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  1. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  2. Protein Repeats from First Principles.

    PubMed

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2016-04-05

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family.

  3. Protein Repeats from First Principles

    PubMed Central

    Turjanski, Pablo; Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Becher, Verónica; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2016-01-01

    Some natural proteins display recurrent structural patterns. Despite being highly similar at the tertiary structure level, repeating patterns within a single repeat protein can be extremely variable at the sequence level. We use a mathematical definition of a repetition and investigate the occurrences of these in sequences of different protein families. We found that long stretches of perfect repetitions are infrequent in individual natural proteins, even for those which are known to fold into structures of recurrent structural motifs. We found that natural repeat proteins are indeed repetitive in their families, exhibiting abundant stretches of 6 amino acids or longer that are perfect repetitions in the reference family. We provide a systematic quantification for this repetitiveness. We show that this form of repetitiveness is not exclusive of repeat proteins, but also occurs in globular domains. A by-product of this work is a fast quantification of the likelihood of a protein to belong to a family. PMID:27044676

  4. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  5. RepeatsDB: a database of tandem repeat protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Tomás; Potenza, Emilio; Walsh, Ian; Gonzalo Parra, R.; Giollo, Manuel; Minervini, Giovanni; Piovesan, Damiano; Ihsan, Awais; Ferrari, Carlo; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2014-01-01

    RepeatsDB (http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is a database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Tandem repeats pose a difficult problem for the analysis of protein structures, as the underlying sequence can be highly degenerate. Several repeat types haven been studied over the years, but their annotation was done in a case-by-case basis, thus making large-scale analysis difficult. We developed RepeatsDB to fill this gap. Using state-of-the-art repeat detection methods and manual curation, we systematically annotated the Protein Data Bank, predicting 10 745 repeat structures. In all, 2797 structures were classified according to a recently proposed classification schema, which was expanded to accommodate new findings. In addition, detailed annotations were performed in a subset of 321 proteins. These annotations feature information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units. RepeatsDB is an ongoing effort to systematically classify and annotate structural protein repeats in a consistent way. It provides users with the possibility to access and download high-quality datasets either interactively or programmatically through web services. PMID:24311564

  6. Multifunctional protein: cardiac ankyrin repeat protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Na; Xie, Xiao-jie; Wang, Jian-an

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) not only serves as an important component of muscle sarcomere in the cytoplasm, but also acts as a transcription co-factor in the nucleus. Previous studies have demonstrated that CARP is up-regulated in some cardiovascular disorders and muscle diseases; however, its role in these diseases remains controversial now. In this review, we will discuss the continued progress in the research related to CARP, including its discovery, structure, and the role it plays in cardiac development and heart diseases. PMID:27143260

  7. Exploring the repeat protein universe through computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Brunette, T J; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Bhabha, Gira; Ekiert, Damian C; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Hura, Greg L; Tainer, John A; Baker, David

    2015-12-24

    A central question in protein evolution is the extent to which naturally occurring proteins sample the space of folded structures accessible to the polypeptide chain. Repeat proteins composed of multiple tandem copies of a modular structure unit are widespread in nature and have critical roles in molecular recognition, signalling, and other essential biological processes. Naturally occurring repeat proteins have been re-engineered for molecular recognition and modular scaffolding applications. Here we use computational protein design to investigate the space of folded structures that can be generated by tandem repeating a simple helix-loop-helix-loop structural motif. Eighty-three designs with sequences unrelated to known repeat proteins were experimentally characterized. Of these, 53 are monomeric and stable at 95 °C, and 43 have solution X-ray scattering spectra consistent with the design models. Crystal structures of 15 designs spanning a broad range of curvatures are in close agreement with the design models with root mean square deviations ranging from 0.7 to 2.5 Å. Our results show that existing repeat proteins occupy only a small fraction of the possible repeat protein sequence and structure space and that it is possible to design novel repeat proteins with precisely specified geometries, opening up a wide array of new possibilities for biomolecular engineering.

  8. Control of repeat protein curvature by computational protein design

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keunwan; Shen, Betty W.; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Shape complementarity is an important component of molecular recognition, and the ability to precisely adjust the shape of a binding scaffold to match a target of interest would greatly facilitate the creation of high affinity protein reagents and therapeutics. Here we describe a general approach to control the shape of the binding surface on repeat protein scaffolds, and apply it to leucine rich repeat proteins. First, a set of self-compatible building block modules are designed that when polymerized each generate surfaces with unique but constant curvatures. Second, a set of junction modules that connect the different building blocks are designed. Finally, new proteins with custom designed shapes are generated by appropriately combining building block and junction modules. Crystal structures of the designs illustrate the power of the approach in controlling repeat protein curvature. PMID:25580576

  9. Nanostructured functional films from engineered repeat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grove, Tijana Z.; Regan, Lynne; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental advances in biotechnology, medicine, environment, electronics and energy require methods for precise control of spatial organization at the nanoscale. Assemblies that rely on highly specific biomolecular interactions are an attractive approach to form materials that display novel and useful properties. Here, we report on assembly of films from the designed, rod-shaped, superhelical, consensus tetratricopeptide repeat protein (CTPR). We have designed three peptide-binding sites into the 18 repeat CTPR to allow for further specific and non-covalent functionalization of films through binding of fluorescein labelled peptides. The fluorescence signal from the peptide ligand bound to the protein in the solid film is anisotropic, demonstrating that CTPR films can impose order on otherwise isotropic moieties. Circular dichroism measurements show that the individual protein molecules retain their secondary structure in the film, and X-ray scattering, birefringence and atomic force microscopy experiments confirm macroscopic alignment of CTPR molecules within the film. This work opens the door to the generation of innovative biomaterials with tailored structure and function. PMID:23594813

  10. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  11. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects.

    PubMed

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R E

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  12. CAG trinucleotide RNA repeats interact with RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, B. A.; Spencer, C.; Eberwine, J.

    1996-01-01

    Genes associated with several neurological diseases are characterized by the presence of an abnormally long trinucleotide repeat sequence. By way of example, Huntington's disease (HD), is characterized by selective neuronal degeneration associated with the expansion of a polyglutamine-encoding CAG tract. Normally, this CAG tract is comprised of 11-34 repeats, but in HD it is expanded to > 37 repeats in affected individuals. The mechanism by which CAG repeats cause neuronal degeneration is unknown, but it has been speculated that the expansion primarily causes abnormal protein functioning, which in turn causes HD pathology. Other mechanisms, however, have not been ruled out. Interactions between RNA and RNA-binding proteins have previously been shown to play a role in the expression of several eukaryotic genes. Herein, we report the association of cytoplasmic proteins with normal length and extended CAG repeats, using gel shift and UV crosslinking assays. Cytoplasmic protein extracts from several rat brain regions, including the striatum and cortex, sites of neuronal degeneration in HD, contain a 63-kD RNA-binding protein that specifically interacts with these CAG-repeat sequences. These protein-RNA interactions are dependent on the length of the CAG repeat, with longer repeats binding substantially more protein. Two CAG repeat-binding proteins are present in human cortex and striatum; one comigrates with the rat protein at 63 kD, while the other migrates at 49 kD. These data suggest mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins may be involved in the pathological course of trinucleotide repeat-associated neurological diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8751857

  13. Tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    Tandem-repeat protein domains, composed of repeated units of conserved stretches of 20–40 amino acids, are required for a wide array of biological functions. Despite their diverse and fundamental functions, there has been no comprehensive assessment of their taxonomic distribution, incidence, and associations with organismal lifestyle and phylogeny. In this study, we assess for the first time the abundance of armadillo (ARM) and tetratricopeptide (TPR) repeat domains across all three domains in the tree of life and compare the results to our previous analysis on ankyrin (ANK) repeat domains in this journal. All eukaryotes and a majority of the bacterial and archaeal genomes analyzed have a minimum of one TPR and ARM repeat. In eukaryotes, the fraction of ARM-containing proteins is approximately double that of TPR and ANK-containing proteins, whereas bacteria and archaea are enriched in TPR-containing proteins relative to ARM- and ANK-containing proteins. We show in bacteria that phylogenetic history, rather than lifestyle or pathogenicity, is a predictor of TPR repeat domain abundance, while neither phylogenetic history nor lifestyle predicts ARM repeat domain abundance. Surprisingly, pathogenic bacteria were not enriched in TPR-containing proteins, which have been associated within virulence factors in certain species. Taken together, this comparative analysis provides a newly appreciated view of the prevalence and diversity of multiple types of tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life. A central finding of this analysis is that tandem repeat domain-containing proteins are prevalent not just in eukaryotes, but also in bacterial and archaeal species. PMID:25653910

  14. A general computational approach for repeat protein design.

    PubMed

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Vorobiev, Sergey; Xiao, Rong; Park, Keunwan; Caprari, Silvia; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Mao, Lei; Janjua, Haleema; Montelione, Gaetano T; Hunt, John; Baker, David

    2015-01-30

    Repeat proteins have considerable potential for use as modular binding reagents or biomaterials in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here we describe a general computational method for building idealized repeats that integrates available family sequences and structural information with Rosetta de novo protein design calculations. Idealized designs from six different repeat families were generated and experimentally characterized; 80% of the proteins were expressed and soluble and more than 40% were folded and monomeric with high thermal stability. Crystal structures determined for members of three families are within 1Å root-mean-square deviation to the design models. The method provides a general approach for fast and reliable generation of stable modular repeat protein scaffolds. PMID:25451037

  15. A General Computational Approach for Repeat Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Vorobiev, Sergey; Xiao, Rong; Park, Keunwan; Caprari, Silvia; Su, Min; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Mao, Lei; Janjua, Haleema; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Repeat proteins have considerable potential for use as modular binding reagents or biomaterials in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here we describe a general computational method for building idealized repeats that integrates available family sequences and structural information with Rosetta de novo protein design calculations. Idealized designs from six different repeat families were generated and experimentally characterized; 80% of the proteins were expressed and soluble and more than 40% were folded and monomeric with high thermal stability. Crystal structures determined for members of three families are within 1 Å root-mean-square deviation to the design models. The method provides a general approach for fast and reliable generation of stable modular repeat protein scaffolds. PMID:25451037

  16. Structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins show propagation of inter-repeat interface effects

    PubMed Central

    Reichen, Christian; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Hansen, Simon; Grütter, Markus G.; Plückthun, Andreas; Mittl, Peer R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The armadillo repeat serves as a scaffold for the development of modular peptide-recognition modules. In order to develop such a system, three crystal structures of designed armadillo-repeat proteins with third-generation N-caps (YIII-type), four or five internal repeats (M-type) and second-generation C-caps (AII-type) were determined at 1.8 Å (His-YIIIM4AII), 2.0 Å (His-YIIIM5AII) and 1.95 Å (YIIIM5AII) resolution and compared with those of variants with third-generation C-caps. All constructs are full consensus designs in which the internal repeats have exactly the same sequence, and hence identical conformations of the internal repeats are expected. The N-cap and internal repeats M1 to M3 are indeed extremely similar, but the comparison reveals structural differences in internal repeats M4 and M5 and the C-cap. These differences are caused by long-range effects of the C-cap, contacting molecules in the crystal, and the intrinsic design of the repeat. Unfortunately, the rigid-body movement of the C-terminal part impairs the regular arrangement of internal repeats that forms the putative peptide-binding site. The second-generation C-cap improves the packing of buried residues and thereby the stability of the protein. These considerations are useful for future improvements of an armadillo-repeat-based peptide-recognition system. PMID:26894544

  17. Optimisation of a simple and reliable label-free methodology for the relative quantitation of raw pork meat proteins.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Aristoy, M Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in proteomics have become an indispensable tool for a fast, precise and sensitive analysis of proteins in complex biological samples at both, qualitative and quantitative level. In this study, a label-free quantitative proteomic methodology has been optimised for the relative quantitation of proteins extracted from raw pork meat. So, after the separation of proteins by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and trypsin digestion, their identification and quantitation have been done using nanoliquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole/time-of-flight (Q/ToF) mass spectrometer. Relative quantitation has been based on the measurement of mass spectral peak intensities, which have been described that are correlated with protein abundances. The results obtained regarding linearity, robustness, repeatability and accuracy show that this procedure could be used as a fast, simple, and reliable method to quantify changes in protein abundance in meat samples.

  18. Capping motifs stabilize the leucine-rich repeat protein PP32 and rigidify adjacent repeats.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thuy P; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2014-06-01

    Capping motifs are found to flank most β-strand-containing repeat proteins. To better understand the roles of these capping motifs in organizing structure and stability, we carried out folding and solution NMR studies on the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain of PP32, which is composed of five tandem LRR, capped by α-helical and β-hairpin motifs on the N- and C-termini. We were able to purify PP32 constructs lacking either cap and containing destabilizing substitutions. Removing the C-cap results in complete unfolding of PP32. Removing the N-cap has a much less severe effect, decreasing stability but retaining much of its secondary structure. In contrast, the dynamics and tertiary structure of the first two repeats are significantly perturbed, based on (1)H-(15)N relaxation studies, chemical shift perturbations, and residual dipolar couplings. However, more distal repeats (3 to C-cap) retain their native tertiary structure. In this regard, the N-cap drives the folding of adjacent repeats from what appears to be a molten-globule-like state. This interpretation is supported by extensive analysis using core packing substitutions in the full-length and N-cap-truncated PP32. This work highlights the importance of caps to the stability and structural integrity of β-strand-containing LRR proteins, and emphasizes the different contributions of the N- and C-terminal caps. PMID:24659532

  19. The first crystal structure of an archaeal helical repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Kazunari; Sakuraba, Haruhiko; Tsuge, Hideaki; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Kawabata, Takeshi; Ohshima, Toshihisa

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of ST1625p, a protein encoded by a hypothetical open reading frame ST1625 in the genome of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii, was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The only sequence similarity exhibited by the amino-acid sequence of ST1625p was a 33% identity with the sequence of SSO0983p from S. solfataricus. The 19 kDa monomeric protein was observed to consist of a right-handed superhelix assembled from a tandem repeat of ten α-­helices. A structural homology search using the DALI and MATRAS algorithms indicates that this protein can be classified as a helical repeat protein. PMID:16511116

  20. Gastric protein hydrolysis of raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Drechsler, Krista C; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, R Paul

    2016-11-15

    Gastric protein hydrolysis may influence gastric emptying rate and subsequent protein digestibility in the small intestine. This study examined the gastric hydrolysis of dietary protein from raw and roasted almonds in the growing pig as a model for the adult human. The gastric hydrolysis of almond proteins was quantified by performing tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent image analysis. There was an interaction between digestion time, stomach region, and almond type for gastric protein hydrolysis (p<0.05). Gastric emptying rate of protein was a significant (p<0.05) covariate in the gastric protein hydrolysis. In general, greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in raw almonds (compared to roasted almonds), hypothesized to be related to structural changes in almond proteins during roasting. Greater gastric protein hydrolysis was observed in the distal stomach (compared to the proximal stomach), likely related to the lower pH in the distal stomach. PMID:27283660

  1. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  2. Functional properties of raw and heat processed cashew nut (Anacardium occidentale, L.) kernel protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Neto, V Q; Narain, N; Silva, J B; Bora, P S

    2001-08-01

    The functional properties viz. solubility, water and oil absorption, emulsifying and foaming capacities of the protein isolates prepared from raw and heat processed cashew nut kernels were evaluated. Protein solubility vs. pH profile showed the isoelectric point at pH 5 for both isolates. The isolate prepared from raw cashew nuts showed superior solubility at and above isoelectric point pH. The water and oil absorption capacities of the proteins were slightly improved by heat treatment of cashew nut kernels. The emulsifying capacity of the isolates showed solubility dependent behavior and was better for raw cashew nut protein isolate at pH 5 and above. However, heat treated cashew nut protein isolate presented better foaming capacity at pH 7 and 8 but both isolates showed extremely low foam stability as compared to that of egg albumin.

  3. Muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed diets containing raw legumes as the main source of protein

    SciTech Connect

    Goena, M.; Santidrian, S.; Cuevillas, F.; Larralde, J.

    1986-03-01

    Although legumes are widely used as protein sources, their effects on protein metabolism remain quite unexplored. The authors have measured the rates of gastrocnemius muscle and liver protein synthesis in growing rats fed ad libitum over periods of 12 days on diets containing raw field bean (Vicia faba L.), raw kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and raw bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia L.) as the major sources of protein. Diets were isocaloric and contained about 12% protein. Protein synthesis was evaluated by the constant-intravenous-infusion method, using L-//sup 14/C/-tyrosine, as well as by the determination of the RNA-activity (g of newly synthesized protein/day/g RNA). Results showed that, as compared to well-fed control animals, those fed the raw legume diets exhibited a marked reduction in the rate of growth with no changes in the amount of food intake (per 100 g b.wt.). These changes were accompanied by a significant reduction in the rate of muscle protein synthesis in all legume-treated rats, being this reduction greater in the animals fed the Ph. vulgaris and V. ervilia diets. Liver protein synthesis was slightly higher in the rats fed the V. faba and V. ervilia diets, and smaller in the Ph. vulgaris-fed rats. It is suggested that both sulfur amino acid deficiency and the presence of different anti-nutritive factors in raw legumes may account for these effects.

  4. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  5. Protein landscape at Drosophila melanogaster telomere-associated sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Antão, José M; Mason, James M; Déjardin, Jérôme; Kingston, Robert E

    2012-06-01

    The specific set of proteins bound at each genomic locus contributes decisively to regulatory processes and to the identity of a cell. Understanding of the function of a particular locus requires the knowledge of what factors interact with that locus and how the protein composition changes in different cell types or during the response to internal and external signals. Proteomic analysis of isolated chromatin segments (PICh) was developed as a tool to target, purify, and identify proteins associated with a defined locus and was shown to allow the purification of human telomeric chromatin. Here we have developed this method to identify proteins that interact with the Drosophila telomere-associated sequence (TAS) repeats. Several of the purified factors were validated as novel TAS-bound proteins by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and the Brahma complex was confirmed as a dominant modifier of telomeric position effect through the use of a genetic test. These results offer information on the efficacy of applying the PICh protocol to loci with sequence more complex than that found at human telomeres and identify proteins that bind to the TAS repeats, which might contribute to TAS biology and chromatin silencing. PMID:22493064

  6. A designed repeat protein as an affinity capture reagent.

    PubMed

    Speltz, Elizabeth B; Brown, Rebecca S H; Hajare, Holly S; Schlieker, Christian; Regan, Lynne

    2015-10-01

    Repeat proteins are an attractive target for protein engineering and design. We have focused our attention on the design and engineering of one particular class: tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins. In previous work, we have shown that the structure and stability of TPR proteins can be manipulated in a rational fashion [Cortajarena (2011) Prot. Sci. 20: , 1042-1047; Main (2003) Structure 11: , 497-508]. Building on those studies, we have designed and characterized a number of different peptide-binding TPR modules and we have also assembled these modules into supramolecular arrays [Cortajarena (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 5: , 545-552; Cortajarena (2008) ACS Chem. Biol. 3: , 161-166; Jackrel (2009) Prot. Sci. 18: , 762-774; Kajander (2007) Acta Crystallogr. D Biol. Crystallogr. 63: , 800-811]. Here we focus on the development of one such TPR-peptide interaction for a practical application, affinity purification. We illustrate the general utility of our designed protein interaction. Furthermore, this example highlights how basic research on protein-peptide interactions can lead to the development of novel reagents with important practical applications. PMID:26517897

  7. Identification of Ige-binding proteins of raw and cooked extracts of Loligo edulis (white squid).

    PubMed

    Yadzir, Zailatul Hani Mohamad; Misnan, Rosmilah; Abdullah, Noormalin; Bakhtiar, Faizal; Arip, Masita; Murad, Shahnaz

    2010-05-01

    Allergy to different classes of mollusks, including squid, which are members of the class Cephalopods has been reported. Tropomyosin, a major muscle protein, is the only well-recognized allergen in squid. The aim of this study was to characterize IgE-binding proteins of local Loligo edulis (white squid) consumed in Malaysia. Protein profiles and IgE-binding proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from 23 patients with positive skin prick test to raw squid extract. SDS-PAGE of the raw extract exhibited 21 protein bands (10-170 kDa) but those ranging from 19 to 29 kDa and 41 to 94 kDa were not found in the cooked extract. Immunoblotting of raw extract demonstrated 16 IgE-binding bands, ranging from 13 to 170 kDa. A heat-resistant 36 kDa protein, corresponding to squid tropomyosin, was identified as the major allergen of both extracts. In addition, a 50 kDa heat-sensitive protein was shown to be a major allergen of the raw extract. Our findings indicate that the allergen extract used for diagnosis of squid allergy should contain both the 36 kDa and 50 kDa proteins.

  8. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  9. Tandem Repeats in Proteins: Prediction Algorithms and Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repetitions in protein sequence and structure is a fascinating subject of research which has been a focus of study since the late 1990s. In this survey, we give an overview on the multi-faceted aspects of research on protein tandem repeats (PTR for short), including prediction algorithms, databases, early classification efforts, mechanisms of PTR formation and evolution, and synthetic PTR design. We also touch on the rather open issue of the relationship between PTR and flexibility (or disorder) in proteins. Detection of PTR either from protein sequence or structure data is challenging due to inherent high (biological) signal-to-noise ratio that is a key feature of this problem. As early in silico analytic tools have been key enablers for starting this field of study, we expect that current and future algorithmic and statistical breakthroughs will have a high impact on the investigations of the biological role of PTR. PMID:26442257

  10. Potential Biomarker of Myofibrillar Protein Oxidation in Raw and Cooked Ham: 3-Nitrotyrosine Formed by Nitrosation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xianchao; Li, Chenyi; Ullah, Niamat; Hackman, Robert M; Chen, Lin; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-12-30

    The stability of cured meat products is increased by the protection of its proteins from oxidation by sodium nitrite (NaNO2) during processing. This study investigated the effects of NaNO2 (0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) on the physiochemical and structural characteristics of myofibrillar protein (MP) in raw and cooked ham. The NaNO2 showed a dose-dependent antioxidant effect, by inhibiting carbonyl formation, dityrosine formation, and denaturation of MP, and a nitrosative effect, through the formation of 3-Nitrotyrosine (3-NT). The 3-NT content within MP of raw ham had distinct negative correlations with sulfhydryl content and surface hydrophobicity. The 3-NT content within MP of cooked ham had significantly negative correlations with carbonyl, sulfhydryl content and turbidity and had significantly positive correlations with disulfide content. These results indicated that 3-NT may be a potential marker for protein oxidation in raw and cooked cured meat products. PMID:26593775

  11. Analyses of Physcomitrella patens Ankyrin Repeat Proteins by Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Niaz; Tamanna, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrin (ANK) repeat containing proteins are evolutionary conserved and have functions in crucial cellular processes like cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. In this study, through an entirely in silico approach using the first release of the moss genome annotation, we found that at least 54 ANK proteins are present in P. patens. Based on their differential domain composition, the identified ANK proteins were classified into nine subfamilies. Comparative analysis of the different subfamilies of ANK proteins revealed that P. patens contains almost all the known subgroups of ANK proteins found in the other angiosperm species except for the ones having the TPR domain. Phylogenetic analysis using full length protein sequences supported the subfamily classification where the members of the same subfamily almost always clustered together. Synonymous divergence (dS) and nonsynonymous divergence (dN) ratios showed positive selection for the ANK genes of P. patens which probably helped them to attain significant functional diversity during the course of evolution. Taken together, the data provided here can provide useful insights for future functional studies of the proteins from this superfamily as well as comparative studies of ANK proteins. PMID:27429806

  12. Pro-inflammatory effects of a litchi protein extract in murine RAW264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Hu, Xiaorong; Yan, Huiqing; Ma, Zhaocheng; Deng, Xiuxin

    2016-01-01

    It has been observed that the consumption of litchi often causes symptoms characterized by itching or sore throat, gum swelling, oral cavity ulcers and even fever and inflammation, which significantly impair the quality of life of a large population. Using the RAW264.7 cell line, a step-by-step strategy was used to screen for the components in litchi fruits that elicited adverse reactions. The adverse reaction fractions were identified by mass spectrometry and analyzed using the SMART program, and a sequence alignment of the homologous proteins was performed. MTT tests were used to determine the cytotoxicity of a litchi protein extract in RAW264.7 macrophages, and real-time PCR was applied to analyze the expression of inflammatory genes in the RAW264.7 cells treated with lipopolysaccharide or the litchi protein extract. The results showed that the litchi water-soluble protein extract could increase the production of the pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2, and the anti-inflammatory mediator HO-1 in the RAW264.7 cell line. The 14-3-3-like proteins GF14 lambda, GF14 omega and GF14 upsilon were likely the candidate proteins that caused the adverse effects. PMID:27195125

  13. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2015-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein-protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  14. Expansion and Function of Repeat Domain Proteins During Stress and Development in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manisha; Pandey, Girdhar K.

    2016-01-01

    The recurrent repeats having conserved stretches of amino acids exists across all domains of life. Subsequent repetition of single sequence motif and the number and length of the minimal repeating motifs are essential characteristics innate to these proteins. The proteins with tandem peptide repeats are essential for providing surface to mediate protein–protein interactions for fundamental biological functions. Plants are enriched in tandem repeat containing proteins typically distributed into various families. This has been assumed that the occurrence of multigene repeats families in plants enable them to cope up with adverse environmental conditions and allow them to rapidly acclimatize to these conditions. The evolution, structure, and function of repeat proteins have been studied in all kingdoms of life. The presence of repeat proteins is particularly profuse in multicellular organisms in comparison to prokaryotes. The precipitous expansion of repeat proteins in plants is presumed to be through internal tandem duplications. Several repeat protein gene families have been identified in plants. Such as Armadillo (ARM), Ankyrin (ANK), HEAT, Kelch-like repeats, Tetratricopeptide (TPR), Leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40, and Pentatricopeptide repeats (PPR). The structure and functions of these repeat proteins have been extensively studied in plants suggesting a critical role of these repeating peptides in plant cell physiology, stress and development. In this review, we illustrate the structural, functional, and evolutionary prospects of prolific repeat proteins in plants. PMID:26793205

  15. Biomolecular templating of functional hybrid nanostructures using repeat protein scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Romera, David; Couleaud, Pierre; Mejias, Sara H; Aires, Antonio; Cortajarena, Aitziber L

    2015-10-01

    The precise synthesis of materials and devices with tailored complex structures and properties is a requisite for the development of the next generation of products based on nanotechnology. Nowadays, the technology for the generation of this type of devices lacks the precision to determine their properties and is accomplished mostly by 'trial and error' experimental approaches. The use of bottom-up approaches that rely on highly specific biomolecular interactions of small and simple components is an attractive approach for the templating of nanoscale elements. In nature, protein assemblies define complex structures and functions. Engineering novel bio-inspired assemblies by exploiting the same rules and interactions that encode the natural diversity is an emerging field that opens the door to create nanostructures with numerous potential applications in synthetic biology and nanotechnology. Self-assembly of biological molecules into defined functional structures has a tremendous potential in nano-patterning and the design of novel materials and functional devices. Molecular self-assembly is a process by which complex 3D structures with specified functions are constructed from simple molecular building blocks. Here we discuss the basis of biomolecular templating, the great potential of repeat proteins as building blocks for biomolecular templating and nano-patterning. In particular, we focus on the designed consensus tetratricopeptide repeats (CTPRs), the control on the assembly of these proteins into higher order structures and their potential as building blocks in order to generate functional nanostructures and materials.

  16. Coordinate control of terminal dendrite patterning and dynamics by the membrane protein Raw

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiae; Peng, Yun; Lin, Wen-Yang; Parrish, Jay Z.

    2015-01-01

    The directional flow of information in neurons depends on compartmentalization: dendrites receive inputs whereas axons transmit them. Axons and dendrites likewise contain structurally and functionally distinct subcompartments. Axon/dendrite compartmentalization can be attributed to neuronal polarization, but the developmental origin of subcompartments in axons and dendrites is less well understood. To identify the developmental bases for compartment-specific patterning in dendrites, we screened for mutations that affect discrete dendritic domains in Drosophila sensory neurons. From this screen, we identified mutations that affected distinct aspects of terminal dendrite development with little or no effect on major dendrite patterning. Mutation of one gene, raw, affected multiple aspects of terminal dendrite patterning, suggesting that Raw might coordinate multiple signaling pathways to shape terminal dendrite growth. Consistent with this notion, Raw localizes to branch-points and promotes dendrite stabilization together with the Tricornered (Trc) kinase via effects on cell adhesion. Raw independently influences terminal dendrite elongation through a mechanism that involves modulation of the cytoskeleton, and this pathway is likely to involve the RNA-binding protein Argonaute 1 (AGO1), as raw and AGO1 genetically interact to promote terminal dendrite growth but not adhesion. Thus, Raw defines a potential point of convergence in distinct pathways shaping terminal dendrite patterning. PMID:25480915

  17. Deep conservation of human protein tandem repeats within the eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schaper, Elke; Gascuel, Olivier; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are a major element of protein sequences in all domains of life. They are particularly abundant in mammals, where by conservative estimates one in three proteins contain a TR. High generation-scale duplication and deletion rates were reported for nucleic TR units. However, it is not known whether protein TR units can also be frequently lost or gained providing a source of variation for rapid adaptation of protein function, or alternatively, tend to have conserved TR unit configurations over long evolutionary times. To obtain a systematic picture, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of the mode of evolution for human protein TRs. For this purpose, we propose a novel method for the detection of orthologous TRs based on circular profile hidden Markov models. For all detected TRs, we reconstructed bispecies TR unit phylogenies across 61 eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Moreover, we performed additional analyses to correlate functional and structural annotations of human TRs with their mode of evolution. Surprisingly, we find that the vast majority of human TRs are ancient, with TR unit number and order preserved intact since distant speciation events. For example, ≥ 61% of all human TRs have been strongly conserved at least since the root of all mammals, approximately 300 Ma. Further, we find no human protein TR that shows evidence for strong recent duplications and deletions. The results are in contrast to the high generation-scale mutability of nucleic TRs. Presumably, most protein TRs fold into stable and conserved structures that are indispensable for the function of the TR-containing protein. All of our data and results are available for download from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/TRE.

  18. Deep Conservation of Human Protein Tandem Repeats within the Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, Elke; Gascuel, Olivier; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are a major element of protein sequences in all domains of life. They are particularly abundant in mammals, where by conservative estimates one in three proteins contain a TR. High generation-scale duplication and deletion rates were reported for nucleic TR units. However, it is not known whether protein TR units can also be frequently lost or gained providing a source of variation for rapid adaptation of protein function, or alternatively, tend to have conserved TR unit configurations over long evolutionary times. To obtain a systematic picture, we performed a proteome-wide analysis of the mode of evolution for human protein TRs. For this purpose, we propose a novel method for the detection of orthologous TRs based on circular profile hidden Markov models. For all detected TRs, we reconstructed bispecies TR unit phylogenies across 61 eukaryotes ranging from human to yeast. Moreover, we performed additional analyses to correlate functional and structural annotations of human TRs with their mode of evolution. Surprisingly, we find that the vast majority of human TRs are ancient, with TR unit number and order preserved intact since distant speciation events. For example, ≥61% of all human TRs have been strongly conserved at least since the root of all mammals, approximately 300 Ma. Further, we find no human protein TR that shows evidence for strong recent duplications and deletions. The results are in contrast to the high generation-scale mutability of nucleic TRs. Presumably, most protein TRs fold into stable and conserved structures that are indispensable for the function of the TR-containing protein. All of our data and results are available for download from http://www.atgc-montpellier.fr/TRE. PMID:24497029

  19. Reduced hnRNPA3 increases C9orf72 repeat RNA levels and dipeptide-repeat protein deposition.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohji; Nihei, Yoshihiro; Arzberger, Thomas; Zhou, Qihui; Mackenzie, Ian R; Hermann, Andreas; Hanisch, Frank; Kamp, Frits; Nuscher, Brigitte; Orozco, Denise; Edbauer, Dieter; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Intronic hexanucleotide (G4C2) repeat expansions in C9orf72 are genetically associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The repeat RNA accumulates within RNA foci but is also translated into disease characterizing dipeptide repeat proteins (DPR). Repeat-dependent toxicity may affect nuclear import. hnRNPA3 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, which specifically binds to the G4C2 repeat RNA We now report that a reduction of nuclear hnRNPA3 leads to an increase of the repeat RNA as well as DPR production and deposition in primary neurons and a novel tissue culture model that reproduces features of the C9orf72 pathology. In fibroblasts derived from patients carrying extended C9orf72 repeats, nuclear RNA foci accumulated upon reduction of hnRNPA3. Neurons in the hippocampus of C9orf72 patients are frequently devoid of hnRNPA3. Reduced nuclear hnRNPA3 in the hippocampus of patients with extended C9orf72 repeats correlates with increased DPR deposition. Thus, reduced hnRNPA3 expression in C9orf72 cases leads to increased levels of the repeat RNA as well as enhanced production and deposition of DPR proteins and RNA foci. PMID:27461252

  20. Ankyrin-repeat proteins from sponge symbionts modulate amoebal phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mary T H D; Liu, Michael; Thomas, Torsten

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria-eukaryote symbiosis occurs in all stages of evolution, from simple amoebae to mammals, and from facultative to obligate associations. Sponges are ancient metazoans that form intimate symbiotic interactions with complex communities of bacteria. The basic nutritional requirements of the sponge are in part satisfied by the phagocytosis of bacterial food particles from the surrounding water. How bacterial symbionts, which are permanently associated with the sponge, survive in the presence of phagocytic cells is largely unknown. Here, we present the discovery of a genomic fragment from an uncultured gamma-proteobacterial sponge symbiont that encodes for four proteins, whose closest known relatives are found in a sponge genome. Through recombinant approaches, we show that these four eukaryotic-like, ankyrin-repeat proteins (ARP) when expressed in Eschericha coli can modulate phagocytosis of amoebal cells and lead to accumulation of bacteria in the phagosome. Mechanistically, two ARPs appear to interfere with phagosome development in a similar way to reduced vacuole acidification, by blocking the fusion of the early phagosome with the lysosome and its digestive enzymes. Our results show that ARP from sponge symbionts can function to interfere with phagocytosis, and we postulate that this might be one mechanism by which symbionts can escape digestion in a sponge host.

  1. Locating tandem repeats in weighted sequences in proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Guo, Qing; Iliopoulos, Costas S

    2013-01-01

    A weighted biological sequence is a string in which a set of characters may appear at each position with respective probabilities of occurrence. We attempt to locate all the tandem repeats in a weighted sequence. A repeated substring is called a tandem repeat if each occurrence of the substring is directly adjacent to each other. By introducing the idea of equivalence classes in weighted sequences, we identify the tandem repeats of every possible length using an iterative partitioning technique. We also present the algorithm for recording the tandem repeats, and prove that the problem can be solved in O(n²) time. PMID:23815711

  2. Pre-freezing raw hams affects quality traits in cooked hams: potential influence of protein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Utrera, M; Armenteros, M; Ventanas, S; Solano, F; Estévez, M

    2012-12-01

    The influence of protein carbonylation and lipid oxidation on colour and texture changes in cooked hams from fresh and pre-frozen (frozen/thawed) raw material was studied. Samples from three muscles, biceps femoris (BF) quadriceps femoris (QF) and semimembranosus (SM) were analysed for the gain of specific protein carbonyls, α-aminoadipic and γ-glutamic semialdehydes, the gain of TBA-RS and their colour and texture properties by instrumental and sensory techniques. The formation of protein carbonyls occurred concomitantly with an intense loss of redness and increase of hardness. Both phenomena were found to be more intense in QF and SM muscles in cooked hams elaborated from frozen material. Lipid oxidation played a negligible role on the impaired quality traits observed in cooked hams as a result of pre-freezing. Plausible mechanisms by which protein carbonylation may be implicated in the loss of quality in cooked hams produced from pre-frozen material are discussed.

  3. Rational design of alpha-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Bradley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials1,2. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks3,4. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures – which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks – is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners5–9, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis10. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed alpha-solenoid11 repeat structures (alpha-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the N- and C-termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering12–20, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed alpha-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that – to our knowledge – is not yet present in the protein structure database21. PMID:26675735

  4. Rational design of α-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L; Bradley, Philip

    2015-12-24

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures--which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks--is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed α-solenoid repeat structures (α-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed α-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that--to our knowledge--is not yet present in the protein structure database.

  5. Free fatty acid particles in protein formulations, part 2: contribution of polysorbate raw material.

    PubMed

    Siska, Christine C; Pierini, Christopher J; Lau, Hollis R; Latypov, Ramil F; Fesinmeyer, R Matthew; Litowski, Jennifer R

    2015-02-01

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20) is a nonionic surfactant frequently used to stabilize protein biopharmaceuticals. During the development of mAb formulations containing PS20, small clouds of particles were observed in solutions stored in vials. The degree of particle formation was dependent on PS20 concentration. The particles were characterized by reversed-phase HPLC after dissolution and labeling with the fluorescent dye 1-pyrenyldiazomethane. The analysis showed that the particles consisted of free fatty acids (FFAs), with the distribution of types consistent with those found in the PS20 raw material. Protein solutions formulated with polysorbate 80, a chemically similar nonionic surfactant, showed a substantial delay in particle formation over time compared with PS20. Multiple lots of polysorbates were evaluated for FFA levels, each exhibiting differences based on polysorbate type and lot. Polysorbates purchased in more recent years show a greater distribution and quantity of FFA and also a greater propensity to form particles. This work shows that the quality control of polysorbate raw materials could play an important role in biopharmaceutical product quality.

  6. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins): binding proteins for research, diagnostics, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Plückthun, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) can recognize targets with specificities and affinities that equal or surpass those of antibodies, but because of their robustness and extreme stability, they allow a multitude of more advanced formats and applications. This review highlights recent advances in DARPin design, illustrates their properties, and gives some examples of their use. In research, they have been established as intracellular, real-time sensors of protein conformations and as crystallization chaperones. For future therapies, DARPins have been developed by advanced, structure-based protein engineering to selectively induce apoptosis in tumors by uncoupling surface receptors from their signaling cascades. They have also been used successfully for retargeting viruses. In ongoing clinical trials, DARPins have shown good safety and efficacy in macular degeneration diseases. These developments all ultimately exploit the high stability, solubility, and aggregation resistance of these molecules, permitting a wide range of conjugates and fusions to be produced and purified.

  7. Tetratricopeptide repeat protein-associated proteins contribute to the virulence of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshio; Ohara, Naoya; Sato, Keiko; Yoshimura, Mamiko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Naito, Mariko; Fujiwara, Taku; Nakayama, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the most etiologically important microorganisms in periodontal disease. We found in a previous study that PG1385 (TprA) protein, a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein, was upregulated in P. gingivalis wild-type cells placed in a mouse subcutaneous chamber and that a tprA mutant was clearly less virulent in the mouse subcutaneous abscess model (M. Yoshimura et al., Oral Microbiol. Immunol. 23:413-418, 2008). In the present study, we investigated the gene expression profile of tprA mutant cells placed in a mouse subcutaneous chamber and found that 9 genes, including PG2102 (tapA), PG2101 (tapB), and PG2100 (tapC) genes, were downregulated in the tprA mutant compared with those in the wild type. Expression of a cluster of tapA, tapB, and tapC genes of the mutant was also downregulated in an in vitro culture with enriched brain heart infusion medium. The TprA protein has three TPR motifs known as a protein-protein interaction module. Yeast two-hybrid system analysis and in vitro protein binding assays with immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance detection revealed that the TprA protein could bind to TapA and TapB proteins. TprA and TapB proteins were located in the periplasmic space, whereas TapA, which appeared to be one of the C-terminal domain family proteins, was located at the outer membrane. We constructed tapA, tapB, and tapC single mutants and a tapA-tapB-tapC deletion mutant. In the mouse subcutaneous infection experiment, all of the mutants were less virulent than the wild type. These results suggest that TprA, TapA, TapB, and TapC are cooperatively involved in P. gingivalis virulence. PMID:20351137

  8. Functional insights from the distribution and role of homopeptide repeat-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Faux, Noel G; Bottomley, Stephen P; Lesk, Arthur M; Irving, James A; Morrison, John R; de la Banda, Maria Garcia; Whisstock, James C

    2005-04-01

    Expansion of "low complex" repeats of amino acids such as glutamine (Poly-Q) is associated with protein misfolding and the development of degenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. The mechanism by which such regions promote misfolding remains controversial, the function of many repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) remains obscure, and the role (if any) of repeat regions remains to be determined. Here, a Web-accessible database of RCPs is presented. The distribution and evolution of RCPs that contain homopeptide repeats tracts are considered, and the existence of functional patterns investigated. Generally, it is found that while polyamino acid repeats are extremely rare in prokaryotes, several eukaryote putative homologs of prokaryote RCP-involved in important housekeeping processes-retain the repetitive region, suggesting an ancient origin for certain repeats. Within eukarya, the most common uninterrupted amino acid repeats are glutamine, asparagines, and alanine. Interestingly, while poly-Q repeats are found in vertebrates and nonvertebrates, poly-N repeats are only common in more primitive nonvertebrate organisms, such as insects and nematodes. We have assigned function to eukaryote RCPs using Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), the Human Reference Protein Database (HRPD), FlyBase, and Wormpep. Prokaryote RCPs were annotated using BLASTp searches and Gene Ontology. These data reveal that the majority of RCPs are involved in processes that require the assembly of large, multiprotein complexes, such as transcription and signaling.

  9. Label-free detection repeatability of protein microarrays by oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jun; Li, Lin; Wang, JingYi; He, LiPing; Lu, HuiBin; Ruan, KangCheng; Jin, KuiJuan; Yang, GuoZhen

    2012-12-01

    We examine the repeatabilities of oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) method for label-free detecting biological molecular interaction using protein microarrays. The experimental results show that the repeatabilities are the same in a given microarray or microarray-microarray and are consistent, indicating that OIRD is a promising label-free detection technique for biological microarrays.

  10. De-coding and re-coding RNA recognition by PUF and PPR repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Hall, Traci M Tanaka

    2016-02-01

    PUF and PPR proteins are two families of α-helical repeat proteins that recognize single-stranded RNA sequences. Both protein families hold promise as scaffolds for designed RNA-binding domains. A modular protein RNA recognition code was apparent from the first crystal structures of a PUF protein in complex with RNA, and recent studies continue to advance our understanding of natural PUF protein recognition (de-coding) and our ability to engineer specificity (re-coding). Degenerate recognition motifs make de-coding specificity of individual PPR proteins challenging. Nevertheless, re-coding PPR protein specificity using a consensus recognition code has been successful.

  11. The design and structural characterization of a synthetic pentatricopeptide repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Gully, Benjamin S; Shah, Kunal R; Lee, Mihwa; Shearston, Kate; Smith, Nicole M; Sadowska, Agata; Blythe, Amanda J; Bernath-Levin, Kalia; Stanley, Will A; Small, Ian D; Bond, Charles S

    2015-02-01

    Proteins of the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) superfamily are characterized by tandem arrays of a degenerate 35-amino-acid α-hairpin motif. PPR proteins are typically single-stranded RNA-binding proteins with essential roles in organelle biogenesis, RNA editing and mRNA maturation. A modular, predictable code for sequence-specific binding of RNA by PPR proteins has recently been revealed, which opens the door to the de novo design of bespoke proteins with specific RNA targets, with widespread biotechnological potential. Here, the design and production of a synthetic PPR protein based on a consensus sequence and the determination of its crystal structure to 2.2 Å resolution are described. The crystal structure displays helical disorder, resulting in electron density representing an infinite superhelical PPR protein. A structural comparison with related tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins, and with native PPR proteins, reveals key roles for conserved residues in directing the structure and function of PPR proteins. The designed proteins have high solubility and thermal stability, and can form long tracts of PPR repeats. Thus, consensus-sequence synthetic PPR proteins could provide a suitable backbone for the design of bespoke RNA-binding proteins with the potential for high specificity.

  12. Repeat protein engineering: creating functional nanostructures/biomaterials from modular building blocks.

    PubMed

    Main, Ewan R G; Phillips, Jonathan J; Millership, Charlotte

    2013-10-01

    There is enormous interest in molecular self-assembly and the development of biological systems to form smart nanostructures for biotechnology (so-called 'bottom-up fabrications'). Repeat proteins are ideal choices for development of such systems as they: (i) possess a relatively simple relationship between sequence, structure and function; (ii) are modular and non-globular in structure; (iii) act as diverse scaffolds for the mediation of a diverse range of protein-protein interactions; and (iv) have been extensively studied and successfully engineered and designed. In the present review, we summarize recent advances in the use of engineered repeat proteins in the self-assembly of novel materials, nanostructures and biosensors. In particular, we show that repeat proteins are excellent monomeric programmable building blocks that can be triggered to associate into a range of morphologies and can readily be engineered as stimuli-responsive biofunctional materials.

  13. Spontaneous self-assembly of engineered armadillo repeat protein fragments into a folded structure.

    PubMed

    Watson, Randall P; Christen, Martin T; Ewald, Christina; Bumbak, Fabian; Reichen, Christian; Mihajlovic, Maja; Schmidt, Elena; Güntert, Peter; Caflisch, Amedeo; Plückthun, Andreas; Zerbe, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    Repeat proteins are built of modules, each of which constitutes a structural motif. We have investigated whether fragments of a designed consensus armadillo repeat protein (ArmRP) recognize each other. We examined a split ArmRP consisting of an N-capping repeat (denoted Y), three internal repeats (M), and a C-capping repeat (A). We demonstrate that the C-terminal MA fragment adopts a fold similar to the corresponding part of the entire protein. In contrast, the N-terminal YM2 fragment constitutes a molten globule. The two fragments form a 1:1 YM2:MA complex with a nanomolar dissociation constant essentially identical to the crystal structure of the continuous YM3A protein. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the complex is structurally stable over a 1 μs timescale and reveal the importance of hydrophobic contacts across the interface. We propose that the existence of a stable complex recapitulates possible intermediates in the early evolution of these repeat proteins. PMID:24931467

  14. A MORN Repeat Protein Facilitates Protein Entry into the Flagellar Pocket of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma brucei lives in the bloodstream of infected mammalian hosts, fully exposed to the adaptive immune system. It relies on a very high rate of endocytosis to clear bound antibodies from its cell surface. All endo- and exocytosis occurs at a single site on its plasma membrane, an intracellular invagination termed the flagellar pocket. Coiled around the neck of the flagellar pocket is a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein T. brucei MORN1 (TbMORN1). In this study, the phenotypic effects of TbMORN1 depletion in the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei were analyzed. Depletion of TbMORN1 resulted in a rapid enlargement of the flagellar pocket. Dextran, a polysaccharide marker for fluid phase endocytosis, accumulated inside the enlarged flagellar pocket. Unexpectedly, however, the proteins concanavalin A and bovine serum albumin did not do so, and concanavalin A was instead found to concentrate outside it. This suggests that TbMORN1 may have a role in facilitating the entry of proteins into the flagellar pocket. PMID:26318396

  15. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats.

    PubMed

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as "junk" sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in shaping

  16. Molecular tandem repeat strategy for elucidating mechanical properties of high-strength proteins.

    PubMed

    Jung, Huihun; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Saadat, Alham; Sebastian, Aswathy; Kim, Dong Hwan; Hamilton, Reginald F; Albert, Istvan; Allen, Benjamin D; Demirel, Melik C

    2016-06-01

    Many globular and structural proteins have repetitions in their sequences or structures. However, a clear relationship between these repeats and their contribution to the mechanical properties remains elusive. We propose a new approach for the design and production of synthetic polypeptides that comprise one or more tandem copies of a single unit with distinct amorphous and ordered regions. Our designed sequences are based on a structural protein produced in squid suction cups that has a segmented copolymer structure with amorphous and crystalline domains. We produced segmented polypeptides with varying repeat number, while keeping the lengths and compositions of the amorphous and crystalline regions fixed. We showed that mechanical properties of these synthetic proteins could be tuned by modulating their molecular weights. Specifically, the toughness and extensibility of synthetic polypeptides increase as a function of the number of tandem repeats. This result suggests that the repetitions in native squid proteins could have a genetic advantage for increased toughness and flexibility. PMID:27222581

  17. Conformational modulation mediated by polyglutamine expansion in CAG repeat expansion disease-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Verani, Margherita; Bustamante, Maria; Martufi, Paola; Daldin, Manuel; Cariulo, Cristina; Azzollini, Lucia; Fodale, Valentina; Puglisi, Francesca; Weiss, Andreas; Macdonald, Douglas; Petricca, Lara; Caricasole, Andrea

    2016-09-16

    We have previously reported TR-FRET based immunoassays to detect a conformational change imparted on huntingtin protein by the polyglutamine expansion, which we confirmed using biophysical methodologies. Using these immunoassays, we now report that polyglutamine expansion influences the conformational properties of other polyglutamine disease proteins, exemplified by the androgen receptor (associated with spinal bulbar muscular atrophy) and TATA binding protein (associated with spinocerebellar ataxia 17). Using artificial constructs bearing short or long polyglutamine expansions or a multimerized, unrelated epitope (mimicking the increase in anti-polyglutamine antibody epitopes present in polyglutamine repeats of increasing length) we confirmed that the conformational TR-FRET based immunoassay detects an intrinsic conformational property of polyglutamine repeats. The TR-FRET based conformational immunoassay may represent a rapid, scalable tool to identify modulators of polyglutamine-mediated conformational change in different proteins associated with CAG triplet repeat disorders. PMID:27520369

  18. Differential interaction and aggregation of 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau isoforms with 14-3-3{zeta} protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sadik, Golam; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kato, Kiyoko; Yanagi, Kentaro; Kudo, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-05-22

    Tau isoforms, 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat tau (4R), are differentially involved in neuronal development and in several tauopathies. 14-3-3 protein binds to tau and 14-3-3/tau association has been found both in the development and in tauopathies. To understand the role of 14-3-3 in the differential regulation of tau isoforms, we have performed studies on the interaction and aggregation of 3R-tau and 4R-tau, either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated, with 14-3-3{zeta}. We show by surface plasmon resonance studies that the interaction between unphosphorylated 3R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta} is {approx}3-folds higher than that between unphosphorylated 4R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta}. Phosphorylation of tau by protein kinase A (PKA) increases the affinity of both 3R- and 4R-tau for 14-3-3{zeta} to a similar level. An in vitro aggregation assay employing both transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the aggregation of unphosphorylated 4R-tau to be significantly higher than that of unphosphorylated 3R-tau following the induction of 14-3-3{zeta}. The filaments formed from 3R- and 4R-tau were almost similar in morphology. In contrast, the aggregation of both 3R- and 4R-tau was reduced to a similar low level after phosphorylation with PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3{zeta} exhibits a similar role for tau isoforms after PKA-phosphorylation, but a differential role for unphosphorylated tau. The significant aggregation of 4R-tau by 14-3-3{zeta} suggests that 14-3-3 may act as an inducer in the generation of 4R-tau-predominant neurofibrillary tangles in tauopathies.

  19. Sequestration of multiple RNA recognition motif-containing proteins by C9orf72 repeat expansions

    PubMed Central

    Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Walsh, Matthew J.; Higginbottom, Adrian; Robin Highley, J.; Dickman, Mark J.; Edbauer, Dieter; Ince, Paul G.; Wharton, Stephen B.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Kirby, Janine; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.

    2014-01-01

    GGGGCC repeat expansions of C9orf72 represent the most common genetic variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration, but the mechanism of pathogenesis is unclear. Recent reports have suggested that the transcribed repeat might form toxic RNA foci that sequester various RNA processing proteins. Consensus as to the identity of the binding partners is missing and whole neuronal proteome investigation is needed. Using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization we first identified nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA foci in peripheral and central nervous system biosamples from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72+), but not from those patients without a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72−) or control subjects. Moreover, in the cases examined, the distribution of foci-positive neurons correlated with the clinical phenotype (t-test P < 0.05). As expected, RNA foci are ablated by RNase treatment. Interestingly, we identified foci in fibroblasts from an asymptomatic C9orf72+ carrier. We next performed pulldown assays, with GGGGCC5, in conjunction with mass spectrometry analysis, to identify candidate binding partners of the GGGGCC repeat expansion. Proteins containing RNA recognition motifs and involved in splicing, messenger RNA nuclear export and/or translation were significantly enriched. Immunohistochemistry in central nervous system tissue from C9orf72+ patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis demonstrated co-localization of RNA foci with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F, ALYREF and hnRNP A1 in cerebellar granule cells and with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F and ALYREF in motor neurons, the primary target of pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Direct binding of proteins to GGGGCC repeat RNA was confirmed in vitro by ultraviolet-crosslinking assays. Co-localization was only detected in a small proportion of RNA foci, suggesting dynamic sequestration rather than irreversible binding. Additional immunohistochemistry

  20. Sequestration of multiple RNA recognition motif-containing proteins by C9orf72 repeat expansions.

    PubMed

    Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Walsh, Matthew J; Higginbottom, Adrian; Robin Highley, J; Dickman, Mark J; Edbauer, Dieter; Ince, Paul G; Wharton, Stephen B; Wilson, Stuart A; Kirby, Janine; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Shaw, Pamela J

    2014-07-01

    GGGGCC repeat expansions of C9orf72 represent the most common genetic variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal degeneration, but the mechanism of pathogenesis is unclear. Recent reports have suggested that the transcribed repeat might form toxic RNA foci that sequester various RNA processing proteins. Consensus as to the identity of the binding partners is missing and whole neuronal proteome investigation is needed. Using RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization we first identified nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA foci in peripheral and central nervous system biosamples from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72+), but not from those patients without a repeat expansion of C9orf72 (C9orf72-) or control subjects. Moreover, in the cases examined, the distribution of foci-positive neurons correlated with the clinical phenotype (t-test P < 0.05). As expected, RNA foci are ablated by RNase treatment. Interestingly, we identified foci in fibroblasts from an asymptomatic C9orf72+ carrier. We next performed pulldown assays, with GGGGCC5, in conjunction with mass spectrometry analysis, to identify candidate binding partners of the GGGGCC repeat expansion. Proteins containing RNA recognition motifs and involved in splicing, messenger RNA nuclear export and/or translation were significantly enriched. Immunohistochemistry in central nervous system tissue from C9orf72+ patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis demonstrated co-localization of RNA foci with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F, ALYREF and hnRNP A1 in cerebellar granule cells and with SRSF2, hnRNP H1/F and ALYREF in motor neurons, the primary target of pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Direct binding of proteins to GGGGCC repeat RNA was confirmed in vitro by ultraviolet-crosslinking assays. Co-localization was only detected in a small proportion of RNA foci, suggesting dynamic sequestration rather than irreversible binding. Additional immunohistochemistry

  1. The alpha-subunit of protein prenyltransferases is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Grishin, N V

    1999-08-01

    Lipidation catalyzed by protein prenyltransferases is essential for the biological function of a number of eukaryotic proteins, many of which are involved in signal transduction and vesicular traffic regulation. Sequence similarity searches reveal that the alpha-subunit of protein prenyltransferases (PTalpha) is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) superfamily. This finding makes the three-dimensional structure of the rat protein farnesyltransferase the first structural model of a TPR protein interacting with its protein partner. Structural comparison of the two TPR domains in protein farnesyltransferase and protein phosphatase 5 indicates that variation in TPR consensus residues may affect protein binding specificity through altering the overall shape of the TPR superhelix. A general approach to evolutionary analysis of proteins with repetitive sequence motifs has been developed and applied to the protein prenyltransferases and other TPR proteins. The results suggest that all members in PTalpha family originated from a common multirepeat ancestor, while the common ancestor of PTalpha and other members of TPR superfamily is likely to be a single repeat protein.

  2. HHrep: de novo protein repeat detection and the origin of TIM barrels.

    PubMed

    Söding, Johannes; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas

    2006-07-01

    HHrep is a web server for the de novo identification of repeats in protein sequences, which is based on the pairwise comparison of profile hidden Markov models (HMMs). Its main strength is its sensitivity, allowing it to detect highly divergent repeat units in protein sequences whose repeats could as yet only be detected from their structures. Examples include sequences with beta-propellor fold, ferredoxin-like fold, double psi barrels or (betaalpha)8 (TIM) barrels. We illustrate this with proteins from four superfamilies of TIM barrels by revealing a clear 4- and 8-fold symmetry, which we detect solely from their sequences. This symmetry might be the trace of an ancient origin through duplication of a betaalphabetaalpha or betaalpha unit. HHrep can be accessed at http://hhrep.tuebingen.mpg.de.

  3. Intermediates in the folding equilibrium of repeat proteins from the TPR family.

    PubMed

    González-Charro, Vicente; Rey, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    In recent decades, advances in computational methods and experimental biophysical techniques have improved our understanding of protein folding. Although some of these advances have been remarkable, the structural variability of globular proteins usually encountered makes it difficult to extract general features of their folding processes. To overcome this difficulty, experimental and computational studies of the folding of repeat (or modular) proteins are of interest. Because their native structures can be described as linear arrays of the same, repeated, supersecondary structure unit, it is possible to seek a possibly independent behavior of the different modules without taking into account the intrinsic stability associated with different secondary structure motifs. In this work we have used a Monte Carlo-based simulation to study the folding equilibrium of four repeat proteins belonging to the tetratricopeptide repeat family. Our studies provide new insights into their energy profiles, enabling investigation about the existence of intermediate states and their relative stabilities. We have also performed structural analyses to describe the structure of these intermediates, going through the vast number of conformations obtained from the simulations. In this way, we have tried to identify the regions of each protein in which the modular structure yields a different behavior and, more specifically, regions of the proteins that can stay folded when the rest of the chain has been thermally denatured.

  4. Serum proteins and some biochemical parameters in broiler chickens fed with raw and treated bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) seeds.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Gh; Pourreza, J

    2007-03-15

    This study carried out to evaluate the effect of bitter vetch seeds on serum proteins and biochemical parameters in broiler chickens. A total of 1320 one-day-old broiler chicks of a commercial breed were placed in 64 pens. Treatments were included raw and four different processed bitter vetch seeds in three levels (150, 300 and 450 g kg(-1)) and a corn-soybean based diet as control. Each treatment group consisted of four replicates. Processing methods were included soaked in water for 12 h, autoclaved, then dried at room temperature (SAD); ground, soaked in water for 24 h, autoclaved and dried (GSAD); ground, soaked in water for 47 h with exchange water every 12 h, cooked and dried (GSCD) and ground, soaked at 1% acetic acid solution for 24 h at 60 degrees C (AA). Feeding raw, AA and GSAD seeds decreased serum albumin significantly (p<0.05) in 21-days-old chicks. Chickens that fed with raw and treated bitter vetch seed had lower alpha 1 and gamma globulins than control (p<0.05). Increasing raw and treated bitter vetch seeds from 15 to 30 and 45% decreased albumin, alpha 1 and gamma globulins and increased alpha 2 and beta globulins significantly (p<0.05). In 14-days-old chicks feeding raw and treated biter vetch had no effect on serum urea, but uric acid concentration decreased significantly (p<0.05). Feeding SAD seeds increased serum urea significantly (p<0.05), but uric acid concentration did not change with feeding raw and treated bitter vetch seeds in 42-day-old chicks. Adding raw and treated bitter vetch seeds to diet increased T4 and decreased T3 concentrations in all ages. At 28-days-old chicks, feeding raw and treated biter vetch seeds decreased alkaline phosphatase concentration significantly than control. Results showed that raw bitter vetch seeds have some toxic effects on metabolism in broiler chickens and GSCD and SAD treatments were more effective to detoxification of this seed.

  5. Purification of proteins specifically binding human endogenous retrovirus K long terminal repeat by affinity elution chromatography.

    PubMed

    Trubetskoy, D O; Zavalova, L L; Akopov, S B; Nikolaev, L G

    2002-11-01

    A novel affinity elution procedure for purification of DNA-binding proteins was developed and employed to purify to near homogeneity the proteins recognizing a 21 base pair sequence within the long terminal repeat of human endogenous retroviruses K. The approach involves loading the initial protein mixture on a heparin-agarose column and elution of protein(s) of interest with a solution of double-stranded oligonucleotide containing binding sites of the protein(s). The affinity elution has several advantages over conventional DNA-affinity chromatography: (i) it is easier and faster, permitting to isolate proteins in a 1 day-one stage procedure; (ii) yield of a target protein is severalfold higher than that in DNA-affinity chromatography; (iii) it is not necessary to prepare a special affinity support for each factor to be isolated. Theaffinity elution could be a useful alternative to conventional DNA-affinity chromatography.

  6. A matricellular protein and EGF-like repeat signalling in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-12-01

    Matricellular proteins interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular processes by binding to cell surface receptors and initiating intracellular signal transduction. Their association with the ECM and the ability of some members of this protein family to regulate cell motility have opened up new avenues of research to investigate their functions in normal and diseased cells. In this review, we summarize the research on CyrA, an ECM calmodulin-binding protein in Dictyostelium. CyrA is proteolytically cleaved into smaller EGF-like (EGFL) repeat containing cleavage products during development. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA binds to the cell surface and activates a novel signalling pathway that modulates cell motility in this model organism. The similarity of CyrA to the most well-characterized matricellular proteins in mammals allows it to be designated as the first matricellular protein identified in Dictyostelium. PMID:22782112

  7. A matricellular protein and EGF-like repeat signalling in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-12-01

    Matricellular proteins interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular processes by binding to cell surface receptors and initiating intracellular signal transduction. Their association with the ECM and the ability of some members of this protein family to regulate cell motility have opened up new avenues of research to investigate their functions in normal and diseased cells. In this review, we summarize the research on CyrA, an ECM calmodulin-binding protein in Dictyostelium. CyrA is proteolytically cleaved into smaller EGF-like (EGFL) repeat containing cleavage products during development. The first EGFL repeat of CyrA binds to the cell surface and activates a novel signalling pathway that modulates cell motility in this model organism. The similarity of CyrA to the most well-characterized matricellular proteins in mammals allows it to be designated as the first matricellular protein identified in Dictyostelium.

  8. Myotonin protein-kinase [AGC]n trinucleotide repeat in seven nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Novelli, G.; Sineo, L.; Pontieri, E. ||

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is due to a genomic instability of a trinucleotide [AGC]n motif, located at the 3{prime} UTR region of a protein-kinase gene (myotonin protein kinase, MT-PK). The [AGC] repeat is meiotically and mitotically unstable, and it is directly related to the manifestations of the disorder. Although a gene dosage effect of the MT-PK has been demonstrated n DM muscle, the mechanism(s) by which the intragenic repeat expansion leads to disease is largely unknown. This non-standard mutational event could reflect an evolutionary mechanism widespread among animal genomes. We have isolated and sequenced the complete 3{prime}UTR region of the MT-PK gene in seven primates (macaque, orangutan, gorilla, chimpanzee, gibbon, owl monkey, saimiri), and examined by comparative sequence nucleotide analysis the [AGC]n intragenic repeat and the surrounding nucleotides. The genomic organization, including the [AGC]n repeat structure, was conserved in all examined species, excluding the gibbon (Hylobates agilis), in which the [AGC]n upstream sequence (GGAA) is replaced by a GA dinucleotide. The number of [AGC]n in the examined species ranged between 7 (gorilla) and 13 repeats (owl monkeys), with a polymorphism informative content (PIC) similar to that observed in humans. These results indicate that the 3{prime}UTR [AGC] repeat within the MT-PK gene is evolutionarily conserved, supporting that this region has important regulatory functions.

  9. Alternative conformations of the Tau repeat domain in complex with an engineered binding protein.

    PubMed

    Grüning, Clara S R; Mirecka, Ewa A; Klein, Antonia N; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Willbold, Dieter; Marino, Stephen F; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-08-15

    The aggregation of Tau into paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. The aggregation reaction is characterized by conformational conversion of the repeat domain, which partially adopts a cross-β-structure in the resulting amyloid-like fibrils. Here, we report the selection and characterization of an engineered binding protein, β-wrapin TP4, targeting the Tau repeat domain. TP4 was obtained by phage display using the four-repeat Tau construct K18ΔK280 as a target. TP4 binds K18ΔK280 as well as the longest isoform of human Tau, hTau40, with nanomolar affinity. NMR spectroscopy identified two alternative TP4-binding sites in the four-repeat domain, with each including two hexapeptide motifs with high β-sheet propensity. Both binding sites contain the aggregation-determining PHF6 hexapeptide within repeat 3. In addition, one binding site includes the PHF6* hexapeptide within repeat 2, whereas the other includes the corresponding hexapeptide Tau(337-342) within repeat 4, denoted PHF6**. Comparison of TP4-binding with Tau aggregation reveals that the same regions of Tau are involved in both processes. TP4 inhibits Tau aggregation at substoichiometric concentration, demonstrating that it interferes with aggregation nucleation. This study provides residue-level insight into the interaction of Tau with an aggregation inhibitor and highlights the structural flexibility of Tau.

