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Sample records for rauwolfia vomitoria foilage

  1. Tissue lipid lowering-effect of a traditional Nigerian anti-diabetic infusion of Rauwolfia vomitoria foilage and Citrus aurantium fruit.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joan I A; Mortensen, Alicja; Mølgaard, Per

    2006-04-06

    The toxicity and anti-diabetic properties of an aqueous plant extract made by boiling Rauwolfia vomitoria foilage and Citrus aurantium fruits were evaluated in mice. A single dosage corresponding to 70x the human-daily-dose was non-toxic when administered to 6-week-old NMRI lean mice or 6- or 11-week-old C57BL/6J lean mice. Daily treatment of 11-week-old C57BL/KsBom-db (db/db) genetic diabetic mice with a dose corresponding to 10x human-daily-dose for 6 weeks facilitated a significant weight loss as compared to the untreated controls. During treatment, the db/db mice were maintained on the carbohydrate-deficient Altromin C1009 diet. Although the food intake in the treated mice was not statistically significant from that in the controls, the treated animals had significantly higher serum triglyceride contents, suggesting that the treatment induced lipid mobilization from internal stores. Moreover, the fatty acid profile of the eyes from the treated animals showed a significant reduction in total fatty acid content accompanied by a 33% reduction in estimated Stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity (p = 0.039) as compared with controls. The fatty acid mobilization and a protection of the brittle C57BL/KsBom-db pancreas were observed 5 weeks after cessation of treatment when the treated animals were maintained on the poorer Altromin C1009 diet.

  2. Rauwolfia vomitoria inhibits olfaction and modifies olfactory bulb cells.

    PubMed

    Ekong, Moses B; Peter, Aniekan I; Edagha, Innocent A; Ekpene, Ubong U; Friday, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    The rising cost of orthodox medication has endeared so many to the use of herbs for the management of neurological conditions. Rauwolfia vomitoria (RV) one of such herbs is a rainforest shrub whose parts are used locally in the management of psychiatry and other medical issues. Its usefulness though not in doubt is wrapped with adverse reports as its active constituents depletes brain monoamine and dopamine stores. This motivated this research on the effects of the root bark extract on olfaction and the olfactory bulb of adult Wistar rats. Eighteen adult Wistar rats (220g average) were divided into three groups (n=6); control (placebo), 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg RV root bark extract, respectively. The oral administration lasted for seven days and on day 8, test of olfaction was carried out and the animals immediately anaesthetized with ketamine hydrochloride (i.p.) and perfuse-fixed with 10% neutral buffered formalin. All the brains were processed for histology and immunoreactivity. Results showed loss of body weights and olfaction in the 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg RV groups. There was hypertrophy and atrophy of mitral cells respectively, in the 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg RV groups, while there was hyperplasia of cells in the internal granular and plexiform layers of both groups. There was decreased neuron specific enolase (NSE) and neurofilament (NF) expression in the 200mg/kg RV group, while NF and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression was decreased in the 400mg/kg RV group. However, NSE expression was enhanced in the 400mg/kg group, while GFAP expression was enhanced in the 200mg/kg RV group. These results suggest that these doses of RV affect olfaction and appetite, and stimulate adverse cellular changes in the olfactory bulb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vitamin E Supplementation with Rauwolfia Vomitoria Root Bark Extract Improves Hematological Indices

    PubMed Central

    Isaiah, Akpanabiatu Monday; Olawale, Otitoju; Effiong, Edet Emmanuel; Idongesit, Ndem Jessie; Fidelis, Uwah Anthony; Friday, Ufot Usenobong

    2012-01-01

    Background: Vitamin supplementation in Rauwolfia vomitoria root bark extract administration may interact and impact significantly on hematology of albino Wistar rats. Aim: In this investigation we studied vitamin E supplementation with Rauwolfia vomitoria root bark extract on the hematology of experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Forty two rats weighing 200 – 230 g were randomly selected into six groups of seven animals each. Group 1 animals serve as controls; group 2 received vitamin E (10 IU/kg body weight). Groups 3 and 4 were given the extract (150 and 300 mg/kg body weight) respectively. Groups 5 and 6 were given vitamin E (10 IU/kg body weight), the extract (150 and 300 mg/kg body weight) respectively. The extract and the vitamin were administered daily by oral intubation. Blood samples analyzed for hematological indices. Results: Decrease in white blood cell count (WBC) was observed, indicating improved immunity of animals. Extract at 150 and 300 mg/kg body weight with and without vitamin E affected hemoglobin and packed cell volume. Conclusion: Rauwolfia vomitoria with or without vitamin E improved animal's immunity and enhances their hematology. Interaction of vitamin E with the extract affects medicinal therapeutics of this plant. PMID:22408754

  4. Vitamin e supplementation with rauwolfia vomitoria root bark extract improves hematological indices.

    PubMed

    Isaiah, Akpanabiatu Monday; Olawale, Otitoju; Effiong, Edet Emmanuel; Idongesit, Ndem Jessie; Fidelis, Uwah Anthony; Friday, Ufot Usenobong

    2012-02-01

    Vitamin supplementation in Rauwolfia vomitoria root bark extract administration may interact and impact significantly on hematology of albino Wistar rats. In this investigation we studied vitamin E supplementation with Rauwolfia vomitoria root bark extract on the hematology of experimental animals. Forty two rats weighing 200 - 230 g were randomly selected into six groups of seven animals each. Group 1 animals serve as controls; group 2 received vitamin E (10 IU/kg body weight). Groups 3 and 4 were given the extract (150 and 300 mg/kg body weight) respectively. Groups 5 and 6 were given vitamin E (10 IU/kg body weight), the extract (150 and 300 mg/kg body weight) respectively. The extract and the vitamin were administered daily by oral intubation. Blood samples analyzed for hematological indices. Decrease in white blood cell count (WBC) was observed, indicating improved immunity of animals. Extract at 150 and 300 mg/kg body weight with and without vitamin E affected hemoglobin and packed cell volume. Rauwolfia vomitoria with or without vitamin E improved animal's immunity and enhances their hematology. Interaction of vitamin E with the extract affects medicinal therapeutics of this plant.

  5. Anti-prostate cancer activity of a beta-carboline alkaloid enriched extract from Rauwolfia vomitoria.

    PubMed

    Bemis, D L; Capodice, J L; Gorroochurn, P; Katz, A E; Buttyan, R

    2006-11-01

    The tropical shrub, Rauwolfia vomitoria, is a medicinal plant used traditionally to treat a variety of ailments. A bioactive beta-carboline alkaloid, alstonine, present in this extract was previously shown to have anti-cancer activity against cancer cell lines. This study considers the potential anti-prostate cancer activity of this extract in vitro and in vivo. Rauwolfia vomitoria extract standardized for beta-carboline alkaloids was tested for ability to influence the growth and survival of the human LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. A WST-1 assay was used to measure cell growth, and cell cycle analyses were conducted with flow cytometry. Western blot detection of PARP cleavage and accumulation of cells containing sub-genomic DNA indicated induction of apoptosis. Pathway specific microarray analyses were utilized to identify the effect of Rauwolfia extract on the expression of 225 genes. Mice xenografted with LNCaP cells were treated with the extract or placebo control, and tumor growth was measured for 5 weeks. The effects of the extract on xenografted tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by in situ BrdU incorporation and TUNEL staining. Rauwolfia extract decreased in vitro cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.001) and induced the accumulation of G1 phase cells. PARP cleavage demonstrated that apoptosis was induced only at the highest concentration tested (500 microg/ml) which was confirmed by detection of cells containing sub-genomic DNA. The expression of genes associated with DNA damage signaling pathway was up-regulated by Rauwolfia treatment, including that of GADD153 and MDG. The expression of a few cell cycle genes (p21, cyclin D1 and E2F1) was also modulated. These alterations were confirmed by RT-PCR. Tumor volumes were decreased by 60%, 70% and 58% in the groups fed the 75, 37.5 or 7.5 mg/kg Rauwolfia, respectively (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.001). The Rauwolfia vomitoria extract significantly suppressed the growth and cell cycle

  6. Comparative effects of Rauwolfia vomitoria and chlorpromazine on social behaviour and pain

    PubMed Central

    Bisong, Sunday; Brown, Richard; Osim, Eme

    2011-01-01

    Background: Rauwolfia vomitoria has been used in Nigeria to manage psychiatric disorders despite orthodox medicine. Aims: This research was therefore aimed at comparing the effects of R. vomitoria, chlorpromazine and reserpine on social behaviour and pain in mice. Materials and Methods: Ninety male CD-1 mice (32 – 38g body weight) were grouped into 3 with 5 subgroups (n=6) each. Mice were given chlorpromazine (0.0, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 mg/kg i.p.), 30 minutes before testing and R. vomitoria (0.0, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and reserpine (0.0, 0.1, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg/kg, i.p) 24 hours before testing. Nesting score assessed social behaviour while the tail flick and hot plate analgesiometers assessed pain. Results: Chlorpromazine dose-dependently decreased nesting score (F4,25 = 5.5660; p< 0.01), indicating decreased social behaviour (social loss) in the mice. Although R. vomitoria did not affect nesting score, reserpine decreased the nesting score (social loss). In the pain test, chlorpromazine did not alter tail flick latency but decreased hind paw lick latency in the hot plate at 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg (p< 0.01), indicating increased pain sensitivity at these doses which may indirectly increase social withdrawal and thus aggravating depression. R. vomitoria however, increased tail flick and hind paw lick latencies in the hot plate test (p< 0.05) indicating decreased pain sensitivity. Reserpine, like R. vomitoria, increased latency of hind paw lick in the hot plate. Conclusion: R. vomitoria has a high potential as an antipsychotic and may have advantage over chlorpromazine; it is not necessary to isolate active components from this herb. PMID:22540065

  7. Cerebellar neurohistology and behavioural effects of gongronema latifolium and Rauwolfia vomitoria in mice.

    PubMed

    Ekong, Moses B; Peter, Mine D; Peter, Aniekan I; Eluwa, Mokutima A; Umoh, Idorenyin U; Igiri, Anozeng O; Ekanem, Theresa B

    2014-06-01

    Rauwolfia vomitoria and Gongronema latifolium are medicinal herbs used for the treatment of hypertension, malaria, mental and intestinal disorders. G. latifolium is known to prevent the side effects reported for R. vomitoria. Therefore we decided to investigate what effects a combination treatment of G. latifolium and R. vomitoria would have on mice. Thirty male mice weighing 15-26 g were divided into 4 groups of 6 mice each. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were the treatment groups, and were treated with 150 mg/kg of R. vomitoria root bark extract, 200 mg/kg of G. latifolium leaf extract, and combination of both extracts, respectively. The control group received 0.5 mL of 20% Tween. The treatments were by oral gavages and lasted for 7 days. The open field maze neurobehavioural test was performed on day 8 to ascertain locomotion, exploration and anxiety, and the animals were immediately sacrificed. Results indicate lower body weights, though no difference was seen in the brain weights and behavioural test parameters in the treatment groups compared with the control group. Neurohistology of the cerebellum showed slight hypertrophy of Purkinje cells, with brain matrix loss in treatment groups 2 and 3, but group 4 showed no apparent histopathology. The cellular population was higher, while the cellular sizes and total cellular areas were lower in all the treatment groups. This study showed that R. vomitoria root bark and G. latifolium leaf extracts may individually cause cerebellar cytoarchitecture changes, which may be prevented with the combination of both remedies.

  8. Antitumor Activities of Rauwolfia vomitoria Extract and Potentiation of Carboplatin Effects Against Ovarian Cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Ma, Yan; Drisko, Jeanne; Chen, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor resistance to platinum-based drugs has been an obstacle to the treatment of ovarian cancer. Extract of the plant Rauwolfia vomitoria has long been used by cancer patients. However, there have not been systematic studies of its anticancer activity. Objective In an effort to enhance the effectiveness of platinum-based drugs, we investigated the anticancer effect of a Rauwolfia vomitoria extract (Rau), both alone and in combination with carboplatin (Cp). Methods In vitro cytotoxicity and colony formation were evaluated in several ovarian cancer cell lines. In vivo effects were evaluated in an intraperitoneal ovarian cancer mouse model. The combination of Rau and Cp was assessed using Chou-Talalay’s constant ratio design and median effect analysis based on the isobologram principle to determine the combination index values. Results Rau decreased cell growth in all 3 tested ovarian cancer cell lines dose dependently and completely inhibited formation of colonies in soft agar. Apoptosis was induced in a time- and dose-dependent manner and was the predominant form of Rau-induced cell death. Synergy of Rau with Cp was detected, with combination index values <1 and dose reduction index values for Cp ranging from 1.7- to 7-fold. Tumor growth in mice was significantly suppressed by 36% or 66% with Rau treatment alone at a low (20 mg/kg) or a high dose (50 mg/kg), respectively, an effect comparable to that of Cp alone. The volume of ascitic fluid and the number of nonblood cells in ascites were also significantly decreased. Combining Rau with Cp remarkably enhanced the effect of Cp and reduced tumor burden by 87% to 90% and ascites volume by 89% to 97%. Conclusions Rau has potent antitumor activity and in combination significantly enhances the effect of Cp against ovarian cancer. PMID:24465036

  9. Antitumor Activities of Rauwolfia vomitoria Extract and Potentiation of Carboplatin Effects Against Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Ma, Yan; Drisko, Jeanne; Chen, Qi

    2013-12-01

    Tumor resistance to platinum-based drugs has been an obstacle to the treatment of ovarian cancer. Extract of the plant Rauwolfia vomitoria has long been used by cancer patients. However, there have not been systematic studies of its anticancer activity. In an effort to enhance the effectiveness of platinum-based drugs, we investigated the anticancer effect of a Rauwolfia vomitoria extract (Rau), both alone and in combination with carboplatin (Cp). In vitro cytotoxicity and colony formation were evaluated in several ovarian cancer cell lines. In vivo effects were evaluated in an intraperitoneal ovarian cancer mouse model. The combination of Rau and Cp was assessed using Chou-Talalay's constant ratio design and median effect analysis based on the isobologram principle to determine the combination index values. Rau decreased cell growth in all 3 tested ovarian cancer cell lines dose dependently and completely inhibited formation of colonies in soft agar. Apoptosis was induced in a time- and dose-dependent manner and was the predominant form of Rau-induced cell death. Synergy of Rau with Cp was detected, with combination index values <1 and dose reduction index values for Cp ranging from 1.7- to 7-fold. Tumor growth in mice was significantly suppressed by 36% or 66% with Rau treatment alone at a low (20 mg/kg) or a high dose (50 mg/kg), respectively, an effect comparable to that of Cp alone. The volume of ascitic fluid and the number of nonblood cells in ascites were also significantly decreased. Combining Rau with Cp remarkably enhanced the effect of Cp and reduced tumor burden by 87% to 90% and ascites volume by 89% to 97%. Rau has potent antitumor activity and in combination significantly enhances the effect of Cp against ovarian cancer.

  10. Comparative extrapyramidal effects of Rauwolfia vomitoria, chlorpromazine and reserpine in mice.

    PubMed

    Bisong, Sunday Agba; Brown, Richard Earl; Osim, Eme Effiom

    2013-01-01

    Most antipsychotics interfere with the dopaminergic system, resulting in extrapyramidal effects. This study compared the extrapyramidal effects of chlorpromazine (Cpz), the herb Rauwolfia vomitoria (RV) and its alkaloid reserpine (Res), used as antipsychotics, in mice. Ninety age-matched male CD-1 strain of mice (25-33 g body weight) were divided into 3 groups, each consisting of 5 subgroups (n = 6). Cpz (0.0, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 30 min before testing. RV (0.0, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and Res (0.0, 0.1, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered 24 h before testing. Locomotor behaviour (open field test) and motor coordination (acceleratory rotarod) were assessed. Mice were also observed for 10 min for tremor and vacuous chewing movement (VCM). CPZ and Res dose-dependently decreased locomotor behaviour and impaired motor coordination (p < 0.01). RV also decreased locomotor behaviour (4.0 mg/kg; p < 0.05) but had minimal effect on motor coordination. VCM was lower in the RV group (0.17 ± 0.16/10 min) than the Res (6.8 ± 1.36/10 min) and Cpz groups (7.83 ± 1.95/10 min): F ((4,25)) = 10.703; p < 0.01. The frequency of bouts of tremor was also lower in the RV group (1.17 ± 0.72/10 min) than the Res (21.2 ± 5.63/10 min) and Cpz (7.83 ± 1.59/10 min) groups: F ((4,25)) = 11.012; p < 0.001. The root bark extract of R. vomitoria, therefore, has great potential in the management of psychotic disorders.

