofloxacin, respectively, while with concomitant quinidine, values were 0.18 +/- 0.01 versus 0.23 +/- 0.01 ml/min without modifying their areas under the concentration-time curve in serum. Similar results were found with another fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin, in previous work. P-glycoprotein appears to be involved in the intestinal elimination of fluoroquinolones in rats. The characterization of fluoroquinolone intestinal elimination has significant clinical relevance for the better evaluation of the

  2. Antigen presentation by small intestinal epithelial cells uniquely enhances IFN-γ secretion from CD4{sup +} intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Ryo; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Iwamoto, Taku; Maeda, Nana; Emoto, Tetsuro; Shimizu, Makoto; Totsuka, Mamoru

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs). •sIECs are able to induce antigen specific proliferation of CD4{sup +} IELs. •sIECs induce markedly enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} IELs. •Induction of enhanced IFN-γ secretion by sIECs is uniquely observed in CD4{sup +} IELs. -- Abstract: Small intestinal epithelial cells (sIECs) express major histocompatibility complex class II molecules even in a normal condition, and are known to function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) at least in vitro. These findings raised the possibility that sIECs play an important role in inducing immune responses against luminal antigens, especially those of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs). We herein showed that antigenic stimulation with sIECs induced markedly greater secretion of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) by CD4{sup +} IELs, but not interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and IL-17 although the proliferative response was prominently lower than that with T cell-depleted splenic APCs. In contrast, no enhanced IFN-γ secretion by CD4{sup +} LPLs and primed splenic CD4{sup +} T cells was observed when stimulated with sIECs. Taken together, these results suggest that sIECs uniquely activate CD4{sup +} IELs and induce remarkable IFN-γ secretion upon antigenic stimulation in vivo.

  3. Intestinal microflora molecular markers of spleen-deficient rats and evaluation of traditional Chinese drugs

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Zhuo; Lu, Yuan; Wu, Chun-Fu; Yang, Jing-Yu; Li, Xiao-Bo

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To find a rapid and efficient analysis method of gastrointestinal microflora in Pi-deficient (spleen-deficient) rats and to evaluate traditional Chinese drugs. METHODS: Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR (ERIC-PCR) based assay was performed to examine changes of intestinal microflora in two Pi-deficienct animal models and to evaluate the efficacy of four traditional Chinese drugs as well as a probiotic recipe and another therapy in Pi-deficient rats. RESULTS: A molecular marker was identified for Pi-deficiency in rats. The pharmacodynamic evaluation system, including identified molecular markers (net integral area and abundance of DNA bands), Shannon’s index for diversity of intestinal microflora, and Sorenson’s pairwise similarity coefficient, was established. The four major clinical recipes of traditional Chinese drugs for Pi-deficiency in rats, especially at their medium dose (equivalence to the clinical dose), produced more pronounced recovery activities in Pi-deficient rats, while higher doses of these recipes did not show a better therapeutic effect but some toxic effects such as perturbation deterioration of intestinal microflora. CONCLUSION: Both fingerprint analysis and identified marker can show Pi-deficiency in rats and its difference after treatment. The identified molecular marker may be applied in screening for the active compounds both in relative traditional Chinese drugs and in pharmacodynamic study of Pi-deficiency in rats. PMID:19437561

  4. The Relation between Peristaltic and Segmental Contraction, Mixing, and Absorption in the Small Intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banco, Gino; Brasseur, James; Wang, Yanxing; Ailiani, Amit; Neuberger, Thomas; Webb, Andrew

    2009-11-01

    The physiology and mechanics of the small intestine originates with lumen-scale fluid motions generated by enterically controlled muscle wall contractions. Although complex in appearance, we have shown with principle component decomposition of gut motion from a rat model that simpler component structure may integrate to produce basic peristaltic and segmental motions. To couple these measured modes with fluid mixing and nutrient absorption we have developed 2-D and axisymmetric models of the gut using the lattice-Boltzmann framework with scalar and second order moving boundary conditions. Previous models indicated that peristalsis is detrimental to absorption and therefore that gut motility is likely bimodal, transitioning between peristalsis and segmental modes to optimize the transport of chyme vs. nutrient absorption. However we have since discovered that more complex control is possible due to potential transitions between ``trapped'' vs. ``nontrapped'' peristaltic fluid motions, depending on occlusion ratio. These transitions lead to an important distinction between 2-D and axisymmetric models and indicate that gut motility may be more finely controlled than previously thought. [Supported by NSF

  5. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Amy M.; Callahan, Derrick J.; Richner, Justin M.; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F.; Diamond, Michael S.; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26197390

  6. GPR18 Controls Reconstitution of Mouse Small Intestine Intraepithelial Lymphocytes following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Amy M; Callahan, Derrick J; Richner, Justin M; Choi, Jaebok; DiPersio, John F; Diamond, Michael S; Bhattacharya, Deepta