  10. Chlorovirus Skp1-Binding Ankyrin Repeat Protein Interplay and Mimicry of Cellular Ubiquitin Ligase Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Eric A.; Kang, Ming; Adamec, Jiri; Oyler, George A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin-proteasome system is targeted by many viruses that have evolved strategies to redirect host ubiquitination machinery. Members of the genus Chlorovirus are proposed to share an ancestral lineage with a broader group of related viruses, nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV). Chloroviruses encode an Skp1 homolog and ankyrin repeat (ANK) proteins. Several chlorovirus-encoded ANK repeats contain C-terminal domains characteristic of cellular F-boxes or related NCLDV chordopox PRANC (pox protein repeats of ankyrin at C-terminal) domains. These observations suggested that this unique combination of Skp1 and ANK repeat proteins might form complexes analogous to the cellular Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. We identified two ANK proteins from the prototypic chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1 (PBCV-1) that functioned as binding partners for the virus-encoded Skp1, proteins A682L and A607R. These ANK proteins had a C-terminal Skp1 interactional motif that functioned similarly to cellular F-box domains. A C-terminal motif of ANK protein A682L binds Skp1 proteins from widely divergent species. Yeast two-hybrid analyses using serial domain deletion constructs confirmed the C-terminal localization of the Skp1 interactional motif in PBCV-1 A682L. ANK protein A607R represents an ANK family with one member present in all 41 sequenced chloroviruses. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of these related ANK and viral Skp1 proteins suggested partnered function tailored to the host alga or common ancestral heritage. Here, we show protein-protein interaction between corresponding family clusters of virus-encoded ANK and Skp1 proteins from three chlorovirus types. Collectively, our results indicate that chloroviruses have evolved complementing Skp1 and ANK proteins that mimic cellular SCF-associated proteins. IMPORTANCE Viruses have evolved ways to direct ubiquitination events in order to create environments conducive to their

  11. Origin of a folded repeat protein from an intrinsically disordered ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongbo; Sepulveda, Edgardo; Hartmann, Marcus D; Kogenaru, Manjunatha; Ursinus, Astrid; Sulz, Eva; Albrecht, Reinhard; Coles, Murray; Martin, Jörg; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive proteins are thought to have arisen through the amplification of subdomain-sized peptides. Many of these originated in a non-repetitive context as cofactors of RNA-based replication and catalysis, and required the RNA to assume their active conformation. In search of the origins of one of the most widespread repeat protein families, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR), we identified several potential homologs of its repeated helical hairpin in non-repetitive proteins, including the putatively ancient ribosomal protein S20 (RPS20), which only becomes structured in the context of the ribosome. We evaluated the ability of the RPS20 hairpin to form a TPR fold by amplification and obtained structures identical to natural TPRs for variants with 2–5 point mutations per repeat. The mutations were neutral in the parent organism, suggesting that they could have been sampled in the course of evolution. TPRs could thus have plausibly arisen by amplification from an ancestral helical hairpin. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16761.001 PMID:27623012

  12. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway mediates DBP-maf-induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Reddy, C Damodar; Swamy, Narasimha

    2003-09-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage-activating factor (DBP-maf) is derived from serum vitamin D binding protein (DBP) by selective deglycosylation during inflammation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DBP-maf on RAW 264.7 macrophages and the underlying intracellular signal transduction pathways. DBP-maf increased proapoptotic caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities and induced apoptosis in RAW 264.7 cells. However, DBP, the precursor to DBP-maf did not induce apoptosis in these cells. Cell cycle analysis of DBP-maf-treated RAW 264.7 cells revealed growth arrest with accumulation of cells in sub-G(0)/G(1) phase. We also investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in the DBP-maf-induced apoptosis of RAW264.7 cells. DBP-maf increased the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK1/2, while it decreased the ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB202190, attenuated DBP-maf-induced apoptosis. PD98059, a MEK specific inhibitor, did not show a significant inhibition of apoptosis induced by DBP-maf. Taken together, these results suggest that the p38 MAPK pathway plays a crucial role in DBP-maf-mediated apoptosis of macrophages. Our studies indicate that, during inflammation DBP-maf may function positively by causing death of the macrophages when activated macrophages are no longer needed at the site of inflammation. In summary, we report for the first time that DBP-maf induces apoptosis in macrophages via p38 and JNK1/2 pathway. PMID:12938159

  14. Nanoparticles Self-Assembly Driven by High Affinity Repeat Protein Pairing.

    PubMed

    Gurunatha, Kargal L; Fournier, Agathe C; Urvoas, Agathe; Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Marchi, Valérie; Minard, Philippe; Dujardin, Erik

    2016-03-22

    Proteins are the most specific yet versatile biological self-assembling agents with a rich chemistry. Nevertheless, the design of new proteins with recognition capacities is still in its infancy and has seldom been exploited for the self-assembly of functional inorganic nanoparticles. Here, we report on the protein-directed assembly of gold nanoparticles using purpose-designed artificial repeat proteins having a rigid but modular 3D architecture. αRep protein pairs are selected for their high mutual affinity from a library of 10(9) variants. Their conjugation onto gold nanoparticles drives the massive colloidal assembly of free-standing, one-particle thick films. When the average number of proteins per nanoparticle is lowered, the extent of self-assembly is limited to oligomeric particle clusters. Finally, we demonstrate that the aggregates are reversibly disassembled by an excess of one free protein. Our approach could be optimized for applications in biosensing, cell targeting, or functional nanomaterials engineering.

  15. Muscle and liver protein synthesis and degradation in growing rats fed a raw field bean (Vicia faba L.) diet.

    PubMed

    Goena, M; Santidrián, S; Cuevillas, F; Larralde, J

    1988-12-01

    Body weight gain, food intake, gastrocnemius muscle and liver weight, protein and RNA content, as well as the fractional rates of muscle and liver protein synthesis (ks, according to the method of constant infusion of L-[14C]tyrosine), growth (kg) and degradation (kd), along with RNA activity (g of protein synthesized per day/g RNA) of both organs, were determined in growing male rats fed ad libitum over a period of 10 days on 18.7% protein diets containing either casein (5% of methionine added) (control) or the raw legume field bean (Vicia faba L.) as the sole sources of protein. It has been found that as compared to control rats, those fed the raw legume diet exhibited a significant reduction in the rate of growth, muscle RNA, ks, kg, kd and RNA activity, and a significant increase in liver ks, kd and RNA activity. All differences were statistically significant at least at the 5% level. The possible nature of these findings is discussed.

  16. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  17. Tianeptine modulates amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry and synaptic proteins in rats subjected to repeated stress.

    PubMed

    Piroli, Gerardo G; Reznikov, Leah R; Grillo, Claudia A; Hagar, Janel M; Fadel, Jim R; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2013-03-01

    Stress is a common environmental factor associated with depressive illness and the amygdala is thought to be integral for this association. For example, repeated stress impairs amygdalar neuroplasticity in rodents and these defects parallel amygdalar deficits in depressive illness patients. Because the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is important in neuroplasticity, we hypothesized that alterations in amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as key players in depressive illness. Moreover, restoration of amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as important therapeutic targets in the successful management of multiple stress-related mood disorders. To address these hypotheses, we measured glutamate efflux in the basolateral and central amygdalar complexes via in vivo microdialysis, as well as the expression of synaptic proteins that regulate vesicular glutamate packaging and release, in rats subjected to repeated stress and treated daily with saline or the antidepressant tianeptine. Glutamate efflux was significantly reduced in the central amygdalar complex of animals subjected to repeated stress. In addition, repeated stress nearly eliminated amygdalar vGLUT2 expression, thereby proving a potential mechanism through which repeated stress impairs amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry. These stress-induced changes in glutamate efflux and vGLUT2 expression were inhibited by daily tianeptine administration. Moreover, tianeptine administration increased the vesicular localization of SNAP-25, which could account for the ability of tianeptine to modify glutamatergic tone in non-stressed control rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate that repeated stress differentially affects amygdalar glutamate systems and further supports our previous studies indicating that tianeptine's antidepressant efficacy may involve targeting amygdalar glutatamatergic systems.

  18. Double stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase is involved in osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Teramachi, Junpei; Morimoto, Hiroyuki; Baba, Ryoko; Doi, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Kanji; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2010-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) plays a critical role in antiviral defence of the host cells. PKR is also involved in cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. We previously reported that PKR is required for differentiation and calcification of osteoblasts. However, it is unknown about the role of PKR in osteoclast differentiation. A dominant-negative PKR mutant cDNA, in which the amino acid lysine at 296 was replaced with arginine, was transfected into RAW264.7 cells. We have established the cell line that stably expresses the PKR mutant gene (PKR-K/R). Phosphorylation of PKR and {alpha}-subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 was not stimulated by polyinosic-polycytidylic acid in the PKR-K/R cells. RANKL stimulated the formation of TRAP-positive multinuclear cells in RAW264.7 cells. However, TRAP-positive multinuclear cells were not formed in the PKR-K/R cells even when the cells were stimulated with higher doses of RANKL. A specific inhibitor of PKR, 2-aminopurine, also suppressed the RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW264.7 cells. The expression of macrophage fusion receptor and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein significantly decreased in the PKR-K/R cells by real time PCR analysis. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the mRNA expression of osteoclast markers (cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor) was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and RAW264.7 cells treated with 2-aminopurine. Expression of NF-{kappa}B protein was suppressed in the PKR-K/R cells and 2-aminopurine-treated RAW264.7 cells. The level of STAT1 protein expression was elevated in the PKR-K/R cells compared with that of the wild-type cells. Immunohistochemical study showed that PKR was localized in osteoclasts of metatarsal bone of newborn mouse. The finding that the PKR-positive multinuclear cells should be osteoclasts was confirmed by TRAP-staining. Our present study indicates that PKR plays important

  19. Shifting transition states in the unfolding of a large ankyrin repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Werbeck, Nicolas D.; Rowling, Pamela J. E.; Chellamuthu, Vasuki R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2008-01-01

    The 33-amino-acid ankyrin motif comprises a β-turn followed by two anti-parallel α-helices and a loop and tandem arrays of the motif pack in a linear fashion to produce elongated structures characterized by short-range interactions. In this article we use site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the kinetic unfolding mechanism of D34, a 426-residue, 12-ankyrin repeat fragment of the protein ankyrinR. The data are consistent with a model in which the N-terminal half of the protein unfolds first by unraveling progressively from the start of the polypeptide chain to form an intermediate; in the next step, the C-terminal half of the protein unfolds via two pathways whose transition states have either the early or the late C-terminal ankyrin repeats folded. We conclude that the two halves of the protein unfold by different mechanisms because the N-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of a folded C-terminal moiety, which therefore acts as a “seed” and confers a unique directionality on the process, whereas the C-terminal moiety folds and unfolds in the context of an unfolded N-terminal moiety and therefore behaves like a single-domain ankyrin repeat protein, having a high degree of symmetry and consequently more than one unfolding pathway accessible to it. PMID:18632570

  20. Telomere repeat binding proteins are functional components of Arabidopsis telomeres and interact with telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Procházková Schrumpfová, Petra; Vychodilová, Ivona; Dvořáčková, Martina; Majerská, Jana; Dokládal, Ladislav; Schořová, Šárka; Fajkus, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Although telomere-binding proteins constitute an essential part of telomeres, in vivo data indicating the existence of a structure similar to mammalian shelterin complex in plants are limited. Partial characterization of a number of candidate proteins has not identified true components of plant shelterin or elucidated their functional mechanisms. Telomere repeat binding (TRB) proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana bind plant telomeric repeats through a Myb domain of the telobox type in vitro, and have been shown to interact with POT1b (Protection of telomeres 1). Here we demonstrate co-localization of TRB1 protein with telomeres in situ using fluorescence microscopy, as well as in vivo interaction using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Classification of the TRB1 protein as a component of plant telomeres is further confirmed by the observation of shortening of telomeres in knockout mutants of the trb1 gene. Moreover, TRB proteins physically interact with plant telomerase catalytic subunits. These findings integrate TRB proteins into the telomeric interactome of A. thaliana. PMID:24397874

  1. Functional analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana CHLOROPLAST BIOGENESIS 19 pentatricopeptide repeat editing protein.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Vega, Maricela; Guevara-García, Arturo; Llamas, Ernesto; Sánchez-León, Nidia; Olmedo-Monfil, Vianey; Vielle-Calzada, Jean Philippe; León, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family of proteins contains several degenerate 35-aa motifs named PPR repeats. These proteins control diverse post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, including RNA editing. CLB19 belongs to the PLS subfamily of PPR proteins and is essential for the editing and functionality of the subunit A of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (RpoA) and the catalytic subunit of the Clp protease (ClpP1). We demonstrate in vitro that CLB19 has a specific interaction with these two targets, in spite of their modest sequence similarity. Using site-directed mutagenesis of the rpoA target, we analyzed the essential nucleotides required for CLB19-rpoA interactions. We verified that, similar to other editing proteins, the C-terminal E domain of CLB19 is essential for editing but not for RNA binding. Using biomolecular fluorescence complementation, we demonstrated that the E domain of CLB19 interacts with the RNA-interacting protein MORF2/RIP2 but not with MORF9/RIP9. An interesting finding from this analysis was that overexpression of a truncated CLB19 protein lacking the E domain interferes with cell fate during megasporogenesis and the subsequent establishment of a female gametophyte, supporting an important role of plastids in female gametogenesis. Together these analyses provide important clues about the particularities of the CLB19 editing protein. PMID:25980341

  2. An essential yeast gene encoding a TTAGGG repeat-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Brigati, C. Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa ); Kurtz, S.; Balderes, D.; Shore, D. ); Vidali, G. )

    1993-02-01

    Among all eukaryotes examined to date, telomere is a highly conserved structure. It is designed to protect chromosomes from degradation and fusion. Telomeres are composed of multiple repeats of short sequence elements and range in length from a few repeat units to > kb. The repeated sequence TTAGGG is found at telomeres in all vertebrates, certain slime molds, and trypanosomes. Because sequence TTAGGG is present at the telomere of all of these divergent organisms, it is likely that it constitutes a binding site for highly conserved proteins with important roles in chromosomal structure and function. The occurrence of a TTAGGG-binding activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the presence of TTAGGG sequences at telomere junctions raise the possibility that there is a related factor with a functional role at telomeres in S. cervisiae. The research in this paper tests this hypothesis. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. DNA-binding proteins from marine bacteria expand the known sequence diversity of TALE-like repeats.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Thiel, Philipp; Krüger, Jens; Kleusch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lahaye, Thomas

    2015-11-16

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) of Xanthomonas bacteria are programmable DNA binding proteins with unprecedented target specificity. Comparative studies into TALE repeat structure and function are hindered by the limited sequence variation among TALE repeats. More sequence-diverse TALE-like proteins are known from Ralstonia solanacearum (RipTALs) and Burkholderia rhizoxinica (Bats), but RipTAL and Bat repeats are conserved with those of TALEs around the DNA-binding residue. We study two novel marine-organism TALE-like proteins (MOrTL1 and MOrTL2), the first to date of non-terrestrial origin. We have assessed their DNA-binding properties and modelled repeat structures. We found that repeats from these proteins mediate sequence specific DNA binding conforming to the TALE code, despite low sequence similarity to TALE repeats, and with novel residues around the BSR. However, MOrTL1 repeats show greater sequence discriminating power than MOrTL2 repeats. Sequence alignments show that there are only three residues conserved between repeats of all TALE-like proteins including the two new additions. This conserved motif could prove useful as an identifier for future TALE-likes. Additionally, comparing MOrTL repeats with those of other TALE-likes suggests a common evolutionary origin for the TALEs, RipTALs and Bats.

  4. DNA-binding proteins from marine bacteria expand the known sequence diversity of TALE-like repeats.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Thiel, Philipp; Krüger, Jens; Kleusch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lahaye, Thomas

    2015-11-16

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) of Xanthomonas bacteria are programmable DNA binding proteins with unprecedented target specificity. Comparative studies into TALE repeat structure and function are hindered by the limited sequence variation among TALE repeats. More sequence-diverse TALE-like proteins are known from Ralstonia solanacearum (RipTALs) and Burkholderia rhizoxinica (Bats), but RipTAL and Bat repeats are conserved with those of TALEs around the DNA-binding residue. We study two novel marine-organism TALE-like proteins (MOrTL1 and MOrTL2), the first to date of non-terrestrial origin. We have assessed their DNA-binding properties and modelled repeat structures. We found that repeats from these proteins mediate sequence specific DNA binding conforming to the TALE code, despite low sequence similarity to TALE repeats, and with novel residues around the BSR. However, MOrTL1 repeats show greater sequence discriminating power than MOrTL2 repeats. Sequence alignments show that there are only three residues conserved between repeats of all TALE-like proteins including the two new additions. This conserved motif could prove useful as an identifier for future TALE-likes. Additionally, comparing MOrTL repeats with those of other TALE-likes suggests a common evolutionary origin for the TALEs, RipTALs and Bats. PMID:26481363

  5. Repeat-enriched proteins are related to host cell invasion and immune evasion in parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Mendes, T A O; Lobo, F P; Rodrigues, T S; Rodrigues-Luiz, G F; daRocha, W D; Fujiwara, R T; Teixeira, S M R; Bartholomeu, D C

    2013-04-01

    Proteins containing repetitive amino acid domains are widespread in all life forms. In parasitic organisms, proteins containing repeats play important roles such as cell adhesion and invasion and immune evasion. Therefore, extracellular and intracellular parasites are expected to be under different selective pressures regarding the repetitive content in their genomes. Here, we investigated whether there is a bias in the repetitive content found in the predicted proteomes of 6 exclusively extracellular and 17 obligate intracellular protozoan parasites, as well as 4 free-living protists. We also attempted to correlate the results with the distinct ecological niches they occupy and with distinct protein functions. We found that intracellular parasites have higher repetitive content in their proteomes than do extracellular parasites and free-living protists. In intracellular parasites, these repetitive proteins are located mainly at the parasite surface or are secreted and are enriched in amino acids known to be part of N- and O-glycosylation sites. Furthermore, in intracellular parasites, the developmental stages that are able to invade host cells express a higher proportion of proteins with perfect repeats relative to other life cycle stages, and these proteins have molecular functions associated with cell invasion. In contrast, in extracellular parasites, degenerate repetitive motifs are enriched in proteins that are likely to play roles in evading host immune response. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that both the ability to invade host cells and to escape the host immune response may have shaped the expansion and maintenance of perfect and degenerate repeats in the genomes of intra- and extracellular parasites.

  6. Structural and Functional Insights into Small, Glutamine-Rich, Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joanna D.; Thapaliya, Arjun; Martínez-Lumbreras, Santiago; Krysztofinska, Ewelina M.; Isaacson, Rivka L.

    2015-01-01

    The small glutamine-rich, tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha (SGTA) is an emerging player in the quality control of secretory and membrane proteins mislocalized to the cytosol, with established roles in tail-anchored (TA) membrane protein biogenesis. SGTA consists of three structural domains with individual functions, an N-terminal dimerization domain that assists protein sorting pathways, a central tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain that mediates interactions with heat-shock proteins, proteasomal, and hormonal receptors, and viral proteins, and a C-terminal glutamine rich region that binds hydrophobic substrates. SGTA has been linked to viral lifecycles and hormone receptor signaling, with implications in the pathogenesis of various disease states. Thus far, a range of biophysical techniques have been employed to characterize SGTA structure in some detail, and to investigate its interactions with binding partners in different biological contexts. A complete description of SGTA structure, together with further investigation into its function as a co-chaperone involved quality control, could provide us with useful insights into its role in maintaining cellular proteostasis, and broaden our understanding of mechanisms underlying associated pathologies. This review describes how some structural features of SGTA have been elucidated, and what this has uncovered about its cellular functions. A brief background on the structure and function of SGTA is given, highlighting its importance to biomedicine and related fields. The current level of knowledge and what remains to be understood about the structure and function of SGTA is summarized, discussing the potential direction of future research. PMID:26734616

  7. Gudu, an Armadillo repeat-containing protein, is required for spermatogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila annotated gene CG5155 encodes a protein that contains 10 Armadillo-repeats and has an unknown function. To fill this gap, we performed loss-of-function studies using RNAi. By analysis of four independent Drosophila RNAi lines targeting two non-overlapping regions of the CG5155 transcript, we demonstrate that this gene is required for male fertility. Therefore, we have named this gene Gudu. The transcript of Gudu is highly enriched in adult testes. Knockdown of Gudu by a ubiquitous driver leads to defects in the formation of the individualization complex that is required for spermatid maturation, thereby impairing spermatogenesis. Furthermore, testis-specific knockdown of Gudu by crossing the RNAi lines with the bam-Gal4 driver is sufficient to cause the infertility and defective spermatogenesis. Since Gudu is highly homologous to vertebrate ARMC4, also an Armadillo-repeat-containing protein enriched in testes, our results suggest that Gudu and ARMC4 is a subfamily of Armadillo-repeat containing proteins that may have an evolutionarily conserved function in spermatogenesis. PMID:24055424

  8. Structural correlations in the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteins and proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Paul A; Scott, Paul G; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    The family of small leucine-rich repeat proteins and proteoglycans (SLRPs) contains several extracellular matrix molecules that are structurally related by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) flanked by two conserved cysteine-rich regions. The small proteoglycan decorin is the archetypal SLRP. Decorin is present in a variety of connective tissues, typically "decorating" collagen fibrils, and is involved in important biological functions, including the regulation of the assembly of fibrillar collagens and modulation of cell adhesion. Several SLRPs are known to regulate collagen fibrillogenesis and there is evidence that they may share other biological functions. We have recently determined the crystal structure of the protein core of decorin, the first such determination of a member of the SLRP family. This structure has highlighted several correlations: (1) SLRPs have similar internal repeat structures; (2) SLRP molecules are far less curved than an early model of decorin based on the three-dimensional structure of ribonuclease inhibitor; (3) the N-terminal and C-terminal cysteine-rich regions are conserved capping motifs. Furthermore, the structure shows that decorin dimerizes through the concave surface of its LRR domain, which has been implicated previously in its interaction with collagen. We have established that both decorin and opticin, another SLRP, form stable dimers in solution. Conservation of residues involved in decorin dimerization suggests that the mode of dimerization for other SLRPs will be similar. Taken together these results suggest the need for reevaluation of currently accepted models of SLRP interaction with their ligands.

  9. Generation of Fluorogen-Activating Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (FADAs) as Versatile Sensor Tools.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marco; Batyuk, Alexander; Klenk, Christoph; Kummer, Lutz; de Picciotto, Seymour; Gülbakan, Basri; Wu, Yufan; Newby, Gregory A; Zosel, Franziska; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Mittl, Peer R E; Zenobi, Renato; Wittrup, K Dane; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-27

    Fluorescent probes constitute a valuable toolbox to address a variety of biological questions and they have become irreplaceable for imaging methods. Commonly, such probes consist of fluorescent proteins or small organic fluorophores coupled to biological molecules of interest. Recently, a novel class of fluorescence-based probes, fluorogen-activating proteins (FAPs), has been reported. These binding proteins are based on antibody single-chain variable fragments and activate fluorogenic dyes, which only become fluorescent upon activation and do not fluoresce when free in solution. Here we present a novel class of fluorogen activators, termed FADAs, based on the very robust designed ankyrin repeat protein scaffold, which also readily folds in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm. The FADA generated in this study was obtained by combined selections with ribosome display and yeast surface display. It enhances the fluorescence of malachite green (MG) dyes by a factor of more than 11,000 and thus activates MG to a similar extent as FAPs based on single-chain variable fragments. As shown by structure determination and in vitro measurements, this FADA was evolved to form a homodimer for the activation of MG dyes. Exploiting the favorable properties of the designed ankyrin repeat protein scaffold, we created a FADA biosensor suitable for imaging of proteins on the cell surface, as well as in the cytosol. Moreover, based on the requirement of dimerization for strong fluorogen activation, a prototype FADA biosensor for in situ detection of a target protein and protein-protein interactions was developed. Therefore, FADAs are versatile fluorescent probes that are easily produced and suitable for diverse applications and thus extend the FAP technology.

  10. Generation of Fluorogen-Activating Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (FADAs) as Versatile Sensor Tools.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marco; Batyuk, Alexander; Klenk, Christoph; Kummer, Lutz; de Picciotto, Seymour; Gülbakan, Basri; Wu, Yufan; Newby, Gregory A; Zosel, Franziska; Schöppe, Jendrik; Sedlák, Erik; Mittl, Peer R E; Zenobi, Renato; Wittrup, K Dane; Plückthun, Andreas

    2016-03-27

    Fluorescent probes constitute a valuable toolbox to address a variety of biological questions and they have become irreplaceable for imaging methods. Commonly, such probes consist of fluorescent proteins or small organic fluorophores coupled to biological molecules of interest. Recently, a novel class of fluorescence-based probes, fluorogen-activating proteins (FAPs), has been reported. These binding proteins are based on antibody single-chain variable fragments and activate fluorogenic dyes, which only become fluorescent upon activation and do not fluoresce when free in solution. Here we present a novel class of fluorogen activators, termed FADAs, based on the very robust designed ankyrin repeat protein scaffold, which also readily folds in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm. The FADA generated in this study was obtained by combined selections with ribosome display and yeast surface display. It enhances the fluorescence of malachite green (MG) dyes by a factor of more than 11,000 and thus activates MG to a similar extent as FAPs based on single-chain variable fragments. As shown by structure determination and in vitro measurements, this FADA was evolved to form a homodimer for the activation of MG dyes. Exploiting the favorable properties of the designed ankyrin repeat protein scaffold, we created a FADA biosensor suitable for imaging of proteins on the cell surface, as well as in the cytosol. Moreover, based on the requirement of dimerization for strong fluorogen activation, a prototype FADA biosensor for in situ detection of a target protein and protein-protein interactions was developed. Therefore, FADAs are versatile fluorescent probes that are easily produced and suitable for diverse applications and thus extend the FAP technology. PMID:26812208

  11. Characterization and binding analysis of a microneme adhesive repeat domain-containing protein from Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haiyan; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Ishiwa, Akiko; Recuenco, Frances C; Murakoshi, Fumi; Xuan, Xuenan; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi; Kato, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii invades almost all nucleated cells, and has infected approximately 34% of the world's population to date. In order to develop effective vaccines against T. gondii infection, understanding of the role of the molecules that are involved in the invasion process is important. For this purpose, we characterized T. gondii proteins that contain microneme adhesive repeats (MARs), which are common in moving junction proteins. T. gondii MAR domain-containing protein 4a (TgMCP4a), which contains repeats of 17-22 amino acid segments at the N-terminus and three putative MAR domains at the C-terminus, is localized near the rhoptry of extracellular parasites. Following infection, TgMCP4a was detected in the parasitophorous vacuole. The recombinant Fc-TgMCP4a N-terminus protein (rTgMCP4a-1/Fc) showed binding activity to the surface proteins of Vero, 293T, and CHO cells. The recombinant GST-TgMCP4a N-terminus protein (rTgMCP4a-1/GST), which exhibited binding activity, was used to pull down the interacting factors from 293T cell lysate, and subsequent mass spectrometry analysis revealed that three types of heat shock proteins (HSPs) interacted with TgMCP4a. Transfection of a FLAG fusion protein of TgMCP4a-1 (rTgMCP4a-1/FLAG) into 293T cell and the following immunoprecipitation with anti-FLAG antibody confirmed the interactions of HSC70 with TgMCP4a. The addition of rTgMCP4a-1/GST into the culture medium significantly affected the growth of the parasite. This study hints that T. gondii may employ HSP proteins of host cell to facilitate their growth.

  12. Repeated evolution of identical domain architecture in metazoan netrin domain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Lucas; Rentzsch, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    The majority of proteins in eukaryotes are composed of multiple domains, and the number and order of these domains is an important determinant of protein function. Although multidomain proteins with a particular domain architecture were initially considered to have a common evolutionary origin, recent comparative studies of protein families or whole genomes have reported that a minority of multidomain proteins could have appeared multiple times independently. Here, we test this scenario in detail for the signaling molecules netrin and secreted frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs), two groups of netrin domain-containing proteins with essential roles in animal development. Our primary phylogenetic analyses suggest that the particular domain architectures of each of these proteins were present in the eumetazoan ancestor and evolved a second time independently within the metazoan lineage from laminin and frizzled proteins, respectively. Using an array of phylogenetic methods, statistical tests, and character sorting analyses, we show that the polyphyly of netrin and sFRP is well supported and cannot be explained by classical phylogenetic reconstruction artifacts. Despite their independent origins, the two groups of netrins and of sFRPs have the same protein interaction partners (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer/neogenin and Unc5 for netrins and Wnts for sFRPs) and similar developmental functions. Thus, these cases of convergent evolution emphasize the importance of domain architecture for protein function by uncoupling shared domain architecture from shared evolutionary history. Therefore, we propose the terms merology to describe the repeated evolution of proteins with similar domain architecture and discuss the potential of merologous proteins to help understanding protein evolution. PMID:22813778

  13. Identification of Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins in the Model Organism Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sam; Brewster, Jessica; Barth, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are RNA binding proteins with functions in organelle RNA metabolism. They are found in all eukaryotes but have been most extensively studied in plants. We report on the identification of 12 PPR-encoding genes in the genome of the protist Dictyostelium discoideum, with potential homologs in other members of the same lineage and some predicted novel functions for the encoded gene products in protists. For one of the gene products, we show that it localizes to the mitochondria, and we also demonstrate that antisense inhibition of its expression leads to slower growth, a phenotype associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  15. Tianeptine modulates amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry and synaptic proteins in rats subjected to repeated stress.

    PubMed

    Piroli, Gerardo G; Reznikov, Leah R; Grillo, Claudia A; Hagar, Janel M; Fadel, Jim R; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2013-03-01

    Stress is a common environmental factor associated with depressive illness and the amygdala is thought to be integral for this association. For example, repeated stress impairs amygdalar neuroplasticity in rodents and these defects parallel amygdalar deficits in depressive illness patients. Because the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is important in neuroplasticity, we hypothesized that alterations in amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as key players in depressive illness. Moreover, restoration of amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as important therapeutic targets in the successful management of multiple stress-related mood disorders. To address these hypotheses, we measured glutamate efflux in the basolateral and central amygdalar complexes via in vivo microdialysis, as well as the expression of synaptic proteins that regulate vesicular glutamate packaging and release, in rats subjected to repeated stress and treated daily with saline or the antidepressant tianeptine. Glutamate efflux was significantly reduced in the central amygdalar complex of animals subjected to repeated stress. In addition, repeated stress nearly eliminated amygdalar vGLUT2 expression, thereby proving a potential mechanism through which repeated stress impairs amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry. These stress-induced changes in glutamate efflux and vGLUT2 expression were inhibited by daily tianeptine administration. Moreover, tianeptine administration increased the vesicular localization of SNAP-25, which could account for the ability of tianeptine to modify glutamatergic tone in non-stressed control rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate that repeated stress differentially affects amygdalar glutamate systems and further supports our previous studies indicating that tianeptine's antidepressant efficacy may involve targeting amygdalar glutatamatergic systems. PMID:23262120

  16. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  17. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  18. Rings and ribbons in protein structures: Characterization using helical parameters and Ramachandran plots for repeating dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Steven; Leader, David P; Al-Shubailly, Fawzia; Milner-White, E James

    2014-02-01

    Helical parameters displayed on a Ramachandran plot allow peptide structures with successive residues having identical main chain conformations to be studied. We investigate repeating dipeptide main chain conformations and present Ramachandran plots encompassing the range of possible structures. Repeating dipeptides fall into the categories: rings, ribbons, and helices. Partial rings occur in the form of "nests" and "catgrips"; many nests are bridged by an oxygen atom hydrogen bonding to the main chain NH groups of alternate residues, an interaction optimized by the ring structure of the nest. A novel recurring feature is identified that we name unpleated β, often situated at the ends of a β-sheet strand. Some are partial rings causing the polypeptide to curve gently away from the sheet; some are straight. They lack β-pleat and almost all incorporate a glycine. An example is the first glycine in the GxxxxGK motif of P-loop proteins. Ribbons in repeating dipeptides can be either flat, as seen in repeated type II and type II' β-turns, or twisted, as in multiple type I and type I' β-turns. Hexa- and octa-peptides in such twisted ribbons occur frequently in proteins, predominantly with type I β-turns, and are the same as the "β-bend ribbons" hitherto identified only in short peptides. One is seen in the GTPase-activating protein for Rho in the active, but not the inactive, form of the enzyme. It forms a β-bend ribbon, which incorporates the catalytic arginine, allowing its side chain guanidino group to approach the active site and enhance enzyme activity.

  19. The nebulin repeat protein Lasp regulates I-band architecture and filament spacing in myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Isabelle; Schöck, Frieder

    2014-08-18

    Mutations in nebulin, a giant muscle protein with 185 actin-binding nebulin repeats, are the major cause of nemaline myopathy in humans. Nebulin sets actin thin filament length in sarcomeres, potentially by stabilizing thin filaments in the I-band, where nebulin and thin filaments coalign. However, the precise role of nebulin in setting thin filament length and its other functions in regulating power output are unknown. Here, we show that Lasp, the only member of the nebulin family in Drosophila melanogaster, acts at two distinct sites in the sarcomere and controls thin filament length with just two nebulin repeats. We found that Lasp localizes to the Z-disc edges to control I-band architecture and also localizes at the A-band, where it interacts with both actin and myosin to set proper filament spacing. Furthermore, introducing a single amino acid change into the two nebulin repeats of Lasp demonstrated different roles for each domain and established Lasp as a suitable system for studying nebulin repeat function. PMID:25113030

  20. Structural and functional dissection of Toxoplasma gondii armadillo repeats only protein.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christina; Samoo, Atta; Hammoudi, Pierre-Mehdi; Klages, Natacha; Kallio, Juha Pekka; Kursula, Inari; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    Rhoptries are club-shaped, regulated secretory organelles that cluster at the apical pole of apicomplexan parasites. Their discharge is essential for invasion and the establishment of an intracellular lifestyle. Little is known about rhoptry biogenesis and recycling during parasite division. In Toxoplasma gondii, positioning of rhoptries involves the armadillo repeats only protein (ARO) and myosin F (MyoF). Here, we show that two ARO partners, ARO-interacting protein (AIP) and adenylate cyclase β (ACβ) localize to a rhoptry subcompartment. In absence of AIP, ACβ disappears from the rhoptries. By assessing the contribution of each ARO armadillo (ARM) repeat, we provide evidence that ARO is multifunctional, participating not only in positioning but also in clustering of rhoptries. Structural analyses show that ARO resembles the myosin-binding domain of the Caenorhabditis elegans myosin chaperone UNC-45. A conserved patch of aromatic and acidic residues denotes the putative MyoF-binding site, and the overall arrangement of the ARM repeats explains the dramatic consequences of deleting each of them. Finally, Plasmodium falciparum ARO functionally complements ARO depletion and interacts with the same partners, highlighting the conservation of rhoptry biogenesis in Apicomplexa. PMID:26769898

  1. Electrostatic effect of H1-histone protein binding on nucleosome repeat length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Teif, Vladimir B.

    2014-08-01

    Within a simple biophysical model we describe the effect of electrostatic binding of H1 histone proteins on the nucleosome repeat length in chromatin. The length of wrapped DNA optimizes its binding energy to the histone core and the elastic energy penalty of DNA wrapping. The magnitude of the effect predicted from our model is in agreement with the systematic experimental data on the linear variation of nucleosome repeat lengths with H1/nucleosome ratio (Woodcock C L et al 2006 Chromos. Res. 14 17-25). We compare our model to the data for different cell types and organisms, with a widely varying ratio of bound H1 histones per nucleosome. We underline the importance of this non-specific histone-DNA charge-balance mechanism in regulating the positioning of nucleosomes and the degree of compaction of chromatin fibers in eukaryotic cells.

  2. A Naturally Occurring Repeat Protein with High Internal Sequence Identity Defines a New Class of TPR-like Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marold, Jacob D; Kavran, Jennifer M; Bowman, Gregory D; Barrick, Doug

    2015-11-01

    Linear repeat proteins often have high structural similarity and low (∼25%) pairwise sequence identities (PSI) among modules. We identified a unique P. anserina (Pa) sequence with tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) homology, which contains longer (42 residue) repeats (42PRs) with an average PSI >91%. We determined the crystal structure of five tandem Pa 42PRs to 1.6 Å, and examined the stability and solution properties of constructs containing three to six Pa 42PRs. Compared with 34-residue TPRs (34PRs), Pa 42PRs have a one-turn extension of each helix, and bury more surface area. Unfolding transitions shift to higher denaturant concentration and become sharper as repeats are added. Fitted Ising models show Pa 42PRs to be more cooperative than consensus 34PRs, with increased magnitudes of intrinsic and interfacial free energies. These results demonstrate the tolerance of the TPR motif to length variation, and provide a basis to understand the effects of helix length on intrinsic/interfacial stability.

  3. Mutagenic roles of DNA "repair" proteins in antibody diversity and disease-associated trinucleotide repeat instability.

    PubMed

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Ranum, Laura P; Pearson, Christopher E

    2008-07-01

    While DNA repair proteins are generally thought to maintain the integrity of the whole genome by correctly repairing mutagenic DNA intermediates, there are cases where DNA "repair" proteins are involved in causing mutations instead. For instance, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) require the contribution of various DNA repair proteins, including UNG, MSH2 and MSH6 to mutate certain regions of immunoglobulin genes in order to generate antibodies of increased antigen affinity and altered effector functions. Another instance where "repair" proteins drive mutations is the instability of gene-specific trinucleotide repeats (TNR), the causative mutations of numerous diseases including Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FRAXA), Huntington's disease (HD), myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) all of which arise via various modes of pathogenesis. These healthy and deleterious mutations that are induced by repair proteins are distinct from the genome-wide mutations that arise in the absence of repair proteins: they occur at specific loci, are sensitive to cis-elements (sequence context and/or epigenetic marks) and transcription, occur in specific tissues during distinct developmental windows, and are age-dependent. Here we review and compare the mutagenic role of DNA "repair" proteins in the processes of SHM, CSR and TNR instability.

  4. The impact of Fusarium culmorum infection on the protein fractions of raw barley and malted grains.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro M; Waters, Deborah M; Arendt, Elke K

    2013-03-01

    Contaminating fungi, such as Fusarium species, produce metabolites that may interfere with normal barley grain proteolysis pattern and consequently, affect malt and beer quality. Protein compositional changes of an initial mixture of 20 % Fusarium culmorum infected and 80 % noninfected mature barley grains and respective malt are reported here. Proteolytic activity of infected barley grains (IBG) and respective malt, with controls (uninfected grains), were characterized using protease inhibitors from each class of this enzyme, including metallo-, cysteine, serine, and aspartic proteases, as well as uninhibited protease fractions. The proteins were extracted according to the Osborne fractionation and separated by size exclusion chromatography. Additionally, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis (GE) was used to analyze hydrophobic storage proteins isolated from the control and IBG. Analyses revealed that F. culmorum IBG had a twofold increase of proteolytic activity compared to the control sample, which showed an increase in all protease classes with aspartic proteases dominating. Infected and control malt grains were comparable with cysteine proteases representing almost 50 % of all proteolytic enzymes detected. Protein extractability was 31 % higher in IBG compared to the control barley. The albumin fraction showed that several metabolic proteins decreased and increased at different rates during infection and malting, thus showing a complex F. culmorum infection interdependence. Prolamin storage proteins were more hydrophobic during barley fungal infection. F. culmorum interfered with the grain hydrolytic protein profile, thereby altering the grain's protein content and quality.

  5. Methylation of C9orf72 expansion reduces RNA foci formation and dipeptide-repeat proteins expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Peter O

    2016-01-26

    A hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9orf72 gene is the most common genetic cause of both frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), together referred to as c9FTD/ALS. It has been suggested that a loss of C9orf72 protein expression, the formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins contribute to C9orf72-related diseases. Interestingly, it has been shown that trimethylation of histones and methylation of CpG islands near the repeat expansion may play a role in the pathogenesis c9FTD/ALS. Recently, methylation of expanded repeat itself has been reported. To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying these diseases, the influence of epigenetic modification in the repeat expansion on its pathogenic effect was assessed. Here, a reduced formation of toxic RNA foci and dipeptide-repeat proteins upon methylation of the GGGGCC repeat in a cellular model of c9FTD/ALS is shown. Additionally, a novel methylcytosine-capture DNA hybridization immunoassay for semi-quantitative detection of the repeat methylation levels is presented, potentially usable for methylation analysis in patients carrying C9orf72 repeat expansion carriers as a diagnostic tool. Presented results suggest that increased level of pathogenic GGGGCC expansion methylation may be sufficient to alleviate the molecular pathology of the C9orf72-related diseases.

  6. N-Acetylglucosaminylation of Serine-Aspartate Repeat Proteins Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Becker, Samuel; Emolo, Carla; Quach, Austin; Kim, Hwan Keun; Rauch, Sabine; Anderson, Mark; LeBlanc, James F.; Schneewind, Olaf; Faull, Kym F.; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes products that convert host fibrinogen to fibrin and promote its agglutination with fibrin fibrils, thereby shielding bacteria from immune defenses. The agglutination reaction involves ClfA (clumping factor A), a surface protein with serine-aspartate (SD) repeats that captures fibrin fibrils and fibrinogen. Pathogenic staphylococci express several different SD proteins that are modified by two glycosyltransferases, SdgA and SdgB. Here, we characterized three genes of S. aureus, aggA, aggB (sdgA), and aggC (sdgB), and show that aggA and aggC contribute to staphylococcal agglutination with fibrin fibrils in human plasma. We demonstrate that aggB (sdgA) and aggC (sdgB) are involved in GlcNAc modification of the ClfA SD repeats. However, only sdgB is essential for GlcNAc modification, and an sdgB mutant is defective in the pathogenesis of sepsis in mice. Thus, GlcNAc modification of proteins promotes S. aureus replication in the bloodstream of mammalian hosts. PMID:24344128

  7. The Role of Leucine-Rich Repeat Containing Protein 10 (LRRC10) in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Matthew J.; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 10 (LRRC10) is a cardiomyocyte-specific member of the Leucine-rich repeat containing (LRRC) protein superfamily with critical roles in cardiac function and disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have identified LRRC10 mutations in human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and Lrrc10 homozygous knockout mice develop DCM, strongly linking LRRC10 to the molecular etiology of DCM. LRRC10 localizes to the dyad region in cardiomyocytes where it can interact with actin and α-actinin at the Z-disc and associate with T-tubule components. Indeed, this region is becoming increasingly recognized as a signaling center in cardiomyocytes, not only for calcium cycling, excitation-contraction coupling, and calcium-sensitive hypertrophic signaling, but also as a nodal signaling hub where the myocyte can sense and respond to mechanical stress. Disruption of a wide range of critical structural and signaling molecules in cardiomyocytes confers susceptibility to cardiomyopathies in addition to the more classically studied mutations in sarcomeric proteins. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DCM remain unclear. Here, we review what is known about the cardiomyocyte functions of LRRC10, lessons learned about LRRC10 and DCM from the Lrrc10 knockout mouse model, and discuss ongoing efforts to elucidate molecular mechanisms whereby mutation or absence of LRRC10 mediates cardiac disease. PMID:27536250

  8. Identification and characterization of GSRP-56, a novel Golgi-localized spectrin repeat-containing protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yuko . E-mail: yu-kobayashi@kinran.ac.jp; Katanosaka, Yuki; Iwata, Yuko; Matsuoka, Masayuki; Shigekawa, Munekazu; Wakabayashi, Shigeo . E-mail: wak@ri.ncvc.go.jp

    2006-10-01

    Spectrin repeat (SR)-containing proteins are important for regulation of integrity of biomembranes, not only the plasma membrane but also those of intracellular organelles, such as the Golgi, nucleus, endo/lysosomes, and synaptic vesicles. We identified a novel SR-containing protein, named GSRP-56 (Golgi-localized SR-containing protein-56), by a yeast two-hybrid method, using a member of the transient receptor potential channel family, TRPV2, as bait. GSRP-56 is an isoform derived from a giant SR-containing protein, Syne-1 (synaptic nuclear envelope protein-1, also referred to as Nesprin-1 or Enaptin), predicted to be produced by alternative splicing. Immunological analysis demonstrated that this isoform is a 56-kDa protein, which is localized predominantly in the Golgi apparatus in cardiomyocytes and C2C12 myoblasts/myotubes, and we found that two SR domains were required both for Golgi targeting and for interaction with TRPV2. Interestingly, overexpression of GSRP-56 resulted in a morphological change in the Golgi structure, characterized by its enlargement of cis-Golgi marker antibody-staining area, which would result partly from fragmentation of Golgi membranes. Our findings indicate that GSRP-56 is a novel, particularly small Golgi-localized member of the spectrin family, which possibly play a role in maintenance of the Golgi structure.

  9. RRW: repeated random walks on genome-scale protein networks for local cluster discovery

    PubMed Central

    Macropol, Kathy; Can, Tolga; Singh, Ambuj K

    2009-01-01

    Background We propose an efficient and biologically sensitive algorithm based on repeated random walks (RRW) for discovering functional modules, e.g., complexes and pathways, within large-scale protein networks. Compared to existing cluster identification techniques, RRW implicitly makes use of network topology, edge weights, and long range interactions between proteins. Results We apply the proposed technique on a functional network of yeast genes and accurately identify statistically significant clusters of proteins. We validate the biological significance of the results using known complexes in the MIPS complex catalogue database and well-characterized biological processes. We find that 90% of the created clusters have the majority of their catalogued proteins belonging to the same MIPS complex, and about 80% have the majority of their proteins involved in the same biological process. We compare our method to various other clustering techniques, such as the Markov Clustering Algorithm (MCL), and find a significant improvement in the RRW clusters' precision and accuracy values. Conclusion RRW, which is a technique that exploits the topology of the network, is more precise and robust in finding local clusters. In addition, it has the added flexibility of being able to find multi-functional proteins by allowing overlapping clusters. PMID:19740439

  10. Disulfide bonds in a recombinant protein modeled after a core repeat in an aquatic insect's silk protein.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S. V.; Correia, J. J.; Case, S. T.

    1995-01-01

    We constructed a gene encoding rCAS, recombinant constant and subrepeat protein, modeled after tandem repeats found in the major silk proteins synthesized by aquatic larvae of the midge, Chironomus tentans. Bacterially synthesized rCAS was purified to near homogeneity and characterized by several biochemical and biophysical methods including amino-terminal sequencing, amino acid compositional analysis, sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation, and mass spectrometry. Complementing these techniques with quantitative sulfhydryl assays, we discovered that the four cysteines present in rCAS form two intramolecular disulfide bonds. Mapping studies revealed that the disulfide bonds are heterogeneous. When reduced and denatured rCAS was allowed to refold and its disulfide bonding state monitored, it again adopted a conformation with two intramolecular disulfide bonds. The inherent ability of rCAS to quantitatively form two intramolecular disulfide bonds may reflect a previously unknown feature of the in vivo silk proteins from which it is derived. PMID:7663350

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of mussel adhesive protein repeating peptide segment.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, M P; Wollman, R M; Alderfer, J L

    1997-12-01

    Mussel adhesive protein (MAP) is the adhesive agent used by the common blue sea mussel (Mytilus edulis) to attach the animal to various underwater surfaces. It is generally composed of 75 to 85 repeating decameric units with the reported primary sequence NH2-Ala(1)-Lyst(2)-Pro(3)-Ser(4)-Tyr(5)-Hyp(6)-Hyp(7)-Thr(8)-DOPA( 9)- Lys(10)-COOH. This study examines this peptide's solution-state conformation using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. NMR and molecular modeling of the decamer before and after molecular dynamics calculations in water suggests a conformation that retains an overall bent helix.

  12. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Tandem Repeat Proteins and Ank200 are Type 1 Secretion System Substrates Related to the Repeats-in-Toxin Exoprotein Family

    PubMed Central

    Wakeel, Abdul; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; McBride, Jere W.

    2011-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis has type 1 and 4 secretion systems (T1SS and T4SS), but the substrates have not been identified. Potential substrates include secreted tandem repeat protein (TRP) 47, TRP120, and TRP32, and the ankyrin repeat protein, Ank200, that are involved in molecular host–pathogen interactions including DNA binding and a network of protein–protein interactions with host targets associated with signaling, transcriptional regulation, vesicle trafficking, and apoptosis. In this study we report that E. chaffeensis TRP47, TRP32, TRP120, and Ank200 were not secreted in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Cre recombinase reporter assay routinely used to identify T4SS substrates. In contrast, all TRPs and the Ank200 proteins were secreted by the Escherichia coli complemented with the hemolysin secretion system (T1SS), and secretion was reduced in a T1SS mutant (ΔTolC), demonstrating that these proteins are T1SS substrates. Moreover, T1SS secretion signals were identified in the C-terminal domains of the TRPs and Ank200, and a detailed bioinformatic analysis of E. chaffeensis TRPs and Ank200 revealed features consistent with those described in the repeats-in-toxins (RTX) family of exoproteins, including glycine- and aspartate-rich tandem repeats, homology with ATP-transporters, a non-cleavable C-terminal T1SS signal, acidic pIs, and functions consistent with other T1SS substrates. Using a heterologous E. coli T1SS, this investigation has identified the first Ehrlichia T1SS substrates supporting the conclusion that the T1SS and corresponding substrates are involved in molecular host–pathogen interactions that contribute to Ehrlichia pathobiology. Further investigation of the relationship between Ehrlichia TRPs, Ank200, and the RTX exoprotein family may lead to a greater understanding of the importance of T1SS substrates and specific functions of T1SS in the pathobiology of obligately intracellular bacteria. PMID:22919588

  13. The αRep artificial repeat protein scaffold: a new tool for crystallization and live cell applications.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Guellouz, Asma; Ferrandez, Yann; Mesneau, Agnès; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a new family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on HEAT (acronym for Huntingtin, elongation factor 3 (EF3), protein pphosphatase 2A (PP2A), yeast kinase Tor1) repeat proteins containing an α-helical repeated motif. The sequence of the repeated motifs, first identified in a thermostable archae protein was optimized using a consensus design strategy and used for the construction of a library of artificial proteins. All proteins from this library share the same general fold but differ both in the number of repeats and in five highly randomized amino acid positions within each repeat. The randomized side chains altogether provide a hypervariable surface on αRep variants. Sequences from this library are efficiently expressed as soluble, folded and very stable proteins. αRep binders with high affinity for various protein targets were selected by phage display. Low micromolar to nanomolar dissociation constants between partners were measured and the structures of several complexes (specific αRep/protein target) were solved by X-ray crystallography. Using GFP as a model target, it was demonstrated that αReps can be used as bait in pull-down experiments. αReps can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and specifically interact with their target addressed to different cell compartments. PMID:26517888

  14. The αRep artificial repeat protein scaffold: a new tool for crystallization and live cell applications.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lepiniec, Marie; Urvoas, Agathe; Chevrel, Anne; Guellouz, Asma; Ferrandez, Yann; Mesneau, Agnès; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    We have designed a new family of artificial proteins, named αRep, based on HEAT (acronym for Huntingtin, elongation factor 3 (EF3), protein pphosphatase 2A (PP2A), yeast kinase Tor1) repeat proteins containing an α-helical repeated motif. The sequence of the repeated motifs, first identified in a thermostable archae protein was optimized using a consensus design strategy and used for the construction of a library of artificial proteins. All proteins from this library share the same general fold but differ both in the number of repeats and in five highly randomized amino acid positions within each repeat. The randomized side chains altogether provide a hypervariable surface on αRep variants. Sequences from this library are efficiently expressed as soluble, folded and very stable proteins. αRep binders with high affinity for various protein targets were selected by phage display. Low micromolar to nanomolar dissociation constants between partners were measured and the structures of several complexes (specific αRep/protein target) were solved by X-ray crystallography. Using GFP as a model target, it was demonstrated that αReps can be used as bait in pull-down experiments. αReps can be expressed in eukaryotic cells and specifically interact with their target addressed to different cell compartments.

  15. Highly Stable Trypsin-Aggregate Coatings on Polymer Nanofibers for Repeated Protein Digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Byoung Chan; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Lee, Sang-mok; Ahn, Hye-kyung; Nair, Sujith; Kim, Seong H.; Kim, Beom S.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Camp, David G.; Grate, Jay W.; Smith, Richard D.; Koo, Yoon-mo; Gu, Man Bock; Kim, Jungbae

    2009-04-01

    A stable and robust trypsin-based biocatalytic system was developed and demonstrated for proteomic applications. The system utilizes polymer nanofibers coated with trypsin aggregates for immobilized protease digestions. After covalently attaching an initial layer of trypsin to the polymer nanofibers, highly concentrated trypsin molecules are crosslinked to the layered trypsin by way of a glutaraldehyde treatment. This new process produced a 300-fold increase in trypsin activity compared with a conventional method for covalent trypsin immobilization and proved to be robust in that it still maintained a high level of activity after a year of repeated recycling. This highly stable form of immobilized trypsin was also resistant to autolysis, enabling repeated digestions of bovine serum albumin over 40 days and successful peptide identification by LC-MS/MS. Finally, the immobilized trypsin was resistant to proteolysis when exposed to other enzymes (i.e. chymotrypsin), which makes it suitable for use in “real-world” proteomic applications. Overall, the biocatalytic nanofibers with enzyme aggregate coatings proved to be an effective approach for repeated and automated protein digestion in proteomic analyses.

  16. A circular loop of the 16-residue repeating unit in ice nucleation protein.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Kawano, Keiichi; Hikichi, Kunio; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Matsushima, Norio

    2008-06-20

    Ice nucleation protein (INP) from Gram-negative bacteria promotes the freezing of supercooled water. The central domain of INPs with 1034-1567 residues consists of 58-81 tandem repeats with the 16-residue consensus sequence of AxxxSxLTAGYGSTxT. This highly repetitive domain can also be represented by tandem repeats of 8-residues or 48-residues. In order to elucidate the structure of the tandem repeats, NMR measurements were made for three synthetic peptides including QTARKGSDLTTGYGSTS corresponding to a section of the repetitive domains in Xanthomonas campestris INP. One remarkable observation is a long-range NOE between the side chains of Tyr(i) and Ala(i-10) in the 17-residue peptide. Medium-range NOEs between the side chains of Tyr(i) and Leu(i-4), Thr(i-3) or Thr(i-2) were also observed. These side chain-side chain interactions can be ascribed to CH/pi interaction. Structure calculation reveals that the 17-residue peptide forms a circular loop incorporating the 11-residue segment ARKGSDLTTGY.

  17. Harp (harmonin-interacting, ankyrin repeat-containing protein), a novel protein that interacts with harmonin in epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Anne M; Naselli, Gaetano; Niwa, Hideo; Brodnicki, Thomas; Harrison, Leonard C; Góñez, L Jorge

    2004-10-01

    Mutations in the triple PDZ domain-containing protein harmonin have been identified as the cause of Usher deafness syndrome type 1C. Independently, we identified harmonin in a screen for genes expressed in pancreatic beta cells. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we show that the first PDZ domain of harmonin interacts with a novel protein, designated harp for harmonin-interacting, ankyrin repeat-containing protein. This interaction was confirmed in an over-expression system and in mammalian cells, and shown to be mediated by the three C-terminal amino acids of harp. Harp is expressed in many of the same epithelia as harmonin and co-localization of native harp and harmonin was demonstrated by confocal microscopy in pancreatic duct epithelium and in a pancreatic beta-cell line. Harp, predicted molecular mass 48 kDa, has a domain structure which includes three ankyrin repeats and a sterile alpha motif. Human harp maps to chromosome 16, and its mouse homologue to chromosome 7. Sequences with similarity to harp include the sans gene, mutations of which are responsible for deafness in the Jackson shaker 2 (js) mutant mouse and in human Usher syndrome type 1G. The functional domain structures of harp and harmonin, their interaction under native conditions and their co-localization suggest they constitute a scaffolding complex to facilitate signal transduction in epithelia.

  18. Crystallization of a pentapeptide-repeat protein by reductive cyclic pentylation of free amines with glutaraldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Vetting, Matthew W. Hegde, Subray S.; Blanchard, John S.

    2009-05-01

    A method to modify proteins with glutaraldehyde under reducing conditions is presented. Treatment with glutaraldehyde and dimethylaminoborane was found to result in cyclic pentylation of free amines and facilitated the structural determination of a protein previously recalcitrant to the formation of diffraction quality crystals. The pentapeptide-repeat protein EfsQnr from Enterococcus faecalis protects DNA gyrase from inhibition by fluoroquinolones. EfsQnr was cloned and purified to homogeneity, but failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals in initial crystallization screens. Treatment of EfsQnr with glutaraldehyde and the strong reducing agent borane–dimethylamine resulted in a derivatized protein which produced crystals that diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution; their structure was subsequently determined by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion. Analysis of the derivatized protein using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry indicated a mass increase of 68 Da per free amino group. Electron-density maps about a limited number of structurally ordered lysines indicated that the modification was a cyclic pentylation of free amines, producing piperidine groups.

  19. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Proteins Critical for Cilia Formation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanan; Cao, Jingli; Huang, Shan; Feng, Di; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Xueliang; Yan, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    Cilia formation and function require a special set of trafficking machinery termed intraflagellar transport (IFT), consisting mainly of protein complexes IFT-A, IFT-B, BBSome, and microtubule-dependent molecular motors. Tetratricopeptide repeat-containing (TTC) proteins are widely involved in protein complex formation. Nine of them are known to serve as components of the IFT or BBSome complexes. How many TTC proteins are cilia-related and how they function, however, remain unclear. Here we show that twenty TTC genes were upregulated by at least 2-fold during the differentiation of cultured mouse tracheal epithelial cells (MTECs) into multiciliated cells. Our systematic screen in zebrafish identified four novel TTC genes, ttc4, -9c, -36, and -39c, that are critical for cilia formation and motility. Accordingly, their zebrafish morphants displayed typical ciliopathy-related phenotypes, including curved body, abnormal otolith, hydrocephalus, and defective left-right patterning. The morphants of ttc4 and ttc25, a known cilia-related gene, additionally showed pronephric cyst formation. Immunoprecipitation indicated associations of TTC4, -9c, -25, -36, and -39c with components or entire complexes of IFT-A, IFT-B, or BBSome, implying their participations in IFT or IFT-related activities. Our results provide a global view for the relationship between TTC proteins and cilia. PMID:25860617

  20. The Triple-Repeat Protein Anakonda Controls Epithelial Tricellular Junction Formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Byri, Sunitha; Misra, Tvisha; Syed, Zulfeqhar A; Bätz, Tilmann; Shah, Jimit; Boril, Lukas; Glashauser, Jade; Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Matzat, Till; Moussian, Bernard; Uv, Anne; Luschnig, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    In epithelia, specialized tricellular junctions (TCJs) mediate cell contacts at three-cell vertices. TCJs are fundamental to epithelial biology and disease, but only a few TCJ components are known, and how they assemble at tricellular vertices is not understood. Here we describe a transmembrane protein, Anakonda (Aka), which localizes to TCJs and is essential for the formation of tricellular, but not bicellular, junctions in Drosophila. Loss of Aka causes epithelial barrier defects associated with irregular TCJ structure and geometry, suggesting that Aka organizes cell corners. Aka is necessary and sufficient for accumulation of Gliotactin at TCJs, suggesting that Aka initiates TCJ assembly by recruiting other proteins to tricellular vertices. Aka's extracellular domain has an unusual tripartite repeat structure that may mediate self-assembly, directed by the geometry of tricellular vertices. Conversely, Aka's cytoplasmic tail is dispensable for TCJ localization. Thus, extracellular interactions, rather than TCJ-directed intracellular transport, appear to mediate TCJ assembly.

  1. Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat protein SOAR1 plays a critical role in abscisic acid signalling

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Chao; Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Lu, Yan-Fen; Wu, Fu-Qing; Yu, Yong-Tao; Liang, Shan; Feng, Xiu-Jing; Portoles Comeras, Sergi; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2014-01-01

    A dominant suppressor of the ABAR overexpressor, soar1-1D, from CHLH/ABAR [coding for Mg-chelatase H subunit/putative abscisic acid (ABA) receptor (ABAR)] overexpression lines was screened to explore the mechanism of the ABAR-mediated ABA signalling. The SOAR1 gene encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein which localizes to both the cytosol and nucleus. Down-regulation of SOAR1 strongly enhances, but up-regulation of SOAR1 almost completely impairs, ABA responses, revealing that SOAR1 is a critical, negative, regulator of ABA signalling. Further genetic evidence supports that SOAR1 functions downstream of ABAR and probably upstream of an ABA-responsive transcription factor ABI5. Changes in the SOAR1 expression alter expression of a subset of ABA-responsive genes including ABI5. These findings provide important information to elucidate further the functional mechanism of PPR proteins and the complicated ABA signalling network. PMID:25005137

  2. Protein markers for discrimination of meat species in raw beef, pork and poultry and their mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gap-Don; Seo, Jin-Kyu; Yum, Hyeon-Woong; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Yang, Han-Sul

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to find discrimination markers for four major meat species such as beef, pork, chicken and duck. Myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins isolated from each meat type were analyzed by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and some proteins were identified through LC-MS/MS analysis. We confirmed that troponin I (TnI), enolase 3, l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) could be useful markers for discrimination of mammals from poultry due to their different electrophoretic mobility. Tropomyosin 1 and carbonic anhydrase 3 were observed as muscle fiber type-related proteins and these could also be markers to distinguish mammals from poultry. Species-specific peptides identified by LC-MS/MS spectra allow the identification of each species regardless of the same protein. Therefore, it is easy to discriminate between mammals and poultry by comparing the electrophoretic mobility of TnI, enolase 3, LDH, TPI and CA3, and each species could be identified through LC-MS/MS analysis. PMID:27664622

  3. Elemental Analysis and Protein Quantification of Raw Natural Rubber of IAC Series 400 Clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein, nitrogen and sulfur contents were investigated for natural rubber from commercial Hevea, synthetic polyisoprene, and new IAC clones from Mococa city (IAC 405, 406, 410, 413, and 420), Jaú city (IAC 400, 401, 402, and 417), and from RRIM 600 clone (used as a control in both cases). IAC 405 a...

  4. Exaggerated phosphorylation of brain tau protein in CRH KO mice exposed to repeated immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Novak, Petr; Vargovic, Peter; Lejavova, Katarina; Horvathova, Lubica; Ondicova, Katarina; Manz, George; Filipcik, Peter; Novak, Michal; Mravec, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses are orchestrated by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and norepinephrine (NE) synthesizing neurons. Recent findings indicate that stress may promote development of neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we investigated relationships among stress, tau protein phosphorylation, and brain NE using wild-type (WT) and CRH-knockout (CRH KO) mice. We assessed expression of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) at the PHF-1 epitope and NE concentrations in the locus coeruleus (LC), A1/C1 and A2/C2 catecholaminergic cell groups, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and frontal cortex of unstressed, singly stressed or repeatedly stressed mice. Moreover, gene expression and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and CRH receptor mRNA were determined in the LC. Plasma corticosterone levels were also measured. Exposure to a single stress increases tau phosphorylation throughout the brain in WT mice when compared to singly stressed CRH KO animals. In contrast, repeatedly stressed CRH KO mice showed exaggerated tau phosphorylation relative to WT controls. We also observed differences in extent of tau phosphorylation between investigated structures, e.g. the LC and hippocampus. Moreover, CRH deficiency leads to different responses to stress in gene expression of TH, NE concentrations, CRH receptor mRNA, and plasma corticosterone levels. Our data indicate that CRH effects on tau phosphorylation are dependent on whether stress is single or repeated, and differs between brain regions. Our findings indicate that CRH attenuates mechanisms responsible for development of stress-induced tau neuropathology, particularly in conditions of chronic stress. However, the involvement of central catecholaminergic neurons in these mechanisms remains unclear and is in need of further investigation. PMID:27484105

  5. Exaggerated phosphorylation of brain tau protein in CRH KO mice exposed to repeated immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Novak, Petr; Vargovic, Peter; Lejavova, Katarina; Horvathova, Lubica; Ondicova, Katarina; Manz, George; Filipcik, Peter; Novak, Michal; Mravec, Boris

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses are orchestrated by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and norepinephrine (NE) synthesizing neurons. Recent findings indicate that stress may promote development of neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we investigated relationships among stress, tau protein phosphorylation, and brain NE using wild-type (WT) and CRH-knockout (CRH KO) mice. We assessed expression of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) at the PHF-1 epitope and NE concentrations in the locus coeruleus (LC), A1/C1 and A2/C2 catecholaminergic cell groups, hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and frontal cortex of unstressed, singly stressed or repeatedly stressed mice. Moreover, gene expression and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and CRH receptor mRNA were determined in the LC. Plasma corticosterone levels were also measured. Exposure to a single stress increases tau phosphorylation throughout the brain in WT mice when compared to singly stressed CRH KO animals. In contrast, repeatedly stressed CRH KO mice showed exaggerated tau phosphorylation relative to WT controls. We also observed differences in extent of tau phosphorylation between investigated structures, e.g. the LC and hippocampus. Moreover, CRH deficiency leads to different responses to stress in gene expression of TH, NE concentrations, CRH receptor mRNA, and plasma corticosterone levels. Our data indicate that CRH effects on tau phosphorylation are dependent on whether stress is single or repeated, and differs between brain regions. Our findings indicate that CRH attenuates mechanisms responsible for development of stress-induced tau neuropathology, particularly in conditions of chronic stress. However, the involvement of central catecholaminergic neurons in these mechanisms remains unclear and is in need of further investigation.

