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Sample records for ray current-driven instability

  1. Current-driven plasma instabilities in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kempa, K.; Cen, J.; Bakshi, P.

    1989-02-01

    We examine here the possibility of current-driven plasma instabilities in superconductors in two temperature regimes. At low temperatures (Tapprox. =0) an instability can be generated in a layered system. Near the critical temperature (Tapprox. =T/sub c/) an instability can occur in a single superconductor for sufficiently large drifts which might be achievable in the new high-T/sub c/ materials. These instabilities offer possibilities for new radiation-source device applications.

  2. Gyrokinetic simulation of current-driven instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenaghan, Joseph

    The gyrokinetic toroidal code(GTC) capability has been extended for simulating current-driven instabilities in magnetized plasmas such as kink and resistive tearing modes with kinetic effects. This new gyrokinetic capability enables first-principles, integrated simulations of macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic(MHD) modes, which limit the performance of burning plasmas and threaten the integrity of fusion devices. The excitation and evolution of macroscopic MHD modes often depend on the kinetic effects at microscopic scales and the nonlinear coupling of multiple physical processes. GTC simulation in the fluid limit of the internal kink modes in cylindrical geometry has been verified by benchmarking with an MHD eigenvalue code. The global simulation domain covers the magnetic axis which is necessary for simulating the macroscopic MHD modes. Gyrokinetic simulations of the internal kink modes in the toroidal geometry find that ion kinetic effects significantly reduce the growth rate even when the banana orbit width is much smaller than the radial width of the perturbed current layer at the mode rational surface. This new GTC capability for current-driven instability has now been extended to simulate fishbone instabilities excited by energetic particles and resistive tearing modes. GTC has also been applied to study the internal kink modes in astrophysical jets that are formed around supermassive black holes. Linear simulations find that the internal kink modes in astrophysical jets are unstable with a broad eigenmode. Nonlinear saturation amplitude of these kink modes is observed to be small, suggesting that the jets can remain collimated even in the presence of the internal kink modes. Generation of a mean parallel electric field by the nonlinear dynamics of internal kink modes and the potential implication of this field on particle acceleration in jets has been examined.

  3. Current-Driven Instabilities and Coronal Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven

    2008-11-01

    Radioastronomical observations of the solar corona have yielded measurements consistent with coronal currents ˜2.5 x10^9 Amperes inside an Amperian Loop with a width of about 35,000 km (Spangler, Astrophysical Journal, 670, 841, 2007). An estimate has been made of the coronal heating due to Joule heating by these currents. It is assumed that the current is concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of MHD turbulence. If the Joule heating is to be astrophysically significant, the resistivity in the corona must be enhanced by about 6 orders of magnitude relative to the Spitzer value. In this paper, I explore the possibility that instabilities produced by these currents could be responsible for generating waves and turbulence which raise the resistivity to significant levels. Model-dependent calculations of the electron drift speed in the current sheets indicate that speeds of order the electron thermal speed are possible. Current-driven instabilities and their associated waves are therefore feasible. These drift speeds also exceed the ion acoustic speed, which would excite lower hybrid waves and enhance the resistivity.

  4. Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Chuang

    2013-02-13

    This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flow-driven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

  5. Current driven instabilities of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chouetri, E. Y.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    A plasma instability that strongly influences the efficiency and lifetime of electromagnetic plasma accelerators was quantitatively measured. Experimental measurements of dispersion relations (wave phase velocities), spatial growth rates, and stability boundaries are reported. The measured critical wave parameters are in excellent agreement with theoretical instability boundary predictions. The instability is current driven and affects a wide spectrum of longitudinal (electrostatic) oscillations. Current driven instabilities, which are intrinsic to the high-current-carrying magnetized plasma of the magnetoplasmadynmic (MPD) accelerator, were investigated with a kinetic theoretical model based on first principles. Analytical limits of the appropriate dispersion relation yield unstable ion acoustic waves for T(i)/T(e) much less than 1 and electron acoustic waves for T(i)/T(e) much greater than 1. The resulting set of nonlinear equations for the case of T(i)/T(e) = 1, of most interest to the MPD thruster Plasma Wave Experiment, was numerically solved to yield a multiparameter set of stability boundaries. Under certain conditions, marginally stable waves traveling almost perpendicular to the magnetic field would travel at a velocity equal to that of the electron current. Such waves were termed current waves. Unstable current waves near the upper stability boundary were observed experimentally and are in accordance with theoretical predictions. This provides unambiguous proof of the existence of such instabilites in electromagnetic plasma accelerators.

  6. Sheared Buneman Instabilities in Current-Driven Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Sen, N.

    2005-05-01

    Simulation studies of magnetic reconnection in strongly magnetized plasmas1 have indicated that electron phase-space holes evolve out of current-driven Buneman instabilities and that these holes play an important role in supplying the needed dissipation in the reconnection process by acting as electron scattering centers. Drake and collaborators have shown in simulations that the evolution of electron holes is mediated by lower hybrid waves. We have shown independently, via 2-D simulations of the evolution of Buneman instabilities, that electron phase space holes evolve and interact with lower hybrid waves in a manner similar to that seen in the reconnection simulations2 Perpendicular shear in the parallel velocity and the current will be present near the edges and elsewhere in realistic current sheets associated with magnetic reconnection. We have studied the effects of such shear on the nature and evolution of Buneman instabilities and the resulting electron phase space holes. Both linear theory and 2-D Vlasov simulations are employed. It is shown that even a small amount of velocity shear can have a large effect on the nonlinear evolution of holes and lower hybrid waves. 1Drake, J. F., M. Swisdak, C. Cattell, M. A. Shay, B. N. Rogers, and A.~Zeiler, Formation of Electron Holes and Particle Energization During Magnetic Reconnection, Science, 299, (2003). 2Martin V. Goldman, D. L. Newman, A. Mangeney, F. Califano, Theory and Simulation of Sheared Electron Beam Instabilities in Strongly Magnetized Plasmas, COSPAR04-A-02395; D3.5-0015-04, 35th COSPAR Scientific Assembly Paris, France, 18 - 25 July 2004. This research was supported by DOE, NSF and NASA.

  7. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  8. Off-equatorial current-driven instabilities ahead of approaching dipolarization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Angelopoulos, V.; Pritchett, P. L.; Liu, Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Recent kinetic simulations have revealed that electromagnetic instabilities near the ion gyrofrequency and slightly away from the equatorial plane can be driven by a current parallel to the magnetic field prior to the arrival of dipolarization fronts. Such instabilities are important because of their potential contribution to global electromagnetic energy conversion near dipolarization fronts. Of the several instabilities that may be consistent with such waves, the most notable are the current-driven electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability and the current-driven kink-like instability. To confirm the existence and characteristics of these instabilities, we used observations by two Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms satellites, one near the neutral sheet observing dipolarization fronts and the other at the boundary layer observing precursor waves and currents. We found that such instabilities with monochromatic signatures are rare, but one of the few cases was selected for further study. Two different instabilities, one at about 0.3 Hz and the other at a much lower frequency, 0.02 Hz, were seen in the data from the off-equatorial spacecraft. A parallel current attributed to an electron beam coexisted with the waves. Our instability analysis attributes the higher-frequency instability to a current-driven ion cyclotron instability and the lower frequency instability to a kink-like instability. The current-driven kink-like instability we observed is consistent with the instabilities observed in the simulation. We suggest that the currents needed to excite these low-frequency instabilities are so intense that the associated electron beams are easily thermalized and hence difficult to observe.

  9. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Current-Driven Instability. 1; Instability of a Static Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic MHD simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the non-linear regime the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depends moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and the non-linear regime is reached at a later time than for constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the non-linear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the non-linear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  10. Filamentation instability of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-12-15

    The filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range have been studied using the Lorentz transformation formulas. Based on the kinetic theory, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate as well as the ion acoustic instability have been investigated. The results of the research show that the possibility and growth rate of these instabilities are significantly dependent on the electron nonextensive parameter and drift velocity. Besides, the increase of electrons nonextensive parameter and drift velocity lead to the increase of the growth rates of both instabilities. In addition, the wavelength region in which the filamentation instability occurs is more stretched in the presence of higher values of drift velocity and nonextensive parameter. Finally, the results of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities have been compared and the conditions for filamentation instability to be dominant mode of instability have been presented.

  11. Filamental quenching of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, S.L.; D'Angelo, N.; Krumm, P.H.; Merlino, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented on the effect of the finite width of the current channel for the excitation of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability. The results are in agreement with the nonlocal theory of Bakshi, Ganguli, and Palmadesso.

  12. Filamental quenching of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, S.L.; D'Angelo, N.; Krumm, P.H.; Merlino, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental evidence is presented on the effect of the finite width of the current channel for the excitation of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability. The results are in agreement with the non-local theory of Bakshi, Ganguli, and Palmadesso.

  13. Nonlocal aspects of electrostatic current-driven ion cyclotron instability due to magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.

    1982-10-01

    The effect of the magnetic shear on the current-driven ion cyclotron instability has been studied. Taking into account the asymmetry introduced by the external current, an analytical theory to study the nonlocal behavior of this instability is given. The main consequences of the magnetic shear are to (i) localize the instability in space and (ii) reduce the growth rates in general. The damping influence of shear arises in two distinct ways; (a) a damping rate directly proportional to the shear strength, and (b) a damping rate (due to the nonlocal nature of the dispersion relation) not explicitly dependent on shear which can be quite strong for above marginal currents. Shear makes this instability more coherent by reducing the band of the perpendicular wavelengths which is unstable. The general physics of this instability and the parametric dependences of the growth rates are studied and marginal stability curves given.

  14. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. III. ROTATING RELATIVISTIC JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2012-09-20

    We have investigated the influence of jet rotation and differential motion on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria via three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box. Displacement of the initial helical magnetic field leads to the growth of the CD kink instability. We find that, in accordance with the linear stability theory, the development of the instability depends on the lateral distribution of the poloidal magnetic field. If the poloidal field significantly decreases outward from the axis, then the initial small perturbations grow strongly, and if multiple wavelengths are excited, then nonlinear interaction eventually disrupts the initial cylindrical configuration. When the profile of the poloidal field is shallow, the instability develops slowly and eventually saturates. We briefly discuss implications of our findings for Poynting-dominated jets.

  15. Current-driven magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in sheared fields. [of solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Rosner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions are sought for the dispersion relation for the MHD stability of magnetized medium in current-driven filamentation modes such as those observed in the solar atmosphere. The magnetic field is assumed to have a self-consistent sheared equilibrium structure. The analysis is carried out in the small wavenumber regime, where shear length is similar to the mode wavelength. Instability is found to depend on the ratio between the thermal and magnetic diffusivities, i.e., the Prandtl number, which identifies the unstable transverse wavenumbers. The instability conditions are expressed in an algebraic equation amenable to numerical solution. Results are provided from use of the model to determine the maximum growth rate and typical scale lengths of instabilities in a precoronal atmosphere and the lower transition region.

  16. Filamental quenching of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.; Krumm, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Since their discovery by D'Angelo and Motley (1962), ion-cyclotron waves have been an area of active research. Drummond and Rosenbluth (1962) have first conducted a theoretical analysis of the current-driven ion-cyclotron wave instability, taking into account a uniform, magnetized plasma, without magnetic shear, in which electrons drift along B field lines with the same drift velocity at all points in the plasma. Bakshi et al. (1983) have found conditions for which the instability is completely quenched. This phenomenon has been referred to as filamental quenching. The present investigation is concerned with a systematic test of the filamental quenching effect. It is found that filamental quenching operates at widths of the current channel comparable to the local Larmor radius, in agreement with the conclusions of Bakshi et al.

  17. Filamental quenching of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartier, S. L.; Dangelo, N.; Merlino, R. L.; Krumm, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Since their discovery by D'Angelo and Motley (1962), ion-cyclotron waves have been an area of active research. Drummond and Rosenbluth (1962) have first conducted a theoretical analysis of the current-driven ion-cyclotron wave instability, taking into account a uniform, magnetized plasma, without magnetic shear, in which electrons drift along B field lines with the same drift velocity at all points in the plasma. Bakshi et al. (1983) have found conditions for which the instability is completely quenched. This phenomenon has been referred to as filamental quenching. The present investigation is concerned with a systematic test of the filamental quenching effect. It is found that filamental quenching operates at widths of the current channel comparable to the local Larmor radius, in agreement with the conclusions of Bakshi et al.