  11. Comparative effects of Rauwolfia vomitoria and chlorpromazine on locomotor behaviour and anxiety in mice.

    PubMed

    Bisong, Sunday Agba; Brown, Richard; Osim, Eme Effiom

    2010-10-28

    Since remedies for mental disorders have been sought through both orthodox and traditional medicine this study compared the effects of the antipsychotic, chlorpromazine (Cpz), the herb Rauwolfia vomitoria (RV) and its alkaloid reserpine (Res) in mice. Ninety male CD-1 strain of mice (75-80 days old; 30-34 g body weight) were divided into 3 major groups and each consisting 5 subgroups (n=6). Cpz (0.0, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered 30 min before testing. RV (0.0, 0.25, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and Res (0.0, 0.1, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered 24 h before testing. The open field test was used to assess locomotor and exploratory behaviour, acceleratory rotarod for motor coordination, light/dark box for anxiety. CPZ dose-dependently decreased locomotor and exploration behaviour and impaired motor coordination (p<0.01). RV also decreased locomotor behaviour at 4.0 mg/kg (p<0.5) but did not alter exploration and motor coordination. Res however, decreased locomotion and exploration and impaired motor coordination 0.8 and 1.6 mg/kg (p<0.05). In the light/dark box, CPZ increased anxiety related behaviour at 1.0, 2.0 mg/kg (p<0.05) whereas RV dose-dependently decreased anxiety from 1.0 to 4.0 mg/kg (p<0.01). Res, unlike RV, dose-dependently increased anxiety related behaviour from 0.4 to 1.6 mg/kg. Root bark extract from Rauwolfia vomitoria produced better behavioural effects with less distortion in motor coordination when compared to chlorpromazine and so has a great potential as an alternative antipsychotic agent compared to chlorpromazine. Since Res did not produce same effects as RV, the effect of RV may not be due solely to Res as claimed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antitumor Activities of Rauwolfia vomitoria Extract and Potentiation of Gemcitabine Effects Against Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Chen, Qi

    2014-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies with very limited treatment option. In the effort of enhancing the effect of the conventional chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine against pancreatic cancer, we investigatedin vitroandin vivothe anticancer effect of a β-carboline-enriched extract from the plantRauwolfia vomitoria(Rau), either alone or in combination with gemcitabine, in preclinical pancreatic cancer models. Rau induced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner, and completely inhibited colony formation of PANC-1 cells in soft agar. The combination of Rau and gemcitabine had synergistic effect in inhibiting cell growth with dose reduction effect for gemcitabine. In an orthotopic pancreatic cancer mouse model, PANC-1 tumor growth was significantly suppressed by Rau treatment. Metastasis was inhibited by Rau. Adding Rau to gemcitabine treatment reduced tumor burden and metastatic potential in the gemcitabine non-responsive tumor. These data suggest that Rau possesses anti-pancreatic cancer activity and could improve effect of gemcitabine. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Comparative study of teratogenic potentials of crude ethanolic root bark and leaf extract of Rauwolfia vomitoria (apocynaceae) on the fetal heart

    PubMed Central

    Eluwa, Mokutima A.; Udoaffah, Matilda T.; Vulley, Moses B. G.; Ekanem, Theresa B.; Akpantah, Amabe O.; Asuquo, Olaitan A.; Ekong, Moses B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Rauwolfia vomitoria, a tropical shrub, is a medicinal plant used in the treatment of a variety of ailments. It is popular to the locals because of its anti-hypertensive and sedative properties. Aim: This is to find the probable teratogenic effects of ethanolic leaf and root bark extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria on the morphological and histological features of the fetal heart. Material and Methods: Twenty five female rats weighing between 170-200g were used for this study. The rats were divided into five groups labeled A, B, C, D and E, with each group consisting of five rats. Pregnancy was induced by caging the female rats with sexually matured males. The presence of vaginal plug and tail structures in the vaginal smear the following morning confirmed coition, and it was regarded as day 0 of pregnancy. Group A was given sham treatment of distilled water. Group B and C received respectively 150mg/kg and 250mg/kg body weight doses of ethanolic leaf extract of Rauwolfia vomitoria, and those in groups D and E received respectively 150mg/kg and 250mg/kg body weight doses of ethanolic root bark extract of Rauwolfia vomitoria. These treatments were on days 7-11 of gestation (5 days) with the aid of an orogastric tube. On the day 20 of gestation, the rats were sacrificed and the fetuses examined for gross anomalies, preserved and latter process for histological studies. Results: There were no mortality in this study, and no obvious gross malformations in the fetuses. Histological observations of the fetal heart showed marked distortion of the cardiac muscle nuclei and myocardial fibers in the treated groups particularly those whose mothers received 250mg/kg of the extracts. These effects were more pronounced in the groups whose mothers received the root extract when compared with the control and the groups whose mothers received the leaf extract. Conclusion: This result suggests that high doses of ethanolic leaf and root extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria may be

  14. Comparative study of teratogenic potentials of crude ethanolic root bark and leaf extract of Rauwolfia vomitoria (apocynaceae) on the fetal heart.

    PubMed

    Eluwa, Mokutima A; Udoaffah, Matilda T; Vulley, Moses B G; Ekanem, Theresa B; Akpantah, Amabe O; Asuquo, Olaitan A; Ekong, Moses B

    2010-12-01

    Rauwolfia vomitoria, a tropical shrub, is a medicinal plant used in the treatment of a variety of ailments. It is popular to the locals because of its anti-hypertensive and sedative properties. This is to find the probable teratogenic effects of ethanolic leaf and root bark extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria on the morphological and histological features of the fetal heart. Twenty five female rats weighing between 170-200g were used for this study. The rats were divided into five groups labeled A, B, C, D and E, with each group consisting of five rats. Pregnancy was induced by caging the female rats with sexually matured males. The presence of vaginal plug and tail structures in the vaginal smear the following morning confirmed coition, and it was regarded as day 0 of pregnancy. Group A was given sham treatment of distilled water. Group B and C received respectively 150mg/kg and 250mg/kg body weight doses of ethanolic leaf extract of Rauwolfia vomitoria, and those in groups D and E received respectively 150mg/kg and 250mg/kg body weight doses of ethanolic root bark extract of Rauwolfia vomitoria. These treatments were on days 7-11 of gestation (5 days) with the aid of an orogastric tube. On the day 20 of gestation, the rats were sacrificed and the fetuses examined for gross anomalies, preserved and latter process for histological studies. There were no mortality in this study, and no obvious gross malformations in the fetuses. Histological observations of the fetal heart showed marked distortion of the cardiac muscle nuclei and myocardial fibers in the treated groups particularly those whose mothers received 250mg/kg of the extracts. These effects were more pronounced in the groups whose mothers received the root extract when compared with the control and the groups whose mothers received the leaf extract. This result suggests that high doses of ethanolic leaf and root extracts of Rauwolfia vomitoria may be cardiotoxic to the developing rat's heart.

  15. In Vitro Assessment of Anthelmintic Activities of Rauwolfia vomitoria (Apocynaceae) Stem Bark and Roots against Parasitic Stages of Schistosoma mansoni and Cytotoxic Study

    PubMed Central

    Bosompem, Kwabena Mante; Anyan, William Kofi; Owusu, Kofi Baffour-Awuah; Tettey, Mabel Deladem; Kissi, Felicia Amanfo; Appiah, Alfred Ampomah; Penlap Beng, Veronique; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo

    2017-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a Neglected Tropical Diseases which can be prevented with mass deworming chemotherapy. The reliance on a single drug, praziquantel, is a motivation for the search of novel antischistosomal compounds. This study investigated the anthelmintic activity of the stem bark and roots of Rauwolfia vomitoria against two life stages of Schistosoma mansoni. Both plant parts were found to be active against cercariae and adult worms. Within 2 h of exposure all cercariae were killed at a concentration range of 62.5–1000 µg/mL and 250–1000 µg/mL of R. vomitoria stem bark and roots, respectively. The LC50 values determined for the stem bark after 1 and 2 h of exposure were 207.4 and 61.18 µg/mL, respectively. All adult worms exposed to the concentrations range of 250–1000 µg/mL for both plant parts died within 120 h of incubation. The cytotoxic effects against HepG2 and Chang liver cell assessed using MTT assay method indicated that both plant extracts which were inhibitory to the proliferation of cell lines with IC50 > 20 μg/mL appear to be safe. This report provides the first evidence of in vitro schistosomicidal potency of R. vomitoria with the stem bark being moderately, but relatively, more active and selective against schistosome parasites. This suggests the presence of promising medicinal constituent(s). PMID:28348881

  16. Structural characterization of monoterpene indole alkaloids in ethanolic extracts of Rauwolfia species by liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Srivastava, Mukesh; Singh, Bhim Pratap; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-12-01

    Rauwolfia species (Apocynaceae) are medicinal plants well known worldwide due to its potent bioactive monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) such as reserpine, ajmalicine, ajmaline, serpentine and yohimbine. Reserpine, ajmalicine and ajmaline are powerful antihypertensive, tranquilizing agents used in hypertension. Yohimbine is an aphrodisiac used in dietary supplements. As there is no report on the comparative and comprehensive phytochemical investigation of the roots of Rauwolfia species, we have developed an efficient and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for ethanolic root extract of Rauwolfia species to elucidate the fragmentation pathways for dereplication of bioactive MIAs using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS) in positive ion mode. We identified and established diagnostic fragment ions and fragmentation pathways using reserpine, ajmalicine, ajmaline, serpentine and yohimbine. The MS/MS spectra of reserpine, ajmalicine, and ajmaline showed C -ring-cleavage whereas E -ring cleavage was observed in serpentine via Retro Diels Alder (RDA). A total of 47 bioactive MIAs were identified and characterized on the basis of their molecular formula, exact mass measurements and MS/MS analysis. Reserpine, ajmalicine, ajmaline, serpentine and yohimbine were unambiguously identified by comparison with their authentic standards and other 42 MIAs were tentatively identified and characterized from the roots of Rauwolfia hookeri, Rauwolfia micrantha, Rauwolfia serpentina, Rauwolfia verticillata, Rauwolfia tetraphylla and Rauwolfia vomitoria . Application of LC-MS followed by principal component analysis (PCA) has been successfully used to discriminate among six Rauwolfia species.

  17. Rauwolfia in the Treatment of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lobay, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina is a safe and effective treatment for hypertension. The plant was used by many physicians throughout India in the 1940s and then was used throughout the world in the 1950s, including in the United States and Canada. It fell out of popularity when adverse side effects, including depression and cancer, became associated with it. This author reviews the scientific literature with regard to the use of Rauwolfia and the treatment of hypertension. The author reviews the plant’s botany, chemistry, and pharmacology and provides a researched and documented method of action for the active ingredients. With special emphasis on the plant’s role in treating high blood pressure, the author looks at medical uses of the plant, critically examining its adverse side effects, toxicology, and carcinogenicity. The author refutes the association between the plant and carcinogenicity and discusses the importance of correct dosing and of screening patients to minimize the occurrence of depression. He concludes with the recommendation of use of low dose Rauwolfia (LDR) for suitable patients with hypertension. The plant provides clinicians with a safe and effective adjunct to pharmaceuticals in the treatment of high blood pressure. PMID:26770146

  18. Rauwolfia in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lobay, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina is a safe and effective treatment for hypertension. The plant was used by many physicians throughout India in the 1940s and then was used throughout the world in the 1950s, including in the United States and Canada. It fell out of popularity when adverse side effects, including depression and cancer, became associated with it. This author reviews the scientific literature with regard to the use of Rauwolfia and the treatment of hypertension. The author reviews the plant's botany, chemistry, and pharmacology and provides a researched and documented method of action for the active ingredients. With special emphasis on the plant's role in treating high blood pressure, the author looks at medical uses of the plant, critically examining its adverse side effects, toxicology, and carcinogenicity. The author refutes the association between the plant and carcinogenicity and discusses the importance of correct dosing and of screening patients to minimize the occurrence of depression. He concludes with the recommendation of use of low dose Rauwolfia (LDR) for suitable patients with hypertension. The plant provides clinicians with a safe and effective adjunct to pharmaceuticals in the treatment of high blood pressure.

  19. Mass propagation of Rauwolfia serpentina L. Benth.

    PubMed

    Salma, U; Rahman, M S M; Islam, S; Haque, N; Khatun, M; Jubair, T A; Paul, B C

    2008-05-01

    A protocol for mass propagation through axillary bud proliferation was established for Rauwolfia serpentina L. Benth. (Apocynaceae). MS medium supplemented with 1.5 mg L(-1) BA and 0.2 mg L(-1) NAA elicited the maximum number of shoots (4 multiple shoots) from nodal explants. These adventitious shoots were best rooted on half strength MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg L(-1) each of IBA and IAA. The in vitro raised plants were acclimatized in glass house and successfully transplanted to field condition with almost 95% survival.

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing in Rauwolfia species.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Cyrielle; Lafontaine, Florent; Sepúlveda, Liuda Johana; Carqueijeiro, Ines; Courtois, Martine; Lanoue, Arnaud; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Besseau, Sébastien; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Papon, Nicolas; Atehortúa, Lucia; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Clastre, Marc; St-Pierre, Benoit; Oudin, Audrey; Courdavault, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Elucidation of the monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis has recently progressed in Apocynaceae through the concomitant development of transcriptomic analyses and reverse genetic approaches performed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). While most of these tools have been primarily adapted for the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), the VIGS procedure has scarcely been used on other Apocynaceae species. For instance, Rauwolfia sp. constitutes a unique source of specific and valuable monoterpene indole alkaloids such as the hypertensive reserpine but are also well recognized models for studying alkaloid metabolism, and as such would benefit from an efficient VIGS procedure. By taking advantage of a recent modification in the inoculation method of the Tobacco rattle virus vectors via particle bombardment, we demonstrated that the biolistic-mediated VIGS approach can be readily used to silence genes in both Rauwolfia tetraphylla and Rauwolfia serpentina. After establishing the bombardment conditions minimizing injuries to the transformed plantlets, gene downregulation efficiency was evaluated at approximately a 70% expression decrease in both species by silencing the phytoene desaturase encoding gene. Such a gene silencing approach will thus constitute a critical tool to identify and characterize genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis in both of these prominent Rauwolfia species.

  1. Augmentation of immune cell activity against tumor cells by Rauwolfia radix.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guang-Bi; Hong, Tie; Inoue, Satoshi; Urano, Tomohiko; Cho, Shigefumi; Otsu, Koji; Kitahara, Maya; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Cyong, Jong-Chol

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of Rauwolfia radix on heat shock protein (HSP) 70 expression and cytotoxicity against tumor cells in activated human T cells. When activated T cells were cultured with Rauwolfia radix for 18 h, HSP70 expression after heat shock was remarkably increased, and cytotoxicity against T98G tumor cells was augmented. Moreover, Rauwolfia radix also enhanced the cytotoxicity of heat shocked activated T cells against Molt-4 and T98G tumor cells. Secretions of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-alpha), due to Concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation, were increased by Rauwolfia radix in activated T cells. To investigate the antitumor effect in vivo, EL-4 tumor-bearing mice were administered with Rauwolfia radix in drinking water. The survival period of the Rauwolfia radix treatment group was significantly prolonged compared with that of the control group. Reserpine, the major active ingredient of Rauwolfia radix, also enhanced the cytotoxicity of activated T cells against Molt-4 and T98G tumor cells, and prolonged the survival period of EL-4 tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our results suggest that Rauwolfia radix can enhance the activity of immune cells against tumor cells.

  2. High innate attractiveness to black targets in the blue blowfly, Calliphora vomitoria (L.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Benelli, Giovanni; Otranto, Domenico; Caselli, Alice; Romano, Donato; Remorini, Damiano; Di Giuseppe, Graziano; Stefanini, Cesare; Mele, Marcello; Canale, Angelo

    2018-06-01

    Calliphora vomitoria is a myiasis-causing fly in many animal species including humans. The control of blowflies is still anchored on the use of chemicals. However, mass trapping and lure-and-kill techniques represent a promising alternative to pesticides. Visual and olfactory cues are the main stimuli routing the fly's landing behavior. Notably, color attractiveness has been barely explored in flies of medical and veterinary importance, with special reference to blowflies. In this study, we investigated the innate color preferences in C. vomitoria adults, testing binary combinations of painted targets under laboratory conditions. The identity of tested species C. vomitoria was confirmed by DNA sequencing (18S and cox1 genes). C. vomitoria flies showed a significant preference for black colored targets in all tested binary color combinations, after 5, 15, 30 and 60 min of exposure. Black targets were significantly preferred over blue, red, yellow and white ones. Spectral characteristics of all tested color combinations were quantified and the innate attraction of blowflies towards black targets was discussed in relation to their behavioral ecology. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on innate color preferences in the Calliphora genus. Our findings can be useful to develop new, cheap and reliable monitoring traps as well as "lure and kill" tools to control blowfly pests. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. RAUWOLFIA SERPENTINA—Prolonged Use in Elderly Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lipsett, Mortimer B.; Levine, Albert H.; Goldman, Ralph

    1954-01-01

    In a group of older, arteriosclerotic hypertensive patients treated with an extract of Rauwolfia over a long period, a mild hypotensive effect was noted after weeks, or occasionally months, of therapy. No dramatic responses were seen, but the so-called “tranquilizing” effect was readily apparent and was appreciated by the patients. Side effects were usually relatively minor, were transient and rarely necessitated stopping the drug. PMID:13209377

  4. Artemisia spp. essential oils against the disease-carrying blowfly Calliphora vomitoria.

    PubMed

    Bedini, Stefano; Flamini, Guido; Cosci, Francesca; Ascrizzi, Roberta; Echeverria, Maria Cristina; Guidi, Lucia; Landi, Marco; Lucchi, Andrea; Conti, Barbara

    2017-02-13

    Synanthropic flies play a considerable role in the transmission of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. In this work, the essential oil (EO) of two aromatic plants, Artemisia annua and Artemisia dracunculus, were evaluated for their abilities to control the blowfly Calliphora vomitoria. Artemisia annua and A. dracunculus EOs were extracted, analysed and tested in laboratory bioassays. Besides, the physiology of EOs toxicity and the EOs antibacterial and antifungal properties were evaluated. Both Artemisia EOs deterred C. vomitoria oviposition on fresh beef meat. At 0.05 μl cm -2 A. dracunculus EO completely inhibited C. vomitoria oviposition. Toxicity tests, by contact, showed LD 50 of 0.49 and 0.79 μl EO per fly for A. dracunculus and A. annua, respectively. By fumigation, LC 50 values were 49.55 and 88.09 μl l -1 air for A. dracunculus and A. annua, respectively. EOs AChE inhibition in C. vomitoria (IC 50  = 202.6 and 472.4 mg l -1 , respectively, for A. dracunculus and A. annua) indicated that insect neural sites are targeted by the EOs toxicity. Finally, the antibacterial and antifungal activities of the two Artemisia EOs may assist in the reduction of transmission of microbial infections/contaminations. Results suggest that Artemisia EOs could be of use in the control of C. vomitoria, a common vector of pathogenic microorganisms and agent of human and animal cutaneous myiasis. The prevention of pathogenic and parasitic infections is a priority for human and animal health. The Artemisia EOs could represent an eco-friendly, low-cost alternative to synthetic repellents and insecticides to fight synanthropic disease-carrying blowflies.