  6. Dietary Protein Sources Affect Internal Quality of Raw and Cooked Shell Eggs under Refrigerated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. C.; Zhang, H. J.; Wu, S. G.; Yue, H. Y.; Wang, J.; Li, J.; Qi, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of various protein sources (soybean meal, SBM; cottonseed protein, CSP; double-zero rapeseed meal, DRM) on the internal quality of refrigerated eggs. A total of 360 laying hens (32 wk of age) were randomly allotted to six treatment groups (five replicates per treatment) and fed diets containing SBM, CSP, or DRM individually or in combination with equal crude protein content (SBM-CSP, SBM-DRM, and CSP-DRM) as the protein ingredient(s). A 6×3 factorial arrangement was employed with dietary types and storage time (0 d, 2 wk, and 4 wk) as the main effects. After 12 wk of diet feeding, a total of 270 eggs were collected for egg quality determination. The egg Haugh unit (HU) in the CSP, SBM-DRM, and DRM groups were significantly lower than those in the SBM and SBM-CSP groups. The hardness and springiness of the cooked yolk in the CSP group were significantly higher than those in the other treatment groups. A lower HU, lower yolk index and higher albumen pH were observed in the DRM group compared to the SBM and SBM-CSP groups when the eggs were stored to 4 wk, and the HU was improved in the CSP-DRM group compared to the DRM group (p<0.05). Higher yolk hardness was observed in the CSP group compared to the other groups during storage (p<0.05), but the hardness of the cooked yolk in the SBM-CSP and CSP-DRM groups showed no difference in comparison to the SBM group. In conclusion, CSP may ameliorate the negative effects of DRM on the HU of refrigerated eggs, and SBM or DRM may alleviate the adverse effects of CSP on yolk hardness. PMID:26580286

  7. WD40-Repeat Proteins in Plant Cell Wall Formation: Current Evidence and Research Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Ezcurra, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic complexity of living organisms relies on supramolecular protein structures which ensure vital processes, such as signal transduction, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In eukaryotes WD40-repeat (WDR) proteins often function as molecular “hubs” mediating supramolecular interactions. WDR proteins may display a variety of interacting partners and participate in the assembly of complexes involved in distinct cellular functions. In plants, the formation of lignocellulosic biomass involves extensive synthesis of cell wall polysaccharides, a process that requires the assembly of large transmembrane enzyme complexes, intensive vesicle trafficking, interactions with the cytoskeleton, and coordinated gene expression. Because of their function as supramolecular hubs, WDR proteins could participate in each or any of these steps, although to date only few WDR proteins have been linked to the cell wall by experimental evidence. Nevertheless, several potential cell wall-related WDR proteins were recently identified using in silico approaches, such as analyses of co-expression, interactome and conserved gene neighborhood. Notably, some WDR genes are frequently genomic neighbors of genes coding for GT2-family polysaccharide synthases in eukaryotes, and this WDR-GT2 collinear microsynteny is detected in diverse taxa. In angiosperms, two WDR genes are collinear to cellulose synthase genes, CesAs, whereas in ascomycetous fungi several WDR genes are adjacent to chitin synthase genes, chs. In this Perspective we summarize and discuss experimental and in silico studies on the possible involvement of WDR proteins in plant cell wall formation. The prospects of biotechnological engineering for enhanced biomass production are discussed. PMID:26734023

  8. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kalunke, Raviraj M.; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens. PMID:25852708

  9. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kalunke, Raviraj M; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens.

  10. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  11. Pentapeptide-repeat proteins that act as topoisomerase poison resistance factors have a common dimer interface

    PubMed Central

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Zhang, Yong; Blanchard, John S.

    2011-01-01

    The protein AlbG is a self-resistance factor against albicidin, a nonribosomally encoded hybrid polyketide-peptide with antibiotic and phytotoxic properties produced by Xanthomonas albilineans. Primary-sequence analysis indicates that AlbG is a member of the pentapeptide-repeat family of proteins (PRP). The structure of AlbG from X. albilineans was determined at 2.0 Å resolution by SAD phasing using data collected from a single trimethyllead acetate derivative on a home source. AlbG folds into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix composed of approximately eight semi-regular coils. The regularity of the β-­helix is blemished by a large loop/deviation in the β-helix between coils 4 and 5. The C-terminus of the β-helix is capped by a dimerization module, yielding a dimer with a 110 Å semi-collinear β-helical axis. This method of dimer formation appears to be common to all PRP proteins that confer resistance to topoisomerase poisons and contrasts with most PRP proteins, which are typically monomeric. PMID:21393830

  12. BB0238, a presumed tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein, is required during Borrelia burgdorferi mammalian infection.

    PubMed

    Groshong, Ashley M; Fortune, Danielle E; Moore, Brendan P; Spencer, Horace J; Skinner, Robert A; Bellamy, William T; Blevins, Jon S

    2014-10-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, occupies both a tick vector and mammalian host in nature. Considering the unique enzootic life cycle of B. burgdorferi, it is not surprising that a large proportion of its genome is composed of hypothetical proteins not found in other bacterial pathogens. bb0238 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein of unknown function that is predicted to contain a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain, a structural motif responsible for mediating protein-protein interactions. To evaluate the role of bb0238 during mammalian infection, a bb0238-deficient mutant was constructed. The bb0238 mutant was attenuated in mice infected via needle inoculation, and complementation of bb0238 expression restored infectivity to wild-type levels. bb0238 expression does not change in response to varying culture conditions, and thus, it appears to be constitutively expressed under in vitro conditions. bb0238 is expressed in murine tissues during infection, though there was no significant change in expression levels among different tissue types. Localization studies indicate that BB0238 is associated with the inner membrane of the spirochete and is therefore unlikely to promote interaction with host ligands during infection. B. burgdorferi clones containing point mutations in conserved residues of the putative TPR motif of BB0238 demonstrated attenuation in mice that was comparable to that in the bb0238 deletion mutant, suggesting that BB0238 may contain a functional TPR domain.

  13. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of a pentapeptide-repeat protein (Rfr23) from bacterium Cyanothece 511421

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Ni, Shuisong; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2006-12-01

    A unique feature of cyanobacteria genomes is the abundance of genes that code for hypothetical proteins containing tandem pentapeptide repeats approximately described by the consensus motif A[N/D]LXX. Too date, structures of two pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) have been determined with the tandem pentapeptide repeat sequences observed to adopt a novel right-handed quadrilateral b-helix, or Rfr-fold, in both structures. One structure, Mycobacterium tuberculosis MfpA, is a 183-residue protein that contains 30 consecutive pentapeptide repeats and appears to offer antibiotic resistance by acting as a DNA mimic. The other structure, Cyanothece Rfr32, is a 167-residue protein that contains 21 consecutive pentapeptide repeats. The function of Rfr32, like the other 35 hypothetical PRPs identified in the genome of Cyanothece, is unknown. In an effort to understand the role of PRPs in cyanobacteria, and to better characterize the structural properties of Rfr-folds with different amino acid sequences, a second PRP from Cyanothece 51142, Rfr23, has been cloned, expressed, and purified. Selenomethione substituted protein was crystallized by vapor diffusion in hanging drops. MAD diffraction data were collected on these crystals to 2.? Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to space group I41 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.23 Å, c = 52.40 Å. Analysis of the 172-residue protein sequence suggests that Rfr23 contains 26 pentapeptide repeats interrupted by eight residues near the N-terminus. The electron density map suggests that the pentapeptide repeats adopt a similar right-handed quadrilateral b-helix as observed in the other two PRP structures, however, the eight residue interruption in the string of pentapeptide repeats appears to create a distortion in the Rfr-fold.

  14. ANKRD1, the Gene Encoding Cardiac Ankyrin Repeat Protein, Is a Novel Dilated Cardiomyopathy Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moulik, Mousumi; Vatta, Matteo; Witt, Stephanie H.; Arola, Anita M.; Murphy, Ross T.; McKenna, William J.; Boriek, Aladin M.; Oka, Kazuhiro; Labeit, Siegfried; Bowles, Neil E.; Arimura, Takuro; Kimura, Akinori; Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated ankyrin repeat domain 1 (ANKRD1), the gene encoding cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP), as a novel candidate gene for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) through mutation analysis of a cohort of familial or idiopathic DCM patients, based on the hypothesis that inherited dysfunction of mechanical stretch-based signaling is present in a subset of DCM patients. Background CARP, a transcription coinhibitor, is a member of the titin-N2A mechanosensory complex and translocates to the nucleus in response to stretch. It is up-regulated in cardiac failure and hypertrophy and represses expression of sarcomeric proteins. Its overexpression results in contractile dysfunction. Methods In all, 208 DCM patients were screened for mutations/variants in the coding region of ANKRD1 using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, and direct deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing. In vitro functional analyses of the mutation were performed using yeast 2-hybrid assays and investigating the effect on stretch-mediated gene expression in myoblastoid cell lines using quantitative real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results Three missense heterozygous ANKRD1 mutations (P105S, V107L, and M184I) were identified in 4 DCM patients. The M184I mutation results in loss of CARP binding with Talin 1 and FHL2, and the P105S mutation in loss of Talin 1 binding. Intracellular localization of mutant CARP proteins is not altered. The mutations result in differential stretch-induced gene expression compared with wild-type CARP. Conclusions ANKRD1 is a novel DCM gene, with mutations present in 1.9% of DCM patients. The ANKRD1 mutations may cause DCM as a result of disruption of the normal cardiac stretch-based signaling. PMID:19608030

  15. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprCN and TprCC) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSPN and MOSPC) of Treponema denticola and that TprCC is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSPC-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSPN-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSPC-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSPN and MOSPC-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSPN-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. PMID:25805501

  16. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zemin; Tan, Jianjie; Shi, Zhenying; Xie, Qingjun; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-06-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3' untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  17. Destabilizing an interacting motif strengthens the association of a designed ankyrin repeat protein with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shoeb; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Dreier, Birgit; Hamdane, Djemel; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Plückthun, Andreas; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Affinity maturation by random mutagenesis and selection is an established technique to make binding molecules more suitable for applications in biomedical research, diagnostics and therapy. Here we identified an unexpected novel mechanism of affinity increase upon in vitro evolution of a tubulin-specific designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin). Structural analysis indicated that in the progenitor DARPin the C-terminal capping repeat (C-cap) undergoes a 25° rotation to avoid a clash with tubulin upon binding. Additionally, the C-cap appears to be involved in electrostatic repulsion with tubulin. Biochemical and structural characterizations demonstrated that the evolved mutants achieved a gain in affinity through destabilization of the C-cap, which relieves the need of a DARPin conformational change upon tubulin binding and removes unfavorable interactions in the complex. Therefore, this specific case of an order-to-disorder transition led to a 100-fold tighter complex with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant, remarkably associated with a 30% decrease of the binding surface. PMID:27380724

  18. Destabilizing an interacting motif strengthens the association of a designed ankyrin repeat protein with tubulin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shoeb; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Dreier, Birgit; Hamdane, Djemel; Aumont-Nicaise, Magali; Plückthun, Andreas; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Affinity maturation by random mutagenesis and selection is an established technique to make binding molecules more suitable for applications in biomedical research, diagnostics and therapy. Here we identified an unexpected novel mechanism of affinity increase upon in vitro evolution of a tubulin-specific designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin). Structural analysis indicated that in the progenitor DARPin the C-terminal capping repeat (C-cap) undergoes a 25° rotation to avoid a clash with tubulin upon binding. Additionally, the C-cap appears to be involved in electrostatic repulsion with tubulin. Biochemical and structural characterizations demonstrated that the evolved mutants achieved a gain in affinity through destabilization of the C-cap, which relieves the need of a DARPin conformational change upon tubulin binding and removes unfavorable interactions in the complex. Therefore, this specific case of an order-to-disorder transition led to a 100-fold tighter complex with a subnanomolar equilibrium dissociation constant, remarkably associated with a 30% decrease of the binding surface. PMID:27380724

  19. The Leucine-rich Pentatricopeptide-Repeat Containing Protein Regulates Mitochondrial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sondheimer, Neal; Fang, Ji-Kang; Polyak, Erzsebet; Falk, Marni; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial function depends upon the coordinated expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Although the basal factors that carry out the process of mitochondrial transcription are known, the regulation of this process is incompletely understood. To further our understanding of mitochondrial gene regulation we identified proteins that bound to the previously described point of termination for the major mRNA-coding transcript H2. One was the leucine-rich pentatricopeptide-repeat containing protein (LRPPRC), which has been linked to the French-Canadian variant of Leigh syndrome. Cells with reduced expression of LRPPRC had a reduction in oxygen consumption. The expression of mitochondrial mRNA and tRNA was dependent upon LRPPRC levels, but reductions in LRPPRC did not affect the expression of mitochondrial rRNA. Reduction of LRPPRC levels interfered with mitochondrial transcription in vitro but did not affect the stability of mitochondrial mRNAs or alter the expression of nuclear genes responsible for mitochondrial transcription in vivo. These findings demonstrate the control of mitochondrial mRNA synthesis by a protein that has an established role in regulating nuclear transcription, and a link to mitochondrial disease. PMID:20677761

  20. CD4-Specific Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins Are Novel Potent HIV Entry Inhibitors with Unique Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Andreas; Rusert, Peter; Berlinger, Livia; Ruprecht, Claudia R.; Mann, Axel; Corthésy, Stéphanie; Turville, Stuart G.; Aravantinou, Meropi; Fischer, Marek; Robbiani, Melissa; Amstutz, Patrick; Trkola, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation of a novel type of HIV entry inhibitor using the recently developed Designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein (DARPin) technology. DARPin proteins specific for human CD4 were selected from a DARPin DNA library using ribosome display. Selected pool members interacted specifically with CD4 and competed with gp120 for binding to CD4. DARPin proteins derived in the initial selection series inhibited HIV in a dose-dependent manner, but showed a relatively high variability in their capacity to block replication of patient isolates on primary CD4 T cells. In consequence, a second series of CD4-specific DARPins with improved affinity for CD4 was generated. These 2nd series DARPins potently inhibit infection of genetically divergent (subtype B and C) HIV isolates in the low nanomolar range, independent of coreceptor usage. Importantly, the actions of the CD4 binding DARPins were highly specific: no effect on cell viability or activation, CD4 memory cell function, or interference with CD4-independent virus entry was observed. These novel CD4 targeting molecules described here combine the unique characteristics of DARPins—high physical stability, specificity and low production costs—with the capacity to potently block HIV entry, rendering them promising candidates for microbicide development. PMID:18654624

  1. TAPO: A combined method for the identification of tandem repeats in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Do Viet, Phuong; Roche, Daniel B; Kajava, Andrey V

    2015-09-14

    In recent years, there has been an emergence of new 3D structures of proteins containing tandem repeats (TRs), as a result of improved expression and crystallization strategies. Databases focused on structure classifications (PDB, SCOP, CATH) do not provide an easy solution for selection of these structures from PDB. Several approaches have been developed, but no best approach exists to identify the whole range of 3D TRs. Here we describe the TAndem PrOtein detector (TAPO) that uses periodicities of atomic coordinates and other types of structural representation, including strings generated by conformational alphabets, residue contact maps, and arrangements of vectors of secondary structure elements. The benchmarking shows the superior performance of TAPO over the existing programs. In accordance with our analysis of PDB using TAPO, 19% of proteins contain 3D TRs. This analysis allowed us to identify new families of 3D TRs, suggesting that TAPO can be used to regularly update the collection and classification of existing repetitive structures. PMID:26320412

  2. Characterization of the Plasmodium Interspersed Repeats (PIR) proteins of Plasmodium chabaudi indicates functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Xue Yan; Brugat, Thibaut; Siau, Anthony; Lawton, Jennifer; Wong, Daniel S.; Farah, Abdirahman; Twang, Jing Shun; Gao, Xiaohong; Langhorne, Jean; Preiser, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium multigene families play a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria. The Plasmodium interspersed repeat (pir) genes comprise the largest multigene family in many Plasmodium spp. However their function(s) remains unknown. Using the rodent model of malaria, Plasmodium chabaudi, we show that individual CIR proteins have differential localizations within infected red cell (iRBC), suggesting different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. Some CIRs appear to be located on the surface of iRBC and merozoites and are therefore well placed to interact with host molecules. In line with this hypothesis, we show for the first time that a subset of recombinant CIRs bind mouse RBCs suggesting a role for CIR in rosette formation and/or invasion. Together, our results unravel differences in subcellular localization and ability to bind mouse erythrocytes between the members of the cir family, which strongly suggest different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. PMID:26996203

  3. Development of resistant transgenic soybeans with inverted repeat-coat protein genes of soybean dwarf virus.

    PubMed

    Tougou, Makoto; Furutani, Noriyuki; Yamagishi, Noriko; Shizukawa, Yoshiaki; Takahata, Yoshihito; Hidaka, Soh

    2006-11-01

    In an attempt to generate soybean plants resistant to soybean dwarf virus (SbDV), we transformed a construct containing inverted repeat-SbDV coat protein (CP) genes spaced by beta-glucuronidase (GUS) sequences into soybean somatic embryos via microprojectile bombardment. Three T(0) plants with an introduced CP gene were obtained, and one generated T(1) seeds. The presence of the transgene in T(1) plants was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization analysis, but expression of CP was not detected by northern blot hybridization analysis. Two months after inoculation of SbDV by aphid, T(2) plants contained little SbDV-specific RNA and remained symptomless. These plants contained SbDV-CP-specific siRNA. These results suggest that the T(2) plants achieved resistance to SbDV by an RNA-silencing-mediated process.

  4. Characterization of the Plasmodium Interspersed Repeats (PIR) proteins of Plasmodium chabaudi indicates functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Yam, Xue Yan; Brugat, Thibaut; Siau, Anthony; Lawton, Jennifer; Wong, Daniel S; Farah, Abdirahman; Twang, Jing Shun; Gao, Xiaohong; Langhorne, Jean; Preiser, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium multigene families play a central role in the pathogenesis of malaria. The Plasmodium interspersed repeat (pir) genes comprise the largest multigene family in many Plasmodium spp. However their function(s) remains unknown. Using the rodent model of malaria, Plasmodium chabaudi, we show that individual CIR proteins have differential localizations within infected red cell (iRBC), suggesting different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. Some CIRs appear to be located on the surface of iRBC and merozoites and are therefore well placed to interact with host molecules. In line with this hypothesis, we show for the first time that a subset of recombinant CIRs bind mouse RBCs suggesting a role for CIR in rosette formation and/or invasion. Together, our results unravel differences in subcellular localization and ability to bind mouse erythrocytes between the members of the cir family, which strongly suggest different functional roles in a blood-stage infection. PMID:26996203

  5. Sequence-specific DNA binding of individual cut repeats of the human CCAAT displacement/cut homeodomain protein.

    PubMed

    Aufiero, B; Neufeld, E J; Orkin, S H

    1994-08-01

    CCAAT displacement protein (CDP), a nuclear protein of 180-190 kDa, contains a triplicated motif, the cut domain, similar (80-90% conserved) to three repeats of 60-65 amino acids first identified in Drosophila cut, a homeo-domain protein involved in cell-fate decisions in development. Cut repeats bind DNA and exhibit subtle differences in target-site recognition. DNA sequences specifically bound by cut repeats were isolated by PCR-mediated DNA target-site selection. Sequences selected for cut repeat 2 and 3 (CR2 and CR3) binding are A+T-rich and favor an ATA motif with similar, but not identical, flanking base preferences. CR2 and CR3 discriminate among similar target sequences. CR1, which is more divergent from CR2 and CR3, displays the most restricted pattern of DNA sequence recognition. Methylation interference analysis demonstrates different protein-DNA contacts for CR1 and CR3 binding to a target sequence. Thus, CDP/cut is a complex protein whose DNA-binding properties reflect the combinatorial interaction of four domains (three cut repeats and one homeodomain) with target DNA sequences. PMID:7914370

  6. Programmable DNA-binding proteins from Burkholderia provide a fresh perspective on the TALE-like repeat domain.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Dietze, Jörn; Elsaesser, Janett; Morbitzer, Robert; Lahaye, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    The tandem repeats of transcription activator like effectors (TALEs) mediate sequence-specific DNA binding using a simple code. Naturally, TALEs are injected by Xanthomonas bacteria into plant cells to manipulate the host transcriptome. In the laboratory TALE DNA binding domains are reprogrammed and used to target a fused functional domain to a genomic locus of choice. Research into the natural diversity of TALE-like proteins may provide resources for the further improvement of current TALE technology. Here we describe TALE-like proteins from the endosymbiotic bacterium Burkholderia rhizoxinica, termed Bat proteins. Bat repeat domains mediate sequence-specific DNA binding with the same code as TALEs, despite less than 40% sequence identity. We show that Bat proteins can be adapted for use as transcription factors and nucleases and that sequence preferences can be reprogrammed. Unlike TALEs, the core repeats of each Bat protein are highly polymorphic. This feature allowed us to explore alternative strategies for the design of custom Bat repeat arrays, providing novel insights into the functional relevance of non-RVD residues. The Bat proteins offer fertile grounds for research into the creation of improved programmable DNA-binding proteins and comparative insights into TALE-like evolution.

  7. RAP, the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein in Arabidopsis, is required for chloroplast 16S rRNA maturation.

    PubMed

    Kleinknecht, Laura; Wang, Fei; Stübe, Roland; Philippar, Katrin; Nickelsen, Jörg; Bohne, Alexandra-Viola

    2014-02-01

    The biogenesis and activity of chloroplasts in both vascular plants and algae depends on an intracellular network of nucleus-encoded, trans-acting factors that control almost all aspects of organellar gene expression. Most of these regulatory factors belong to the helical repeat protein superfamily, which includes tetratricopeptide repeat, pentatricopeptide repeat, and the recently identified octotricopeptide repeat (OPR) proteins. Whereas green algae express many different OPR proteins, only a single orthologous OPR protein is encoded in the genomes of most land plants. Here, we report the characterization of the only OPR protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, RAP, which has previously been implicated in plant pathogen defense. Loss of RAP led to a severe defect in processing of chloroplast 16S rRNA resulting in impaired chloroplast translation and photosynthesis. In vitro RNA binding and RNase protection assays revealed that RAP has an intrinsic and specific RNA binding capacity, and the RAP binding site was mapped to the 5' region of the 16S rRNA precursor. Nucleoid localization of RAP was shown by transient green fluorescent protein import assays, implicating the nucleoid as the site of chloroplast rRNA processing. Taken together, our data indicate that the single OPR protein in Arabidopsis is important for a basic process of chloroplast biogenesis.

  8. The Protein Synthesis Inhibitor Blasticidin S Enters Mammalian Cells via Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Protein 8D

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Clarissa C.; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Sabatini, David M.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat-containing 8 (LRRC8) proteins have been identified as putative receptors involved in lymphocyte development and adipocyte differentiation. They remain poorly characterized, and no specific function has been assigned to them. There is no consensus on how this family of proteins might function because homology searches suggest that members of the LRRC8 family act not as plasma membrane receptors, but rather as channels that mediate cell-cell signaling. Here we provide experimental evidence that supports a role for LRRC8s in the transport of small molecules. We show that LRRC8D is a mammalian protein required for the import of the antibiotic blasticidin S. We characterize localization and topology of LRRC8A and LRRC8D and demonstrate that LRRC8D interacts with LRRC8A, LRRC8B, and LRRC8C. Given the suggested involvement in solute transport, our results support a model in which LRRC8s form one or more complexes that may mediate cell-cell communication by transporting small solutes. PMID:24782309

  9. Ternary WD40 Repeat-Containing Protein Complexes: Evolution, Composition and Roles in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jimi C.; Chezem, William R.; Clay, Nicole K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants, like mammals, rely on their innate immune system to perceive and discriminate among the majority of their microbial pathogens. Unlike mammals, plants respond to this molecular dialog by unleashing a complex chemical arsenal of defense metabolites to resist or evade pathogen infection. In basal or non-host resistance, plants utilize signal transduction pathways to detect “non-self,” “damaged-self,” and “altered-self”- associated molecular patterns and translate these “danger” signals into largely inducible chemical defenses. The WD40 repeat (WDR)-containing proteins Gβ and TTG1 are constituents of two independent ternary protein complexes functioning at opposite ends of a plant immune signaling pathway. They are also encoded by single-copy genes that are ubiquitous in higher plants, implying the limited diversity and functional conservation of their respective complexes. In this review, we summarize what is currently known about the evolutionary history of these WDR-containing ternary complexes, their repertoire and combinatorial interactions, and their downstream effectors and pathways in plant defense. PMID:26779203

  10. Functional analysis of a RING domain ankyrin repeat protein that is highly expressed during flower senescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinjia; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Donnelly, Linda; Reid, Michael S

    2007-01-01

    A gene encoding a RING zinc finger ankyrin repeat protein (MjXB3), a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, is highly expressed in petals of senescing four o'clock (Mirabilis jalapa) flowers, increasing >40,000-fold during the onset of visible senescence. The gene has homologues in many other species, and the Petunia homologue is strongly up-regulated in senescing Petunia corollas. Silencing the expression of this gene in Petunia, using virus-induced gene silencing, resulted in a 2 d extension in flower life. In Mirabilis, a 2 kb promoter region, 5' upstream of the MjXB3 gene, was isolated. The promoter sequence included putative binding sites for many DNA-binding proteins, including the bZIP, Myb, homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip), MADS-box, and WRKY transcription factors. The construct containing a 1 kb promoter region immediately upstream of the MjXB3 gene drove the strongest expression of the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in a transient expression assay. In Petunia, GUS expression under the control of this heterologous promoter fragment was specific to senescing flowers. The Mirabilis promoter GUS construct was tested in other flower species; while GUS activity in carnation petals was high during senescence, no expression was detected in three monocotyledonous flowers--daylily (Hemerocallis 'Stella d'Oro'), daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus 'King Alfred'), and orchid (Dendrobium 'Emma White'). PMID:18057040

  11. A Secreted Ankyrin-Repeat Protein from Clinical Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Isolates Disrupts Actin Cytoskeletal Structure.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Logan C; O'Keefe, Sean; Parnes, Mei-Fan; MacDonald, Hanlon; Stretz, Lindsey; Templer, Suzanne J; Wong, Emily L; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging, multidrug-resistant pathogen of increasing importance for the immunocompromised, including cystic fibrosis patients. Despite its significance as an emerging pathogen, relatively little is known regarding the specific factors and mechanisms that contribute to its pathogenicity. We identify and characterize a putative ankyrin-repeat protein (Smlt3054) unique to clinical S. maltophilia isolates that binds F-actin in vitro and co-localizes with actin in transfected HEK293a cells. Smlt3054 is endogenously expressed and secreted from clinical S. maltophilia isolates, but not an environmental isolate (R551-3). The in vitro binding of Smlt3054 to F-actin resulted in a thickening of the filaments as observed by TEM. Ectopic expression of Smlt3054-GFP exhibits strong co-localization with F-actin, with distinct, retrograde F-actin waves specifically associated with Smlt3054 in individual cells as well as formation of dense, internal inclusions at the expense of retrograde F-actin waves. Collectively, our results point to an interaction between Smlt3054 and F-actin. Furthermore, as a potentially secreted protein unique to clinical S. maltophilia isolates, Smlt3054 may serve as a starting point for understanding the mechanisms by which S. maltophilia has become an emergent pathogen. PMID:27622948

  12. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E.; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3′ adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  13. Ribosome-associated pentatricopeptide repeat proteins function as translational activators in mitochondria of trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Aphasizheva, Inna; Maslov, Dmitri A; Qian, Yu; Huang, Lan; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Aphasizhev, Ruslan

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are composed of 9S and 12S rRNAs, eubacterial-type ribosomal proteins, polypeptides lacking discernible motifs and approximately 20 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) RNA binding proteins. Several PPRs also populate the polyadenylation complex; among these, KPAF1 and KPAF2 function as general mRNA 3' adenylation/uridylation factors. The A/U-tail enables mRNA binding to the small ribosomal subunit and is essential for translation. The presence of A/U-tail also correlates with requirement for translation of certain mRNAs in mammalian and insect parasite stages. Here, we inquired whether additional PPRs activate translation of individual mRNAs. Proteomic analysis identified KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 as components of the small ribosomal subunit in mammalian and insect forms, but also revealed their association with the polyadenylation complex in the latter. RNAi knockdowns demonstrated essential functions of KRIPP1 and KRIPP8 in the actively respiring insect stage, but not in the mammalian stage. In the KRIPP1 knockdown, A/U-tailed mRNA encoding cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 declined concomitantly with the de novo synthesis of this subunit whereas polyadenylation and translation of cyb mRNA were unaffected. In contrast, the KRIPP8 knockdown inhibited A/U-tailing and translation of both CO1 and cyb mRNAs. Our findings indicate that ribosome-associated PPRs may selectively activate mRNAs for translation. PMID:26713541

  14. Tandem repeat protein as potential diagnostic antigen for Trypanosoma evansi infection.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Nguyen Thu; Goto, Yasuyuki; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Inoue, Noboru

    2012-02-01

    Trypanosoma evansi infection (surra) causes significant losses in livestock production in tropical and sub-tropical areas. The current ELISA recommended by OIE for diagnosis of the disease is based on trypanosome lysate antigen. However, antigenic variation and unstable nature of cell lysate antigen make it difficult to standardize the assay. Thus, there are needs to develop recombinant antigen-based ELISA that improve stability, sensitivity, and specificity of the test. Since tandem repeat (TR) proteins of trypanosomatid parasites generally possess high antigenicity, they have been considered to be the promising antigens for trypanosomosis and leishmaniosis. In this study, IgG responses against 14 recombinant TR proteins of trypanosomes were examined by ELISA. Serum samples were obtained from three water buffaloes experimentally infected with T. evansi. Since Trypanosoma congolense GM6 (TcoGM6) elicited highest IgG responses to all water buffaloes, we further bioinformatically and molecular biologically identified Trypanosoma brucei brucei GM6 (TbbGM6) and T. evansi GM6 (TeGM6) TR genes, respectively. As expected, predicted amino acid sequences of TbbGM6 and TeGM6 were identical while the nucleic acid sequence homology between TbbGM6 and TcoGM6 was 63.8%. All buffaloes became clearly positive in recombinant TbbGM6 (rTbbGM6)-based ELISA at 48 days post-infection, suggesting that rTbbGM6 is usable as a serodiagnostic antigen for chronic T. evansi infection.

  15. The tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein slow green1 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhihong; Xu, Fan; Guan, Liping; Qian, Pingping; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhang, Huifang; Huang, Yan; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-03-01

    A new gene, SG1, was identified in a slow-greening mutant (sg1) isolated from an ethylmethanesulphonate-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana. The newly formed leaves of sg1 were initially albino, but gradually became pale green. After 3 weeks, the leaves of the mutant were as green as those of the wild-type plants. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed delayed proplastid to chloroplast transition. The results of map-based cloning showed that SG1 encodes a chloroplast-localized tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR data demonstrated the presence of SG1 gene expression in all tissues, particularly young green tissues. The sg1 mutation disrupted the expression levels of several genes associated with chloroplast development, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll biosynthesis. The results of genetic analysis indicated that gun1 and gun4 partially restored the expression patterns of the previously detected chloroplast-associated genes, thereby ameliorating the slow-greening phenotype of sg1. Taken together, the results suggest that the newly identified protein, SG1, is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis.

  16. The tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein slow green1 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhihong; Xu, Fan; Hou, Suiwen

    2014-01-01

    A new gene, SG1, was identified in a slow-greening mutant (sg1) isolated from an ethylmethanesulphonate-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana. The newly formed leaves of sg1 were initially albino, but gradually became pale green. After 3 weeks, the leaves of the mutant were as green as those of the wild-type plants. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed that the mutant displayed delayed proplastid to chloroplast transition. The results of map-based cloning showed that SG1 encodes a chloroplast-localized tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription–PCR data demonstrated the presence of SG1 gene expression in all tissues, particularly young green tissues. The sg1 mutation disrupted the expression levels of several genes associated with chloroplast development, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll biosynthesis. The results of genetic analysis indicated that gun1 and gun4 partially restored the expression patterns of the previously detected chloroplast-associated genes, thereby ameliorating the slow-greening phenotype of sg1. Taken together, the results suggest that the newly identified protein, SG1, is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis. PMID:24420572

  17. SdrI, a serine-aspartate repeat protein identified in Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain 7108, is a collagen-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sakinc, Türkan; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2006-08-01

    A gene encoding a serine-aspartate repeat protein of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women, has been cloned and sequenced. In contrast to other SD repeat proteins, SdrI carries 21 additional N-terminal repeats with a consensus sequence of (P/A)ATKE(K/E)A(A/V)(T/I)(A/T/S)EE and has the longest SD(AD)(1-5) repetitive region (854 amino acids) described so far. This highly repetitive sequence contains only the amino acids serine, asparagine, and a distinctly greater amount of alanine (37%) than all other known SD repeat proteins (2.3 to 4.4%). In addition, it is a collagen-binding protein of S. saprophyticus and the second example in this organism of a surface protein carrying the LPXTG motif. We constructed an isogenic sdrI knockout mutant that showed decreased binding to immobilized collagen compared with wild-type S. saprophyticus strain 7108. Binding could be reconstituted by complementation. Collagen binding is specifically caused by SdrI, and the recently described UafA protein, the only LPXTG-containing protein in the genome sequence of the type strain, is not involved in this trait. Our experiments suggest that, as in other staphylococci, the presence of different LPXTG-anchored cell wall proteins is common in S. saprophyticus and support the notion that the presence of matrix-binding surface proteins is common in staphylococci.

  18. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle.

    PubMed

    Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K; Mitchell, Madeline C; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-05-24

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2 Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2 We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1's four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  19. A repeat protein links Rubisco to form the eukaryotic carbon-concentrating organelle

    PubMed Central

    Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Meyer, Moritz T.; Mettler-Altmann, Tabea; Chen, Vivian K.; Mitchell, Madeline C.; Caspari, Oliver; Freeman Rosenzweig, Elizabeth S.; Pallesen, Leif; Reeves, Gregory; Itakura, Alan; Roth, Robyn; Sommer, Frederik; Geimer, Stefan; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Goodenough, Ursula; Stitt, Mark; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Biological carbon fixation is a key step in the global carbon cycle that regulates the atmosphere's composition while producing the food we eat and the fuels we burn. Approximately one-third of global carbon fixation occurs in an overlooked algal organelle called the pyrenoid. The pyrenoid contains the CO2-fixing enzyme Rubisco and enhances carbon fixation by supplying Rubisco with a high concentration of CO2. Since the discovery of the pyrenoid more that 130 y ago, the molecular structure and biogenesis of this ecologically fundamental organelle have remained enigmatic. Here we use the model green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to discover that a low-complexity repeat protein, Essential Pyrenoid Component 1 (EPYC1), links Rubisco to form the pyrenoid. We find that EPYC1 is of comparable abundance to Rubisco and colocalizes with Rubisco throughout the pyrenoid. We show that EPYC1 is essential for normal pyrenoid size, number, morphology, Rubisco content, and efficient carbon fixation at low CO2. We explain the central role of EPYC1 in pyrenoid biogenesis by the finding that EPYC1 binds Rubisco to form the pyrenoid matrix. We propose two models in which EPYC1’s four repeats could produce the observed lattice arrangement of Rubisco in the Chlamydomonas pyrenoid. Our results suggest a surprisingly simple molecular mechanism for how Rubisco can be packaged to form the pyrenoid matrix, potentially explaining how Rubisco packaging into a pyrenoid could have evolved across a broad range of photosynthetic eukaryotes through convergent evolution. In addition, our findings represent a key step toward engineering a pyrenoid into crops to enhance their carbon fixation efficiency. PMID:27166422

  20. The Octatricopeptide Repeat Protein Raa8 Is Required for Chloroplast trans Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christina; Wünsch, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA maturation of the tripartite chloroplast psaA gene from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii depends on various nucleus-encoded factors that participate in trans splicing of two group II introns. Recently, a multiprotein complex was identified that is involved in processing the psaA precursor mRNA. Using coupled tandem affinity purification (TAP) and mass spectrometry analyses with the trans-splicing factor Raa4 as a bait protein, we recently identified a multisubunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex comprising the previously characterized trans-splicing factors Raa1, Raa3, Raa4, and Rat2 plus novel components. Raa1 and Rat2 share a structural motif, an octatricopeptide repeat (OPR), that presumably functions as an RNA interaction module. Two of the novel RNP complex components also exhibit a predicted OPR motif and were therefore considered potential trans-splicing factors. In this study, we selected bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones encoding these OPR proteins and conducted functional complementation assays using previously generated trans-splicing mutants. Our assay revealed that the trans-splicing defect of mutant F19 was restored by a new factor we named RAA8; molecular characterization of complemented strains verified that Raa8 participates in splicing of the first psaA group II intron. Three of six OPR motifs are located in the C-terminal end of Raa8, which was shown to be essential for restoring psaA mRNA trans splicing. Our results support the important role played by OPR proteins in chloroplast RNA metabolism and also demonstrate that combining TAP and mass spectrometry with functional complementation studies represents a vigorous tool for identifying trans-splicing factors. PMID:26209695

  1. Characterization of two potentially universal turn motifs that shape the repeated five-residues fold - Crystal structure of a lumenal pentapeptide repeat protein from Cyanothece 51142

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Robinson, Howard; Welsh, Eric A.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2006-11-01

    The genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 has recently been sequenced and observed to contain 35 pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs). These proteins, while present throughout the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms, are most abundant in cyanobacteria. The sheer number of PRPs in cyanobacteria coupled with their predicted location in all the cyanobacteria cellular compartments argues for important, yet unknown, physiological and biochemical functions. To gain insights into the biochemical function of PRPs in cyanobacteria, the first crystal structure of a PRP from Cyanothece has been determined at 2.1 Å resolution. The native protein, annotated Rfr32 for repeated five-residue, is a 167-residue protein with an N-terminal 29-residue signal peptide. The signal peptide was replaced with a 43-residue tag that was invisible in the electron density maps of two different crystal forms from which essentially identical structures were solved. The structure is dominated by 21 tandem pentapeptide repeats that fold into a right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a “square” tower with four distinct faces. Four consecutive pentapeptide repeats define a “floor” of the tower with a single repeat occupying a face. The Rfr-fold contains five complete, stacked, ascending floors (coils) that complete a revolution every 20 residues with a ~4.8 Å rise along the helix axis. The main chain backbone of the floors are held together with a narrow parallel β-sheet on one face and stacked parallel The main chain backbone of the floors are held together with a narrow parallel β-sheet on one face and stacked parallel β-bridges (single-residue β-sheets) on the other three faces. The regular shape of the tower is maintained by two distinct types of four-residue turns labeled pseudo type II and pseudo type IV β-turns. The interior of the Rfr-fold is primarily hydrophobic, with all side chains of the i and i-2 residues inserted into the

  2. Knowledge-based design of reagentless fluorescent biosensors from a designed ankyrin repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Brient-Litzler, Elodie; Plückthun, Andreas; Bedouelle, Hugues

    2010-04-01

    Designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) can be selected from combinatorial libraries to bind any target antigen. They show high levels of recombinant expression, solubility and stability, and contain no cysteine residue. The possibility of obtaining, from any DARPin and at high yields, fluorescent conjugates which respond to the binding of the antigen by a variation of fluorescence, would have numerous applications in micro- and nano-analytical sciences. This possibility was explored with Off7, a DARPin directed against the maltose binding protein (MalE) from Escherichia coli, with known crystal structure of the complex. Eight residues of Off7, whose solvent accessible surface area varies on association with the antigen but which are not in direct contact with the antigen, were individually mutated into cysteine and then chemically coupled with a fluorophore. The conjugates were ranked according to their relative sensitivities. All of them showed an increase in their fluorescence intensity on antigen binding by >1.7-fold. The best conjugate retained the same affinity as the parental DARPin. Its signal increased linearly and specifically with the concentration of antigen, up to 15-fold in buffer and 3-fold in serum when fully saturated, the difference being mainly due to the absorption of light by serum. Its lower limit of detection was equal to 0.3 nM with a standard spectrofluorometer. Titrations with potassium iodide indicated that the fluorescence variation was due to a shielding of the fluorescent group from the solvent by the antigen. These results suggest rules for the design of reagentless fluorescent biosensors from any DARPin. PMID:19945965

  3. SorLA Complement-type Repeat Domains Protect the Amyloid Precursor Protein against Processing*

    PubMed Central

    Mehmedbasic, Arnela; Christensen, Sofie K.; Nilsson, Jonas; Rüetschi, Ulla; Gustafsen, Camilla; Poulsen, Annemarie Svane Aavild; Rasmussen, Rikke W.; Fjorback, Anja N.; Larson, Göran; Andersen, Olav M.

    2015-01-01

    SorLA is a neuronal sorting receptor that is genetically associated with Alzheimer disease. SorLA interacts directly with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and affects the processing of the precursor, leading to a decreased generation of the amyloid-β peptide. The SorLA complement-type repeat (CR) domains associate in vitro with APP, but the precise molecular determinants of SorLA·APP complex formation and the mechanisms responsible for the effect of binding on APP processing have not yet been elucidated. Here, we have generated protein expression constructs for SorLA devoid of the 11 CR-domains and for two SorLA mutants harboring substitutions of the fingerprint residues in the central CR-domains. We generated SH-SY5Y cell lines that stably express these SorLA variants to study the binding and processing of APP using co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting/ELISAs, respectively. We found that the SorLA CR-cluster is essential for interaction with APP and that deletion of the CR-cluster abolishes the protection against APP processing. Mutation of identified fingerprint residues in the SorLA CR-domains leads to changes in the O-linked glycosylation of APP when expressed in SH-SY5Y cells. Our results provide novel information on the mechanisms behind the influence of SorLA activity on APP metabolism by controlling post-translational glycosylation in the Golgi, suggesting new strategies against amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer disease. PMID:25525276

  4. ETS family proteins activate transcription from HIV-1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Hodge, D R; Thompson, D M; Robinson, L; Panayiotakis, A; Watson, D K; Papas, T S

    1993-10-01

    ets is a multigene family and its members share a common ETS DNA-binding domain. ETS proteins activate transcription via binding to a purine-rich GGAA core sequence located in promoters/enhancers of various genes, including several that are transcriptionally active in T cells. The ETS1, ETS2, and ERBG/Hu-FLI-1 gene expression pattern also suggests a role for these genes in cells of hematopoietic lineage. The HIV-1 LTR core enhancer contains two 10-base pair direct repeat sequences (left and right) that are required for regulation of HIV-1 mRNA expression by host transcription factors, including NF kappa B. Two ETS-binding sites are present in the core enhancer of all the HIV-1 isolates reported so far. In our studies, we utilized HIV-1 HXB2 and HIV-1 Z2Z6 core enhancers because the Z2Z6 strain has a single point mutation flanking the right ETS-binding site. We demonstrate that the ETS1, ETS2, and ERGB/Hu-FLI-1 proteins can trans-activate transcription from both the HXB2 and Z2Z6 core enhancer when linked to a reporter (cat) gene. In addition, we show that the DNA binding and trans-activation with the Z2Z6 core enhancer is at least 40-fold higher than that observed with the HXB2 core enhancer. Further, we provide evidence that the marked increase in binding and trans-activation with Z2Z6 core enhancer sequences is due to the substitution of a flanking T residue in HXB2 TGGAA) by a C residue in Z2Z6 (CGGAA) isolate, thus generating an optimal ETS-binding core (CGGAA) sequence. PMID:8280476

  5. Chemosensory Regulation of a HEAT-Repeat Protein Couples Aggregation and Sporulation in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Darnell, Cynthia L.; Wilson, Janet M.; Tiwari, Nitija; Fuentes, Ernesto J.

    2014-01-01

    Chemosensory systems are complex, highly modified two-component systems (TCS) used by bacteria to control various biological functions ranging from motility to sporulation. Chemosensory systems and TCS both modulate phosphorelays comprised of histidine kinases and response regulators, some of which are single-domain response regulators (SD-RRs) such as CheY. In this study, we have identified and characterized the Che7 chemosensory system of Myxococcus xanthus, a common soil bacterium which displays multicellular development in response to stress. Both genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that the Che7 system regulates development via a direct interaction between the SD-RR CheY7 and a HEAT repeat domain-containing protein, Cpc7. Phosphorylation of the SD-RR affects the interaction with its target, and residues within the α4-β5-α5 fold of the REC domain govern this interaction. The identification of the Cpc7 interaction with CheY7 extends the diversity of known targets for SD-RRs in biological systems. PMID:24957622

  6. Hybrid Sterility in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Involves the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhao, Zhigang; Shi, Yanrong; Tian, Hua; Liu, Linglong; Bian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Yang; Zheng, Xiaoming; Gan, Lu; Shen, Yumin; Wang, Chaolong; Yu, Xiaowen; Wang, Chunming; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Jiulin; Ikehashi, Hiroshi; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-07-01

    Intersubspecific hybrid sterility is a common form of reproductive isolation in rice (Oryza sativa L.), which significantly hampers the utilization of heterosis between indica and japonica varieties. Here, we elucidated the mechanism of S7, which specially causes Aus-japonica/indica hybrid female sterility, through cytological and genetic analysis, map-based cloning, and transformation experiments. Abnormal positioning of polar nuclei and smaller embryo sac were observed in F1 compared with male and female parents. Female gametes carrying S7(cp) and S7(i) were aborted in S7(ai)/S7(cp) and S7(ai)/S7(i), respectively, whereas they were normal in both N22 and Dular possessing a neutral allele, S7(n) S7 was fine mapped to a 139-kb region in the centromere region on chromosome 7, where the recombination was remarkably suppressed due to aggregation of retrotransposons. Among 16 putative open reading frames (ORFs) localized in the mapping region, ORF3 encoding a tetratricopeptide repeat domain containing protein was highly expressed in the pistil. Transformation experiments demonstrated that ORF3 is the candidate gene: downregulated expression of ORF3 restored spikelet fertility and eliminated absolutely preferential transmission of S7(ai) in heterozygote S7(ai)/S7(cp); sterility occurred in the transformants Cpslo17-S7(ai) Our results may provide implications for overcoming hybrid embryo sac sterility in intersubspecific hybrid rice and utilization of hybrid heterosis for cultivated rice improvement. PMID:27182946

  7. Hybrid Sterility in Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Involves the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zhao, Zhigang; Shi, Yanrong; Tian, Hua; Liu, Linglong; Bian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Yang; Zheng, Xiaoming; Gan, Lu; Shen, Yumin; Wang, Chaolong; Yu, Xiaowen; Wang, Chunming; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Jiulin; Ikehashi, Hiroshi; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-07-01

    Intersubspecific hybrid sterility is a common form of reproductive isolation in rice (Oryza sativa L.), which significantly hampers the utilization of heterosis between indica and japonica varieties. Here, we elucidated the mechanism of S7, which specially causes Aus-japonica/indica hybrid female sterility, through cytological and genetic analysis, map-based cloning, and transformation experiments. Abnormal positioning of polar nuclei and smaller embryo sac were observed in F1 compared with male and female parents. Female gametes carrying S7(cp) and S7(i) were aborted in S7(ai)/S7(cp) and S7(ai)/S7(i), respectively, whereas they were normal in both N22 and Dular possessing a neutral allele, S7(n) S7 was fine mapped to a 139-kb region in the centromere region on chromosome 7, where the recombination was remarkably suppressed due to aggregation of retrotransposons. Among 16 putative open reading frames (ORFs) localized in the mapping region, ORF3 encoding a tetratricopeptide repeat domain containing protein was highly expressed in the pistil. Transformation experiments demonstrated that ORF3 is the candidate gene: downregulated expression of ORF3 restored spikelet fertility and eliminated absolutely preferential transmission of S7(ai) in heterozygote S7(ai)/S7(cp); sterility occurred in the transformants Cpslo17-S7(ai) Our results may provide implications for overcoming hybrid embryo sac sterility in intersubspecific hybrid rice and utilization of hybrid heterosis for cultivated rice improvement.

  8. Sushi repeat protein X-linked 2, a novel mediator of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miljkovic-Licina, Marijana; Hammel, Philippe; Garrido-Urbani, Sarah; Bradfield, Paul F; Szepetowski, Pierre; Imhof, Beat A

    2009-12-01

    On appropriate stimuli, quiescent endothelial cells start to proliferate and form de novo blood vessels through angiogenesis. To further define molecular mechanisms accompanying the activation of endothelial cells during angiogenesis, we identified genes that were differentially regulated during this process using microarray analyses. In this work, we established a regulatory role for Sushi repeat protein X-linked 2 (Srpx2) in endothelial cell remodeling during angiogenesis. In particular, silencing of Srpx2 using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specifically attenuated endothelial cell migration and delayed angiogenic sprout formation. In vivo, Srpx2 expression was detected in de novo formation of blood vessels in angiogenic tissues by in situ mRNA hybridization and immunostaining. Pulldown experiments identified Srpx2 as a ligand for vascular uPAR, a key molecule involved in invasive migration of angiogenic endothelium. Immunostaining revealed coexpression of the Srpx2 and uPAR on vascular endothelium. These findings suggest that Srpx2 regulates endothelial cell migration and tube formation and provides a new target for modulating angiogenesis.

  9. Prevalence of antibodies to the repeat epitope of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mota, J; Coreño, O; Cochrane, A H; Ramos, C

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies against the repeat epitope of the circumsporozoite protein (cs) of the standard (PV210) and variant (PVK247) strain of Plasmodium vivax was determined by ELISA in 1170 sera from individual residents of seven localities of the Region Huasteca of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The capture antigens were the synthetic peptides DDAAD and (ANGAGNQPG) that correspond to the repeats of the PV210 and PVK247 cs proteins, respectively. Of the analyzed serum samples, 34.1% (400/1170) were positive with one or both of these antigens. Of the sera, 18.2% (214/1170) reacted with the DDAAD peptide and 6.6% (78/1170) were positive with the variant synthetic peptide. Additionally, 9.2% (108/1170) of the samples reacted with both peptides. A sample of 10% of positive sera for the variant cs repeat (18/78) was tested with the cs repeat peptide of P. malariae/P. brasilianum (NAAG); almost all of them (16/18, 89%) being positive. These results confirm that the transmission of the variant strain of P. vivax is a common phenomenon in endemic regions in Latin America, as well as in other tropical regions of the world. These findings may have implications for the development of aP. vivax vaccine since that based on the standard cs repeat only would not be universally protective.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is required for the behavioural desensitization that occurs after repeated injections of angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Vento, Peter J; Daniels, Derek

    2012-12-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts on central angiotensin type 1 (AT(1)) receptors to increase water and saline intake. Prolonged exposure to Ang II in cell culture models results in a desensitization of the AT(1) receptor that is thought to involve receptor internalization, and a behavioural correlate of this desensitization has been shown in rats after repeated central injections of Ang II. Specifically, rats given repeated injections of Ang II drink less water than control animals after a subsequent test injection of Ang II. In the same conditions, however, repeated injections of Ang II have no effect on Ang II-induced saline intake. Given earlier studies indicating that separate intracellular signalling pathways mediate Ang II-induced water and saline intake, we hypothesized that the desensitization observed in rats may be incomplete, leaving the receptor able to activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (ERK1/2), which play a role in Ang II-induced saline intake without affecting water intake. In support of this hypothesis, we found no difference in MAP kinase phosphorylation after an Ang II test injection in rats given prior treatment with repeated injections of vehicle, Ang II or Sar(1),Ile(4),Ile(8)-Ang II (SII), an Ang II analogue that activates MAP kinase without G protein coupling. In addition, we found that pretreatment with the MAP kinase inhibitor U0126 completely blocked the desensitizing effect of repeated Ang II injections on water intake. Furthermore, Ang II-induced water intake was reduced to a similar extent by repeated injections of Ang II or SII. The results suggest that G protein-independent signalling is sufficient to produce behavioural desensitization of the angiotensin system and that the desensitization requires MAP kinase activation.

  11. Effects of Tannic Acid on Lipid and Protein Oxidation, Color, and Volatiles of Raw and Cooked Chicken Breast Meat during Storage

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hijazeen, Marwan; Lee, Eun Joo; Mendonca, Aubrey; Ahn, Dong Uk

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tannic acid (TA) on the oxidative stability and the quality characteristics of ground chicken breast meat. Five treatments including (1) control (none added), (2) 2.5 ppm TA, (3) 5 ppm TA, (4) 10 ppm TA, and (5) 5 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) were added to boneless, skinless ground chicken breast meat, and used for both raw and cooked meat studies. For the raw meat study, the ground chicken breast meat was packaged in oxygen-permeable bags and stored at 4 °C for 7 days. For the cooked study, raw ground meat samples were vacuum-packaged in oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, cooked in-bag to the internal temperature of 75 °C, re-packaged in oxygen-permeable bags, and then stored. Both raw and cooked meats were analyzed for lipid and protein oxidation, color, and volatiles (cooked meat only) at 0, 3, and 7 days of storage. Raw meats with 10 ppm of TA added had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower lipid and protein oxidation than other treatments during storage. In addition, TA at 10 ppm level maintained the highest color a*- and L*-values during storage. Cooked chicken breast meat with 5 and 10 ppm TA added produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower amounts of off-odor volatiles than other treatments. Among the volatile compounds, the amount of hexanal increased rapidly during storage for cooked meat. However, meats with 5 and 10 ppm TA added showed the lowest amount of hexanal and other aldehydes related to lipid oxidation, indicating a strong antioxidant effect of TA in cooked chicken breast meat. Furthermore, the differences in aldehydes among the treatments were bigger in cooked than in raw meat, indicating that the antioxidant effect of TA in cooked meat was greater than that in raw meat. Therefore, TA at >5 ppm can be used as a good natural preservative in cooked chicken meat to maintain its quality during storage. PMID:27304971

  12. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  13. A New Aspergillus fumigatus Typing Method Based on Hypervariable Tandem Repeats Located within Exons of Surface Protein Coding Genes (TRESP)

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rubio, Rocio; Gil, Horacio; Monteiro, Maria Candida; Pelaez, Teresa; Mellado, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprotrophic mold fungus ubiquitously found in the environment and is the most common species causing invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. For A. fumigatus genotyping, the short tandem repeat method (STRAf) is widely accepted as the first choice. However, difficulties associated with PCR product size and required technology have encouraged the development of novel typing techniques. In this study, a new genotyping method based on hypervariable tandem repeats within exons of surface protein coding genes (TRESP) was designed. A. fumigatus isolates were characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing with a panel of three TRESP encoding genes: cell surface protein A; MP-2 antigenic galactomannan protein; and hypothetical protein with a CFEM domain. The allele sequence repeats of each of the three targets were combined to assign a specific genotype. For the evaluation of this method, 126 unrelated A. fumigatus strains were analyzed and 96 different genotypes were identified, showing a high level of discrimination [Simpson’s index of diversity (D) 0.994]. In addition, 49 azole resistant strains were analyzed identifying 26 genotypes and showing a lower D value (0.890) among them. This value could indicate that these resistant strains are closely related and share a common origin, although more studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. In summary, a novel genotyping method for A. fumigatus has been developed which is reproducible, easy to perform, highly discriminatory and could be especially useful for studying outbreaks. PMID:27701437

  14. Selection of Specific Protein Binders for Pre-Defined Targets from an Optimized Library of Artificial Helicoidal Repeat Proteins (alphaRep)

    PubMed Central

    Chevrel, Anne; Graille, Marc; Fourati-Kammoun, Zaineb; Desmadril, Michel; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Minard, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We previously designed a new family of artificial proteins named αRep based on a subgroup of thermostable helicoidal HEAT-like repeats. We have now assembled a large optimized αRep library. In this library, the side chains at each variable position are not fully randomized but instead encoded by a distribution of codons based on the natural frequency of side chains of the natural repeats family. The library construction is based on a polymerization of micro-genes and therefore results in a distribution of proteins with a variable number of repeats. We improved the library construction process using a “filtration” procedure to retain only fully coding modules that were recombined to recreate sequence diversity. The final library named Lib2.1 contains 1.7×109 independent clones. Here, we used phage display to select, from the previously described library or from the new library, new specific αRep proteins binding to four different non-related predefined protein targets. Specific binders were selected in each case. The results show that binders with various sizes are selected including relatively long sequences, with up to 7 repeats. ITC-measured affinities vary with Kd values ranging from micromolar to nanomolar ranges. The formation of complexes is associated with a significant thermal stabilization of the bound target protein. The crystal structures of two complexes between αRep and their cognate targets were solved and show that the new interfaces are established by the variable surfaces of the repeated modules, as well by the variable N-cap residues. These results suggest that αRep library is a new and versatile source of tight and specific binding proteins with favorable biophysical properties. PMID:24014183

  15. AMPK-Activated Protein Kinase Suppresses Ccr2 Expression by Inhibiting the NF-κB Pathway in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kumase, Fumiaki; Takeuchi, Kimio; Morizane, Yuki; Suzuki, Jun; Matsumoto, Hidetaka; Kataoka, Keiko; Al-Moujahed, Ahmad; Maidana, Daniel E.; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 2 (Ccr2) is a key pro-inflammatory marker of classic (M1) macrophage activation. Although Ccr2 is known to be expressed both constitutively and inductively, the full regulatory mechanism of its expression remains unclear. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is not only a master regulator of energy homeostasis but also a central regulator of inflammation. In this study, we sought to assess AMPK’s role in regulating RAW264.7 macrophage Ccr2 protein levels in resting (M0) or LPS-induced M1 states. In both M0 and M1 RAW264.7 macrophages, knockdown of the AMPKα1 subunit by siRNA led to increased Ccr2 levels whereas pharmacologic (A769662) activation of AMPK, attenuated LPS-induced increases in Ccr2 expression in an AMPK dependent fashion. The increases in Ccr2 levels by AMPK downregulation were partially reversed by NF-κB inhibition whereas TNF-a inhibition had minimal effects. Our results indicate that AMPK is a negative regulator of Ccr2 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages, and that the mechanism of action of AMPK inhibition of Ccr2 is mediated, in part, through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26799633

  16. Effect of pistachio oil on gene expression of IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2: a biomarker of inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Thompson, Jerry T; Vanden Heuvel, John P

    2010-05-01

    When incorporated into the diet, pistachios have a beneficial effect on lipid and lipoprotein profiles. However, little is known about potential anti-inflammatory properties. This study was conducted to determine whether pistachio oil and an organic extract from pistachio oil extract (PE) regulated expression of inflammation-related genes. A mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7 cells) was treated with pistachio oil and gene expression microarray analyses were performed. Pistachio oil significantly affected genes involved in immune response, defense response to bacteria, and gene silencing, of which INF-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2 (Ifit-2) was the most dramatically reduced. PE reduced the LPS-induced Ifit-2 by 78% and the bioactive molecules contained in PE, linoleic acid, and beta-sitosterol recapitulated this inhibition. Promoter analysis identified two adjacent IFN-stimulated response elements, which lie between -110 and -85bp of the 5'-flanking region of the Ifit-2 promoter, as being responsive to LPS activation and inhibition by PE. Our results indicate that pistachio oil and bioactive molecules present therein decrease Ifit-2 expressions, and due to the sensitivity of this effect, this gene is a potential biomarker for monitoring diet-induced changes in inflammation.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii: a bradyzoite-specific DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Akio; Dautu, George; Haga, Kaori; Munyaka, Biscah; Carmen, Gabriella; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Igarashi, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    The DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) gene (ToxoDB ID, TGME49_002020) is expressed predominantly at the bradyzoite stage. DnaK-TPR protein has a heat shock protein (DnaK) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains with amino acid sequence similarity to the counterparts of other organisms (40.2-43.7% to DnaK domain and 41.1-66.0% to TPR domain). These findings allowed us to infer that DnaK-TPR protein is important in the tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite development or maintenance of cyst structure although the function of this gene is still unknown. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that DnaK-TPR protein was expressed in Toxoplasma gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites and distributed in the whole part of parasite cells. We conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to identify proteins interacting with DnaK-TPR protein, and demonstrated that DnaK-TPR protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein (Tgp23). It was expected that DnaK-TPR protein would have a function as a molecular chaperon in bradyzoite cells associated with Tgp23. Possible mechanisms for this gene are discussed.

  18. Non-essential repeats in the promoter region of a Brassica rapa acyl carrier protein gene expressed in developing embryos.

    PubMed

    Scherer, D; Sato, A; McCarter, D W; Radke, S E; Kridl, J C; Knauf, V C

    1992-02-01

    A genomic clone of an acyl carrier protein gene (Bcg4-4) which is highly expressed in developing embryos of Brassica rapa was isolated and sequenced. The promoter and transcription terminator regions of Bcg4-4 were used to express a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in transgenic rapeseed. Deletion of repeated domains in the promoter region did not lower beta-glucuronidase expression in seeds.

  19. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K.; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K. Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  20. Evidence for the Nucleo-Apical Shuttling of a Beta-Catenin Like Plasmodium falciparum Armadillo Repeat Containing Protein.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Pallabi; Gupta, Enna Dogra; Sahar, Tajali; Pandey, Alok K; Dangi, Poonam; Reddy, K Sony; Chauhan, Virander Singh; Gaur, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic Armadillo (ARM) repeat proteins are multifaceted with prominent roles in cell-cell adhesion, cytoskeletal regulation and intracellular signaling among many others. One such ARM repeat containing protein, ARM Repeats Only (ARO), has recently been demonstrated in both Toxoplasma (TgARO) and Plasmodium (PfARO) parasites to be targeted to the rhoptries during the late asexual stages. TgARO has been implicated to play an important role in rhoptry positioning i.e. directing the rhoptry towards the apical end of the parasite. Here, we report for the first time that PfARO exhibits a DNA binding property and a dynamic sub-cellular localization between the nucleus (early schizont) and rhoptry (late schizont) during the different stages of the asexual blood-stage life cycle. PfARO possesses a putative nuclear export signal (NES) and the nucleo-apical shuttling was sensitive to Leptomycin B (LMB) suggesting that the nuclear export was mediated by CRM1. Importantly, PfARO specifically bound an A-T rich DNA sequence of the P. falciparum Gyrase A (PfgyrA) gene, suggesting that the DNA binding specificity of PfARO is likely due to the AT-richness of the probe. This is a novel functional characteristic that has not been reported previously for any P. falciparum ARM containing protein and suggests a putative role for PfARO in gene regulation. This study describes for the first time a conserved P. falciparum ARM repeat protein with a high degree of functional versatility. PMID:26828945

  1. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  2. Specific Binding of Tetratricopeptide Repeat Proteins to Heat Shock Protein 70 (Hsp70) and Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) Is Regulated by Affinity and Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Assimon, Victoria A; Southworth, Daniel R; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2015-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) require the help of tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain-containing cochaperones for many of their functions. Each monomer of Hsp70 or Hsp90 can interact with only a single TPR cochaperone at a time, and each member of the TPR cochaperone family brings distinct functions to the complex. Thus, competition for TPR binding sites on Hsp70 and Hsp90 appears to shape chaperone activity. Recent structural and biophysical efforts have improved our understanding of chaperone-TPR contacts, focusing on the C-terminal EEVD motif that is present in both chaperones. To better understand these important protein-protein interactions on a wider scale, we measured the affinity of five TPR cochaperones, CHIP, Hop, DnaJC7, FKBP51, and FKBP52, for the C-termini of four members of the chaperone family, Hsc70, Hsp72, Hsp90α, and Hsp90β, in vitro. These studies identified some surprising selectivity among the chaperone-TPR pairs, including the selective binding of FKBP51/52 to Hsp90α/β. These results also revealed that other TPR cochaperones are only able to weakly discriminate between the chaperones or between their paralogs. We also explored whether mimicking phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues near the EEVD motif might impact affinity and found that pseudophosphorylation had selective effects on binding to CHIP but not other cochaperones. Together, these findings suggest that both intrinsic affinity and post-translational modifications tune the interactions between the Hsp70 and Hsp90 proteins and the TPR cochaperones.

  3. Comparison of immunohistochemical, histochemical and immunochemical methods for the detection of wheat protein allergens in meat samples and cooked, dry, raw and fermented sausage samples.

    PubMed

    Lukášková, Z Řezáčová; Tremlová, B; Pospiech, M; Renčová, E; Randulová, Z; Steinhauser, L; Reichová, A; Bednář, J

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays is it a common practice to add vegetable protein in the production of meat products. Because of the possible substitution of high-quality raw meat with vegetable protein without the labelling the product package and because of the allergenic potential of many vegetable proteins, it is important to develop accurate methods for its detection. The objective of the study was to compare histochemical, immunochemical (ELISA, ALERT gliadin screening test) and immunohistochemical methods for the detection of wheat protein in meat samples and sausages. Histochemical methods were useful for the detection of flour in meat samples, but the immunohistochemical method was better for the detection of wheat protein. ALERT gliadin screening test detected gliadin from 10 mg kg(-1), while an immunohistochemical method detected wheat protein concentrations from 1 g kg(-1) and an ELISA method detected wheat protein concentrations from 4 g kg(-1). ALERT gliadin screening test showed results within 1 day, whilst an ELISA detection method took 2 days, and an immunohistochemical procedure took 5 days at the soonest, all including sample preparation. This study also focused on optimisation of an immunohistochemical method for samples of cooked sausage. In addition, three samples were sufficient for wheat protein detection at a concentration of 1 g kg(-1) (and greater) with a confidence level greater than 95%.