  18. Nonlocal effects on the convective properties of the electrostatic current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    The convective behavior of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability (CDICI) in the presence of nonlocal magnetic-shear and current-channel-width effects is investigated theoretically using the analytical approach of Bakshi et al. (1983). The results are presented in graphs and discussed. Three different CDICI regimes defined by the ratio of the channel width to the shear length are obtained: a purely nonlocal regime with reduced temporal growth rate and group velocity in the z direction going to zero (ratios greater than about 0.1); a regime corresponding to the results of local theory (ratios less than 0.01); and a regime characterized by decreasing temporal growth rate and by z and y group velocities which become negative when the channel width becomes less than the mean ion Larmor radius (ratios 0.001 or less).

  19. Nonlocal effects on the convective properties of the electrostatic current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-08-01

    The convective behavior of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability (CDICI) in the presence of nonlocal magnetic-shear and current-channel-width effects is investigated theoretically using the analytical approach of Bakshi et al. (1983). The results are presented in graphs and discussed. Three different CDICI regimes defined by the ratio of the channel width to the shear length are obtained: a purely nonlocal regime with reduced temporal growth rate and group velocity in the z direction going to zero (ratios greater than about 0.1); a regime corresponding to the results of local theory (ratios less than 0.01); and a regime characterized by decreasing temporal growth rate and by z and y group velocities which become negative when the channel width becomes less than the mean ion Larmor radius (ratios 0.001 or less).

  20. Nonlocal effects on the convective properties of the electrostatic current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-01-01

    The convective behavior of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability (CDICI) in the presence of nonlocal magnetic-shear and current-channel-width effects is investigated theoretically using the analytical approach of Bakshi et al. (1983). The results are presented in graphs and discussed. Three different CDICI regimes defined by the ratio of the channel width to the shear length are obtained: a purely nonlocal regime with reduced temporal growth rate and group velocity in the z direction going to zero (ratios greater than about 0.1); a regime corresponding to the results of local theory (ratios less than 0.01); and a regime characterized by decreasing temporal growth rate and by z and y group velocities which become negative when the channel width becomes less than the mean ion Larmor radius (ratios 0.001 or less).

  1. The Current Driven Kink Instability and its Relationship to Delta-Spot Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, Mark George

    The current driven kink instability may be the cause of both the unusual morphology of solar δ-spot active regions and the tendency of these regions to be significantly more flare active than most active regions. We investigate the current driven kink instability of flux tubes in the solar interior both with a linear stability analysis and with nonlinear MHD simulations. The linear analysis shows that there is a critical twist, which depends on the axial magnetic field profile, that a flux tube needs to become kink unstable. This critical twist decreases as the tube expands, so twisted flux tubes will become increasingly unstable as they rise through the convection zone. The nonlinear simulations show that a twisted tube excited by a single unstable kink mode will evolve to a helical equilibrium state. The emergence through the photosphere of such a kinked tube would create an active region which was tilted with respect to Hale's law and which would rotate as it evolved, as δ-spots are observed to do. We then find that, when excited by multiple unstable kink modes, highly twisted flux tubes develop concentrated kinks. These concentrated kinks would produce more of the observed characteristics of δ-spot active regions. They would create active regions which, in addition to emerging tilted and then rotating, would remain compact as they evolved, and develop strong shear along their magnetic neutral line. Finally, we find that a strong concentrated kink develops a current sheet at which the magnetic field reconnects, which may be the cause of the high flare activity of δ-spots.

  2. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY. I. INSTABILITY OF A STATIC COLUMN

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Hardee, Philip E.

    2009-07-20

    We have investigated the development of current-driven (CD) kink instability through three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. A static force-free equilibrium helical magnetic configuration is considered in order to study the influence of the initial configuration on the linear and nonlinear evolution of the instability. We found that the initial configuration is strongly distorted but not disrupted by the kink instability. The instability develops as predicted by linear theory. In the nonlinear regime, the kink amplitude continues to increase up to the terminal simulation time, albeit at different rates, for all but one simulation. The growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the CD kink instability depend moderately on the density profile and strongly on the magnetic pitch profile. The growth rate of the kink mode is reduced in the linear regime by an increase in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the nonlinear regime at a later time than the case with constant helical pitch. On the other hand, the growth rate of the kink mode is increased in the linear regime by a decrease in the magnetic pitch with radius and reaches the nonlinear regime sooner than the case with constant magnetic pitch. Kink amplitude growth in the nonlinear regime for decreasing magnetic pitch leads to a slender helically twisted column wrapped by magnetic field. On the other hand, kink amplitude growth in the nonlinear regime nearly ceases for increasing magnetic pitch.

  3. Nonlocal effects on the convective properties of the electrostatic current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, G.; Bakshi, P.; Palmadesso, P.

    1984-08-01

    Nonlocal effects due to magnetic shear and finite current channel width on the convective characteristics of the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability have been investigated. When the magnetic shear length (L/sub s/) is smaller than the current channel width (L/sub c/), the group velocity parallel to the external magnetic field at the origin (V/sub g/z) vanishes, and there is a reduction in the group velocity perpendicular to the external magnetic field (V/sub g/y). For L/sub c/approx.10/sup -2/ L/sub s/ the values of V/sub g/z and V/sub g/y as given by local theory are recovered. When L/sub c/< or approx. =rho/sub i/, where rho/sub i/ is the mean ion Larmor radius, both V/sub g/z and V/sub g/y change sign, indicating a reversal of the direction of propagation.

  4. Current-driven plasma instability in lower dimensional solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hanzhen

    The object of this study was to investigate the feasibility of generating Current Driven Plasma Instabilities (CDPI) in lower dimensional solid state systems. This thesis presents a complete formalism and results of numerical calculations of CDPI in lower dimensional uniform and modulated solid state systems. Random phase approximation has been used to study the response of a plasma system. The presence of a driving field, collisional heating and damping effects, as well as the inter-particle and wave-particle effects have been taken into account in the analysis of the mode structure and growth rate of unstable plasma modes. We have compared plasma waves amplification performance of different uniform two dimensional layered systems, studying in detail the effects of various material parameters on the growth rates of the unstable plasma modes. We have studied the efficiency of a grating coupler which can he used to convert the plasma wave energy into electromagnetic radiation. We have also investigated CDPI in lower dimensional solid state systems with a periodic modulation of density. CDPI can be generated at much lower applied electric fields for the modulated than for the corresponding uniform systems. The fastest and the strongest growing waves which can be generated in the systems we analyzed are relevant for device applications for radiation sources in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wave ranges.

  5. A hybrid Rayleigh-Taylor-current-driven coupled instability in a magnetohydrodynamically collimated cylindrical plasma with lateral gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Xiang Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-03-15

    We present an MHD theory of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the surface of a magnetically confined cylindrical plasma flux rope in a lateral external gravity field. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability that cannot be described by either of the two instabilities alone. The lateral gravity breaks the axisymmetry of the system and couples all azimuthal modes together. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. The theory successfully explains the lateral Rayleigh-Taylor instability observed in the Caltech plasma jet experiment [Moser and Bellan, Nature 482, 379 (2012)]. Potential applications of the theory include magnetic controlled fusion, solar emerging flux, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections, and other space and astrophysical plasma processes.

  6. Dielectric permittivity tensor and low frequency instabilities of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Rastbood, E.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-15

    The dielectric permittivity tensor of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma is obtained by employing the kinetic theory based on the Vlasov equation and Lorentz transformation formulas with an emphasize on the q-nonextensive statistics. By deriving the q-generalized dispersion relation of the low frequency modes in this plasma system, the possibility and properties of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities are then studied. It is shown that the occurrence and the growth rate of these instabilities depend strongly on the nonextensive parameters, external magnetic field strength, and drift velocity. It is observed that the growth rate of ion acoustic instability is affected by the magnetic field strength much more than that of the filamentation instability in the low frequency range. The external magnetic field facilitates the development of the ion-acoustic instability. It is also shown that the filamentation is the dominant instability only for the high value of drift velocity.

  7. Coupling of the Okuda-Dawson model with a shear current-driven wave and the associated instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, W.; Saleem, H.; Saleem

    2013-12-01

    It is pointed out that the Okuda-Dawson mode can couple with the newly proposed current-driven wave. It is also shown that the Shukla-Varma mode can couple with these waves if the density inhomogeneity is taken into account in a plasma containing stationary dust particles. A comparison of several low-frequency electrostatic waves and instabilities driven by shear current and shear plasma flow in an electron-ion plasma with and without stationary dust is also presented.

  8. Verification of gyrokinetic particle simulation of current-driven instability in fusion plasmas. I. Internal kink mode

    SciTech Connect

    McClenaghan, J.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Deng, W.; Wang, Z.

    2014-12-15

    The gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) capability has been extended for simulating internal kink instability with kinetic effects in toroidal geometry. The global simulation domain covers the magnetic axis, which is necessary for simulating current-driven instabilities. GTC simulation in the fluid limit of the kink modes in cylindrical geometry is verified by benchmarking with a magnetohydrodynamic eigenvalue code. Gyrokinetic simulations of the kink modes in the toroidal geometry find that ion kinetic effects significantly reduce the growth rate even when the banana orbit width is much smaller than the radial width of the perturbed current layer at the mode rational surface.

  9. Current-driven plasma instabilities and auroral-type particle acceleration at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Brace, L. H.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Stewart, A. I. F.

    1985-01-01

    Above the ionosphere of Venus, several instruments on the Pioneer Orbiter detect correlated wave, field and particle phenomena suggestive of current-driven anomalous resistivity and auroral-type particle acceleration. In localized regions the plasma wave instrument measures intense mid-frequency turbulence levels together with strong field-aligned currents. Here the local parameters indicate that there is marginal stability for ion acoustic waves, and the electron temperature probe finds evidence that energetic primaries are present. This suggests an auroral-type energy deposition into the upper atmosphere of Venus. These results appear to be consistent with the direct measurements of auroral emissions from the Pioneer-Venus ultraviolet imaging spectrometer.

  10. Kinetic theory of the filamentation instability in a collisional current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M. Rastbood, E.; Niknam, A. R.

    2015-07-15

    The evolution of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma with nonextensive distribution was studied in the diffusion frequency region, taking into account the effects of electron-neutral collisions. Using the kinetic theory, Lorentz transformation formulas, and Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, the generalized dielectric permittivity functions of this plasma system were achieved. By obtaining the dispersion relation of low-frequency waves, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate were investigated. It was shown that collisions can increase the maximum growth rate of instability. The analysis of temporal evolution of filamentation instability revealed that the growth rate of instability increased by increasing the q-parameter and electron drift velocity. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions were compared and discussed.

  11. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  12. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  13. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  14. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  15. On the Filamental Quenching of the Current-Driven Ion-Cyclotron Instability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    useful discussions. This work was J 4 supported by a Northwest Area Foundation grant of the Research Corporation and by the United States Office of Naval...Instability by STEVEN L. CARTIER, NICOLA D’ANGELO, PETER H. KRUM,* and ROBERT L. MERLINO Department of Physics and Astronomy The University of Iowa Iowa City...Palmadesso. PACS numbers: 52.35.Fp, 52.35.Py *Permanent address: Department of Physics, University of Natal, Durban 4001, South Africa. ’II

  16. Current-Driven Instability of the Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Ferromagnetic Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Minoru; Yoshimi, Ryutaro; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Kei S.; Kawasaki, Masashi; Tokura, Yoshinori

    2017-07-01

    The instability of the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect has been studied as a function of the electric current and temperature in ferromagnetic topological insulator thin films. We find that a characteristic current for the breakdown of the QAH effect is roughly proportional to the Hall-bar width, indicating that the Hall electric field is relevant to the breakdown. We also find that electron transport is dominated by variable range hopping (VRH) at low temperatures. Combining the current and temperature dependences of the conductivity in the VRH regime, the localization length of the QAH state is evaluated to be about 5 μ m . The long localization length suggests a marginally insulating nature of the QAH state due to a large number of in-gap states.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CURRENT-DRIVEN INSTABILITY WITH A SUB-ALFVENIC JET: TEMPORAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip E.