  5. Rustom Jal Vakil and the saga of Rauwolfia serpentina.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Ajit H

    2007-11-01

    Dr Rustom Jal Vakil was India's pioneer in cardiology. He introduced the discipline of cardiology in his country. His mixture of clinical acumen, research and writing has survived him. Through his work with an ancient Indian folk remedy, Rauwolfia serpentina, he ushered in the modern era of effective pharmacotherapy of hypertension. His work was particularly significant since it galvanized other workers into finding more effective agents for the treatment of hypertension. He is remembered fondly by his acquaintances as an unassuming man in whom a multitude of choicest qualities blended seamlessly with each other.

  6. Indole alkaloids and other constituents of Rauwolfia serpentina.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Atsuko; Kumashiro, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Machiko; Nagakura, Naotaka; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki; Nishi, Toyoyuki; Tanahashi, Takao

    2005-06-01

    From the dried roots of Rauwolfia serpentina were isolated five new indole alkaloids, N(b)-methylajmaline (1), N(b)-methylisoajmaline (2), 3-hydroxysarpagine (3), yohimbinic acid (4), isorauhimbinic acid (5), a new iridoid glucoside, 7-epiloganin (6), and a new sucrose derivative, 6'-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl)glomeratose A (7), together with 20 known compounds. The structures of the new compounds were determined by spectroscopic and chemical means. The inhibitory activities of the selected alkaloids on topoisomerase I and II and their cytotoxicity against the human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cell lines were assessed.

  7. Antidiarrhoeal activity of leaf methanolic extract of Rauwolfia serpentina

    PubMed Central

    Ezeigbo, II; Ezeja, MI; Madubuike, KG; Ifenkwe, DC; Ukweni, IA; Udeh, NE; Akomas, SC

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antidiarrhoeal property of methanol extract of the leaves of Rauwolfia serpentina (R. serpentina) in experimental diarrhoea induced by castor oil in mice. Methods Doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg R. serpentina leaf methanol extracts were administered to castor oil induced diarrhoea mice to determine its antidiarrhoeal activity. Results All doses of the extract and the reference drug atropine sulphate (3 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent reduction in intestinal weight and fluid volume. The extracts also significantly reduced the intestinal transit in charcoal meal test when compared to diphenoxylate Hcl (5 mg/kg, p.o.). Conclusions The results show that the extract of R. serpentina leaves has a significant antidiarrhoeal activity and supports its traditional uses in herbal medicine. PMID:23569944

  8. Antidiarrhoeal activity of leaf methanolic extract of Rauwolfia serpentina.

    PubMed

    Ezeigbo, I I; Ezeja, M I; Madubuike, K G; Ifenkwe, D C; Ukweni, I A; Udeh, N E; Akomas, S C

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the antidiarrhoeal property of methanol extract of the leaves of Rauwolfia serpentina (R. serpentina) in experimental diarrhoea induced by castor oil in mice. Doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg R. serpentina leaf methanol extracts were administered to castor oil induced diarrhoea mice to determine its antidiarrhoeal activity. All doses of the extract and the reference drug atropine sulphate (3 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a dose-dependent reduction in intestinal weight and fluid volume. The extracts also significantly reduced the intestinal transit in charcoal meal test when compared to diphenoxylate Hcl (5 mg/kg, p.o.). The results show that the extract of R. serpentina leaves has a significant antidiarrhoeal activity and supports its traditional uses in herbal medicine.

  9. Rauvomines A and B, Two Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids from Rauvolfia vomitoria.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jun; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Zhou, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Qi-Li; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Jian-Jun; Gao, Kun

    2017-08-04

    Two unusual normonoterpenoid indole alkaloids rauvomine A (1) and rauvomine B (2), together with two known compounds peraksine (3) and alstoyunine A (4), were isolated from the aerial parts of Rauvolfia vomitoria. The structures with absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) calculations. Compound 2 is a novel C 18 normonoterpenoid indole alkaloid with a substituted cyclopropane ring that forms an unusual 6/5/6/6/3/5 hexcyclic rearranged ring system. The plausible biogenetic pathways of 1 and 2 were proposed. Compound 2 exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity.

  10. The antifungal activity of the cuticular and internal fatty acid methyl esters and alcohols in Calliphora vomitoria.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Marek; Cerkowniak, Magdalena; Dawgul, Małgorzata; Kamysz, Wojciech; Boguś, Mieczysława I; Stepnowski, Piotr

    2013-07-01

    SUMMARY The composition of the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and alcohol fractions of the cuticular and internal lipids of Calliphora vomitoria larvae, pupae and male/female adults was obtained by separating these two fractions by HPLC-LLSD and analysing them quantitatively using GC-MS. Analysis of the cuticular lipids of the worldwide, medically important ectoparasite C. vomitoria revealed 6 FAMEs with odd-numbered carbon chains from C15:0 to C19:0 in the larvae, while internal lipids contained 9 FAMEs ranging from C15:1 to C19:0. Seven FAMEs from C15:0 to C19:0 were identified in the cuticular lipids of the pupae, whereas the internal lipids of the pupae contained 10 FAMEs from C13:0 to C19:0. The cuticular lipids of males and females and also the internal lipids of males contained 5, 7 and 6 FAMEs from C15:0 to C19:0 respectively. Seven FAMEs from C13:0 to C19:0 were identified in the internal lipids of females, and 7, 6, 5 and 3 alcohols were found in the cuticular lipids of larvae, pupae, males and females respectively. Only saturated alcohols with even-numbered carbon chains were present in these lipids. Only 1 alcohol (C22:0) was detected in the internal lipids of C. vomitoria larvae, while just 4 alcohols from - C18:0 to C24:0 - were identified in the internal lipids of pupae, and males and females. We also identified glycerol and cholesterol in the larvae, pupae, males and females of C. vomitoria. The individual alcohols and FAMEs, as well as their mixtures isolated from the cuticular and internal lipids of larvae, pupae, males and females of C. vomitoria, demonstrated antimicrobial activity against entomopathogenic fungi.

  11. Variability of ribosomal RNA genes in Rauwolfia species: parallelism between tissue culture-induced rearrangements and interspecies polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Andreev, I O; Spiridonova, K V; Solovyan, V T; Kunakh, V A

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of 18S-25S and 5S rRNA genes in intact plants and cultured tissues of some Rauwolfia species was performed to compare these sequences variability occurred as a result of the species evolution in nature and that induced by tissue culture. The restriction fragment length polymorphism of 18S-25S and 5S rDNA was found both in intact plants of various Rauwolfia species and in long-term Rauwolfia serpentina tissue cultures. In addition, changes in the amount of 18S-25S rRNA genes were observed in long-term R. serpentina tissue cultures. The results demonstrate that rDNA variability observed in intact plants as well as in long-term cultures is attributed to differences in the same regions of ribosomal RNA genes.

  12. Extracts of Euphorbia hirta Linn. (Euphorbiaceae) and Rauvolfia vomitoria Afzel (Apocynaceae) demonstrate activities against Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Attah, Simon K; Ayeh-Kumi, Patrick F; Sittie, Archibald A; Oppong, Isaac V; Nyarko, Alexander K

    2013-03-18

    Onchocerciasis transmitted by Onchocerca volvulus is the second major cause of blindness in the world and it impacts negatively on the socio-economic development of the communities affected. Currently, ivermectin, a microfilaricidal drug is the only drug recommended for treating this disease. There have been speculations, of late, concerning O. volvulus resistance to ivermectin. Owing to this, it has become imperative to search for new drugs. World-wide, ethnomedicines including extracts of Euphorbia hirta and Rauvolfia vomitoria are used for treating various diseases, both infectious and non-infectious. In this study extracts of the two plants were evaluated in vitro in order to determine their effect against O. volvulus microfilariae. The toxicity of the E. hirta extracts on monkey kidney cell (LLCMK2) lines was also determined. The investigations showed that extracts of both plants immobilised microfilariae at different levels in vitro and, therefore, possess antifilarial properties. It was found that all the E. hirta extracts with the exception of the hexane extracts were more effective than those of R. vomitoria. Among the extracts of E. hirta the ethyl acetate fraction was most effective, and comparable to that of dimethanesulphonate salt but higher than that of Melarsoprol (Mel B). However, the crude ethanolic extract of E. hirta was found to be the least toxic to the LLCMK2 compared to the fractionated forms. Extracts from both plants possess antifilarial properties; however, the crude extract of E. hirta was found to be least toxic to LLCMK2.

  13. Extracts of Euphorbia hirta Linn. (Euphorbiaceae) and Rauvolfia vomitoria Afzel (Apocynaceae) demonstrate activities against Onchocerca volvulus Microfilariae in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Onchocerciasis transmitted by Onchocerca volvulus is the second major cause of blindness in the world and it impacts negatively on the socio-economic development of the communities affected. Currently, ivermectin, a microfilaricidal drug is the only drug recommended for treating this disease. There have been speculations, of late, concerning O. volvulus resistance to ivermectin. Owing to this, it has become imperative to search for new drugs. World-wide, ethnomedicines including extracts of Euphorbia hirta and Rauvolfia vomitoria are used for treating various diseases, both infectious and non-infectious. Method In this study extracts of the two plants were evaluated in vitro in order to determine their effect against O. volvulus microfilariae. The toxicity of the E. hirta extracts on monkey kidney cell (LLCMK2) lines was also determined. Results The investigations showed that extracts of both plants immobilised microfilariae at different levels in vitro and, therefore, possess antifilarial properties. It was found that all the E. hirta extracts with the exception of the hexane extracts were more effective than those of R. vomitoria. Among the extracts of E. hirta the ethyl acetate fraction was most effective, and comparable to that of dimethanesulphonate salt but higher than that of Melarsoprol (Mel B). However, the crude ethanolic extract of E. hirta was found to be the least toxic to the LLCMK2 compared to the fractionated forms. Conclusions Extracts from both plants possess antifilarial properties; however, the crude extract of E. hirta was found to be least toxic to LLCMK2. PMID:23506674

  14. Development and validation of an HPLC-MS/MS method for the detection of ketamine in Calliphora vomitoria (L.) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Magni, Paola A; Pazzi, Marco; Droghi, Jessica; Vincenti, Marco; Dadour, Ian R

    2018-05-03

    Entomotoxicology is a branch of forensic entomology that studies the detection of drugs or other toxic substances from insects developing on the decomposing tissues of a human corpse or animal carcass. Entomotoxicology also investigates the effects of these substances on insect development, survival and morphology to provide an estimation of the minimum time since death. Ketamine is a medication mainly used for starting and maintaining anesthesia. In recent years ketamine has also been used as a recreational drug, and occasionally as a sedating drug to facilitate sexual assault. In both activities, it has resulted in several deaths. Furthermore, ketamine has been also implicated in suspicious deaths of animals. The present research describes for the first time the development and validation of an analytical method suited to detect ketamine in larvae, pupae, empty puparia, and adults of Calliphora vomitoria L. (Diptera: Calliphoridae), using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). This research also considers the effects of ketamine on the survival, developmental rate and morphology (length and width of larvae and pupae) of C. vomitoria. The larvae were reared on liver substrates homogeneously spiked with ketamine concentrations consistent with those found in humans after recreational use (300 ng/mg) or allegedly indicated as capable of causing death in either humans or animals (600 ng/mg). The results demonstrated that (a) HPLC-MS/MS method is applicable to ketamine detection in C. vomitoria immatures, not adults; (b) the presence of ketamine at either concentration in the food substrate significantly delays the developmental time to pupal and adult instar; (d) the survival of C. vomitoria is negatively affected by the presence of ketamine in the substrate; (e) the length and width of larvae and pupae exposed to either ketamine concentration were significantly larger than the control samples. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Human kidney proximal tubule cells are vulnerable to the effects of Rauwolfia serpentina.

    PubMed

    Mossoba, Miriam E; Flynn, Thomas J; Vohra, Sanah; Wiesenfeld, Paddy L; Sprando, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina (or Snake root plant) is a botanical dietary supplement marketed in the USA for maintaining blood pressure. Very few studies have addressed the safety of this herb, despite its wide availability to consumers. Its reported pleiotropic effects underscore the necessity for evaluating its safety. We used a human kidney cell line to investigate the possible negative effects of R. serpentina on the renal system in vitro, with a specific focus on the renal proximal tubules. We evaluated cellular and mitochondrial toxicity, along with a variety of other kidney-specific toxicology biomarkers. We found that R. serpentina was capable of producing highly detrimental effects in our in vitro renal cell system. These results suggest more studies are needed to investigate the safety of this dietary supplement in both kidney and other target organ systems.

  16. Hairy root biotechnology of Rauwolfia serpentina: a potent approach for the production of pharmaceutically important terpenoid indole alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shakti; Goel, Manoj K; Srivastava, Vikas; Rahman, Laiq Ur

    2015-02-01

    Hairy root cultures of Rauwolfia serpentina induced by Agrobacterium rhizogenes have been investigated extensively for the production of terpenoid indole alkaloids. Various biotechnological developments, such as scaling up in bioreactors, pathway engineering etc., have been explored to improve their metabolite production potential. These hairy roots are competent for regenerating into complete plants and show survival and unaltered biosynthetic potential during storage at low temperature. This review provides a comprehensive account of the hairy root cultures of R. serpentina, their biosynthetic potential and various biotechnological methods used to explore the production of pharmaceutically important terpenoid indole alkaloids. The review also indicates how biotechnological endeavors might improve the future progress of research for production of alkaloids using Rauwolfia hairy roots.

  17. Elicitation Based Enhancement of Secondary Metabolites in Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum Hairy Root Cultures.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrinalini; Sharma, Swati; Misra, Pratibha

    2016-05-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum are well-known medicinally important plants contained important alkaloids in their different parts. Elicitation of these alkaloids is important because of associated pharmaceutical properties. Targeted metabolites were ajmaline and ajmalicine in R. serpentina; solasodine and α-solanine in S. khasianum. Enhancement of secondary metabolites through biotic and abiotic elicitors in hairy root cultures of R. serpentina and S. khasianum. In this report, hairy root cultures of these two plants were established through Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation by optimizing various parameters as age of explants, duration of preculture, and co-cultivation period. NaCl was used as abiotic elicitors in these two plants. Cellulase from Aspergillus niger was used as biotic elicitor in S. khasianum and mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in R. serpentina. First time we have reported the effect of biotic and abiotic elicitors on the production of important metabolites in hairy root cultures of these two plants. Ajmalicine production was stimulated up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of NaCl after 1 week of treatment. Ajmaline concentration was also increased 2.9-fold at 100 mg/l dose of mannan after 1 week. Solasodine content was enhanced up to 4.0-fold and 3.6-fold at 100 mM and 200 mM NaCl, respectively, after 6 days of treatments. This study explored the potential of the elicitation strategy in A. rhizogenes transformed cell cultures and this potential further used for commercial production of these pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites. Hairy roots of Rauwolfia serpentina were subjected to salt (abiotic stress) and mannan (biotic stress) treatment for 1 week. Ajmaline and ajmalicine secondary metabolites were quantified before and after stress treatmentAjmalicine yield was enhanced up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of NaCl. Ajmaline content was also stimulated 2.9-fold at 100 mg/l dose of mannan

  18. Elicitation Based Enhancement of Secondary Metabolites in Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum Hairy Root Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Mrinalini; Sharma, Swati; Misra, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum are well-known medicinally important plants contained important alkaloids in their different parts. Elicitation of these alkaloids is important because of associated pharmaceutical properties. Targeted metabolites were ajmaline and ajmalicine in R. serpentina; solasodine and α-solanine in S. khasianum. Objective: Enhancement of secondary metabolites through biotic and abiotic elicitors in hairy root cultures of R. serpentina and S. khasianum. Materials and Methods: In this report, hairy root cultures of these two plants were established through Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation by optimizing various parameters as age of explants, duration of preculture, and co-cultivation period. NaCl was used as abiotic elicitors in these two plants. Cellulase from Aspergillus niger was used as biotic elicitor in S. khasianum and mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in R. serpentina. Results: First time we have reported the effect of biotic and abiotic elicitors on the production of important metabolites in hairy root cultures of these two plants. Ajmalicine production was stimulated up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of NaCl after 1 week of treatment. Ajmaline concentration was also increased 2.9-fold at 100 mg/l dose of mannan after 1 week. Solasodine content was enhanced up to 4.0-fold and 3.6-fold at 100 mM and 200 mM NaCl, respectively, after 6 days of treatments. Conclusion: This study explored the potential of the elicitation strategy in A. rhizogenes transformed cell cultures and this potential further used for commercial production of these pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites. SUMMARY Hairy roots of Rauwolfia serpentina were subjected to salt (abiotic stress) and mannan (biotic stress) treatment for 1 week. Ajmaline and ajmalicine secondary metabolites were quantified before and after stress treatmentAjmalicine yield was enhanced up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of Na

  19. A NEW ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AGENT—Clinical Evaluation of a Rauwolfia-Flumethiazide Combination (Rautrax®)

    PubMed Central

    Nesche, George E.