  4. Sodium selenate, a protein phosphatase 2A activator, mitigates hyperphosphorylated tau and improves repeated mild traumatic brain injury outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin L; Wright, David K; Liu, Shijie; Hovens, Christopher; O'Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R

    2016-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injuries may result in cumulative brain damage and neurodegenerative disease. To date, there is no pharmaceutical intervention known to prevent these consequences. Hyperphosphorylated tau has been associated in this process, and protein phosphatase 2A 55 kDa regulatory B subunit (PP2A/PR55) - the major tau phosphatase - is decreased after a brain insult. Sodium selenate up-regulates PP2A/PR55 and dephosphorylates tau, and may hold promise as a treatment in the mild brain injury setting. Here we investigated sodium selenate treatment in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Rats were given three mild fluid percussion injuries or three sham-injuries, and treated with sodium selenate (1 mg/kg/day) or saline-vehicle for three months before undergoing behavioral testing, MRI, and post-mortem analysis of brain tissue. Repeated mild traumatic brain injuries increased the phosphorylation of tau and decreased PP2A/PR55, whilst inducing brain atrophy and cognitive and sensorimotor deficits. Sodium selenate treatment increased PP2A/PR55, and decreased tau phosphorylation, brain damage, and cognitive and motor impairments in rats given repeated mild traumatic brain injuries. Our findings implicate PP2A/PR55 and tau as important mechanisms in the pathophysiological aftermath of repeated mild brain traumas, and support sodium selenate as a novel and translatable treatment for these common injuries. PMID:27163189

  5. Head-to-head comparison of three vaccination strategies based on DNA and raw insect-derived recombinant proteins against Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Todolí, Felicitat; Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Núñez, María Del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M; Alberola, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories -the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines- is a practical and cost-effective way for potential "off the shelf" supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  6. Head-to-Head Comparison of Three Vaccination Strategies Based on DNA and Raw Insect-Derived Recombinant Proteins against Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, María del Carmen; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Rodríguez, Fernando; Pérez-Martín, Eva; Escribano, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitic diseases plague billions of people among the poorest, killing millions annually, and causing additional millions of disability-adjusted life years lost. Leishmaniases affect more than 12 million people, with over 350 million people at risk. There is an urgent need for efficacious and cheap vaccines and treatments against visceral leishmaniasis (VL), its most severe form. Several vaccination strategies have been proposed but to date no head-to-head comparison was undertaken to assess which is the best in a clinical model of the disease. We simultaneously assayed three vaccination strategies against VL in the hamster model, using KMPII, TRYP, LACK, and PAPLE22 vaccine candidate antigens. Four groups of hamsters were immunized using the following approaches: 1) raw extracts of baculovirus-infected Trichoplusia ni larvae expressing individually one of the four recombinant proteins (PROT); 2) naked pVAX1 plasmids carrying the four genes individually (DNA); 3) a heterologous prime-boost (HPB) strategy involving DNA followed by PROT (DNA-PROT); and 4) a Control including empty pVAX1 plasmid followed by raw extract of wild-type baculovirus-infected T. ni larvae. Hamsters were challenged with L. infantum promastigotes and maintained for 20 weeks. While PROT vaccine was not protective, DNA vaccination achieved protection in spleen. Only DNA-PROT vaccination induced significant NO production by macrophages, accompanied by a significant parasitological protection in spleen and blood. Thus, the DNA-PROT strategy elicits strong immune responses and high parasitological protection in the clinical model of VL, better than its corresponding naked DNA or protein versions. Furthermore, we show that naked DNA coupled with raw recombinant proteins produced in insect larvae biofactories –the cheapest way of producing DNA-PROT vaccines– is a practical and cost-effective way for potential “off the shelf” supplying vaccines at very low prices for the protection against

  7. Interrogation of the protein-protein interactions between human BRCA2 BRC repeats and RAD51 reveals atomistic determinants of affinity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Daniel J; Rajendra, Eeson; Roberts-Thomson, Meredith; Hardwick, Bryn; McKenzie, Grahame J; Payne, Mike C; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-07-01

    The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the recombinase RAD51 in the reactions that mediate homologous DNA recombination, an essential cellular process required for the error-free repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. The primary mode of interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51 is through the BRC repeats, which are ∼35 residue peptide motifs that interact directly with RAD51 in vitro. Human BRCA2, like its mammalian orthologues, contains 8 BRC repeats whose sequence and spacing are evolutionarily conserved. Despite their sequence conservation, there is evidence that the different human BRC repeats have distinct capacities to bind RAD51. A previously published crystal structure reports the structural basis of the interaction between human BRC4 and the catalytic core domain of RAD51. However, no structural information is available regarding the binding of the remaining seven BRC repeats to RAD51, nor is it known why the BRC repeats show marked variation in binding affinity to RAD51 despite only subtle sequence variation. To address these issues, we have performed fluorescence polarisation assays to indirectly measure relative binding affinity, and applied computational simulations to interrogate the behaviour of the eight human BRC-RAD51 complexes, as well as a suite of BRC cancer-associated mutations. Our computational approaches encompass a range of techniques designed to link sequence variation with binding free energy. They include MM-PBSA and thermodynamic integration, which are based on classical force fields, and a recently developed approach to computing binding free energies from large-scale quantum mechanical first principles calculations with the linear-scaling density functional code onetep. Our findings not only reveal how sequence variation in the BRC repeats directly affects affinity with RAD51 and provide significant new insights into the control of RAD51 by human BRCA2, but also exemplify a palette of computational and experimental tools for the

  8. A Drosophila protein homologous to the human p70 Ku autoimmune antigen interacts with the P transposable element inverted repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Beall, E L; Admon, A; Rio, D C

    1994-01-01

    P transposable elements in Drosophila are mobilized via a cut-and-paste mechanism. This mode of transposition requires repair of both a double-strand break at the donor DNA site and gapped DNA at the target site. Biochemical studies have identified a cellular non-P element-encoded DNA binding protein, termed the inverted repeat binding protein (IRBP), that specifically interacts with the outer half of the 31-bp terminal inverted repeats. Protein sequence information was used to isolate cDNA clones encoding IRBP. Sequence analysis shows that IRBP is related to the 70-kDa subunit of the human Ku autoimmune antigen. The mammalian Ku antigen binds free DNA termini and has been implicated in immunoglobulin VDJ recombination, DNA repair, and transcription. In addition, Ku is the DNA binding subunit of the double-strand DNA-dependent protein kinase. Cytogenetic mapping indicates that the IRBP gene maps to chromosomal position 86E on the right arm of the third chromosome. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7809101

  9. Unfolding of quadruplex structure in the G-rich strand of the minisatellite repeat by the binding protein UP1

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Hirokazu; Katahira, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoto; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Sugimura, Takashi; Nagao, Minako; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2002-01-01

    The mouse hypervariable minisatellite (MN) Pc-1 consists of tandem repeats of d(GGCAG) and flanked sequences. We have previously demonstrated that single-stranded d(GGCAG)n folds into the intramolecular folded-back quadruplex structure under physiological conditions. Because DNA polymerase progression in vitro is blocked at the repeat, the characteristic intramolecular quadruplex structure of the repeat, at least in part, could be responsible for the hypermutable feature of Pc-1 and other MNs with similar repetitive units. On the other hand, we have isolated six MN Pc-1 binding proteins (MNBPs) from nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 cells. Here, we describe one of those MNBPs, MNBP-B, that binds to the single-stranded d(GGCAG)n. Amino acid sequences of seven proteolytic peptide fragments of MNBP-B were determined, and the cDNA clones were isolated. MNBP-B was proven identical to the single-stranded DNA-binding protein, UP1. Recombinant UP1 bound to single-stranded d(GGCAG)n and other G-rich repetitive sequences, such as d(GTCAGG)n and d(GTTAGG)n. In addition, UP1 was demonstrated by CD spectrum analysis to unfold the intramolecular quadruplex structure of d(GGCAG)5 and d(TTAGGG)4 and to abrogate the arrest of DNA synthesis at the d(GGG)n site. This ability of UP1 suggests that unfolding of quadruplex DNA is required for DNA synthesis processes. PMID:12235355

  10. Wolffish antifreeze protein genes are primarily organized as tandem repeats that each contain two genes in inverted orientation.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, G K; Hayes, P H; Fletcher, G L; Davies, P L

    1988-01-01

    The antifreeze protein genes of the wolffish (Anarhichas lupus) constitute a large multigene family of 80 to 85 copies, which can be classified into two sets. One-third of the genes were linked but irregularly spaced. The other two-thirds were organized as 8-kilobase-pair (kbp) tandem direct repeats that each contained two genes in inverted orientation; DNA sequence analysis suggests that both genes are functional. Except for a single region specific to each gene, the genes and their immediate flanking sequences were 99.2% identical. This degree of identity ended soon after a putative transcription termination sequence; as the 3' ends of the genes were only 1.3 kbp apart, these sequences might confer mutual protection from interference by transcriptional runoff. A Southern blot of wolffish DNA restricted with enzymes that do not cut within the tandem repeats indicated that the repeats were clustered in groups of six or more. The organization of antifreeze protein genes in the wolffish was very similar to that in the unrelated winter flounder, which produces a completely different antifreeze. This similarity might reflect common dynamics by which their progenitors adapted to life in ice-laden sea water. Images PMID:2851724

  11. Identification of the ankyrin repeat proteins ANKRA and RFXANK as novel partners of class IIa histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Audrey H; Grégoire, Serge; Zika, Eleni; Xiao, Lin; Li, Cathy S; Li, Hongwei; Wright, Kenneth L; Ting, Jenny P; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2005-08-12

    Eighteen human histone deacetylases (HDACs) have been identified, and according to their sequence similarity to yeast homologs, these enzymes are grouped into distinct classes. Within class II, HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC7, and HDAC9 share similar domain organization both within the N-terminal extension and the C-terminal catalytic domain, thus forming a subclass known as class IIa. These HDACs function as signal-responsive transcriptional corepressors. To gain further insight into their function and regulation, we utilized an N-terminal fragment of HDAC4 as bait in yeast two-hybrid screens, which uncovered myocyte enhancer factor 2C, 14-3-3zeta, and ankyrin repeat family A protein (ANKRA). ANKRA is a poorly characterized protein with an ankyrin repeat domain similar to RFXANK, a subunit of the trimeric transcription factor RFX. Mutations on genes of the RFX subunits and the coactivator CIITA are responsible for the bare lymphocyte syndrome, an immunodeficiency disorder attributed to the lack of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) antigens. Through its ankyrin repeat domain, RFXANK interacted with HDAC4. Two RFXANK-binding sites were found on HDAC4 with one located within residues 118-279 and another within residues 448-666. Interestingly, this deacetylase also interacted with CIITA. Consistent with the physical interaction with RFXANK and CIITA, HDAC4 and homologs repressed MHCII expression. These results identify ANKRA, RFXANK, and CIITA as novel targets of class IIa HDACs and suggest that these deacetylases play a role in regulating MHCII expression.

  12. The repeat domain of the type III effector protein PthA shows a TPR-like structure and undergoes conformational changes upon DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Mário Tyago; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Neves, Jorge Luiz; Paiva, Joice Helena; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Pereira, André Luiz Araujo; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    Many plant pathogenic bacteria rely on effector proteins to suppress defense and manipulate host cell mechanisms to cause disease. The effector protein PthA modulates the host transcriptome to promote citrus canker. PthA possesses unusual protein architecture with an internal region encompassing variable numbers of near-identical tandem repeats of 34 amino acids termed the repeat domain. This domain mediates protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and two polymorphic residues in each repeat unit determine DNA specificity. To gain insights into how the repeat domain promotes protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts, we have solved the structure of a peptide corresponding to 1.5 units of the PthA repeat domain by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and carried out small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopic studies on the entire 15.5-repeat domain of PthA2 (RD2). Consistent with secondary structure predictions and circular dichroism data, the NMR structure of the 1.5-repeat peptide reveals three α-helices connected by two turns that fold into a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domain. The NMR structure corroborates the theoretical TPR superhelix predicted for RD2, which is also in agreement with the elongated shape of RD2 determined by SAXS. Furthermore, RD2 undergoes conformational changes in a pH-dependent manner and upon DNA interaction, and shows sequence similarities to pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), a nucleic acid-binding motif structurally related to TPR. The results point to a model in which the RD2 structure changes its compactness as it embraces the DNA with the polymorphic diresidues facing the interior of the superhelix oriented toward the nucleotide bases.

  13. RNase J participates in a pentatricopeptide repeat protein-mediated 5′ end maturation of chloroplast mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Luro, Scott; Germain, Arnaud; Sharwood, Robert E.; Stern, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleus-encoded ribonucleases and RNA-binding proteins influence chloroplast gene expression through their roles in RNA maturation and stability. One mechanism for mRNA 5′ end maturation posits that sequence-specific pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins define termini by blocking the 5′→3′ exonucleolytic activity of ribonuclease J (RNase J). To test this hypothesis in vivo, virus-induced gene silencing was used to reduce the expression of three PPR proteins and RNase J, both individually and jointly, in Nicotiana benthamiana. In accordance with the stability-conferring function of the PPR proteins PPR10, HCF152 and MRL1, accumulation of the cognate RNA species atpH, petB and rbcL was reduced when the PPR-encoding genes were silenced. In contrast, RNase J reduction alone or combined with PPR deficiency resulted in reduced abundance of polycistronic precursor transcripts and mature counterparts, which were replaced by intermediately sized species with heterogeneous 5′ ends. We conclude that RNase J deficiency can partially mask the absence of PPR proteins, and that RNase J is capable of processing chloroplast mRNAs up to PPR protein-binding sites. These findings support the hypothesis that RNase J is the major ribonuclease responsible for maturing chloroplast mRNA 5′ termini, with RNA-binding proteins acting as barriers to its activity. PMID:23921629

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of Arabidopsis Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins Reveals Their Essential Role in Organelle BiogenesisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lurin, Claire; Andrés, Charles; Aubourg, Sébastien; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Bitton, Frédérique; Bruyère, Clémence; Caboche, Michel; Debast, Cédrig; Gualberto, José; Hoffmann, Beate; Lecharny, Alain; Le Ret, Monique; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Mireau, Hakim; Peeters, Nemo; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Szurek, Boris; Taconnat, Ludivine; Small, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The complete sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome revealed thousands of previously unsuspected genes, many of which cannot be ascribed even putative functions. One of the largest and most enigmatic gene families discovered in this way is characterized by tandem arrays of pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs). We describe a detailed bioinformatic analysis of 441 members of the Arabidopsis PPR family plus genomic and genetic data on the expression (microarray data), localization (green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein fusions), and general function (insertion mutants and RNA binding assays) of many family members. The basic picture that arises from these studies is that PPR proteins play constitutive, often essential roles in mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably via binding to organellar transcripts. These results confirm, but massively extend, the very sparse observations previously obtained from detailed characterization of individual mutants in other organisms. PMID:15269332

  15. Interaction of S-SCAM with neural plakophilin-related Armadillo-repeat protein/delta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ide, N; Hata, Y; Deguchi, M; Hirao, K; Yao, I; Takai, Y

    1999-03-24

    Synaptic scaffolding molecule (S-SCAM) is a multiple PDZ domain-containing protein, which interacts with neuroligin, a cell adhesion molecule, and the NMDA receptor. In this study, we searched for S-SCAM-interacting proteins and obtained a neuralplakophilin-related armadillo-repeat protein (NPRAP)/delta-catenin. NPRAP/delta-catenin bound to the last PDZ domain of S-SCAM via its carboxyl-terminus in three different cell-free assay systems, was coimmunoprecipitated with S-SCAM from rat crude synaptosomes, and was localized at the excitatory synapses in rat hippocampal neurons. NPRAP/delta-catenin may be implicated in the molecular organization of synaptic junctions through the interaction with S-SCAM.

  16. Sel1 repeat protein LpnE is a Legionella pneumophila virulence determinant that influences vacuolar trafficking.

    PubMed

    Newton, Hayley J; Sansom, Fiona M; Dao, Jenny; McAlister, Adrian D; Sloan, Joan; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2007-12-01

    The environmental pathogen Legionella pneumophila possesses five proteins with Sel1 repeats (SLRs) from the tetratricopeptide repeat protein family. Three of these proteins, LpnE, EnhC, and LidL, have been implicated in the ability of L. pneumophila to efficiently establish infection and/or manipulate host cell trafficking events. Previously, we showed that LpnE is important for L. pneumophila entry into macrophages and epithelial cells. In further virulence studies here, we show that LpnE is also required for efficient infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii by L. pneumophila and for replication of L. pneumophila in the lungs of A/J mice. In addition, we found that the role of LpnE in host cell invasion is dependent on the eight SLR regions of the protein. A truncated form of LpnE lacking the two C-terminal SLR domains was unable to complement the invasion defect of an lpnE mutant of L. pneumophila 130b in both the A549 and THP-1 cell lines. The lpnE mutant displayed impaired avoidance of LAMP-1 association, suggesting that LpnE influenced trafficking of the L. pneumophila vacuole, similar to the case for EnhC and LidL. We also found that LpnE was present in L. pneumophila culture supernatants and that its export was independent of both the Lsp type II secretion system and the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. The fact that LpnE was exported suggested that the protein may interact with a eukaryotic protein. Using LpnE as bait, we screened a HeLa cell cDNA library for interacting partners, using the yeast two-hybrid system. Examination of the protein-protein interaction between LpnE and a eukaryotic protein, obscurin-like protein 1, suggested that LpnE can interact with eukaryotic proteins containing immunoglobulin-like folds via the SLR regions. This investigation has further characterized the contribution of LpnE to L. pneumophila virulence and, more specifically, the importance of the SLR regions to LpnE function.

  17. NUC-2, a component of the phosphate-regulated signal transduction pathway in Neurospora crassa, is an ankyrin repeat protein.

    PubMed

    Poleg, Y; Aramayo, R; Kang, S; Hall, J G; Metzenberg, R L

    1996-10-28

    In response to phosphorus limitation, the fungus Neurospora crassa synthesizes a number of enzymes that function to bring more phosphate into the cell. The NUC-2 protein appears to sense the availability of phosphate and transmits the signal downstream to the regulatory pathway. The nuc-2+ gene has been cloned by its ability to restore growth of a nuc-2 mutant under restrictive conditions of high pH and low phosphate concentration. We mapped the cloned gene to the right arm of linkage group II, consistent with the chromosomal position of the nuc-2 mutation as determined by classical genetic mapping. The nuc-2' open reading frame is interrupted by five introns and codes for a protein of 1066 amino acid residues. Its predicted amino acid sequence has high similarity to that of its homolog in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PHO81. Both proteins contain six ankyrin repeats, which have been implicated in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory activity of PHO81. The phenotypes of a nuc-2 mutant generated by repeat-induced point mutation and of a strain harboring a UV-induced nuc-2 allele are indistinguishable. Both are unable to grow under the restrictive conditions, a phenotype which is to some degree temperature dependent. The nuc-2+ gene is transcriptionally regulated. A 15-fold increase in the level of the nuc-2+ transcript occurs in response to a decrease in exogenous phosphate concentration.

  18. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.

  19. A gene (SRPX) encoding a sushi-repeat-containing protein is deleted in patients with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Meindl, A; Carvalho, M R; Herrmann, K; Lorenz, B; Achatz, H; Lorenz, B; Apfelstedt-Sylla, E; Wittwer, B; Ross, M; Meitinger, T

    1995-12-01

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is characterized by retinal degeneration with night blindness and progressive reduction of the visual fields. By linkage and deletion analysis a gene locus (RP3) has been mapped to the short arm of the X chromosome between the genes CYBB and OTC. Analysis of transcript in this region has revealed a gene which is abundantly expressed in human retina and encodes a putative membrane protein with significant homologies to short consensus repeat (SCR/sushi) domains known from selections and complement proteins. The gene termed SRPX (sushi-repeat-containing protein, x chromosome) is deleted in an RP patient who also suffers from chronic granulomatous disease and McLeod syndrome. A 75 kb deletion removing exon 1 of the gene was also found in two brothers of a second XLRP family. However, no further functionally significant mutations were detected by SSCP screening of all 10 exons in 34 unrelated XLRP patients nor by full length RT-PCR sequencing in two RP3 families. The role of this highly conserved retinal gene in the pathogenesis of RP therefore remains to be determined.

  20. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    DOE PAGES

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. Amore » putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.« less

  1. Design and analysis of post-fusion 6-helix bundle of heptad repeat regions from Newcastle disease virus F protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jieqing; Li, Pengyun; Wu, Tinghe; Gao, Feng; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Catherine W-H; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2003-05-01

    Fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell involves receptor binding of the HN glycoprotein and a number of conformational changes of F glycoprotein. The F protein is expressed as a homotrimer on the virus surface. In the present model, there are at least three conformations of F protein, i.e. native form, pre-hairpin intermediate and the post-fusion state. In the post-fusion state, the two highly conserved heptad repeat (HR) regions of F protein form a stable 6-helix coiled-coil bundle. However, no crystal structure is known for this state for the Newcastle disease virus, although the crystal structure of the F protein native form has been solved recently. Here we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to engineer this 6-helix bundle by fusion of either the two HR regions (HR1, linker and HR2) or linking the 6-helix [3 x (HR1, linker and HR2)] together as a single chain. Subsequently, both of them form a stable 6-helix bundle in vitro judging by gel filtration and chemical cross-linking and the proteins show salient features of an alpha-helix structure. Crystals diffracting X-rays have been obtained from both protein preparations and the structure determination is under way. This method could be used for crystallization of the post-fusion state HR structures of other viruses.

  2. aPPRove: An HMM-Based Method for Accurate Prediction of RNA-Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Binding Events.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Thomas; Ruiz, Jaime; Sloan, Daniel B; Ben-Hur, Asa; Boucher, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins (PPRs) bind to RNA transcripts originating from mitochondria and plastids. There are two classes of PPR proteins. The [Formula: see text] class contains tandem [Formula: see text]-type motif sequences, and the [Formula: see text] class contains alternating [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] type sequences. In this paper, we describe a novel tool that predicts PPR-RNA interaction; specifically, our method, which we call aPPRove, determines where and how a [Formula: see text]-class PPR protein will bind to RNA when given a PPR and one or more RNA transcripts by using a combinatorial binding code for site specificity proposed by Barkan et al. Our results demonstrate that aPPRove successfully locates how and where a PPR protein belonging to the [Formula: see text] class can bind to RNA. For each binding event it outputs the binding site, the amino-acid-nucleotide interaction, and its statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that our method can be used to predict binding events for [Formula: see text]-class proteins using a known edit site and the statistical significance of aligning the PPR protein to that site. In particular, we use our method to make a conjecture regarding an interaction between CLB19 and the second intronic region of ycf3. The aPPRove web server can be found at www.cs.colostate.edu/~approve. PMID:27560805

  3. Characterization of Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Like Proteins in Francisella tularensis and Identification of a Novel Locus Required for Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dankova, Vera; Balonova, Lucie; Straskova, Adela; Spidlova, Petra; Putzova, Daniela; Kijek, Todd; Bozue, Joel; Cote, Christopher; Mou, Sherry; Worsham, Patricia; Szotakova, Barbora; Stulik, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium that causes the potentially lethal disease tularemia. This extremely virulent bacterium is able to replicate in the cytosolic compartments of infected macrophages. To invade macrophages and to cope with their intracellular environment, Francisella requires multiple virulence factors, which are still being identified. Proteins containing tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domains seem to be promising targets to investigate, since these proteins have been reported to be directly involved in virulence-associated functions of bacterial pathogens. Here, we studied the role of the FTS_0201, FTS_0778, and FTS_1680 genes, which encode putative TPR-like proteins in Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200. Mutants defective in protein expression were prepared by TargeTron insertion mutagenesis. We found that the locus FTS_1680 and its ortholog FTT_0166c in the highly virulent Francisella tularensis type A strain SchuS4 are required for proper intracellular replication, full virulence in mice, and heat stress tolerance. Additionally, the FTS_1680-encoded protein was identified as a membrane-associated protein required for full cytopathogenicity in macrophages. Our study thus identifies FTS_1680/FTT_0166c as a new virulence factor in Francisella tularensis. PMID:25245806

  4. aPPRove: An HMM-Based Method for Accurate Prediction of RNA-Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Binding Events

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Thomas; Ruiz, Jaime; Sloan, Daniel B.; Ben-Hur, Asa; Boucher, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat containing proteins (PPRs) bind to RNA transcripts originating from mitochondria and plastids. There are two classes of PPR proteins. The P class contains tandem P-type motif sequences, and the PLS class contains alternating P, L and S type sequences. In this paper, we describe a novel tool that predicts PPR-RNA interaction; specifically, our method, which we call aPPRove, determines where and how a PLS-class PPR protein will bind to RNA when given a PPR and one or more RNA transcripts by using a combinatorial binding code for site specificity proposed by Barkan et al. Our results demonstrate that aPPRove successfully locates how and where a PPR protein belonging to the PLS class can bind to RNA. For each binding event it outputs the binding site, the amino-acid-nucleotide interaction, and its statistical significance. Furthermore, we show that our method can be used to predict binding events for PLS-class proteins using a known edit site and the statistical significance of aligning the PPR protein to that site. In particular, we use our method to make a conjecture regarding an interaction between CLB19 and the second intronic region of ycf3. The aPPRove web server can be found at www.cs.colostate.edu/~approve. PMID:27560805

  5. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  6. Diversity-generating retroelement homing regenerates target sequences for repeated rounds of codon rewriting and protein diversification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huatao; Tse, Longping V; Barbalat, Roman; Sivaamnuaiphorn, Sameer; Xu, Min; Doulatov, Sergei; Miller, Jeff F

    2008-09-26

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) introduce vast amounts of sequence diversity into target genes. During mutagenic homing, adenine residues are converted to random nucleotides in a unidirectional, reverse transcriptase-dependent transposition process from a donor template repeat (TR) to a recipient variable repeat (VR). Using a Bordetella bacteriophage DGR as a model, we demonstrate that homing occurs through a TR-containing RNA intermediate and is RecA independent. Marker transfer studies show that cDNA integration at the 3' end of VR occurs within a (G/C)(14) element, and deletion analysis demonstrates that the reaction is independent of 5' end cDNA integration. cDNA integration at the 5' end of VR requires only short stretches of sequence homology. We propose that homing occurs through a unique target DNA-primed reverse transcription mechanism that precisely regenerates target sequences. This nonproliferative "copy and replace" mechanism enables repeated rounds of protein diversification and optimization of ligand-receptor interactions.

  7. Diversity-Generating Retroelement Homing Regenerates Target Sequences for Repeated Rounds of Codon Rewriting and Protein Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huatao; Tse, Longping V.; Barbalat, Roman; Sivaamnuaiphorn, Sameer; Xu, Min; Doulatov, Sergei; Miller, Jeff F.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) introduce vast amounts of sequence diversity into target genes. During mutagenic homing, adenine residues are converted to random nucleotides in a unidirectional, reverse transcriptase-dependent transposition process from a donor template repeat (TR) to a recipient variable repeat (VR). Using a Bordetella bacteriophage DGR as a model, we demonstrate that homing occurs through a TR-containing RNA intermediate and is RecA-independent. Marker transfer studies show that cDNA integration at the 3′ end of VR occurs within a (G/C)14 element, and deletion analysis demonstrates that the reaction is independent of 5′-end cDNA integration. cDNA integration at the 5′ end of VR requires only short stretches of sequence homology. We propose that homing occurs through a unique target DNA-primed reverse transcription (TPRT) mechanism that precisely regenerates target sequences. This non-proliferative, “copy and replace” mechanism enables repeated rounds of protein diversification and optimization of ligand-receptor interactions. PMID:18922465

  8. Repeated exposures to roadside particulate matter extracts suppresses pulmonary defense mechanisms, resulting in lipid and protein oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Michal; Porat, Ziv; Rudich, Assaf; Schauer, James J; Rudich, Yinon

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) pollution in cities and urban canyons can be harmful to the exposed population. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to health effects are not yet elucidated. It is postulated that exposure to repeated, small, environmentally relevant concentrations can affect lung homeostasis. This study examines the impact of repeated exposures to urban PM on mouse lungs with focus on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters. Aqueous extracts from collected urban PM were administered to mice by 5 repeated intra-tracheal instillations (IT). Multiple exposures, led to an increase in cytokine levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in the blood serum, indicating a systemic reaction. Lung mRNA levels of antioxidant/phase II detoxifying enzymes decreased by exposure to the PM extract, but not when metals were removed by chelation. Finally, disruption of lung tissue oxidant-inflammatory/defense balance was evidenced by increased levels of lipid and protein oxidation. Unlike response to a single IT exposure to the same dose and source of extract, multiple exposures result in lung oxidative damage and a systemic inflammatory reaction. These could be attributed to compromised capacity to activate the protective Nrf2 tissue defense system. It is suggested that water-soluble metals present in urban PM, potentially from break and tire wear, may constitute major drivers of the pulmonary and systemic responses to multiple exposure to urban PM.

  9. 6-alkynyl fucose is a bioorthogonal analog for O-fucosylation of epidermal growth factor-like repeats and thrombospondin type-1 repeats by protein O-fucosyltransferases 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Al-Shareffi, Esam; Chaubard, Jean-Luc; Leonhard-Melief, Christina; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Wong, Chi-Huey; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2013-02-01

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) and protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (Pofut2) add O-linked fucose at distinct consensus sequences in properly folded epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats and thrombospondin type-1 (TSR) repeats, respectively. Glycan chain elongation past O-fucose can occur to yield a tetrasaccharide on EGF repeats and a disaccharide on TSRs. Elimination of Pofut1 in mice causes embryonic lethality with Notch-like phenotypes demonstrating that O-fucosylation of Notch is essential for its function. Similarly, elimination of Pofut2 results in an early embryonic lethal phenotype in mice, although the molecular mechanism for the lethality is unknown. The recent development of sugar analogs has revolutionized the study of glycans by providing a convenient method for labeling and tracking glycosylation. In order to study O-fucosylation, we took advantage of the recently developed reporter, 6-alkynyl fucose. Using the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), or "click" reaction, azido-biotin allows tagging and detection of 6AF-modified proteins. Here we examine whether proteins containing EGF repeats or TSRs with O-fucose consensus sequences are specifically modified with 6AF in cell culture. Using mass spectrometry (MS), we demonstrate that 6AF is efficiently incorporated onto the appropriate consensus sequences on EGF repeats and TSRs. Furthermore, the elongation of the O-fucose monosaccharide on EGF repeats and TSRs is not hampered when 6AF is used. These results show that 6AF is efficiently utilized in a truly bioorthogonal manner by Pofut1, Pofut2 and the enzymes that elongate O-fucose, providing evidence that 6AF is a significant new tool in the study of protein O-fucosylation.

  10. A WD40 repeat protein regulates fungal cell differentiation and can be replaced functionally by the mammalian homologue striatin.

    PubMed

    Pöggeler, Stefanie; Kück, Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Fruiting body development in fungi is a complex cellular differentiation process that is controlled by more than 100 developmental genes. Mutants of the filamentous fungus Sordaria macrospora showing defects in fruiting body formation are pertinent sources for the identification of components of this multicellular differentiation process. Here we show that the sterile mutant pro11 carries a defect in the pro11 gene encoding a multimodular WD40 repeat protein. Complementation analysis indicates that the wild-type gene or C-terminally truncated versions of the wild-type protein are able to restore the fertile phenotype in mutant pro11. PRO11 shows significant homology to several vertebrate WD40 proteins, such as striatin and zinedin, which seem to be involved in Ca2+-dependent signaling in cells of the central nervous system and are supposed to function as scaffolding proteins linking signaling and eukaryotic endocytosis. Cloning of a mouse cDNA encoding striatin allowed functional substitution of the wild-type protein with restoration of fertility in mutant pro11. Our data strongly suggest that an evolutionarily conserved cellular process controlling eukaryotic cell differentiation may regulate fruiting body formation.

  11. Sequence specific protein binding to and activation of the TGF-beta 3 promoter through a repeated TCCC motif.

    PubMed Central

    Lafyatis, R; Denhez, F; Williams, T; Sporn, M; Roberts, A

    1991-01-01

    We have previously characterized the TGF-beta 3 promoter and shown that the activity of this promoter is highly variable in different cell types. Although the promoter contains a proximal cAMP responsive element, which is critical to basal and forskolin-induced promoter activity, this element is not responsible for the variable, cell-specific regulation of the promoter. In this paper, we identify a 25 base pair sequence in the proximal region of the TGF-beta 3 promoter that binds a novel DNA-binding protein. This region includes the sequence T-CCCTCCCTCCC, (3 x TCCC), and mutation of these T-CCC repeats inhibits protein binding. Further, we show that in the cell line A375, which we have previously shown expresses high levels of TGF-beta 3 mRNA, this region is responsible for mediating high level TGF-beta 3 promoter activity. Immediately 3' to the 3 x TCCC sequence is a consensus AP-2 binding site, however, we show that this region does not bind AP-2, and AP-2 does not transactivate the TGF-beta 3 promoter. Therefore, we provide strong evidence that high level expression of TGF-beta 3 in A375 cells results from transactivation of the TGF-beta 3 promoter by a protein that binds to a repeated TCCC motif in the promoter and suggest that this DNA-binding protein likely also regulates aspects of developmental and tissue-specific expression of this cytokine. Images PMID:1754378

  12. The Hexapeptide Repeated Segment LIAGY is a Hot Spot of Aggregation of the Pseudomonas syringae Ice Nucleation Protein.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation proteins (INPs) form oligomeric structures by self-assembly and aggregation. We looked for the presence of potential aggregating sequences inside the INP from Pseudomonas syringae by a computational approach with the AGGRESCAN, FOMDAMYLOID and TANGO softwares. A total of 38 hot spots of aggregation were predicted in the INP sequence: 7 localized in the Nterminal domain, 2 in the C-terminal region, 28 in the highly repetitive central (HRC) region and 1 shared between the HRC and the Carboxyl-terminus regions of the protein. All the hot spots of aggregation identified in the HRC domain overlapped a 8-residue low fidelity repeat including a LIAGYrelated sequence. We confirmed the predictions by an experimental approach using synthetic peptides corresponding to different parts of the INP central sequence, absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in the presence of Congo red (CR) or Thioflavin T (ThT), respectively. Peptide 620-SFIIAGYG-627 predicted to aggregate by the three softwares induced an increase in fluorescence of ThT. Peptide 729-GFKSILTAGY-738 predicted to aggregate by AGGRESCAN and FOLDAMYLOID induced a shift in the maximum of absorbance of CR. Peptide 1124-SVLTAGA-1130 predicted to aggregate only by TANGO did not interfere with CR absorbance or ThT fluorescence. In conclusion, the use of three aggregation prediction algorithms and two biochemical assays showed that the hexapeptide repeated segment LIAGY, previously shown to form a hairpin loop may be involved in the aggregation of the P. syringae INP. PMID:26548995

  13. Fibronectin Binding to the Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium ShdA Autotransporter Protein Is Inhibited by a Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing the A3 Repeat

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, Robert A.; Abi Ghanem, Daad; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Keestra, A. Marijke; Berghman, Luc; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2004-01-01

    ShdA is a large outer membrane protein of the autotransporter family whose passenger domain binds the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen I, possibly by mimicking the host ligand heparin. The ShdA passenger domain consists of ∼1,500 amino acid residues that can be divided into two regions based on features of the primary amino acid sequence: an N-terminal nonrepeat region followed by a repeat region composed of two types of imperfect direct amino acid repeats, called type A and type B. The repeat region bound bovine fibronectin with an affinity similar to that for the complete ShdA passenger domain, while the nonrepeat region exhibited comparatively low fibronectin-binding activity. A number of fusion proteins containing truncated fragments of the repeat region did not bind bovine fibronectin. However, binding of the passenger domain to fibronectin was inhibited in the presence of immune serum raised to one truncated fragment of the repeat region that contained repeats A2, B8, A3, and B9. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognized an epitope in a recombinant protein containing the A3 repeat inhibited binding of ShdA to fibronectin. PMID:15262930

  14. Fibronectin binding to the Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium ShdA autotransporter protein is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody recognizing the A3 repeat.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Robert A; Abi Ghanem, Daad; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Keestra, A Marijke; Berghman, Luc; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2004-08-01

    ShdA is a large outer membrane protein of the autotransporter family whose passenger domain binds the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen I, possibly by mimicking the host ligand heparin. The ShdA passenger domain consists of approximately 1,500 amino acid residues that can be divided into two regions based on features of the primary amino acid sequence: an N-terminal nonrepeat region followed by a repeat region composed of two types of imperfect direct amino acid repeats, called type A and type B. The repeat region bound bovine fibronectin with an affinity similar to that for the complete ShdA passenger domain, while the nonrepeat region exhibited comparatively low fibronectin-binding activity. A number of fusion proteins containing truncated fragments of the repeat region did not bind bovine fibronectin. However, binding of the passenger domain to fibronectin was inhibited in the presence of immune serum raised to one truncated fragment of the repeat region that contained repeats A2, B8, A3, and B9. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognized an epitope in a recombinant protein containing the A3 repeat inhibited binding of ShdA to fibronectin. PMID:15262930

  15. An extracellular matrix, calmodulin-binding protein from Dictyostelium with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Andres; Huber, Robert J; Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2011-07-01

    CyrA is a novel cysteine-rich protein with four EGFL repeats that was isolated using the calmodulin (CaM) binding overlay technique (CaMBOT), suggesting it is a CaM-binding protein (CaMBP). The full-length 63kDa cyrA is cleaved into two major C-terminal fragments, cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40. A putative CaM-binding domain was detected and both CaM-agarose binding and CaM immunoprecipitation verified that cyrA-C45 and cyrA-C40 each bind to CaM in both a Ca(2+)-dependent and -independent manner. cyrA-C45 was present continuously throughout growth and development but was secreted at high levels during the multicellular slug stage of Dictyostelium development. At this time, cyrA localizes to the extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM purification verified the presence of cyrA-C45. An 18 amino acid peptide (DdEGFL1) from the first EGFL repeat sequence of cyrA (EGFL1) that is present in both cyrA-C45 and -C40 enhances both random cell motility and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis. Here we reveal that the dose-dependent enhancement of motility by DdEGFL1 is related to the time of cell starvation. Addition of DdEGFL1 also inhibits cyrA proteolysis. The status of cyrA as an extracellular CaMBP was further clarified by the demonstration that CaM is secreted during development. Antagonism of CaM with W7 resulted in enhanced cyrA proteolysis suggesting a functional role for extracellular CaM in protecting CaMBPs from proteolysis. cyrA is the first extracellular CaMBP identified in Dictyostelium and since it is an ECM protein with EGF-like repeats that enhance cell motility and it likely also represents the first matricellular protein identified in a lower eukaryote. PMID:21402150

  16. Effects of diet, packaging, and irradiation on protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, and color of raw broiler thigh meat during refrigerated storage.

    PubMed

    Xiao, S; Zhang, W G; Lee, E J; Ma, C W; Ahn, D U

    2011-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of dietary treatment, packaging, and irradiation singly or in combination on the oxidative stability of broiler chicken thigh meat. A total of 120 four-week-old chickens were divided into 12 pens (10 birds/pen), and 4 pens of broilers were randomly assigned to a control oxidized diet (5% oxidized oil) or an antioxidant-added diet [500 IU of vitamin E + 200 mg/kg of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA)] and fed for 2 wk. After slaughter, thigh meats were separated, ground, packaged in either oxygen-permeable or oxygen-impermeable vacuum bags, and irradiated at 0 or 3 kGy. Lipid oxidation (TBA-reactive substances), protein oxidation (carbonyl), and color of the meat were measured at 1, 4, and 7 d of refrigerated storage. The lipid and protein oxidation of thigh meats from birds fed the diet supplemented with antioxidants (vitamin E + BHA) was significantly lower than the lipid and protein oxidation of birds fed the control diet, whereas the lipid and protein oxidation of broilers fed the oxidized oil diet was higher than that of birds fed the control diet. Vacuum packaging slowed, but irradiation accelerated, the lipid and protein oxidation of thigh meat during storage. Dietary antioxidants (vitamin E + BHA) and irradiation treatments showed a stronger effect on lipid oxidation than on protein oxidation. A significant correlation between lipid and protein oxidation in meat was found during storage. Dietary supplementation of vitamin E + BHA and the irradiation treatment increased the lightness and redness of thigh meat, respectively. It is suggested that appropriate use of dietary antioxidants in combination with packaging could be effective in minimizing oxidative changes in irradiated raw chicken thigh meat.

  17. Electrochemical bioplatforms for the simultaneous determination of interleukin (IL)-8 mRNA and IL-8 protein oral cancer biomarkers in raw saliva.

    PubMed

    Torrente-Rodríguez, R M; Campuzano, S; Ruiz-Valdepeñas Montiel, V; Gamella, M; Pingarrón, J M

    2016-03-15

    The development of electrochemical magnetobiosensors for the simultaneous determination of two biomarkers associated with salivary oral cancer, protein IL-8 and its messenger RNA (IL-8 mRNA) associated, in undiluted human saliva samples is reported in this work. The implemented methodology involves the use of functionalized magnetic beads, specific antibodies against IL-8 protein, a specific hairpin DNA sequence for IL-8 mRNA and amperometric detection at disposable dual screen printed carbon electrodes. This methodology exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity for the target analytes providing detection limits of 0.21 nM for IL-8 mRNA and 72.4 pgmL(-1) (far below the clinical established cut-off of 600 pgmL(-1)) for IL-8 protein in undiluted saliva samples. The dual amperometric magnetobiosensor was applied to the direct determination of both biomarkers in spiked raw saliva samples and to determine the endogenous content of IL-8 protein in saliva samples from 7 healthy individuals. The obtained results were statistically in agreement with those provided by a commercial ELISA kit.

  18. Glutathione S-transferase P1 suppresses iNOS protein stability in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells after LPS stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiang; Kong, Xiuqin; Zhou, Yi; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) is a ubiquitous expressed protein which plays an important role in the detoxification and xenobiotics metabolism. Previous studies showed that GSTP1 was upregulated by the LPS stimulation in RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells and GSTP1 overexpression downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Here we show that GSTP1 physically associates with the oxygenase domain of iNOS by the G-site domain and decreases the protein level of iNOS dimer. Both overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments indicate that GSTP1 downregulates iNOS protein level and increases S-nitrosylation and ubiquitination of iNOS. The Y7F mutant type of GSTP1 physically associates with iNOS, but shows no effect on iNOS protein content, iNOS S-nitrosylation, and changes in iNOS from dimer to monomer, suggesting the importance of enzyme activity of GSTP1 in regulating iNOS S-nitrosylation and stability. GSTM1, another member of GSTs shows no significant effect on regulation of iNOS. In conclusion, our study reveals the novel role of GSTP1 in regulation of iNOS by affecting S-nitrosylation, dimerization, and stability, which provides a new insight for analyzing the regulation of iNOS and the anti-inflammatory effects of GSTP1. PMID:26361746

  19. Crucial roles of the pentatricopeptide repeat protein SOAR1 in Arabidopsis response to drought, salt and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Mei, Chao; Liang, Shan; Yu, Yong-Tao; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2015-07-01

    Whereas several mitochondrial/chloroplast pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins have been reported to regulate plant responses to abiotic stresses, no nucleus-localized PPR protein has been found to play role in these processes. In the present experiment, we provide evidence that a cytosol-nucleus dual-localized PPR protein SOAR1, functioning to negatively regulate abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in seed germination and postgermination growth, is a crucial, positive regulator of plant response to abiotic stresses. Downregulation of SOAR1 expression reduces, but upregulation of SOAR1 expression enhances, ABA sensitivity in ABA-induced promotion of stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening, and plant tolerance to multiple, major abiotic stresses including drought, high salinity and low temperature. Interestingly and importantly, the SOAR1-overexpression lines display strong abilities to tolerate drought, salt and cold stresses, with surprisingly high resistance to salt stress in germination and postgermination growth of seeds that are able to potentially germinate in seawater, while no negative effect on plant growth and development was observed. So, the SOAR1 gene is likely useful for improvement of crops by transgenic manipulation to enhance crop productivity in stressful conditions. Further experimental data suggest that SOAR1 likely regulates plant stress responses at least partly by integrating ABA-dependent and independent signaling pathways, which is different from the ABI2/ABI1 type 2C protein phosphatase-mediated ABA signaling. These findings help to understand highly complicated stress and ABA signalling network. PMID:26093896

  20. Organellar RNA editing and plant-specific extensions of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in jungermanniid but not in marchantiid liverworts.

    PubMed

    Rüdinger, Mareike; Polsakiewicz, Monika; Knoop, Volker

    2008-07-01

    The pyrimidine exchange type of RNA editing in land plant (embryophyte) organelles has largely remained an enigma with respect to its biochemical mechanisms, the underlying specificities, and its raison d'être. Apparently arising with the earliest embryophytes, RNA editing is conspicuously absent in one clade of liverworts, the complex thalloid Marchantiidae. Several lines of evidence suggest that the large gene family of organelle-targeted RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins plays a fundamental role in the sequence-specific editing of organelle transcripts. We here describe the identification of PPR protein genes with plant-specific carboxyterminal (C-terminal) sequence signatures (E, E+, and DYW domains) in ferns, lycopodiophytes, mosses, hornworts, and jungermanniid liverworts, one subclass of the basal most clade of embryophytes, on DNA and cDNA level. In contrast, we were unable to identify these genes in a wide sampling of marchantiid liverworts (including the phylogenetic basal genus Blasia)--taxa for which no RNA editing is observed in the organelle transcripts. On the other hand, we found significant diversity of this type of PPR proteins also in Haplomitrium, a genus with an extremely high rate of RNA editing and a phylogenetic placement basal to all other liverworts. Although the presence of modularly extended PPR proteins correlates well with organelle RNA editing, the now apparent complete loss of an entire gene family from one clade of embryophytes, the marchantiid liverworts, remains puzzling.

  1. Characterization of a novel anther-specific gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat protein in petunia.

    PubMed

    Yue, Y Z; Sun, J; Huang, X; Peng, H; Liu, G F; Hu, H R

    2014-01-01

    In Petunia x hybrida 'Fantasy Red', a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene referred to as PhLRR, was identified in a flower bud cDNA library. The open reading frame sequence of PhLRR was 1251 bp, encoding a putative 46.2-kDa protein of 416 amino acids. The PhLRR protein showed high similarity to members of polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs), contained 11 conserved LRR domains, and was an extracellular localization protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PhLRR belonged to the same PGIPs subfamily as SHY, indicating that PhLRR may be involved in the development of pollen-like SHY. Expression analysis revealed that PhLRR was abundantly expressed during early stages of flower bud and anther development, while it was not detected in any other examined organs, such as sepals, petals, pistils, roots, stems, leaves, or open flowers. Furthermore, many cis-acting elements (such as AGAAA and GTGA) related to anther-specific gene expression were identified in the PhLRR gene promoter region, indicating that the promoter is also anther-specific. These results suggested that PhLRR is a novel anther-specific gene that may be essential for the early development of anthers. PMID:25501199

  2. The rapid determination of fat and protein content in fresh raw milk using the laser light scattering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qi; Zhi Ling, Hou; Jian Long, Tian; Zhu, Yu

    2006-08-01

    The aim was to develop a simple and rapid method for determination of fat and protein content in milk. Based on the laser light scattering theory, the ratio of the scattered light (at 90±0.05° scattering angles) intensity to the transmitted light intensity, which is called scattered-transmitted-ratio method, is adopted as the optical parameter representing the milk fat content and the protein content. In this way, the influence of the fluctuation of the power of the light source is eliminated and the accuracy of determination is improved accordingly. The system we use is real-time and can satisfy the challenging requirements of dairy farming. Results of this study indicate the feasibility of using this technology for fresh milk fat and protein analysis. The fat contents and protein contents of 50 milk samples determined by this method were consistent with the values obtained by the reference methods based on Rose-Gottlieb method and Kjeldahl determination of N method. In this paper, the operating principle of the instrument is introduced and the influence of the environmental conditions, such as the homogenization pressure and homogenization temperature, etc. on the result of the test is analyzed. Through data analysis, the concrete schemes for testing the fat using the curve fitting and testing the protein using the surface fitting technique are determined. Finally, the difference from the reference values of the test is discussed.

  3. C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 as non-specific anchors for tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Andrew J; Russell, Lance C; Chinkers, Michael

    2009-10-12

    Steroid-hormone-receptor maturation is a multi-step process that involves several TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) proteins that bind to the maturation complex via the C-termini of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) and hsp90 (heat-shock protein 90). We produced a random T7 peptide library to investigate the roles played by the C-termini of the two heat-shock proteins in the TPR-hsp interactions. Surprisingly, phages with the MEEVD sequence, found at the C-terminus of hsp90, were not recovered from our biopanning experiments. However, two groups of phages were isolated that bound relatively tightly to HsPP5 (Homo sapiens protein phosphatase 5) TPR. Multiple copies of phages with a C-terminal sequence of LFG were isolated. These phages bound specifically to the TPR domain of HsPP5, although mutation studies produced no evidence that they bound to the domain's hsp90-binding groove. However, the most abundant family obtained in the initial screen had an aspartate residue at the C-terminus. Two members of this family with a C-terminal sequence of VD appeared to bind with approximately the same affinity as the hsp90 C-12 control. A second generation pseudo-random phage library produced a large number of phages with an LD C-terminus. These sequences acted as hsp70 analogues and had relatively low affinities for hsp90-specific TPR domains. Unfortunately, we failed to identify residues near hsp90's C-terminus that impart binding specificity to individual hsp90-TPR interactions. The results suggest that the C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 act primarily as non-specific anchors for TPR proteins.

  4. Albino Leaf1 That Encodes the Sole Octotricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Responsible for Chloroplast Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jianjie; Xing, Yi; Liu, Changhong; Chen, Qiaoling; Zhu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Jingliu; Zhang, Guiquan

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast, the photosynthetic organelle in plants, plays a crucial role in plant development and growth through manipulating the capacity of photosynthesis. However, the regulatory mechanism of chloroplast development still remains elusive. Here, we characterized a mutant with defective chloroplasts in rice (Oryza sativa), termed albino leaf1 (al1), which exhibits a distinct albino phenotype in leaves, eventually leading to al1 seedling lethality. Electronic microscopy observation demonstrated that the number of thylakoids was reduced and the structure of thylakoids was disrupted in the al1 mutant during rice development, which eventually led to the breakdown of chloroplast. Molecular cloning revealed that AL1 encodes the sole octotricopeptide repeat protein (RAP) in rice. Genetic complementation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rap mutants indicated that the AL1 protein is a functional RAP. Further analysis illustrated that three transcript variants were present in the AL1 gene, and the altered splices occurred at the 3′ untranslated region of the AL1 transcript. In addition, our results also indicate that disruption of the AL1 gene results in an altered expression of chloroplast-associated genes. Consistently, proteomic analysis demonstrated that the abundance of photosynthesis-associated proteins is altered significantly, as is that of a group of metabolism-associated proteins. More specifically, we found that the loss of AL1 resulted in altered abundances of ribosomal proteins, suggesting that RAP likely also regulates the homeostasis of ribosomal proteins in rice in addition to the ribosomal RNA. Taken together, we propose that AL1, particularly the AL1a and AL1c isoforms, plays an essential role in chloroplast development in rice. PMID:27208287

  5. Expression of a gibberellin-induced leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase in deepwater rice and its interaction with kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Knaap, E. van der; Sauter, M.; Kende, H. . DOE Plant Research Lab.); Song, W.Y.; Ruan, D.L.; Ronald, P.C. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1999-06-01

    The authors identified in deepwater rice (Oryza sativa L.) a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like transmembrane protein kinase, OsTMK (O. sativa transmembrane kinase). The transcript levels of OsTMK increased in the rice internode in response to gibberellin. Expression of OsTMK was especially high in regions undergoing cell division and elongation. The kinase domain of OsTMK was enzymatically active autophosphorylating on serine and threonine residues. A cDNA encoding a rice ortholog of a kinase-associated type 2C protein phosphatase (OsKAPP) was cloned. KAPPs are putative downstream components in kinase-mediated signal transduction pathways. The kinase interaction domain of OsKAPP was phosphorylated in vitro by the kinase domain of OsTMK. RNA gel-blot analysis indicated that the expression of OsTMK and OsKAPP was similar in different tissues of the rice plant. In protein-binding assays, OsKAPP interacted with a receptor-like protein kinase, RLK5 of Arabidopsis, but not with the protein kinase domains of the rice and maize receptor-like protein kinases Xa21 and ZmPK1, respectively.

  6. Drosha Inclusions Are New Components of Dipeptide-Repeat Protein Aggregates in FTLD-TDP and ALS C9orf72 Expansion Cases

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Sílvia; Kwong, Linda K.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are 2 neurodegenerative disorders that share clinical, genetic, and neuropathologic features. The presence of abnormal expansions of GGGGCC repeats (G4C2 repeats) in a noncoding region of the Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the major genetic cause of both FTLD and ALS. Transcribed G4C2 repeats can form nuclear RNA foci and recruit RNA-binding proteins, thereby inhibiting their normal function. Moreover, through a repeat-associated non-ATG translation mechanism, G4C2 repeats translation leads to dipeptide-repeat protein aggregation in the cytoplasm of neurons. Here, we identify Drosha protein as a new component of these dipeptide-repeat aggregates. In C9orf72 mutation cases of FTLD-TDP (c9FTLD-TDP) and ALS (c9ALS), but not in FTLD or ALS cases without C9orf72 mutation, Drosha is mislocalized to form neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. Further characterization of Drosha-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum revealed colocalization with p62 and ubiquilin-2, 2 pathognomonic signatures of c9FTLD-TDP and c9ALS cases; however, Drosha inclusions rarely colocalized with TDP-43 pathology. We conclude that Drosha may play a unique pathogenic role in the onset or progression of FTLD-TDP/ALS in patients with the C9orf72 mutation. PMID:25756586

  7. Wound induced Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein genes encode a longer leucine-rich repeat domain and inhibit fungal polygalacturonases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins involved in plant defense. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes, BvPGIP1, BvPGIP2 and BvPGIP3, were isolated from two breeding lines, F1016 and F1010. Full-length cDNA sequences of the three BvPGIP genes encod...

  8. Tetratricopeptide repeat protein protects photosystem I from oxidative disruption during assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heinnickel, Mark; Kim, Rick G.; Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Yang, Wenqiang; Walters, Karim A.; Herbert, Stephen K.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    A Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant lacking CGL71, a thylakoid membrane protein previously shown to be involved in photosystem I (PSI) accumulation, exhibited photosensitivity and highly reduced abundance of PSI under photoheterotrophic conditions. Remarkably, the PSI content of this mutant declined to nearly undetectable levels under dark, oxic conditions, demonstrating that reduced PSI accumulation in the mutant is not strictly the result of photodamage. Furthermore, PSI returns to nearly wild-type levels when the O2 concentration in the medium is lowered. Overall, our results suggest that the accumulation of PSI in the mutant correlates with the redox state of the stroma rather than photodamage and that CGL71 functions under atmospheric O2 conditions to allow stable assembly of PSI. These findings may reflect the history of the Earth’s atmosphere as it transitioned from anoxic to highly oxic (1–2 billion years ago), a change that required organisms to evolve mechanisms to assist in the assembly and stability of proteins or complexes with O2-sensitive cofactors. PMID:26903622

  9. An evolutionary comparison of leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors reveals a novel LGR subtype.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Van Loy, Tom; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2012-03-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors or LGRs are receptors with important functions in development and reproduction. Belonging to this evolutionarily conserved group of receptors are the well-studied glycoprotein hormone receptors and relaxin receptors in mammals, as well as the bursicon receptor, which triggers cuticle hardening and tanning in freshly enclosed insects. In this study, the numerous LGR sequences in different animal phyla are analyzed and compared. Based on these data a phylogenetic tree was generated. This information sheds new light on structural and evolutionary aspects regarding this receptor group. Apart from vertebrates and insects, LGRs are also present in early chordates (Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Hyperoartia) and other arthropods (Arachnida and Branchiopoda) as well as in Mollusca, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Nematoda, and even in ancient animal life forms, such as Cnidaria and Placozoa. Three distinct types of LGR exist, distinguishable by their number of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), their type-specific hinge region and the presence or absence of an LDLa motif. Type C LGRs containing only one LDLa (C1 subtype) appear to be present in nearly all animal phyla. We here describe a second subtype, C2, containing multiple LDLa motifs, which was discovered in echinoderms, mollusks and in one insect species (Pediculus humanis corporis). In addition, eight putative LGRs can be predicted from the genome data of the placozoan species Trichoplax adhaerens. They may represent an ancient form of the LGRs, however, more genomic data will be required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22100731

  10. An evolutionary comparison of leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors reveals a novel LGR subtype.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Van Loy, Tom; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2012-03-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors or LGRs are receptors with important functions in development and reproduction. Belonging to this evolutionarily conserved group of receptors are the well-studied glycoprotein hormone receptors and relaxin receptors in mammals, as well as the bursicon receptor, which triggers cuticle hardening and tanning in freshly enclosed insects. In this study, the numerous LGR sequences in different animal phyla are analyzed and compared. Based on these data a phylogenetic tree was generated. This information sheds new light on structural and evolutionary aspects regarding this receptor group. Apart from vertebrates and insects, LGRs are also present in early chordates (Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Hyperoartia) and other arthropods (Arachnida and Branchiopoda) as well as in Mollusca, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Nematoda, and even in ancient animal life forms, such as Cnidaria and Placozoa. Three distinct types of LGR exist, distinguishable by their number of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), their type-specific hinge region and the presence or absence of an LDLa motif. Type C LGRs containing only one LDLa (C1 subtype) appear to be present in nearly all animal phyla. We here describe a second subtype, C2, containing multiple LDLa motifs, which was discovered in echinoderms, mollusks and in one insect species (Pediculus humanis corporis). In addition, eight putative LGRs can be predicted from the genome data of the placozoan species Trichoplax adhaerens. They may represent an ancient form of the LGRs, however, more genomic data will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  11. Characterization of Raphanus sativus pentatricopeptide repeat proteins encoded by the fertility restorer locus for Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Uyttewaal, M; Arnal, N; Quadrado, M; Martin-Canadell, A; Vrielynck, N; Hiard, S; Gherbi, H; Bendahmane, A; Budar, F; Mireau, H

    2008-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility is a maternally inherited trait in higher plants that prevents the production of functional pollen. Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility in radish (Raphanus sativus) is regulated by the orf138 mitochondrial locus. Male fertility can be restored when orf138 accumulation is suppressed by the nuclear Rfo locus, which consists of three genes putatively encoding highly similar pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR-A, -B, and -C). We produced transgenic rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants separately expressing PPR-A and PPR-B and demonstrated that both encoded proteins accumulated preferentially in the anthers of young flower buds. Immunodetection of ORF138 showed that, unlike PPR-B, PPR-A had no effect on the synthesis of the sterility protein. Moreover, immunolocalization experiments indicated that complete elimination of ORF138 from the tapetum of anthers correlated with the restoration of fertility. Thus, the primary role of PPR-B in restoring fertility is to inhibit ORF138 synthesis in the tapetum of young anthers. In situ hybridization experiments confirmed, at the cellular level, that PPR-B has no effect on the accumulation of orf138 mRNA. Lastly, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PPR-B, but not PPR-A, is associated with the orf138 RNA in vivo, linking restoration activity with the ability to directly or indirectly interact with the orf138 RNA. Together, our data support a role for PPR-B in the translational regulation of orf138 mRNA.

  12. Characterization of Raphanus sativus pentatricopeptide repeat proteins encoded by the fertility restorer locus for Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Uyttewaal, M; Arnal, N; Quadrado, M; Martin-Canadell, A; Vrielynck, N; Hiard, S; Gherbi, H; Bendahmane, A; Budar, F; Mireau, H

    2008-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility is a maternally inherited trait in higher plants that prevents the production of functional pollen. Ogura cytoplasmic male sterility in radish (Raphanus sativus) is regulated by the orf138 mitochondrial locus. Male fertility can be restored when orf138 accumulation is suppressed by the nuclear Rfo locus, which consists of three genes putatively encoding highly similar pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPR-A, -B, and -C). We produced transgenic rapeseed (Brassica napus) plants separately expressing PPR-A and PPR-B and demonstrated that both encoded proteins accumulated preferentially in the anthers of young flower buds. Immunodetection of ORF138 showed that, unlike PPR-B, PPR-A had no effect on the synthesis of the sterility protein. Moreover, immunolocalization experiments indicated that complete elimination of ORF138 from the tapetum of anthers correlated with the restoration of fertility. Thus, the primary role of PPR-B in restoring fertility is to inhibit ORF138 synthesis in the tapetum of young anthers. In situ hybridization experiments confirmed, at the cellular level, that PPR-B has no effect on the accumulation of orf138 mRNA. Lastly, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that PPR-B, but not PPR-A, is associated with the orf138 RNA in vivo, linking restoration activity with the ability to directly or indirectly interact with the orf138 RNA. Together, our data support a role for PPR-B in the translational regulation of orf138 mRNA. PMID:19098270

  13. Cross Protection against Influenza A Virus by Yeast-Expressed Heterologous Tandem Repeat M2 Extracellular Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    The influenza M2 ectodomain (M2e) is well conserved across human influenza A subtypes, but there are few residue changes among avian and swine origin influenza A viruses. We expressed a tandem repeat construct of heterologous M2e sequences (M2e5x) derived from human, swine, and avian origin influenza A viruses using the yeast expression system. Intramuscular immunization of mice with AS04-adjuvanted M2e5x protein vaccines was effective in inducing M2e-specific antibodies reactive to M2e peptide and native M2 proteins on the infected cells with human, swine, or avian influenza virus, mucosal and systemic memory cellular immune responses, and cross-protection against H3N2 virus. Importantly, M2e5x immune sera were found to confer protection against different subtypes of H1N1 and H5N1 influenza A viruses in naïve mice. Also, M2e5x-immune complexes of virus-infected cells stimulated macrophages to secrete cytokines via Fc receptors, indicating a possible mechanism of protection. The present study provides evidence that M2e5x proteins produced in yeast cells could be developed as a potential universal influenza vaccine. PMID:26366729

  14. The WD40 repeat protein NEDD1 functions in microtubule organization during cell division in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zeng, C J Tracy; Lee, Y-R Julie; Liu, Bo

    2009-04-01

    Although cells of flowering plants lack a structurally defined microtubule-organizing center like the centrosome, organization of the spindles and phragmoplasts in mitosis is known to involve the evolutionarily conserved gamma-tubulin complex. We have investigated the function of Arabidopsis thaliana NEDD1, a WD40 repeat protein related to the animal NEDD1/GCP-WD protein, which interacts with the gamma-tubulin complex. The NEDD1 protein decorates spindle microtubules (MTs) preferentially toward spindle poles and phragmoplast MTs toward their minus ends. A T-DNA insertional allele of the single NEDD1 gene was isolated and maintained in heterozygous sporophytes, and NEDD1's function in cell division was analyzed in haploid microspores produced by the heterozygote. In approximately half of the dividing microspores exhibiting aberrant MT organization, spindles were no longer restricted to the cell periphery and became abnormally elongated. After mitosis, MTs aggregated between reforming nuclei but failed to appear in a bipolar configuration. Consequently, defective microspores did not form a continuous cell plate, and two identical nuclei were produced with no differentiation into generative and vegetative cells. Our results support the notion that the plant NEDD1 homolog plays a critical role in MT organization during mitosis, and its function is likely linked to that of the gamma-tubulin complex. PMID:19383896

  15. Characterization of Microsporidia-Induced Developmental Arrest and a Transmembrane Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Luallen, Robert J.; Bakowski, Malina A.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a highly diverged phylum of intracellular, eukaryotic pathogens, with some species able to cause life-threatening illnesses in immunocompromised patients. To better understand microsporidian infection in animals, we study infection of the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and a species of microsporidia, Nematocida parisii, which infects Caenorhabditis nematodes in the wild. We conducted a targeted RNAi screen for host C. elegans genes important for infection and growth of N. parisii, using nematode larval arrest as an assay for infection. Here, we present the results of this RNAi screen, and our analyses on one of the RNAi hits from the screen that was ultimately not corroborated by loss of function mutants. This hit was an RNAi clone against F56A8.3, a conserved gene that encodes a transmembrane protein containing leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), a domain found in numerous pathogen receptors from other systems. This RNAi clone caused C. elegans to be resistant to infection by N. parisii, leading to reduced larval arrest and lower pathogen load. Characterization of the endogenous F56A8.3 protein revealed that it is expressed in the intestine, localized to the membrane around lysosome-related organelles (LROs), and exists in two different protein isoforms in C. elegans. We used the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit the F56A8.3 locus and created both a frameshift mutant resulting in a truncated protein and a complete knockout mutant. Neither of these mutants was able to recapitulate the infection phenotypes of the RNAi clone, indicating that the RNAi-mediated phenotypes are due to an off-target effect of the RNAi clone. Nevertheless, this study describes microsporidia-induced developmental arrest in C. elegans, presents results from an RNAi screen for host genes important for microsporidian infection, and characterizes aspects of the conserved F56A8.3 gene and its protein product. PMID:25874557

  16. The WD-40 repeat protein PkwA of Thermomonospora curvata is associated with rapid growth and is localized in the tips of growing hyphae.