    2011-06-10

    We have investigated the influence of a velocity shear surface on the linear and nonlinear development of the current-driven (CD) kink instability of force-free helical magnetic equilibria in three dimensions. In this study, we follow the temporal development within a periodic computational box and concentrate on flows that are sub-Alfvenic on the cylindrical jet's axis. Displacement of the initial force-free helical magnetic field leads to the growth of CD kink instability. We find that helically distorted density structure propagates along the jet with speed and flow structure dependent on the radius of the velocity shear surface relative to the characteristic radius of the helically twisted force-free magnetic field. At small velocity shear surface radius, the plasma flows through the kink with minimal kink propagation speed. The kink propagation speed increases as the velocity shear radius increases and the kink becomes more embedded in the plasma flow. A decreasing magnetic pitch profile and faster flow enhance the influence of velocity shear. Simulations show continuous transverse growth in the nonlinear phase of the instability. The growth rate of the CD kink instability and the nonlinear behavior also depend on the velocity shear surface radius and flow speed, and the magnetic pitch radial profile. Larger velocity shear radius leads to slower linear growth, makes a later transition to the nonlinear stage, and with larger maximum amplitude than that occuring for a static plasma column. However, when the velocity shear radius is much greater than the characteristic radius of the helical magnetic field, linear and nonlinear development can be similar to the development of a static plasma column.

  18. COSMIC-RAY CURRENT-DRIVEN TURBULENCE AND MEAN-FIELD DYNAMO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Kleeorin, Nathan; Brandenburg, Axel; Eichler, David

    2012-07-01

    We show that an {alpha} effect is driven by the cosmic-ray (CR) Bell instability exciting left-right asymmetric turbulence. Alfven waves of a preferred polarization have maximally helical motion, because the transverse motion of each mode is parallel to its curl. We show how large-scale Alfven modes, when rendered unstable by CR streaming, can create new net flux over any finite region, in the direction of the original large-scale field. We perform direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a magnetohydrodynamic fluid with a forced CR current and use the test-field method to determine the {alpha} effect and the turbulent magnetic diffusivity. As follows from DNS, the dynamics of the instability has the following stages: (1) in the early stage, the small-scale Bell instability that results in the production of small-scale turbulence is excited; (2) in the intermediate stage, there is formation of larger-scale magnetic structures; (3) finally, quasi-stationary large-scale turbulence is formed at a growth rate that is comparable to that expected from the dynamo instability, but its amplitude over much longer timescales remains unclear. The results of DNS are in good agreement with the theoretical estimates. It is suggested that this dynamo is what gives weakly magnetized relativistic shocks such as those from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) a macroscopic correlation length. It may also be important for large-scale magnetic field amplification associated with CR production and diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) and blast waves from GRBs. Magnetic field amplification by Bell turbulence in SNRs is found to be significant, but it is limited owing to the finite time available to the super-Alfvenicly expanding remnant. The effectiveness of the mechanisms is shown to be dependent on the shock velocity. Limits on magnetic field growth in longer-lived systems, such as the Galaxy and unconfined intergalactic CRs, are also discussed.

  19. A current-driven resistive instability and its nonlinear effects in simulations of coaxial helicity injection in a tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, E. B.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2016-10-06

    An instability observed in whole-device, resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the driven phase of coaxial helicity injection in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment is identified as a current-driven resistive mode in an unusual geometry that transiently generates a current sheet. The mode consists of plasma flow velocity and magnetic field eddies in a tube aligned with the magnetic field at the surface of the injected magnetic flux. At low plasma temperatures (~10–20 eV), the mode is benign, but at high temperatures (~100 eV) its amplitude undergoes relaxation oscillations, broadening the layer of injected current and flow at the surface of themore » injected toroidal flux and background plasma. The poloidal-field structure is affected and the magnetic surface closure is generally prevented while the mode undergoes relaxation oscillations during injection. Furthermore, this study describes the mode and uses linearized numerical computations and an analytic slab model to identify the unstable mode.« less

  20. Current disruption and modulation of Electron Current layer by current-driven Electrostatic and Electron Tearing Instabilities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Khazanov, I. G.; Wells, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of an electron current layer (ECL) through its several stages by means of three-dimensional PIC simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/m =400. ECL evolves through the following sequential stages, culminating in fast isotropic heating of electrons and ions: (i) Electrostatic current-driven instability (CDI) soon after its formation, (ii) current disruption in the central part of the ECL by trapping electrons and generation of anomalous resistivity, (iii) electron tearing instability (ETI) with growth rates larger than that predicted by theories, (iv) the ETI growth rate maximizes at a wave number kw ~ 0.5 where k is the wave number parallel to the ECL magnetic field B and w is its half width, (v) the ECL width and current are modulated by the ETI, (vi) interactions between the induced electric fields of the ETI and the density cavities created by the CDI cause further current disruption and fine-grained modulation of the ECL current associated with highly spiked electric field structures like in double layers and (vii) the spiky electric fields very effectively heat both electrons and ions. The developing ETI generates in-plane currents that support out-of-plane magnetic fields around the X-lines. The ETI and the spiky electrostatic structures are accompanied by fluctuations in the magnetic fields near and above the lower hybrid (ion plasma) frequency, including the whistler frequency range. Fluctuations in the magnetic field are also enhanced above the electron plasma frequency. We will compare our results with satellite observations [1] and laboratory experiments [2]. [1] F. S. Mozer et al., New features of electron diffusion regions observed at subsolar magnetic field reconnection sites, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L24102, doi:10.1029/2005GL024092. [2] S. Dorfman et al. (20013), Three-dimensional, impulsive magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 233, doi:10.1029/2012GL054574.

  1. Stochastic Current-Driven Domain-Wall Motion Observed by X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Guido

    2008-03-01

    Transmission x-ray microscopy can directly visualize the influence of a spin-polarized current on the magnetization of micro- and nanostructures. We investigate the stochastic motion of domain walls in curved wires [1] and the motion of vortices in squares [2]. To observe domain-wall motion pulses of nanosecond duration and high current density are send through permalloy wires and either move or deform the domain wall. The current pulses have nanosecond duration and a high current density of up to 1.0 10^12 A/m^2 and drive the wall either undisturbed, i.e. as a composite particle through the wire or causes structural changes of the magnetization. Repetitive pulse measurements reveal the stochastic nature of current induced domain-wall motion. From the experiments we estimate the ratio between the degree of nonadiabaticity and the Gilbert damping parameter indicating the importance of the nonadiabatic contribution to current driven domain-wall motion. To compare experimental results with theory the spin-torque transfer model of Zhang and Li [3] is implemented in the micromagnetic framework OOMMF [4]. The code is applied to determine the current-induced domain wall velocity using the material parameters of permalloy. The simulations support the interpretation of the experimental results. Sinusoidal high-density currents are applied to micrometer-sized permalloy squares containing ferromagnetic vortices. Spin-torque induced vortex gyration on the nanosecond timescale is observed. The phase of the gyration in structures with different chirality are compared to an analytical model and micromagnetic simulations, considering both alternating spin-polarized currents and the current's Oersted fields. This analysis reveals that spin-torque is the main source of motion. Supported by the DFG via SFB 668 and GK 1286 as well as by the U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231. References: [1] G. Meier, M. Bolte, R. Eiselt, U. Merkt, B. Krüger, D. Pfannkuche, D.-H. Kim, and P

  2. Numerical study of the two-species Vlasov-Ampère system: Energy-conserving schemes and the current-driven ion-acoustic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yingda; Christlieb, Andrew J.; Zhong, Xinghui

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose energy-conserving Eulerian solvers for the two-species Vlasov-Ampère (VA) system and apply the methods to simulate current-driven ion-acoustic instability. The two-species VA systems are of practical importance in applications, and they conserve many physical quantities including the particle number of each species and the total energy that is comprised of kinetic energy for both species and the electric energy. The main goal of this paper is to generalize our previous work for the single-species VA system [9] and Vlasov-Maxwell (VM) system [8] to the two-species case. The methodologies proposed involve careful design of temporal discretization and the use of the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) spatial discretizations. We show that the energy-conserving time discretizations for single-species equations [9,8] can also work for the two-species case if extended properly. Compared to other high order schemes, we emphasize that our schemes can preserve the total particle number and total energy on the fully discrete level regardless of mesh size, making them very attractive for long time simulations. We benchmark our algorithms on a test example to check the one-species limit, and the current-driven ion-acoustic instability. To simulate the current-driven ion-acoustic instability, a slight modification for the implicit method is necessary to fully decouple the split equations. This is achieved by a Gauss-Seidel type iteration technique. Numerical results verified the conservation and performance of our methods. Finally, we remark that the schemes in this paper can be readily extended to applications when the models take more general form, such as the multi-species VM equations.

  3. Finite width currents, non-uniform magnetic shear and the current driven ion cyclotron instability. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-03-17

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10/sup -2/. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability.

  4. Current-driven Langmuir oscillations and formation of wave packets via modulational instability: Relevance to STEREO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K.; Sydora, R. D.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been shown that Langmuir oscillations (LOs) at the plasma frequency can be driven by an electron current without any electrostatic instability. This current may appear due to a (small) drift of the whole electron population against the ions or by beam electrons after their relaxation to a plateau-like distribution. The consequences of LOs for nonlinear wave phenomena in this scenario are studied by means of kinetic plasma simulations. It is shown that the electric field of LOs can act as a pump wave and generate Langmuir envelope solitons via the modulational instability. In this way, both counterstreaming Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves arise with the same wave number. For solar wind conditions the Doppler shift leads to the generation of satellite peaks with frequencies symmetric around the plasma frequency. Simultaneously, a peak appears in the ion-acoustic branch. These results agree well with recent STEREO observations in the solar wind.

  5. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M. Koleva, E. G.; Belenkiy, V. Ya. Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup −2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  6. MOMENTUM TRANSPORT FROM CURRENT-DRIVEN RECONNECTION IN ASTROPHYSICAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahimi, F.; Prager, S. C.

    2011-12-20

    Current-driven reconnection is investigated as a possible mechanism for angular momentum transport in astrophysical disks. A theoretical and computational study of angular momentum transport from current-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities is performed. It is found that both a single resistive tearing instability and an ideal instability can transport momentum in the presence of azimuthal Keplerian flow. The structure of the Maxwell stress is examined for a single mode through analytic quasilinear theory and computation. Full nonlinear multiple-mode computation shows that a global Maxwell stress causes significant momentum transport.

  7. Plasma Instabilities in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, Robert C.

    2008-12-24

    Magnetic fields are important in a variety of astrophysical scenarios, ranging from possible creation mechanisms of cosmological magnetic fields through relativistic jets such as that from Active Galactic Nuclei and gamma-ray bursts to local phenomena in the solar system. Here, the outstanding importance of plasma instabilities to astrophysics is illustrated by applying the so-called neutral point method to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are assumed to have a homogeneous background magnetic field. It is shown how magnetic turbulence, which is a prerequisite for the creation of dissipation and, subsequently, radiation, is created by the highly relativistic particles in the GRB jet. Using the fact that different particle compositions lead to different instability conditions, conclusions can be drawn about the particle composition of the jet, showing that it is more likely of baryonic nature.