    1960-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients were treated with Rautrax,® a combination of flumethiazide, rauwolfia and potassium chloride for from one to seven months. The average mean blood pressure for the group declined from 135 mm. of mercury to 107 mm. All but two of the patients had a decrease in blood pressure and 19 became normotensive. Associated symptoms of headache, dyspnea, edema and angina were completely relieved or improved in the majority of patients with these complaints. On the basis of the blood pressure response and the clinical effects seen in the patient, therapeutic results were classified as good to excellent in 22 of the 28 patients, fair in two, and poor in three. No evaluation was made in the remaining patient in the series because further adjustment in dosage was required. Three patients had side effects—moderate gastrointestinal upset in one case, headache and a sensation of the bladder's having been “wrung out” in another, and headache and paresthesia of the legs in the third. Only the third patient had persisting symptoms after the drug was discontinued. In the other two reduction of dosage sufficed. PMID:14426568

  20. Identification, characterization and distribution of monoterpene indole alkaloids in Rauwolfia species by Orbitrap Velos Pro mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-01-25

    Monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are medicinally important class of compounds abundant in the roots of Rauwolfia species (Apocynaceae). MIAs such as yohimbine (aphrodisiac agent) and reserpine (antihypertensive, tranquilizer) are the official drugs included in Model List of Essential Drugs of World Health Organization (WHO). Therefore, we have attempt to identify and characterize the MIAs in the crude extracts of six Rauwolfia species using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with Orbitrap Velos Pro hybrid mass spectrometer. The identity of the MIAs were construed using the high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS) spectra of standard compounds 'yohimbine' and 'reserpine' in higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) modes. The diagnostic fragment ions found in HCD mode was highly affected by variation of normalized collision energy (NCE) and gave few product ions ('C-F') while CID produced intense and more diagnostic product ions ('A-F'). Consequently, CID-MS/MS mode provided significantly more structural information about basic skeleton and therefore the recommended mode for analysis of MIAs. Furthermore, six diagnostic fragmentation pathways were established by multi-stage mass analysis (MS(n) (n=5)) analysis which gave information regarding the substitution. Fragment ions 'A-F' revealed the number and position of substituents on indole and terpene moieties. The proposed diagnostic fragmentation pathways have been successfully applied for identification and characterization of MIAs in crude root extracts of six Rauwolfia species. Ten bioactive reserpine class of MIAs were tentatively identified and characterized on the basis of chromatographic and mass spectrometric features as well as HRMS/MS an MS(n) (n=4) analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of different hormone concentration and combination on callus induction and regeneration of Rauwolfia serpentina L. Benth.

    PubMed

    Salma, U; Rahman, M S M; Islam, S; Haque, N; Jubair, T A; Haque, A K M F; Mukti, I J

    2008-06-15

    The influence of media composition on callus induction and subsequent regeneration of Rauwolfia serpentina L. Benth has been studied. High frequency (96.43%) callus induction was obtained when nodal segments from in vitro raised shoots were cultured on MS medium supplemented with 0.5 mg L(-1) BA and 2.0 mg L(-1) NAA. The callus differentiated into adventitious shoots when it was subcultured on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg L(-1) BA with 0.2 mg L(-1) NAA. Regenerated shoots were best rooted on half-strength MS medium with 1.0 mg L(-1) each of IBA and IAA.

  2. [Dynamics of genome changes in Rauwolfia serpentina callus tissue upon the switch to conditions of submerged cultivation].

    PubMed

    Spiridonova, E V; Adnof, D M; Andreev, I O; Kunakh, V A

    2008-01-01

    Genome of Rauwolfia serpentina callus cells was found to fail undergo the noticeable changes for several early passages upon the switch from surface to submerged cultivation in the liquid medium of special composition. After subsequent 4-6 passages in submerged culture RAPD spectra polymorphism was revealed which may reflect the changes in DNA sequence as well as in the structure of cell population that forms the strain. Introduction of the intermediary passage on the agar-solidified medium of more simple composition prior to transfer into liquid medium appeared not to affect essentially the level and the pattern of genome changes.

  3. Quantification and characterization of alkaloids from roots of Rauwolfia serpentina using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-photo diode array-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-PDA-MS)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The roots of Rauwolfia serpentina (L.) Benth. ex Kurz has been used in native Indian medicine for treatment of various illnesses and has been mainly used to treat hypertension. Reserpine is potent substance which shared both central nervous system depressant and hypotensive actions. An UHPLC-UV meth...

  4. Structural and functional diversity of rhizobacteria associated with Rauwolfia spp. across the Western Ghat regions of Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Prasanna Kumar, S P; Hariprasad, P; Brijesh Singh, S; Gowtham, H G; Niranjana, S R

    2014-01-01

    The present study carried out with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of DNA extracted from rhizosphere soils of Rauwolfia spp. collected from Western Ghat (WG) regions of Karnataka indicated that Pseudomonas sp. was prevalently found followed by Methylobacterium sp., Bacillus sp. and uncultured bacteria. A total of 200 rhizobacteria were isolated from 58 rhizosphere soil samples comprising of 15 different bacterial genera. The Shannon Weaver diversity index (H') and Simpson's diversity index (D) were found to be 2.57 and 0.91 for cultivable bacteria, respectively. The total species richness of cultivable rhizobacteria was high in Coorg district comprising 15 bacterial genera while in Mysore district, four bacterial genera were recorded. Rarefaction curve analysis also indicated the presence of higher species richness in samples of Shimoga and Coorg. All the rhizobacteria were screened for their multiple plant growth promotion and disease suppression traits. The results revealed that 70% of the isolates colonized tomato roots, 42% produced indole acetic acid, 55% solubilized phosphorus, while 43, 22, 27, 19, 40, 15 and 44% produced siderophore, salicylic acid, hydrogen cyanide, chitinase, phytase, cellulase and protease, respectively. Rhizobacterial isolates showing antagonistic activity against Fusarium oxysporum and Aspergillus flavus were 53 and 33%, respectively. Plant growth promotion studies revealed that most of the isolates increased percent germination with significantly higher vigour index as compared to untreated control. Most predominant rhizobacteria found in the rhizospheres of Rauwolfia spp. of WG regions are potential PGPR which can serve as biofertilizers and biopesticides.

  5. Rauwolfia serpentina improves altered glucose and lipid homeostasis in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A

    2016-09-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina is well-reported in traditional medicines for the treatment of hypertensive and neurological disorders. However, its antidiabetic potential has been currently described in both alloxan-treated and normoglycemic mice. Present effort was carried out to investigate the effect of methanol root extract (MREt) of R.serpentina in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice. Experimental mice were grouped into normal control (distilled water 1ml/kg) and fructose-induced type 2 diabetic groups (10% fructose 1 ml/kg).The second group sub-divided into negative (0.05% DMSO 1ml/kg) control, positive (pioglitazone 15mg/kg) control and three test groups (MREt 10, 30 & 60 mg/kg). Each treatment was given orally for 14 days consecutively then mice were sacrificed in order to collect serum and liver samples to analyze physical, biochemical as well as hematological markers. MREt significantly improved percent body weight and glycemic change along with serum insulin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL-c), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterols (HDL-c), total hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hepatic glycogen, coronary risk and fasting insulin resistance indices while suppressed down the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase enzyme in test groups when compared with diabetic controls. The present findings conclude that MREt of R. serpentina can effectively betters the carbohydrate and lipid homeostasis by either inhibiting fructose absorption in intestine or decreasing insulin resistance in fructose-induced type 2 diabetic mice.

  6. Bioactivity guided isolation of antipsychotic constituents from the leaves of Rauwolfia tetraphylla L.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikha; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Maurya, Anupam; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar Umrao; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Pal, Anirban; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2012-09-01

    This study was undertaken to ascertain the antipsychotic properties of Rauwolfia tetraphylla L. leaves and to isolate and characterize the antipsychotic constituents. Among the MeOH extract and some alkaloidal fractions at different pHs, the alkaloidal CHCl(3) fraction at pH-9 (2C) showed the highest antipsychotic activity against dopaminergic (DA-D(2)) and serotonergic (5-HT(2A)) receptors in-vitro and amphetamine induced hyperactive mouse model in-vivo. The activity guided isolation of CHCl(3) fraction (2C) afforded six indole alkaloids: 10-methoxytetrahydroalstonine (1), isoreserpiline (2), an isomeric mixture of 11-demethoxyreserpiline (3) and 10-demethoxyreserpiline (4), α-yohimbine (5) and reserpiline (6). Given orally, alkaloids 3-6 showed significant antipsychotic activity in a dose dependent manner. None of the extract, alkaloidal fractions or alkaloids showed any extra pyramidal symptoms at the tested doses. It was also observed that MeOH extract was behaving similar to other clinically used novel atypical antipsychotics in having 5-HT(2A) occupancy greater than the DA-D(2) receptor at the tested doses. Further toxicity and safety evaluation studies of MeOH extracts of R. tetraphylla leaves at different doses (10, 100, 300 and 2000 mg/kg) on female Swiss albino mice showed that MeOH extract is non toxic. The isolated alkaloids, 3-6 could serve as a promising lead structure for drug development of treating psychotic conditions in human. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous determination of intestinal permeability and potential drug interactions of complex mixtures using Caco-2 cells and high-resolution mass spectrometry: Studies with Rauwolfia serpentina extract.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Thomas J; Vohra, Sanah N

    2018-06-25

    Caco-2 cells are a commonly used model for estimating the intestinal bioavailability of single chemical entity pharmaceuticals. Caco-2 cells, when induced with calcitriol, also express other biological functions such as phase I (CYP) and phase II (glucuronosyltransferases) drug metabolizing enzymes which are relevant to drug-supplement interactions. Intestinal bioavailability is an important factor in the overall safety assessment of products consumed orally. Foods, including herbal dietary supplements, are complex substances with multiple chemical components. Because of potential interactions between components of complex mixtures, more reliable safety assessments can be obtained by studying the commercial products "as consumed" rather than by testing individual chemical components one at a time. The present study evaluated the apparent intestinal permeability (P app ) of a model herbal extract, Rauwolfia serpentina, using both whole plant extracts and the individual purified Rauwolfia alkaloids. All test compounds, endpoint substrates, and their metabolites were quantified using liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. The P app values for individual Rauwolfia alkaloids were comparable whether measured individually or as components of the complete extract. Both Rauwolfia extract and all individual Rauwolfia alkaloids except yohimbine inhibited CYP3A4 activity (midazolam 1'-hydroxylation). Both Rauwolfia extract and all individual Rauwolfia alkaloids except corynanthine and reserpic acid significantly increased glucuronosyltransferase activity (glucuronidation of 4-methylumbelliferone). The positive control, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited both CYP3A4 and glucuronosyltransferase activities. These findings suggest that the Caco-2 assay is capable of simultaneously identifying both bioavailability and potentially hazardous intestinal drug-supplement interactions in complex mixtures. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Cytotoxicity of the indole alkaloid reserpine from Rauwolfia serpentina against drug-resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelfatah, Sara A A; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-02-15

    The antihypertensive reserpine is an indole alkaloid from Rauwolfia serpentina and exerts also profound activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The present investigation was undertaken to investigate possible modes of action to explain its activity toward drug-resistant tumor cells. Sensitive and drug-resistant tumor cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein (ABCB1/MDR1), breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP), mutation-activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), wild-type and p53-knockout cells as well as the NCI panel of cell lines from different tumor origin were analyzed. Reserpine's cytotoxicity was investigated by resazurin and sulforhodamine assays, flow cytometry, and COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide microarray-based RNA expressions. P-glycoprotein- or BCRP overexpressing tumor cells did not reveal cross-resistance to reserpine. EGFR-overexpressing cells were collateral sensitive and p53- Knockout cells cross-resistant to this drug compared to their wild-type parental cell lines. Reserpine increased the uptake of doxorubicin in P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cells, indicating that reserpine inhibited the efflux function of P-glycoprotein. Using molecular docking, we found that reserpine bound with even higher binding energy to P-glycoprotein and EGFR than the control drugs verapamil (P-glycoprotein inhibitor) and erlotinib (EGFR inhibitor). COMPARE and cluster analyses of microarray data showed that the mRNA expression of a panel of genes predicted the sensitivity or resistance of the NCI tumor cell line panel with statistical significance. The genes belonged to diverse pathways and biological functions, e.g. cell survival and apoptosis, EGFR activation, regulation of angiogenesis, cell mobility, cell adhesion, immunological functions, mTOR signaling, and Wnt signaling. The lack of cross-resistance to most resistance mechanisms and the collateral sensitivity in EGFR-transfectants compared to wild

  9. Quantification and characterization of alkaloids from roots of Rauwolfia serpentina using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-photo diode array-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Satyanarayanaraju; Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-01-01

    A new UHPLC-UV method has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of seven alkaloids [ajmaline (1), yohimbine (2), corynanthine (3), ajmalicine (4), serpentine (5), serpentinine (6), and reserpine (7)] from the root samples of Rauwolfia serpentina (L.) Benth. ex Kurz. The chromatographic separation was achieved using a reversed phase C18 column with a mobile phase of water and acetonitrile, both containing 0.05% formic acid. The seven compounds were completely separated within 8 min at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min with a 2-μL injection volume. The method is validated for linearity, accuracy, repeatability, limits of detection (LOD), and limits of quantification (LOQ). Seven plant samples and 21 dietary supplements claiming to contain Rauwolfia roots were analyzed and content of total alkaloids (1-7) varied, namely, 1.57-12.1 mg/g dry plant material and 0.0-4.5 mg/day, respectively. The results indicated that commercial products are of variable quality. The developed analytical method is simple, economic, fast, and suitable for quality control analysis of Rauwolfia samples and commercial products. The UHPLC-QToF-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization (ESI) interface method is described for the confirmation and characterization of alkaloids from plant samples. This method involved the detection of [M + H](+) or M(+) ions in the positive mode.

  10. Conservation and multiplication of encapsulated micro shoots of Rauvolfia vomitoria--an endangered medicinal tree: ISSR and RAPD based evaluation of genetic fidelity of converted plantlets.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shakti; Rahman, Liaq Ur; Mishra, Jahnvi; Kukreja, Arun K

    2012-12-01

    The in vitro grown axillary micro shoots of Rauvolfia vomitoria were encapsulated in alginate beads. Following 6 months of normal storage at 25 +/- 2 degrees C the regrowth of encapsulated micro shoots, reached 95.2% within 40 days of incubation on MS medium containing 1.0 mg/L BAP and 0.1 mg/L NAA. Among the responding encapsulated explants 69.6% showed emergence of multiple shoots. The developing shoots showed rhizogenesis in two weeks following their transfer to rooting medium. Healthy plants were established in a glass house with 95% survival. Of the 50 RAPD primers tested, 10 produced 23 clear and reproducible amplicons, with an average of 2.3 bands per primer. Eleven ISSR primers produced a total of 42 bands, with a size range of 0.1-1.9 kb. The number of scorable bands for each primer varied from 2 to 6, with an average of 3.81. The similarity matrix, calculated individually from the results obtained from ISSR and RAPD analysis, showed similarity coefficients ranging from 1.0 for RAPD and 0.85 to 1.0 for ISSR.

  11. Methanolic Root Extract of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth Improves the Glycemic, Antiatherogenic, and Cardioprotective Indices in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the phytochemistry and the effect of methanolic root extract (MREt) of Rauwolfia serpentina on alloxan-induced diabetic Wister male mice. Mice were divided in control (distilled water at 1 mL/kg) and alloxan-induced diabetic mice which subdivided into diabetic (distilled water at 1 mL/kg), negative (0.05% dimethyl sulfoxide at 1 mL/kg), positive (glibenclamide at 5 mg/kg) controls, and three test groups (MREt at 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg). All treatments were given orally for 14 days. Qualitatively MREt showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, phlobatannins, resins, saponins, steroids, tannins, and triterpenoids, while quantitatively extract was rich in total phenols. The flavonoids, saponins and alkaloids were also determined in root powder. MREt found effective in improving the body weights, glucose and insulin levels, insulin/glucose ratio, glycosylated and total hemoglobin in test groups as compared to diabetic control. Similarly, significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c) cholesterols were found in test groups. Significant lipolysis with improved glycogenesis was also found in liver tissues of all test groups. ALT levels were found normal in all groups. Thus, MREt improves the glycemic, antiatherogenic, coronary risk, and cardioprotective indices in alloxan-induced diabetic mice.