    PubMed

    Petrícková, Katerina; Hasek, Jirí; Benada, Oldrich; Petrícek, Miroslav

    2006-05-01

    The PkwA protein of the thermophilic actinomycete Thermomonospora curvata has already been reported as the first instance of a WD-40 module-containing protein of prokaryotic origin. This protein is composed of an N-terminal eukaryotic-type protein kinase domain and of seven C-terminal WD-40 repeats. PkwA is a peripheral membrane protein that is linked to the early exponential growth phase of the bacterium. Its intracellular concentrations are extremely low. We have shown that the protein forms high molecular weight complexes and is localized mainly in the tips of the young Thermomonospora vegetative hyphae.

  17. The repeat domain of the melanosome fibril protein Pmel17 forms the amyloid core promoting melanin synthesis

    PubMed Central

    McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Shewmaker, Frank; McPhie, Peter; Monterroso, Begoña; Thurber, Kent; Wickner, Reed B.

    2009-01-01

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte protein necessary for eumelanin deposition 1 in mammals and found in melanosomes in a filamentous form. The luminal part of human Pmel17 includes a region (RPT) with 10 copies of a partial repeat sequence, pt.e.gttp.qv., known to be essential in vivo for filament formation. We show that this RPT region readily forms amyloid in vitro, but only under the mildly acidic conditions typical of the lysosome-like melanosome lumen, and the filaments quickly become soluble at neutral pH. Under the same mildly acidic conditions, the Pmel filaments promote eumelanin formation. Electron diffraction, circular dichroism, and solid-state NMR studies of Pmel17 filaments show that the structure is rich in beta sheet. We suggest that RPT is the amyloid core domain of the Pmel17 filaments so critical for melanin formation. PMID:19666488

  18. The Role of Slr0151, a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II Assembly and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Anna; Rengstl, Birgit; Heinz, Steffen; Klingl, Andreas; Nickelsen, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII) is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014). Here, we show that inactivation of slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells. PMID:27200072

  19. Structures and Polymorphic Interactions of Two Heptad-Repeat Regions of the SARS Virus S2 Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,Y.; Liu, J.; Zheng, Q.; Yong, W.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Entry of SARS coronavirus into its target cell requires large-scale structural transitions in the viral spike (S) glycoprotein in order to induce fusion of the virus and cell membranes. Here we describe the identification and crystal structures of four distinct a-helical domains derived from the highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) regions of the S2 fusion subunit. The four domains are an antiparallel four-stranded coiled coil, a parallel trimeric coiled coil, a four-helix bundle, and a six-helix bundle that is likely the final fusogenic form of the protein. When considered together, the structural and thermodynamic features of the four domains suggest a possible mechanism whereby the HR regions, initially sequestered in the native S glycoprotein spike, are released and refold sequentially to promote membrane fusion. Our results provide a structural framework for understanding the control of membrane fusion and should guide efforts to intervene in the SARS coronavirus entry process.

  20. F-box/LRR-repeat protein 7 is genetically associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tosto, Giuseppe; Fu, Hongjun; Vardarajan, Badri N; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Reyes-Dumeyer, Dolly; Lantigua, Rafael; Medrano, Martin; Jimenez-Velazquez, Ivonne Z; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B; Sacco, Ralph L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Farrer, Lindsay; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Reitz, Christiane; Mayeux, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the context of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) over 20 genes have been identified but, aside APOE, all show small effect sizes, leaving a large part of the genetic component unexplained. Admixed populations, such as Caribbean Hispanics, can provide a valuable contribution because of their unique genetic profile and higher incidence of the disease. We aimed to identify novel loci associated with LOAD. Methods About 4514 unrelated Caribbean Hispanics (2451 cases and 2063 controls) were selected for genome-wide association analysis. Significant loci were further tested in the expanded cohort that also included related family members (n = 5300). Two AD-like transgenic mice models (J20 and rTg4510) were used to study gene expression. Independent data sets of non-Hispanic Whites and African Americans were used to further validate findings, along with publicly available brain expression data sets. Results A novel locus, rs75002042 in FBXL7 (5p15.1), was found genome-wide significant in the case–control cohort (odd ratio [OR] = 0.61, P = 6.19E-09) and confirmed in the related members cohorts (OR = 0.63, P = 4.7E-08). Fbxl7 protein was overexpressed in both AD-like transgenic mice compared to wild-type littermates. Publicly available microarray studies also showed significant overexpression of Fbxl7 in LOAD brains compared to nondemented controls. single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs75002042 was in complete linkage disequilibrium with other variants in two independent non-Hispanic White and African American data sets (0.0005 < P < 0.02) used for replication. Interpretation FBXL7, encodes a subcellular protein involved in phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination processes and displays proapoptotic activity. F-box proteins also modulate inflammation and innate immunity, which may be important in LOAD pathogenesis. Further investigations are needed to validate and understand its role in this and other populations. PMID:26339675

  1. C-reactive Protein: Repeated Measurements will Improve Dialysis Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Gabriela; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a common feature in the uremic phenotype and associates with poor outcomes. The awareness regarding the importance of inflammation assessment in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has risen in recent years, and despite the development of novel biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP) is still the most measured inflammatory parameter. Notwithstanding, the possible weak points of CRP determination, this biomarker has demonstrated being useful both for guidance in clinical practice and for risk estimation. In addition, regular determination of CRP among dialysis patients has been associated with better outcomes in different dialysis facilities. Because persistent inflammation may be a silent reflection of various pathophysiologic alterations in CKD, it is crucial that inflammatory markers are regularly monitored and therapeutic attempts be made to target this inflammation.

  2. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  3. The Arabidopsis mitochondria-localized pentatricopeptide repeat protein PGN functions in defense against necrotrophic fungi and abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Laluk, Kristin; Abuqamar, Synan; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2011-08-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins (PPRPs) are encoded by a large gene family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and their functions are largely unknown. The few studied PPRPs are implicated in different developmental processes through their function in RNA metabolism and posttranscriptional regulation in plant organelles. Here, we studied the functions of Arabidopsis PENTATRICOPEPTIDE REPEAT PROTEIN FOR GERMINATION ON NaCl (PGN) in plant defense and abiotic stress responses. Inactivation of PGN results in susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA), glucose, and salinity. Interestingly, ectopic expression of PGN results in the same phenotypes as the pgn null allele, indicating that a tight regulation of the PGN transcript is required for normal function. Loss of PGN function dramatically enhanced reactive oxygen species accumulation in seedlings in response to salt stress. Inhibition of ABA synthesis and signaling partially alleviates the glucose sensitivity of pgn, suggesting that the mutant accumulates high endogenous ABA. Accordingly, induction of NCED3, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in stress-induced ABA biosynthesis, is significantly higher in pgn, and the mutant has higher basal ABA levels, which may underlie its phenotypes. The pgn mutant has altered expression of other ABA-related genes as well as mitochondria-associated transcripts, most notably elevated levels of ABI4 and ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a, which are known for their roles in retrograde signaling induced by changes in or inhibition of mitochondrial function. These data, coupled with its mitochondrial localization, suggest that PGN functions in regulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in mitochondria during abiotic and biotic stress responses, likely through involvement in retrograde signaling.

  4. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum's intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  5. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum's intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  6. Effects of acute versus repeated cocaine exposure on the expression of endocannabinoid signaling-related proteins in the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Ana; Pavón, Francisco-Javier; Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Serrano, Antonia; Arrabal, Sergio; Rivera, Patricia; Alén, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Bilbao, Ainhoa; Rubio, Leticia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Growing awareness of cerebellar involvement in addiction is based on the cerebellum’s intermediary position between motor and reward, potentially acting as an interface between motivational and cognitive functions. Here, we examined the impact of acute and repeated cocaine exposure on the two main signaling systems in the mouse cerebellum: the endocannabinoid (eCB) and glutamate systems. To this end, we investigated whether eCB signaling-related gene and protein expression {cannabinoid receptor type 1 receptors and enzymes that produce [diacylglycerol lipase alpha/beta (DAGLα/β) and N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD)] and degrade [monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amino hydrolase (FAAH)] eCB} were altered. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression of relevant components of the glutamate signaling system [glutamate synthesizing enzymes liver-type glutaminase isoform (LGA) and kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA), metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR3/5), NMDA-ionotropic glutamatergic receptor (NR1/2A/2B/2C) and AMPA-ionotropic receptor subunits (GluR1/2/3/4)] and the gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, because noradrenergic terminals innervate the cerebellar cortex. Results indicated that acute cocaine exposure decreased DAGLα expression, suggesting a down-regulation of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) production, as well as gene expression of TH, KGA, mGluR3 and all ionotropic receptor subunits analyzed in the cerebellum. The acquisition of conditioned locomotion and sensitization after repeated cocaine exposure were associated with an increased NAPE-PLD/FAAH ratio, suggesting enhanced anandamide production, and a decreased DAGLβ/MAGL ratio, suggesting decreased 2-AG generation. Repeated cocaine also increased LGA gene expression but had no effect on glutamate receptors. These findings indicate that acute cocaine modulates the expression of the eCB and

  7. Statistical characterization of the GxxxG glycine repeats in the flagellar biosynthesis protein FliH and its Type III secretion homologue YscL

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background FliH is a protein involved in the export of components of the bacterial flagellum and we herein describe the presence of glycine-rich repeats in FliH of the form AxxxG(xxxG)mxxxA, where the value of m varies considerably in FliH proteins from different bacteria. While GxxxG and AxxxA patterns have previously been described, the long glycine repeat segments in FliH proteins have yet to be characterized. The Type III secretion system homologue to FliH (YscL, AscL, PscL, etc.) also contains a similar GxxxG repeat, and hence the presence of the repeat is evolutionarily conserved in these proteins, suggesting an important structural role or biological function. Results A set of FliH and YscL protein sequences was downloaded from GenBank, and then filtered to reduce redundancy, to ensure the soundness of the sequences, and to eliminate, as much as possible, confounding phylogenetic signal between individual sequences by implementing a pairwise 25% sequence identity cut-off. The general features of the glycine-rich repeats in these proteins were examined, and it was found that the length of these repeat segments varied substantially among FliH proteins but was fairly consistent for the Type III (YscL) homologue sequences, with values of m ranging from 0 to 12 for FliH and 0 to 2 for YscL. The amino acid sequence distribution of each of the three positions in the GxxxG repeats was found to differ significantly from the overall amino acid composition of the FliH/YscL proteins. The high frequency of Glu, Gln, Lys and Ala residues in the repeat positions, which is not likely indicative of any contaminating phylogenetic signal, suggests an α-helical structure for this motif. In addition, we sought to determine whether certain pairs of amino acids, in certain pairs of positions, were found together significantly more often than would be predicted by chance. Several statistically significant correlations were uncovered, which may be important for maintaining helical

  8. Distribution of dipeptide repeat proteins in cellular models and C9orf72 mutation cases suggests link to transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Schludi, Martin H; May, Stephanie; Grässer, Friedrich A; Rentzsch, Kristin; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Küpper, Clemens; Klopstock, Thomas; Arzberger, Thomas; Edbauer, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    A massive expansion of a GGGGCC repeat upstream of the C9orf72 coding region is the most common known cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. Despite its intronic localization and lack of a canonical start codon, both strands are translated into aggregating dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins: poly-GA, poly-GP, poly-GR, poly-PR and poly-PA. To address conflicting findings on the predominant toxicity of the different DPR species in model systems, we compared the expression pattern of the DPR proteins in rat primary neurons and postmortem brain and spinal cord of C9orf72 mutation patients. Only poly-GA overexpression closely mimicked the p62-positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions commonly observed for all DPR proteins in patients. In contrast, overexpressed poly-GR and poly-PR formed nucleolar p62-negative inclusions. In patients, most of the less common neuronal intranuclear DPR inclusions were para-nucleolar and p62 positive. Neuronal nucleoli in C9orf72 cases showed normal size and morphology regardless of the presence of poly-GR and poly-PR inclusions arguing against widespread nucleolar stress, reported in cellular models. Colocalization of para-nucleolar DPR inclusions with heterochromatin and a marker of transcriptional repression (H3K9me2) indicates a link to gene transcription. In contrast, we detected numerous intranuclear DPR inclusions not associated with nucleolar structures in ependymal and subependymal cells. In patients, neuronal inclusions of poly-GR, poly-GP and the poly-GA interacting protein Unc119 were less abundant than poly-GA inclusions, but showed similar regional and subcellular distribution. Regardless of neurodegeneration, all inclusions were most abundant in neocortex, hippocampus and thalamus, with few inclusions in brain stem and spinal cord. In the granular cell layer of the cerebellum, poly-GA and Unc119 inclusions were significantly more abundant in cases with FTLD than in cases with MND and FTLD/MND. Poly

  9. In vitro genetic selection analysis of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein binding to 3'-terminal AUGC repeats in the viral RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Houser-Scott, F; Ansel-McKinney, P; Cai, J M; Gehrke, L

    1997-01-01

    The coat proteins of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the related ilarviruses bind specifically to the 3' untranslated regions of the viral RNAs, which contain conserved repeats of the tetranucleotide sequence AUGC. The purpose of this study was to develop a more detailed understanding of RNA sequence and/or structural determinants required for coat protein binding by characterizing the role of the AUGC repeats. Starting with a complex pool of 39-nucleotide RNA molecules containing random substitutions in the AUGC repeats, in vitro genetic selection was used to identify RNAs that bound coat protein. After six iterative rounds of selection, amplification, and reselection, 25% of the RNAs selected from the randomized pool were wild type; that is, they contained all four AUGC sequences. Among the 31 clones analyzed, AUGC was clearly the preferred selected sequence at the four repeats, but some nucleotide sequence variability was observed at AUGC(865-868) if the other three AUGC repeats were present. Variant RNAs that bound coat protein with affinities equal to or greater than that of the wild-type molecule were not selected. To extend the in vitro selection results, RNAs containing specific nucleotide substitutions were transcribed in vitro and tested in coat protein and peptide binding assays. The data strongly suggest that the AUGC repeats provide sequence-specific determinants and contribute to a structural platform for specific coat protein binding. Coat protein may function in maintaining the 3' ends of the genomic RNAs during replication by stabilizing an RNA structure that defines the 3' terminus as the initiation site for minus-strand synthesis. PMID:9032367

  10. Adeno-associated virus Rep78 protein and terminal repeats enhance integration of DNA sequences into the cellular genome.

    PubMed Central

    Balagúe, C; Kalla, M; Zhang, W W

    1997-01-01

    Two adeno-associated virus (AAV) elements are necessary for the integration of the AAV genome: Rep78/68 proteins and inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). To study the contribution of the Rep proteins and the ITRs in the process of integration, we have compared the integration efficiencies of three different plasmids containing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression cassette. In one plasmid, no viral sequences were present; a second plasmid contained AAV ITRs flanking the reporter gene (integration cassette), and a third plasmid consisted of an integration cassette plus a Rep78 expression cassette. One day after transfection of 293 cells, fluorescent cells were sorted by flow cytometry and plated at 1 cell per well. Two weeks after sorting, colonies were monitored for stable expression of GFP. Transfection with the GFP plasmid containing no viral sequences resulted in no stable fluorescent colonies. Transfection with the plasmid containing the integration cassette alone (GFP flanked by ITRs) produced stable fluorescent colonies at a frequency of 5.3% +/- 1.0% whereas transfection with the plasmid containing both the integration cassette and Rep78 expression cassette produced stable fluorescent colonies at a frequency of 47% +/- 7.5%. Southern blot analysis indicated that in the presence of Rep78, integration is targeted to the AAVSI site in more than 50% of the clones analyzed. Some clones also showed tandem arrays of the integrated GFP cassette. Both head-to-head and head-to-tail orientations were detected. These findings indicate that the presence of AAV ITRs and the Rep78 protein enhance the integration of DNA sequences into the cellular genome and that the integration cassette is targeted to AAVS1 in the presence of Rep78. PMID:9060699

  11. Characterization of Protective Epitopes in a Highly Conserved Plasmodium falciparum Antigenic Protein Containing Repeats of Acidic and Basic Residues

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pawan; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Balwan; Bharadwaj, Ashima; Sailaja, V. Naga; Adak, T.; Kushwaha, Ashima; Malhotra, Pawan; Chauhan, V. S.

    1998-01-01

    The delineation of putatively protective and immunogenic epitopes in vaccine candidate proteins constitutes a major research effort towards the development of an effective malaria vaccine. By virtue of its role in the formation of the immune clusters of merozoites, its location on the surface of merozoites, and its highly conserved nature both at the nucleotide sequence level and the amino acid sequence level, the antigen which contains repeats of acidic and basic residues (ABRA) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum represents such an antigen. Based upon the predicted amino acid sequence of ABRA, we synthesized eight peptides, with six of these (AB-1 to AB-6) ranging from 12 to 18 residues covering the most hydrophilic regions of the protein, and two more peptides (AB-7 and AB-8) representing its repetitive sequences. We found that all eight constructs bound an appreciable amount of antibody in sera from a large proportion of P. falciparum malaria patients; two of these peptides (AB-1 and AB-3) also elicited a strong proliferation response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all 11 human subjects recovering from malaria. When used as carrier-free immunogens, six peptides induced a strong, boostable, immunoglobulin G-type antibody response in rabbits, indicating the presence of both B-cell determinants and T-helper-cell epitopes in these six constructs. These antibodies specifically cross-reacted with the parasite protein(s) in an immunoblot and in an immunofluorescence assay. In another immunoblot, rabbit antipeptide sera also recognized recombinant fragments of ABRA expressed in bacteria. More significantly, rabbit antibodies against two constructs (AB-1 and AB-5) inhibited the merozoite reinvasion of human erythrocytes in vitro up to ∼90%. These results favor further studies so as to determine possible inclusion of these two constructs in a multicomponent subunit vaccine against asexual blood stages of P. falciparum. PMID:9596765

  12. Empty pericarp5 encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat protein that is required for mitochondrial RNA editing and seed development in maize.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Jun; Xiu, Zhi-Hui; Meeley, Robert; Tan, Bao-Cai

    2013-03-01

    In flowering plants, RNA editing is a posttranscriptional mechanism that converts specific cytidines to uridines in both mitochondrial and plastidial transcripts, altering the information encoded by these genes. Here, we report the molecular characterization of the empty pericarp5 (emp5) mutants in maize (Zea mays). Null mutation of Emp5 results in abortion of embryo and endosperm development at early stages. Emp5 encodes a mitochondrion-targeted DYW subgroup pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein. Analysis of the mitochondrial transcripts revealed that loss of the EMP5 function abolishes the C-to-U editing of ribosomal protein L16 at the rpl16-458 site (100% edited in the wild type), decreases the editing at nine sites in NADH dehydrogenase9 (nad9), cytochrome c oxidase3 (cox3), and ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), and surprisingly increases the editing at five sites of ATP synthase F0 subunit a (atp6), apocytochrome b (cob), nad1, and rpl16. Mutant EMP5-4 lacking the E+ and DYW domains still retains the substrate specificity and editing function, only at reduced efficiency. This suggests that the E+ and DYW domains of EMP5 are not essential to the EMP5 editing function but are necessary for efficiency. Analysis of the ortholog in rice (Oryza sativa) indicates that rice EMP5 has a conserved function in C-to-U editing of the rice mitochondrial rpl16-458 site. EMP5 knockdown expression in transgenics resulted in slow growth and defective seeds. These results demonstrate that Emp5 encodes a PPR-DYW protein that is required for the editing of multiple transcripts in mitochondria, and the editing events, particularly the C-to-U editing at the rpl16-458 site, are critical to the mitochondrial functions and, hence, to seed development in maize. PMID:23463776

  13. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation.

  14. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation. PMID:25497915

  15. Participation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Muneshige; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Oikawa, Shinji; Murakami, Akira; Ohuchi, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    Stimulation of the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 with thapsigargin, an endomembrane Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor, induced histamine production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The protein kinase C activator, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), also enhanced histamine production. α-Fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide substrate of L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), suppressed the thapsigargin (30 nM)- and TPA (30 nM)-induced histamine production. Both thapsigargin (30 nM) and TPA (30 nM) induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase and p38 MAP kinase. PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK-1 which phosphorylates p44/p42 MAP kinase, strongly suppressed both the thapsigargin (30 nM)- and TPA (30 nM)-induced histamine production, whereas SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, inhibited them only partially. The other MEK-1 inhibitor, U-0126, also inhibited both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production in a concentration-dependent manner. Thapsigargin (30 nM) and TPA (30 nM) increased the levels of HDC mRNA at 4 h, but PD98059 suppressed both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced increases in the HDC mRNA level. These findings indicate that thapsigargin and TPA induce histamine production in RAW 264.7 cells by increasing the level of HDC mRNA, and that both the thapsigargin- and TPA-induced histamine production are regulated largely by p44/p42 MAP kinase and partially by p38 MAP kinase.. PMID:10711350

  16. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase N2 Is a Positive Regulator of Lipopolysaccharide Signaling in Raw264.7 Cell through Derepression of Src Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Ha Thi, Huyen Trang; Choi, Seo-Won; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Hye-Youn; Hong, Suntaek

    2016-01-01

    T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is a phosphotyrosine-specific nonreceptor phosphatase and is ubiquitously expressed in tissues. Although PTPN2 functions as an important regulator in different signaling pathways, it is still unclear what is specific target protein of PTPN2 and how is regulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory signaling pathway. Here, we found that PTPN2 deficiency downregulated the expression of LPS-mediated pro-inflammtory cytokine genes. Conversely, overexpression of PTPN2 in Raw264.7 cells enhanced the expression and secretion of those cytokines. The activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways by LPS was reduced in PTPN2-knockdowned cells and ectopic expression of PTPN2 reversed these effects. Furthermore, we found that PTNP2 directly interacted with Src and removed the inhibitory Tyr527 phosphorylation of Src to enhance the activatory phosphorylation of Tyr416 residue. These results suggested that PTPN2 is a positive regulator of LPS-induced inflammatory response by enhancing the activity of Src through targeting the inhibitory phosphor-tyrosine527 of Src. PMID:27611995

  17. Avocado by-products as inhibitors of color deterioration and lipid and protein oxidation in raw porcine patties subjected to chilled storage.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carpena, J G; Morcuende, D; Estévez, M

    2011-10-01

    Processing of avocados generates an important amount of by-products such as peels and seeds that are rich in bioactive substances with proven radical suppressing activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of peel and seed extracts from two avocado varieties-'Hass' and 'Fuerte'-as inhibitors of lipid and protein oxidation and color deterioration of raw porcine patties during chilled storage (4 °C/15 days). Avocado extracts significantly (p<0.05) reduced the loss of redness and the increase of lightness during storage of porcine patties. 'Fuerte' extracts were more efficient at inhibiting discoloration of chilled patties than 'Hass' extracts. Patties treated with avocado extracts had significantly lower amounts of TBA-RS than control ones throughout the storage. 'Hass' avocado extracts significantly inhibited the formation of protein carbonyls in chilled patties at day 15. The present results highlight the potential usage of extracts from avocado by-products as ingredients for the production of muscle foods with enhanced quality traits.

  18. Building global models for fat and total protein content in raw milk based on historical spectroscopic data in the visible and short-wave near infrared range.

    PubMed

    Melenteva, Anastasiia; Galyanin, Vladislav; Savenkova, Elena; Bogomolov, Andrey

    2016-07-15

    A large set of fresh cow milk samples collected from many suppliers over a large geographical area in Russia during a year has been analyzed by optical spectroscopy in the range 400-1100 nm in accordance with previously developed scatter-based technique. The global (i.e. resistant to seasonal, genetic, regional and other variations of the milk composition) models for fat and total protein content, which were built using partial least-squares (PLS) regression, exhibit satisfactory prediction performances enabling their practical application in the dairy. The root mean-square errors of prediction (RMSEP) were 0.09 and 0.10 for fat and total protein content, respectively. The issues of raw milk analysis and multivariate modelling based on the historical spectroscopic data have been considered and approaches to the creation of global models and their transfer between the instruments have been proposed. Availability of global models should significantly facilitate the dissemination of optical spectroscopic methods for the laboratory and in-line quantitative milk analysis.

  19. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase N2 Is a Positive Regulator of Lipopolysaccharide Signaling in Raw264.7 Cell through Derepression of Src Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Hye-Youn; Hong, Suntaek

    2016-01-01

    T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is a phosphotyrosine-specific nonreceptor phosphatase and is ubiquitously expressed in tissues. Although PTPN2 functions as an important regulator in different signaling pathways, it is still unclear what is specific target protein of PTPN2 and how is regulated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory signaling pathway. Here, we found that PTPN2 deficiency downregulated the expression of LPS-mediated pro-inflammtory cytokine genes. Conversely, overexpression of PTPN2 in Raw264.7 cells enhanced the expression and secretion of those cytokines. The activation of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways by LPS was reduced in PTPN2-knockdowned cells and ectopic expression of PTPN2 reversed these effects. Furthermore, we found that PTNP2 directly interacted with Src and removed the inhibitory Tyr527 phosphorylation of Src to enhance the activatory phosphorylation of Tyr416 residue. These results suggested that PTPN2 is a positive regulator of LPS-induced inflammatory response by enhancing the activity of Src through targeting the inhibitory phosphor-tyrosine527 of Src. PMID:27611995

  20. Distinct role of Arabidopsis mitochondrial P-type pentatricopeptide repeat protein-modulating editing protein, PPME, in nad1 RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Kuan-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Huei-Jing; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitochondrion is an important power generator in most eukaryotic cells. To preserve its function, many essential nuclear-encoded factors play specific roles in mitochondrial RNA metabolic processes, including RNA editing. RNA editing consists of post-transcriptional deamination, which alters specific nucleotides in transcripts to mediate gene expression. In plant cells, many pentatricopeptide repeat proteins (PPRs) participate in diverse organellar RNA metabolic processes, but only PLS-type PPRs are involved in RNA editing. Here, we report a P-type PPR protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, P-type PPR-Modulating Editing (PPME), which has a distinct role in mitochondrial nad1 RNA editing via RNA binding activity. In the homozygous ppme mutant, cytosine (C)-to-uracil (U) conversions at both the nad1-898 and 937 sites were abolished, disrupting Arg300-to-Trp300 and Pro313-to-Ser313 amino acid changes in the mitochondrial NAD1 protein. NAD1 is a critical component of mitochondrial respiration complex I; its activity is severely reduced in the homozygous ppme mutant, resulting in significantly altered growth and development. Both abolished RNA editing and defective complex I activity were completely rescued by CaMV 35S promoter- and PPME native promoter-driven PPME genomic fragments tagged with GFP in a homozygous ppme background. Our experimental results demonstrate a distinct role of a P-type PPR protein, PPME, in RNA editing in plant organelles. PMID:27149614

  1. Lovastatin insensitive 1, a Novel pentatricopeptide repeat protein, is a potential regulatory factor of isoprenoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Suzuki, Masashi; Tang, Jianwei; Nagata, Noriko; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Seki, Hikaru; Kiuchi, Reiko; Kaneko, Yasuko; Nakazawa, Miki; Matsui, Minami; Matsumoto, Shogo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2007-02-01

    Higher plants have two metabolic pathways for isoprenoid biosynthesis: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidal non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. Despite the compartmentalization of these two pathways, metabolic flow occurs between them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cross-talk. To identify such regulatory mechanisms, we isolated and characterized the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutant lovastatin insensitive 1 (loi1), which is resistant to lovastatin and clomazone, inhibitors of the MVA and MEP pathways, respectively. The accumulation of the major products of these pathways, i.e. sterols and chlorophyll, was less affected by lovastatin and clomazone, respectively, in loi1 than in the wild type. Furthermore, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity analysis showed higher activity of HMGR in loi1-1 treated with lovastatin than that in the WT. We consider that the lovastatin-resistant phenotype of loi1-1 was derived from this post-transcriptional up-regulation of HMGR. The LOI1 gene encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein. PPR proteins are thought to regulate the expression of genes encoded in organelle genomes by post-transcriptional regulation in mitochondria or plastids. Our results demonstrate that LOI1 is predicted to localize in mitochondria and has the ability to bind single-stranded nucleic acids. Our investigation revealed that the post-transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial RNA may be involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis in both the MVA and MEP pathways.

  2. TRIP: a novel double stranded RNA binding protein which interacts with the leucine rich repeat of flightless I.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S A; Brown, E C; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1998-01-01

    A northwestern screen of a CHO-K1 cell line cDNA library with radiolabelled HIV-1 TAR RNA identified a novel TAR RNA interacting protein, TRIP. The human trip cDNA was also cloned and its expression is induced by phorbol esters. The N-terminus of TRIP shows high homology to the coiled coil domain of FLAP, a protein which binds the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) of Flightless I (FLI) and the interaction of TRIP with the FLI LRR has been confirmed in vitro . TRIP does not bind single stranded DNA or RNA significantly and binds double stranded DNA weakly. In contrast, TRIP binds double stranded RNA with high affinity and two molecules of TRIP bind the TAR stem. The RNA binding domain has been identified and encompasses a lysine-rich motif. A TRIP-GFP fusion is localised in the cytoplasm and excluded from the nucleus. FLI has a C-terminal gelsolin-like domain which binds actin and therefore the association of TRIP with the FLI LRR may provide a link between the actin cytoskeleton and RNA in mammalian cells. PMID:9671805

  3. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  4. The molecular chaperone Hsp70 activates protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) by binding the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain.

    PubMed

    Connarn, Jamie N; Assimon, Victoria A; Reed, Rebecca A; Tse, Eric; Southworth, Daniel R; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Gestwicki, Jason E; Sun, Duxin

    2014-01-31

    Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is auto-inhibited by intramolecular interactions with its tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Hsp90 has been shown to bind PP5 to activate its phosphatase activity. However, the functional implications of binding Hsp70 to PP5 are not yet clear. In this study, we find that both Hsp90 and Hsp70 bind to PP5 using a luciferase fragment complementation assay. A fluorescence polarization assay shows that Hsp90 (MEEVD motif) binds to the TPR domain of PP5 almost 3-fold higher affinity than Hsp70 (IEEVD motif). However, Hsp70 binding to PP5 stimulates higher phosphatase activity of PP5 than the binding of Hsp90. We find that PP5 forms a stable 1:1 complex with Hsp70, but the interaction appears asymmetric with Hsp90, with one PP5 binding the dimer. Solution NMR studies reveal that Hsc70 and PP5 proteins are dynamically independent in complex, tethered by a disordered region that connects the Hsc70 core and the IEEVD-TPR contact area. This tethered binding is expected to allow PP5 to carry out multi-site dephosphorylation of Hsp70-bound clients with a range of sizes and shapes. Together, these results demonstrate that Hsp70 recruits PP5 and activates its phosphatase activity which suggests dual roles for PP5 that might link chaperone systems with signaling pathways in cancer and development.

  5. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5): sensing intracellular iron and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Julio C; Bruick, Richard K

    2014-04-01

    Though essential for many vital biological processes, excess iron results in the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, iron metabolism must be tightly regulated. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 5 (FBXL5), an E3 ubiquitin ligase subunit, regulates cellular and systemic iron homeostasis by facilitating iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) degradation. FBXL5 possesses an N-terminal hemerythrin (Hr)-like domain that mediates its own differential stability by switching between two different conformations to communicate cellular iron availability. In addition, the FBXL5-Hr domain also senses O2 availability, albeit by a distinct mechanism. Mice lacking FBXL5 fail to sense intracellular iron levels and die in utero due to iron overload and exposure to damaging levels of oxidative stress. By closely monitoring intracellular levels of iron and oxygen, FBLX5 prevents the formation of conditions that favor ROS formation. These findings suggest that FBXL5 is essential for the maintenance of iron homeostasis and is a key sensor of bioavailable iron. Here, we describe the iron and oxygen sensing mechanisms of the FBXL5 Hr-like domain and its role in mediating ROS biology.

  6. Small Glutamine-Rich Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Protein Alpha (SGTA) Ablation Limits Offspring Viability and Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Philp, Lisa K.; Day, Tanya K.; Butler, Miriam S.; Laven-Law, Geraldine; Jindal, Shalini; Hickey, Theresa E.; Scher, Howard I.; Butler, Lisa M.; Tilley, Wayne D.

    2016-01-01

    Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) has been implicated as a co-chaperone and regulator of androgen and growth hormone receptor (AR, GHR) signalling. We investigated the functional consequences of partial and full Sgta ablation in vivo using Cre-lox Sgta-null mice. Sgta+/− breeders generated viable Sgta−/− offspring, but at less than Mendelian expectancy. Sgta−/− breeders were subfertile with small litters and higher neonatal death (P < 0.02). Body size was significantly and proportionately smaller in male and female Sgta−/− (vs WT, Sgta+/− P < 0.001) from d19. Serum IGF-1 levels were genotype- and sex-dependent. Food intake, muscle and bone mass and adiposity were unchanged in Sgta−/−. Vital and sex organs had normal relative weight, morphology and histology, although certain androgen-sensitive measures such as penis and preputial size, and testis descent, were greater in Sgta−/−. Expression of AR and its targets remained largely unchanged, although AR localisation was genotype- and tissue-dependent. Generally expression of other TPR-containing proteins was unchanged. In conclusion, this thorough investigation of SGTA-null mutation reports a mild phenotype of reduced body size. The model’s full potential likely will be realised by genetic crosses with other models to interrogate the role of SGTA in the many diseases in which it has been implicated. PMID:27358191

  7. Small Glutamine-Rich Tetratricopeptide Repeat-Containing Protein Alpha (SGTA) Ablation Limits Offspring Viability and Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Philp, Lisa K; Day, Tanya K; Butler, Miriam S; Laven-Law, Geraldine; Jindal, Shalini; Hickey, Theresa E; Scher, Howard I; Butler, Lisa M; Tilley, Wayne D

    2016-01-01

    Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA) has been implicated as a co-chaperone and regulator of androgen and growth hormone receptor (AR, GHR) signalling. We investigated the functional consequences of partial and full Sgta ablation in vivo using Cre-lox Sgta-null mice. Sgta(+/-) breeders generated viable Sgta(-/-) offspring, but at less than Mendelian expectancy. Sgta(-/-) breeders were subfertile with small litters and higher neonatal death (P < 0.02). Body size was significantly and proportionately smaller in male and female Sgta(-/-) (vs WT, Sgta(+/-) P < 0.001) from d19. Serum IGF-1 levels were genotype- and sex-dependent. Food intake, muscle and bone mass and adiposity were unchanged in Sgta(-/-). Vital and sex organs had normal relative weight, morphology and histology, although certain androgen-sensitive measures such as penis and preputial size, and testis descent, were greater in Sgta(-/-). Expression of AR and its targets remained largely unchanged, although AR localisation was genotype- and tissue-dependent. Generally expression of other TPR-containing proteins was unchanged. In conclusion, this thorough investigation of SGTA-null mutation reports a mild phenotype of reduced body size. The model's full potential likely will be realised by genetic crosses with other models to interrogate the role of SGTA in the many diseases in which it has been implicated. PMID:27358191

  8. Molecular Characterization of Antibody Epitopes of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Ankyrin Protein 200 and Tandem Repeat Protein 47 and Evaluation of Synthetic Immunodeterminants for Serodiagnosis of Human Monocytotropic Ehrlichiosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tian; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Nicholson, William L.; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, major species-specific antibody epitopes in three immunoreactive tandem repeat proteins (TRPs) of Ehrlichia chaffeensis, TRP32, TRP47, and TRP120, have been identified and molecularly characterized within tandem repeat (TR) regions. In this study, we mapped the major immunodeterminants of the E. chaffeensis 200-kDa ankyrin protein (Ank200) and the minor immunodeterminants in the N- and C-terminal regions of E. chaffeensis TRP47. Major antibody epitopes of Ank200 were localized to four polypeptide regions (18-mer, 20-mer, 20-mer, and 21-mer, respectively) in terminal acidic domains, which reacted with antibodies in sera from human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME) patients and an E. chaffeensis-infected dog. Two minor epitope-containing regions were identified in the N terminus and the C terminus of TRP47. The sensitivities and specificities of synthetic peptides representing these and other well-defined major immunodeterminants of E. chaffeensis were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thirty-one HME patient serum samples that had detectable E. chaffeensis antibodies (titers from 64 to 8,192) by indirect fluorescent-antibody assay (IFA) were tested. All 31 serum samples reacted with at least one E. chaffeensis peptide, 30 (96.8%) with TRP120 peptides, 27 (87.1%) with TRP32 peptides, 24 (77.4%) with TRP47 peptides, 19 (61.3%) with Ank200 peptides, and 28 (90.3%) with recombinant TRP120-TR protein. A mixture of the two most sensitive peptides from TRP120 and TRP32 did not provide enhanced analytical sensitivity compared to that provided by TRP120 alone. Our results demonstrate that the TRP120 peptide can be utilized for development of standardized sensitive point-of-care and reference laboratory immunodiagnostics for HME. This is the first study to compare analysis of molecularly defined major antibody epitopes with IFA for diagnosis of HME. PMID:19955322

  9. The human mid-size neurofilament subunit: a repeated protein sequence and the relationship of its gene to the intermediate filament gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, M W; Lazzarini, R A; Lee, V M; Schlaepfer, W W; Nelson, D L

    1987-01-01

    We report the isolation and sequence of cDNA and genomic clones for one of the two large subunits of human neurofilament, NF-M. Analysis of the sequence has allowed us to investigate the structure of the carboxy-terminal tail of this protein, and to compare it to that of the small neurofilament as well as to other intermediate filaments. The carboxy-terminal region of the protein contains a 13 amino acid proline- and serine-rich sequence repeated six times in succession. Within each repeat unit are two smaller repeats of the sequence Lys-Ser-Pro-Val. The four amino acid repeat may represent a kinase recognition site in a region of the protein that is known to be highly phosphorylated. We also note the presence of an additional heptad repeat at the extreme carboxy terminus of the protein. This region of 60 amino acids may be involved in coiled-coil interactions similar to those that facilitate the filament formation in the rod region. The human gene contains only two introns. Their positions correspond to two of the three introns found in the small neurofilament of the mouse. Thus, two of the three neurofilament genes of mammals have similar structures which are quite different from those of the other intermediate filaments. This finding suggests a common origin of the neurofilament subunits, whose evolutionary relationship to other intermediate filament genes is uncertain. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3608989

  10. Association of the small latent transforming growth factor-beta with an eight cysteine repeat of its binding protein LTBP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Saharinen, J; Taipale, J; Keski-Oja, J

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas) are produced by most cells in large latent complexes of TGF-beta and its propeptide (LAP) associated with a binding protein. The latent TGF-beta binding proteins (LTBPs-1, -2 and -3) mediate the secretion and, subsequently, the association of latent TGF-beta complexes with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The association of beta1-LAP with LTBP-1 was characterized at the molecular level with an expression system in mammalian cells, where TGF-beta1 and various fragments of LTBP-1 were co-expressed and secreted with the aid of a signal peptide synthesized to the LTBP-1 constructs. Immunoblotting of the fusion protein complexes indicated that the third 8-Cys repeat of LTBP-1 bound covalently to the LAP region of TGF-beta1. The cysteine required for the association between LTBP-1 and beta1-LAP was mapped to Cys33 of beta1-LAP. The N-terminal region of LTBP-1 consisting of the first 400 amino acids was found to associate covalently with the ECM. The data indicate that an 8-Cys repeat of LTBP is capable of covalent and specific protein-protein interactions. These interactions are mediated by exchanging cysteine disulfide bonds between the core 8-Cys repeat and an optionally associated protein during the secretion. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an extracellular protein module that is able to exchange cysteine disulfide bonds with heterologous ligand proteins. Images PMID:8617200

  11. A variant of the breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRC) repeat is essential for the RECQL5 helicase to interact with RAD51 recombinase for genome stabilization.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Nurul; Paquet, Nicolas; Fox, David; Dray, Eloise; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Klein, Hannah; Sung, Patrick; Wang, Weidong

    2012-07-01

    The BRC repeat is a structural motif in the tumor suppressor BRCA2 (breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein), which promotes homologous recombination (HR) by regulating RAD51 recombinase activity. To date, the BRC repeat has not been observed in other proteins, so that its role in HR is inferred only in the context of BRCA2. Here, we identified a BRC repeat variant, named BRCv, in the RECQL5 helicase, which possesses anti-recombinase activity in vitro and suppresses HR and promotes cellular resistance to camptothecin-induced replication stress in vivo. RECQL5-BRCv interacted with RAD51 through two conserved motifs similar to those in the BRCA2-BRC repeat. Mutations of either motif compromised functions of RECQL5, including association with RAD51, inhibition of RAD51-mediated D-loop formation, suppression of sister chromatid exchange, and resistance to camptothecin-induced replication stress. Potential BRCvs were also found in other HR regulatory proteins, including Srs2 and Sgs1, which possess anti-recombinase activities similar to that of RECQL5. A point mutation in the predicted Srs2-BRCv disrupted the ability of the protein to bind RAD51 and to inhibit D-loop formation. Thus, BRC is a common RAD51 interaction module that can be utilized by different proteins to either promote HR, as in the case of BRCA2, or to suppress HR, as in RECQL5.

  12. Functional differentiation in the leucine-rich repeat domains of closely related plant virus-resistance proteins that recognize common avr proteins.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Ken-Taro; Tomita, Reiko; Takeuchi, Shigeharu; Atsumi, Go; Saitoh, Hiromasa; Mizumoto, Hiroyuki; Kiba, Akinori; Yamaoka, Naoto; Nishiguchi, Masamichi; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2012-09-01

    The N' gene of Nicotiana sylvestris and L genes of Capsicum plants confer the resistance response accompanying the hypersensitive response (HR) elicited by tobamovirus coat proteins (CP) but with different viral specificities. Here, we report the identification of the N' gene. We amplified and cloned an N' candidate using polymerase chain reaction primers designed from L gene sequences. The N' candidate gene was a single 4143 base pairs fragment encoding a coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-type resistance protein of 1,380 amino acids. The candidate gene induced the HR in response to the coexpression of tobamovirus CP with the identical specificity as reported for N'. Analysis of N'-containing and tobamovirus-susceptible N. tabacum accessions supported the hypothesis that the candidate is the N' gene itself. Chimera analysis between N' and L(3) revealed that their LRR domains determine the spectrum of their tobamovirus CP recognition. Deletion and mutation analyses of N' and L(3) revealed that the conserved sequences in their C-terminal regions have important roles but contribute differentially to the recognition of common avirulence proteins. The results collectively suggest that Nicotiana N' and Capsicum L genes, which most likely evolved from a common ancestor, differentiated in their recognition specificity through changes in the structural requirements for LRR function.

  13. The Ankyrin-Repeat Transmembrane Protein BDA1 Functions Downstream of the Receptor-Like Protein SNC2 to Regulate Plant Immunity1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanai; Zhang, Yaxi; Ding, Pingtao; Johnson, Kaeli; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2012-01-01

    Plants utilize a large number of immune receptors to recognize pathogens and activate defense responses. A small number of these receptors belong to the receptor-like protein family. Previously, we showed that a gain-of-function mutation in the receptor-like protein SNC2 (for Suppressor of NPR1, Constitutive2) leads to constitutive activation of defense responses in snc2-1D mutant plants. To identify defense signaling components downstream of SNC2, we carried out a suppressor screen in the snc2-1D mutant background of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Map-based cloning of one of the suppressor genes, BDA1 (for bian da; “becoming big” in Chinese), showed that it encodes a protein with amino-terminal ankyrin repeats and carboxyl-terminal transmembrane domains. Loss-of-function mutations in BDA1 suppress the dwarf morphology and constitutive defense responses in snc2-1D npr1-1 (for nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes1,1) and also result in enhanced susceptibility to bacterial pathogens. In contrast, a gain-of-function allele of bda1 isolated from a separate genetic screen to search for mutants with enhanced pathogen resistance was found to constitutively activate cell death and defense responses. These data suggest that BDA1 is a critical signaling component that functions downstream of SNC2 to regulate plant immunity. PMID:22740615

  14. Raw data for the identification of SUMOylated proteins in S. cerevisiae subjected to two types of osmotic shock, using affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Srikumar, Tharan; Lewicki, Megan C.; Raught, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) “stress response” (SSR) is a poorly understood evolutionarily conserved phenomenon in which steady-state SUMO conjugate levels are dramatically increased in response to environmental stresses. Here we describe the data acquired using affinity-purification coupled with mass spectrometry to identify proteins that are SUMOylated in response to two different types of osmotic stress, 1 M sorbitol and 1 M KCl. The mass spectrometry dataset described here has been uploaded to the MassIVE repository with ID: MSV000078739, and consists of 32 raw MS files acquired in data-dependent mode on a Thermo Q-Exactive instrument. iProphet-processed MS/MS search results and associated SAINT scores are also included as a reference. These data are discussed and interpreted in “The S. cerevisiae SUMO stress response is a conjugation–deconjugation cycle that targets the transcription machinery”, by Lewicki et al. in the Journal of Proteomics, 2014 [1]. PMID:26217701

  15. Effects of Glycated Whey Protein Concentrate on Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Expression and Phagocytic Activity in RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chun, Su-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Ah; Lee, Keon Bong; Kim, Sae Hun; Park, Kun-Young; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the stimulatory effects of Maillard reaction, a non-enzymatic browning reaction on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activity induced by whey protein concentrate (WPC). Glycated WPC (G-WPC) was prepared by a reaction between WPC and the lactose it contained. The fluorescence intensity of G-WPC dramatically increased after one day, and high molecular weight complexes formed via the Maillard reaction were also observed in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis profiles. G-WPC demonstrated immunomodulatory effects, including stimulation of increased nitric oxide production and cytokine expressions (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), compared to WPC. Furthermore, the phagocytic activity of RAW264.7 cells was significantly increased upon treatment with G-WPC, compared to WPC. Therefore, we suggest that G-WPC can be utilized as an improved dietary source for providing immune modulating activity. PMID:26830480

  16. Copper complex species within a fragment of the N-terminal repeat region in opossum PrP protein.

    PubMed

    Vagliasindi, Laura I; Arena, Giuseppe; Bonomo, Raffaele P; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tabbì, Giovanni

    2011-03-21

    A spectroscopic (UV-Vis, CD and EPR), thermodynamic and voltammetric study of the copper(ii) complexes with the Ac-PHPGGSNWGQ-NH(2) polypeptide (L), a fragment of the opossum PrP protein N-terminal four-repeat region, was carried out in aqueous solution. It suggests the formation of a highly distorted [Cu(L)H(-2)] complex species in the neutral region, the stereochemistry of which is ascribable to a square base pyramid and a CuN(3)O(2) chromophore, resulting from the coordination of a histidine imidazole and two peptide nitrogen atoms and probably oxygen atoms from water molecules. At basic pH values a [Cu(L)H(-3)](-) species with a pseudo-octahedral geometry was also obtained, with four nitrogen donor atoms in its equatorial plane, coming from the histidine residue and from peptidic nitrogen atoms. Interestingly, at pH values relatively higher than the neutrality, the coordination sphere of the copper complex in the [Cu(L)H(-2)] species changes its stereochemistry towards a pseudo-octahedron, as suggested by the change in the parallel copper hyperfine coupling constant of the EPR spectra at low temperature. A slight difference in the redox potentials between this two-faced [Cu(L)H(-2)] complex species seems to confirm this behaviour. Both potentiometric and spectroscopic data were compared with the analogous species obtained with the Ac-PHGGGWGQ-NH(2) peptide, belonging to the octarepeat domain of the human prion protein (hPrP) N-terminal region. The [Cu(L)H(-2)] species formed by the Ac-PHPGGSNWGQ-NH(2) decapeptide, having a slightly lower stability, turned out to be less abundant and to exist within a narrow pH range.

  17. Copper complex species within a fragment of the N-terminal repeat region in opossum PrP protein.

    PubMed

    Vagliasindi, Laura I; Arena, Giuseppe; Bonomo, Raffaele P; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tabbì, Giovanni

    2011-03-21

    A spectroscopic (UV-Vis, CD and EPR), thermodynamic and voltammetric study of the copper(ii) complexes with the Ac-PHPGGSNWGQ-NH(2) polypeptide (L), a fragment of the opossum PrP protein N-terminal four-repeat region, was carried out in aqueous solution. It suggests the formation of a highly distorted [Cu(L)H(-2)] complex species in the neutral region, the stereochemistry of which is ascribable to a square base pyramid and a CuN(3)O(2) chromophore, resulting from the coordination of a histidine imidazole and two peptide nitrogen atoms and probably oxygen atoms from water molecules. At basic pH values a [Cu(L)H(-3)](-) species with a pseudo-octahedral geometry was also obtained, with four nitrogen donor atoms in its equatorial plane, coming from the histidine residue and from peptidic nitrogen atoms. Interestingly, at pH values relatively higher than the neutrality, the coordination sphere of the copper complex in the [Cu(L)H(-2)] species changes its stereochemistry towards a pseudo-octahedron, as suggested by the change in the parallel copper hyperfine coupling constant of the EPR spectra at low temperature. A slight difference in the redox potentials between this two-faced [Cu(L)H(-2)] complex species seems to confirm this behaviour. Both potentiometric and spectroscopic data were compared with the analogous species obtained with the Ac-PHGGGWGQ-NH(2) peptide, belonging to the octarepeat domain of the human prion protein (hPrP) N-terminal region. The [Cu(L)H(-2)] species formed by the Ac-PHPGGSNWGQ-NH(2) decapeptide, having a slightly lower stability, turned out to be less abundant and to exist within a narrow pH range. PMID:21283898

  18. Complementary Activities of TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING Proteins and Polycomb Group Complexes in Transcriptional Regulation of Target Genes[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Benjamin; James, Geo Velikkakam

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) and PRC2 repress target genes through histone modification and chromatin compaction. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants strongly compromised in the pathway cannot develop differentiated organs. LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1) is so far the only known plant PRC1 component that directly binds to H3K27me3, the histone modification set by PRC2, and also associates genome-wide with trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3). Surprisingly, lhp1 mutants show relatively mild phenotypic alterations. To explain this paradox, we screened for genetic enhancers of lhp1 mutants to identify novel components repressing target genes together with, or in parallel to, LHP1. Two enhancing mutations were mapped to TELOMERE REPEAT BINDING PROTEIN1 (TRB1) and its paralog TRB3. We show that TRB1 binds to thousands of genomic sites containing telobox or related cis-elements with a significant increase of sites and strength of binding in the lhp1 background. Furthermore, in combination with lhp1, but not alone, trb1 mutants show increased transcription of LHP1 targets, such as floral meristem identity genes, which are more likely to be bound by TRB1 in the lhp1 background. By contrast, expression of a subset of LHP1-independent TRB1 target genes, many involved in primary metabolism, is decreased in the absence of TRB1 alone. Thus, TRB1 is a bivalent transcriptional modulator that maintains downregulation of Polycomb Group (PcG) target genes in lhp1 mutants, while it sustains high expression of targets that are regulated independently of PcG. PMID:26721861

  19. Pentatricopeptide-repeat family protein RF6 functions with hexokinase 6 to rescue rice cytoplasmic male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenchao; Yu, Changchun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lili; Dan, Zhiwu; Zhou, Wei; He, Chunlan; Zeng, Yafei; Yao, Guoxin; Qi, Jianzhao; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Renshan; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhu, Yingguo

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been extensively used for hybrid seed production in many major crops. Honglian CMS (HL-CMS) is one of the three major types of CMS in rice and has contributed greatly to food security worldwide. The HL-CMS trait is associated with an aberrant chimeric mitochondrial transcript, atp6-orfH79, which causes pollen sterility and can be rescued by two nonallelic restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes, Rf5 or Rf6. Here, we report the identification of Rf6, which encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family protein with a characteristic duplication of PPR motifs 3–5. RF6 is targeted to mitochondria, where it physically associates with hexokinase 6 (OsHXK6) and promotes the processing of the aberrant CMS-associated transcript atp6-orfH79 at nucleotide 1238, which ensures normal pollen development and restores fertility. The duplicated motif 3 of RF6 is essential for RF6-OsHXK6 interactions, processing of the aberrant transcript, and restoration of fertility. Furthermore, reductions in the level of OsHXK6 result in atp6-orfH79 transcript accumulation and male sterility. Together these results reveal a novel mechanism for CMS restoration by which RF6 functions with OsHXK6 to restore HL-CMS fertility. The present study also provides insight into the function of hexokinase 6 in regulating mitochondrial RNA metabolism and may facilitate further exploitation of heterosis in rice. PMID:26578814

  20. Pentatricopeptide-repeat family protein RF6 functions with hexokinase 6 to rescue rice cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenchao; Yu, Changchun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lili; Dan, Zhiwu; Zhou, Wei; He, Chunlan; Zeng, Yafei; Yao, Guoxin; Qi, Jianzhao; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Renshan; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhu, Yingguo

    2015-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been extensively used for hybrid seed production in many major crops. Honglian CMS (HL-CMS) is one of the three major types of CMS in rice and has contributed greatly to food security worldwide. The HL-CMS trait is associated with an aberrant chimeric mitochondrial transcript, atp6-orfH79, which causes pollen sterility and can be rescued by two nonallelic restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes, Rf5 or Rf6. Here, we report the identification of Rf6, which encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family protein with a characteristic duplication of PPR motifs 3-5. RF6 is targeted to mitochondria, where it physically associates with hexokinase 6 (OsHXK6) and promotes the processing of the aberrant CMS-associated transcript atp6-orfH79 at nucleotide 1238, which ensures normal pollen development and restores fertility. The duplicated motif 3 of RF6 is essential for RF6-OsHXK6 interactions, processing of the aberrant transcript, and restoration of fertility. Furthermore, reductions in the level of OsHXK6 result in atp6-orfH79 transcript accumulation and male sterility. Together these results reveal a novel mechanism for CMS restoration by which RF6 functions with OsHXK6 to restore HL-CMS fertility. The present study also provides insight into the function of hexokinase 6 in regulating mitochondrial RNA metabolism and may facilitate further exploitation of heterosis in rice.

  1. Pentatricopeptide-repeat family protein RF6 functions with hexokinase 6 to rescue rice cytoplasmic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenchao; Yu, Changchun; Hu, Jun; Wang, Lili; Dan, Zhiwu; Zhou, Wei; He, Chunlan; Zeng, Yafei; Yao, Guoxin; Qi, Jianzhao; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhu, Renshan; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhu, Yingguo

    2015-12-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been extensively used for hybrid seed production in many major crops. Honglian CMS (HL-CMS) is one of the three major types of CMS in rice and has contributed greatly to food security worldwide. The HL-CMS trait is associated with an aberrant chimeric mitochondrial transcript, atp6-orfH79, which causes pollen sterility and can be rescued by two nonallelic restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes, Rf5 or Rf6. Here, we report the identification of Rf6, which encodes a novel pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family protein with a characteristic duplication of PPR motifs 3-5. RF6 is targeted to mitochondria, where it physically associates with hexokinase 6 (OsHXK6) and promotes the processing of the aberrant CMS-associated transcript atp6-orfH79 at nucleotide 1238, which ensures normal pollen development and restores fertility. The duplicated motif 3 of RF6 is essential for RF6-OsHXK6 interactions, processing of the aberrant transcript, and restoration of fertility. Furthermore, reductions in the level of OsHXK6 result in atp6-orfH79 transcript accumulation and male sterility. Together these results reveal a novel mechanism for CMS restoration by which RF6 functions with OsHXK6 to restore HL-CMS fertility. The present study also provides insight into the function of hexokinase 6 in regulating mitochondrial RNA metabolism and may facilitate further exploitation of heterosis in rice. PMID:26578814

  2. Clinical Characterization of a Kindred with a Novel Twelve Octapeptide Repeat Insertion in the Prion Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Neeraj; Boeve, Bradley F.; Boot, Brendon P.; Orr, Carolyn F.; Duffy, Joseph; Woodruff, Bryan K.; Nair, Anil K.; Ellison, Jay; Kuntz, Karen; Kantarci, Kejal; Jack, Clifford R.; Westmoreland, Barbara F.; Fields, Julie A.; Baker, Matthew; Rademakers, Rosa; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroradiologic findings in a kindred with a novel insertion in the prion protein gene (PRNP). Design Clinical description of a kindred. Setting Mayo Clinic Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center (Rochester). Subjects Two pathologically-confirmed cases and their relatives. Main outcome measures Clinical features, electroencephalographic patterns, magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, genetic analyses and neuropathological features. Results The proband presented with clinical and neuroimaging features of atypical frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and ataxia. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures developed later in her course, and electroencephalography revealed spike and wave discharges but no periodic sharp wave complexes. Her affected sister and father also exhibited FTD-like features, and both experienced generalized tonic-clonic seizures and gait ataxia late in their course. Genetic analyses in the proband identified a novel defect in PRNP with one mutated allele carrying a 288 base pair insertion (BPI) consisting of 12 octapeptide repeats. Neuropathologic examination of the sister and proband revealed PrP-positive plaques and widespread tau-positive tangles. Conclusion This kindred has a unique combination of clinical and neuropathologic features associated with the largest BPI identified to date in PRNP, and underscores the need to consider familial prion disease in the differential diagnosis of a familial FTD-like syndrome. PMID:21911696

  3. Regulation of inflorescence branch development in rice through a novel pathway involving the pentatricopeptide repeat protein sped1-D.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guanghuai; Xiang, Yanghai; Zhao, Jiying; Yin, Dedong; Zhao, Xianfeng; Zhu, Lihuang; Zhai, Wenxue

    2014-08-01

    Panicle type has a direct bearing on rice yield. Here, we characterized a rice clustered-spikelet mutant, sped1-D, with shortened pedicels and/or secondary branches, which exhibits decreased pollen fertility. We cloned sped1-D and found that it encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat protein. We investigated the global expression profiles of wild-type, 9311, and sped1-D plants using Illumina RNA sequencing. The expression of several GID1L2 family members was downregulated in the sped1-D mutant, suggesting that the gibberellin (GA) pathway is involved in the elongation of pedicels and/or secondary branches. When we overexpressed one GID1L2, AK070299, in sped1-D plants, the panicle phenotype was restored to varying degrees. In addition, we analyzed the expression of genes that function in floral meristems and found that RFL and WOX3 were severely downregulated in sped1-D. These results suggest that sped1-D may prompt the shortening of pedicels and secondary branches by blocking the action of GID1L2, RFL, and Wox3. Moreover, overexpression of sped1-D in Arabidopsis resulted in the shortening of pedicels and clusters of siliques, which indicates that the function of sped1-D is highly conserved in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Sequence data from this article have been deposited with the miRBase Data Libraries under accession no. MI0003201.

  4. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; King, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  5. Biological and biochemical characterization of mice expressing prion protein devoid of the octapeptide repeat region after infection with prions.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Miyata, Hironori; Uchiyama, Keiji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Inubushi, Sachiko; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Muramatsu, Naomi; Katamine, Shigeru; Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating lines of evidence indicate that the N-terminal domain of prion protein (PrP) is involved in prion susceptibility in mice. In this study, to investigate the role of the octapeptide repeat (OR) region alone in the N-terminal domain for the susceptibility and pathogenesis of prion disease, we intracerebrally inoculated RML scrapie prions into tg(PrPΔOR)/Prnp(0/0) mice, which express mouse PrP missing only the OR region on the PrP-null background. Incubation times of these mice were not extended. Protease-resistant PrPΔOR, or PrP(Sc)ΔOR, was easily detectable but lower in the brains of these mice, compared to that in control wild-type mice. Consistently, prion titers were slightly lower and astrogliosis was milder in their brains. However, in their spinal cords, PrP(Sc)ΔOR and prion titers were abundant and astrogliosis was as strong as in control wild-type mice. These results indicate that the role of the OR region in prion susceptibility and pathogenesis of the disease is limited. We also found that the PrP(Sc)ΔOR, including the pre-OR residues 23-50, was unusually protease-resistant, indicating that deletion of the OR region could cause structural changes to the pre-OR region upon prion infection, leading to formation of a protease-resistant structure for the pre-OR region.

  6. Liat1, an arginyltransferase-binding protein whose evolution among primates involved changes in the numbers of its 10-residue repeats.

    PubMed

    Brower, Christopher S; Rosen, Connor E; Jones, Richard H; Wadas, Brandon C; Piatkov, Konstantin I; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2014-11-18

    The arginyltransferase Ate1 is a component of the N-end rule pathway, which recognizes proteins containing N-terminal degradation signals called N-degrons, polyubiquitylates these proteins, and thereby causes their degradation by the proteasome. At least six isoforms of mouse Ate1 are produced through alternative splicing of Ate1 pre-mRNA. We identified a previously uncharacterized mouse protein, termed Liat1 (ligand of Ate1), that interacts with Ate1 but does not appear to be its arginylation substrate. Liat1 has a higher affinity for the isoforms Ate1(1A7A) and Ate1(1B7A). Liat1 stimulated the in vitro N-terminal arginylation of a model substrate by Ate1. All examined vertebrate and some invertebrate genomes encode proteins sequelogous (similar in sequence) to mouse Liat1. Sequelogs of Liat1 share a highly conserved ∼30-residue region that is shown here to be required for the binding of Liat1 to Ate1. We also identified non-Ate1 proteins that interact with Liat1. In contrast to Liat1 genes of nonprimate mammals, Liat1 genes of primates are subtelomeric, a location that tends to confer evolutionary instability on a gene. Remarkably, Liat1 proteins of some primates, from macaques to humans, contain tandem repeats of a 10-residue sequence, whereas Liat1 proteins of other mammals contain a single copy of this motif. Quantities of these repeats are, in general, different in Liat1 of different primates. For example, there are 1, 4, 13, 13, 17, and 17 repeats in the gibbon, gorilla, orangutan, bonobo, neanderthal, and human Liat1, respectively, suggesting that repeat number changes in this previously uncharacterized protein may contribute to evolution of primates. PMID:25369936

  7. A tandem repeat of a fragment of Listeria monocytogenes internalin B protein induces cell survival and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mungunsukh, Ognoon; Lee, Young H.; Marquez, Ana P.; Cecchi, Fabiola; Bottaro, Donald P.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is critical for tissue homeostasis and repair in many organs including the lung, heart, kidney, liver, nervous system, and skin. HGF is a heterodimeric protein containing 20 disulfide bonds distributed among an amino-terminal hairpin, four kringle domains, and a serine protease-like domain. Due to its complex structure, recombinant production of HGF in prokaryotes requires denaturation and refolding, processes that are impractical for large-scale manufacture. Thus, pharmaceutical quantities of HGF are not available despite its potential applications. A fragment of the Listeria monocytogenes internalin B protein from amino acids 36–321 (InlB36–321) was demonstrated to bind to and partially activate the HGF receptor Met. InlB36–321 has a stable β-sheet structure and is easily produced in its native conformation by Escherichia coli. We cloned InlB36–321 (1×InlB36–321) and engineered a head-to-tail repeat of InlB36–321 with a linker peptide (2×InlB36–321); 1×InlB36–321 and 2×InlB36–321 were purified from E. coli. Both 1× and 2×InlB36–321 activated the Met tyrosine kinase. We subsequently compared signal transduction of the two proteins in primary lung endothelial cells. 2×InlB36–321 activated ERK1/2, STAT3, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathways, whereas 1×InlB36–321 activated only STAT3 and ERK1/2. The 2×InlB36–321 promoted improved motility compared with 1×InlB36–321 and additionally stimulated proliferation equivalent to full-length HGF. Both the 1× and 2×InlB36–321 prevented apoptosis by the profibrotic peptide angiotensin II in cell culture and ex vivo lung slice cultures. The ease of large-scale production and capacity of 2×InlB36–321 to mimic HGF make it a potential candidate as a pharmaceutical agent for tissue repair. PMID:20889677

  8. Cloning, Expression, Crystallization and Preliminary Crystallographic Analysis of a Pentapeptide-repeat Protein (Rfr23) from the Bacterium Cyanothece 51142l

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko,G.; Robinson, H.; Ni, S.; Pakrasi, H.; Kennedy, M.

    2006-01-01

    A unique feature of cyanobacteria genomes is the abundance of genes that code for hypothetical proteins containing tandem pentapeptide repeats approximately described by the consensus motif A(N/D)LXX. To date, the structures of two pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) have been determined, with the tandem pentapeptide-repeat sequences observed to adopt a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix, or Rfr-fold, in both structures. One structure, Mycobacterium tuberculosis MfpA, is a 183-residue protein that contains 30 consecutive pentapeptide repeats and appears to offer antibiotic resistance by acting as a DNA mimic. The other structure, Cyanothece 51142 Rfr32, is a 167-residue protein that contains 21 consecutive pentapeptide repeats. The function of Rfr32, like the other 35 hypothetical PRPs identified in the genome of Cyanothece, is unknown. In an effort to understand the role of PRPs in cyanobacteria and to better characterize the structural properties of Rfr-folds with different amino-acid sequences, a second PRP from Cyanothece 51142, Rfr23, has been cloned, expressed and purified. Selenomethione-substituted protein was crystallized by vapor diffusion in hanging drops. Nearly complete SAD and native diffraction data sets were collected from these crystals to 2.5 and 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, respectively, using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to space group I4{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.61, c = 53.37 {angstrom}, and one molecule per asymmetric unit. Preliminary analysis of the electron-density map from the SAD data shows that Rfr23 contains an Rfr-fold.