    2015-01-01

    Specific G protein coupled receptors (GPRs) regulate the proper positioning, function, and development of immune lineage subsets. Here, we demonstrate that GPR18 regulates the reconstitution of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of the small intestine following bone marrow transplantation. Through analysis of transcriptional microarray data, we find that GPR18 is highly expressed in IELs, lymphoid progenitors, and mature follicular B cells. To establish the physiological role of this largely uncharacterized GPR, we generated Gpr18-/- mice. Despite high levels of GPR18 expression in specific hematopoietic progenitors, Gpr18-/- mice have no defects in lymphopoiesis or myelopoiesis. Moreover, antibody responses following immunization with hapten-protein conjugates or infection with West Nile virus are normal in Gpr18-/- mice. Steady-state numbers of IELs are also normal in Gpr18-/- mice. However, competitive bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrate that GPR18 is cell-intrinsically required for the optimal restoration of small intestine TCRγδ+ and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ IELs. In contrast, GPR18 is dispensable for the reconstitution of large intestine IELs. Moreover, Gpr18-/- bone marrow reconstitutes small intestine IELs similarly to controls in athymic recipients. Gpr18-/- chimeras show no changes in susceptibility to intestinal insults such as Citrobacter rodentium infections or graft versus host disease. These data reveal highly specific requirements for GPR18 in the development and reconstitution of thymus-derived intestinal IEL subsets in the steady-state and after bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26197390

  7. LAZAROID U-74500A FOR WARM ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION INJURY OF THE CANINE SMALL INTESTINE

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiromu; Zhu, Yue; Zhang, Shimin; Ishizaki, Naoki; Jin, Maeng Bong; Azuma, Takashi; Lee, Randall; Starzl, Thomas E.; Todo, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although lazaroids have been shown to protect various organs from ischemia/reperfusion injury, results obtained in the small intestine have been conflicting. STUDY DESIGN The canine small intestine was made totally ischemic for 2 hours by occluding the superior mesenteric artery and the superior mesenteric vein with interruption of the mesenteric collateral vessels. A lazaroid compound, U74500A, or a citrate vehicle was given intravenously to each of the six animals for 30 minutes before intestinal ischemia. Intestinal tissue blood flow, lipid peroxidation, neutrophil infiltration, adenine nucleotides and their catabolites, and histologic changes after reperfusion were determined. RESULTS Lazaroid treatment attenuated decline of the mucosal and serosal blood flow after reperfusion. Accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and neutrophils in mucosal tissues was markedly inhibited by the treatment. Postischemic energy resynthesis was also augmented by lazaroid. Morphologically, mucosal architectures were better preserved with lazaroid treatment after reperfusion, and recovered to normal by postoperative day 3 in the treated group and by post-operative day 7 in control animals. CONCLUSIONS Lazaroids protect the canine small intestine from ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and neutrophil infiltration. Dogs are tolerant of 2-hour normothermic complete intestinal ischemia. PMID:9100685

  8. Influence of mesenchymal stem cells on stomach tissue engineering using small intestinal submucosa.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Hiroki; Ueno, Tomio; Oga, Atsunori; Nakao, Mitsuhiro; Nishimura, Taku; Kobayashi, Sei; Oka, Masaaki

    2015-03-01

    Small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is a biodegradable collagen-rich matrix containing functional growth factors. We have previously reported encouraging outcomes for regeneration of an artificial defect in the rodent stomach using SIS grafts, although the muscular layer was diminutive. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of SIS in conjunction with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regeneration of the gastrointestinal tract. MSCs from the bone marrow of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-transgenic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were isolated and expanded ex vivo. A 1 cm whole-layer stomach defect in SD rats was repaired using: a plain SIS graft without MSCs (group 1, control); a plain SIS graft followed by intravenous injection of MSCs (group 2); a SIS graft co-cultured with MSCs (group 3); or a SIS sandwich containing an MSC sheet (group 4). Pharmacological, electrophysiological and immunohistochemical examination was performed to evaluate the regenerated stomach tissue. Contractility in response to a muscarinic receptor agonist, a nitric oxide precursor or electrical field stimulation was observed in all groups. SIS grafts seeded with MSCs (groups 3 and 4) appeared to support improved regeneration compared with SIS grafts not seeded with MSCs (groups 1 and 2), by enabling the development of well-structured smooth muscle layers of significantly increased length. GFP expression was detected in the regenerated interstitial tissue, with fibroblast-like cells in the seeded-SIS groups. SIS potently induced pharmacological and electrophysiological regeneration of the digestive tract, and seeded MSCs provided an enriched environment that supported tissue regeneration by the SIS graft in the engineered stomach.