  12. Methanolic Root Extract of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth Improves the Glycemic, Antiatherogenic, and Cardioprotective Indices in Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the phytochemistry and the effect of methanolic root extract (MREt) of Rauwolfia serpentina on alloxan-induced diabetic Wister male mice. Mice were divided in control (distilled water at 1 mL/kg) and alloxan-induced diabetic mice which subdivided into diabetic (distilled water at 1 mL/kg), negative (0.05% dimethyl sulfoxide at 1 mL/kg), positive (glibenclamide at 5 mg/kg) controls, and three test groups (MREt at 10, 30, and 60 mg/kg). All treatments were given orally for 14 days. Qualitatively MREt showed the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, flavonoids, glycosides, cardiac glycosides, phlobatannins, resins, saponins, steroids, tannins, and triterpenoids, while quantitatively extract was rich in total phenols. The flavonoids, saponins and alkaloids were also determined in root powder. MREt found effective in improving the body weights, glucose and insulin levels, insulin/glucose ratio, glycosylated and total hemoglobin in test groups as compared to diabetic control. Similarly, significantly decreased levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-c), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-c) cholesterols were found in test groups. Significant lipolysis with improved glycogenesis was also found in liver tissues of all test groups. ALT levels were found normal in all groups. Thus, MREt improves the glycemic, antiatherogenic, coronary risk, and cardioprotective indices in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. PMID:23365565

  13. Influence of Inoculation with the Endomycorrhizal Fungi and Trichoderma viride on Morphological and Physiological Growth Parameters of Rauwolfia serpentina Benth. Ex. Kurtz.

    PubMed

    Kaushish, Sunita; Kumar, Aditya; Aggarwal, Ashok; Parkash, Vipin

    2012-06-01

    Two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Glomus mosseae and Acaulospora laevis either alone or in combination with Trichoderma viride showed the dependence of Rauwolfia serpentina on endomycorrhizal fungi. After 60 days, G. mosseae singly or in combination with Trichoderma viride showed enhanced height increment compared to control plants. Maximum phosphorus content was shown by plants treated with G. mosseae plus T. viride (0.444 ± 2.62) in roots and (0.437 ± 4.71) in shoots. Phosphorus content in roots was more than that in shoots. Chlorophyll content and stomatal conductivity also showed similar trend.

  14. The impact of packaging materials on the antioxidant phytochemical stability of aqueous infusions of green tea (Camellia sinensis) and yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria) during cold storage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmok; Welt, Bruce A; Talcott, Stephen T

    2011-05-11

    Ready to drink (RTD) teas are a growing segment in the beverage category, brought about by improvements in the flavor of these products and healthy market trends driven by consumers. The presented results evaluated the antioxidant phytochemical stability of RTD teas from aqueous infusions of traditional green tea (Camellia sinensis) and a botanical tea from yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria) as influenced by packaging materials during cold storage. Two common packaging materials for RTD products are glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and have been compared to a retortable pouch (RP), an emerging packaging material for various types of food since it is durable, inexpensive, lightweight, and easy to sterilize. Storage stability was then evaluated for each aqueous infusion prepared at 10 g/L at 90 °C for 10 min and evaluated at 3 °C in the absence of light over 12 weeks. Analyses included quantification and characterization of individual polyphenolics by high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry as well as changes in total antioxidant capacity. For green tea, concentrations of the three major flavan-3-ols, epigallocatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, and epicatechin gallate were better retained in glass bottles as compared to other packages over 12 weeks. In yaupon holly, chlorogenic acid and its isomers that were the predominant compounds were generally stable in each packaging material, and a 20.6-fold higher amount of saponin was found as compared to green tea, which caused higher stability of flavonol glycosides present in yaupon holly during storage. The antioxidant capacity of green tea was better retained in glass and PET versus RP, whereas no differences were again observed for yaupon holly. Results highlight the superiority of oxygen-impervious glass packaging, but viable alternatives may be utilizable for RTD teas with variable phytochemical compositions.

  15. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a benzenoid/phenylpropanoid meta/para-O-methyltransferase from Rauwolfia serpentina roots.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Brent; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    The monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, reserpine and rescinnamine contain 3, 4, 5-trimethoxybenzoate or 3, 4, 5-trimethoxycinnamate, respectively, within their structures and they accumulate in different plant organs and particularly within roots of Rauwolfia serpentina. This plant also accumulates acylated sugars substituted with 3, 4, 5-trimethoxybenzoate and 3, 4, 5-trimethoxycinnamate. In the present study, transcriptome and metabolome analyses of R. serpentina roots allowed the identification of 7 candidate O-methytransferase (OMT) genes that might be associated with the formation of 3, 4, 5-trimethoxybenzoate and 3, 4, 5-trimethoxycinnamate and led to the molecular cloning of 4 genes for functional expression and analysis. Two candidate genes were expressed in E. coli and were shown to use different phenolics as methyl acceptors. RsOMT1, a member of the caffeoyl CoA-OMT-like family of genes, converted 3, 5 dimethoxy-4-hydroxycinnamic, caffeic and 3, 4, 5 trihydroxybenzoic acids to trimethoxycinnamic-, ferulic/isoferulic- and 3-methoxy, 4, 5 dihydroxybenzoic or 4-methoxy, 3, 5 dihydroxybenzoic acids, respectively, when supplied with these substrates. RsOMT3, a member of the caffeic acid-OMT-like family of genes, only converted caffeic acid to ferulic acid. Both enzymes showed considerable promiscuity with respect to various flavonoid substrates that they accepted. The para-O-methylation activity of RsOMT1 is quite rare and unusual for plant OMTs. The involvement of RsOMT1 and RsOMT3 in the assembly of trimethoxybenzoic and trimethoxycinnamic acids is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Scale-Up of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-Mediated Hairy Root Cultures of Rauwolfia serpentina: A Persuasive Approach for Stable Reserpine Production.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shakti; Srivastava, Vikas; Goel, Manoj K; Kukreja, Arun K

    2016-01-01

    Roots of Rauwolfia serpentina, also known as "Sarpagandha" possess high pharmaceutical value due to the presence of reserpine and other medicinally important terpene indole alkaloids. Ever increasing commercial demand of R. serpentina roots is the major reason behind the unsystematic harvesting and fast decline of the species from its natural environment. Considering Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy root cultures as an alternative source for the production of plant-based secondary metabolites, the present optimized protocol offers a commercially feasible method for the production of reserpine, the most potent alkaloid from R. serpentina roots. This end-to-end protocol presents the establishment of hairy root culture from the leaf explants of R. serpentina through the infection of A. rhizogenes strain A4 in liquid B5 culture medium and its up-scaling in a 5 L bench top, mechanically agitated bioreactor. The transformed nature of roots was confirmed through PCR-based rol A gene amplification in genomic DNA of putative hairy roots. The extraction and quantification of reserpine in bioreactor grown roots has been done using monolithic reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  17. Ameliorative effect of hydro-methanolic extract from roots of Rauwolfia serpentina on some biochemical parameters of type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Muhammad Bilal; Qureshi, Shamim A; Ahmed, Syed Danish Haseen; Mudassir, Hina Akram; Imtiaz, Fauzia; Rais, Sumera; Khan, Auwais Ahmed; Ahsan, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    Present work seeks to investigate the biochemical parameters in terms of hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of hydro-methanolic roots extract (HyMREt) of Rauwolfia serpentina in type 1 (alloxan induced) diabetic mice. Animals were divided into seven groups, four control groups, and three were test groups (HyMREt at 50, 100, & 150mg/kg). Each treatment was repeated for 14 days regularly in all seven respective groups and afterwards the body weights, fasting blood glucose (FBG), insulin, and serum lipid levels were determined. Total body weights of diabetic mice treated with HyMREt extract were dose dependently (p<0.05) improved. FBG of test groups were significantly (p<0.0001) reduced in comparison with diabetic controls which displayed elevated fasting blood glucose level. The insulin levels of HyMREt treated groups were significantly (p<0.0001) higher than those of diabetic controls. Lower triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-c) whereas elevated level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) were observed in test dose treated groups. In comparison with diabetic controls, the converse levels of serum lipid were observed. Significant improvement in cardio-protective indices and coronary risk index was also observed. Findings of present study support the hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic potential of HyMREt of R. serpentina.

  18. In vitro propagation of Rauwolfia serpentina using liquid medium, assessment of genetic fidelity of micropropagated plants, and simultaneous quantitation of reserpine, ajmaline, and ajmalicine.

    PubMed

    Goel, M K; Mehrotra, S; Kukreja, A K; Shanker, K; Khanuja, S P S

    2009-01-01

    Rauwolfia serpentina holds an important position in the pharmaceutical world because of its immense anti-hypertensive properties resulting from the presence of reserpine in the oleoresin fraction of the roots. Poor seed viability, low seed germination rate, and enormous genetic variability are the major constraints for the commercial cultivation of R. serpentina through conventional mode. The present optimized protocol offers an impeccable end to end method from the establishment of aseptic cultures to in-vitro plantlet production employing semisolid as well liquid nutrient culture medium and assessment of their genetic fidelity using polymerase chain reaction based rapid amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. In vitro shoots multiplied on Murashige and Skoog basal liquid nutrients supplemented with benzo[a]pyrene (1.0 mg/L) and NAA (0.1 mg/L) and in-vitro rhizogenesis was observed in modified MS basal nutrient containing NAA (1.0 mg/L) and 2% sucrose. In-vitro raised plants exhibited 90-95% survival under glass house/field condition and 85% similarity in the plants regenerated through this protocol. Field established plants were harvested and extraction of indole alkaloid particularly reserpine, ajmaline and ajmalicine and their simultaneous quantitation was performed using monolithic reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  19. HPTLC method for the simultaneous determination of four indole alkaloids in Rauwolfia tetraphylla: a study of organic/green solvent and continuous/pulse sonication.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shikha; Shanker, Karuna; Srivastava, Santosh K

    2012-07-01

    A new validated high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method has been developed for the simultaneous quantitation of four antipsychotic indole alkaloids (IAs), reserpiline (RP, 1), α-yohimbine (YH, 2), isoreserpiline (IRP, 3) and 10-methoxy tetrahydroalstonine (MTHA, 4) as markers in the leaves of Rauwolfia tetraphylla. Extraction efficiency of the targeted IAs from the leaf matrix with organic and ecofriendly (green) solvents using percolation, ultrasonication and microwave techniques were studied. Non-ionic surfactants, viz. Triton X-100, Triton X-114 and Genapol X-80 were used for extraction and no back-extraction or liquid chromatographic steps were used to remove the targeted IAs from the surfactant-rich extractant phase. The optimized cloud point extraction was found a potentially useful methodology for the preconcentration of the targeted IAs. The separation was achieved on silica gel 60F(254) HPTLC plates using hexane-ethylacetate-methanol (5:4:1, v/v/v) as mobile phase. The quantitation of IAs (1-4) was carried out using the densitometric reflection/absorption mode at 520 nm after post chromatographic derivatization using Dragendorff's reagent. The method was validated for peak purity, precision, accuracy, robustness, limit of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ). Method specificity was confirmed using retention factor (R(f)) and visible spectral (post chromatographic scan) correlation of marker compounds in the samples and standard tracks. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Large-scale separation of antipsychotic alkaloids from Rauwolfia tetraphylla L. by pH-zone-refining fast centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Anupam; Gupta, Shikha; Srivastava, Santosh K

    2013-01-01

    pH-zone-refining centrifugal partition chromatography was successively applied in the large-scale separation of close R(f) antipsychotic indole alkaloids directly from CHCl(3) fraction of Rauwolfia tetraphylla leaves. Two experiments with increasing mass from 500 mg to 3 g of crude alkaloid extracts (1C) of R. tetraphylla were carried out in normal-displacement mode using a two-phase solvent system composed of methyl tert-butyl ether/ACN/water (4:1:5, v/v/v) where HCl (12 mM) was added to the lower aqueous stationary phase as a retainer and triethylamine (5 mM) to the organic mobile phase as an eluter. The two centrifugal partition chromatography separations afforded a total of 162.6 mg of 10-methoxytetrahydroalstonine (1) and 296.5 mg of isoreserpiline (2) in 97% and 95.5% purity, respectively, along with a 400.9 mg mixture of α-yohimbine and reserpiline (3 and 4). Further, this mixture was resolved over medium pressure LC using TLC grade silica gel H (average particle size 10 μm), which afforded 160.4 mg of α-yohimbine (3) and 150.2 mg of reserpiline (4) in >95% purities. The purity of the isolated antipsychotic alkaloids was analyzed by high-performance LC and their structures were characterized on the basis of their 1D, 2D NMR and electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopic data. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Suppressive effect of pectic polysaccharides extracted from Rauwolfia verticillata (Lour.) Baill.var.hainanensis Tsiang on inflammation by regulation of NF- κ B pathway and interleukin-17 in mice with dextran sulphatesodium-induced ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xin-Pu; Sun, Xiao-Ning; Cui, Lu-Jia; Cao, Qin-Fang; Zhuang, Gui-Feng; Deng, Tao-Zhi; Zhang, Dong-Yan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effects of pectic polysaccharides extracted from Rauwolfia verticillata (Lour.) Baill.var.hainanensis Tsiang on an experimental murine colitis model. Experimental colitis was induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), and mice were divided into 4 groups: control, DSS alone, DSS plus SASP, DSS plus pectic polysaccharides. The disease activity index (DAI) and histological score were observed. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- α and interleukin (IL)-17 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. I κ B and NF- κ B p65 expression were assessed by western blot analysis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was determined by using MPO assay kit. Administration of pectic polysaccharides significantly reduced the severity of DSS-induced colitis as assessed by DAI and histological score, and resulted in down regulation of MPO activity and NF- κ B p65 expression and subsequent degradation of I κ B protein, strikingly reduced the production of TNF- a and IL-17. Pectic polysaccharides extracted from Rauvolfia verticillata (Lour.)Baill.var. hainanensis Tsiang exerts beneficial effects in experimental colitis and may therefore provide a useful therapeutic approach for the treatment of UC. Copyright © 2015 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Delftia tsuruhatensis WGR-UOM-BT1, a novel rhizobacterium with PGPR properties from Rauwolfia serpentina (L.) Benth. ex Kurz also suppresses fungal phytopathogens by producing a new antibiotic-AMTM.

    PubMed

    Prasannakumar, S P; Gowtham, H G; Hariprasad, P; Shivaprasad, K; Niranjana, S R

    2015-11-01

    The bacterial strain designated as WGR-UOM-BT1 isolated from rhizosphere of Rauwolfia serpentina exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal activity and also improved early plant growth. Based on morphological, biochemical and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, the strain BT1 was identified as Delftia tsuruhatensis (KF727978). Under in vitro conditions, the strain BT1 suppressed the growth of wide range of fungal phytopathogens. Purified antimicrobial metabolite from the strain BT1 was identified as nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compound, 'amino(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methyl-2-(thiophen-2-yl)-2,3-dihydrofuran-3-yl)methanol' (AMTM), with molecular mass of 340•40 and molecular formula of C17 H19 NO3 S. The strain BT1 was positive for rhizosphere colonization (tomato), IAA production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity and phosphate solubilization. Under laboratory and greenhouse conditions, the strain BT1 promoted plant growth and suppressed foliar and root fungal pathogens of tomato. Therefore, antimicrobial and disease protection properties of strain BT1 could serve as an effective biological control candidate against devastating fungal pathogens of vegetable plants. Besides, the production of IAA, P solubilization and ACC deaminase activity enhance its potential as a biofertilizer and may stabilize the plant performance under fluctuating environmental conditions. In this study, we reported that Delftia tsuruhatensis WGR-UOM-BT1 strain has the plant growth promotion activities such as rhizosphere colonization (tomato), IAA production, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity and phosphate solubilization. This bacterial strain was found producing an antimicrobial nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compound identified as 'amino(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methyl-2-(thiophen-2-yl)-2,3-dihydrofuran-3-yl)methanol' [C17 H19 NO3 S] (AMTM), which is new to the bacterial world. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Comparisons of Elemental Profiles of the Western Spruce Budworm Reared on Three host Foilages and Artificial Medium

    Treesearch

    John A. McLean; P. Laks; T.L. Shore

    1983-01-01

    Western spruce budworm were reared on three host foliages and artificial medium. Trace element analyses showed large differences in elemental concentrations between food sources and only minor differences between insect life stages. Discriminant analyses were carried out to test the distinctiveness of adult chemoprints from each rearing regime. Fe, Cu, and Zn were...

  4. Dual Catalytic Activity of a Cytochrome P450 Controls Bifurcation at a Metabolic Branch Point of Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Rauwolfia serpentina

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Thu‐Thuy T.; Franke, Jakob; Tatsis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Plants create tremendous chemical diversity from a single biosynthetic intermediate. In plant‐derived ajmalan alkaloid pathways, the biosynthetic intermediate vomilenine can be transformed into the anti‐arrhythmic compound ajmaline, or alternatively, can isomerize to form perakine, an alkaloid with a structurally distinct scaffold. Here we report the discovery and characterization of vinorine hydroxylase, a cytochrome P450 enzyme that hydroxylates vinorine to form vomilenine, which was found to exist as a mixture of rapidly interconverting epimers. Surprisingly, this cytochrome P450 also catalyzes the non‐oxidative isomerization of the ajmaline precursor vomilenine to perakine. This unusual dual catalytic activity of vinorine hydroxylase thereby provides a control mechanism for the bifurcation of these alkaloid pathway branches. This discovery highlights the unusual catalytic functionality that has evolved in plant pathways. PMID:28654178

  5. REMOVED: Reversal of immobilization stress-induced anorexia and endogenous leptin levels by Rauwolfia serpentina in rats: Relationship with adaptation to stress.