  8. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  9. Acoustic instability driven by cosmic-ray streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1994-08-01

    We study the linear stability of compressional waves in a medium through which cosmic rays stream at the Alfven speed due to strong coupling with Alfven waves. Acoustic waves can be driven unstable by the cosmic-ray drift, provided that the streaming speed is sufficiently large compared to the thermal sound speed. Two effects can cause instability: (1) the heating of the thermal gas due to the damping of Alfven waves driven unstable by cosmic-ray streaming; and (2) phase shifts in the cosmic-ray pressure perturbation caused by the combination of cosmic-ray streaming and diffusion. The instability does not depend on the magnitude of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, and occurs whether or not cosmic-ray diffusion is important relative to streaming. When the cosmic-ray pressure is small compared to the gas pressure, or cosmic-ray diffusion is strong, the instability manifests itself as a weak overstability of slow magnetosonic waves. Larger cosmic-ray pressure gives rise to new hybrid modes, which can be strongly unstable in the limits of both weak and strong cosmic-ray diffusion and in the presence of thermal conduction. Parts of our analysis parallel earlier work by McKenzie & Webb (which were brought to our attention after this paper was accepted for publication), but our treatment of diffusive effects, thermal conduction, and nonlinearities represent significant extensions. Although the linear growth rate of instability is independent of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, the onset of nonlinear eff ects does depend on absolute value of DEL (vector differential operator) Pc. At the onset of nonlinearity the fractional amplitude of cosmic-ray pressure perturbations is delta PC/PC approximately (kL) -1 much less than 1, where k is the wavenumber and L is the pressure scale height of the unperturbed cosmic rays. We speculate that the instability may lead to a mode of cosmic-ray transport in which plateaus of uniform cosmic-ray pressure are

  10. Acoustic instability driven by cosmic-ray streaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1994-01-01

    We study the linear stability of compressional waves in a medium through which cosmic rays stream at the Alfven speed due to strong coupling with Alfven waves. Acoustic waves can be driven unstable by the cosmic-ray drift, provided that the streaming speed is sufficiently large compared to the thermal sound speed. Two effects can cause instability: (1) the heating of the thermal gas due to the damping of Alfven waves driven unstable by cosmic-ray streaming; and (2) phase shifts in the cosmic-ray pressure perturbation caused by the combination of cosmic-ray streaming and diffusion. The instability does not depend on the magnitude of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, and occurs whether or not cosmic-ray diffusion is important relative to streaming. When the cosmic-ray pressure is small compared to the gas pressure, or cosmic-ray diffusion is strong, the instability manifests itself as a weak overstability of slow magnetosonic waves. Larger cosmic-ray pressure gives rise to new hybrid modes, which can be strongly unstable in the limits of both weak and strong cosmic-ray diffusion and in the presence of thermal conduction. Parts of our analysis parallel earlier work by McKenzie & Webb (which were brought to our attention after this paper was accepted for publication), but our treatment of diffusive effects, thermal conduction, and nonlinearities represent significant extensions. Although the linear growth rate of instability is independent of the background cosmic-ray pressure gradient, the onset of nonlinear eff ects does depend on absolute value of DEL (vector differential operator) P(sub c). At the onset of nonlinearity the fractional amplitude of cosmic-ray pressure perturbations is delta P(sub C)/P(sub C) approximately (kL) (exp -1) much less than 1, where k is the wavenumber and L is the pressure scale height of the unperturbed cosmic rays. We speculate that the instability may lead to a mode of cosmic-ray transport in which plateaus of uniform cosmic-ray

  11. COSMIC-RAY-INDUCED FILAMENTATION INSTABILITY IN COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, D.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2013-03-01

    We used unprecedentedly large two-dimensional and three-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions-fluid electrons) simulations of non-relativistic collisionless strong shocks in order to investigate the effects of self-consistently accelerated ions on the overall shock dynamics. The current driven by suprathermal particles streaming ahead of the shock excites modes transverse to the background magnetic field. The Lorentz force induced by these self-amplified fields tends to excavate tubular, underdense, magnetic-field-depleted cavities that are advected with the fluid and perturb the shock surface, triggering downstream turbulent motions. These motions further amplify the magnetic field, up to factors of 50-100 in knot-like structures. Once downstream, the cavities tend to be filled by hot plasma plumes that compress and stretch the magnetic fields in elongated filaments; this effect is particularly evident if the shock propagates parallel to the background field. Highly magnetized knots and filaments may provide explanations for the rapid X-ray variability observed in RX J1713.7-3946 and for the regular pattern of X-ray bright stripes detected in Tycho's supernova remnant.

  12. Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, Miklos; Egedal-Pedersen, Jan; Fox, William

    2010-08-31

    CMPD Final Report Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection Miklos Porkolab, PI, Jan Egedal, co-PI, William Fox, graduate student. This is the final report for Grant DE-FC02-04ER54786, MIT Participation in the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics, which was active from 8/1/2004 to 7/31/2010. This Grant supported the thesis work of one MIT graduate student, William Fox, The thesis research consisted of an experimental study of the fluctuations arising during magnetic reconnection in plasmas on the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center (PSFC). The thesis was submitted and accepted by the MIT physics Department,. Fox, Experimental Study of Current-Driven Turbulence During Magnetic Reconnection, Ph.D. Thesis, MIT (2009). In the VTF experiment reconnection and current-sheet formation is driven by quickly changing currents in a specially arranged set of internal conductors. Previous work on this device [Egedal, et al, PRL 98, 015003, (2007)] identified a spontaneous reconnection regime. In this work fluctuations were studied using impedance-matched, high-bandwidth Langmuir probes. Strong, broadband fluctuations, with frequencies extending from near the lower-hybrid frequency [fLH = (fcefci)1/2] to the electron cyclotron frequency fce were found to arise during the reconnection events. Based on frequency and wavelength measurements, lower-hybrid waves and Trivelpiece-Gould waves were identified. The lower-hybrid waves are easiest to drive with strong perpendicular drifts or gradients which arise due to the reconnection events; an appealing possibility is strong temperature gradients. The Trivelpiece-Gould modes can result from kinetic, bump-on-tail instability of a runaway electron population energized by the reconnection events. We also observed that the turbulence is often spiky, consisting of discrete positive-potential spikes, which were identified as electron phase-space holes, a class of

  13. Influence of the backreaction of streaming cosmic rays on magnetic field generation and thermal instability

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Anatoly K.; Shadmehri, Mohsen E-mail: nekrasov.anatoly@gmail.com

    2014-06-10

    Using a multifluid approach, we investigate streaming and thermal instabilities of the electron-ion plasma with homogeneous cold cosmic rays propagating perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Perturbations are also considered to be across the magnetic field. The backreaction of cosmic rays resulting in strong streaming instabilities is taken into account. It is shown that, for sufficiently short wavelength perturbations, the growth rates can exceed the growth rate of cosmic-ray streaming instability along the magnetic field, found by Nekrasov and Shadmehri, which is in turn considerably larger than the growth rate of the Bell instability. The thermal instability is shown not to be subject to the action of cosmic rays in the model under consideration. The dispersion relation for the thermal instability has been derived, which includes sound velocities of plasma and cosmic rays and Alfvén and cosmic-ray streaming velocities. The relation between these parameters determines the kind of thermal instability ranging from the Parker to the Field instabilities. The results obtained can be useful for a more detailed investigation of electron-ion astrophysical objects, such as supernova remnant shocks, galaxy clusters, and others, including the dynamics of streaming cosmic rays.

  14. High-speed x-ray radiographic measurement of laser-driven hydrodynamic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shigemori, Keisuke; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sakaiya, Tatsuhiro; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Tamari, Yohei; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2003-07-01

    Hydrodynamic instability in laser-irradiated targets have been investigated in detail by using ultra high-speed x-ray radiographic technique. Recently developed high-resolution x-ray imaging for laser-driven Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments as well as data including RT growth rate, ablation density and plasma density profile are desribed. Results are of great importance for comprehensive understanding of the dispersion relation of the laser-driven RT instability. Especially, direct observation of the ablation density was first achieved with temporal and spatial resolutions of 100 ps and 3 μm, respectively. Imaging techniques includes x-ray Moire imaging, x-ray penumbral imaging and Fresnel phase zone plate imaging coupled with x-ray streak cameras or x-ray CCD cameras. Experiments were performed by using Gekko-XII/HIPER laser system at the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University.

  15. The effect of beam-driven return current instability on solar hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, D.; Mcquillan, P.; Brown, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of electrostatic wave generation by a return current driven by a small area electron beam during solar hard X-ray bursts is discussed. The marginal stability method is used to solve numerically the electron and ion heating equations for a prescribed beam current evolution. When ion-acoustic waves are considered, the method appears satisfactory and, following an initial phase of Coulomb resistivity in which T sub e/T sub i rise, predicts a rapid heating of substantial plasma volumes by anomalous ohmic dissipation. This hot plasma emits so much thermal bremsstrahlung that, contrary to previous expectations, the unstable beam-plasma system actually emits more hard X-rays than does the beam in the purely collisional thick target regime relevant to larger injection areas. Inclusion of ion-cyclotron waves results in ion-acoustic wave onset at lower T sub e/T sub i and a marginal stability treatment yields unphysical results.

  16. STREAMING COLD COSMIC-RAY BACK-REACTION AND THERMAL INSTABILITIES ALONG THE BACKGROUND MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Anatoly K.; Shadmehri, Mohsen E-mail: nekrasov.anatoly@gmail.com

    2012-09-01

    Using a multi-fluid approach, we investigate the streaming and thermal instabilities of electron-ion-cosmic-ray astrophysical objects in which homogeneous cold cosmic rays have a drift velocity perpendicular to the background magnetic field. One-dimensional perturbations along the magnetic field are considered. The induced return current of the background plasma and back-reaction of cosmic rays are taken into account. It is shown that the cosmic-ray back-reaction results in a streaming instability with considerably higher growth rates than that due to the return current of the background plasma. This increase is by a factor of the square root of the ratio of the background plasma mass density to the cosmic-ray mass density. The maximal growth rate and the corresponding wavenumber are then found. Thermal instability is shown to be not subject to the action of cosmic rays in the model under consideration. The dispersion relation for thermal instability includes ion inertia. In the limit of a fast thermal energy exchange between electrons and ions, the isobaric and isochoric growth rates are obtained. The results can be useful for the investigation of electron-ion astrophysical objects such as galaxy clusters, including the dynamics of streaming cosmic rays.

  17. Linear growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with an adiabatic cosmic-ray gas

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Kudoh, Takahiro

    2014-06-01

    We investigate effects of cosmic rays on the linear growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Cosmic rays are treated as an adiabatic gas and allowed to diffuse along magnetic field lines. We calculated the dispersion relation of the instability for various sets of two free parameters, the ratio of the cosmic-ray pressure to the thermal gas pressure, and the diffusion coefficient. Including cosmic-ray effects, a shear layer is more destabilized and the growth rates can be enhanced in comparison with the ideal magnetohydrodynamical case. Whether the growth rate is effectively enhanced or not depends on the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays. We obtain the criterion for effective enhancement by comparing the growing timescale of the instability with the diffusion timescale of cosmic rays. These results can be applied to various astrophysical phenomena where a velocity shear is present, such as outflows from star-forming galaxies, active galactic nucleus jet, channel flows resulting from the nonlinear development of the magnetorotational instability, and galactic disks.

  18. Ray and wave instabilities in twisted graded-index optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.; della Valle, G.; Janner, D.

    2004-05-01

    We study ray and wave propagation in an elliptical graded-index optical fiber or lens with a twisted axis and show analytically the existence of an instability for both ray trajectories and beam moments in a finite range of axis twist rate embedded within the spatial frequencies of periodically focused rays for the untwisted fiber. By considering the paraxial ray equations and the paraxial wave dynamics in a rotating frame that follows the fiber axis twist, we reduce the dynamical problem of ray trajectories to the classical Blackburn’s pendulum, which shows a dynamical instability, corresponding to classical diverging trajectories, due to the competing effects of confining potential, Coriolis force, and centrifugal force. A closed set of linear evolution equations for generalized beam moments are also derived from the paraxial wave equation in the rotating reference frame, revealing the existence of a dynamical moment instability in addition to the trajectory instability. A detailed analysis of beam propagation is presented in case of a Gaussian beam, and different dynamical regimes are discussed.

  19. Experimental Study on Current-Driven Domain Wall Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, T.; Yamaguchi, A.; Tanigawa, H.; Yano, K.; Kasai, S.

    2006-06-01

    Current-driven domain wall (DW) motion for a well-defined single DW in a micro-fabricated magnetic wire with submicron width was investigated by real-space observation with magnetic force microscopy. Magnetic force microscopy visualizes that a single DW introduced in a wire is displaced back and forth by positive and negative pulsed-current, respectively. Effect of the Joule heating, reduction of the threshold current density by shape control, and magnetic ratchet effect are also presented.

  20. Current-driven dynamics of chiral ferromagnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Emori, Satoru; Bauer, Uwe; Ahn, Sung-Min; Martinez, Eduardo; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2013-07-01

    In most ferromagnets the magnetization rotates from one domain to the next with no preferred handedness. However, broken inversion symmetry can lift the chiral degeneracy, leading to topologically rich spin textures such as spin spirals and skyrmions through the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Here we show that in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal and an oxide, the DMI stabilizes chiral domain walls (DWs) whose spin texture enables extremely efficient current-driven motion. We show that spin torque from the spin Hall effect drives DWs in opposite directions in Pt/CoFe/MgO and Ta/CoFe/MgO, which can be explained only if the DWs assume a Néel configuration with left-handed chirality. We directly confirm the DW chirality and rigidity by examining current-driven DW dynamics with magnetic fields applied perpendicular and parallel to the spin spiral. This work resolves the origin of controversial experimental results and highlights a new path towards interfacial design of spintronic devices.