  9. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  10. The Rec protein of HERV-K(HML-2) upregulates androgen receptor activity by binding to the human small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat protein (hSGT).

    PubMed

    Hanke, Kirsten; Chudak, Claudia; Kurth, Reinhard; Bannert, Norbert

    2013-02-01

    The expression of endogenous retroviruses of the HERV-K(HML-2) family is strongly upregulated in germ cell tumors and several other cancers. Although the accessory Rec protein of HERV-K(HML-2) has been shown to induce carcinoma in situ in transgenic mice, to increase the activity of c-myc and to interact with the androgen receptor (AR), whether or not Rec expression is indeed implicated causally in the initiation or progression of any human malignancies remains unclear. We used the yeast two-hybrid system involving the Rec protein of a recently integrated HERV-K(HML-2) element in an effort to identify potential Rec-related oncogenic mechanisms. This revealed the human small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-containing protein (hSGT) to be a cellular binding partner. The interaction of Rec with this known negative regulator of the AR was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation, pull-down assays and colocalization studies. The interaction involves the TPR motif of hSGT and takes place in the cytoplasm and in the nucleoli. Using an AR-responsive promoter and gene we could demonstrate that Rec interference with hSGT resulted in an up to five-fold increase in the activity of AR. Furthermore, in AR positive cells, Rec was shown to act as transactivator by enhancing AR-mediated activation of the HERV-K(HML-2) LTR promoter. This is in line with previous observations of elevated HERV-K(HML-2) expression in steroid-regulated tissues. On the basis of our findings we propose a "vicious cycle" model of Rec-driven hyperactivation of the AR leading to increased cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis and eventually to tumor induction or promotion.

  11. The chicken FMR1 gene is highly conserved with a CCT 5{prime} - untranslated repeat and encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.K.; Zhang, F.; Ashley, C.T. Jr.; Warren, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The transcriptional silencing of the human gene, fragile X metal retardation 1 (FMR1), is due to abnormal methylation in response to an expanded 5{prime}-untranslated CGG trinucleotide repeat and accounts for most cases of fragile X syndrome, a frequent inherited form of metal retardation. Although the encoded fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is known to have properties of a RNA-binding protein, the precise function of FMRP remains to be elucidated. We report the cloning of the chicken homolog of FMR1 and show strong evolutionary conservation, with nucleotide and amino acid identities of 85 and 92%, respectively, between chicken and human. In place of the mammalian CGG trinucleotide repeat, a 99-nt tripartite repetitive element containing a CCT trinucleotide repeat flanked on both sides by dinucleotide repeats was identified. Blocks of highly conserved 3{prime}-untranslated sequence were also found. Within the coding region, two copies each of the highly conserved K homology motif and the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) box motif, both ribonucleotide particle family domains implicated in RNA binding, were identified. Chicken FMRP was found to bind RNA in vitro, and this activity correlated with the presence of the carboxy-terminal portion of the protein that includes the RGG motifs. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Design of High-Affinity Stapled Peptides To Target the Repressor Activator Protein 1 (RAP1)/Telomeric Repeat-Binding Factor 2 (TRF2) Protein-Protein Interaction in the Shelterin Complex.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xu; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yong; Lei, Ming; Wang, Shaomeng

    2016-01-14

    Shelterin, a six-protein complex, plays a fundamental role in protecting both the length and the stability of telomeres. Repressor activator protein 1 (RAP1) and telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) are two subunits in shelterin that interact with each other. Small-molecule inhibitors that block the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction can disrupt the structure of shelterin and may be employed as pharmacological tools to investigate the biology of shelterin. On the basis of the cocrystal structure of RAP1/TRF2 complex, we have developed first-in-class triazole-stapled peptides that block the protein-protein interaction between RAP1 and TRF2. Our most potent stapled peptide binds to RAP1 protein with a Ki value of 7 nM and is >100 times more potent than the corresponding wild-type TRF2 peptide. On the basis of our high-affinity peptides, we have developed and optimized a competitive, fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for accurate and rapid determination of the binding affinities of our designed compounds and this assay may also assist in the discovery of non-peptide, small-molecule inhibitors capable of blocking the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction.

  13. The EDGE Hypothesis: Epigenetically Directed Genetic Errors in Repeat-Containing Proteins (RCPs) Involved in Evolution, Neuroendocrine Signaling, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ruden, Douglas M.; Jamison, D. Curtis; Zeeberg, Barry R.; Garfinkel, Mark D.; Weinstein, John N.; Rasouli, Parsa; Lu, Xiangyi

    2009-01-01

    Trans-generational epigenetic phenomena, such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that decrease fertility and the global methylation status of DNA in the offspring, are of great concern because they may affect the health of our children. However, of even greater concern is the possibility that trans-generational changes in the methylation status of the DNA might lead to permanent changes in the DNA sequence itself. By contaminating the environment with EDCs, mankind might be permanently affecting the health of future generations. In this chapter, we present evidence from our laboratory and others that trans-generational epigenetic changes in DNA might lead to mutations directed to genes encoding amino acid repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that are important for adaptive evolution or cancer progression. Such epigenetic changes can be induced “naturally” by hormones or “unnaturally” by EDCs or environmental stress. To illustrate the phenomenon, we present new bioinformatic evidence that the only RCP ontological categories conserved from Drosophila to humans are “regulation of splicing,” “regulation of transcription,” and “regulation of synaptogenesis,” which are precisely the classes of genes that are important for evolutionary processes. Based on that and other evidence, we propose a model for evolution that we call the EDGE (Epigenetically Directed Genetic Errors) hypothesis for the mechanism by which mutations are targeted at epigenetically-modified “contingency genes” encoding RCPs. In the model, “epigenetic assimilation” of metastable epialleles of RCPs over many generations can lead to mutations directed to those genes, thereby permanently stabilizing the adaptive phenotype. PMID:18295320

  14. Residue-specific analysis of frustration in the folding landscape of repeat beta/alpha protein apoflavodoxin.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Loren; Samiotakis, Antonios; Homouz, Dirar; Cheung, Margaret S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2010-02-12

    Flavodoxin adopts the common repeat beta/alpha topology and folds in a complex kinetic reaction with intermediates. To better understand this reaction, we analyzed a set of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans apoflavodoxin variants with point mutations in most secondary structure elements by in vitro and in silico methods. By equilibrium unfolding experiments, we first revealed how different secondary structure elements contribute to overall protein resistance to heat and urea. Next, using stopped-flow mixing coupled with far-UV circular dichroism, we probed how individual residues affect the amount of structure formed in the experimentally detected burst-phase intermediate. Together with in silico folding route analysis of the same point-mutated variants and computation of growth in nucleation size during early folding, computer simulations suggested the presence of two competing folding nuclei at opposite sides of the central beta-strand 3 (i.e., at beta-strands 1 and 4), which cause early topological frustration (i.e., misfolding) in the folding landscape. Particularly, the extent of heterogeneity in folding nuclei growth correlates with the in vitro burst-phase circular dichroism amplitude. In addition, phi-value analysis (in vitro and in silico) of the overall folding barrier to apoflavodoxin's native state revealed that native-like interactions in most of the beta-strands must form in transition state. Our study reveals that an imbalanced competition between the two sides of apoflavodoxin's central beta-sheet directs initial misfolding, while proper alignment on both sides of beta-strand 3 is necessary for productive folding. PMID:19913555

  15. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein (LRPPRC) does not activate transcription in mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Julia; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Terzioglu, Mügen; Spåhr, Henrik; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2013-05-31

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for controlling oxidative phosphorylation capacity and has been reported to occur at several different levels in mammalian mitochondria. LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein) has a key role in this regulation and acts at the post-transcriptional level to stabilize mitochondrial mRNAs, to promote mitochondrial mRNA polyadenylation, and to coordinate mitochondrial translation. However, recent studies have suggested that LRPPRC may have an additional intramitochondrial role by directly interacting with the mitochondrial RNA polymerase POLRMT to stimulate mtDNA transcription. In this study, we have further examined the intramitochondrial roles for LRPPRC by creating bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice with moderately increased LRPPRC expression and heterozygous Lrpprc knock-out mice with moderately decreased LRPPRC expression. Variation of LRPPRC levels in mice in vivo, occurring within a predicted normal physiological range, strongly affected the levels of an unprocessed mitochondrial precursor transcript (ND5-cytochrome b) but had no effect on steady-state levels of mitochondrial transcripts or de novo transcription of mtDNA. We further assessed the role of LRPPRC in mitochondrial transcription by performing size exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments in human cell lines and mice, but we found no interaction between LRPPRC and POLRMT. Furthermore, addition of purified LRPPRC to a recombinant human in vitro transcription system did not activate mtDNA transcription. On the basis of these data, we conclude that LRPPRC does not directly regulate mtDNA transcription but rather acts as a post-transcriptional regulator of mammalian mtDNA expression. PMID:23599432

  16. Increased Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 is associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, K L; Wu, J; Zhou, Y; Fan, J H

    2015-04-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer. Its role in tumor biology remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer and its potential association with cancer progression. The expression of SRPX2 and its clinicopathological significance was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray including 88 colon cancer and pairing normal tissues. The impact of SRPX2 on behavior of colorectal cancer cells and possible mechanism was explored using gene transfection and silencing. Strong staining of SRPX2 was noted in 71 (80.7 %) of 88 colon cancer specimen and 30 (34.1 %) of 88 adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly correlated with histological differentiation grade (P = 0.003), infiltration depth (P = 0.003), and clinical stage (P = 0.006). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly higher in HCT116 than in HT29 and SW480 cells. Suppression of endogenous SRPX2 expression by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) in HCT116 cells resulted in significant reduction in the ability of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. Up-regulation of endogenous SRPX2 in SW480 cells significantly promoted the migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In addition, inhibition of SRPX2 by siRNA led to notable down-regulation of β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. These findings indicate that overexpressed SRPX2 exerts an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. SRPX2 may promote the invasion of colorectal cancer through MMP-2 and MMP-9 modulated by Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  17. Increased Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 is associated with progression of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, K L; Wu, J; Zhou, Y; Fan, J H

    2015-04-01

    Sushi repeat-containing protein X-linked 2 (SRPX2) is a novel chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan overexpressed in gastrointestinal cancer. Its role in tumor biology remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer and its potential association with cancer progression. The expression of SRPX2 and its clinicopathological significance was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray including 88 colon cancer and pairing normal tissues. The impact of SRPX2 on behavior of colorectal cancer cells and possible mechanism was explored using gene transfection and silencing. Strong staining of SRPX2 was noted in 71 (80.7 %) of 88 colon cancer specimen and 30 (34.1 %) of 88 adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.001). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly correlated with histological differentiation grade (P = 0.003), infiltration depth (P = 0.003), and clinical stage (P = 0.006). The expression of SRPX2 was significantly higher in HCT116 than in HT29 and SW480 cells. Suppression of endogenous SRPX2 expression by small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) in HCT116 cells resulted in significant reduction in the ability of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion. Up-regulation of endogenous SRPX2 in SW480 cells significantly promoted the migration and invasion of SW480 cells. In addition, inhibition of SRPX2 by siRNA led to notable down-regulation of β-catenin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. These findings indicate that overexpressed SRPX2 exerts an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. SRPX2 may promote the invasion of colorectal cancer through MMP-2 and MMP-9 modulated by Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:25737434

  18. The Ccr4 Protein from Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Contains a Leucine-Rich Repeat Region Which Is Required for Its Control of Adh2 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Malvar, T.; Biron, R. W.; Kaback, D. B.; Denis, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The CCR4 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the transcription of the glucose-repressible alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH2). Mutations in CCR4 also suppress the transcription at the ADH2 and his4-912delta loci caused by defects in the SPT10 (CRE1) and SPT6 (CRE2) genes. The CCR4 gene was mapped to the left arm of chromosome I and cloned by complementation of function using previously isolated segments of chromosome I. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned gene defined CCR4 as a 2511 bp open reading frame that would encode a polypeptide of 837 amino acids. The CCR4 mRNA was found to be 2.8 kb in size and Western analysis identified CCR4 as a 95,000 D protein. Disruption of the CCR4 gene resulted in reduced levels of ADH2 expression under both glucose and ethanol growth conditions and in temperature sensitive growth on nonfermentative medium, phenotypes essentially indistinguishable from previously identified mutations in CCR4. The amino terminus of the CCR4 protein was found to be rich in glutamine residues similar to a number of genes which are required for transcription. More importantly, CCR4 showed similarity to a diverse set of proteins sharing a leucine-rich tandem repeat motif, the presence of which has been implicated in mediating protein-protein interactions. Deletions of several of the five leucine-rich repeats in CCR4 were shown to produce nonfunctional proteins indicating the importance of the repeats to CCR4 activity. This leucine-rich repeat region may mediate the contact CCR4 makes with another factor. PMID:1459446

  19. A fragmented alignment method detects a putative phosphorylation site and a putative BRC repeat in the Drosophila melanogaster BRCA2 protein.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA2 tumor suppressor protein leave individuals susceptible to breast, ovarian and other cancers. The BRCA2 protein is a critical component of the DNA repair pathways in eukaryotes, and also plays an integral role in fostering genomic variability through meiotic recombination. Although present in many eukaryotes, as a whole the BRCA2 gene is weakly conserved. Conserved fragments of 30 amino acids (BRC repeats), which mediate interactions with the recombinase RAD51, helped detect orthologs of this protein in other organisms. The carboxy-terminal of the human BRCA2 has been shown to be phosphorylated by checkpoint kinases (Chk1/Chk2) at T3387, which regulate the sequestration of RAD51 on DNA damage. However, apart from three BRC repeats, the Drosophila melanogaster gene has not been annotated and associated with other functionally relevant sequence fragments in human BRCA2. In the current work, the carboxy-terminal phosphorylation threonine site (E=9.1e-4) and a new BRC repeat (E=17e-4) in D. melanogaster has been identified, using a fragmented alignment methodology (FRAGAL). In a similar study, FRAGAL has also identified a novel half-a- tetratricopeptide (HAT) motif (E=11e-4), a helical repeat motif implicated in various aspects of RNA metabolism, in Utp6 from yeast. The characteristic three aromatic residues with conserved spacing are observed in this new HAT repeat, further strengthening my claim. The reference and target sequences are sliced into overlapping fragments of equal parameterized lengths. All pairs of fragments in the reference and target proteins are aligned, and the gap penalties are adjusted to discourage gaps in the middle of the alignment. The results of the best matches are sorted based on differing criteria to aid the detection of known and putative sequences. The source code for FRAGAL results on these sequences is available at https://github.com/sanchak/FragalCode, while the database can be accessed at www.sanchak.com/fragal.html.

  20. PF16 encodes a protein with armadillo repeats and localizes to a single microtubule of the central apparatus in Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that the central pair of microtubules and their associated structures play a significant role in regulating flagellar motility. To begin a molecular analysis of these components we have generated central apparatus-defective mutants in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using insertional mutagenesis. One paralyzed mutant recovered in our screen, D2, is an allele of a previously identified mutant, pf16. Mutant cells have paralyzed flagella, and the C1 microtubule of the central apparatus is missing in isolated axonemes. We have cloned the wild-type PF16 gene and confirmed its identity by rescuing pf16 mutants upon transformation. The rescued pf16 cells were wild-type in motility and in axonemal ultrastructure. A full-length cDNA clone for PF16 was obtained and sequenced. Database searches using the predicted 566 amino acid sequence of PF16 indicate that the protein contains eight contiguous armadillo repeats. A number of proteins with diverse cellular functions also contain armadillo repeats including pendulin, Rch1, importin, SRP-1, and armadillo. An antibody was raised against a fusion protein expressed from the cloned cDNA. Immunofluorescence labeling of wild-type flagella indicates that the PF16 protein is localized along the length of the flagella while immunogold labeling further localizes the PF16 protein to a single microtubule of the central pair. Based on the localization results and the presence of the armadillo repeats in this protein, we suggest that the PF16 gene product is involved in protein-protein interactions important for C1 central microtubule stability and flagellar motility. PMID:8636214

  1. Regulation of the double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR by RNAs encoded by a repeated sequence in the Epstein-Barr virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Elia, A; Laing, K G; Schofield, A; Tilleray, V J; Clemens, M J

    1996-01-01

    During the initial infection of B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) only a few viral genes are expressed, six of which encode the EBV nuclear antigens, EBNAs 1-6. The majority of EBNA mRNAs share common 5'-ends containing a variable number of two alternating and repeated exons transcribed from the BamHI W major internal repeats of the viral DNA. These sequences can also exist as independent small RNA species in some EBV-infected cell types. We present evidence that transcripts from these W repeat regions can exert a trans-acting effect on protein synthesis, through their ability to activate the dsRNA-dependent protein kinase PKR. UV cross-linking and filter binding assays have demonstrated that the W transcripts bind specifically to PKR and can compete with another EBV-encoded small RNA, EBER-1, which was shown previously to bind this kinase. In the reticulocyte lysate system the W RNAs shut off protein synthesis through an ability to activate PKR. In contrast to EBER-1, the W RNAs are unable to block the dsRNA-dependent activation of PKR. Using a purified preparation of the protein kinase we have shown that the W transcripts directly activate PKR in vitro. The results suggest that EBV has the ability both to activate and to inhibit PKR through the actions of different products of viral transcription. PMID:8948637

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans Kettin, a Large Immunoglobulin-like Repeat Protein, Binds to Filamentous Actin and Provides Mechanical Stability to the Contractile Apparatuses in Body Wall Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Kanako; Yu, Robinson; Mohri, Kurato

    2006-01-01

    Kettin is a large actin-binding protein with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) repeats, which is associated with the thin filaments in arthropod muscles. Here, we report identification and functional characterization of kettin in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that one of the monoclonal antibodies that were raised against C. elegans muscle proteins specifically reacts with kettin (Ce-kettin). We determined the entire cDNA sequence of Ce-kettin that encodes a protein of 472 kDa with 31 Ig repeats. Arthropod kettins are splice variants of much larger connectin/titin-related proteins. However, the gene for Ce-kettin is independent of other connectin/titin-related genes. Ce-kettin localizes to the thin filaments near the dense bodies in both striated and nonstriated muscles. The C-terminal four Ig repeats and the adjacent non-Ig region synergistically bind to actin filaments in vitro. RNA interference of Ce-kettin caused weak disorganization of the actin filaments in body wall muscle. This phenotype was suppressed by inhibiting muscle contraction by a myosin mutation, but it was enhanced by tetramisole-induced hypercontraction. Furthermore, Ce-kettin was involved in organizing the cytoplasmic portion of the dense bodies in cooperation with α-actinin. These results suggest that kettin is an important regulator of myofibrillar organization and provides mechanical stability to the myofibrils during contraction. PMID:16597697

  3. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  4. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  5. The dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in the 3'UTR of the CD154 gene has a functional role on protein expression and is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Citores, M; Rua-Figueroa, I; Rodriguez-Gallego, C; Durantez, A; Garcia-Laorden, M; Rodriguez-Lozano, C; Rodriguez-Perez, J; Vargas, J; Perez-Aciego, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of the (CA)n dinucleotide repeat in the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of the CD154 gene with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and its functional role in protein expression. Methods: The allelic and genotypic distributions of the polymorphism were compared in 80 patients with SLE and 80 controls. A complete clinical and analytical database was recorded in each patient in order to correlate the clinical manifestations in SLE with different alleles. To investigate the functional role of the polymorphism, the CD154 protein expression on activated lymphocytes from healthy homozygous controls was evaluated by flow cytometry. Results: The 24 CA allele was the most represented in controls (p = 0.029), whereas the alleles containing >24 CA repeats were found in patients (p = 0.0043). Furthermore, when only homozygous women were considered, most controls carried two 24 CA alleles (p = 0.041), whereas most patients carried two alleles containing >24 CA repeats (p = 0.032). Also, patients carrying at least one 24 CA allele had less neurological involvement (p = 0.034), and carriers of at least one allele with fewer than 24 CA repeats presented more livedo reticularis (p = 0.006) and anti-Sm (p = 0.01) and anti-RNP (p = 0.038) autoantibodies. CD154 maximum expression in activated lymphocytes from all controls was reached after 54 hours, but it was more prolonged in controls carrying two alleles with >24 CA repeats (p = 0.0068). Conclusion: The CD154 3'UTR microsatellite is associated with SLE, and the most represented alleles in patients were accompanied by a more prolonged protein expression in activated lymphocytes from controls. PMID:14962968

  6. An application of capsid-specific artificial ankyrin repeat protein produced in E. coli for immunochromatographic assay as a surrogate for antibody.

    PubMed

    Nangola, Sawitree; Thongkum, Weeraya; Saoin, Somphot; Ansari, Aftab A; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2014-07-01

    Immunochromatographic strip test is a unique type of rapid test that has been developed for use as part of a diagnostic kit for the rapid detection of antibodies and/or other proteins of interest. For the detection of target proteins, most of the commercial tests are assembled based on the conjugation of colloidal gold particles to monoclonal antibodies embedded within the conjugate pad of a strip test. In this study, we tested the novel concept of using an artificial non-antibody structure for generating a colloidal gold conjugate (CGC). We exploited the property of an ankyrin repeat protein that specifically binds to the HIV-1 capsid protein termed Ank(GAG)1D4. This construct was applied as a model structure to create Ank1D4-CGC and used as a new type of visible detector system and termed it ankyrin-based immunochromatographic strip (ABIS) test. The ABIS test was shown to be highly sensitive with a lower limit of detection of the target protein at 0.1 μg/ml. Moreover, the ABIS test was not only highly sensitive but also shared a level of specificity within the same range of the commercial test kit. The results of the studies presented herein therefore demonstrate the novel application of an artificial non-immunoglobulin structure (ankyrin repeat protein) as the new line of a visible detector using a rapid diagnostic test with characteristics that have the potential to be superior to those that utilize antibody-based tests.

  7. High-temperature protein G is essential for activity of the Escherichia coli clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Goren, Moran G; Kiro, Ruth; Edgar, Rotem; Qimron, Udi

    2011-12-13

    Prokaryotic DNA arrays arranged as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), along with their associated proteins, provide prokaryotes with adaptive immunity by RNA-mediated targeting of alien DNA or RNA matching the sequences between the repeats. Here, we present a thorough screening system for the identification of bacterial proteins participating in immunity conferred by the Escherichia coli CRISPR system. We describe the identification of one such protein, high-temperature protein G (HtpG), a homolog of the eukaryotic chaperone heat-shock protein 90. We demonstrate that in the absence of htpG, the E. coli CRISPR system loses its suicidal activity against λ prophage and its ability to provide immunity from lysogenization. Transcomplementation of htpG restores CRISPR activity. We further show that inactivity of the CRISPR system attributable to htpG deficiency can be suppressed by expression of Cas3, a protein that is essential for its activity. Accordingly, we also find that the steady-state level of overexpressed Cas3 is significantly enhanced following HtpG expression. We conclude that HtpG is a newly identified positive modulator of the CRISPR system that is essential for maintaining functional levels of Cas3.

  8. Localization of p0071-interacting proteins, plakophilin-related armadillo-repeat protein-interacting protein (PAPIN) and ERBIN, in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hideki; Hirabayashi, Susumu; Iizuka, Toshihiko; Ohnishi, Hirohide; Fujita, Toshiro; Hata, Yutaka

    2002-10-10

    PAPIN has six PDZ domains and interacts with p0071, a catenin-related protein. Recent studies have revealed that catenins determine the subcellular localization of some PDZ proteins. We have examined whether the localization of PAPIN is determined by p0071 in epithelial cells. PAPIN was localized not only on the lateral membrane but also on the apical membrane, where p0071 was absent. The targeting to both membranes was mediated by the middle region of PAPIN and did not require the p0071-interacting PDZ domain. In cells that came into contact, PAPIN was diffusely distributed on the plasma membrane, while p0071 was concentrated at immature cell-cell contacts. When epithelial cells were exposed to the low concentration of calcium, p0071 was internalized, whereas PAPIN remained on the plasma membrane. We also confirmed that the interaction with p0071 was not essential for the membrane targeting of ERBIN, a recently identified p0071- and ErbB2-binding protein. PAPIN, p0071, and ERBIN formed a complex in 293T cells. Furthermore, ERBIN and ErbB2 were colocalized with PAPIN on the lateral membrane. These findings suggest that PAPIN, p0071, and ERBIN come to the cell-cell contacts independently and interact with each other on the lateral membrane.

  9. The carriage of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among Staphylococcus aureus lineages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanle; Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Hu, Longhua; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2015-01-01

    The serine-aspartate repeat proteins (Sdr) are members of a family of surface proteins and contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Among 288 S. aureus isolates including 158 and 130 associated with skin and soft tissue infections and bloodstream infection, respectively; 275 (95.5%) were positive for at least one of three sdr genes tested. The positivity rates for sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE among S. aureus isolates were 87.8% (253/288), 63.9% (184/288), and 68.1% (196/288), respectively. 224 (77.8%) of 288 isolates were concomitantly positive for two or three sdr genes. There was an association between carriage of sdrE and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, while the carriage rates of sdrC and sdrD in MRSA isolates were similar to those in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. The prevalence of co-existence of sdrC and sdrE among MRSA isolates was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (p<0.05). All ST1, ST5, ST7, and ST25 isolates were positive for sdrD. While all ST121 and ST398 isolates were negative for sdrD. All ST59 and ST88 isolates were positive for sdrE. All ST1 isolates were concomitantly positive for sdrC and sdrD. Concomitant carriage of sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE was found among all ST5, 75.0% (9/12) of ST1, 69.2% (9/13) of ST6, 78.6% (11/14) of ST25, and 90.9% (20/22) of ST88 isolates. sdrD was linked to CC5, CC7 and CC88 isolates, especially CC88 isolates. There was a strong association between the presence of sdrE and CC59, CC88, and CC5 isolates. A significant correlation between concomitant carriage of sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE and CC88 isolates was found. sdrC-positive, sdrD-positive and sdrE-negative gene profile was significantly associated with CC7 clone. There was an association between sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, and sdrE-positive gene profile and CC59 isolates. A correlation between sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, and sdrE-negative gene profile and CC121 clone was found. More CC59 isolates carried sdr

  10. The Yeast Hrs1 Gene Encodes a Polyglutamine-Rich Nuclear Protein Required for Spontaneous and Hpr1-Induced Deletions between Direct Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rosa, H.; Clever, B.; Heyer, W. D.; Aguilera, A.

    1996-01-01

    The hrs1-1 mutation was isolated as an extragenic suppressor of the hyperrecombination phenotype of hpr1Δ cells. We have cloned, sequenced and deleted from the genome the HRS1 gene. The DNA sequence of the HRS1 gene reveals that it is identical to PGD1, a gene with no reported function, and that the Hrs1p protein contains polyglutamine stretches typically found in transcription factors. We have purified a His(6) tagged version of Hrs1p protein from E. coli and have obtained specific anti-Hrs1p polyclonal antibodies. We show that Hrs1p is a 49-kD nuclear protein, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blot analysis. The hrs1Δ null mutation reduces the frequency of deletions in wild-type and hpr1Δ backgrounds sevenfold below wild-type and rad52 levels. Furthermore, hrs1Δ cells show reduced induction of the GAL1,10 promoter relative to wild-type cells. Our results suggest that Hrs1p is required for the formation of deletions between direct repeats and that it may function in gene expression. This suggests a connection between gene expression and direct repeat recombination. In this context, we discuss the possible roles of Hrs1p and Hpr1p in initiation of direct-repeat recombination. PMID:8849881

  11. Difference in fibril core stability between two tau four-repeat domain proteins: a hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Gayathri; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2013-12-10

    One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies is fibrillization of the microtubule-associated protein tau. The purpose of this study was to compare the high-resolution structure of fibrils formed by two different tau four-repeat domain constructs, tau4RD and tauK18, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry as a tool. While the two fibrils are found to be constructed on similar structural principles, the tauK18 fibril has a slightly more stable core. This difference in fibril core stability appears to be reflective of the mechanistic differences in the aggregation pathways of the two proteins. PMID:24256615

  12. Characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Zygote-Specific cDNAs That Encode Novel Proteins Containing Ankyrin Repeats and WW Domains1

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Hideo; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Suzuki, Lena; Uchida, Hidenobu; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Genes that are expressed only in the young zygote are considered to be of great importance in the development of an isogamous green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Clones representing the Zys3 gene were isolated from a cDNA library prepared using zygotes at 10 min after fertilization. Sequencing of Zys3 cDNA clones resulted in the isolation of two related molecular species. One of them encoded a protein that contained two kinds of protein-to-protein interaction motifs known as ankyrin repeats and WW domains. The other clone lacked the ankyrin repeats but was otherwise identical. These mRNA species began to accumulate simultaneously in cells beginning 10 min after fertilization, and reached maximum levels at about 4 h, after which time levels decreased markedly. Genomic DNA gel-blot analysis indicated that Zys3 was a single-copy gene. The Zys3 proteins exhibited parallel expression to the Zys3 mRNAs at first, appearing 2 h after mating, and reached maximum levels at more than 6 h, but persisted to at least 1 d. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed their localization in the endoplasmic reticulum, which suggests a role in the morphological changes of the endoplasmic reticulum or in the synthesis and transport of proteins to the Golgi apparatus or related vesicles. PMID:10069826

  13. Raw Milk Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, John A.

    2015-01-01

    There continues to be considerable public debate on the possible benefits regarding the growing popularity of the consumption of raw milk. However, there are significant concerns by regulatory, or public health, organizations like the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of risk of contracting milkborne illnesses if the raw milk is contaminated with human pathogens. This review describes why pasteurization of milk was introduced more than 100 years ago, how pasteurization helped to reduce the incidence of illnesses associated with raw milk consumption, and the prevalence of pathogens in raw milk. In some studies, up to a third of all raw milk samples contained pathogens, even when sourced from clinically healthy animals or from milk that appeared to be of good quality. This review critically evaluates some of the popularly suggested benefits of raw milk. Claims related to improved nutrition, prevention of lactose intolerance, or provision of “good” bacteria from the consumption of raw milk have no scientific basis and are myths. There are some epidemiological data that indicate that children growing up in a farming environment are associated with a decreased risk of allergy and asthma; a variety of environmental factors may be involved and there is no direct evidence that raw milk consumption is involved in any “protective” effect. PMID:27340300

  14. Instability of the CGG repeat and expression of the FMR1 protein in a male fragile X patient with a lung tumor.

    PubMed Central

    de Graaff, E; Willemsen, R; Zhong, N; de Die-Smulders, C E; Brown, W T; Freling, G; Oostra, B

    1995-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the fragile X syndrome is based on the expansion of an CGG repeat in the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene in the majority of fragile X patients. This repeat displays instability both between individuals and within an individual. We studied the instability of the CGG repeat and the expression of the FMR1 protein (FMRP) in several different tissues derived from a male fragile X patient. Using Southern blot analysis, only a full mutation is detected in 9 of the 11 tissues tested. The lung tumor contains a methylated premutation of 160 repeats, whereas in the testis, besides the full mutation, a premutation of 60 CGG repeats is detected. Immunohistochemistry of the testis revealed expression of FMR1 in the spermatogonia only, confirming the previous finding that, in the sperm cells of fragile X patients with a full mutation in their blood cells, only a premutation is present. Immunohistochemistry of brain and lung tissue revealed that 1% of the cells are expressing the FMRP. PCR analysis demonstrated the presence of a premutation of 160 repeats in these FMR1-expressing cells. This indicates that the tumor was derived from a lung cell containing a premutation. Remarkably, despite the methylation of the EagI and BssHII sites, FMRP expression is detected in the tumor. Methylation of both restriction sites has thus far resulted in a 100% correlation with the lack of FMR1 expression, but the results found in the tumor suggest that the CpGs in these restriction sites are not essential for regulation of FMR1 expression. This indicates a need for a more accurate study of the exact promoter of FMR1. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7668289

  15. The TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 locus, which regulates trichome differentiation and anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, encodes a WD40 repeat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A R; Davison, P A; Bolognesi-Winfield, A C; James, C M; Srinivasan, N; Blundell, T L; Esch, J J; Marks, M D; Gray, J C

    1999-01-01

    The TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1) locus regulates several developmental and biochemical pathways in Arabidopsis, including the formation of hairs on leaves, stems, and roots, and the production of seed mucilage and anthocyanin pigments. The TTG1 locus has been isolated by positional cloning, and its identity was confirmed by complementation of a ttg1 mutant. The locus encodes a protein of 341 amino acid residues with four WD40 repeats. The protein is similar to AN11, a regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis in petunia, and more distantly related to those of the beta subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, which suggests a role for TTG1 in signal transduction to downstream transcription factors. The 1.5-kb TTG1 transcript is present in all major organs of Arabidopsis. Sequence analysis of six mutant alleles has identified base changes producing truncations or single amino acid changes in the TTG1 protein. PMID:10402433

  16. The Mr 140,000 Intermediate Chain of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Inner Arm Dynein Is a WD-Repeat Protein Implicated in Dynein Arm Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Sale, Winfield S.

    1998-01-01

    Previous structural and biochemical studies have revealed that the inner arm dynein I1 is targeted and anchored to a unique site located proximal to the first radial spoke in each 96-nm axoneme repeat on flagellar doublet microtubules. To determine whether intermediate chains mediate the positioning and docking of dynein complexes, we cloned and characterized the 140-kDa intermediate chain (IC140) of the I1 complex. Sequence and secondary structural analysis, with particular emphasis on β-sheet organization, predicted that IC140 contains seven WD repeats. Reexamination of other members of the dynein intermediate chain family of WD proteins indicated that these polypeptides also bear seven WD/β-sheet repeats arranged in the same pattern along each intermediate chain protein. A polyclonal antibody was raised against a 53-kDa fusion protein derived from the C-terminal third of IC140. The antibody is highly specific for IC140 and does not bind to other dynein intermediate chains or proteins in Chlamydomonas flagella. Immunofluorescent microscopy of Chlamydomonas cells confirmed that IC140 is distributed along the length of both flagellar axonemes. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that the 53-kDa C-terminal fusion protein binds specifically to axonemes lacking the I1 complex. Chemical cross-linking indicated that IC140 is closely associated with a second intermediate chain in the I1 complex. These data suggest that IC140 contains domains responsible for the assembly and docking of the I1 complex to the doublet microtubule cargo. PMID:9843573

  17. Improvement of LysM-Mediated Surface Display of Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins) in Recombinant and Nonrecombinant Strains of Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Zadravec, Petra; Štrukelj, Borut

    2015-01-01

    Safety and probiotic properties make lactic acid bacteria (LAB) attractive hosts for surface display of heterologous proteins. Protein display on nonrecombinant microorganisms is preferred for therapeutic and food applications due to regulatory requirements. We displayed two designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins), each possessing affinity for the Fc region of human IgG, on the surface of Lactococcus lactis by fusing them to the Usp45 secretion signal and to the peptidoglycan-binding C terminus of AcmA, containing lysine motif (LysM) repeats. Growth medium containing a secreted fusion protein was used to test its heterologous binding to 10 strains of species of the genus Lactobacillus, using flow cytometry, whole-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and fluorescence microscopy. The fusion proteins bound to the surfaces of all lactobacilli; however, binding to the majority of bacteria was only 2- to 5-fold stronger than that of the control. Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 demonstrated exceptionally strong binding (32- to 55-fold higher than that of the control) and may therefore be an attractive host for nonrecombinant surface display. Genomic comparison of the species indicated the exopolysaccharides of Lb. salivarius as a possible reason for the difference. Additionally, a 15-fold concentration-dependent increase in nonrecombinant surface display on L. lactis was demonstrated by growing bacteria with sublethal concentrations of the antibiotics chloramphenicol and erythromycin. Nonrecombinant surface display on LAB, based on LysM repeats, was optimized by selecting Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 as the optimal host and by introducing antibiotics as additives for increasing surface display on L. lactis. Additionally, effective display of DARPins on the surfaces of nonrecombinant LAB has opened up several new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:25576617

  18. Increased WD-repeat containing protein 1 in interstitial fluid from ovarian carcinomas shown by comparative proteomic analysis of malignant and healthy gynecological tissue.

    PubMed

    Haslene-Hox, Hanne; Oveland, Eystein; Woie, Kathrine; Salvesen, Helga B; Wiig, Helge; Tenstad, Olav

    2013-11-01

    We aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in interstitial fluid from ovarian cancer employing multiple fractioning and high resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis, and asked whether specific proteins that may serve as biomarker candidates or therapeutic targets could be identified. High throughput proteomics was conducted on immunodepleted and fractioned interstitial fluid from pooled samples of ovarian carcinomas, using endometrial carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue as controls. Differential analysis revealed the up-regulation of extracellular proteasomes in tumor interstitial fluid compared to the healthy control. Moreover, a number of differentially expressed proteins in interstitial fluid from ovarian carcinomas compared with control tissues were identified. Detection of proteasome 20S related proteins in TIF compared to IF from healthy tissue indicates that the 20S proteasome can have a role in the tumor microenvironment. Six selected proteins, CEACAM5, FREM2, MUC5AC, TFF3, PYCARD and WDR1, were independently validated in individual tumor lysates from ovarian carcinomas by multiple reaction monitoring initiated detection and sequence analysis, Western blot and/or selected reaction monitoring. Quantification of specific proteins revealed substantial heterogeneity between individual samples. Nevertheless, WD repeat-containing protein 1 was confirmed as being significantly overexpressed in interstitial fluid from ovarian carcinomas compared to healthy ovarian tissue by Orbitrap analysis of individual native interstitial fluid from ovarian and endometrial carcinomas and healthy ovarian tissue. We suggest that this protein should be explored as a therapeutic target in ovarian carcinomas. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: An Updated Secretome.

  19. Over-expression of rice leucine-rich repeat protein results in activation of defense response, thereby enhancing resistance to bacterial soft rot in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Ho; Choi, Changhyun; Park, Eun Mi; Kim, Hyo Sun; Park, Hong Jae; Bae, Shin Cheol; Ahn, Ilpyung; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju

    2012-10-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum causes soft rot disease in various plants, including Chinese cabbage. The simple extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR) domain proteins have been implicated in disease resistance. Rice leucine-rich repeat protein (OsLRP), a rice simple eLRR domain protein, is induced by pathogens, phytohormones, and salt. To see whether OsLRP enhances disease resistance to bacterial soft rot, OsLRP was introduced into Chinese cabbage by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Two independent transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP were generated and further analyzed. Transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP showed enhanced disease resistance to bacterial soft rot compared to non-transgenic control. Bacterial growth was retarded in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP compared to non-transgenic controls. We propose that OsLRP confers enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot. Monitoring expression of defense-associated genes in transgenic lines over-expressing OsLRP, two different glucanases and Brassica rapa polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 2, PDF1 were constitutively activated in transgenic lines compared to non-transgenic control. Taken together, heterologous expression of OsLRP results in the activation of defense response and enhanced resistance to bacterial soft rot.

  20. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Isolated from RAW 264.7 Macrophages: identification of a novel protein that contributes to the replication of serovar Typhimurium inside macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Adkins, Joshua N.; Coleman, James R.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Manes, Nathan P.; Smallwood, Heather S.; Wang, Haixing H.; Forbes, John; Gros, Philippe; Uzzau, Sergio; Rodland, Karin D.; Heffron, Fred; Smith, Richard D.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-09-01

    ABSTRACT: To evade host resistance mechanisms, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (STM), a facultative intracellular pathogen, must alter its proteome following macrophage infection. To identify new colonization and virulence factors that mediate STM pathogenesis, we have isolated STM cells from RAW 264.7 macrophages at various time-points following infection and used a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomic approach to detect the changes in STM protein abundances. Because host resistance to STM infection is strongly modulated by the expression of a functional host resistant regulator, i.e., natural resistance associated macrophage protein 1 (Nramp1, also called Slc11a1), we have also examined the effects of Nramp1 activity on the changes of STM protein abundances. A total of 315 STM proteins have been identified from isolated STM cells, which are largely house-keeping proteins whose abundances remain relatively constant during the time-course of infection. However, 39 STM proteins are strongly induced after infection, suggesting their involvement in modulating colonization and infection. Of the 39 induced proteins, 6 proteins are specifically modulated by Nramp1 activity, including STM3117, as well as STM3118-3119 whose time-dependent abundance changes were confirmed using Western blot analysis. Deletion of the gene encoding STM3117 resulted in a dramatic reduction in the ability of STM to colonize wild-type RAW 264.7 macrophages, demonstrating a critical involvement of STM3117 in promoting the replication of STM inside macrophages. The predicted function common for STM3117-3119 is biosynthesis and modification of the peptidoglycan layer of STM cell wall, emphasizing their important roles in the colonization of macrophages by Salmonella.

  2. A mitotic function for the high-mobility group protein HMG20b regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of the BRCA2 tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, M; Daniels, M J; Garnett, M J; Venkitaraman, A R

    2011-07-28

    The inactivation of BRCA2, a suppressor of breast, ovarian and other epithelial cancers, triggers instability in chromosome structure and number, which are thought to arise from defects in DNA recombination and mitotic cell division, respectively. Human BRCA2 controls DNA recombination via eight BRC repeats, evolutionarily conserved motifs of ∼35 residues, that interact directly with the recombinase RAD51. How BRCA2 controls mitotic cell division is debated. Several studies by different groups report that BRCA2 deficiency affects cytokinesis. Moreover, its interaction with HMG20b, a protein of uncertain function containing a promiscuous DNA-binding domain and kinesin-like coiled coils, has been implicated in the G2-M transition. We show here that HMG20b depletion by RNA interference disturbs the completion of cell division, suggesting a novel function for HMG20b. In vitro, HMG20b binds directly to the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and exhibits the highest affinity for BRC5, a motif that binds poorly to RAD51. Conversely, the BRC4 repeat binds strongly to RAD51, but not to HMG20b. In vivo, BRC5 overexpression inhibits the BRCA2-HMG20b interaction, recapitulating defects in the completion of cell division provoked by HMG20b depletion. In contrast, BRC4 inhibits the BRCA2-RAD51 interaction and the assembly of RAD51 at sites of DNA damage, but not the completion of cell division. Our findings suggest that a novel function for HMG20b in cytokinesis is regulated by its interaction with the BRC repeats of BRCA2, and separate this unexpected function for the BRC repeats from their known activity in DNA recombination. We propose that divergent tumor-suppressive pathways regulating chromosome segregation as well as chromosome structure may be governed by the conserved BRC motifs in BRCA2.

  3. Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins with the DYW Motif Have Distinct Molecular Functions in RNA Editing and RNA Cleavage in Arabidopsis Chloroplasts[W

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kenji; Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure; Nakamura, Takahiro; Delannoy, Etienne; Sugita, Mamoru; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Motohashi, Reiko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Small, Ian; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2009-01-01

    The plant-specific DYW subclass of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins has been postulated to be involved in RNA editing of organelle transcripts. We discovered that the DYW proteins CHLORORESPIRATORY REDUCTION22 (CRR22) and CRR28 are required for editing of multiple plastid transcripts but that their DYW motifs are dispensable for editing activity in vivo. Replacement of the DYW motifs of CRR22 and CRR28 by that of CRR2, which has been shown to be capable of endonucleolytic cleavage, blocks the editing activity of both proteins. In return, the DYW motifs of neither CRR22 nor CRR28 can functionally replace that of CRR2. We propose that different DYW family members have acquired distinct functions in the divergent processes of RNA maturation, including RNA cleavage and RNA editing. PMID:19182104

  4. The 1.7 Å resolution structure of At2g44920, a pentapeptide-repeat protein in the thylakoid lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Shuisong; McGookey, Michael E.; Tinch, Stuart L.; Jones, Alisha N.; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Tong, Liang; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2012-01-09

    At2g44920 belongs to a diverse family (Pfam PF00805) of pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) that are present in all known organisms except yeast. PRPs contain at least eight tandem-repeating sequences of five amino acids with an approximate consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Recent crystal structures show that PRPs adopt a highly regular four-sided right-handed {beta}-helical structure consisting mainly of type II and type IV {beta}-turns, sometimes referred to as a repeated five-residue (or Rfr) fold. Among sequenced genomes, PRP genes are most abundant in cyanobacteria, leading to speculation that PRPs play an important role in the unique lifestyle of photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Despite the recent structural characterization of several cyanobacterial PRPs, most of their functions remain unknown. Plants, whose chloroplasts are of cyanobacterial origin, have only four PRP genes in their genomes. At2g44920 is one of three PRPs located in the thylakoid lumen. Here, the crystal structure of a double methionine mutant of residues 81-224 of At2g44920, the naturally processed fragment of one of its full-length isoforms, is reported at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of At2g44920 consists of the characteristic Rfr fold with five uninterrupted coils made up of 25 pentapeptide repeats and {alpha}-helical elements capping both termini. A disulfide bridge links the two {alpha}-helices with a conserved loop between the helical elements at its C-terminus. This structure represents the first structure of a PRP protein whose subcellular location has been experimentally confirmed to be the thylakoid lumen in a plant species.

  5. Application of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for screening of raw materials used in the cell culture medium for the production of a recombinant therapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Kirdar, Alime Ozlem; Chen, Guoxiang; Weidner, James; Rathore, Anurag S

    2010-01-01

    Control of raw materials based on an understanding of their impact on product attributes has been identified as a key aspect of developing a control strategy in the Quality by Design (QbD) paradigm. This article presents a case study involving use of a combined approach of Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and Multivariate Data Analysis (MVDA) for screening of lots of basal medium powders based on their impact on process performance and product attributes. These lots had identical composition as per the supplier and were manufactured at different scales using an identical process. The NIR/MVDA analysis, combined with further investigation at the supplier site, concluded that grouping of medium components during the milling and blending process varied with the scale of production and media type. As a result, uniformity of blending, impurity levels, chemical compatibility, and/or heat sensitivity during the milling process for batches of large-scale media powder were deemed to be the source of variation as detected by NIR spectra. This variability in the raw materials was enough to cause unacceptably large variability in the performance of the cell culture step and impact the attributes of the resulting product. A combined NIR/MVDA approach made it possible to finger print the raw materials and distinguish between good and poor performing media lots. PMID:19938040

  6. Food Safety and Raw Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety Modernization Act Food Safety and Raw Milk Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir RAW MILK ... THIS: Real Stories About the Dangers of Raw Milk “My daughter turned into a completely different person ...

  7. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5′TOP sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Héroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cécile; Deragon, Jean-Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-01-01

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5′TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5′ UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5′TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. These studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26206669

  8. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti–HIV-1 drugs

    PubMed Central

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S.; Mateo, Pedro L.; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E.; Roger, Marie G.; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  9. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Binds to Neuronal Vesicles through Protein Interactions Mediated by Its C-Terminal WD40 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J. O.; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function. PMID:24687852

  10. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 binds to neuronal vesicles through protein interactions mediated by its C-terminal WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J O; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function. PMID:24687852

  11. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 binds to neuronal vesicles through protein interactions mediated by its C-terminal WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giovanni; Onofri, Franco; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Kaiser, Christoph J O; Jagtap, Pravinkumar; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Pischedda, Francesca; Marte, Antonella; von Zweydorf, Felix; Vogt, Andreas; Giesert, Florian; Pan, Lifeng; Antonucci, Flavia; Kiel, Christina; Zhang, Mingjie; Weinkauf, Sevil; Sattler, Michael; Sala, Carlo; Matteoli, Michela; Ueffing, Marius; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains, including predicted C-terminal WD40 repeats. In this study, we analyzed functional and molecular features conferred by the WD40 domain. Electron microscopic analysis of the purified LRRK2 C-terminal domain revealed doughnut-shaped particles, providing experimental evidence for its WD40 fold. We demonstrate that LRRK2 WD40 binds and sequesters synaptic vesicles via interaction with vesicle-associated proteins. In fact, a domain-based pulldown approach combined with mass spectrometric analysis identified LRRK2 as being part of a highly specific protein network involved in synaptic vesicle trafficking. In addition, we found that a C-terminal sequence variant associated with an increased risk of developing PD, G2385R, correlates with a reduced binding affinity of LRRK2 WD40 to synaptic vesicles. Our data demonstrate a critical role of the WD40 domain within LRRK2 function.

  12. Evaluation of novel Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine candidates incorporating multiple conserved sequences from the C-repeat region of the M-protein.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michelle J; Georgousakis, Melina M; Vu, Therese; Henningham, Anna; Hofmann, Andreas; Rettel, Mandy; Hafner, Louise M; Sriprakash, Kadaba S; McMillan, David J

    2012-03-01

    A major challenge for Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine development is the identification of epitopes that confer protection from infection by multiple S. pyogenes M-types. Here we have identified and characterised the distribution of common variant sequences from individual repeat units of the C-repeat region (CRR) of M-proteins representing 77 different M-types. Three polyvalent fusion vaccine candidates (SV1, SV2 and SV3) incorporating the most common variants were subsequently expressed and purified, and demonstrated to be alpha-helical by Circular Dichroism (CD), a secondary conformational characteristic of the CRR in the M-protein. Antibodies raised against each of these constructs recognise M-proteins that vary in their CRR, and bind to the surface of multiple S. pyogenes isolates. Antibodies raised against SV1, containing five variant sequences, also kill heterologous S. pyogenes isolates in in vitro bactericidal assays. Further structural characterisation of this construct demonstrated the conformation of SV1 was stable at different pHs, and thermal unfolding of SV1 is a reversible process. Our findings demonstrate that linkage of multiple variant sequences into a single recombinant construct overcomes the need to embed the variant sequences in foreign helix promoting flanking sequences for conformational stability, and demonstrates the viability of the polyvalent candidates as global S. pyogenes vaccine candidates. PMID:22265945

  13. The 78,000 M(r) intermediate chain of Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein isa WD-repeat protein required for arm assembly

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced a full-length cDNA clone encoding the 78,000 Mr intermediate chain (IC78) of the Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein. This protein previously was shown to be located at the base of the solubilized dynein particle and to interact with alpha tubulin in situ, suggesting that it may be involved in binding the outer arm to the doublet microtubule. The sequence predicts a polypeptide of 683 amino acids having a mass of 76.5 kD. Sequence comparison indicates that IC78 is homologous to the 69,000 M(r) intermediate chain (IC69) of Chlamydomonas outer arm dynein and to the 74,000 M(r) intermediate chain (IC74) of cytoplasmic dynein. The similarity between the chains is greatest in their COOH-terminal halves; the NH(2)-terminal halves are highly divergent. The COOH-terminal half of IC78 contains six short imperfect repeats, termed WD repeats, that are thought to be involved in protein-protein interactions. Although not previously reported, these repeated elements also are present in IC69 and IC74. Using the IC78 cDNA as a probe, we screened a group of slow-swimming insertional mutants and identified one which has a large insertion in the IC78 gene and seven in which the IC78 gene is completely deleted. Electron microscopy of three of these IC78 mutants revealed that each is missing the outer arm, indicating that IC78 is essential for arm assembly or attachment to the outer doublet. Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping places the IC78 gene on the left arm of chromosome XII/XIII, at or near the mutation oda9, which also causes loss of the outer arm. Mutants with defects in the IC78 gene do not complement the oda9 mutation in stable diploids, strongly suggesting that ODA9 is the structural gene for IC78. PMID:7698982

  14. Imperfect DNA mirror repeats in the gag gene of HIV-1 (HXB2) identify key functional domains and coincide with protein structural elements in each of the mature proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Dorothy M

    2007-01-01

    Background A DNA mirror repeat is a sequence segment delimited on the basis of its containing a center of symmetry on a single strand, e.g. 5'-GCATGGTACG-3'. It is most frequently described in association with a functionally significant site in a genomic sequence, and its occurrence is regarded as noteworthy, if not unusual. However, imperfect mirror repeats (IMRs) having ≥ 50% symmetry are common in the protein coding DNA of monomeric proteins and their distribution has been found to coincide with protein structural elements – helices, β sheets and turns. In this study, the distribution of IMRs is evaluated in a polyprotein – to determine whether IMRs may be related to the position or order of protein cleavage or other hierarchal aspects of protein function. The gag gene of HIV-1 [GenBank:K03455] was selected for the study because its protein motifs and structural components are well documented. Results There is a highly specific relationship between IMRs and structural and functional aspects of the Gag polyprotein. The five longest IMRs in the polyprotein translate a key functional segment in each of the five cleavage products. Throughout the protein, IMRs coincide with functionally significant segments of the protein. A detailed annotation of the protein, which combines structural, functional and IMR data illustrates these associations. There is a significant statistical correlation between the ends of IMRs and the ends of PSEs in each of the mature proteins. Weakly symmetric IMRs (≥ 33%) are related to cleavage positions and processes. Conclusion The frequency and distribution of IMRs in HIV-1 Gag indicates that DNA symmetry is a fundamental property of protein coding DNA and that different levels of symmetry are associated with different functional aspects of the gene and its protein. The interaction between IMRs and protein structure and function is precise and interwoven over the entire length of the polyprotein. The distribution of IMRs and their

  15. P-class pentatricopeptide repeat protein PTSF1 is required for splicing of the plastid pre-tRNA(I) (le) in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Goto, Seiya; Kawaguchi, Yasuhiro; Sugita, Chieko; Ichinose, Mizuho; Sugita, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are widely distributed in eukaryotes and are mostly localized in mitochondria or plastids. PPR proteins play essential roles in various RNA processing steps in organelles; however, the function of the majority of PPR proteins remains unknown. To examine the function of plastid PPR proteins, PpPPR_4 gene knock-out mutants were characterized in Physcomitrella patens. The knock-out mosses displayed severe growth retardation and reduced effective quantum yield of photosystem II. Immunoblot analysis showed that knock-out of PpPPR_4 resulted in a strongly reduced level of plastid-encoded proteins, such as photosystem II reaction center protein D1, the β subunit of ATP synthase, and the stromal enzyme, Rubisco. To further investigate whether knock-out of the PpPPR_4 gene affects plastid gene expression, we analyzed steady-state transcript levels of protein- and rRNA-coding genes by quantitative RT-PCR. This analysis showed that the level of many protein-coding transcripts increased in the mutants. In contrast, splicing of a spacer tRNA(I) (le) precursor encoded by the rrn operon was specifically impaired in the mutants, whereas the accumulation of other plastid tRNAs and rRNAs was not largely affected. Thus, the defect in tRNA(I) (le) splicing leads to a considerable reduction of mature tRNA(I) (le) , which may be accountable for the reduced protein level. An RNA mobility shift assay showed that the recombinant PpPPR_4 bound preferentially to domain III of the tRNA(I) (le) group-II intron. These results provide evidence that PpPPR_4 functions in RNA splicing of the tRNA(I) (le) intron, and hence PpPPR_4 was named plastid tRNA splicing factor 1 (PTSF1). PMID:27117879

  16. Human C9ORF72 Hexanucleotide Expansion Reproduces RNA Foci and Dipeptide Repeat Proteins but Not Neurodegeneration in BAC Transgenic Mice.

    PubMed

    Peters, Owen M; Cabrera, Gabriela Toro; Tran, Helene; Gendron, Tania F; McKeon, Jeanne E; Metterville, Jake; Weiss, Alexandra; Wightman, Nicholas; Salameh, Johnny; Kim, Juhyun; Sun, Huaming; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis; Kennedy, Zachary; Lin, Ziqiang; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Daughrity, Lillian; Jung, Chris; Gao, Fen-Biao; Sapp, Peter C; Horvitz, H Robert; Bosco, Daryl A; Brown, Solange P; de Jong, Pieter; Petrucelli, Leonard; Mueller, Christian; Brown, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    A non-coding hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene is the most common mutation associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). To investigate the pathological role of C9ORF72 in these diseases, we generated a line of mice carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome containing exons 1 to 6 of the human C9ORF72 gene with approximately 500 repeats of the GGGGCC motif. The mice showed no overt behavioral phenotype but recapitulated distinctive histopathological features of C9ORF72 ALS/FTD, including sense and antisense intranuclear RNA foci and poly(glycine-proline) dipeptide repeat proteins. Finally, using an artificial microRNA that targets human C9ORF72 in cultures of primary cortical neurons from the C9BAC mice, we have attenuated expression of the C9BAC transgene and the poly(GP) dipeptides. The C9ORF72 BAC transgenic mice will be a valuable tool in the study of ALS/FTD pathobiology and therapy.

  17. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.

  18. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1more » in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.« less

  19. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. In conclusion, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose. PMID:26528314

  20. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  1. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D.; Dixon, Christopher H.; Spies, Gerhard B.; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; Gawehns, Fleur K. K.; Knight, Marc R.; Sharples, Gary J.; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L. W.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  2. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  3. The Potato Nucleotide-binding Leucine-rich Repeat (NLR) Immune Receptor Rx1 Is a Pathogen-dependent DNA-deforming Protein.

    PubMed

    Fenyk, Stepan; Townsend, Philip D; Dixon, Christopher H; Spies, Gerhard B; de San Eustaquio Campillo, Alba; Slootweg, Erik J; Westerhof, Lotte B; Gawehns, Fleur K K; Knight, Marc R; Sharples, Gary J; Goverse, Aska; Pålsson, Lars-Olof; Takken, Frank L W; Cann, Martin J

    2015-10-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins enable cells to respond to pathogen attack. Several NLRs act in the nucleus; however, conserved nuclear targets that support their role in immunity are unknown. Previously, we noted a structural homology between the nucleotide-binding domain of NLRs and DNA replication origin-binding Cdc6/Orc1 proteins. Here we show that the NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding, Apaf-1, R-proteins, and CED-4) domain of the Rx1 NLR of potato binds nucleic acids. Rx1 induces ATP-dependent bending and melting of DNA in vitro, dependent upon a functional P-loop. In situ full-length Rx1 binds nuclear DNA following activation by its cognate pathogen-derived effector protein, the coat protein of potato virus X. In line with its obligatory nucleocytoplasmic distribution, DNA binding was only observed when Rx1 was allowed to freely translocate between both compartments and was activated in the cytoplasm. Immune activation induced by an unrelated NLR-effector pair did not trigger an Rx1-DNA interaction. DNA binding is therefore not merely a consequence of immune activation. These data establish a role for DNA distortion in Rx1 immune signaling and define DNA as a molecular target of an activated NLR. PMID:26306038

  4. The rice DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein is required for the assembly of the restoration of fertility complex.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiaojian; Huang, Qi; Xiao, Haijun; Zhang, Qiannan; Ni, Chenzi; Xu, Yanghong; Liu, Gai; Yang, Daichang; Zhu, Yingguo; Hu, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and restoration of fertility (Rf) are widely distributed in plant species utilized by humans. RF5 and GRP162 are subunits of the restoration of fertility complex (RFC) in Hong-Lian rice. Despite the fact that the RFC is 400-500 kDa in size, the other proteins or factors in the complex still remain unknown. Here, we identified RFC subunit 3, which encodes a DUF1620-containing and WD40-like repeat protein (RFC3) that is present in all tissues but highly expressed in leaves. We established that RFC3 interacts with both RF5 and GRP162 in vitro and in vivo, and is transported into the mitochondria as a membrane protein. Furthermore, CMS RNA (atp6-orfH79) and CMS cytotoxic protein (ORFH79) accumulate when RFC3 is silenced in restorer lines. We presented the analysis with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, indicating that RFC is disrupted in the RNAi line. We concluded that RCF3 is indispensable as a scaffold protein for the assembly of the RFC complex. We unveil a new molecular player of the RFC in the Rf pathway in rice and propose the model of RFC based on these data. PMID:26781807

  5. The Restorer-of-fertility-like 2 pentatricopeptide repeat protein and RNase P are required for the processing of mitochondrial orf291 RNA in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Sota; Suzuki, Takamasa; Giegé, Philippe; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Koizuka, Nobuya; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotes harbor mitochondria obtained via ancient symbiosis events. The successful evolution of energy production in mitochondria has been dependent on the control of mitochondrial gene expression by the nucleus. In flowering plants, the nuclear-encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) superfamily proteins are widely involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded RNA-binding protein, Restorer-of-fertility-like PPR protein 2 (RFL2), is required for RNA degradation of the mitochondrial orf291 transcript via endonucleolytic cleavage of the transcript in the middle of its reading frame. Both in vivo and in vitro, this RNA cleavage requires the activity of mitochondrial proteinaceous RNase P, which is possibly recruited to the site by RFL2. The site of RNase P cleavage likely forms a tRNA-like structure in the orf291 transcript. This study presents an example of functional collaboration between a PPR protein and an endonuclease in RNA cleavage. Furthermore, we show that the RFL2-binding region within the orf291 gene is hypervariable in the family Brassicaceae, possibly correlated with the rapid evolution of the RNA-recognition interfaces of the RFL proteins. PMID:27122350

  6. Characterization of DNA sequences that mediate nuclear protein binding to the regulatory region of the Pisum sativum (pea) chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80: identification of a repeated heptamer motif.

    PubMed

    Argüello, G; García-Hernández, E; Sánchez, M; Gariglio, P; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-05-01

    Two protein factors binding to the regulatory region of the pea chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80 have been identified. One of these factors is found only in green tissue but not in etiolated or root tissue. The second factor (denominated ABF-2) binds to a DNA sequence element that contains a direct heptamer repeat TCTCAAA. It was found that presence of both of the repeats is essential for binding. ABF-2 is present in both green and etiolated tissue and in roots and factors analogous to ABF-2 are present in several plant species. Computer analysis showed that the TCTCAAA motif is present in the regulatory region of several plant genes. PMID:1303797

  7. Thrombospondin Type-1 Repeat Domain-Containing Proteins Are Strongly Expressed in the Head Region of Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Hamaguchi-Hamada, Kayoko; Kurumata-Shigeto, Mami; Minobe, Sumiko; Fukuoka, Nozomi; Sato, Manami; Matsufuji, Miyuki; Koizumi, Osamu; Hamada, Shun

    2016-01-01

    The head region of Hydra, the hypostome, is a key body part for developmental control and the nervous system. We herein examined genes specifically expressed in the head region of Hydra oligactis using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cloning. A total of 1414 subtracted clones were sequenced and found to be derived from at least 540 different genes by BLASTN analyses. Approximately 25% of the subtracted clones had sequences encoding thrombospondin type-1 repeat (TSR) domains, and were derived from 17 genes. We identified 11 TSR domain-containing genes among the top 36 genes that were the most frequently detected in our SSH library. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that at least 13 out of 17 TSR domain-containing genes were expressed in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. The prominent expression of TSR domain-containing genes suggests that these genes play significant roles in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. PMID:27043211

  8. Thrombospondin Type-1 Repeat Domain-Containing Proteins Are Strongly Expressed in the Head Region of Hydra.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi-Hamada, Kayoko; Kurumata-Shigeto, Mami; Minobe, Sumiko; Fukuoka, Nozomi; Sato, Manami; Matsufuji, Miyuki; Koizumi, Osamu; Hamada, Shun

    2016-01-01

    The head region of Hydra, the hypostome, is a key body part for developmental control and the nervous system. We herein examined genes specifically expressed in the head region of Hydra oligactis using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cloning. A total of 1414 subtracted clones were sequenced and found to be derived from at least 540 different genes by BLASTN analyses. Approximately 25% of the subtracted clones had sequences encoding thrombospondin type-1 repeat (TSR) domains, and were derived from 17 genes. We identified 11 TSR domain-containing genes among the top 36 genes that were the most frequently detected in our SSH library. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analyses confirmed that at least 13 out of 17 TSR domain-containing genes were expressed in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. The prominent expression of TSR domain-containing genes suggests that these genes play significant roles in the hypostome of Hydra oligactis. PMID:27043211

  9. PPR8522 encodes a chloroplast-targeted pentatricopeptide repeat protein necessary for maize embryogenesis and vegetative development

    PubMed Central

    M. Rogowsky, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) domain is an RNA binding domain allowing members of the PPR superfamily to participate in post-transcriptional processing of organellar RNA. Loss of PPR8522 from maize (Zea mays) confers an embryo-specific (emb) phenotype. The emb8522 mutation was isolated in an active Mutator (Mu) population and co-segregation analysis revealed that it was tightly linked to a MuDR insertion in the first exon of PPR8522. Independent evidence that disruption of PPR8522 caused the emb phenotype was provided by fine mapping to a region of 116kb containing no other gene than PPR8522 and complementation of the emb8522 mutant by a PPR8522 cDNA. The deduced PPR8522 amino acid sequence of 832 amino acids contains 10 PPR repeats and a chloroplast target peptide, the function of which was experimentally demonstrated by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Whereas mutant endosperm is apparently normal, mutant embryos deviate from normal development as early as 3 days after pollination, are reduced in size, exhibit more or less severe morphological aberrations depending on the genetic background, and generally do not germinate. The emb8522 mutation is the first to associate the loss of a PPR gene with an embryo-lethal phenotype in maize. Analyses of mutant plantlets generated by embryo-rescue experiments indicate that emb8522 also affects vegetative plant growth and chloroplast development. The loss of chloroplast transcription dependent on plastid-encoded RNA polymerase is the likely cause for the lack of an organized thylakoid network and an albino, seedling-lethal phenotype. PMID:22945943

  10. PM2, a group 3 LEA protein from soybean, and its 22-mer repeating region confer salt tolerance in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yun Liu; Zheng Yizhi . E-mail: yzzheng@szu.edu.cn

    2005-05-27

    To have knowledge of the effect of soybean PM2 protein in protecting dehydrated cells and its functional region, PM2 cDNA was isolated from soybean immature seeds. The recombinants expressing full-length PM2, truncated polypeptides of PM2A (aa 1-262) or PM2B (aa 129-262, 22-mer repeating region), or artificial polypeptide PM2C (duplication of 22-mer repeating region) were constructed. By using SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry approaches, these fusion polypeptides were identified and proved to be hydrophilic and heat-stable. Spot assays of BL/PM2 and BL/pET28 (as control) showed that protein PM2 increased salt tolerance (500 mM NaCl or 500 mM KCl) of Escherichia coli, rather than osmotic tolerance (1100 mM sorbitol). In addition, comparing the survival ratios of the transformants under 500 mM NaCl or 500 mM KCl stresses, the results showed that: (1) the survival ratios of BL/PM2 and BL/PM2B were quite similar, both showing much higher values than those of BL/pET28. (2) The survival ratios of BL/PM2C were much higher than those of BL/PM2, BL/PM2A, and BL/PM2B. This provides the first experimental evidence that PM2 polypeptide enhances salt tolerance of E. coli cells, and the 22-mer repeat region is an important functional region.