    PubMed

    Shireen, Erum; Bint-E-Ali, Wafa; Shafaq, Sania; Majeed, Azka; Fatima, Rija; Masroor, Maria; Haleem, Darakshan J

    2015-12-01

    This article has been removed: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal) This meeting abstract has been removed by the Publisher. Due to an administrative error, abstracts that were not presented at the ISDN 2014 meeting were inadvertently published in the meeting's abstract supplement. The Publisher apologizes to the authors and readers for this error. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Dual Catalytic Activity of a Cytochrome P450 Controls Bifurcation at a Metabolic Branch Point of Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Rauwolfia serpentina.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Franke, Jakob; Tatsis, Evangelos; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2017-08-01

    Plants create tremendous chemical diversity from a single biosynthetic intermediate. In plant-derived ajmalan alkaloid pathways, the biosynthetic intermediate vomilenine can be transformed into the anti-arrhythmic compound ajmaline, or alternatively, can isomerize to form perakine, an alkaloid with a structurally distinct scaffold. Here we report the discovery and characterization of vinorine hydroxylase, a cytochrome P450 enzyme that hydroxylates vinorine to form vomilenine, which was found to exist as a mixture of rapidly interconverting epimers. Surprisingly, this cytochrome P450 also catalyzes the non-oxidative isomerization of the ajmaline precursor vomilenine to perakine. This unusual dual catalytic activity of vinorine hydroxylase thereby provides a control mechanism for the bifurcation of these alkaloid pathway branches. This discovery highlights the unusual catalytic functionality that has evolved in plant pathways. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Repercussion of the phytosanitary treatments on various models of foliage management in a Cabernet Sauvignon Vineyard (I note).

    PubMed

    Spera, G; Moretti, S; Casadei, G

    2004-01-01

    This study is the first communication about the repercussion of several phytosanitary treatments in three different training systems, differently managed in foilage, in relation to the usual phytopatologies: botrytis, acid rot, grape mildew and oldium. Particular attention to residuals of the products supplied on the foilage and present in ground and wine is paid. The considered foilage management systems are among those more spread and effective ones for a good quality wine production for Cabernet Sauvignon variety (clone R5). 11. Cordon Spur of Conegliano (C.S.C); 12. Simple Free Espalier Curtain (S.C.S.L); 13. Lyra (Lyra). The phytosanitary interventions for the foilage management systems have been compared between the company's ordinary plan and one with various and numerous active principles. The CG-ECD with Multiresidual analysis has determined the active principles residuals in the ground and in the wines. The characteristics of the wines have been determined by physical- chemical analysis; their organoleptic quality has been valued by panels of producers, oenologists, consumers and restaurant staff. The results point out a difference among the trials for the different presence of residuals. The foilage management justifies the diversity of the analytical composition of the wines. There is a substantial uniformity of judgements for the organoleptic quality. In conclusion, in this prove the judgement on the economic quality highlights the uselessness of the use of more incisive and radical active principles.

  8. Cadmium distribution in forest ecosystems irrigated with treated municipal waste water and sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Sidle, R.C.; Sopper, W.E.

    1976-01-01

    Treated municipal waste water was irrigated in an abandoned old field area from 1964 to 1974 and in a mixed hardwood area (old gamelands) from 1964 to 1974. Total applications of Cd in the old field and old gamelands areas were 0.47 and 0.61 kg/ha, respectively. White spruce (Picea glauca Moench Voss.) and wild strawberry (Fragaria virginiana Duchesne) foilage sampled from the old field showed no increase in Cd concentrations due to effluent irrigation, while goldenrod (Solidago sp. Ait.) had lower Cd levels in the treated area than in the unirrigated control area. Foilage sampled from red maple (Acer rubrummore » L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), and wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis L.), in the old gamelands, showed no increase in Cd as a result of waste water irrigation. Soil Cd levels were not significantly affected by waste water irrigation in either area, except for the increase in soil Cd in the 0 to 5 cm depth of the old gamelands. The Cd/Zn ratios of the vegetation foilage were not significantly different between the treated and control areas.« less

  9. Growth and forage quality of four southern browse species

    Treesearch

    R. M. Blair; L. K. Halls

    1968-01-01

    Rusty blackhaw (Viburnum rufidulum) , yaupon (Ilex vomitoria), common greenbrier (Smilax rotundifolia), and yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) are major sources of deer food in upland pine-hardwood forests of the South. In the study reported here, the quality of forage on these plants was related to their rate of growth.

  10. Screening cut-stump control of Chinese tallowtree, sweetgum and yaupon with aminocyclopyrachlor

    Treesearch

    J. L. Yeiser; M. Link; J. Grogan

    2012-01-01

    Aminocyclopyrachlor (MAT28) was investigated for the potential control of unwanted woody rootstocks of Chinese tallowtree (Triadica sebifera), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and yaupon (Ilex vomitoria). A cutstump application of MAT28+Brush and Basal Oil by Helena was tested against standard treatments: (1)...

  11. Cultural Resource Survey of Carrollton Bend Revetment, Mississippi River M-105.7 to 101.7-L, Jefferson and Orleans Parishes, Louisiana

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-26

    Myrica cerifera), dwarf palmetto (Sabal minor), marsh elder, elderberry ( Sambucus canadensis), and yaupon (//ex vomitoria). Vines such as trumpet creeper...The spacious walks are lined with the choicest flowers , whose bloom and fragrance are especially attractive to those who come from the North

  12. Test Area C-62 Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    Sorghastrum nutans), little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) and various forbs. Woody vegetation is dominated by shrubs such as yaupon (Ilex vomitoria...effort, the EPA may intervene without discretion to uphold the intent of the CWA (Hasenstein, 2000). A survey of Midwest states by the Indiana ...bluejack oak), persimmon, live oak, and sand post oak and woody shrubs such as holly (Ilex opaca), dwarf huckleberry (Gaylussacia dumosa), gopher apple

  13. Effects of environmental temperature on oviposition behavior in three blow fly species of forensic importance.

    PubMed

    Ody, Helen; Bulling, Mark T; Barnes, Kate M

    2017-06-01

    A number of factors are known to affect blow fly behavior with respect to oviposition. Current research indicates that temperature is the most significant factor. However temperature thresholds for oviposition in forensically important blow flies have not been well studied. Here, the oviposition behavior of three species of forensically important blow fly species (Calliphora vicina, Calliphora vomitoria and Lucilia sericata,) was studied under controlled laboratory conditions over a range of temperatures (10-40°C). Lower temperature thresholds for oviposition of 16°C and 17.5°C were established for C. vomitoria and L. sericata respectively, whilst C. vicina continued to lay eggs at 10°C. C. vomitoria and L. sericata both continued to lay eggs at 40°C, whilst the highest temperature at which oviposition occurred in C. vicina was 35°C. Within these thresholds there was considerable variation in the number of surviving pupae, with a general pattern of a single peak within the range of temperatures at which eggs were laid, but with the pattern being much less distinct for L. sericata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification, characterization, and palynology of high-valued medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Nisar; Haider Abbasi, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug description is intended for their quality assurance at the time of collection, commerce stages, manufacturing, and production. For this purpose the detailed morphology was studied and compared with the Flora of Pakistan and other available literatures. Here we reported the pollen grain morphology of Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Psoralea corylifolia, and Rauwolfia serpentina for the first time. Similarly the crude drug study of Gymnema sylvestre (leaf), Origanum vulgare (aerial parts), Paeonia emodi (tubers), and Peganum harmala (seeds) was also carried out for the first time.

  15. Identification, Characterization, and Palynology of High-Valued Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Fazal, Hina; Ahmad, Nisar; Haider Abbasi, Bilal

    2013-01-01

    High-valued medicinal plants Achillea millefolium, Acorus calamus, Arnebia nobilis, Fumaria indica, Gymnema sylvestre, Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Peganum harmala, Psoralea corylifolia, Rauwolfia serpentina, and Vetiveria zizanioides were identified with the help of taxonomical markers and investigated for characterization and palynological studies. These parameters are used to analyze their quality, safety, and standardization for their safe use. Botanical description and crude drug description is intended for their quality assurance at the time of collection, commerce stages, manufacturing, and production. For this purpose the detailed morphology was studied and compared with the Flora of Pakistan and other available literatures. Here we reported the pollen grain morphology of Origanum vulgare, Paeonia emodi, Psoralea corylifolia, and Rauwolfia serpentina for the first time. Similarly the crude drug study of Gymnema sylvestre (leaf), Origanum vulgare (aerial parts), Paeonia emodi (tubers), and Peganum harmala (seeds) was also carried out for the first time. PMID:23844389

  16. Rustom Jal Vakil

    PubMed Central

    Isharwal, Sumit; Gupta, Shubham

    2006-01-01

    Rustom Jal Vakil returned to India in 1938 after earning his medical degree from the University of London and focused on the treatment of heart ailments at a time when cardiology was not a distinct subspecialty in India. In 1949, after years of scrupulous collation and analysis of data, he published a watershed paper on the antihypertensive properties of Rauwolfia serpentina and effected a paradigm shift in the management of hypertension. Rauwolfia was the world's 1st successful blood-pressure-lowering agent, and its acceptance encouraged research scientists to pursue the development of other hypotensive drugs. Vakil was a prolific researcher whose contributions to Indian cardiovascular epidemiology—and to the whole of medical literature—were enormous. He was also a fine clinician with a remarkable gift for communication, be it with his patients, students, peers, or the lay public. All of this came together to make him the embodiment of a medically competent India. PMID:16878618

  17. Summer Roost Tree Selection by Eastern Red, Seminole, and Evening Bats in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, M.A.; Carter, T.C.; Ford, W.M.

    Radiotraction of six eastern red bats, six seminole bats and twenty-four evening bats to 55, 61, and 65 day roosts during 1996 to 1997 in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. For each species, testing was done for differences between used roost trees and randomly located trees. Also tested for differences between habitat characteristics surrounding roost trees and randomly located trees. Eastern Red and Seminole bats generally roosted in canopies of hardwood and pine while clinging to foilage and small branches. Evening bats roosted in cavities or under exfoliating bark in pines and dead snags. Forest management strategies namedmore » within the study should be beneficial for providing roosts in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina.« less

  18. The use of airborne imaging spectrometer data to determine experimentally induced variation in coniferous canopy chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanberg, Nancy A.; Matson, Pamela A.

    1987-01-01

    It was experimentally determined whether induced differences in forest canopy chemical composition can be detected using data from the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS). Treatments were applied to an even-aged forest of Douglas fir trees. Work to date has stressed wet chemical analysis of foilage samples and correction of AIS data. Plot treatments were successful in providing a range of foliar N2 concentrations. Much time was spent investigating and correcting problems with the raw AIS data. Initial problems with groups of drop out lines in the AIS data were traced to the tape recorder and the tape drive. Custom adjustment of the tape drive led to recovery of most missing lines. Remaining individual drop out lines were replaced using average of adjacent lines. Application of a notch filter to the Fourier transform of the image in each band satisfactorily removed vertical striping. The aspect ratio was corrected by resampling the image in the line direction using nearest neighbor interpolation.

  19. Seasonal Blowfly Distribution and Abundance in Fragmented Landscapes. Is It Useful in Forensic Inference about Where a Corpse Has Been Decaying?

    PubMed Central

    Zabala, Jabi; Díaz, Beatriz; Saloña-Bordas, Marta I.

    2014-01-01

    Blowflies are insects of forensic interest as they may indicate characteristics of the environment where a body has been laying prior to the discovery. In order to estimate changes in community related to landscape and to assess if blowfly species can be used as indicators of the landscape where a corpse has been decaying, we studied the blowfly community and how it is affected by landscape in a 7,000 km2 region during a whole year. Using baited traps deployed monthly we collected 28,507 individuals of 10 calliphorid species, 7 of them well represented and distributed in the study area. Multiple Analysis of Variance found changes in abundance between seasons in the 7 analyzed species, and changes related to land use in 4 of them (Calliphora vomitoria, Lucilia ampullacea, L. caesar and L. illustris). Generalised Linear Model analyses of abundance of these species compared with landscape descriptors at different scales found only a clear significant relationship between summer abundance of C. vomitoria and distance to urban areas and degree of urbanisation. This relationship explained more deviance when considering the landscape composition at larger geographical scales (up to 2,500 m around sampling site). For the other species, no clear relationship between land uses and abundance was found, and therefore observed changes in their abundance patterns could be the result of other variables, probably small changes in temperature. Our results suggest that blowfly community composition cannot be used to infer in what kind of landscape a corpse has decayed, at least in highly fragmented habitats, the only exception being the summer abundance of C. vomitoria. PMID:24918607

  20. A preliminary study about the spatiotemporal distribution of forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in the area of Bern, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Feddern, Nina; Amendt, Jens; Schyma, Christian; Jackowski, Christian; Tschui, Joëlle

    2018-05-21

    To assess the species composition of necrophagous blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in the area around the federal city of Switzerland, Bern, sampling with baited bottle traps was performed over the course of 34 weeks in 2014. Six locations ranging from urban to forest habitats were sampled weekly or rather biweekly in the winter period. 5580 individuals belonging to 16 species were identified with Lucilia sericata as the most dominant and frequent species, followed by Calliphora vicina. While most individuals were found in the urban habitats, species richness was highest in the forest. Species richness and Chao-Shen entropy estimator peaked in most locations in the summer. In winter only two species were documented (C. vicina, Calliphora vomitoria). The species Lucilia illustris was found to be an indicator species for summer and autumn, while C. vomitoria was found to be an indicator species for the forest location. Entomological cases of the same time period conducted in the Institute of Forensic Medicine Bern were included to compare the species composition. Six blow fly species were found on human bodies which are in line with the monitoring. Of these, L. sericata, C. vicina and Protophormia terraenovae were the most frequent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Persistence of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin in blow fly (Calliphoridae) larvae as a possible cause of avian botulism in spring.

    PubMed

    Hubálek, Z; Halouzka, J

    1991-01-01

    Diverse samples were examined at a site of water-bird mortality, caused by Clostridium botulinum type C toxin in southern Moravia (Czechoslovakia). The toxin was detected in high concentrations in mute swan (Cygnus olor) carcasses (less than or equal to 1 x 10(6) LD50/g) as well as in necrophagous larvae and pupae of the blow flies Lucilia sericata and Calliphora vomitoria (less than or equal to 1 x 10(5) LD50/g) collected from them. It was detected in lower concentrations (less than or equal to 1 x 10(3) LD50/g) in other invertebrates (ptychopterid fly larvae, leeches, sow-bugs) associated with these carcasses, and occasionally in water samples (8 LD50/ml) close to the carrion. The toxin was not detected in the samples of water, mud or invertebrates collected at a distance greater than or equal to 5 m from the carcasses. The toxin-bearing larvae of L. sericata and C. vomitoria, containing 80,000 LD50/g of type C toxin, were exposed in the mud at the study site for 131 days from November to March. Although the toxin activity decreased 25-fold and 40-fold in the two samples of maggots exposed during this period, it remained very high (less than or equal to 3,200 LD50/g). Birds ingesting a relatively low number of these toxic larvae (or pupae) in the spring could receive a lethal dose of the toxin.

  2. Oregon transect: Comparison of leaf-level reflectance with canopy-level and modelled reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Lee F.; Baret, Frederic; Peterson, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) project involves the collection of a variety of remotely-sensed and in situ measurements for characterization of forest biophysical and biochemical parameters. The project includes nine study plots located along an environmental gradient in west-central Oregon, extending from the Pacific coast inland approximately 300km. These plots represent a broad range in ecosystem structure and function. Within the OTTER project, the sensitivity of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) signal to absorption by foliar biochemicals is being examined. AVIRIS data were acquired over all plots in conjunction with the four OTTER Multi-sensor Aircraft Campaigns spanning the growing season. Foilage samples were gathered during each campaign for biochemical determination (at Ames Research Center), to estimate stand-level constituency at each plot. Directional-hemispheric leaf reflectance throughout the 400-2400nm region was measured in the laboratory as an aid to interpreting concurrent AVIRIS data. Obtaining leaf spectra in this manner reduces or eliminates the confounding influences of atmosphere, canopy architecture, and reflectance by woody components, understory, and exposed soils which are present in airborne observations. These laboratory spectra were compared to simulated spectra derived by inverting the PROSPECT leaf-level canopy reflectance derived from AVIRIS data by use of the LOWTRAN-7 atmospheric radiative-transfer model.

  3. Validating spatial structure in canopy water content using geostatistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, E. W.; Zhang, M. H.; Ustin, S. L.; Rejmankova, E.; Haxo, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneity in ecological phenomena are scale dependent and affect the hierarchical structure of image data. AVIRIS pixels average reflectance produced by complex absorption and scattering interactions between biogeochemical composition, canopy architecture, view and illumination angles, species distributions, and plant cover as well as other factors. These scales affect validation of pixel reflectance, typically performed by relating pixel spectra to ground measurements acquired at scales of 1m(exp 2) or less (e.g., field spectra, foilage and soil samples, etc.). As image analysis becomes more sophisticated, such as those for detection of canopy chemistry, better validation becomes a critical problem. This paper presents a methodology for bridging between point measurements and pixels using geostatistics. Geostatistics have been extensively used in geological or hydrogeolocial studies but have received little application in ecological studies. The key criteria for kriging estimation is that the phenomena varies in space and that an underlying controlling process produces spatial correlation between the measured data points. Ecological variation meets this requirement because communities vary along environmental gradients like soil moisture, nutrient availability, or topography.