  1. Instabilities in the Gamma Ray Burst central engine. What makes the jet variable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Perna, Rosalba; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2011-02-01

    Both types of long and short gamma ray bursts involve a stage of a hyper-Eddington accretion of hot and dense plasma torus onto a newly born black hole. The prompt gamma ray emission originates in jets at some distance from this `central engine' and in most events is rapidly variable, having a form of sipkes and subpulses. This indicates at the variable nature of the engine itself, for which a plausible mechanism is an internal instability in the accreting flow. We solve numerically the structure and evolution of the neutrino-cooled torus. We take into account the detailed treatment of the microphysics in the nuclear equation of state that includes the neutrino trapping effect. The models are calculated for both Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes. We find that for sufficiently large accretion rates (>~10Msolar s-1 for non-rotating black hole, and >~1Msolar s-1 for rotating black hole, depending on its spin), the inner regions of the disk become opaque, while the helium nuclei are being photodissociated. The sudden change of pressure in this region leads to the development of a viscous and thermal instability, and the neutrino pressure acts similarly to the radiation pressure in sub-Eddington disks. In the case of rapidly rotating black holes, the instability is enhanced and appears for much lower accretion rates. We also find the important and possibly further destabilizing role of the energy transfer from the rotating black hole to the torus via the magnetic coupling.

  2. Current-driven skyrmion dynamics in disordered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joo-Von; Yoo, Myoung-Woo

    2017-03-01

    A theoretical study of the current-driven dynamics of magnetic skyrmions in disordered perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin films is presented. The disorder is simulated as a granular structure, in which the local anisotropy varies randomly from grain to grain. The skyrmion velocity is computed for different disorder parameters and ensembles. Similar behavior is seen for spin-torques due to in-plane currents and the spin Hall effect, where a pinning regime can be identified at low currents with a transition towards the disorder-free case at higher currents, similar to domain wall motion in disordered films. Moreover, a current-dependent skyrmion Hall effect and fluctuations in the core radius are found, which result from the interaction with the pinning potential.

  3. Using the longitudinal space charge instability for generation of vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2010-11-01

    Longitudinal space charge (LSC) driven microbunching instability in electron beam formation systems of x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) is a recently discovered effect hampering beam instrumentation and FEL operation. The instability was observed in different facilities in infrared and visible wavelength ranges. In this paper we propose to use such an instability for generation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray radiation. A typical longitudinal space charge amplifier (LSCA) consists of few amplification cascades (drift space plus chicane) with a short undulator behind the last cascade. If the amplifier starts up from the shot noise, the amplified density modulation has a wide band, on the order of unity. The bandwidth of the radiation within the central cone is given by an inverse number of undulator periods. A wavelength compression could be an attractive option for LSCA since the process is broadband, and a high compression stability is not required. LSCA can be used as a cheap addition to the existing or planned short-wavelength FELs. In particular, it can produce the second color for a pump-probe experiment. It is also possible to generate attosecond pulses in the VUV and x-ray regimes. Some user experiments can profit from a relatively large bandwidth of the radiation, and this is easy to obtain in the LSCA scheme. Finally, since the amplification mechanism is broadband and robust, LSCA can be an interesting alternative to the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser (SASE FEL) in the case of using laser-plasma accelerators as drivers of light sources.

  4. Nonconservative current-driven dynamics: beyond the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Tchavdar N; Dundas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Long metallic nanowires combine crucial factors for nonconservative current-driven atomic motion. These systems have degenerate vibrational frequencies, clustered about a Kohn anomaly in the dispersion relation, that can couple under current to form nonequilibrium modes of motion growing exponentially in time. Such motion is made possible by nonconservative current-induced forces on atoms, and we refer to it generically as the waterwheel effect. Here the connection between the waterwheel effect and the stimulated directional emission of phonons propagating along the electron flow is discussed in an intuitive manner. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics show that waterwheel modes self-regulate by reducing the current and by populating modes in nearby frequency, leading to a dynamical steady state in which nonconservative forces are counter-balanced by the electronic friction. The waterwheel effect can be described by an appropriate effective nonequilibrium dynamical response matrix. We show that the current-induced parts of this matrix in metallic systems are long-ranged, especially at low bias. This nonlocality is essential for the characterisation of nonconservative atomic dynamics under current beyond the nanoscale. PMID:26665086

  5. Annealing effect on current-driven domain wall motion in Pt/[Co/Ni] wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuta, Masaki; Liu, Yang; Sepehri-Amin, Hossein; Hono, Kazuhiro; Zhu, Jian-Gang Jimmy

    2017-09-01

    The annealing effect on the efficiency of current-driven domain wall motion governed by the spin Hall effect in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/[Co/Ni] wires is investigated experimentally. Important physical parameters, such as the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction (DMI), spin Hall angle, and perpendicular anisotropy field strength, for the domain wall motion are all characterized at each annealing temperature. It is found that annealing of wires at temperatures over 120 °C causes significant reduction of the domain wall velocity. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows pronounced Co diffusion across the Pt/Co interface resulted from annealing at relatively high temperatures. The combined modeling study shows that the reduction of DMI caused by annealing is mostly responsible for the domain wall velocity reduction due to annealing.

  6. Influence of Magnetic Shear on the Collisional Current Driven Ion Cyclotron Instability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-05

    I DRIVEN ION CYCLOTRON INSTA9ILITY(U) NAVAL RESEARCH LAB MASHINOTON DC P SATYRNARAYRNA ET AL. S5 JUL 64 UNCLASSIFIED NRLD-NR-5345 FIG 2/9 L II 13J6...These results are verified by directly solving Eq. (14) using a numerical shooting code. We present the former results in the following. In Fig . 1 we...some light on the magnetic shear required to significantly reduce the growth rate, we plot in Fig . 2, the normalized growth rate versus the normalized

  7. Doppler velocimetry of a current driven spin helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    2012-02-01

    We present direct observation of the translational motion of spin helices in GaAs quantum wells under the influence of applied electric fields. Previously, the lifetime of such helices was observed by time-resolving the amplitude of light diffracted from the periodic spin polarization [1]. This technique cannot be applied to tracking the motion of current-driven spin helices because diffraction amplitude is insensitive to translation of the center of mass of a periodic structure. In this talk, we describe a new experimental technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, capable of resolving displacements of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale [2]. This is accomplished through the use of heterodyne detection to measure the optical phase of the diffracted light. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. Several striking observations will be reported -- for example, the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wavevector and is zero at the wavevector that yields the largest spin lifetime. Another important observation is that the velocity of spin polarization packets becomes equal to the drift velocity of the high-mobility electron gas in the limit of small spin helix amplitude. Finally, we show that spin helices continue propagate at the same speed as the Fermi sea even when the electron drift velocity exceeds the Fermi velocity of 10^7 cm-s-1. In collaboration with J. D. Koralek and J. Orenstein, UC Berkeley and LBNL, D. R. Tibbetts, J. L. Reno, and M. P. Lilly, SNL. Supported by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and DE-AC04-94AL85000. [4pt] [1] J. D. Koralek et al., ``Emergency of the persistent spin helix in semiconductor quantum wells,'' Nature 458, 610-613 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Yang et al, ``Doppler velocimetry of spin propagation in a two-dimensional electron gas,'' to appear

  8. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of kink waves in photospheric, chromospheric, and X-ray solar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.

    2013-09-01

    One of the most enduring mysteries in solar physics is why the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona, is millions of kelvins hotter than its surface. Among suggested theories for coronal heating are those that consider the role of various jets of plasma shooting up from just above the Sun's surface through the photosphere and chromosphere to corona. The energy carrying by the waves propagating along the jets can be dissipated and thus transferred to the medium via different mechanisms. Among the various magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves which can propagate in the solar atmosphere the most promising for the heating process turns out to be the so cold kink waves. These waves actually are normal modes of the MHD waves running in spatially (or magnetically) bounded flux tubes. When plasma in a flux tube floats the kink mode can become unstable if the jet's speed exceeds some threshold/critical value. The instability which appears is of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type and it can trigger MHD turbulence, more specifically Alvfén waves' turbulence. Notably this kind of turbulence is considered to be one of the main mechanisms of coronal heating. Here, we consider the conditions under which kink waves traveling on three types of solar flowing plasmas, namely photospheric jets, spicules, and X-ray jets, can become unstable against the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  9. Current-driven non-linear magnetodynamics in exchange-biased spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Seinige, Heidi; Wang, Cheng; Tsoi, Maxim

    2015-05-07

    This work investigates the excitation of parametric resonance in exchange-biased spin valves (EBSVs). Using a mechanical point contact, high density dc and microwave currents were injected into the EBSV sample. Observing the reflected microwave power and the small rectification voltage that develops across the contact allows detecting the current-driven magnetodynamics not only in the bulk sample but originating exclusively from the small contact region. In addition to ferromagnetic resonance (FMR), parametric resonance at twice the natural FMR frequency was observed. In contrast to FMR, this non-linear resonance was excited only in the vicinity of the point contact where current densities are high. Power-dependent measurements displayed a typical threshold-like behavior of parametric resonance and a broadening of the instability region with increasing power. Parametric resonance showed a linear shift as a function of applied dc bias which is consistent with the field-like spin-transfer torque induced by current on magnetic moments in EBSV.

  10. Disk instability and the time-dependent X-ray emission from the intermediate polar GK Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Kim, Soon-Wook; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The correlation between the disk instability model for the 1981-1989 optical outbursts of the intermediate polar GK Per and the accompanying X-ray emission is examined, and the self-consistency of the combined optical-X-ray model is investigated. Special attention is given to the nature of the transition in the X-ray emission due to the time-dependent accretion rates in the simple column accretion model. The large variation in the efficiency of hard X-ray production is explained.

  11. Disk instability and the time-dependent X-ray emission from the intermediate polar GK Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Kim, Soon-Wook; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    The correlation between the disk instability model for the 1981-1989 optical outbursts of the intermediate polar GK Per and the accompanying X-ray emission is examined, and the self-consistency of the combined optical-X-ray model is investigated. Special attention is given to the nature of the transition in the X-ray emission due to the time-dependent accretion rates in the simple column accretion model. The large variation in the efficiency of hard X-ray production is explained.

  12. TWO-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF THE NONRESONANT, COSMIC-RAY-DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio; Reville, Brian; Kirk, John G.

    2009-06-10

    In supernova remnants, the nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields upstream of collisionless shocks is essential for the acceleration of cosmic rays to the energy of the 'knee' at 10{sup 15.5} eV. A nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current is thought to be responsible for this effect. We perform two-dimensional, particle-in-cell simulations of this instability. We observe an initial growth of circularly polarized nonpropagating magnetic waves as predicted in linear theory. It is demonstrated that in some cases the magnetic energy density in the growing waves can grow to at least 10 times its initial value. We find no evidence of competing modes, nor of significant modification by thermal effects. At late times, we observe saturation of the instability in the simulation, but the mechanism responsible is an artifact of the periodic boundary conditions and has no counterpart in the supernova-shock scenario.

  13. Schlieren Cinematography of Current Driven Plasma Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith; Underwood, Thomas; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Schlieren cinematography of a pulsed plasma deflagration jet is presented and analyzed. An ultra-high frame rate CMOS camera coupled to a Z-type laser Schlieren apparatus is used to obtain flow-field refractometry data for the continuous flow Z-pinch formed within the plasma deflagration jet. The 10 MHz frame rate for 256 consecutive frames provides high temporal resolution, enabling turbulent fluctuations and plasma instabilities to be visualized over the course of a single pulse (20 μs). The Schlieren signal is radiometrically calibrated to obtain a two dimensional mapping of the refraction angle of the axisymmetric pinch plasma, and this mapping is then Abel inverted to derive the plasma density distribution as a function radius, axial coordinate, and time. Analyses of previously unknown discharge characteristics and comparisons with prior work are discussed.

  14. Simulations of Edge Current Driven Kink Modes with BOUT + + code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. Q.; Xu, X. Q.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Xia, T. Y.; Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.