  11. PM2, a group 3 LEA protein from soybean, and its 22-mer repeating region confer salt tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Zheng, Yizhi

    2005-05-27

    To have knowledge of the effect of soybean PM2 protein in protecting dehydrated cells and its functional region, PM2 cDNA was isolated from soybean immature seeds. The recombinants expressing full-length PM2, truncated polypeptides of PM2A (aa 1-262) or PM2B (aa 129-262, 22-mer repeating region), or artificial polypeptide PM2C (duplication of 22-mer repeating region) were constructed. By using SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry approaches, these fusion polypeptides were identified and proved to be hydrophilic and heat-stable. Spot assays of BL/PM2 and BL/pET28 (as control) showed that protein PM2 increased salt tolerance (500 mM NaCl or 500 mM KCl) of Escherichia coli, rather than osmotic tolerance (1100 mM sorbitol). In addition, comparing the survival ratios of the transformants under 500 mM NaCl or 500 mM KCl stresses, the results showed that: (1) the survival ratios of BL/PM2 and BL/PM2B were quite similar, both showing much higher values than those of BL/pET28. (2) The survival ratios of BL/PM2C were much higher than those of BL/PM2, BL/PM2A, and BL/PM2B. This provides the first experimental evidence that PM2 polypeptide enhances salt tolerance of E. coli cells, and the 22-mer repeat region is an important functional region.

  12. SdrX, a serine-aspartate repeat protein expressed by Staphylococcus capitis with collagen VI binding activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yule; Ames, Brenda; Gorovits, Elena; Prater, Bradley D; Syribeys, Peter; Vernachio, John H; Patti, Joseph M

    2004-11-01

    Staphylococcus capitis (S. capitis) has been implicated in a large proportion of coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections in very-low-birth-weight infants. To identify potential therapeutic targets, the S. capitis genome was probed for the presence of genes encoding microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMM). By using Southern blot analysis, an S. capitis gene, designated sdrX, that contained sequence motifs consistent with the Sdr family of MSCRAMM proteins was identified. By using monospecific antisera in Western blot and flow cytometry, SdrX was demonstrated to be expressed on the surface of S. capitis. Human collagen type VI was found to bind both the recombinant A domain of SdrX and viable S. capitis expressing SdrX. SdrX is the first collagen-binding Sdr protein described and is the first MSCRAMM protein identified in S. capitis. PMID:15501749

  13. Orientia tsutsugamushi Strain Ikeda Ankyrin Repeat-Containing Proteins Recruit SCF1 Ubiquitin Ligase Machinery via Poxvirus-Like F-Box Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Andrea R.; VieBrock, Lauren; Rodino, Kyle G.; Miller, Daniel P.; Tegels, Brittney K.; Marconi, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A rising theme among intracellular microbes is the delivery of ankyrin repeat-containing effectors (Anks) that interact with target proteins to co-opt host cell functions. Orientia tsutsugamushi, an obligate intracellular bacterium and the etiologic agent of scrub typhus, encodes one of the largest Ank repertoires of any sequenced microorganism. They have been previously identified as type 1 secretion system substrates. Here, in silico and manual sequence analyses revealed that a large proportion of O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks bear a eukaryotic/poxvirus-like F-box motif, which is known to recruit host cell SCF1 ubiquitin ligase machinery. We assessed the Anks for the ability to serve as F-box proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that F-box-containing Anks interact with overexpressed and/or endogenous SCF1 components. When coexpressed with FLAG-Ank4_01 or FLAG-Ank9, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged version of the SCF1 component SKP1 localized to subcellular sites of FLAG-Ank accumulation. The abilities of recombinant Anks to interact and colocalize with SKP1 were F-box dependent. GST-SKP1 precipitated O. tsutsugamushi-derived Ank9 from infected host cells, verifying both that the pathogen expresses Ank9 during infection and the protein's capability to bind SKP1. Aligning O. tsutsugamushi, poxviral, and eukaryotic F-box sequences delineated three F-box residues that are highly conserved and likely to be functionally important. Substitution of these residues ablated the ability of GFP-Ank9 to interact with GST-SKP1. These results demonstrate that O. tsutsugamushi strain Ikeda Anks can co-opt host cell polyubiquitination machinery, provide the first evidence that an O. tsutsugamushi Ank does so during infection, and advance overall understanding of microbial F-box proteins. IMPORTANCE Ankyrin repeat-containing proteins (Anks) are important virulence factors of intracellular bacteria that mediate protein-protein interactions with

  14. empty pericarp4 Encodes a Mitochondrion-Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Necessary for Seed Development and Plant Growth in Maize[W

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Marcos, José F.; Dal Prà, Mauro; Giulini, Anna; Costa, Liliana M.; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Cordelier, Sylvain; Sellam, Olivier; Tatout, Christophe; Paul, Wyatt; Perez, Pascual; Dickinson, Hugh G.; Consonni, Gabriella

    2007-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family represents one of the largest gene families in plants, with >440 members annotated in Arabidopsis thaliana. PPR proteins are thought to have a major role in the regulation of posttranscriptional processes in organelles. Recent studies have shown that Arabidopsis PPR proteins play an essential, nonredundant role during embryogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in empty pericarp4 (emp4), a maize (Zea mays) PPR-encoding gene, confer a seed-lethal phenotype. Mutant endosperms are severely impaired, with highly irregular differentiation of transfer cells in the nutrient-importing basal endosperm. Analysis of homozygous mutant plants generated from embryo-rescue experiments indicated that emp4 also affects general plant growth. The emp4-1 mutation was identified in an active Mutator (Mu) population, and cosegregation analysis revealed that it arose from a Mu3 element insertion. Evidence of emp4 molecular cloning was provided by the isolation of four additional emp4 alleles obtained by a reverse genetics approach. emp4 encodes a novel type of PPR protein of 614 amino acids. EMP4 contains nine 35–amino acid PPR motifs and an N-terminal mitochondrion-targeted sequence peptide, which was confirmed by a translational EMP4–green fluorescent protein fusion that localized to mitochondria. Molecular analyses further suggest that EMP4 is necessary to regulate the correct expression of a small subset of mitochondrial transcripts in the endosperm. PMID:17259266

  15. Evaluation of growth performance, serum biochemistry and haematological parameters on broiler birds fed with raw and processed samples of Entada scandens, Canavalia gladiata and Canavalia ensiformis seed meal as an alternative protein source.

    PubMed

    Sasipriya, Gopalakrishnan; Siddhuraju, Perumal

    2013-03-01

    The experiment was carried out to investigate the inclusion of underutilised legumes, Entada scandens, Canavalia gladiata and Canavalia ensiformis, seed meal in soybean-based diet in broilers. The utilisation of these wild legumes is limited by the presence of antinutrient compounds. Processing methods like soaking followed by autoclaving in sodium bicarbonate solution in E. scandens and C. gladiata and soaking followed by autoclaving in ash solution in C. ensiformis were adopted. The proximate composition of raw and processed samples of E. scandens, C. gladiata and C. ensiformis were determined. The protein content was enhanced in processed sample of E. scandens (46 %) and C. ensiformis (16 %). This processing method had reduced the maximum number of antinutrients such as tannins (10-100 %), trypsin inhibitor activity (99 %), chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (72-100 %), canavanine (60-62 %), amylase inhibitor activity (73-100 %), saponins (78-92 %), phytic acid (19-40 %) and lectins. Hence, the raw samples at 15 % and processed samples at 15 and 30 % were replaced with soybean protein in commercial broiler diet respectively. Birds fed with 30 % processed samples of E. scandens, C. gladiata and C. ensiformis showed significantly similar results of growth performance, carcass characteristics, organ weight, haematological parameters and serum biochemical parameters (cholesterol, protein, bilirubin, albumin, globulin and liver and kidney function parameters) without any adverse effects after 42 days of supplementation. The proper utilisation of these underutilised legumes may act as an alternative protein ingredient in poultry diets. PMID:23076820

  16. Evaluation of growth performance, serum biochemistry and haematological parameters on broiler birds fed with raw and processed samples of Entada scandens, Canavalia gladiata and Canavalia ensiformis seed meal as an alternative protein source.

    PubMed

    Sasipriya, Gopalakrishnan; Siddhuraju, Perumal

    2013-03-01

    The experiment was carried out to investigate the inclusion of underutilised legumes, Entada scandens, Canavalia gladiata and Canavalia ensiformis, seed meal in soybean-based diet in broilers. The utilisation of these wild legumes is limited by the presence of antinutrient compounds. Processing methods like soaking followed by autoclaving in sodium bicarbonate solution in E. scandens and C. gladiata and soaking followed by autoclaving in ash solution in C. ensiformis were adopted. The proximate composition of raw and processed samples of E. scandens, C. gladiata and C. ensiformis were determined. The protein content was enhanced in processed sample of E. scandens (46 %) and C. ensiformis (16 %). This processing method had reduced the maximum number of antinutrients such as tannins (10-100 %), trypsin inhibitor activity (99 %), chymotrypsin inhibitor activity (72-100 %), canavanine (60-62 %), amylase inhibitor activity (73-100 %), saponins (78-92 %), phytic acid (19-40 %) and lectins. Hence, the raw samples at 15 % and processed samples at 15 and 30 % were replaced with soybean protein in commercial broiler diet respectively. Birds fed with 30 % processed samples of E. scandens, C. gladiata and C. ensiformis showed significantly similar results of growth performance, carcass characteristics, organ weight, haematological parameters and serum biochemical parameters (cholesterol, protein, bilirubin, albumin, globulin and liver and kidney function parameters) without any adverse effects after 42 days of supplementation. The proper utilisation of these underutilised legumes may act as an alternative protein ingredient in poultry diets.

  17. Staphylococcus epidermidis serine--aspartate repeat protein G (SdrG) binds to osteoblast integrin alpha V beta 3.

    PubMed

    Claro, T; Kavanagh, N; Foster, T J; O'Brien, F J; Kerrigan, S W

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is the leading etiologic agent of orthopaedic implant infection. Contamination of the implanted device during insertion allows bacteria gain entry into the sterile bone environment leading to condition known as osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis is characterised by weakened bones associated with progressive bone loss. The mechanism through which S. epidermidis interacts with bone cells to cause osteomyelitis is poorly understood. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis can bind to osteoblasts in the absence of matrix proteins. S. epidermidis strains lacking the cell wall protein SdrG had a significantly reduced ability to bind to osteoblasts. Consistent with this, expression of SdrG in Lactococcus lactis resulted in significantly increased binding to the osteoblasts. Protein analysis identified that SdrG contains a potential integrin recognition motif. αVβ3 is a major integrin expressed on osteoblasts and typically recognises RGD motifs in its ligands. Our results demonstrate that S. epidermidis binds to recombinant purified αVβ3, and that a mutant lacking SdrG failed to bind. Blocking αVβ3 on osteoblasts significantly reduced binding to S. epidermidis. These studies are the first to identify a mechanism through which S. epidermidis binds to osteoblasts and potentially offers a mechanism through which implant infection caused by S. epidermidis leads to osteomyelitis.

  18. RNAe: an effective method for targeted protein translation enhancement by artificial non-coding RNA with SINEB2 repeat

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Jin, Shouhong; Long, Haizhou; Yu, Yingting; Zhang, Zhenming; Cheng, Ge; Xu, Chengwei; Ding, Yan; Guan, Qian; Li, Ning; Fu, Suneng; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Hanshuo; Tong, Pei; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Fu, Shushu; Li, Juan; He, Guang-Jun; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a universal protein expression enhancement RNA tool, termed RNAe, was developed by modifying a recently discovered natural long non-coding RNA. At the moment, RNAe is the only technology for gene expression enhancement, as opposed to silencing, at the post-transcriptional level. With this technology, an expression enhancement of 50–1000% is achievable, with more than 200% enhancement achieved in most cases. This work identified the sufficient and necessary element for RNAe function, which was found to be merely 300 nucleotides long and was named minRNAe. It contains a 72-nt 5' pairing sequence which determines the specificity, a 167-nt short non-pairing interspersed nuclear element (SINE) B2 sequence which enhances ribosome recruitment to the target mRNA, and a poly(A) tail, provided together on a plasmid bearing the appropriate sequences. Cellular delivery of RNAe was achieved using routine transfection. The RNAe platform was validated in several widely-used mammalian cell lines. It was proven to be efficient and flexible in specifically enhancing the expression of various endogenous and exogenous proteins of diverse functions in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the expression-inhibitory tool RNAi, the RNAe tool has a comparable effect size, with an enhancing as opposed to inhibitory effect. One may predict that this brand new technology for enhancing the production of proteins will find wide applications in both research and biopharmaceutical production. PMID:25722369

  19. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    PubMed

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-01

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP.

  20. Conservation of the WD-repeat, microtubule-binding protein, EMAP, in sea urchins, humans, and the nematode C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Suprenant, K A; Tuxhorn, J A; Daggett, M A; Ahrens, D P; Hostetler, A; Palange, J M; VanWinkle, C E; Livingston, B T

    2000-01-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP) is the most abundant microtubule-binding protein in the first cleavage mitotic apparatus in sea urchin embryos. The first goal of this study was to determine whether there is sufficient EMAP in the egg and embryo to modify microtubule dynamics during the early cleavages divisions and whether EMAP functions at a specific time or place in the embryo. To accomplish this goal, we examined the relative abundance, tissue distribution, and temporal pattern of EMAP expression during embryonic development. The second goal of this study was to identify important functional domains within the EMAP coding sequence. A conserved sequence might reveal a potential microtubule-binding domain. We cloned, sequenced and compared overlapping EMAP cDNAs from two different sea urchin species that diverged approximately 80 million years ago, and compared these with cDNA sequences from a vertebrate and nematode species. From quantitative immunoblots, we determined the EMAP concentration in eggs to be 4 microM. The steady-state levels of EMAP mRNA and protein accumulated during development, and all three germ layers expressed EMAP. During the early stages of development, EMAP and tubulin were both abundant in the ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. However, during late gastrulation and the formation of the early pluteus larvae, EMAP was enriched in the mesoderm, while tubulin staining was most abundant in the archenteron. These results indicate that EMAP may have tissue-specific functions in the late stage embryo. To identify conserved functional domains, we compared the predicted amino acid sequence encoded by Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Lytechinus variegatus EMAP cDNAs, and determined that these two sea urchin EMAPs were 95% conserved and shared an identical domain organization. A parsimonious analysis of these sea urchin protein sequences, as well as human and C. elegans EMAP sequences was used to construct a gene tree. Together

  1. Repeated, Intermittent Exposures to diisopropylfluorophosphate in Rats: Protracted Effects on Cholinergic Markers, Nerve Growth Factor-Related Proteins, and Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Alvin V.; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Gearhart, Debra A.; Beck, Wayne D.; Middlemore-Risher, Mary-Louise; Truan, Jacob N.; Schwarz, Gary M.; Xu, Meng; Bartlett, Michael G.; Kutiyanawala, Ammar; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) pose a constant threat to human health due to their widespread use as pesticides and their potential employment in military and terrorist attacks. The acute toxicity of OPs has been extensively studied; however, the consequences of prolonged or repeated exposure to levels of OPs that produce no overt signs of acute toxicity (i.e., subthreshold levels) are poorly understood. Further, there is clinical evidence that such repeated exposures to OPs lead to prolonged deficits in cognition, although the mechanism for this effect is unknown. In this study, the behavioral and neurochemical effects of repeated, intermittent, and subthreshold exposures to the alkyl OP, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were investigated. Rats were injected with DFP subcutaneously (dose range, 0.25-1.0 mg/kg) every other day over the course of 30 days, and then given a two week, DFP-free washout period. In behavioral experiments conducted at various times during the washout period, dose dependent decrements in a water maze hidden platform task and a spontaneous novel object recognition (NOR) procedure were observed, while prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response was unaffected. There were modest decreases in open field locomotor activity and grip strength (particularly during the DFP exposure period); however, rotarod performance and water maze swim speeds were not affected. After washout, DFP concentrations were minimal in plasma and brain, however, cholinesterase inhibition was still detectable in the brain. Moreover, the 1.0 mg/kg dose of DFP was associated with (brain region-dependent) alterations in nerve growth factor-related proteins and cholinergic markers. The results of this prospective animal study thus provide evidence to support two novel hypotheses: 1) that intermittent, subthreshold exposures to alkyl OPs can lead to protracted deficits in specific domains of cognition and 2) that such cognitive deficits may be related to persistent functional

  2. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties.

  3. Molecular modeling of the elastomeric properties of repeating units and building blocks of resilin, a disordered elastic protein.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, Md Shahriar K; Dudek, Daniel M; Beers, Eric P; Dillard, David A; Bevan, David R

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the properties of disordered elastomeric proteins are not well known. To better understand the relationship between elastomeric behavior and amino acid sequence, we investigated resilin, a disordered rubber-like protein, found in specialized regions of the cuticle of insects. Resilin of Drosophila melanogaster contains Gly-rich repetitive motifs comprised of the amino acids, PSSSYGAPGGGNGGR, which confer elastic properties to resilin. The repetitive motifs of insect resilin can be divided into smaller partially conserved building blocks: PSS, SYGAP, GGGN and GGR. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the relative roles of SYGAP, and its less common variants SYSAP and TYGAP, on the elastomeric properties of resilin. Results showed that SYGAP adopts a bent structure that is one-half to one-third the end-to-end length of the other motifs having an equal number of amino acids but containing SYSAP or TYGAP substituted for SYGAP. The bent structure of SYGAP forms due to conformational freedom of glycine, and hydrogen bonding within the motif apparently plays a role in maintaining this conformation. These structural features of SYGAP result in higher extensibility compared to other motifs, which may contribute to elastic properties at the macroscopic level. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the SYGAP building block in the elastomeric properties of these disordered proteins. What we learned from simulating the repetitive motifs of resilin may be applicable to the biology and mechanics of other elastomeric biomaterials, and may provide us the deeper understanding of their unique properties. PMID:26851528

  4. Complement components C1r/C1s, bone morphogenic protein 1 and Xenopus laevis developmentally regulated protein UVS.2 share common repeats.

    PubMed

    Bork, P

    1991-04-22

    Property patterns were constructed, based on an alignment of related domains in human complement subcomponents C1r and C1s as well as in the sea urchin protein uEGF. This kind of consensus pattern was able to identify similar domains in a human bone morphogenic protein, in a Xenopus laevis embryonal protein involved in dorsoanterior development and in a calcium-dependent serine protease secreted from malignant hamster embryo fibroblast cells. Because of the high level of overall sequence homology this protease may be the hamsters' equivalent of the human complement subcomponent C1s. The resulting multiple alignment of all studied domains suggests functionally and structurally important regions.

  5. A highly parallel method for synthesizing DNA repeats enables the discovery of ‘smart’ protein polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiram, Miriam; Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Callahan, Daniel J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2011-02-01

    Robust high-throughput synthesis methods are needed to expand the repertoire of repetitive protein-polymers for different applications. To address this need, we developed a new method, overlap extension rolling circle amplification (OERCA), for the highly parallel synthesis of genes encoding repetitive protein-polymers. OERCA involves a single PCR-type reaction for the rolling circle amplification of a circular DNA template and simultaneous overlap extension by thermal cycling. We characterized the variables that control OERCA and demonstrated its superiority over existing methods, its robustness, high-throughput and versatility by synthesizing variants of elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) and protease-responsive polymers of glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues. Despite the GC-rich, highly repetitive sequences of ELPs, we synthesized remarkably large genes without recursive ligation. OERCA also enabled us to discover ‘smart’ biopolymers that exhibit fully reversible thermally responsive behaviour. This powerful strategy generates libraries of repetitive genes over a wide and tunable range of molecular weights in a ‘one-pot’ parallel format.

  6. Analysis of polyglutamine-coding repeats in the TATA-binding protein in different human populations and in patients with schizophrenia an bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Crow, T.J.

    1996-09-20

    A new class of disease (including Huntington disease, Kennedy disease, and spinocerebellar ataxias types 1 and 3) results from abnormal expansions of CAG trinucleotides in the coding regions of genes. In all of these diseases the CAG repeats are thought to be translated into polyglutamine tracts. There is accumulating evidence arguing for CAG trinucleotide expansions as one of the causative disease mutations in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We and others believe that the TATA-binding protein (TBP) is an important candidate to investigate in these diseases as it contains a highly polymorphic stretch of glutamine codons, which are close to the threshold length where the polyglutamine tracts start to be associated with disease. Thus, we examined the lengths of this polyglutamine repeat in normal unrelated East Anglians, South African Blacks, sub-Saharan Africans mainly from Nigeria, and Asian Indians. We also examined 43 bipolar affective disorder patients and 65 schizophrenic patients. The range of polyglutamine tract-lengths that we found in humans was from 26-42 codons. No patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia had abnormal expansions at this locus. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Rhoptry-associated protein (rap-1) genes in the sheep pathogen Babesia sp. Xinjiang: Multiple transcribed copies differing by 3' end repeated sequences.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Marchand, Jordan; Yang, Congshan; Bonsergent, Claire; Guan, Guiquan; Yin, Hong; Malandrin, Laurence

    2015-07-30

    Sheep babesiosis occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas. The sheep parasite Babesia sp. Xinjiang is widespread in China, and our goal is to characterize rap-1 (rhoptry-associated protein 1) gene diversity and expression as a first step of a long term goal aiming at developing a recombinant subunit vaccine. Seven different rap-1a genes were amplified in Babesia sp. Xinjiang, using degenerate primers designed from conserved motifs. Rap-1b and rap-1c gene types could not be identified. In all seven rap-1a genes, the 5' regions exhibited identical sequences over 936 nt, and the 3' regions differed at 28 positions over 147 nt, defining two types of genes designated α and β. The remaining 3' part varied from 72 to 360 nt in length, depending on the gene. This region consists of a succession of two to ten 36 nt repeats, which explains the size differences. Even if the nucleotide sequences varied, 6 repeats encoded the same stretch of amino acids. Transcription of at least four α and two β genes was demonstrated by standard RT-PCR.

  8. Repeated Baclofen treatment ameliorates motor dysfunction, suppresses reflex activity and decreases the expression of signaling proteins in reticular nuclei and lumbar motoneurons after spinal trauma in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Andrea; Schreiberová, Andrea; Závodská, Monika; Gedrová, Štefánia; Hricová, Ľudmila; Pavel, Jaroslav; Gálik, Ján; Maršala, Martin; Lukáčová, Nadežda

    2014-03-01

    The interruption of supraspinal input to the spinal cord leads to motor dysfunction and the development of spasticity. Clinical studies have shown that Baclofen (a GABAB agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with side-effects and the development of tolerance. The aim of the present study was to assess if discontinued Baclofen treatment and its repeated application leads antispasticity effects, and whether such changes affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brainstem, nNOS and parvalbumin (PV) in lumbar α-motoneurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to Th9 spinal cord transection. Baclofen (30mg/b.w.) diluted in drinking water, was administered for 6 days, starting at week 1 after injury and then repeated till week 4 after injury. The behavior of the animals was tested (tail-flick test, BBB locomotor score) from 1 to 8 weeks. Our results clearly indicate the role of nitric oxide, produced by nNOS in the initiation and the maintenance of spasticity states 1, 6 and 8 weeks after spinal trauma. A considerable decrease of nNOS staining after Baclofen treatment correlates with improvement of motor dysfunction. The findings also show that parvalbumin and astrocytes participate in the regulation of ion concentrations in the sub-acute phase after the injury.

  9. The SLOW GROWTH3 Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Required for the Splicing of Mitochondrial NADH Dehydrogenase Subunit7 Intron 2 in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jo-Chien; Chang, Chiung-Yun; Harrison, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in maintaining metabolic and energy homeostasis in the cell. In plants, impairment in mitochondrial functions usually has detrimental effects on growth and development. To study genes that are important for plant growth, we have isolated a collection of slow growth (slo) mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). One of the slo mutants, slo3, has a significant reduction in mitochondrial complex I activity. The slo3 mutant has a four-nucleotide deletion in At3g61360 that encodes a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein. The SLO3 protein contains nine classic PPR domains belonging to the P subfamily. The small deletion in the slo3 mutant changes the reading frame and creates a premature stop codon in the first PPR domain. We demonstrated that the SLO3-GFP is localized to the mitochondrion. Further analysis of mitochondrial RNA metabolism revealed that the slo3 mutant was defective in splicing of NADH dehydrogenase subunit7 (nad7) intron 2. This specific splicing defect led to a dramatic reduction in complex I activity in the mutant as revealed by blue native gel analysis. Complementation of slo3 by 35S:SLO3 or 35S:SLO3-GFP restored the splicing of nad7 intron 2, the complex I activity, and the growth defects of the mutant. Together, these results indicate that the SLO3 PPR protein is a splicing factor of nad7 intron 2 in Arabidopsis mitochondria. PMID:25888618

  10. A unique HEAT repeat-containing protein SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 is involved in vacuolar membrane dynamics in gravity-sensing cells of Arabidopsis inflorescence stem.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Yano, Daisuke; Nagafusa, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Saito, Chieko; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Terao Morita, Miyo

    2014-04-01

    Plant vacuoles play critical roles in development, growth and stress responses. In mature cells, vacuolar membranes (VMs) display several types of structures, which are formed by invagination and folding of VMs into the lumenal side and can gradually move and change shape. Although such VM structures are observed in a broad range of tissue types and plant species, the molecular mechanism underlying their formation and maintenance remains unclear. Here, we report that a novel HEAT-repeat protein, SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 (SGR6), of Arabidopsis is involved in the control of morphological changes and dynamics of VM structures in endodermal cells, which are the gravity-sensing cells in shoots. SGR6 is a membrane-associated protein that is mainly localized to the VM in stem endodermal cells. The sgr6 mutant stem exhibits a reduced gravitropic response. Higher plants utilize amyloplast sedimentation as a means to sense gravity direction. Amyloplasts are surrounded by VMs in Arabidopsis endodermal cells, and the flexible and dynamic structure of VMs is important for amyloplast sedimentation. We demonstrated that such dynamic features of VMs are gradually lost in sgr6 endodermal cells during a 30 min observation period. Histological analysis revealed that amyloplast sedimentation was impaired in sgr6. Detailed live-cell imaging analyses revealed that the VM structures in sgr6 had severe defects in morphological changes and dynamics. Our results suggest that SGR6 is a novel protein involved in the formation and/or maintenance of invaginated VM structures in gravity-sensing cells.

  11. The Cochaperone SGTA (Small Glutamine-rich Tetratricopeptide Repeat-containing Protein Alpha) Demonstrates Regulatory Specificity for the Androgen, Glucocorticoid, and Progesterone Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Atanu; Garcia, Yenni A.; Zierer, Bettina; Patwardhan, Chaitanya; Gutierrez, Omar; Hildenbrand, Zacariah; Harris, Diondra C.; Balsiger, Heather A.; Sivils, Jeffrey C.; Johnson, Jill L.; Buchner, Johannes; Chadli, Ahmed; Cox, Marc B.

    2014-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors that require the ordered assembly of multichaperone complexes for transcriptional activity. Although heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 and Hsp70 are key players in this process, multiple Hsp70- and Hsp90-associated cochaperones associate with receptor-chaperone complexes to regulate receptor folding and activation. Small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein alpha (SGTA) was recently characterized as an Hsp70 and Hsp90-associated cochaperone that specifically regulates androgen receptor activity. However, the specificity of SGTA for additional members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily and the mechanism by which SGTA regulates receptor activity remain unclear. Here we report that SGTA associates with and specifically regulates the androgen, glucocorticoid, and progesterone receptors and has no effect on the mineralocorticoid and estrogen receptors in both yeast and mammalian cell-based reporter assays. In both systems, SGTA knockdown/deletion enhances receptor activity, whereas SGTA overexpression suppresses receptor activity. We demonstrate that SGTA binds directly to Hsp70 and Hsp90 in vitro with similar affinities yet predominately precipitates with Hsp70 from cell lysates, suggesting a role for SGTA in early, Hsp70-mediated folding. Furthermore, SGTA expression completely abrogates the regulation of receptor function by FKBP52 (52-kDa FK506-binding protein), which acts at a later stage of the chaperone cycle. Taken together, our data suggest a role for SGTA at distinct steps in the chaperone-dependent modulation of androgen, glucocorticoid, and progesterone receptor activity. PMID:24753260

  12. The trans-inhibitory Rep78 protein of adeno-associated virus binds to TAR region DNA of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Batchu, R B; Hermonat, P L

    1995-07-01

    The large rep gene products, Rep78 and Rep68, of adeno-associated virus (AAV) are pleiotropic effector proteins which are required for AAV DNA replication and the trans-regulation of AAV gene expression. Apart from these essential functions prerequisite for the life cycle of AAV, these rep products are able to inhibit the replication and gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and a number of DNA viruses. Here, it is demonstrated that Rep78, as a chimeric with the maltose binding protein, directly binds the full-length HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR), and to a subset of these sequences containing the trans-activation response (TAR) sequence as DNA. These interactions, an effector protein physically binding a target promoter, suggest a direct mechanism of action for Rep78 inhibition. Furthermore, competitive binding studies between the TAR region and the full-length HIV-LTR, strongly suggested that another site(s) within the LTR was also bound by Rep78. Finally, as Rep78 binding is also believed to be affected by secondary structure within the DNA, it was found that Rep78 preferentially binds with HIV-LTR sequences with promoted secondary structure generated by heat denaturation and rapid cooling.

  13. SlTPR1, a tomato tetratricopeptide repeat protein, interacts with the ethylene receptors NR and LeETR1, modulating ethylene and auxin responses and development

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhefeng; Arciga-Reyes, Luis; Zhong, Silin; Alexander, Lucy; Hackett, Rachel; Wilson, Ian; Grierson, Don

    2008-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is perceived by a family of ethylene receptors which interact with the Raf-like kinase CTR1. SlTPR1 encodes a novel TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) protein from tomato that interacts with the ethylene receptors NR and LeETR1 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro protein interaction assays. SlTPR1 protein with a GFP fluorescent tag was localized in the plasmalemma and nuclear membrane in Arabidopsis, and SlTPR1-CFP and NR-YFP fusion proteins were co-localized in the plasmalemma and nuclear membrane following co-bombardment of onion cells. Overexpression of SlTPR1 in tomato resulted in ethylene-related pleiotropic effects including reduced stature, delayed and reduced production of inflorescences, abnormal and infertile flowers with degenerate styles and pollen, epinasty, reduced apical dominance, inhibition of abscission, altered leaf morphology, and parthenocarpic fruit. Similar phenotypes were seen in Arabidopsis overexpressing SlTPR1. SlTPR1 overexpression did not increase ethylene production but caused enhanced accumulation of mRNA from the ethylene responsive gene ChitB and the auxin-responsive gene SlSAUR1-like, and reduced expression of the auxin early responsive gene LeIAA9, which is known to be inhibited by ethylene and to be associated with parthenocarpy. Cuttings from the SlTPR1-overexpressors produced fewer adventitious roots and were less responsive to indole butyric acid. It is suggested that SlTPR1 overexpression enhances a subset of ethylene and auxin responses by interacting with specific ethylene receptors. SlTPR1 shares features with human TTC1, which interacts with heterotrimeric G-proteins and Ras, and competes with Raf-1 for Ras binding. Models for SlTPR1 action are proposed involving modulation of ethylene signalling or receptor levels. PMID:19036844

  14. SlTPR1, a tomato tetratricopeptide repeat protein, interacts with the ethylene receptors NR and LeETR1, modulating ethylene and auxin responses and development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhefeng; Arciga-Reyes, Luis; Zhong, Silin; Alexander, Lucy; Hackett, Rachel; Wilson, Ian; Grierson, Don

    2008-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is perceived by a family of ethylene receptors which interact with the Raf-like kinase CTR1. SlTPR1 encodes a novel TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) protein from tomato that interacts with the ethylene receptors NR and LeETR1 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro protein interaction assays. SlTPR1 protein with a GFP fluorescent tag was localized in the plasmalemma and nuclear membrane in Arabidopsis, and SlTPR1-CFP and NR-YFP fusion proteins were co-localized in the plasmalemma and nuclear membrane following co-bombardment of onion cells. Overexpression of SlTPR1 in tomato resulted in ethylene-related pleiotropic effects including reduced stature, delayed and reduced production of inflorescences, abnormal and infertile flowers with degenerate styles and pollen, epinasty, reduced apical dominance, inhibition of abscission, altered leaf morphology, and parthenocarpic fruit. Similar phenotypes were seen in Arabidopsis overexpressing SlTPR1. SlTPR1 overexpression did not increase ethylene production but caused enhanced accumulation of mRNA from the ethylene responsive gene ChitB and the auxin-responsive gene SlSAUR1-like, and reduced expression of the auxin early responsive gene LeIAA9, which is known to be inhibited by ethylene and to be associated with parthenocarpy. Cuttings from the SlTPR1-overexpressors produced fewer adventitious roots and were less responsive to indole butyric acid. It is suggested that SlTPR1 overexpression enhances a subset of ethylene and auxin responses by interacting with specific ethylene receptors. SlTPR1 shares features with human TTC1, which interacts with heterotrimeric G-proteins and Ras, and competes with Raf-1 for Ras binding. Models for SlTPR1 action are proposed involving modulation of ethylene signalling or receptor levels. PMID:19036844

  15. The T=1 Capsid Protein of Penicillium chrysogenum Virus Is Formed by a Repeated Helix-Rich Core Indicative of Gene Duplication▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M.; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A.; Havens, Wendy M.; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L.; Castón, José R.

    2010-01-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 Å resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of α-helices, forming a repeated α-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the α-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability. PMID:20463071

  16. The T=1 capsid protein of Penicillium chrysogenum virus is formed by a repeated helix-rich core indicative of gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M; Garriga, Damiá; Ghabrial, Said A; Havens, Wendy M; Trus, Benes; Verdaguer, Nuria; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2010-07-01

    Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV), a member of the Chrysoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fungal virus with a multipartite genome, with each RNA molecule encapsidated in a separate particle. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular route and are transmitted during sporogenesis and cell fusion. The PcV capsid, based on a T=1 lattice containing 60 subunits of the 982-amino-acid capsid protein, remains structurally undisturbed throughout the viral cycle, participates in genome metabolism, and isolates the virus genome from host defense mechanisms. Using three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy, we determined the structure of the PcV virion at 8.0 A resolution. The capsid protein has a high content of rod-like densities characteristic of alpha-helices, forming a repeated alpha-helical core indicative of gene duplication. Whereas the PcV capsid protein has two motifs with the same fold, most dsRNA virus capsid subunits consist of dimers of a single protein with similar folds. The spatial arrangement of the alpha-helical core resembles that found in the capsid protein of the L-A virus, a fungal totivirus with an undivided genome, suggesting a conserved basic fold. The encapsidated genome is organized in concentric shells; whereas the inner dsRNA shells are well defined, the outermost layer is dense due to numerous interactions with the inner capsid surface, specifically, six interacting areas per monomer. The outermost genome layer is arranged in an icosahedral cage, sufficiently well ordered to allow for modeling of an A-form dsRNA. The genome ordering might constitute a framework for dsRNA transcription at the capsid interior and/or have a structural role for capsid stability.

  17. Interaction of Prevotella intermedia strain 17 leucine-rich repeat domain protein AdpF with eukaryotic cells promotes bacterial internalization.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Dipanwita; Kang, Dae-Joong; Anaya-Bergman, Cecilia; Wyant, Tiana; Ghosh, Arnab K; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Lewis, Janina P

    2014-06-01

    Prevotella intermedia is an oral bacterium implicated in a variety of oral diseases. Although internalization of this bacterium by nonphagocytic host cells is well established, the molecular players mediating the process are not well known. Here, the properties of a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain protein, designated AdpF, are described. This protein contains a leucine-rich region composed of 663 amino acid residues, and molecular modeling shows that it folds into a classical curved solenoid structure. The cell surface localization of recombinant AdpF (rAdpF) was confirmed by electron and confocal microscopy analyses. The recombinant form of this protein bound fibronectin in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the protein was internalized by host cells, with the majority of the process accomplished within 30 min. The internalization of rAdpF was inhibited by nystatin, cytochalasin, latrunculin, nocodazole, and wortmannin, indicating that microtubules, microfilaments, and signal transduction are required for the invasion. It is noteworthy that preincubation of eukaryotic cells with AdpF increased P. intermedia 17 internalization by 5- and 10-fold for HeLa and NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell lines, respectively. The addition of the rAdpF protein was also very effective in inducing bacterial internalization into the oral epithelial cell line HN4, as well as into primary cells, including human oral keratinocytes (HOKs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Finally, cells exposed to P. intermedia 17 internalized the bacteria more readily upon reinfection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that rAdpF plays a role in the internalization of P. intermedia 17 by a variety of host cells.

  18. Conserved charged residues in the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Ran GTPase activating protein are required for Ran binding and GTPase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, J; Gerke, V

    1999-01-01

    GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Ran, a Ras-related GTPase participating in nucleocytoplasmic transport, have been identified in different species ranging from yeast to man. All RanGAPs are characterized by a conserved domain consisting of eight leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) interrupted at two positions by so-called separating regions, the latter being unique for RanGAPs within the family of LRR proteins. The cytosolic RanGAP activity is essential for the Ran GTPase cycle which in turn provides directionality in nucleocytoplasmic transport, but the structural basis for the interaction between Ran and its GAP has not been elucidated. In order to gain a better understanding of this interaction we generated a number of mutant RanGAPs carrying amino acid substitutions in the LRR domain and analysed their complex formation with Ran as well as their ability to stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of the G protein. We show that conserved charged residues present in the separating regions of the LRR domain are indispensable for efficient Ran binding and GAP activity. These separating regions contain three conserved arginines which could possibly serve as catalytic residues similar to the arginine fingers identified in GAPs for other small GTPases. However, mutations in two of these arginines do not affect the GAP activity and replacement of the third conserved arginine (Arg91 in human RanGAP) severely interferes not only with GAP activity but also with Ran binding. This indicates that RanGAP-stimulated GTP hydrolysis on Ran does not involve a catalytic arginine residue but requires certain charged residues of the LRR domain of the GAP for mediating the protein-protein interaction. PMID:10527945

  19. Overexpression of Arabidopsis thaliana LOV KELCH REPEAT PROTEIN 2 promotes tuberization in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. May Queen).

    PubMed

    Inui, Hideyuki; Ogura, Yasunobu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro

    2010-06-01

    Potato tuberization is induced under short-day conditions and repressed under long-day conditions. In this study, we produced transgenic potatoes overexpressing either Arabidopsis thaliana LOV KELCH PROTEIN 2 (35S:LKP2) or CONSTANS fused with a transcription repressor motif (35S:CO-Rep). In an in vitro tuberization assay, the average number of tubers per plant was greater in 35S:LKP2 plants than in vector-control plants, but lower in 35S:CO-Rep plants. Under long-day conditions in soil, all 35S:LKP2 plants tuberized, whereas most control plants and 35S:CO-Rep plants did not. These results suggest genes involved in flowering time regulation can be used to control potato tuber production.

  20. The Arabidopsis Mitochondria-Localized Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein PGN Functions in Defense against Necrotrophic Fungi and Abiotic Stress Tolerance1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Laluk, Kristin; AbuQamar, Synan; Mengiste, Tesfaye

    2011-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins (PPRPs) are encoded by a large gene family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and their functions are largely unknown. The few studied PPRPs are implicated in different developmental processes through their function in RNA metabolism and posttranscriptional regulation in plant organelles. Here, we studied the functions of Arabidopsis PENTATRICOPEPTIDE REPEAT PROTEIN FOR GERMINATION ON NaCl (PGN) in plant defense and abiotic stress responses. Inactivation of PGN results in susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA), glucose, and salinity. Interestingly, ectopic expression of PGN results in the same phenotypes as the pgn null allele, indicating that a tight regulation of the PGN transcript is required for normal function. Loss of PGN function dramatically enhanced reactive oxygen species accumulation in seedlings in response to salt stress. Inhibition of ABA synthesis and signaling partially alleviates the glucose sensitivity of pgn, suggesting that the mutant accumulates high endogenous ABA. Accordingly, induction of NCED3, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in stress-induced ABA biosynthesis, is significantly higher in pgn, and the mutant has higher basal ABA levels, which may underlie its phenotypes. The pgn mutant has altered expression of other ABA-related genes as well as mitochondria-associated transcripts, most notably elevated levels of ABI4 and ALTERNATIVE OXIDASE1a, which are known for their roles in retrograde signaling induced by changes in or inhibition of mitochondrial function. These data, coupled with its mitochondrial localization, suggest that PGN functions in regulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis in mitochondria during abiotic and biotic stress responses, likely through involvement in retrograde signaling. PMID:21653783

  1. Exploring mechanisms of fatigue during repeated exercise and the dose dependent effects of carbohydrate and protein ingestion: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle glycogen has been well established as the primary metabolic energy substrate during physical exercise of moderate- to high-intensity and has accordingly been implicated as a limiting factor when such activity is sustained for a prolonged duration. However, the role of this substrate during repeated exercise after limited recovery is less clear, with ongoing debate regarding how recovery processes can best be supported via nutritional intervention. The aim of this project is to examine the causes of fatigue during repeated exercise bouts via manipulation of glycogen availability through nutritional intervention, thus simultaneously informing aspects of the optimal feeding strategy for recovery from prolonged exercise. Methods/Design The project involves two phases with each involving two treatment arms administered in a repeated measures design. For each treatment, participants will be required to exercise to the point of volitional exhaustion on a motorised treadmill at 70% of previously determined maximal oxygen uptake, before a four hour recovery period in which participants will be prescribed solutions providing 1.2 grams of sucrose per kilogram of body mass per hour of recovery (g.kg-1.h-1) relative to either a lower rate of sucrose ingestion (that is, 0.3 g.kg-1. h-1; Phase I) or a moderate dose (that is, 0.8 g.kg-1.h-1) rendered isocaloric via the addition of 0.4 g.kg-1.h-1 whey protein hydrolysate (Phase II); the latter administered in a double blind manner as part of a randomised and counterbalanced design. Muscle biopsies will be sampled at the beginning and end of recovery for determination of muscle glycogen resynthesis rates, with further biopsies taken following a second bout of exhaustive exercise to determine differences in substrate availability relative to the initial sample taken following the first exercise bout. Discussion Phase I will inform whether a dose–response relationship exists between carbohydrate ingestion rate

  2. Recombinant protein of heptad-repeat HR212, a stable fusion inhibitor with potent anti-HIV action in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Wei; Wang Ruirui; Yang Liumeng; Liu Changmei; Tien Po Zheng Yongtang

    2008-07-20

    HR212, a recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli, has been previously reported to inhibit HIV-1 membrane fusion at low nanomolar level. Here we report that HR212 is effective in blocking laboratory strain HIV-1{sub IIIB} entry and replication with EC{sub 50} values of 3.92 {+-} 0.62 and 6.59 {+-} 1.74 nM, respectively, and inhibiting infection by clinic isolate HIV-1{sub KM018} with EC{sub 50} values of 44.44 {+-} 10.20 nM, as well as suppressing HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect with an EC{sub 50} value of 3.04 {+-} 1.20 nM. It also inhibited HIV-2{sub ROD} and HIV-2{sub CBL-20} entry and replication in the {mu}M range. Notably, HR212 was highly effective against T20-resistant strains with EC{sub 50} values ranging from 5.09 to 7.75 nM. Unlike T20, HR212 showed stability sufficient to inhibit syncytia formation in a time-of-addition assay, and was insensitive to proteinase K digestion. These results suggest that HR212 has great potential to be further developed as novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients, particularly for those infected by T20-resistant variants.

  3. The molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT binds to the Trp-Asp 40 (WD40) repeat protein WDR68 and promotes its folding, protein kinase DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Takeshi; Aoshima, Masato; Tsubata, Takuichi; Nishida, Eisuke

    2014-11-28

    Trp-Asp (WD) repeat protein 68 (WDR68) is an evolutionarily conserved WD40 repeat protein that binds to several proteins, including dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase (DYRK1A), MAPK/ERK kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1), and Cullin4-damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1 (CUL4-DDB1). WDR68 affects multiple and diverse physiological functions, such as controlling anthocyanin synthesis in plants, tissue growth in insects, and craniofacial development in vertebrates. However, the biochemical basis and the regulatory mechanism of WDR68 activity remain largely unknown. To better understand the cellular function of WDR68, here we have isolated and identified cellular WDR68 binding partners using a phosphoproteomic approach. More than 200 cellular proteins with wide varieties of biochemical functions were identified as WDR68-binding protein candidates. Eight T-complex protein 1 (TCP1) subunits comprising the molecular chaperone TCP1 ring complex/chaperonin-containing TCP1 (TRiC/CCT) were identified as major WDR68-binding proteins, and phosphorylation sites in both WDR68 and TRiC/CCT were identified. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the binding between TRiC/CCT and WDR68. Computer-aided structural analysis suggested that WDR68 forms a seven-bladed β-propeller ring. Experiments with a series of deletion mutants in combination with the structural modeling showed that three of the seven β-propeller blades of WDR68 are essential and sufficient for TRiC/CCT binding. Knockdown of cellular TRiC/CCT by siRNA caused an abnormal WDR68 structure and led to reduction of its DYRK1A-binding activity. Concomitantly, nuclear accumulation of WDR68 was suppressed by the knockdown of TRiC/CCT, and WDR68 formed cellular aggregates when overexpressed in the TRiC/CCT-deficient cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT is essential for correct protein folding, DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation of WDR68. PMID

  4. The MTL1 Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Required for Both Translation and Splicing of the Mitochondrial NADH DEHYDROGENASE SUBUNIT7 mRNA in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haïli, Nawel; Planchard, Noelya; Arnal, Nadège; Quadrado, Martine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Dahan, Jennifer; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Mireau, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial translation involves a complex interplay of ancient bacteria-like features and host-derived functionalities. Although the basic components of the mitochondrial translation apparatus have been recognized, very few protein factors aiding in recruiting ribosomes on mitochondria-encoded messenger RNA (mRNAs) have been identified in higher plants. In this study, we describe the identification of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MITOCHONDRIAL TRANSLATION FACTOR1 (MTL1) protein, a new member of the Pentatricopeptide Repeat family, and show that it is essential for the translation of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit7 (nad7) mRNA. We demonstrate that mtl1 mutant plants fail to accumulate the Nad7 protein, even though the nad7 mature mRNA is produced and bears the same 5' and 3' extremities as in wild-type plants. We next observed that polysome association of nad7 mature mRNA is specifically disrupted in mtl1 mutants, indicating that the absence of Nad7 results from a lack of translation of nad7 mRNA. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial translation requires the intervention of gene-specific nucleus-encoded PPR trans-factors and that their action does not necessarily involve the 5' processing of their target mRNA, as observed previously. Interestingly, a partial decrease in nad7 intron 2 splicing was also detected in mtl1 mutants, suggesting that MTL1 is also involved in group II intron splicing. However, this second function appears to be less essential for nad7 expression than its role in translation. MTL1 will be instrumental to understand the multifunctionality of PPR proteins and the mechanisms governing mRNA translation and intron splicing in plant mitochondria.

  5. A Single B-repeat of Staphylococcus epidermidis accumulation-associated protein induces protective immune responses in an experimental biomaterial-associated infection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Hongyan; Chiu, David; Bryers, James D

    2014-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are the fourth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, resulting in 2 million infections and ∼100,000 deaths each year. More than 60% of these infections are associated with some type of biomedical device. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal bacterium of the human skin and is the most common nosocomial pathogen infecting implanted medical devices, especially those in the cardiovasculature. S. epidermidis antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation on inert surfaces make these infections hard to treat. Accumulation-associated protein (Aap), a cell wall-anchored protein of S. epidermidis, is considered one of the most important proteins involved in the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm. A small recombinant protein vaccine comprising a single B-repeat domain (Brpt1.0) of S. epidermidis RP62A Aap was developed, and the vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in vitro with a biofilm inhibition assay and in vivo in a murine model of biomaterial-associated infection. A high IgG antibody response against S. epidermidis RP62A was detected in the sera of the mice after two subcutaneous immunizations with Brpt1.0 coadministered with Freund's adjuvant. Sera from Brpt1.0-immunized mice inhibited in vitro S. epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation in a dose-dependent pattern. After receiving two immunizations, each mouse was surgically implanted with a porous scaffold disk containing 5 × 10(6) CFU of S. epidermidis RP62A. Weight changes, inflammatory markers, and histological assay results after challenge with S. epidermidis indicated that the mice immunized with Brpt1.0 exhibited significantly higher resistance to S. epidermidis RP62A implant infection than the control mice. Day 8 postchallenge, there was a significantly lower number of bacteria in scaffold sections and surrounding tissues and a lower residual inflammatory response to the infected scaffold disks for the Brpt1.0-immunized mice than for of the ovalbumin (Ova

  6. The cell proliferation-associated antigen of antibody Ki-67: a very large, ubiquitous nuclear protein with numerous repeated elements, representing a new kind of cell cycle-maintaining proteins

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The antigen defined by mAb Ki-67 is a human nuclear protein the expression of which is strictly associated with cell proliferation and which is widely used in routine pathology as a "proliferation marker" to measure the growth fraction of cells in human tumors. Ki-67 detects a double band with apparent molecular weights of 395 and 345 kD in immunoblots of proteins from proliferating cells. We cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA, identified two differentially spliced isoforms of mRNA with open reading frames of 9,768 and 8,688 bp encoding for this cell proliferation-associated protein with calculated molecular weights of 358,761 D and 319,508 D, respectively. New mAbs against a bacterially expressed part and a synthetic polypeptide deduced from the isolated cDNA react with the native Ki-67 antigen, thus providing a circle of evidence that we have cloned the authentic Ki-67 antigen cDNA. The central part of the Ki-67 antigen cDNA contains a large 6,845-bp exon with 16 tandemly repeated 366-bp elements, the "Ki-67 repeats", each including a highly conserved new motif of 66 bp, the "Ki-67 motif", which encodes for the epitope detected by Ki-67. Computer analysis of the nucleic acid and the deduced amino acid sequence of the Ki-67 antigen confirmed that the cDNA encodes for a nuclear and short-lived protein without any significant homology to known sequences. Ki-67 antigen-specific antisense oligonucleotides inhibit the proliferation of IM-9 cell line cells, indicating that the Ki-67 antigen may be an absolute requirement for maintaining cell proliferation. We conclude that the Ki-67 antigen defines a new category of cell cycle-associated nuclear nonhistone proteins. PMID:8227122

  7. A new method to determine the structure of the metal environment in metalloproteins: investigation of the prion protein octapeptide repeat Cu(2+) complex.

    PubMed

    Mentler, Matthias; Weiss, Andreas; Grantner, Klaus; del Pino, Pablo; Deluca, Dominga; Fiori, Stella; Renner, Christian; Klaucke, Wolfram Meyer; Moroder, Luis; Bertsch, Uwe; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Tavan, Paul; Parak, Fritz G

    2005-03-01

    Since high-intensity synchrotron radiation is available, "extended X-ray absorption fine structure" spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used for detailed structural analysis of metal ion environments in proteins. However, the information acquired is often insufficient to obtain an unambiguous picture. ENDOR spectroscopy allows the determination of hydrogen positions around a metal ion. However, again the structural information is limited. In the present study, a method is proposed which combines computations with spectroscopic data from EXAFS, EPR, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM). From EXAFS a first picture of the nearest coordination shell is derived which has to be compatible with EPR data. Computations are used to select sterically possible structures, from which in turn structures with correct H and N positions are selected by ENDOR and ESEEM measurements. Finally, EXAFS spectra are re-calculated and compared with the experimental data. This procedure was successfully applied for structure determination of the Cu(2+) complex of the octapeptide repeat of the human prion protein. The structure of this octarepeat complex is rather similar to a pentapeptide complex which was determined by X-ray structure analysis. However, the tryptophan residue has a different orientation: the axial water is on the other side of the Cu.

  8. Leucine-rich repeat containing protein LRRC8A is essential for swelling-activated Cl- currents and embryonic development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiki; Wondergem, Robert; Morrison, Rebecca; Yin, Viravuth P; Strange, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    A volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) has been electrophysiologically characterized in innumerable mammalian cell types. VRAC is activated by cell swelling and mediates the volume regulatory efflux of Cl(-) and small organic solutes from cells. Two groups recently identified the mammalian leucine-rich repeat containing protein LRRC8A as an essential VRAC component. LRRC8A must be coexpressed with at least one of the other four members of this gene family, LRRC8B-E, to reconstitute VRAC activity in LRRC8(-/-) cells. LRRC8 genes likely arose with the origin of chordates. We identified LRRC8A and LRRC8C-E orthologs in the zebrafish genome and demonstrate that zebrafish embryo cells and differentiated adult cell types express a swelling-activated Cl(-) current indistinguishable from mammalian VRAC currents. Embryo cell VRAC currents are virtually eliminated by morpholino knockdown of the zebrafish LRRC8A ortholog lrrc8aa VRAC activity is fully reconstituted in LRRC8(-/-) human cells by coexpression of zebrafish lrrc8aa and human LRRC8C cDNAs. lrrc8aa expression varies during zebrafish embryogenesis and lrrc8aa knockdown causes pericardial edema and defects in trunk elongation and somatogenesis. Our studies provide confirmation of the importance of LRRC8A in VRAC activity and establish the zebrafish as a model system for characterizing the molecular regulation and physiological roles of VRAC and LRRC8 proteins.

  9. Analysis of the Arabidopsis shoot meristem transcriptome during floral transition identifies distinct regulatory patterns and a leucine-rich repeat protein that promotes flowering.

    PubMed

    Torti, Stefano; Fornara, Fabio; Vincent, Coral; Andrés, Fernando; Nordström, Karl; Göbel, Ulrike; Knoll, Daniela; Schoof, Heiko; Coupland, George

    2012-02-01

    Flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana is induced by exposure to long days (LDs). During this process, the shoot apical meristem is converted to an inflorescence meristem that forms flowers, and this transition is maintained even if plants are returned to short days (SDs). We show that exposure to five LDs is sufficient to commit the meristem of SD-grown plants to flower as if they were exposed to continuous LDs. The MADS box proteins SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) and FRUITFULL (FUL) play essential roles in this commitment process and in the induction of flowering downstream of the transmissible FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) signal. We exploited laser microdissection and Solexa sequencing to identify 202 genes whose transcripts increase in the meristem during floral commitment. Expression of six of these transcripts was tested in different mutants, allowing them to be assigned to FT-dependent or FT-independent pathways. Most, but not all, of those dependent on FT and its paralog TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) also relied on SOC1 and FUL. However, this dependency on FT and TSF or SOC1 and FUL was often bypassed in the presence of the short vegetative phase mutation. FLOR1, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat protein, was induced in the early inflorescence meristem, and flor1 mutations delayed flowering. Our data contribute to the definition of LD-dependent pathways downstream and in parallel to FT.

  10. Disruption of a rice pentatricopeptide repeat protein causes a seedling-specific albino phenotype and its utilization to enhance seed purity in hybrid rice production.

    PubMed

    Su, Ning; Hu, Mao-Long; Wu, Dian-Xing; Wu, Fu-Qing; Fei, Gui-Lin; Lan, Ying; Chen, Xiu-Ling; Shu, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiu-Ping; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Lei, Cai-Lin; Qi, Cun-Kou; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jian-Min

    2012-05-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene family represents one of the largest gene families in higher plants. Accumulating data suggest that PPR proteins play a central and broad role in modulating the expression of organellar genes in plants. Here we report a rice (Oryza sativa) mutant named young seedling albino (ysa) derived from the rice thermo/photoperiod-sensitive genic male-sterile line Pei'ai64S, which is a leading male-sterile line for commercial two-line hybrid rice production. The ysa mutant develops albino leaves before the three-leaf stage, but the mutant gradually turns green and recovers to normal green at the six-leaf stage. Further investigation showed that the change in leaf color in ysa mutant is associated with changes in chlorophyll content and chloroplast development. Map-based cloning revealed that YSA encodes a PPR protein with 16 tandem PPR motifs. YSA is highly expressed in young leaves and stems, and its expression level is regulated by light. We showed that the ysa mutation has no apparent negative effects on several important agronomic traits, such as fertility, stigma extrusion rate, selfed seed-setting rate, hybrid seed-setting rate, and yield heterosis under normal growth conditions. We further demonstrated that ysa can be used as an early marker for efficient identification and elimination of false hybrids in commercial hybrid rice production, resulting in yield increases by up to approximately 537 kg ha(-1).

  11. A brief, but repeated, swimming protocol is sufficient to overcome amyloid beta-protein inhibition of hippocampal long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaomin; Feig, Larry A; Hartley, Dean M

    2007-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease starts as an almost imperceptible malady, first observed clinically as a mild memory problem. Accumulating genetic and biochemical data have suggested that amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) plays an important role in this memory loss, and Abeta has been shown to suppress long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular model for memory and learning. Here we show that a very brief (3 min) swimming, twice daily for 2 weeks, rescues LTP inhibition in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices caused by Abeta(42) or Abeta(40) carrying the Arctic mutation using a theta burst stimulation (TBS) protocol. Whereas the input-output curve was not affected, the paired-pulse ratio was reduced in mice receiving our repeated swimming protocol, suggesting a possible involvement of presynaptic facilitation. Similar to swimming, Abeta's inhibition of LTP could be rescued with the adenylyl cyclase, forskolin. Interestingly, this swimming protocol produced conditions in which a weak-TBS could invoke LTP not observed in naïve mice, which again was mimicked by forskolin. In contrast, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, blocked both the forskolin and swimming potentiation of LTP; these data implicate cAMP/PKA signaling in the protective effect of swimming and mediating Abeta' detrimental effects. Our data add a new simple behavior paradigm that shows the importance of an environmental factor in reversing the pathophysiological effects of Abeta, and suggest new therapeutic avenues.

  12. Leucine-rich repeat containing protein LRRC8A is essential for swelling-activated Cl- currents and embryonic development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiki; Wondergem, Robert; Morrison, Rebecca; Yin, Viravuth P; Strange, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    A volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) has been electrophysiologically characterized in innumerable mammalian cell types. VRAC is activated by cell swelling and mediates the volume regulatory efflux of Cl(-) and small organic solutes from cells. Two groups recently identified the mammalian leucine-rich repeat containing protein LRRC8A as an essential VRAC component. LRRC8A must be coexpressed with at least one of the other four members of this gene family, LRRC8B-E, to reconstitute VRAC activity in LRRC8(-/-) cells. LRRC8 genes likely arose with the origin of chordates. We identified LRRC8A and LRRC8C-E orthologs in the zebrafish genome and demonstrate that zebrafish embryo cells and differentiated adult cell types express a swelling-activated Cl(-) current indistinguishable from mammalian VRAC currents. Embryo cell VRAC currents are virtually eliminated by morpholino knockdown of the zebrafish LRRC8A ortholog lrrc8aa VRAC activity is fully reconstituted in LRRC8(-/-) human cells by coexpression of zebrafish lrrc8aa and human LRRC8C cDNAs. lrrc8aa expression varies during zebrafish embryogenesis and lrrc8aa knockdown causes pericardial edema and defects in trunk elongation and somatogenesis. Our studies provide confirmation of the importance of LRRC8A in VRAC activity and establish the zebrafish as a model system for characterizing the molecular regulation and physiological roles of VRAC and LRRC8 proteins. PMID:27688432

  13. Repeated administration of propofol upregulated the expression of c-Fos and cleaved-caspase-3 proteins in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yin; Ling-Shan, Gou; Yi, Liu; Xing-Qi, Wang; Xue-Mei, Zhuang; Xiao-Xing, Yin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives and Aim: This study was designed to analyze the relationship between the expression of c-Fos protein and apoptosis in the hippocampus following propofol administration in infant mice. There are reports that certain drugs, including the general anesthetics applied in pediatrics and obstetrics, could block N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors and activate γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors. Furthermore, some anesthetics could trigger neuroapoptosis and the expression of c-Fos in the developing rodent brain. Propofol is a general anesthetic increasingly used in pediatrics and obstetrics, and is reported to be able to interact with both γ-aminobutyric acid type A and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. No adequate evaluations have been available as to whether the dosage of propofol to maintain anaesthesia could trigger the expression of c-Fos and apoptosis. Materials and Methods: Intraperitoneal injections of propofol (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) or vehicle were administered every 90 minutes (4 times) in infant mice (5–7 days old). 30 minutes after the final administration, the protein expressions of c-Fos and cleaved-caspase-3 in the hippocampus were determined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: It was demonstrated that the expressions of cleaved-caspase-3 and c-Fos were upregulated in the hippocampal CA3 region in this study. Conclusions: The upregulated c-Fos expression induced by repeated injections of propofol might evoke neuroapoptosis. PMID:22144767

  14. HLB1 Is a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain-Containing Protein That Operates at the Intersection of the Exocytic and Endocytic Pathways at the TGN/EE in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sparks, J Alan; Kwon, Taegun; Renna, Luciana; Liao, Fuqi; Brandizzi, Federica; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2016-03-01

    The endomembrane system plays essential roles in plant development, but the proteome responsible for its function and organization remains largely uncharacterized in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the HYPERSENSITIVE TO LATRUNCULIN B1 (HLB1) protein isolated through a forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana for mutants with heightened sensitivity to actin-disrupting drugs. HLB1 is a plant-specific tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein of unknown function encoded by a single Arabidopsis gene. HLB1 associated with the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosome (EE) and tracked along filamentous actin, indicating that it could link post-Golgi traffic with the actin cytoskeleton in plants. HLB1 was found to interact with the ADP-ribosylation-factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor, MIN7/BEN1 (HOPM INTERACTOR7/BREFELDIN A-VISUALIZED ENDOCYTIC TRAFFICKING DEFECTIVE1) by coimmunoprecipitation. The min7/ben1 mutant phenocopied the mild root developmental defects and latrunculin B hypersensitivity of hlb1, and analyses of ahlb1/ min7/ben1 double mutant showed that hlb1 and min7/ben1 operate in common genetic pathways. Based on these data, we propose that HLB1 together with MIN7/BEN1 form a complex with actin to modulate the function of the TGN/EE at the intersection of the exocytic and endocytic pathways in plants. PMID:26941089

  15. The WD-Repeat Protein CsTTG1 Regulates Fruit Wart Formation through Interaction with the Homeodomain-Leucine Zipper I Protein Mict.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Yin, Shuai; Liu, Xingwang; Liu, Bin; Yang, Sen; Xue, Shudan; Cai, Yanling; Black, Kezia; Liu, Huiling; Dong, Mingming; Zhang, Yaqi; Zhao, Binyu; Ren, Huazhong

    2016-06-01

    The cucumber (Cucumis sativus) fruit is covered with bloom trichomes and warts (composed of spines and tubercules), which have an important impact on the commercial value of the crop. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism underlying their formation. Here, we reported that the cucumber WD-repeat homolog CsTTG1, which is localized in the nucleus and cytomembrane, plays an important role in the formation of cucumber fruit bloom trichomes and warts. Functional characterization of CsTTG1 revealed that it is mainly expressed in the epidermis of cucumber ovary and that its overexpression in cucumber alters the density of fruit bloom trichomes and spines, thereby promoting the warty fruit trait. Conversely, silencing CsTTG1 expression inhibits the initiation of fruit spines. Molecular and genetic analyses showed that CsTTG1 acts in parallel to Mict/CsGL1, a key trichome formation factor, to regulate the initiation of fruit trichomes, including fruit bloom trichomes and spines, and that the further differentiation of fruit spines and formation of tubercules regulated by CsTTG1 is dependent on Mict Using yeast two-hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we determined that CsTTG1 directly interacts with Mict. Collectively, our results indicate that CsTTG1 is an important component of the molecular network that regulates fruit bloom trichome and wart formation in cucumber. PMID:27208299

  16. DR1769, a Protein with N-Terminal Beta Propeller Repeats and a Low-Complexity Hydrophilic Tail, Plays a Role in Desiccation Tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S.