  4. Synanthropy and Temporal Variability of Calliphoridae Living in Cosenza (Calabria, Southern Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Silvia; Brandmayr, Pietro; Bonacci, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the synanthropy of Diptera: Calliphoridae, insects of forensic importance, in Calabria (southern Italy). The study lasted 2 years, from February 2010 to January 2012, and was carried out in three areas of Cosenza province representing “urban”, “rural”, and “wild” environments. Bottle traps baited with pork were used to catch Calliphoridae. Six species were identified, Calliphora vicina Robineau-Desvoidy 1830, Calliphora vomitoria (L.), Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann 1819), Lucilia ampullacea Villeneuve 1922, Lucilia caesar (L.), and Lucilia sericata (Meigen 1826). Data on phenologies in the study areas are reported for these species and the Synanthropy Index was calculated to evaluate their relationship with the human environment. PMID:25527571

  5. Seasonal and habitat abundance and distribution of some forensically important blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in Central California.

    PubMed

    Brundage, Adrienne; Bros, Shannon; Honda, Jeffrey Y

    2011-10-10

    Seasonal and habitat calliphorid abundance and distribution were examined weekly for two years (2001-2003) in Santa Clara County, California, using sentinel traps baited with bovine liver. Of the 34,389 flies examined in three defined habitats (rural, urban, and riparian), 38% of the total catch represented Compsomyiops callipes (Bigot) and 23% represented Phormia regina (Meigen). Other flies collected in this survey included Calliphora vomitoria (Linnaeus), Calliphora latifrons (Hough), Lucilia sericata (Meigen), Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann), and Lucilia mexicana (Macquart), which is a new record for the area. Multivariate MANOVA and ANOVA (P ≤ 0.05) analysis indicate significant seasonal habitat preference for all fly species examined. This information may be used to identify potentially forensically impo rtant fly species within Santa Clara County, California. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Microbial effects on the development of forensically important blow fly species.

    PubMed

    Crooks, Esther R; Bulling, Mark T; Barnes, Kate M

    2016-09-01

    Colonisation times and development rates of specific blow fly species are used to estimate the minimum Post Mortem Interval (mPMI). The presence or absence of bacteria on a corpse can potentially affect the development and survival of blow fly larvae. Therefore an understanding of microbial-insect interactions is important for improving the interpretation of mPMI estimations. In this study, the effect of two bacteria (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) on the growth rate and survival of three forensically important blow fly species (Lucilia sericata, Calliphora vicina and Calliphora vomitoria) was investigated. Sterile larvae were raised in a controlled environment (16:8h day: night light cycle, 23:21°C day: night temperature cycle and a constant 35% relative humidity) on four artificial diets prepared with 100μl of 10(5) CFU bacterial solutions as follows: (1) E. coli, (2) S. aureus, (3) a 50:50 E. coli:S. aureus mix and (4) a sterile bacteria-free control diet. Daily measurements (length, width and weight) were taken from first instar larvae through to the emergence of adult flies. Survival rates were also determined at pupation and adult emergence. Results indicate that bacteria were not essential for the development of any of the blow fly species. However, larval growth rates were affected by bacterial diet, with effects differing between blow fly species. Peak larval weights also varied according to species-diet combination; C. vomitoria had the largest weight on E. coli and mixed diets, C. vicina had the largest weight on S. aureus diets, and treatment had no significant effect on the peak larval weight of L. sericata. These results indicate the potential for the bacteria that larvae are exposed to during development on a corpse to alter both developmental rates and larval weight in some blow fly species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC IRRADIATION ON EINKORN WHEAT (in Japanese)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, S.; Fujii, T.

    1963-01-01

    An experiment was carried out with seedlings of einkorn wheat ( Triticum monococcum flavescens), planted at the stage of 3 to 4 foilage leaves on Feb 23rd at several distances from the source and irradiated with varying dose rates and dosages. The plants wer irradiated during their growth and harvested on June 21st. Regular irradiation followed the routine of the gamma field; that is it was applied 20 hr per day starting from April 1st, but before that time, irradiation was occasionally given for mearsurement of dosage or dose rates and checks of the apparatus. Therefore, total irradiation time frommore » planting to harvest amounted to 1843 hours. Total dosages were calculated as 369 r minimum and 4608 r maximum, intensity being 4 to 50 r/20 hr. Survival rate clearly decreased at the highest dosage, while there was no marked difference between the other five irradiated lots and the nonirradiated one. On the other hand, seed fertility was nonlinearly (gradually at higher dosages) decreased with increasing dosage and reached to about one-half of that of the control lot at the highest dosage. For comparison, seedlings of the same kind were irradiated by 0.5 and 1 kr acute gamma rays (1 kr/hr) 16 days after sowing. Survival rate and fertility markedly decreased at 1-kr irradiation. The results were not easily comparable with those of chronic irradiation because acute irradiation was done only in the early seedling stage. Acute 1-kr irradiation showed severe effects and a similar effect was seen at the highest dosage of chronic irradiation (4607 r). Thus, the plants must be more tolerant to higher dosage when radiation intensity is low. (P.C.H.)« less

  8. Fluid physico-chemical properties influence capture and diet in Nepenthes pitcher plants

    PubMed Central

    Bazile, Vincent; Le Moguédec, Gilles; Marshall, David J.; Gaume, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Nepenthes pitcher plants have evolved modified leaves with slippery surfaces and enzymatic fluids that trap and digest prey, faeces and/or plant detritus. Although the fluid’s contribution to insect capture is recognized, the physico-chemical properties involved remain underexplored and may vary among species, influencing their diet type. This study investigates the contributions of acidity and viscoelasticity in the fluid’s capture efficiency of two ant and two fly species in four Nepenthes species with different nutrition strategies. Methods Four Nepenthes species were studied, namely N. rafflesiana, N. gracilis, N. hemsleyana and N. ampullaria. Fluid was collected from pitchers of varying ages from plants growing in the field and immediately transferred to glass vials, and individual ants (tribe Campotini, Fomicinae) and flies (Calliphora vomitoria and Drosophila melanogaster) were dropped in and observed for 5 min. Water-filled vials were used as controls. Survival and lifetime data were analysed using models applied to right-censored observations. Additional laboratory experiments were carried out in which C. vomitoria flies were immersed in pH-controlled aqueous solutions and observed for 5 min. Key Results Pitcher fluid differed among Nepenthes species as regards insect retention capacity and time-to-kill, with differences observed between prey types. Only the fluids of the reputedly insectivorous species were very acidic and/or viscoelastic and retained significantly more insects than the water controls. Viscoelastic fluids were fatal to flies and were able to trap the broadest diversity of insects. Younger viscoelastic fluids showed a better retention ability than older fluids, although with less rapid killing ability, suggesting that a chemical action follows a mechanical one. Insect retention increased exponentially with fluid viscoelasticity, and this happened more abruptly and at a lower threshold for flies compared with

  9. Mutagenic screening of some commonly used medicinal plants in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akintonwa, Alade; Awodele, Olufunsho; Afolayan, Gbenga; Coker, Herbert A B

    2009-09-25

    The uses of medicinal plants have always been part of human culture. The World Health Organization estimates that up to 80% of the world's population relies on traditional medicinal system for some aspect of primary health care. However, there are few reports on the toxicological properties of most medicinal plants especially, their mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Therefore, this research is to determine the mutagenic potentials of Morinda lucida [Oruwo (Root)], Azadirachta indica [Dongoyaro (Leaf)], Terapluera tetraptera [Aridan (Fruit)], Plumbago zeylanica [Inabiri (Root)], Xylopia aethiopica [Erunje (Fruit)], Newbouldia laevis [Akoko (Leaf)], Alstonia boonei [Ahun (Bark)], Enantia chlorantha [Awopa (Bark)], and Rauvolfia vomitoria [Asofeyeje (Root)] using the Allium cepa Linn. model and the modified Ames assay. Allium cepa model was used to determine the mean root length, mitotic index and chromosomal aberrations effects of these plants on onion bulbs using 0.1, 1, 5 and 10mg/ml concentration of the plant extracts. The modified Ames test which is a modification of the standard Ames test as described by Ames et al. [Ames, B.N., McCann, J., Yamasaki, E., 1975. Methods for detecting carcinogens and mutagens with the Salmonella/mammalian microsome mutagenicity test. Mutation Research 31, 347-364] was done using Escherichia coli (0157:H7) that has the phenotypic characteristics of glucose and lactose fermentation, motile, urease negative, indole positive and citrate negative. The results obtained from Allium cepa assay showed increasing root growth inhibition with increased concentration, decreasing mitotic index with increased concentration and chromosomal aberrations. The modified Ames test showed an alteration in the biochemical characteristics of Escherichia coli (0157:H7) for all plants except Rauvolfia vomitoria and Plumbago zeylanica. Three of the medicinal plants altered at least three of the normal biochemical characteristics thus demonstrating mutagenic

  10. Cuticle hydrolysis in four medically important fly species by enzymes of the entomopathogenic fungus Conidiobolus coronatus.

    PubMed

    Boguś, M I; Włóka, E; Wrońska, A; Kaczmarek, A; Kazek, M; Zalewska, K; Ligęza-Żuber, M; Gołębiowski, M

    2017-03-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi infect insects via penetration through the cuticle, which varies remarkably in chemical composition across species and life stages. Fungal infection involves the production of enzymes that hydrolyse cuticular proteins, chitin and lipids. Host specificity is associated with fungus-cuticle interactions related to substrate utilization and resistance to host-specific inhibitors. The soil fungus Conidiobolus coronatus (Constantin) (Entomophthorales: Ancylistaceae) shows virulence against susceptible species. The larvae and pupae of Calliphora vicina (Robineau-Desvoidy) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Calliphora vomitoria (Linnaeus), Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) and Musca domestica (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Muscidae) are resistant, but adults exposed to C. coronatus quickly perish. Fungus was cultivated for 3 weeks in a minimal medium. Cell-free filtrate, for which activity of elastase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, chitobiosidase and lipase was determined, was used for in vitro hydrolysis of the cuticle from larvae, puparia and adults. Amounts of amino acids, N-glucosamine and fatty acids released were measured after 8 h of incubation. The effectiveness of fungal enzymes was correlated with concentrations of compounds detected in the cuticles of tested insects. Positive correlations suggest compounds used by the fungus as nutrients, whereas negative correlations may indicate compounds responsible for insect resistance. Adult deaths result from the ingestion of conidia or fungal excretions. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  11. Identifying 1st instar larvae for three forensically important blowfly species using "fingerprint" cuticular hydrocarbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Hannah E; Adam, Craig D; Drijfhout, Falko P

    2014-07-01

    Calliphoridae are known to be the most forensically important insects when it comes to establishing the minimum post mortem interval (PMImin) in criminal investigations. The first step in calculating the PMImin is to identify the larvae present to species level. Accurate identification which is conventionally carried out by morphological analysis is crucial because different insects have different life stage timings. Rapid identification in the immature larvae stages would drastically cut time in criminal investigations as it would eliminate the need to rear larvae to adult flies to determine the species. Cuticular hydrocarbon analysis on 1st instar larvae has been applied to three forensically important blowflies; Lucilia sericata, Calliphora vicina and Calliphora vomitoria, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and principal component analysis (PCA). The results show that each species holds a distinct "fingerprint" hydrocarbon profile, allowing for accurate identification to be established in 1-day old larvae, when it can be challenging to apply morphological criteria. Consequently, this GC-MS based technique could accelerate and strengthen the identification process, not only for forensically important species, but also for other entomological samples which are hard to identify using morphological features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interspecific shared collective decision-making in two forensically important species.

    PubMed

    Boulay, Julien; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Hédouin, Valéry; Charabidzé, Damien

    2016-02-10

    To date, the study of collective behaviour has mainly focused on intraspecific situations: the collective decision-making of mixed-species groups involving interspecific aggregation-segregation has received little attention. Here, we show that, in both conspecific and heterospecific groups, the larvae of two species (Lucilia sericata and Calliphora vomitoria, calliphorid carrion-feeding flies) were able to make a collective choice. In all groups, the choice was made within a few minutes and persisted throughout the period of the experiment. The monitoring of a focal individual within a group showed that these aggregations were governed by attractive and retentive effects of the group. Furthermore, the similarity observed between the conspecific and heterospecific groups suggested the existence of shared aggregation signals. The group size was found to have a stronger influence than the species of necrophagous larvae. These results should be viewed in relation to the well-known correlation between group size and heat generation. This study provides the first experimental examination of the dynamics of collective decision-making in mixed-species groups of invertebrates, contributing to our understanding of the cooperation-competition phenomenon in animal social groups. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Decomposition and entomological colonization of charred bodies – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Vanin, Stefano; Zanotti, Emma; Gibelli, Daniele; Taborelli, Anna; Andreola, Salvatore; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Aim To use forensic entomological approach to estimate the post mortem interval (PMI) in burnt remains. Methods Two experiments were performed in a field in the outskirts of Milan, in winter and summer 2007. Four 60-kg pigs were used: two for each experiment. One pig carcass was burnt until it reached the level 2-3 of the Glassman-Crow scale and the not-burnt carcass was used as a control. In order to describe the decomposition process and to collect the data useful for minimum PMI estimation, macroscopic, histological, and entomological analyses were performed. Results In the winter part of the experiment, the first insect activity on the burnt carcass began in the third week (Calliphora vomitoria) and at the beginning of the fourth week an increase in the number of species was observed. In the summer part, adult flies and first instar maggots (Phormia regina) appeared a few minutes/hours after the carcass exposure. Both in winter and summer, flies belonging to the first colonization wave (Calliphoridae) appeared on burnt and control pigs at the same time, whereas other species (Diptera and Coleoptera) appeared earlier on burnt pigs. Conclusion In forensic practice, burnt bodies are among the most neglected fields of entomological research, since they are supposed to be an inadequate substratum for insect colonization. Entomological approach for PMI estimation proved to be useful, although further studies on larger samples are needed. PMID:23986281

  14. Antimicrobial biosynthetic potential and genetic diversity of endophytic actinomycetes associated with medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Gohain, Anwesha; Gogoi, Animesh; Debnath, Rajal; Yadav, Archana; Singh, Bhim P; Gupta, Vijai K; Sharma, Rajeev; Saikia, Ratul

    2015-10-01

    Endophytic actinomycetes are one of the primary groups that share symbiotic relationships with medicinal plants and are key reservoir of biologically active compounds. In this study, six selective medicinal plants were targeted for the first time for endophytic actinomycetes isolation from Gibbon Wild Life Sanctuary, Assam, India, during winter and summer and 76 isolates were obtained. The isolates were found to be prevalent in roots followed by stem and leaves. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 16 genera, including rare genera, Verrucosispora, Isoptericola and Kytococcus, which have never been previously reported as endophytic. The genus Streptomyces (66%) was dominant in both seasons. Shannon's diversity index showed that Azadirachta indica (1.49), Rauwolfia serpentina (1.43) and Emblica officinalis (1.24) were relatively good habitat for endophytic actinomycetes. Antimicrobial strains showed prevalence of polyketide synthase (PKS) type-II (85%) followed by PKS type-I (14%) encoded in the genomes. Expression studies showed 12-fold upregulation of PKSII gene in seventh day of incubation for Streptomyces antibioticus (EAAG90). Our results emphasize that the actinomycetes assemblages within plant tissue exhibited biosynthetic systems encoding for important biologically active compounds. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    PubMed

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of Neuropsychopharmacological Effects of a Polyherbal Formulation on the Learning and Memory Process in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shah, JS; Goyal, RK

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the neuropsychopharmacological effect of a polyherbal formulation (PHF) on the learning and memory processes in rats. Materials and Methods: PHF contains Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Nardostachys jatamansi (Jatamansi), Rauwolfia serpentina (Sarpagandha), Evolvulus alsinoides (Shankhpushpi), Asparagus racemosus (Shatavari), Emblica officinalis (Amalki), Mucuna pruriens (Kauch bij extract), Hyoscyamus niger (Khurasani Ajmo), Mineral resin (Shilajit), Pearl (Mukta Shukhti Pishti), and coral calcium (Praval pishti). Its effect (500 mg / kg, p.o.) on the learning and memory processes was tested. The activity of PHF on memory acquisition and retention was studied using passive avoidance learning and elevated plus maze model (EPM) in rats. Results: The animals treated with PHF showed a significant decrease in transfer latency as compared to the control group in EPM. PHF also produced significant improvement in passive avoidance acquisition and memory retrieval, as compared to the controls and reduced the latency to reach the shock free zone (SFZ) after 24 hours. Conclusion: The PHF produces significant improvement in passive avoidance acquisition and memory retrieval in rats, which needs further investigation. PMID:21731356

  17. Investigation of neuropsychopharmacological effects of a polyherbal formulation on the learning and memory process in rats.