    2013-10-01

    Edge kink modes (or peeling modes) play a key role in the ELMs. The edge kink modes are driven by peak edge current, which comes from the bootstrap current. We calculated sequences of equilibria with different edge current using CORSICA by keeping total current and pressure profile fixed. Based on these equilibria, with the 3-field BOUT + + code, we calculated the MHD instabilities driven by edge current. For linear low-n ideal MHD modes, BOUT + + results agree with GATO results. With the edge current increasing, the dominant modes are changed from high-n ballooning modes to low-n kink modes. The edge current provides also stabilizing effects on high-n ballooning modes. Furthermore, for edge current scan without keeping total current fixed, the increasing edge current can stabilize the high-n ballooning modes and cannot drive kink modes. The diamagnetic effect can stabilize the high-n ballooning modes, but has no effect on the low-n kink modes. Also, the nonlinear behavior of kink modes is analyzed. Work supported by China MOST grant 2013GB111000 and by China NSF grant 10975161. Also performed for USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Ataxia telangiectasia derived iPS cells show preserved x-ray sensitivity and decreased chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Fukawatase, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Okamura, Kohji; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Masuda, Akira; Nasu, Michiyo; Hata, Kenichiro; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Higuchi, Akon; Takubo, Kaiyo; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a neurodegenerative inherited disease with chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. iPS cells lacking ATM (AT-iPS cells) exhibited hypersensitivity to X-ray irradiation, one of the characteristics of the disease. While parental ataxia telangiectasia cells exhibited significant chromosomal abnormalities, AT-iPS cells did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro for at least 80 passages (560 days). Whole exome analysis also showed a comparable nucleotide substitution rate in AT-iPS cells. Taken together, these data show that ATM is involved in protection from irradiation-induced cell death. PMID:24970375

  16. Ataxia telangiectasia derived iPS cells show preserved x-ray sensitivity and decreased chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Fukawatase, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Okamura, Kohji; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Masuda, Akira; Nasu, Michiyo; Hata, Kenichiro; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Higuchi, Akon; Takubo, Kaiyo; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2014-06-27

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a neurodegenerative inherited disease with chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. iPS cells lacking ATM (AT-iPS cells) exhibited hypersensitivity to X-ray irradiation, one of the characteristics of the disease. While parental ataxia telangiectasia cells exhibited significant chromosomal abnormalities, AT-iPS cells did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro for at least 80 passages (560 days). Whole exome analysis also showed a comparable nucleotide substitution rate in AT-iPS cells. Taken together, these data show that ATM is involved in protection from irradiation-induced cell death.

  17. Estimation of the current driven by residual loop voltage in LHCD plasma on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. M.; Yu, L. M.; Wan, B. N.; Xue, E. B.; Fang, Y.; Shi, K. Y.; EAST Team

    2016-02-01

    The lower hybrid wave current drive (LHCD) is one of the efficient methods of driving the non-inductive current required for Tokamak operating in steady-state. Residual loop voltage exists in Tokamak when the non-inductive current is not fully driven. Residual loop voltage also accelerates the fast electrons generated by the lower hybrid wave (LHW), which can drive extra current and combine with the current driven by the LHW. It is generally difficult to separate these two different components of driven current in the experiment. In this paper, the currents driven by LHCD and residual loop voltage are separated directly by solving the Fokker-Plank equation numerically. The fraction of the current driven by residual loop voltage compared to the current driven by LHW is evaluated on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The current driven by residual loop voltage is several percent of the currents driven by the LHCD when the residual loop voltage is small, but it increases with the residual loop voltage up to 25% when the residual loop voltage is about 2 V. The hot electrical conductivity is deduced from the net current driven by the residual loop voltage. Its distribution profile is related to the fast electron distribution driven by LHW.

  18. Mitigation of Hot Electrons from Laser-Plasma Instabilities in Laser-Generated X-Ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeffrey R.

    This thesis describes experiments to understand and mitigate energetic or "hot" electrons from laser-plasma instabilities (LPIs) in an effort to improve radiographic techniques using laser-generated x-ray sources. Initial experiments on the OMEGA-60 laser show evidence of an underlying background generated by x-rays with energies over 10 keV on radiographs using backlit pinhole radiography, whose source is consistent with hard x-rays from LPI-generated hot electrons. Mitigating this background can dramatically reduce uncertainties in measured object densities from radiographs and may be achieved by eliminating the target components in which LPIs are most likely to grow. Experiments were performed on the OMEGA-EP laser to study hot electron production from laser-plasma instabilities in high-Z plasmas relevant to laser-generated x-ray sources. Measurements of hard x-rays show a dramatic reduction in hot-electron energy going from low-Z CH to high-Z Au targets, in a manner that is consistent with steepening electron density profiles that were also measured. The profile-steepening, we infer, increased thresholds of LPIs and contributed to the reduced hot-electron production at higher Z. Possible mechanisms for generating hot electrons include the two-plasmon decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities driven by multiple laser beams. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code predict that both of these instabilities were above threshold with linear threshold parameters that decreased with increasing Z due to steepening length-scales, as well as enhanced laser absorption and increased collisional and Landau damping of electron plasma waves. Another set of experiments were performed on the OMEGA-60 laser to test whether hard x-ray background could be mitigated in backlit pinhole imagers by controlling laser-plasma instabilities. Based on the results above, we hypothesized that LPIs and hot electrons that lead to hard x-ray background would be reduced

  19. Z-pinch diagnostics, plasma and liner instabilities and new x-ray techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Oona, H.; Anderson, B.; Benage, J.

    1996-09-01

    Pulse power experiments of the last several decades have contributed greatly to the understanding of high temperature and high density plasmas and, more recently, to the study of hydrodynamic effects in thick imploding cylinders. Common to all these experiments is the application of a large current pulse to a cylindrically symmetric load, with the resulting Lorenz force compressing the load to produce hydrodynamic motion and/or high temperature, high density plasma. In Los Alamos, Pulsed power experiments are carried out at two facilities. Experiments at low current (from several million to ten million Amperes) are conducted on the Pegasus II capacitor bank. Experiments with higher currents (10`s to 100`s MA range) are performed in Ancho Canyon with the explosively driven Procyon and MAGO magnetic flux compression generator systems. In this paper, the authors present a survey of diagnostic capabilities and results from several sets of experiments. First, they discuss the initiation and growth of instabilities in plasmas generated from the implosion of hollow z-pinches in the pegasus and Procyon experiments. Next they discuss spectroscopic data from the plasmas produced by the MAGO system. They also show time resolved imaging data from thick ({approximately} .4 mm) liner implosions. Finally, the authors discuss improvements to x-ray and visible light imaging and spectrographic diagnostic techniques. The emphasis of this paper is not so much a detailed discussion of the experiments, but a presentation of imaging and spectroscopic results and the implications of these observations to the experiments.

  20. ANALYSIS OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY WITH THE EFFECT OF COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Takuhito; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2015-01-10

    We present the results obtained from the linear stability analysis and 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetorotational instability (MRI), including the effects of cosmic rays (CRs). We took into account the CR diffusion along the magnetic field but neglected the cross-field-line diffusion. Two models are considered in this paper: the shearing box model and differentially rotating cylinder model. We studied how MRI is affected by the initial CR pressure (i.e., energy) distribution. In the shearing box model, the initial state is uniform distribution. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI does not depend on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient. In the differentially rotating cylinder model, the initial state is a constant angular momentum polytropic disk threaded by a weak uniform vertical magnetic field. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI becomes larger if the CR diffusion coefficient is larger. Both results are confirmed by MHD simulations. The MHD simulation results show that the outward movement of matter by the growth of MRI is not impeded by the CR pressure gradient, and the centrifugal force that acts on the concentrated matter becomes larger. Consequently, the growth rate of MRI is increased. On the other hand, if the initial CR pressure is uniform, then the growth rate of the MRI barely depends on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient.

  1. Tomographic analysis of the nonthermal x-ray bursts during disruption instability in the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Savrukhin, P. V.; Ermolaeva, A. I.; Shestakov, E. A.; Khramenkov, A. V.

    2014-10-01

    Non-thermal x-ray radiation (E{sub γ} up to 150 keV) is measured in the T-10 tokamaks during disruption instability using two sets of CdTe detectors (10 vertical and 7 horizontal view detectors). Special narrow cupper tubes collimators with lead screening and CdTe detectors integrated with amplifiers inside metallic containers provides enhanced spatial resolution of the system (r ~ 3 cm) and assures protection from the parasitic hard x-ray (E{sub γ} up to 1.5 MeV) and electromagnetic loads during disruption. Spatial localization of the nonthermal x-ray emissivity is reconstructed using tomographic Cormack technique with SVD matrix inversion. Analysis indicated appearance of an intensive non-thermal x-ray bursts during initial stage of the disruptions at high density. The bursts are characterized by repetitive spikes (2–3 kHz) of the x-ray emissivity from the plasma core area. Analysis indicated that the spikes can be connected with acceleration of the non-thermal electrons in enhanced longitudinal electric fields induced during energy quench at the disruption instability.

  2. Tomographic analysis of the nonthermal x-ray bursts during disruption instability in the T-10 tokamak.

    PubMed

    Savrukhin, P V; Ermolaeva, A I; Shestakov, E A; Khramenkov, A V

    2014-10-01

    Non-thermal x-ray radiation (Eγ up to 150 keV) is measured in the T-10 tokamaks during disruption instability using two sets of CdTe detectors (10 vertical and 7 horizontal view detectors). Special narrow cupper tubes collimators with lead screening and CdTe detectors integrated with amplifiers inside metallic containers provides enhanced spatial resolution of the system (r ∼ 3 cm) and assures protection from the parasitic hard x-ray (Eγ up to 1.5 MeV) and electromagnetic loads during disruption. Spatial localization of the nonthermal x-ray emissivity is reconstructed using tomographic Cormack technique with SVD matrix inversion. Analysis indicated appearance of an intensive non-thermal x-ray bursts during initial stage of the disruptions at high density. The bursts are characterized by repetitive spikes (2-3 kHz) of the x-ray emissivity from the plasma core area. Analysis indicated that the spikes can be connected with acceleration of the non-thermal electrons in enhanced longitudinal electric fields induced during energy quench at the disruption instability.

  3. A CORONAL MASS EJECTION AND HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE KINK INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kyung-Suk; Bong, Su-Chan; Kim, Yeon-Han; Park, Young-Deuk; Lee, Jeongwoo; Joshi, Bhuwan

    2009-09-20

    We present a morphological study of the 2004 August 18 solar eruption that occurred in the active region NOAA 10656 near the west limb using extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) data from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), Halpha filtergram of Big Bear Solar Observatory, white light images of Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO), hard X-ray (HXR) data of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), and microwave data of the Owens Valley Solar Array. In this event, we have an excellent set of observations for tracing the early evolution of the coronal mass ejection (CME) from a flux rope emergence to its propagation into space as a well-connected series of events thanks to the coronameter's field of view (FOV) down to 1.1 solar radius in an overlap with that of the TRACE. This data set reveals continuously evolving EUV, Halpha, and WL features that suggest the rise of a small, low-lying loop, its writhing motion, break of the kinked loop at its crossing point, and transformation of the ejecta to the CME. The HXR and microwave sources are found in varying locations with a complicated temporal dependence, which, we interpret, is due to two successive flares in the event. The first flare appears to be associated with the rise of the small loop, which then triggers the second flare. During the second flare a HXR coronal source is detected at the crossing point of the kinked loop, and more intriguingly, the kinked loop apparently breaks at the crossing point of the two legs, which indicates a magnetic reconnection at the X-point configuration. After the break of the kinked UV loop, a CME structure shows up in the MLSO FOV, and propagates away from the Sun. It is concluded that this CME occurred due to the kink instability.

  4. Radiation-induced genomic instability: delayed mutagenic and cytogenetic effects of X rays and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Little, J B; Nagasawa, H; Pfenning, T; Vetrovs, H

    1997-10-01

    The frequency of mutations at the Hprt locus was measured in clonal populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells derived from single cells surviving exposure to 0-12 Gy of X rays or 2 Gy of alpha particles. Approximately 8-9% of 446 clonal populations examined 23 population doublings after irradiation showed high frequencies of late-arising mutations as indicated by mutant fractions 10(2)-10(4)-fold above background. The frequency with which such clones occurred was similar for alpha-particle irradiation and X irradiation, with no apparent dose dependence for X irradiation over the range of 4-12 Gy. The molecular structure of Hprt mutations was determined by analysis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction of all nine exons. Of mutations induced directly after exposure to X rays, 75% involved partial or total gene deletions. Only 19-23% of late-arising (delayed) mutations were associated with deletions, the preponderance of these being partial deletions involving one or two exons. This spectrum was very similar to that for spontaneously arising mutations. To determine whether delayed mutations were non-clonal, the spectrum of exons deleted was examined among 29 mutants with partial deletions derived from a single clonal population. The results indicated that at least 15 of these mutants arose independently. To examine the relationship between the occurrence of delayed mutations and chromosomal instability, 60 Hprt mutant subclones isolated from a clonal population showing a high frequency of delayed mutations were serially cultivated in vitro. Of these, 14 showed a slow-growth phenotype with a high frequency of polyploid cells (10-38%) and a markedly enhanced frequency of non-clonal chromosomal rearrangements including both chromosome-type and chromatid-type aberrations. These clones also showed a 3- to 30-fold increase in the frequency of ouabain-resistant mutations; no ouabain-resistant mutants were induced directly by X irradiation. These results suggest that among

  5. Further numerical studies of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the context of accreting X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Nepveu, M.; Robertson, J. A.