  9. Intestinal adaptation after extensive small bowel resection: differential changes in growth and insulin-like growth factor system messenger ribonucleic acids in jejunum and ileum.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, T R; Mantell, M P; Chow, J C; Rombeau, J L; Smith, R J

    1998-07-01

    The distal small bowel exhibits greater adaptive growth than proximal segments after partial small intestine resection. To explore this process, we evaluated adaptive cellularity, intestinal insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, and effects of recombinant IGF-I treatment in jejunum and ileum of adult rats. Gastrostomy-fed animals underwent 80% jejuno-ileal resection or intestinal transection and reanastomosis without resection, followed by infusion of human recombinant IGF-I (2.4 mg/kgXday) or vehicle. After 7 days, resected rats demonstrated modest adaptive growth in jejunum and marked cell proliferation in ileum. Resection increased IGF-I mRNA in both jejunum (183%) and ileum (249%) and up-regulated IGFBP-4 mRNA levels in both tissues. IGFBP-3 mRNA fell significantly in ileum after resection. IGF-I infusion modestly increased ileal cellularity after resection, but had no effect in jejunum. IGF-I markedly increased IGFBP-3 mRNA levels in jejunum after both transection and resection. These data confirm that bowel resection induces greater adaptive growth in ileum than jejunum. IGF-I administration modestly increases ileal, but not jejunal, growth after resection. Increased levels of intestinal IGF-I and IGFBP-4 mRNA suggest roles for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in mediating small bowel adaptation. Higher levels of jejunal IGFBP-3 mRNA may be related to limited jejunal vs. ileal growth after extensive jejuno-ileal resection.

  10. Age-associated modifications of intestinal permeability and innate immunity in human small intestine.

    PubMed

    Man, Angela L; Bertelli, Eugenio; Rentini, Silvia; Regoli, Mari; Briars, Graham; Marini, Mario; Watson, Alastair J M; Nicoletti, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    The physical and immunological properties of the human intestinal epithelial barrier in aging are largely unknown. Ileal biopsies from young (7-12 years), adult (20-40 years) and aging (67-77 years) individuals not showing symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies were used to assess levels of inflammatory cytokines, barrier integrity and cytokine production in response to microbial challenges. Increased expression of interleukin (IL)-6, but not interferon (IFN)γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β was observed during aging; further analysis showed that cluster of differentiation (CD)11c(+) dendritic cells (DCs) are one of the major sources of IL-6 in the aging gut and expressed higher levels of CD40. Up-regulated production of IL-6 was accompanied by increased expression of claudin-2 leading to reduced transepithelial electric resistance (TEER); TEER could be restored in in vitro and ex vivo cultures by neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibody. In contrast, expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin and junctional-adhesion molecule-A1 did not vary with age and overall permeability to macromolecules was not affected. Finally, cytokine production in response to different microbial stimuli was assessed in a polarized in vitro organ culture (IVOC). IL-8 production in response to flagellin declined progressively with age although the expression and distribution of toll-like receptor (TLR)-5 on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) remained unchanged. Also, flagellin-induced production of IL-6 was less pronounced in aging individuals. In contrast, TNF-α production in response to probiotics (VSL#3) did not decline with age; however, in our experimental model probiotics did not down-regulate the production of IL-6 and expression of claudin-2. These data suggested that aging affects properties of the intestinal barrier likely to impact on age-associated disturbances, both locally and systemically. PMID:25948052

  11. d-Psicose Inhibits Intestinal alpha-Glucosidase and Suppresses the Glycemic Response after Ingestion of Carbohydrates in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tatsuhiro; Izumori, Ken

    2009-09-01

    d-psicose is one of the rare sugars present in small quantities in commercial carbohydrates and agricultural products. In this study, we investigated the effects of d-psicose on the activities of alpha-amylases and alpha-glucosidases in vitro, and evaluated the effects of d-psicose on the in vivo postprandial glycemic response using rats. In the in vitro study, d-psicose potently inhibited the intestinal sucrase and maltase, however, slightly inhibited the intestinal and salivary alpha-amylase activities. Male Wistar rats (6 months old) were administrated 2 g/kg of sucrose, maltose or soluble starch together with 0.2 g/kg of d-psicose or d-fructose. The d-psicose significantly inhibited the increment of plasma glucose concentration induced by sucrose or maltose. The starch-induced glycemic response tended to be suppressed by d-psicose, however the suppression was not significant. These results suggest that d-psicose inhibits intestinal sucrase and maltase activities and suppresses the plasma glucose increase the normally occurs after sucrose and maltose ingestion. Thus, d-psicose may be useful in preventing postprandial hyperglycemia in diabetic patients when foods containing sucrose and maltose are ingested.

  12. Hydroxyethyl Starch (HES 130/0.4) Impairs Intestinal Barrier Integrity and Metabolic Function: Findings from a Mouse Model of the Isolated Perfused Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowsky, Heike; Zitta, Karina; Bein, Berthold; Krause, Thorsten; Goldmann, Torsten; Frerichs