    PubMed

    Shah, Js; Goyal, Rk

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the neuropsychopharmacological effect of a polyherbal formulation (PHF) on the learning and memory processes in rats. PHF contains Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Nardostachys jatamansi (Jatamansi), Rauwolfia serpentina (Sarpagandha), Evolvulus alsinoides (Shankhpushpi), Asparagus racemosus (Shatavari), Emblica officinalis (Amalki), Mucuna pruriens (Kauch bij extract), Hyoscyamus niger (Khurasani Ajmo), Mineral resin (Shilajit), Pearl (Mukta Shukhti Pishti), and coral calcium (Praval pishti). Its effect (500 mg / kg, p.o.) on the learning and memory processes was tested. The activity of PHF on memory acquisition and retention was studied using passive avoidance learning and elevated plus maze model (EPM) in rats. The animals treated with PHF showed a significant decrease in transfer latency as compared to the control group in EPM. PHF also produced significant improvement in passive avoidance acquisition and memory retrieval, as compared to the controls and reduced the latency to reach the shock free zone (SFZ) after 24 hours. The PHF produces significant improvement in passive avoidance acquisition and memory retrieval in rats, which needs further investigation.

  18. Relating a Spectral Index from MODIS and Tower-based Measurements to Ecosystem Light Use Efficiency for a Fluxnet-Canada Coniferous Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Cheng, Yen-Ben; Hilker, Thomas; Huemmrich, Karl F.; Black, T. Andrew; Krishnan, Praveena; Coops, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    reflectance forward scatter minimum), while the intermediate, mixed sunlit/shade sector was located in the cross-plane to the SPP. The PRI indices clearly captured the differences in leaf groups, with sunlit foliage exhibiting the lowest values on sunny days throughout the 2006 season. When tower-based canopy-level LUE was recalculated to estimate foliage-based values (LUE(sub foilage) for the three foliage groups under their incident light environments, a strong linear relationship for PRI:LUE(sub foilage) was demonstrated (0.6 less than or equal to r(sup 2) less than or equal to 0.8, n=822, P<0.0001). The MODIS data represent relatively large areas when acquired at nadir (approx.1 sq km) or at variable off-nadir view angles (greater than or equal to 1 sq km) looking forward or aft. Nevertheless, a similar relationship between MODIS PRI and tower-based LUE was obtained from satellite observations (r(sup 2) = 0.76, n=105, P= 0.026) when the azimuth offsets from the SPP for off-nadir observations were considered. At this relatively high latitude of 50 degrees, the MODIS directional observations were offset from the SPP by approximately 50 degrees, but still represented backscatter or forward scatter sectors of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). The backscatter observations sampled the sunlit forest and provided lower PRI values, in general, than the forward scatter observations from the shaded forest. Since the hotspot and darkspot were not typically directly observed, the dynamic range for MODIS PRI was less than that observed in the SPP at the canopy level; therefore, MODIS PRI values were more similar to those observed in sifu in the BRDF cross-plane. While not ideal in terms of spatial resolution or optimal viewing configuration, the MODIS observations nevertheless provide a means to monitor forest under stress using narrow spectral band indices and off-nadir observations. This research has stimulated several spin-off studies for remote sensinf LUE

  19. Fluid physico-chemical properties influence capture and diet in Nepenthes pitcher plants.

    PubMed

    Bazile, Vincent; Le Moguédec, Gilles; Marshall, David J; Gaume, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    Nepenthes pitcher plants have evolved modified leaves with slippery surfaces and enzymatic fluids that trap and digest prey, faeces and/or plant detritus. Although the fluid's contribution to insect capture is recognized, the physico-chemical properties involved remain underexplored and may vary among species, influencing their diet type. This study investigates the contributions of acidity and viscoelasticity in the fluid's capture efficiency of two ant and two fly species in four Nepenthes species with different nutrition strategies. Four Nepenthes species were studied, namely N. rafflesiana, N. gracilis, N. hemsleyana and N. ampullaria. Fluid was collected from pitchers of varying ages from plants growing in the field and immediately transferred to glass vials, and individual ants (tribe Campotini, Fomicinae) and flies (Calliphora vomitoria and Drosophila melanogaster) were dropped in and observed for 5 min. Water-filled vials were used as controls. Survival and lifetime data were analysed using models applied to right-censored observations. Additional laboratory experiments were carried out in which C. vomitoria flies were immersed in pH-controlled aqueous solutions and observed for 5 min. Pitcher fluid differed among Nepenthes species as regards insect retention capacity and time-to-kill, with differences observed between prey types. Only the fluids of the reputedly insectivorous species were very acidic and/or viscoelastic and retained significantly more insects than the water controls. Viscoelastic fluids were fatal to flies and were able to trap the broadest diversity of insects. Younger viscoelastic fluids showed a better retention ability than older fluids, although with less rapid killing ability, suggesting that a chemical action follows a mechanical one. Insect retention increased exponentially with fluid viscoelasticity, and this happened more abruptly and at a lower threshold for flies compared with ants. Flies were more often retained if they

  20. Why ritual plant use has ethnopharmacological relevance.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Diana; Sosef, Marc; van Andel, Tinde

    2016-07-21

    Although ritual plant use is now recognised both for its socio-cultural importance and for its contribution to nature conservation, its potential pharmacological effects remain overlooked. Our objective was to see whether ritual plant use could have ethnopharmacological relevance through practices that involve direct physical contact with the human body. We hypothesise that ritual practices reflect traditional knowledge on biological activities of plant species, even if plants are used in a symbolic way. Data were collected in collaboration with traditional healers and ritual plant vendors and harvesters in Benin (West Africa) and Gabon (Central Africa). Both ritual and medicinal uses of plants were recorded. Voucher specimens were collected and identified. We documented different administration routes of ritual plants and selected those whose uses involved direct contact with the human body. Based on our quantitative market surveys and field inventories, we identified 24 commercially or otherwise culturally important species and compared their ritual uses with proven biological activity from the literature. We recorded 573 plant species with 667 ritual uses, of which ca. 75% (442 species and 499 uses) implied direct contact with the human body. The most common route of administration for ritual treatments was baths, followed by oral ingestion and skin rubbing. One third (186 species) of all ritual plants doubled as medicine for physical ailments. In contrast to previous research that explained the effectiveness of ritual plant use to be a matter of belief, our results hint at the potential medicinal properties of these plants. Ritual treatment of madness caused by evil spirits by the consumption of Rauvolfia vomitoria roots, for example, may be based on the species' proven anticonvulsant properties. We discuss some of the possible implications of ritual plant use for public health and conclude by suggesting that ritual plant uses that do not involve contact with

  1. Technical Note: "Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA approaches for reliable identification of Lucilia (Diptera, Calliphoridae) species of forensic interest from Southern Europe".

    PubMed

    GilArriortua, Maite; Saloña-Bordas, Marta I; Cainé, Laura M; Pinheiro, Fátima; M de Pancorbo, Marian

    2015-12-01

    In forensic entomology, rapid and unambiguous identification of blowfly species is a critical prerequisite for accurately estimating the post-mortem interval (PMI). The conventional diagnosis of cadaveric entomofauna based on external characters is hampered by the morphological similarities between species, especially in immature stages. Genetic analysis has been shown to allow precise and reliable diagnosis and delimitation of insect species. Nevertheless, the taxonomy of some species remains unresolved. This study was focused on improving the effectiveness and accuracy of analysis based on the widely used cytochrome c oxidase subunit I barcode region (COI barcode, 658 bp), complemented by other mitochondrial and nuclear regions, such as cytochrome b (Cyt-b, 307 bp) and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2, 310-331 bp), for the identification of Southern European blowflies. We analyzed a total of 209 specimens, collected from 38 human corpses, belonging to three Calliphoridae genera and seven species: Chrysomya (Ch. albiceps), Calliphora (C. vicina and C. vomitoria), and Lucilia (L. sericata, L. ampullacea, L. caesar and L. illustris). These species are the most common PMI indicators in Portugal. The results revealed that unambiguous separation of species of the Lucilia genus requires different loci from the barcode region. Furthermore, we conclude that the ITS2 (310-331 bp) molecular marker is a promising diagnostic tool because its inter-specific discriminatory power enables unequivocal and consistent distinctions to be made, even between closely related species (L. caesar-L. illustris). This work also contributes new genetic data that may be of interest in performing species diagnosis for Southern European blowflies. Notably, to the best of our knowledge, we provide the first records of the Cyt-b (307 bp) locus for L. illustris and the ITS2 (310-331 bp) region for Iberian Peninsula Lucilia species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  2. Design, Development and Rationalization of Sarpagandha Ghanvati

    PubMed Central

    Pundarikakshudu, K.; Bhatt, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Sarpagandha ghanvati is a classical Ayurvedic formulation widely prescribed for anxiety and insomnia. It contains Sarpagandha (roots of Rauwolfia serpentina L. (Benth.) Ex Kurz; Family: Apocyanaceae), Khurasani ajowan (Hyocyamus niger L.; Family: Solanaceae) seeds, Jatamansi (Nardostachys jatamansi DC. Family: Valerianaceae) roots and Pipplamul (root of Piper longum L.; Family: Piperaceae). The objective of this study was to make a comparative evaluation of Ghanvatis and tablets of this formulation. Two tablet formulations were prepared; one incorporating only powders of all ingredients; the other with ethanol extracts of the first three ingredients and powder of Piper longum root. Similarly, two types of Sarpagandha ghanvati pills were prepared; one as per Ayurvedic Formulary of India; the other with ethanol extracts of the first three ingredients and powder of Piper longum root. Alcohol extracted 0.22% w/w of total alkaloids as against 0.061% w/w extracted by water. Tablets prepared with powders of all the ingredients had friability more than 3.0% where as those prepared with ethanol extract had very low friability. Ghanvatis, prepared as per the Ayurvedic formulary, did not show reserpine although other alkaloids were present. They showed less content uniformity and lower drug release. Ethanol extracted reserpine along with other alkaloids. Ghanvatis made with the alcoholic extracts exhibited better content uniformity and drug release than the traditional formulation. Tablets prepared with powders or extracts of the ingredients exhibited good content uniformity but the release of alkaloids from the tablets of powders was only 80%. Tablets of the extracts had good content uniformity with 90% release of the total alkaloids. Tablets prepared with alcoholic extracts using 1% polyvinylpyrrolidone as binder and 5% dried starch powder as disintegrating agent confirmed to all the requirements. Thus, the study shows tablets made with the extracts are superior to

  3. Using bacterial and necrophagous insect dynamics for post-mortem interval estimation during cold season: Novel case study in Romania.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Lavinia; Carter, David O; Junkins, Emily N; Purcarea, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Considering the biogeographical characteristics of forensic entomology, and the recent development of forensic microbiology as a complementary approach for post-mortem interval estimation, the current study focused on characterizing the succession of necrophagous insect species and bacterial communities inhabiting the rectum and mouth cavities of swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) carcasses during a cold season outdoor experiment in an urban natural environment of Bucharest, Romania. We monitored the decomposition process of three swine carcasses during a 7 month period (November 2012-May 2013) corresponding to winter and spring periods of a temperate climate region. The carcasses, protected by wire cages, were placed on the ground in a park type environment, while the meteorological parameters were constantly recorded. The succession of necrophagous Diptera and Coleoptera taxa was monitored weekly, both the adult and larval stages, and the species were identified both by morphological and genetic characterization. The structure of bacterial communities from swine rectum and mouth tissues was characterized during the same time intervals by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. We observed a shift in the structure of both insect and bacterial communities, primarily due to seasonal effects and the depletion of the carcass. A total of 14 Diptera and 6 Coleoptera species were recorded on the swine carcasses, from which Calliphora vomitoria and C. vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae), Necrobia violacea (Coleoptera: Cleridae) and Thanatophilus rugosus (Coleoptera: Silphidae) were observed as predominant species. The first colonizing wave, primarily Calliphoridae, was observed after 15 weeks when the temperature increased to 13°C. This was followed by Muscidae, Fanniidae, Anthomyiidae, Sepsidae and Piophilidae. Families belonging to Coleoptera Order were observed at week 18 when temperatures raised above 18°C, starting with

  4. Simultaneous Determination of Bioactive Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids in Ethanolic Extract of Seven Rauvolfia Species using UHPLC with Hybrid Triple Quadrupole Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Singh, Awantika; Bajpai, Vikas; Srivastava, Mukesh; Singh, Bhim Pratap; Ojha, Sanjeev; Kumar, Brijesh

    2016-09-01

    Rauvolfia serpentina is an endangered plant species due to its over-exploitation. It has highly commercial and economic importance due to the presence of bioactive monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) such as ajmaline, yohimbine, ajmalicine, serpentine and reserpine. To develop a validated, rapid, sensitive and selective ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQLIT -MS/MS) method in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode for simultaneous determination of bioactive MIAs in ethanolic extract of seven Rauvolfia species and herbal formulations. The separation of MIAs was achieved on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH™ C18 column (1.7 μm, 2.1 mm × 50 mm) using a gradient mobile phase (0.1% aqueous formic acid and acetonitrile) at flow rate 0.3 μL/min in 7 min. The validated method showed good linearity (r(2)  ≥ 0.9999), limit of detection (LOD) (0.06-0.15 ng/mL), limit of quantitation (LOQ) (0.18-0.44 ng/mL), precisions [intraday: relative standard deviation (RSD) ≤ 2.24%, interday: RSD ≤ 2.74%], stability (RSD ≤ 1.53%) and overall recovery (RSD ≤ 2.23%). The validated method was applied to quantitate MIAs. Root of Rauvolfia vomitoria showed a high content of ajmaline (48.43 mg/g), serpentine (87.77 mg/g) whereas high quantities of yohimbine (100.21 mg/g) and ajmalicine (120.51 mg/g) were detected in R. tetraphylla. High content of reserpine was detected in R. micrantha (35.18 mg/g) and R. serpentina (32.38 mg/g). The encouraging results of this study may lead to easy selection of suitable Rauvolfia species according to the abundance of MIAs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Randomized and double-blinded pilot clinical study of the safety and anti-diabetic efficacy of the Rauvolfia-Citrus tea, as used in Nigerian traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Tofte, Joan I A; Mølgaard, Per; Josefsen, Knud; Abdallah, Zostam; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Cornett, Claus; Mu, Huiling; Richter, Erik A; Petersen, Henning Willads; Nørregaard, Jens Christian; Winther, Kaj

    2011-01-27

    The aim of this randomized and double blinded pilot clinical trial was to investigate the anti-diabetic efficacy of the Rauvolfia-Citrus (RC) tea in humans. We have earlier shown that a combination of calorie-restriction and chronic administration of the RC tea to the genetic diabetic (BKS-db) mice resulted in the normalization of blood sugar, reduction in lipid accumulated in the mice eyes and prevention of the degeneration of the otherwise brittle BKS-db pancreas. The tea is made by boiling foliage of Rauvolfia vomitoria and fruits of Citrus aurantium and is used to treat diabetes in Nigerian folk medicine. The RC tea was produced using the Nigerian traditional recipe and tested in the traditional dosage on 23 Danish type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. The participants were divided into two equivalent groups after stratification by sex, age and BMI, in a 4-month double-blinded, placebo-controlled and randomized clinical trial. Most of the study subjects (19/23) were using oral anti-diabetic agents (OADs). Mean disease duration was 6±4.6 years, mean age was 64±7 years and mean BMI was 28.7±3.8 kg/m(2). Prior to starting the treatment, the participants received individual dietician consultations. At the end of the 4-month treatment period, the treated group showed an 11% decrease in 2-h postprandial plasma glucose relative to the 3% increase in the placebo group (p=0.004). The improvement in blood glucose clearance with RC tea treatment was reflected in a 6% reduction in HbA(1c) (p=0.02) and in a 10% reduction in fasting plasma glucose (p=0.02), when comparing the post 4-month treatment to pre-treatment baseline values. Though the basal levels of phosphorylated acetyl CoA carboxylase enzyme in skeletal muscle were significantly reduced in the treated group (p=0.04), as compared to the placebo, only the pattern of reductions in the tissue fatty acids (FAs) differed in the two groups. While all types of FAs were reduced in placebo, only saturated (SFA) and

  6. The medical treatment of Parkinson disease from James Parkinson to George Cotzias.

    PubMed

    Fahn, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    It took exactly 150 years since James Parkinson's description in 1817 of the illness bearing his name until the development of effective therapy for this disorder, namely, the introduction of high-dosage levodopa by George Cotzias in 1967. During the first 50 years, no effective therapy was available, but neurologists reported using different agents, including metals. Then, around 1867, Charcot found solanaceous alkaloids to be somewhat helpful, and these became the accepted and popular therapy for the next 75 years. When basic scientists discovered that these alkaloids had central antimuscarinic activity, pharmaceutical chemists developed synthetic chemical agents that were equally effective, with possibly less adverse effects, and around 1950 these synthetic drugs became the standard medical therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). The link between dopamine and PD did not take place until 1957, 140 years after Parkinson's Essay. The clue came from research on reserpine, a drug derived from the Rauwolfia plant that caused a sedative effect, now recognized as a drug-induced parkinsonian state. Initial investigations revealed that reserpine caused the release and depletion of serotonin stores in the brain. With that knowledge, Arvid Carlsson, a young pharmacologist in Sweden, decided to explore the possibility that reserpine might also affect brain catecholamines. In his now famous, elegant, and simple experiment, he showed that injecting l-dopa, the precursor of catecholamines, alleviated the reserpine-induced parkinsonian state in animals, whereas the precursor of serotonin failed to do so. Carlsson then developed a highly sensitive assay to measure dopamine, and his lab found that dopamine is selectively present in high concentrations in the striatum and that administered l-dopa could restore the dopamine depleted by reserpine. Carlsson postulated that all these findings implicate dopamine in motor disorders. Oleh Hornykiewicz, a young pharmacologist in Vienna, on