    1984-06-01

    An earlier investigation of the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability for accreting X-ray sources is extended to allow for more realistic initial conditions. The two-dimensional computations show the heavy and light fluids undergoing complementary circulatory motions which result in the formation of alternating inverted and upright 'mushroom' structures along the interface. The structures develop independently of the shape of the initial perturbation. Short wavelength modes have a strong tendency to dominate long ones, with the lower bound being set by viscous damping. A relatively modest vertical magnetic field will act to suppress the vortex motions and produce a 'bubble and spike' structure. A crude simulation of the instability occurring in a radiation-supported accretion column is presented; after a slow start, the magnetically constrained plasma drips down into the photon medium in the form of long narrow fingers, the dominant scale-length being determined by radiative viscosity.

  6. Chromosomal instability induced by mammography X-rays in primary human fibroblasts from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg-Schwager, Marlis; Gregus, Anke

    2012-11-01

    Mammography X-rays are known to induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) whose error-free recombinational repair requires the function of the tumour repressor genes BRCA1 (breast-cancer-associated gene 1) and BRCA2 (breast-cancer-associated gene 2). Since un- or misrepaired DSB lead to chromosomal anomalies which may promote the development of breast cancer, we have studied the potential of mammography X-rays for immediate and delayed induction of chromosomal anomalies in human primary fibroblasts from BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Primary human fibroblasts from three BRCA1, three BRCA2 mutation carriers, one BRCA2-deficient fanconi anemia (FA) patient and three normal individuals were exposed to various doses of mammography X-rays. Chromosomal anomalies at first mitosis and at several population doublings post-irradiation were assayed (Giemsa staining and Fish [fluorescence in situ hybridization]). No effect of the BRCA mutation status was observed on survival curves after exposure to mammography X-rays and on the dose-dependent increase of chromosomal anomalies at first mitosis post-irradiation. In contrast, several population doublings after exposure to a low dose of only 0.5 Gy chromosomal instability, manifested as gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy, had developed in BRCA2-deficient FA fibroblasts and in some - but not all - BRCA heterozygous fibroblasts. Low doses of mammography X-rays have the potential to induce chromosomal instability in fibroblasts from BRCA mutation carriers: Cells exhibit gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy similar to those observed in breast cancer cells. These results suggest that for women carrying a BRCA mutation early and frequent screening with mammography X-rays may not be the method of choice to detect breast cancer.

  7. Observation of room-temperature magnetic skyrmions and their current-driven dynamics in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Seonghoon; Litzius, Kai; Krüger, Benjamin; Im, Mi-Young; Caretta, Lucas; Richter, Kornel; Mann, Maxwell; Krone, Andrea; Reeve, Robert M.; Weigand, Markus; Agrawal, Parnika; Lemesh, Ivan; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Fischer, Peter; Kläui, Mathias; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected spin textures that exhibit fascinating physical behaviours and large potential in highly energy-efficient spintronic device applications. The main obstacles so far are that skyrmions have been observed in only a few exotic materials and at low temperatures, and fast current-driven motion of individual skyrmions has not yet been achieved. Here, we report the observation of stable magnetic skyrmions at room temperature in ultrathin transition metal ferromagnets with magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy. We demonstrate the ability to generate stable skyrmion lattices and drive trains of individual skyrmions by short current pulses along a magnetic racetrack at speeds exceeding 100 m s-1 as required for applications. Our findings provide experimental evidence of recent predictions and open the door to room-temperature skyrmion spintronics in robust thin-film heterostructures.

  8. Implications of plasma beam instabilities for the statistics of the Fermi hard gamma-ray blazars and the origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, Avery E.; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald; Chang, Philip

    2014-08-01

    Fermi has been instrumental in constraining the luminosity function and redshift evolution of gamma-ray bright BL Lac objects, a subpopulation of blazars with almost featureless optical spectra. This includes limits on the spectrum and anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB), redshift distribution of nearby Fermi active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the construction of a logN-log S relation. Based on these, it has been argued that the evolution of the gamma-ray bright BL Lac population must be much less dramatic than that of other AGNs. However, critical to such claims is the assumption that inverse Compton cascades reprocess emission above a TeV into the Fermi energy range, substantially enhancing the strength of the observed limits. Here we demonstrate that in the absence of such a process, due, e.g., to the presence of virulent plasma beam instabilities that preempt the cascade, a population of TeV-bright BL Lac objects that evolve similarly to quasars is consistent with the population of hard gamma-ray BL Lac objects observed by Fermi. Specifically, we show that a simple model for the properties and luminosity function is simultaneously able to reproduce their logN-log S relation, local redshift distribution, and contribution to the EGRB and its anisotropy without any free parameters. Insofar as the naturalness of a picture in which the hard gamma-ray BL Lac population exhibits the strong redshift evolution observed in other tracers of the cosmological history of accretion onto halos is desirable, this lends support for the absence of the inverse Compton cascades and the existence of the beam plasma instabilities.

  9. Efficient stopping of current-driven domain wall using a local Rashba field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatara, Gen; Saarikoski, Henri; Mitsumata, Chiharu

    2016-10-01

    We show theoretically that a locally embedded Rashba interaction acts as a strong pinning center for current-driven domain walls and demonstrate efficient capturing and depinning of the wall using a weak Rashba interaction of the order of 0.01 eV Å. Our discovery is expected to be useful for highly reliable control of domain walls in racetrack memories.

  10. Detection of current-driven magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowire by tunneling magnetoresistive sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, Mitsunobu; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Saito, Nobuo; Hayashi, Naoto; Nakagawa, Shigeki

    2015-05-01

    Current-driven magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires have attracted a great deal of interest in terms of both physical studies and engineering applications. The anomalous Hall effect measurement is widely used for detecting the magnetization direction of current-driven magnetic domains in a magnetic nanowire. However, the problem with this measurement is that the detection point for current-driven domain wall motion is fixed at only the installed sensing wire across the specimen nanowire. A potential solution is the magnetic domain scope method, whereby the distribution of the magnetic flux leaking from the specimen can be analyzed directly by contact-scanning a tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor on a sample. In this study, we fabricated specimen nanowires consisting of [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]21/Ta(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on Si substrates. A tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was placed on the nanowire surface and a predetermined current pulse was applied. Real-time detection of the current-driven magnetic domain motion was successful in that the resistance of the tunneling magnetoresistive sensor was changed with the magnetization direction beneath the sensor. This demonstrates that magnetic domain detection using a tunneling magnetoresistive sensor is effective for the direct analysis of micro magnetic domain motion.

  11. Induction of Genomic Instability In Vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Simon, Sanford, R.; Whorton, Elbert, B.

    2006-01-06

    The overall goal of this project is to determine if low doses (below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection, i.e. less than or equal to 10 cGy) of low LET radiation can induce genomic instability. The magnitude of genomic instability was measured as delayed chromosome instability in bone marrow cells of exposed mice with different levels of endogenous DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) activity, i.e. high (C57BL/6J mice), intermediate (BALB/cJ mice), and extremely low (Scid mice). In addition, at early time points (1 and 4 hrs) following irradiation, levels of activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcription factor known to be involved in regulating the expression of genes responsible for cell protection following stimuli, were measured in these cells. Bone marrow cells were collected at different times following irradiation, i.e. 1 hr, 4 hrs, 1 month, and 6 months. A total of five mice per dose per strain were sacrificed at each time point for sample collection. As a result, a total of 80 mice from each strain were used. The frequency and the type of metaphase chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells collected from exposed mice at different times following irradiation were used as markers for radiation-induced genomic instability. A three-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol for mouse chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was used for the analysis of delayed stable chromosomal aberrations in metaphase cells. All other visible chromatid-type aberrations and gross structural abnormalities involving non-painted chromosomes were also evaluated on the same metaphase cells used for scoring the stable chromosomal aberrations of painted chromosomes. Levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation were also determined in cells at 1 and 4 hrs following irradiation (indicative of early responses).

  12. Principle and experimental investigation of current-driven negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Liu, Jianshe; Zhang, Yingshan; Cai, Han; Li, Gang; Liu, Qichun; Han, Siyuan; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-01

    A negative-inductance superconducting quantum interference device (nSQUID) is an adiabatic superconducting logic device with high energy efficiency, and therefore a promising building block for large-scale low-power superconducting computing. However, the principle of the nSQUID is not that straightforward and an nSQUID driven by voltage is vulnerable to common mode noise. We investigate a single nSQUID driven by current instead of voltage, and clarify the principle of the adiabatic transition of the current-driven nSQUID between different states. The basic logic operations of the current-driven nSQUID with proper parameters are simulated by WRspice. The corresponding circuit is fabricated with a 100 A cm‑2 Nb-based lift-off process, and the experimental results at low temperature confirm the basic logic operations as a gated buffer.

  13. Nonstationary current-driven dynamics of vortex domain walls in films with in-plane anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovik, M. N.; Filippov, B. N.; Korzunin, L. G.

    2017-02-01

    Micromagnetic simulation of a current-driven vortex domain wall motion in a film with in-plane anisotropy was carried out. The current density values j >jc were considered corresponding to the nonstationary motion, with the domain wall structure dynamic transformation occurred. A nonlinear dependence of the jc value on the film thickness was obtained. The nonstationary motion regime existence restricted the possibility to increase the domain wall velocity by increasing j and decreasing the damping parameter.

  14. Thorough small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the instability of liquid micro-jets in air.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Benedetta; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Pérez, Javier; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Liquid jets are of interest, both for their industrial relevance and for scientific applications (more important, in particular for X-rays, after the advent of free-electron lasers that require liquid jets as sample carrier). Instability mechanisms have been described theoretically and by numerical simulation, but confirmed by few experimental techniques. In fact, these are mainly based on cameras, which is limited by the imaging resolution, and on light scattering, which is hindered by absorption, reflection, Mie scattering and multiple scattering due to complex air/liquid interfaces during jet break-up. In this communication it is demonstrated that synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can give quantitative information on liquid jet dynamics at the nanoscale, by detecting time-dependent morphology and break-up length. Jets ejected from circular tubes of different diameters (100-450 µm) and speeds (0.7-21 m s(-1)) have been explored to cover the Rayleigh and first wind-induced regimes. Various solvents (water, ethanol, 2-propanol) and their mixtures have been examined. The determination of the liquid jet behaviour becomes essential, as it provides background data in subsequent studies of chemical and biological reactions using SAXS or X-ray diffraction based on synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers.

  15. Investigations into the seeding of instabilities due to x-ray preheat in beryllium-based inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, E. N.; Greenfield, S. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Cobble, J. A.; Luo, S. N.; Montgomery, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.

    2010-05-15

    The geometry of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules makes them susceptible to various types of hydrodynamic instabilities at different stages during an ICF implosion. From the beginnings of ICF research, it has been known that grain-level anisotropy and defects could be a significant source of instability seeding in solid beryllium capsules. We report on experiments conducted at the Trident laser facility [S. H. Batha et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10F305 (2008)] to measure dynamic surface roughening from hard x-ray preheat due to anisotropic thermal expansion. M-band emission from laser-produced gold plasma was used to heat beryllium targets with different amounts of copper doping to temperatures comparable to ICF ignition preheat levels. Dynamic roughening measurements were made on the surface away from the plasma at discrete times up to 8 ns after the beginning of the drive pulse using a surface displacement interferometer with nanometer scale sensitivity. Undoped large-grained targets were measured to roughen between 15 and 50 nm rms. Fine-grained, copper-doped targets were observed to roughen near the sensitivity limit of the interferometer. The results of this work have shed light on the effects of high-Z doping and microstructural refinement on the dynamics of differential thermal expansion and have shown that current ICF capsule designs using beryllium are very effective in reducing preheat related roughening ahead of the first shock.