    2013-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m−2. These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions. PMID:23794625

  17. DR1769, a protein with N-terminal beta propeller repeats and a low-complexity hydrophilic tail, plays a role in desiccation tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Misra, Hari S

    2013-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m(-2). These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions.

  18. Identification of Interacting Motifs Between Armadillo Repeat Containing 1 (ARC1) and Exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) Proteins in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hecui; Lian, Xiaoping; Converse, Richard; Zhu, Liquan

    2016-02-01

    In order to identify the functional domains which regulate the interaction between the self-incompatibility proteins armadillo repeat containing 1 (ARC1) and exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) in Brassica oleracea, fragments containing selected motifs of ARC1 (ARC1210, ARC1246, ARC1279, ARC1354) and site-specific mutants with substitutions at possible interaction sites (ARC1354m, ARC1664m) were PCR amplified and inserted into pGADT7, while coding sequences from Exo70A1 (Exo70A185, Exo70A1) were subcloned into pGBKT7. The interactions between the protein products produced by these constructs were then analyzed utilizing a yeast two-hybrid system. Our data indicate that both ARC1210 and ARC1246 interact strongly with Exo70A185 and Exo70A1, while ARC1279, ARC1354, ARC1354m and ARC1664m exhibited a weak interaction, indicating that the recognition sites are located within the 210 N-terminal amino acids of ARC1 and the 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1. This was further verified by GST pull-down analysis. This supports a model in which the N-terminal leucine zipper of ARC1 and the first 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1 mediate the interaction between these two proteins. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these motifs were highly conserved across different species, indicating that the interaction characterized in B. oleracea may operate in a wide array of cultivars. PMID:26696546

  19. Orthogonal assembly of a designed ankyrin repeat protein-cytotoxin conjugate with a clickable serum albumin module for half-life extension.

    PubMed

    Simon, Manuel; Frey, Raphael; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe; Plückthun, Andreas

    2013-11-20

    The generation of drug conjugates for safe and effective tumor targeting requires binding proteins tolerant to functionalization by rational engineering. Here, we show that Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins), a novel class of binding proteins not derived from antibodies, can be used as building blocks for facile orthogonal assembly of bioconjugates for tumor targeting with tailored properties. DARPin Ec1, which targets the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), was genetically modified with a C-terminal cysteine for conjugation of the small molecule cytotoxin monomethylauristatin F (MMAF). In addition, it was N-terminally functionalized by metabolic introduction of the non-natural amino acid azidohomoalanine to enable linkage of site-specifically dibenzocyclooctyne-modified mouse serum albumin (MSA) for half-life extension using Cu(I)-free click chemistry. The conjugate MSA-Ec1-MMAF was assembled to obtain high yields of a pure and stable drug conjugate as confirmed by various analytical methods and in functional assays. The orthogonality of the assembly led to a defined reaction product and preserved the functional properties of all modules, including EpCAM-specific binding and internalization, FcRn binding mediated by MSA, and cytotoxic potency. Linkage of MMAF to the DARPin increased receptor-specific uptake of the drug while decreasing nonspecific uptake, and further coupling of the conjugate to MSA enhanced this effect. In mice, albumin conjugation increased the serum half-life from 11 min to 17.4 h, resulting in a more than 22-fold increase in the area-under-the-curve (AUC). Our data demonstrate the promise of the DARPin format for facile modular assembly of drug conjugates with improved pharmacokinetic performance for tumor targeting.

  20. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex. We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.

  1. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    DOE PAGES

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex.more » We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.« less

  2. Identification of Interacting Motifs Between Armadillo Repeat Containing 1 (ARC1) and Exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) Proteins in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hecui; Lian, Xiaoping; Converse, Richard; Zhu, Liquan

    2016-02-01

    In order to identify the functional domains which regulate the interaction between the self-incompatibility proteins armadillo repeat containing 1 (ARC1) and exocyst 70 A1 (Exo70A1) in Brassica oleracea, fragments containing selected motifs of ARC1 (ARC1210, ARC1246, ARC1279, ARC1354) and site-specific mutants with substitutions at possible interaction sites (ARC1354m, ARC1664m) were PCR amplified and inserted into pGADT7, while coding sequences from Exo70A1 (Exo70A185, Exo70A1) were subcloned into pGBKT7. The interactions between the protein products produced by these constructs were then analyzed utilizing a yeast two-hybrid system. Our data indicate that both ARC1210 and ARC1246 interact strongly with Exo70A185 and Exo70A1, while ARC1279, ARC1354, ARC1354m and ARC1664m exhibited a weak interaction, indicating that the recognition sites are located within the 210 N-terminal amino acids of ARC1 and the 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1. This was further verified by GST pull-down analysis. This supports a model in which the N-terminal leucine zipper of ARC1 and the first 85 N-terminal amino acids of Exo70A1 mediate the interaction between these two proteins. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these motifs were highly conserved across different species, indicating that the interaction characterized in B. oleracea may operate in a wide array of cultivars.

  3. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex. Here we report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. These results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens. PMID:25775123

  4. A conserved glutamate residue in the C-terminal deaminase domain of pentatricopeptide repeat proteins is required for RNA editing activity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Dang, Kim N; Diaz, Michael F; Mulligan, R Michael

    2015-04-17

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins include an RNA binding domain that provides site specificity. In addition, many PPR proteins include a C-terminal DYW deaminase domain with characteristic zinc binding motifs (CXXC, HXE) and has recently been shown to bind zinc ions. The glutamate residue of the HXE motif is catalytically required in the reaction catalyzed by cytidine deaminase. In this work, we examine the activity of the DYW deaminase domain through truncation or mutagenesis of the HXE motif. OTP84 is required for editing three chloroplast sites, and transgenes expressing OTP84 with C-terminal truncations were capable of editing only one of the three cognate sites at high efficiency. These results suggest that the deaminase domain of OTP84 is required for editing two of the sites, but another deaminase is able to supply the deamination activity for the third site. OTP84 and CREF7 transgenes were mutagenized to replace the glutamate residue of the HXE motif, and transgenic plants expressing OTP84-E824A and CREF7-E554A were unable to efficiently edit the cognate editing sites for these genes. In addition, plants expressing CREF7-E554A exhibited substantially reduced capacity to edit a non-cognate site, rpoA C200. These results indicate that the DYW deaminase domains of PPR proteins are involved in editing their cognate editing sites, and in some cases may participate in editing additional sites in the chloroplast. PMID:25739442

  5. Identification and expression analysis of the interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 5 (IFIT5) gene in duck (Anas platyrhynchos domesticus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Chen, Yang; Mu, Chunyu; Su, Yanhui; Liu, Ran; Huang, Zhengyang; Li, Yang; Yu, Qingming; Chang, Guobin; Xu, Qi; Chen, Guohong

    2015-01-01

    The interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFITs) protein family mediates antiviral effects by inhibiting translation initiation, cell proliferation, and migration in the interferon (IFN) dependent innate immune system. Several members of this family, including IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3 and IFIT5, have been heavily studied in mammals. Avian species contain only one family member, IFIT5, and little is known about the role of this protein in birds. In this study, duck IFIT5 (duIFIT5) full-length mRNA was cloned by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE). Based on the sequence obtained, we performed a series of bioinformatics analyses, and found that duIFIT5 was most similar to homologs in other avian species. Also, duIFIT5 contained eight conserved TPR motifs and two conserved multi-domains (TPR_11 and TPR_12). Finally, we used duck hepatitis virus type 1 (DHV-1) and polyriboinosinicpolyribocytidylic acid (poly (I:C)) as a pathogen or a pathogen-associated molecular pattern induction to infect three-day-old domestic ducklings. The liver and spleen were collected to detect the change in duIFIT5 transcript level upon infection by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). DuIFIT5 expression rapidly increased after DHV-1 infection and maintained a high level, while the transcripts of duIFIT5 peaked at 8h after poly (I:C) infection and then returned to normal. Taken together, these results provide a greater understanding of avian IFIT5. PMID:25816333

  6. Comparative functional analysis of Jembrana disease virus Tat protein on lentivirus long terminal repeat promoters: evidence for flexibility at its N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yang; Deng, Gang; Gai, Yuanming; Li, Yue; Gao, Yang; Du, Jiansen; Geng, Yunqi; Chen, Qimin; Qiao, Wentao

    2009-01-01

    Background Jembrana disease virus (JDV) encodes a potent regulatory protein Tat that strongly stimulates viral expression by transactivating the long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. JDV Tat (jTat) promotes the transcription from its own LTR as well as non-cognate LTRs, by recruiting host transcription factors and facilitating transcriptional elongation. Here, we compared the sequence requirements of jTat for transactivation of JDV, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) LTRs. Results In this study, we identified the minimal protein sequence for LTR activation using jTat truncation mutants. We found that jTat N-terminal residues were indispensable for transactivating the HIV LTR. In contrast, transactivation of BIV and JDV LTRs depended largely on an arginine-rich motif and some flanking residues. Competitive inhibition assay and knockdown analysis showed that P-TEFb was required for jTat-mediated LTR transactivation, and a mammalian two-hybrid assay revealed the robust interaction of jTat with cyclin T1. In addition, HIV LTR transactivation was largely affected by fusion protein at the jTat N-terminus despite the fact that the cyclin T1-binding affinity was not altered. Furthermore, the jTat N-terminal sequence enabled HIV Tat to transactivate BIV and JDV LTRs, suggesting the flexibility at the jTat N-terminus. Conclusion This study showed the distinct sequence requirements of jTat for HIV, BIV and JDV LTR activation. Residues responsible for interaction with cyclin T1 and transactivation response element are the key determinants for transactivation of its cognate LTR. N-terminal residues in jTat may compensate for transactivation of the HIV LTR, based on the flexibility. PMID:19860923

  7. The Ancestral Gene for Transcribed, Low-Copy Repeats in the Prader-Willi/Angleman Region Encodes a Large Protein Implicated in Protein Trafficking that is Deficient in Mice with Neuromuscular and

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.

    1999-01-01

    Transcribed, low-copy repeat elements are associated with the breakpoint regions of common deletions in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. We report here the identification of the ancestral gene ( HERC2 ) and a family of duplicated, truncated copies that comprise these low-copy repeats. This gene encodes a highly conserved giant protein, HERC2, that is distantly related to p532 (HERC1), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) implicated in vesicular trafficking. The mouse genome contains a single Herc2 locus, located in the jdf2 (juvenile development and fertility-2) interval of chromosome 7C. We have identified single nucleotide splice junction mutations in Herc2 in three independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced jdf2 mutant alleles, each leading to exon skipping with premature termination of translation and/or deletion of conserved amino acids. Therefore, mutations in Herc2 lead to the neuromuscular secretory vesicle and sperm acrosome defects, other developmental abnormalities and juvenile lethality of jdf2 mice. Combined, these findings suggest that HERC2 is an important gene encoding a GEF involved in protein trafficking and degradation pathways in the cell.

  8. Amyloid fibril formation propensity is inherent into the hexapeptide tandemly repeating sequence of the central domain of silkmoth chorion proteins of the A-family.

    PubMed

    Iconomidou, Vassiliki A; Chryssikos, Georgios D; Gionis, Vassilis; Galanis, Athanassios S; Cordopatis, Paul; Hoenger, Andreas; Hamodrakas, Stavros J

    2006-12-01

    Peptide-analogues of the A and B families of silkmoth chorion proteins form amyloid fibrils under a variety of conditions [Iconomidou, V.A., Vriend, G. Hamodrakas, S.J. 2000. Amyloids protect the silkmoth oocyte and embryo. FEBS Lett. 479, 141-145; Iconomidou,V.A., Chryssikos, G.D.,Gionis, V., Vriend, G., Hoenger, A., Hamodrakas, S.J., 2001. Amyloid-like fibrils from an 18-residue peptide-analogue of a part of the central domain of the B-family of silkmoth chorion protein. FEBS Lett. 499, 268-273; Hamodrakas, S.J. Hoenger, A., Iconomidou, V. A., 2004 . Amyloid fibrillogenesis of silkmoth chorion protein peptide-analogues via a liquid crystalline intermediate phase. J. Struct. Biol. 145, 226-235.], which led us to propose that silkmoth chorion is a natural protective amyloid. In this study, we designed and synthesized two mutant peptide-analogues of the central conservative domain of the A family: (a) one, cA_m1, with a length half of that of the central domain of the A family, which folds and self-assembles, in various conditions, into amyloid fibrils very similar in properties and structure to the fibrils formed by the cA peptide, which corresponds to the entire length of the A family central domain [Iconomidou, V.A., Vriend, G. Hamodrakas, S.J. 2000. Amyloids protect the silkmoth oocyte and embryo. FEBS Lett. 479, 141-145.], in full support of our previous proposal, (b) the second, cA_m2, differing from cA_m1 at three positions, where three glutamates have replaced two valines and one alanine residues, does not form amyloid fibrils in any conditions. It appears that (a) the amyloidogenic properties of silkmoth chorion peptides are encoded into the tandemly repeating hexapeptides comprising the central domain of silkmoth chorion proteins, and, that (b) suitable mutations, properly and carefully designed, greatly affect the strong amyloidogenic properties inherent in certain aminoacid sequences and may inhibit amyloid formation. PMID:17056273

  9. A Single B-repeat of Staphylococcus epidermidis accumulation-associated protein induces protective immune responses in an experimental biomaterial-associated infection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Hongyan; Chiu, David; Bryers, James D

    2014-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are the fourth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, resulting in 2 million infections and ∼100,000 deaths each year. More than 60% of these infections are associated with some type of biomedical device. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal bacterium of the human skin and is the most common nosocomial pathogen infecting implanted medical devices, especially those in the cardiovasculature. S. epidermidis antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation on inert surfaces make these infections hard to treat. Accumulation-associated protein (Aap), a cell wall-anchored protein of S. epidermidis, is considered one of the most important proteins involved in the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm. A small recombinant protein vaccine comprising a single B-repeat domain (Brpt1.0) of S. epidermidis RP62A Aap was developed, and the vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in vitro with a biofilm inhibition assay and in vivo in a murine model of biomaterial-associated infection. A high IgG antibody response against S. epidermidis RP62A was detected in the sera of the mice after two subcutaneous immunizations with Brpt1.0 coadministered with Freund's adjuvant. Sera from Brpt1.0-immunized mice inhibited in vitro S. epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation in a dose-dependent pattern. After receiving two immunizations, each mouse was surgically implanted with a porous scaffold disk containing 5 × 10(6) CFU of S. epidermidis RP62A. Weight changes, inflammatory markers, and histological assay results after challenge with S. epidermidis indicated that the mice immunized with Brpt1.0 exhibited significantly higher resistance to S. epidermidis RP62A implant infection than the control mice. Day 8 postchallenge, there was a significantly lower number of bacteria in scaffold sections and surrounding tissues and a lower residual inflammatory response to the infected scaffold disks for the Brpt1.0-immunized mice than for of the ovalbumin (Ova

  10. Inducibility of c-Fos protein in visuo-motor system and limbic structures after acute and repeated administration of nicotine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mathieu-Kia, A M; Pages, C; Besson, M J

    1998-08-01

    To identify neuroanatomical substrates affected by nicotine, we have studied its effects after acute and repeated administration through the c-Fos protein inducibility in various brain structures. Ninety minutes after acute nicotine (0.35 mg/kg, s.c.) the number of c-Fos-like immunoreactive nuclei was consistently increased in visuo-motor structures such as the superior colliculus, the medial terminal nucleus of accessory optic tract, and the nucleus of the optic tract. The anteroventral and lateroposterior thalamic nuclei, connected with the retina and involved in limbic processing, showed a c-Fos induction. c-Fos was preferentially induced in terminal fields of neurons of the ventral tegmental area such as the nucleus accumbens, the central amygdala, the lateral habenula, the lateral septum, as well as the cingulate, medial prefrontal, orbital and piriform cortices. In chronically treated rats (0.35 mg/kg s.c., 3 x day for 14 days), the last nicotine injection given on the 15th day was still able to induce 90 minutes later c-Fos protein in visuo-motor, retino-limbic, subcortical, and cortical limbic structures. Moreover, this chronic treatment produced an additional recruitment of c-Fos-positive nuclei in the cingulate cortex, the core and the ventral shell of the nucleus accumbens. c-Fos induction after nicotine differs from that reported after other addictive drugs in terms of pattern and chronic inducibility, indicating that different mechanisms are involved for maintaining this transcription factor. In addition to a preferential sensitivity of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons to nicotine, activation of visuo-limbic and limbic regions could be relevant for understanding some context-dependent and addictive behaviors produced by nicotine.

  11. Lower expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) association with poor prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yachao; Deng, Jingyu; Zhang, Li; Xie, Xingming; Guo, Xiaofan; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Rupeng; Liang, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1) in gastric cancer (GC), and its potential influence on the prognosis of GC patients. Methods: At present study, we examined the immunohistochemical expression of PHLPP1 on tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing 135 gastric adenocarcinoma tissues and 135 matched adjacent non-tumor tissues. In addition, both semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting analysis (WB) were adopted to detect of the expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines (AGS, SUN-1, KATO-III, BGC-823, MGC-803, SGC-7901, and HGC-27) and the normal gastric cell line GES-1. Survival analysis was used to investigate the efficiency of the prognostic evaluation of PHLPP1 expression in GC patients. Results: Positive expression rate of PHLPP1 in the primary GC tissues was significantly lower than that in adjacent non-tumor tissues (55.6% vs. 87.4%, P<0.001). Both gene transcription (mRNA) and Protein expression of PHLPP1 in the GC cell lines were significantly lower than those in the GES-1 cell line, respectively. The Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients presented PHLPP1 negative expression in the GC tissues had significantly lower overall survival rate than those presented PHLPP1 positive expression in the GC tissues (P=0.008). With the multivariate survival analysis (Cox regression), PHLPP1 expression in the GC tissue was identified as an independent predictor of the survival of patients. Conclusions: This study indicated that aberrant PHLPP1 expression was observed in GC tissues, which was significantly associated with the poor prognostic outcomes of GC patients. PMID:26884964

  12. Surface display of monkey metallothionein α tandem repeats and EGFP fusion protein on Pseudomonas putida X4 for biosorption and detection of cadmium.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaochuan; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2012-09-01

    Monkey metallothionein α domain tandem repeats (4mMTα), which exhibit high cadmium affinity, have been displayed for the first time on the surface of a bacterium using ice nucleation protein N-domain (inaXN) protein from the Xanthomonas campestris pv (ACCC-10049) as an anchoring motif. The shuttle vector pIME, which codes for INAXN-4mMTα-EGFP fusion, was constructed and used to target 4mMTα and EGFP on the surface of Pseudomonas putida X4 (CCTCC-209319). The surface location of the INAXN-4mMTα-EGFP fusion was further verified by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. The growth of X4 showed resistance to cadmium presence. The presence of surface-exposed 4mMTα on the engineered strains was four times higher than that of the wild-type X4. The Cd²⁺ accumulation by X4/pIME was not only four times greater than that of the original host bacterial cells but was also remarkably unaffected by the presence of Cu²⁺ and Zn²⁺. Moreover, the surface-engineered strains could effectively bind Cd²⁺ under a wide range of pH levels, from 4 to 7. P. putida X4/pIME with surface-expressed 4mMTα-EGFP had twice the cadmium binding capacity as well as 1.4 times the fluorescence as the cytoplasmic 4mMTa-EGFP. These results suggest that P. putida X4 expressing 4mMTα-EGFP with the INAXN anchor motif on the surface would be a useful tool for the remediation and biodetection of environmental cadmium contaminants.

  13. The LuWD40-1 gene encoding WD repeat protein regulates growth and pollen viability in flax (Linum Usitatissimum L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Jordan, Mark C; Datla, Raju; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As a crop, flax holds significant commercial value for its omega-3 rich oilseeds and stem fibres. Canada is the largest producer of linseed but there exists scope for significant yield improvements. Implementation of mechanisms such as male sterility can permit the development of hybrids to assist in achieving this goal. Temperature sensitive male sterility has been reported in flax but the leakiness of this system in field conditions limits the production of quality hybrid seeds. Here, we characterized a 2,588 bp transcript differentially expressed in male sterile lines of flax. The twelve intron gene predicted to encode a 368 amino acid protein has five WD40 repeats which, in silico, form a propeller structure with putative nucleic acid and histone binding capabilities. The LuWD40-1 protein localized to the nucleus and its expression increased during the transition and continued through the vegetative stages (seed, etiolated seedling, stem) while the transcript levels declined during reproductive development (ovary, anthers) and embryonic morphogenesis of male fertile plants. Knockout lines for LuWD40-1 in flax failed to develop shoots while overexpression lines showed delayed growth phenotype and were male sterile. The non-viable flowers failed to open and the pollen grains from these flowers were empty. Three independent transgenic lines overexpressing the LuWD40-1 gene had ∼80% non-viable pollen, reduced branching, delayed flowering and maturity compared to male fertile genotypes. The present study provides new insights into a male sterility mechanism present in flax.

  14. Molecular Analysis of Alternative Transcripts of the Equine Cordon-Bleu WH2 Repeat Protein-Like 1 (COBLL1) Gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Woong; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Shin, Sangsu; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Nam-Young; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Do, Kyong-Tak; Song, Ki-Duk; Cho, Byung-Wook

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the alternative splicing in equine cordon-bleu WH2 repeat protein-like 1 (COBLL1) gene that was identified in horse muscle and blood leukocytes, and to predict functional consequences of alternative splicing by bioinformatics analysis. In a previous study, RNA-seq analysis predicted the presence of alternative spliced isoforms of equine COBLL1, namely COBLL1a as a long form and COBLL1b as a short form. In this study, we validated two isoforms of COBLL1 transcripts in horse tissues by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, and cloned them for Sanger sequencing. The sequencing results showed that the alternative splicing occurs at exon 9. Prediction of protein structure of these isoforms revealed three putative phosphorylation sites at the amino acid sequences encoded in exon 9, which is deleted in COBLL1b. In expression analysis, it was found that COBLL1b was expressed ubiquitously and equivalently in all the analyzed tissues, whereas COBLL1a showed strong expression in kidney, spinal cord and lung, moderate expression in heart and skeletal muscle, and low expression in thyroid and colon. In muscle, both COBLL1a and COBLL1b expression decreased after exercise. It is assumed that the regulation of COBLL1 expression may be important for regulating glucose level or switching of energy source, possibly through an insulin signaling pathway, in muscle after exercise. Further study is warranted to reveal the functional importance of COBLL1 on athletic performance in race horses.

  15. Orientia tsutsugamushi ankyrin repeat-containing protein family members are Type 1 secretion system substrates that traffic to the host cell endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    VieBrock, Lauren; Evans, Sean M.; Beyer, Andrea R.; Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Ge, Hong; Singh, Smita; Rodino, Kyle G.; Heinzen, Robert A.; Richards, Allen L.; Carlyon, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an understudied, potentially fatal infection that threatens one billion persons in the Asia-Pacific region. How the causative obligate intracellular bacterium, Orientia tsutsugamushi, facilitates its intracellular survival and pathogenesis is poorly understood. Many intracellular bacterial pathogens utilize the Type 1 (T1SS) or Type 4 secretion system (T4SS) to translocate ankyrin repeat-containing proteins (Anks) that traffic to distinct subcellular locations and modulate host cell processes. The O. tsutsugamushi genome encodes one of the largest known bacterial Ank repertoires plus T1SS and T4SS components. Whether these potential virulence factors are expressed during infection, how the Anks are potentially secreted, and to where they localize in the host cell are not known. We determined that O. tsutsugamushi transcriptionally expresses 20 unique ank genes as well as genes for both T1SS and T4SS during infection of mammalian host cells. Examination of the Anks' C-termini revealed that the majority of them resemble T1SS substrates. Escherichia coli expressing a functional T1SS was able to secrete chimeric hemolysin proteins bearing the C-termini of 19 of 20 O. tsutsugamushi Anks in an HlyBD-dependent manner. Thus, O. tsutsugamushi Anks C-termini are T1SS-compatible. Conversely, Coxiella burnetii could not secrete heterologously expressed Anks in a T4SS-dependent manner. Analysis of the subcellular distribution patterns of 20 ectopically expressed Anks revealed that, while 6 remained cytosolic or trafficked to the nucleus, 14 localized to, and in some cases, altered the morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study identifies O. tsutsugamushi Anks as T1SS substrates and indicates that many display a tropism for the host cell secretory pathway. PMID:25692099

  16. Kelch Repeat and BTB Domain Containing Protein 5 (Kbtbd5) Regulates Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis through the E2F1-DP1 Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wuming; Gohla, Rachel M.; Bowlin, Kathy M.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Daniel J.; Shi, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    We have previously isolated a muscle-specific Kelch gene, Kelch repeat and BTB domain containing protein 5 (Kbtbd5)/Kelch-like protein 40 (Klhl40). In this report, we identified DP1 as a direct interacting factor for Kbtbd5 using a yeast two-hybrid screen and in vitro binding assays. Our studies demonstrate that Kbtbd5 interacts and regulates the cytoplasmic localization of DP1. GST pulldown assays demonstrate that the dimerization domain of DP1 interacts with all three of the Kbtbd5 domains. We further show that Kbtbd5 promotes the ubiquitination and degradation of DP1, thereby inhibiting E2F1-DP1 activity. To investigate the in vivo function of Kbtbd5, we used gene disruption technology and engineered Kbtbd5 null mice. Targeted deletion of Kbtbd5 resulted in postnatal lethality. Histological studies reveal that the Kbtbd5 null mice have smaller muscle fibers, a disorganized sarcomeric structure, increased extracellular matrix, and decreased numbers of mitochondria compared with wild-type controls. RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR analyses demonstrate the up-regulation of E2F1 target apoptotic genes (Bnip3 and p53inp1) in Kbtbd5 null skeletal muscle. Consistent with these observations, the cellular apoptosis in Kbtbd5 null mice was increased. Breeding of Kbtbd5 null mouse into the E2F1 null background rescues the lethal phenotype of the Kbtbd5 null mice but not the growth defect. The expression of Bnip3 and p53inp1 in Kbtbd5 mutant skeletal muscle are also restored to control levels in the E2F1 null background. In summary, our studies demonstrate that Kbtbd5 regulates skeletal muscle myogenesis through the regulation of E2F1-DP1 activity. PMID:25940086

  17. Molecular Analysis of Alternative Transcripts of the Equine Cordon-Bleu WH2 Repeat Protein-Like 1 (COBLL1) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Woong; Jang, Hyun-Jun; Shin, Sangsu; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Nam-Young; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Do, Kyong-Tak; Song, Ki-Duk; Cho, Byung-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the alternative splicing in equine cordon-bleu WH2 repeat protein-like 1 (COBLL1) gene that was identified in horse muscle and blood leukocytes, and to predict functional consequences of alternative splicing by bioinformatics analysis. In a previous study, RNA-seq analysis predicted the presence of alternative spliced isoforms of equine COBLL1, namely COBLL1a as a long form and COBLL1b as a short form. In this study, we validated two isoforms of COBLL1 transcripts in horse tissues by the real-time polymerase chain reaction, and cloned them for Sanger sequencing. The sequencing results showed that the alternative splicing occurs at exon 9. Prediction of protein structure of these isoforms revealed three putative phosphorylation sites at the amino acid sequences encoded in exon 9, which is deleted in COBLL1b. In expression analysis, it was found that COBLL1b was expressed ubiquitously and equivalently in all the analyzed tissues, whereas COBLL1a showed strong expression in kidney, spinal cord and lung, moderate expression in heart and skeletal muscle, and low expression in thyroid and colon. In muscle, both COBLL1a and COBLL1b expression decreased after exercise. It is assumed that the regulation of COBLL1 expression may be important for regulating glucose level or switching of energy source, possibly through an insulin signaling pathway, in muscle after exercise. Further study is warranted to reveal the functional importance of COBLL1 on athletic performance in race horses. PMID:25925064

  18. Role of protein kinase A in tax transactivation of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Kadison, P; Poteat, H T; Klein, K M; Faller, D V

    1990-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat (LTR) is inducible both by the retroviral tax gene product and by cyclic AMP in the murine thymoma S49 cell line. The cis-acting sequences that control transcriptional induction by tax and by cyclic AMP are in close proximity within the HTLV-I promoter. By using a protein kinase A (PKA)-deficient S49 mutant cell line, the response of the viral promoter to cyclic AMP was shown to depend on PKA, whereas the response to tax did not require the activity of this enzyme. Transactivation of the HTLV-I LTR by tax, however, decreased in PKA-deficient and adenylate cyclase-deficient cells. The evidence presented supports largely independent mechanisms of promoter induction by cyclic AMP and tax but also suggests a role for PKA-mediated phosphorylation in the regulation of HTLV-I LTR-driven gene expression by tax. Images PMID:2157876

  19. Sequence-specific interaction of the Ets1 protein with the long terminal repeat of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Gitlin, S D; Bosselut, R; Gégonne, A; Ghysdael, J; Brady, J N

    1991-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that members of the c-ets proto-oncogene family, Ets1 and Ets2, are sequence-specific transcriptional activators of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat (LTR). We now report that the HTLV-I LTR contains two distinct Ets1-responsive regions, ERR-1 and ERR-2. Expression of Ets1 with reporter plasmids containing ERR-1 or ERR-2 upstream of a basal promoter resulted in an increase in transcriptional activity. By gel mobility shift assay, the interaction of Ets1 with the downstream ERR-1-binding region was found to be more stable than its interaction with the upstream ERR-2 region. By DNase I footprint, gel mobility shift, and methylation interference analyses, ERR-1 was found to contain two Ets1 binding sites, ERE-A and ERE-B. A recombinant Ets1 protein was found to bind with higher affinity to ERE-A than to ERE-B. Binding of Ets1 to these sites appears to result in a specific and sequential protection of a 37-nucleotide sequence of the HTLV-I LTR from -154 to -118. In view of the high-level expression of Ets1 in lymphoid cells, the c-ets proto-oncogenes encode transcription factors which could play an important role in both basal and Tax1-mediated HTLV-I transcription. Images PMID:1895400

  20. Comparison of leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 expression in different cancer and normal cell lines

    PubMed Central

    ALIZADEH-NAVAEI, REZA; RAFIEI, ALIREZA; ABEDIAN-KENARI, SAEID; ASGARIAN-OMRAN, HOSSEIN; VALADAN, REZA; HEDAYATIZADEH-OMRAN, AKBAR

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the expression of leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5) may be useful for predicting the best models and achieving more accurate results in cancer research. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze the LGR5 expression levels in different cell lines. Eight commonly used cell lines were assessed (COS-7, NIH3T3, HEK293, VERO, HeLa, BHK, HepG2 and AGS). All the cell lines were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium contain 10% fetal calf serum at 37°C in humidified conditions with 5% CO2. According to the western blotting results, LGR5 was expressed in all cell lines. Densitometry results of LGR5 expression in the different cell lines showed that high LGR5 expression levels were apparent in BHK, AGS, VERO and NIH3T3 cell lines compared with the other cell lines. The results indicate that for the normal and cancer cell lines, BNK and AGS may be a better choice, respectively, for in vitro cancer studies. PMID:27347416

  1. Repeated administration of AC-5216, a ligand for the 18 kDa translocator protein, improves behavioral deficits in a mouse model of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Zhang, Li-Ming; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, You-Zhi; Liu, Yan-Qin; Mi, Tian-Yue; Zhou, Wen-Wen; Li, Yang; Yang, Ri-Fang; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Li, Yun-Feng

    2013-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severely disabling anxiety disorder that may occur following exposure to a serious traumatic event. It is a psychiatric condition that can afflict anyone who has experienced a life-threatening or violent event. Previous studies have shown that changes in 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) expression (or function), a promising target for treating neurological disorders without benzodiazepine-like side effects, may correlate with PTSD. However, few studies have investigated the anti-PTSD effects of TSPO ligands. AC-5216, a ligand for TSPO, induces anxiolytic- and anti-depressant-like effects in animal models. The present study aimed to determine whether AC-5216 ameliorates PTSD behavior in mice. Following the training session consisting of exposure to inescapable electric foot shocks, animals were administered AC-5216 daily during the behavioral assessments, i.e., situational reminders (SRs), the open field (OF) test, the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test, and the staircase test (ST). The results indicated that exposure to foot shocks induced long-term behavioral deficiencies in the mice, including freezing and anxiety-like behavior, which were significantly ameliorated by repeated treatment with AC-5216 but without any effect on spontaneous locomotor activity or body weight. In summary, this study demonstrated the anti-PTSD effects of AC-5216 treatment, suggesting that TSPO may represent a therapeutic target for anti-PTSD drug discovery and that TSPO ligands may be a promising new class of drugs for the future treatment of PTSD.

  2. Structural and biochemical analysis of nuclease domain of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein 3 (Cas3).

    PubMed

    Mulepati, Sabin; Bailey, Scott

    2011-09-01

    RNA transcribed from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) protects many prokaryotes from invasion by foreign DNA such as viruses, conjugative plasmids, and transposable elements. Cas3 (CRISPR-associated protein 3) is essential for this CRISPR protection and is thought to mediate cleavage of the foreign DNA through its N-terminal histidine-aspartate (HD) domain. We report here the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the HD domain of Cas3 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Structural and biochemical studies predict that this enzyme binds two metal ions at its active site. We also demonstrate that the single-stranded DNA endonuclease activity of this T. thermophilus domain is activated not by magnesium but by transition metal ions such as manganese and nickel. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirms the importance of the metal-binding residues for the nuclease activity and identifies other active site residues. Overall, these results provide a framework for understanding the role of Cas3 in the CRISPR system.

  3. Suppression among alleles encoding nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat resistance proteins interferes with resistance in F1 hybrid and allele-pyramided wheat plants.

    PubMed

    Stirnweis, Daniel; Milani, Samira D; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Buchmann, Gabriele; Peditto, David; Jordan, Tina; Keller, Beat

    2014-09-01

    The development of high-yielding varieties with broad-spectrum durable disease resistance is the ultimate goal of crop breeding. In plants, immune receptors of the nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) class mediate race-specific resistance against pathogen attack. When employed in agriculture this type of resistance is often rapidly overcome by newly adapted pathogen races. The stacking of different resistance genes or alleles in F1 hybrids or in pyramided lines is a promising strategy for achieving more durable resistance. Here, we identify a molecular mechanism which can negatively interfere with the allele-pyramiding approach. We show that pairwise combinations of different alleles of the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm3 in F1 hybrids and stacked transgenic wheat lines can result in suppression of Pm3-based resistance. This effect is independent of the genetic background and solely dependent on the Pm3 alleles. Suppression occurs at the post-translational level, as levels of RNA and protein in the suppressed alleles are unaffected. Using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana, the LRR domain was identified as the domain conferring suppression. The results of this study suggest that the expression of closely related NB-LRR resistance genes or alleles in the same genotype can lead to dominant-negative interactions. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the frequently observed ineffectiveness of resistance genes introduced from the secondary gene pool into polyploid crop species and mark an important step in overcoming this limitation.

  4. Early repeated administration of progesterone improves the recovery of neuropathic pain and modulates spinal 18kDa-translocator protein (TSPO) expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Weiyan; Dai, Lihua; Zhang, Tingting; Xia, Weiliang; Liu, Hongjun; Ma, Ke; Xu, Jianguo; Jin, Yi

    2014-09-01

    Although progesterone was reported to be a neuroprotective agent against injuries to the nervous system, including the peripheral neuropathy, the mechanisms of its dose or timing-related effects remain unclear. Translocator protein (TSPO) is predominantly located in the mitochondrial outer membrane and has been recently implicated in modulation of several brain injuries and nociception. This experiment was conducted using a rat model of L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) to observe the effects of progesterone against allodynia development in an 84-day period and to explore the spinal TSPO expression after treatment. Our results demonstrated that a 10-day progesterone treatment started right after injury at a dose of 15 mg/kg/d or more could significantly increase the mechanical thresholds within the 84-day observation period. Moreover, increased TSPO expression was observed in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn after SNL surgery and reached its peak on Day 14. A treatment regimen of pharmacological progesterone augmented this spinal TSPO activation and expression before Day 28 and after Day 56. Both the anti-nociception and TSPO activation augment effect of progesterone were completely abolished by 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride but not progesterone receptor antagonist mifepristone. These results indicate that early repeated administration of progesterone could improve the recovery of neuropathic pain and modulate spinal TSPO activation which were dependent on its 5α-reductase metabolites.

  5. Cloning and identification of a cDNA that encodes a novel human protein with thrombospondin type I repeat domain, hPWTSR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Zhong; Wang, Shu; Tang, Rong; Yang, Quan-Sheng; Zhao, Enpeng; Chao, Yaoqiong; Ying, Kang; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yu-Min

    2002-09-01

    A cDNA was isolated from the fetal brain cDNA library by high throughput cDNA sequencing. The 2390 bp cDNA with an open reading fragment (ORF) of 816 bp encodes a 272 amino acids putative protein with a thrombospondin type I repeat (TSR) domain and a cysteine-rich region at the N-terminus, so it is named hPWTSR. We used Northern blot detected two bands with length of about 3 kb and 4 kb respectively, which expressed in human adult tissues with different intensities. The expression pattern was verified by RT-PCR, revealing that the transcripts were expressed ubiquitously in fetal tissues and human tumor tissues too. However, the transcript was detected neither in ovarian carcinoma GI-102 nor in lung carcinoma LX-1. Blast analysis against NCBI database revealed that the new gene contained at least 5 exons and located in human chromosome 6q22.33. Our results demonstrate that the gene is a novel member of TSR supergene family.

  6. Genetic analysis of the leucine-rich repeat and lg domain containing Nogo receptor-interacting protein 1 gene in essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Song, Zhi; Deng, Xiong; Xu, Hongbo; Zhu, Anding; Zheng, Wen; Zhao, Yongxiang; Deng, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Variants in the leucine-rich repeat and lg domain containing nogo receptor-interacting protein 1 gene (LINGO1) have been identified to be associated with the increased risk of essential tremor (ET), especially among Caucasians. To explore whether the LINGO1 gene plays a role in ET susceptibility, we performed a systematic genetic analysis of the coding region in the LINGO1 gene. Four nucleotide variants have been genotyped, including three known variants (rs2271398, rs2271397, and rs3743481), and a novel G → C transition (ss491228439). Extended analysis showed no significant difference in genotypic and allelic distributions between 151 patients and 301 control subjects for these four variants (all P > 0.05). However, further sex-stratified analysis revealed that the C allele of rs2271397 and ss491228439 contributed the risk of ET in female (P = 0.017, OR = 2.139, 95 % CI 1.135 ~ 4.030 for rs2271397 and P = 0.038, OR = 1.812, 95 % CI 1.027 ~ 3.194 for ss491228439). Haplotype analysis indicated that A465-C474-C714 haplotype was significantly associated with increased risk of ET in female (P = 0.041, OR = 1.800, 95 % CI 1.020 ~ 3.178). Our results indicate that the LINGO1 variants are associated with ET in Chinese Han female patients.

  7. The GIY-YIG Type Endonuclease Ankyrin Repeat and LEM Domain-Containing Protein 1 (ANKLE1) Is Dispensable for Mouse Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Juliane; Meixner, Arabella; Brachner, Andreas; Foisner, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat and LEM-domain containing protein 1 (ANKLE1) is a GIY-YIG endonuclease with unknown functions, mainly expressed in mouse hematopoietic tissues. To test its potential role in hematopoiesis we generated Ankle1-deficient mice. Ankle1Δ/Δ mice are viable without any detectable phenotype in hematopoiesis. Neither hematopoietic progenitor cells, myeloid and lymphoid progenitors, nor B and T cell development in bone marrow, spleen and thymus, are affected in Ankle1Δ/Δ-mice. Similarly embryonic stress erythropoiesis in liver and adult erythropoiesis in bone marrow and spleen appear normal. To test whether ANKLE1, like the only other known GIY-YIG endonuclease in mammals, SLX1, may contribute to Holliday junction resolution during DNA repair, Ankle1-deficient cells were exposed to various DNA-damage inducing agents. However, lack of Ankle1 did not affect cell viability and, unlike depletion of Slx1, Ankle1-deficiency did not increase sister chromatid exchange in Bloom helicase-depleted cells. Altogether, we show that lack of Ankle1 does neither affect mouse hematopoiesis nor DNA damage repair in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, indicating a redundant or non-essential function of ANKLE1 in mouse. PMID:27010503

  8. Too much love, a novel Kelch repeat-containing F-box protein, functions in the long-distance regulation of the legume-Rhizobium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Masahiro; Magori, Shimpei; Soyano, Takashi; Okamoto, Satoru; Yoshida, Chie; Yano, Koji; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Takeda, Naoya; Suzaki, Takuya; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of legumes with N2-fixing bacteria collectively called rhizobia results in root nodule development. The number of nodules formed is tightly restricted through the systemic negative feedback control by the host called autoregulation of nodulation (AON). Here, we report the characterization and gene identification of TOO MUCH LOVE (TML), a root factor that acts during AON in a model legume Lotus japonicus. In our genetic analyses using another root-regulated hypernodulation mutant, plenty, the tml-1 plenty double mutant showed additive effects on the nodule number, whereas the tml-1 har1-7 double mutant did not, suggesting that TML and PLENTY act in different genetic pathways and that TML and HAR1 act in the same genetic pathway. The systemic suppression of nodule formation by CLE-RS1/RS2 overexpression was not observed in the tml mutant background, indicating that TML acts downstream of CLE-RS1/RS2. The tml-1 Snf2 double mutant developed an excessive number of spontaneous nodules, indicating that TML inhibits nodule organogenesis. Together with the determination of the deleted regions in tml-1/-2/-3, the fine mapping of tml-4 and the next-generation sequencing analysis, we identified a nonsense mutation in the Kelch repeat-containing F-box protein. As the gene knockdown of the candidate drastically increased the number of nodules, we concluded that it should be the causative gene. An expression analysis revealed that TML is a root-specific gene. In addition, the activity of ProTML-GUS was constitutively detected in the root tip and in the nodules/nodule primordia upon rhizobial infection. In conclusion, TML is a root factor acting at the final stage of AON.

  9. Imipramine blue halts head and neck cancer invasion through promoting F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 14-mediated Twist1 degradation.

    PubMed

    Yang, W-H; Su, Y-H; Hsu, W-H; Wang, C-C; Arbiser, J L; Yang, M-H

    2016-05-01

    The unique characteristic of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is that local invasion rather than distant metastasis is the major route for dissemination. Therefore, targeting the locally invasive cancer cells is more important than preventing systemic metastasis in HNSCC and other invasive-predominant cancers. We previously demonstrate a specific mechanism for HNSCC local invasion: the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulator Twist1 represses microRNA let-7i expression, leading to the activation of the small GTPase Rac1 and engendering the mesenchymal-mode movement in three-dimensional (3D) culture. However, targeting the EMT regulator is relatively difficult because of its transcription factor nature and the strategy for confining HNSCC invasion to facilitate local treatment is limited. Imipramine blue (IB) is a newly identified anti-invasive compound that effectively inhibits glioma invasion. Here we demonstrate that in HNSCC cells, a noncytotoxic dose of IB represses mesenchymal-mode migration in two-and-a-half-dimensional/3D culture system. IB suppresses EMT and stemness of HNSCC cells through inhibition of Twist1-mediated let-7i downregulation and Rac1 activation and the EMT signalling. Mechanistically, IB inhibits reactive oxygen species-induced nuclear factor-κB pathway activation. Importantly, IB promotes degradation of the EMT inducer Twist1 by enhancing F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 14 (FBXL14)-mediated polyubiquitination of Twist1. Together, this study demonstrates the potent anti-invasion and EMT-inhibition effect of IB, suggesting the potential of IB in treating local invasion-predominant cancers. PMID:26257063

  10. Natural Variation in Arabidopsis Leads to the Identification of REME1, a Pentatricopeptide Repeat-DYW Protein Controlling the Editing of Mitochondrial Transcripts1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bentolila, Stéphane; Knight, Walter; Hanson, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    In vascular plants, organelle RNAs are edited by C-to-U base modification. Hundreds of mitochondrial C residues are targeted for editing in flowering plants. In this study, we exploited naturally occurring variation in editing extent to identify Required for Efficiency of Mitochondrial Editing1 (REME1), an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) pentatricopeptide repeat protein-encoding gene belonging to the DYW subclass that promotes editing of at least two C residues on different mitochondrial transcripts. Positional cloning identified REME1 unambiguously as the gene controlling editing of nad2-558. Virus-induced gene silencing of REME1 confirmed its role in editing of nad2-558 and allowed us to identify orfX-552 as a second C whose editing is positively controlled by REME1. An unexpected outcome of REME1 silencing was the finding of a number of mitochondrial C targets whose editing extent exhibits a significant and reproducible increase in silenced tissues. That increase was shown to be partly due to the virus inoculation and partly to REME1-specific silencing. Analysis of an insertional T-DNA mutant within the REME1 coding sequence confirmed the findings of the virus-induced gene silencing experiments: decrease in editing extent of nad2-558 and orfX-552 and increase in editing extent of two sites, matR-1771 and rpl5-92. Transgenic complementation of the low-edited accession (Landsberg erecta) restored the editing of nad2-558 and orfX-552 to high-edited accession (Columbia)-type levels or to even higher levels than Columbia. There was no effect of the transgene on editing extent of matR-1771 and rpl5-92. The strategy and tools used in this report can be applied to identify additional genes that affect editing extent in plant mitochondria. PMID:20974892

  11. Ten tandem repeats of {beta}-hCG 109-118 enhance immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of {beta}-hCG C-terminal peptide carried by mycobacterial heat-shock protein HSP65

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yankai; Yan Rong; He Yi; Liu Wentao; Cao Rongyue; Yan Ming; Li Taiming; Liu Jingjing; Wu Jie . E-mail: wu_jie97@yahoo.com.cn

    2006-07-14

    The {beta}-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin ({beta}-hCG) is secreted by many kinds of tumors and it has been used as an ideal target antigen to develop vaccines against tumors. In view of the low immunogenicity of this self-peptide,we designed a method based on isocaudamer technique to repeat tandemly the 10-residue sequence X of {beta}-hCG (109-118), then 10 tandemly repeated copies of the 10-residue sequence combined with {beta}-hCG C-terminal 37 peptides were fused to mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 to construct a fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 as an immunogen. In this study, we examined the effect of the tandem repeats of this 10-residue sequence in eliciting an immune by comparing the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effects of the two immunogens, HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 and HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37 (without the 10 tandem repeats). Immunization of mice with the fusion protein HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 elicited much higher levels of specific anti-{beta}-hCG antibodies and more effectively inhibited the growth of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in vivo than with HSP65-{beta}hCGCTP37, which should suggest that HSP65-X10-{beta}hCGCTP37 may be an effective protein vaccine for the treatment of {beta}-hCG-dependent tumors and multiple tandem repeats of a certain epitope are an efficient method to overcome the low immunogenicity of self-peptide antigens.

  12. The R Region Found in the Human Foamy Virus Long Terminal Repeat Is Critical for both Gag and Pol Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Rebecca A.; Zeng, Yan; Erlwein, Otto; Cullen, Bryan R.; McClure, Myra O.

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that sequences located within the 5′ noncoding region of human foamy virus (HFV) are critical for expression of the viral Gag and Pol structural proteins. Here, we identify a discrete ∼151-nucleotide sequence, located within the R region of the HFV long terminal repeat, that activates HFV Gag and Pol expression when present in the 5′ noncoding region but that is inactive when inverted or when placed in the 3′ noncoding region. Sequences that are critical for the expression of both Gag and Pol include not only the 5′ splice site positioned at +51 in the R region, which is used to generate the spliced pol mRNA, but also intronic R sequences located well 3′ to this splice site. Analysis of total cellular gag and pol mRNA expression demonstrates that deletion of the R region has little effect on gag mRNA levels but that R deletions that would be predicted to leave the pol 5′ splice site intact nevertheless inhibit the production of the spliced pol mRNA. Gag expression can be largely rescued by the introduction of an intron into the 5′ noncoding sequence in place of the R region but not by an intron or any one of several distinct retroviral nuclear RNA export sequences inserted into the mRNA 3′ noncoding sequence. Neither the R element nor the introduced 5′ intron markedly affects the cytoplasmic level of HFV gag mRNA. The poor translational utilization of these cytoplasmic mRNAs when the R region is not present in cis also extended to a cat indicator gene linked to an internal ribosome entry site introduced into the 3′ noncoding region. Together these data imply that the HFV R region acts in the nucleus to modify the cytoplasmic fate of target HFV mRNA. The close similarity between the role of the HFV R region revealed in this study and previous data (M. Butsch, S. Hull, Y. Wang, T. M. Roberts, and K. Boris-Lawrie, J. Virol. 73:4847–4855, 1999) demonstrating a critical role for the R region in activating gene expression in

  13. Spectrin repeat containing nuclear envelope 1 and forkhead box protein E1 are promising markers for the detection of colorectal cancer in blood.

    PubMed

    Melotte, Veerle; Yi, Joo Mi; Lentjes, Marjolein H F M; Smits, Kim M; Van Neste, Leander; Niessen, Hanneke E C; Wouters, Kim A D; Louwagie, Joost; Schuebel, Kornel E; Herman, James G; Baylin, Stephen B; van Criekinge, Wim; Meijer, Gerrit A; Ahuja, Nita; van Engeland, Manon

    2015-02-01

    Identifying biomarkers in body fluids may improve the noninvasive detection of colorectal cancer. Previously, we identified N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 4 (NDRG4) and GATA binding protein 5 (GATA5) methylation as promising biomarkers for colorectal cancer in stool DNA. Here, we examined the utility of NDRG4, GATA5, and two additional markers [Forkhead box protein E1 (FOXE1) and spectrin repeat containing nuclear envelope 1 (SYNE1)] promoter methylation as biomarkers in plasma DNA. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR was performed on plasma DNA from 220 patients with colorectal cancer and 684 noncancer controls, divided in a training set and a test set. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to measure the area under the curve of GATA5, NDRG4, SYNE1, and FOXE1 methylation. Functional assays were performed in SYNE1 and FOXE1 stably transfected cell lines. The sensitivity of NDRG4, GATA5, FOXE1, and SYNE1 methylation in all stages of colorectal cancer (154 cases, 444 controls) was 27% [95% confidence interval (CI), 20%-34%), 18% (95% CI, 12%-24%), 46% (95% CI, 38%-54%), and 47% (95% CI, 39%-55%), with a specificity of 95% (95% CI, 93%-97%), 99% (95% CI, 98%-100%), 93% (95% CI, 91%-95%), and 96% (95% CI, 94%-98%), respectively. Combining SYNE1 and FOXE1, increased the sensitivity to 56% (95% CI, 48%-64%), while the specificity decreased to 90% (95% CI, 87%-93%) in the training set and to 58% sensitivity (95% CI, 46%-70%) and 91% specificity (95% CI, 80%-100%) in a test set (66 cases, 240 controls). SYNE1 overexpression showed no major differences in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion compared with controls. Overexpression of FOXE1 significantly decreased the number of colonies in SW480 and HCT116 cell lines. Overall, our data suggest that SYNE1 and FOXE1 are promising markers for colorectal cancer detection. PMID:25538088

  14. Raw Dough's a Raw Deal and Could Make You Sick

    MedlinePlus

    ... homemade “play” clay? Do you eat at family restaurants that give kids raw dough to play with ... of the recalled flours had been sold to restaurants that allow children to play with dough made ...

  15. Understanding and identifying amino acid repeats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong; Nijveen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    Amino acid repeats (AARs) are abundant in protein sequences. They have particular roles in protein function and evolution. Simple repeat patterns generated by DNA slippage tend to introduce length variations and point mutations in repeat regions. Loss of normal and gain of abnormal function owing to their variable length are potential risks leading to diseases. Repeats with complex patterns mostly refer to the functional domain repeats, such as the well-known leucine-rich repeat and WD repeat, which are frequently involved in protein–protein interaction. They are mainly derived from internal gene duplication events and stabilized by ‘gate-keeper’ residues, which play crucial roles in preventing inter-domain aggregation. AARs are widely distributed in different proteomes across a variety of taxonomic ranges, and especially abundant in eukaryotic proteins. However, their specific evolutionary and functional scenarios are still poorly understood. Identifying AARs in protein sequences is the first step for the further investigation of their biological function and evolutionary mechanism. In principle, this is an NP-hard problem, as most of the repeat fragments are shaped by a series of sophisticated evolutionary events and become latent periodical patterns. It is not possible to define a uniform criterion for detecting and verifying various repeat patterns. Instead, different algorithms based on different strategies have been developed to cope with different repeat patterns. In this review, we attempt to describe the amino acid repeat-detection algorithms currently available and compare their strategies based on an in-depth analysis of the biological significance of protein repeats. PMID:23418055

  16. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  17. The proteins encoded by the pogo-like Lemi1 element bind the TIRs and subterminal repeated motifs of the Arabidopsis Emigrant MITE: consequences for the transposition mechanism of MITEs

    PubMed Central

    Loot, Céline; Santiago, Néstor; Sanz, Alicia; Casacuberta, Josep M.

    2006-01-01

    MITEs (miniature inverted-repeated transposable elements) are a particular class of defective DNA transposons usually present within genomes as high copy number populations of highly homogeneous elements. Although an active MITE, the mPing element, has recently been characterized in rice, the transposition mechanism of MITEs remains unknown. It has been proposed that transposases of related transposons could mobilize MITEs in trans. Moreover, it has also been proposed that the presence of conserved terminal inverted-repeated (TIR) sequences could be the only requirement of MITEs for mobilization, allowing divergent or unrelated elements to be mobilized by a particular transposase. We present here evidence for a recent mobility of the Arabidopsis Emigrant MITE and we report on the capacity of the proteins encoded by the related Lemi1 transposon, a pogo-related element, to specifically bind Emigrant elements. This suggests that Lemi1 could mobilize Emigrant elements and makes the Lemi1/Emigrant couple an ideal system to study the transposition mechanism of MITEs. Our results show that Lemi1 proteins bind Emigrant TIRs but also bind cooperatively to subterminal repeated motifs. The requirement of internal sequences for the formation of proper DNA/protein structure could affect the capacity of divergent MITEs to be mobilized by distantly related transposases. PMID:17003053

  18. A Repeat Look at Repeating Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    A "repeating pattern" is a cyclical repetition of an identifiable core. Children in the primary grades usually begin pattern work with fairly simple patterns, such as AB, ABC, or ABB patterns. The unique letters represent unique elements, whereas the sequence of letters represents the core that is repeated. Based on color, shape,…

  19. Recognition of DNA by ω protein from the broad-host range Streptococcus pyogenes plasmid pSM19035: analysis of binding to operator DNA with one to four heptad repeats

    PubMed Central

    de la Hoz, Ana B.; Pratto, Florencia; Misselwitz, Rolf; Speck, Christian; Weihofen, Wilhelm; Welfle, Karin; Saenger, Wolfram; Welfle, Heinz; Alonso, Juan C.

    2004-01-01

    pSM19035-encoded ω protein forms a dimer (ω2) that binds to a set of 7-bp repeats with sequence 5′-NATCACN-3′. Upon binding to its cognate sites, ω2 regulates transcription of genes required for copy number control and stable inheritance of plasmids, and promotes accurate plasmid segregation. Protein ω2 binds poorly to one heptad but the affinity to DNA increases with two and more unspaced heptads in direct or inverted orientation. DNA titration of increasing numbers of heptads with ω2, monitored by circular dichroism measurements, indicates the binding of one ω2 to one heptad (ω2:heptad stoichiometry of 1:1). Spacing of two directly or inversely oriented heptads by 1 to 7 bp reduces the affinity of the protein for its cognate target site. The binding affinity of ω2 for two directly repeated heptads was severely reduced if one of the base pairs of the core 5′-ATCAC-3′ sequence of one of the heptads was individually substituted by any other base pair. Hydroxyl radical footprinting shows a protection pattern at the 5′-ATCAC-3′ core. These data suggest that each heptad defines an operator half-site and that tight binding of the symmetric ω2 to the central 5′-TCA-3′ core of symmetric or asymmetric targets (differently oriented heptads) is probably achieved by structural changes of DNA and/or protein or both. PMID:15190131

  20. Conversion of raw carbonaceous fuels

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.

    2007-08-07

    Three configurations for an electrochemical cell are utilized to generate electric power from the reaction of oxygen or air with porous plates or particulates of carbon, arranged such that waste heat from the electrochemical cells is allowed to flow upwards through a storage chamber or port containing raw carbonaceous fuel. These configurations allow combining the separate processes of devolatilization, pyrolysis and electrochemical conversion of carbon to electric power into a single unit process, fed with raw fuel and exhausting high BTU gases, electric power, and substantially pure CO.sub.2 during operation.

  1. Gastric digestion of raw and roasted almonds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Gail M; Roman, Maxine J; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Burri, Betty J; Moughan, Paul J; Singh, R Paul

    2013-11-01

    Almonds are an important dietary source of lipids, protein, and α-tocopherol. It has been demonstrated that the physical form of almond kernels influences their digestion and absorption, but the role of thermal processes on the digestion of almonds has received little attention. The objectives of this study were to examine the gastric emptying and nutrient composition of gastric chyme from pigs (used as a model for the adult human) fed a single meal of either raw or roasted almonds over a 12-h postprandial period (72 pigs total, 6 pigs at each diet-time combination). Concentrations of glucose, triacylglycerols, and α-tocopherol in peripheral plasma during the 12-h postprandial period were determined. For dry matter and lipid, the gastric emptying profile was not different between raw and roasted almonds. Roasting almonds also did not influence gastric pH, or plasma glucose or triacylglycerols levels. In contrast, the gastric emptying of protein was more rapid for raw almonds compared to roasted almonds (P < 0.01) and intragastric protein content exhibited segregation (P < 0.001) throughout the stomach, with raw almonds having a higher level of segregation compared to roasted almonds. Postprandial plasma α-tocopherol levels were, on average 33% greater (P < 0.001) after consumption of raw almonds, most likely as a result of the higher concentration of α-tocopherol in raw almonds compared to roasted almonds. Roasting of almonds did not influence the overall gastric emptying process, but did lead to differences in the distribution of protein in the stomach and to the gastric emptying of protein.

  2. Raw eggs-moving target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Doug

    1999-09-01

    High school physics students often have difficulty with understanding when and where to use an appropriate calculation to solve a problem. In this activity students have to solve a real problem using formulas they have seen before, but in a context with which they are unfamiliar; namely dropping a raw egg on a moving target-their instructor.

  3. Raw milk consumption and health.

    PubMed

    Vranješ, Anka Popović; Popović, Milka; Jevtić, Marija

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the safe practices of milk pasteurization or sterilization, which effectively reduce foodborne outbreaks incidence associated with raw milk and dairy products use, outbreaks caused by such products continue to occur. Despite this fact, a worldwide movement advocating for the rights of raw milk and cheese selling and consumption, due to their specific nutritive characteristics, has strengthened significantly in recent years. Traditional agricultural manufacturers from Serbia still sell products related to thermally unprocessed milk, such as cottage cheese and raw cream. In AP Vojvodina during the period of 1981-2010 a total of 179 foodborne outbreaks were reported, where the incriminated cause of the outbreak were milk or diary. In 126 (70.39%) outbreaks, totaling 2276 sick individuals and one casualty, it was confirmed that the incriminated food was from the group of dairy products. In 48 instances (26.82%), bacteriological tests confirmed that milk and dairy products were excluded as the outbreak causes, while in another 5 (2.79%) outbreaks, microbiological analysis of food failed to confirm any relation to the actual epidemiological instances. In some cases, bacteriological testing of incriminated foods was not possible. In the cases of outbreaks associated with the consumption of milk and dairy products, traditional raw milk products were cited as being used. Consumption of unpasteurized milk and cheese represents public health threat. National and international rules ensuring use of safe products for human consumption have to set rules of trade of thermally processed milk and products on the market.

  4. Multiple roles of CLAN (caspase-associated recruitment domain, leucine-rich repeat, and NAIP CIIA HET-E, and TP1-containing protein) in the mammalian innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Jason S; Newman, Ruchi M; Reed, John C

    2004-11-15

    NAIP CIIA HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) family proteins are involved in sensing intracellular pathogens or pathogen-derived molecules, triggering host defense responses resulting in caspase-mediated processing of proinflammatory cytokines and NF-kappaB activation. Caspase-associated recruitment domain, leucine-rich repeat, and NACHT-containing protein (CLAN), also known as ICE protease-activating factor, belongs to a branch of the NACHT family that contains proteins carrying caspase-associated recruitment domains (CARDs) and leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). By using gene transfer and RNA-interference approaches, we demonstrate in this study that CLAN modulates endogenous caspase-1 activation and subsequent IL-1beta secretion from human macrophages after exposure to LPS, peptidoglycan, and pathogenic bacteria. CLAN was also found to mediate a direct antibacterial effect within macrophages after Salmonella infection and to sensitize host cells to Salmonella-induced cell death through a caspase-1-independent mechanism. These results indicate that CLAN contributes to several biological processes central to host defense, suggesting a prominent role for this NACHT family member in innate immunity.

  5. Prion extraction methods: comparison of bead beating, ultrasonic disruption and repeated freeze-thaw methodologies for the recovery of functional renilla-prion fusion protein from bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular DNA technology allows for production of mammalian proteins in bacteria at sufficient quantities for downstream use and analysis. Variation in design and engineering of DNA expression vectors imparts selective alterations resulting in the generation of fusion proteins with intrinsic report...

  6. GsLRPK, a novel cold-activated leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase from Glycine soja, is a positive regulator to cold stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Wu, Kangcheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Guangpu; Wu, Zujian

    2014-02-01

    Plant LRR-RLKs serve as protein interaction platforms, and as regulatory modules of protein activation. Here, we report the isolation of a novel plant-specific LRR-RLK from Glycine soja (termed GsLRPK) by differential screening. GsLRPK expression was cold-inducible and shows Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsLRPK is localized in the plasma membrane. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that temperature, salt, drought, and ABA treatment can alter GsLRPK gene transcription in G. soja. However, just protein induced by cold stress not by salinity and ABA treatment in tobacco was found to possess kinase activity. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of GsLRPK in yeast and Arabidopsis can enhance resistance to cold stress and increase the expression of a number of cold responsive gene markers.

  7. DMR1 (CCM1/YGR150C) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an RNA-binding protein from the pentatricopeptide repeat family required for the maintenance of the mitochondrial 15S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Puchta, Olga; Lubas, Michal; Lipinski, Kamil A; Piatkowski, Jakub; Malecki, Michal; Golik, Pawel

    2010-04-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form the largest known RNA-binding protein family and are found in all eukaryotes, being particularly abundant in higher plants. PPR proteins localize mostly in mitochondria and chloroplasts, where they modulate organellar genome expression on the post-transcriptional level. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DMR1 (CCM1, YGR150C) encodes a PPR protein that localizes to mitochondria. Deletion of DMR1 results in a complete and irreversible loss of respiratory capacity and loss of wild-type mtDNA by conversion to rho(-)/rho(0) petites, regardless of the presence of introns in mtDNA. The phenotype of the dmr1Delta mitochondria is characterized by fragmentation of the small subunit mitochondrial rRNA (15S rRNA), that can be reversed by wild-type Dmr1p. Other mitochondrial transcripts, including the large subunit mitochondrial rRNA (21S rRNA), are not affected by the lack of Dmr1p. The purified Dmr1 protein specifically binds to different regions of 15S rRNA in vitro, consistent with the deletion phenotype. Dmr1p is therefore the first yeast PPR protein, which has an rRNA target and is probably involved in the biogenesis of mitochondrial ribosomes and translation.

  8. The C-terminal RG dipeptide repeats of the spliceosomal Sm proteins D1 and D3 contain symmetrical dimethylarginines, which form a major B-cell epitope for anti-Sm autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Brahms, H; Raymackers, J; Union, A; de Keyser, F; Meheus, L; Lührmann, R

    2000-06-01

    The Sm proteins B/B', D1, D2, D3, E, F, and G are components of the small nuclear ribonucleoproteins U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5 that are essential for the splicing of pre-mRNAs in eukaryotes. D1 and D3 are among the most common antigens recognized by anti-Sm autoantibodies, an autoantibody population found exclusively in patients afflicted with systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we demonstrate by protein sequencing and mass spectrometry that all arginines in the C-terminal arginine-glycine (RG) dipeptide repeats of the human Sm proteins D1 and D3, isolated from HeLa small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, contain symmetrical dimethylarginines (sDMAs), a posttranslational modification thus far only identified in the myelin basic protein. The further finding that human D1 individually overexpressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells contains asymmetrical dimethylarginines suggests that the symmetrical dimethylation of the RG repeats in D1 and D3 is dependent on the assembly status of D1 and D3. In antibody binding studies, 10 of 11 anti-Sm patient sera tested, as well as the monoclonal antibody Y12, reacted with a chemically synthesized C-terminal peptide of D1 containing sDMA, but not with peptides containing asymmetrically modified or nonmodified arginines. These results thus demonstrate that the sDMA-modified C terminus of D1 forms a major linear epitope for