  16. THE DISCOVERY OF A NEW INSTABILITY IN A HYPERACCRETION FLOW AND ITS IMPLICATION FOR GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanaka, Norita; Mineshige, Shin; Piran, Tsvi

    2013-11-01

    A hyperaccretion flow around a stellar mass black hole is thought to be the most plausible engine that powers gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The flow efficiently cools via neutrino emission at ∼> 0.003-0.01 M {sub ☉} s{sup –1} (corresponding to a luminosity of ∼10{sup 50} erg s{sup –1}), while neither neutrino nor photon emission is efficient below this rate, so the flow should be advection-dominated. We carefully solve how a transition occurs from the advection-dominated to the neutrino-dominated branches, and find that the slope of the thermal equilibrium curve is negative in the surface density-accretion rate (Σ- M-dot ) plane, a condition for viscous instability, at radii smaller than ∼12 R {sub g} (with R {sub g} being the gravitational radius). We also confirm that the flow is thermally stable. The consequence of this instability is the formation of a clumpy structure in the flow. This is because the larger (respectively smaller) surface density is, the smaller (respectively larger) the mass accretion rate from the region in question becomes, leading to growth of the density contrast. The timescale for clump formation is estimated to be shorter than 0.1 s. The observational implication is discussed in the context of GRBs. We suggest that this might explain the origin of the large variability observed in the prompt emission of GRBs.

  17. High resistance to X-rays and therapeutic carbon ions in glioblastoma cells bearing dysfunctional ATM associates with intrinsic chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Dokic, Ivana; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Schoell, Brigitte; Jauch, Anna; Krunic, Damir; Debus, Jürgen; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2015-02-01

    To investigate chromosomal instability and radiation response mechanisms in glioblastoma cells. We undertook a comparative analysis of two patient-derived glioblastoma cell lines. Their resistance to low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation was assessed using clonogenic survival assay and their intrinsic chromosome instability status using fluorescence in situ hybridization. DNA damage was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and by γ-H2AX foci quantification. Expression of DNA damage response proteins was assessed by immunoblot. Increased radioresistance to X-rays as well as carbon ions was observed in glioblastoma cells exhibiting high levels of naturally occurring chromosomal instability and impaired Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling, as reflected by lack of phosphorylation of ATM, CHK2 and p53 after double-strand breaks induction. Our results indicate the existence of highly radioresistant glioblastoma cells, characterized by dysfunctional ATM signaling and high levels of intrinsic chromosomal instability.

  18. Chromosome instability and X-ray hypersensitivity in a microcephalic and growth-retarded child

    SciTech Connect

    Barbi, G.; Scheres, J.M.; Schindler, D.; Taalman, R.D.; Rodens, K.; Mehnert, K.; Mueller, M.S.; Seyschab, H. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors report on a microcephalic, growth-retarded newborn girl without major anomalies who has chromosome instability in lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Frequent involvement of bands 7p13, 7q34, 14q11, and 14q32 suggested the diagnosis of ataxia telangiectasia (AT) or a related disorder. Supportive evidence was radioresistant DNA synthesis in fibroblasts and radiation hypersensitivity of short-term lymphocyte cultures. Follow-up for nearly 4 years showed largely normal development, and no signs of telangiectasia, ataxia, or immunodeficiency. Serum AFP levels turned from elevated at age 5 months to normal at age 2 years. They propose that their patient belongs to the expanding category of AT-related genetic disorders, probably to the Nijmegen breakage syndrome.

  19. PLASMA EFFECTS ON EXTRAGALACTIC ULTRAHIGH-ENERGY COSMIC-RAY HADRON BEAMS IN COSMIC VOIDS. II. KINETIC INSTABILITY OF PARALLEL ELECTROSTATIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Krakau, S.; Schlickeiser, R. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2016-02-20

    The linear instability of an ultrarelativistic hadron beam in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium (IGM) is investigated with respect to the excitation of parallel electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations. This analysis is important for the propagation of extragalactic ultrarelativistic cosmic rays from their distant sources to Earth. As opposed to the previous paper, we calculate the minimum instability growth time for Lorentz-distributed cosmic rays which traverse the hot IGM. The growth times are orders of magnitude higher than the cosmic-ray propagation time in the IGM. Since the backreaction of the generated plasma fluctuations (plateauing) lasts longer than the propagation time, the cosmic-ray hadron beam can propagate to the Earth without losing a significant amount of energy to electrostatic turbulence.

  20. The Role of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability for Producing Loop-top Hard X-Ray Sources in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xia; Yuan, Ding; Xia, Chun; Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Keppens, Rony

    2016-12-01

    We propose a model for the formation of loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) sources in solar flares through the inverse Compton mechanism, scattering the surrounding soft X-ray (SXR) photons to higher energy HXR photons. We simulate the consequences of a flare-driven energy deposit in the upper chromosphere in the impulsive phase of single loop flares. The consequent chromosphere evaporation flows from both footpoints reach speeds up to hundreds of kilometers per second, and we demonstrate how this triggers Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in the loop top, under mildly asymmetric conditions, or more toward the loop flank for strongly asymmetric cases. The KHI vortices further fragment the magnetic topology into multiple magnetic islands and current sheets, and the hot plasma within leads to a bright loop-top SXR source region. We argue that the magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that appears at the loop apex could be an efficient accelerator of non-thermal particles, which the island structures can trap at the loop-top. These accelerated non-thermal particles can upscatter the surrounding thermal SXR photons emitted by the extremely hot evaporated plasma to HXR photons.

  1. Verification of gyrokinetic particle simulation of current-driven instability in fusion plasmas. III. Collisionless tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dongjian; Bao, Jian; Han, Tao; Wang, Jiaqi; Lin, Zhihong

    2016-02-15

    A finite-mass electron fluid model for low frequency electromagnetic fluctuations, particularly the collisionless tearing mode, has been implemented in the gyrokinetic toroidal code. Using this fluid model, linear properties of the collisionless tearing mode have been verified. Simulations verify that the linear growth rate of the single collisionless tearing mode is proportional to D{sub e}{sup 2}, where D{sub e} is the electron skin depth. On the other hand, the growth rate of a double tearing mode is proportional to D{sub e} in the parameter regime of fusion plasmas.

  2. Controlling Chaos Caused by the Current-Driven Ion Acoustic Instability in a Laboratory Plasma Using Delayed Feedback

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-20

    for the Circuit experimental systems working in real time. k[x(t) - x(t - r)] We have attempted chaos control using the TDAS method based on the...Pyragas technique in order to attain stable chaos control . System 2. Experimental set up I 1 The experiments are performed using a Double G2 G1 x(t) Plasma

  3. Current-Driven Motion of Magnetic Domain Wall with Many Bloch Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Junichi; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2015-08-01

    The current-driven motion of a domain wall (DW) in a ferromagnet with many Bloch lines (BLs) via the spin transfer torque is studied theoretically. It is found that the motion of BLs changes the current-velocity (j-v) characteristic considerably. In particular, the critical current density for overcoming the pinning force is even lower than that of a skyrmion by the factor of the Gilbert damping coefficient α. This is in sharp contrast to the case of magnetic-field-driven motion, where the existence of BLs reduces the mobility of the DW.

  4. Current-driven antivortex core resonance measured by the rectifying effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Minori; Nozaki, Yukio

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the current-driven resonance of a single antivortex core confined in a cross-shaped Ni81Fe19 wire. The antivortex core dynamics can be excited purely by spin transfer torque; therefore, it is significant to understand the current-induced magnetization dynamics. The antivortex core resonance can be measured from the frequency dependence of a rectified voltage generated by an alternating current application. We found that the resonance frequency and peak amplitude greatly depend on the external magnetic field. This result is in good agreement with micromagnetic simulation.

  5. Current-driven domain wall depinning from an anisotropy boundary in nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, T; Drews, A; Meier, G

    2014-05-21

    The interaction of a current-driven domain wall with an anisotropy boundary in nanowires with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is investigated. A local reduction of the anisotropy constant is used to create an artificial boundary where the domain wall gets pinned. Micromagnetic simulations and analytical calculations, based on a one-dimensional model, are employed to describe the interaction of the domain wall and the anisotropy boundary and to determine the depinning current densities. Two different pinning regimes-an intrinsic and an extrinsic-can be identified in dependence with the characteristic of the boundary. A very good agreement between simulated and analytically obtained data is achieved.

  6. Current-driven antivortex core resonance measured by the rectifying effect

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Minori; Nozaki, Yukio

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate the current-driven resonance of a single antivortex core confined in a cross-shaped Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} wire. The antivortex core dynamics can be excited purely by spin transfer torque; therefore, it is significant to understand the current-induced magnetization dynamics. The antivortex core resonance can be measured from the frequency dependence of a rectified voltage generated by an alternating current application. We found that the resonance frequency and peak amplitude greatly depend on the external magnetic field. This result is in good agreement with micromagnetic simulation.

  7. Effect of Joule heating in current-driven domain wall motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Nasu, S.; Tanigawa, H.; Ono, T.; Miyake, K.; Mibu, K.; Shinjo, T.

    2005-01-01

    It was found that high current density needed for the current-driven domain wall motion results in the Joule heating of the sample. The sample temperature, when the current-driven domain wall motion occurred, was estimated by measuring the sample resistance during the application of a pulsed current. The sample temperature was 750 K for the threshold current density of 6.7×1011A/m2 in a 10-nm-thick Ni81Fe19 wire with a width of 240 nm on thermally oxidized silicon substrate. The temperature was raised to 830 K for the current density of 7.5×1011A/m2, which is very close to the Curie temperature of bulk Ni81Fe19. When the current density exceeded 7.5×1011A/m2, an appearance of a multidomain structure in the wire was observed by magnetic force microscopy, suggesting that the sample temperature exceeded the Curie temperature.

  8. Current-driven phase-change optical gate switch using indium-tin-oxide heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kentaro; Kuwahara, Masashi; Kawashima, Hitoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-01

    We proposed and fabricated a current-driven phase-change optical gate switch using a Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST225) thin film, an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) heater, and a Si waveguide. Microfabrication technology compatible with CMOS fabrication was used for the fabrication of the Si waveguide. The repetitive phase changing of GST225 was obtained by injecting a current pulse into the ITO heater beneath the GST225 thin film. The switching operation was observed by injecting a 100-ns current pulse of 20 mA into the ITO heater. The average extinction ratio over the wavelength range of 1,525 to 1,625 nm was 1.2 dB.

  9. Generalization of a circuit theory for current perpendicular to plane magnetoresistance and current-driven torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchon, A.; Slonczewski, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    Extensions of an existing circuit theory for current perpendicular to plane magnetoresistance and current-driven torque in noncollinear magnetic-multilayer pillar devices are presented. Our expressions for monodomain critical-current threshold Jc and giant magnetoresistance ΔR are firstly derived in terms of assumed spin-channel resistances for each of the two ferromagnets. Spinflips are thus neglected. We find a class of closed linear relationships connecting Jc-1 and ΔR . We then derive more general expressions for these quantities which take into account spin-flip relaxation. In this case, we assume analytically calculable linear 2×2 current-voltage matrices for the separate two-channel ferromagnets. These expressions again lead to a class of closed linear relationships connecting Jc-1 and ΔR . The latter generalization gives a simple theoretical framework to take into account bulk and interfacial spin flip and more complicated multilayer structures often used in experiments.

  10. Current-driven magnetic domain wall motion and its real-time detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kab-Jin; Yoshimura, Yoko; Ono, Teruo

    2017-08-01

    Current-controlled magnetic domain wall motion has opened the possibility of a novel type of shift register memory device, which has been optimistically predicted to replace existing magnetic memories. Owing to this promising prospect, intensive work has been carried out during the last few decades. In this article, we first review the progress in the study of current-induced magnetic domain wall motion. Underlying mechanisms behind the domain wall motion, which have been discovered during last few decades, as well as technological achievements are presented. We then present our recent experimental results on the real-time detection of current-driven multiple magnetic domain wall motion, which directly demonstrates the operation of a magnetic domain wall shift register.

  11. Mechanical Signature of Heat Generated in a Current-Driven Ferromagnetic Resonance System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Un; Jo, Myunglae; Park, Seondo; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Yang, Chanuk; Kang, Seokwon; Park, Yun Daniel

    2017-07-01

    In a current-driven ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) system, heat generated by time-dependent magnetoresistance effects, caused by magnetization precession, cannot be overlooked. Here, we describe the generated heat by magnetization motion under electric current in a freestanding nanoelectromechanical resonator fashioned from a permalloy (Py )/Pt bilayer. By piezoresistive transduction of Pt, the mechanical mode is electrically detected at room temperature and the internal heat in Py excluding thermoelectric effects is quantified as a shift of the mechanical resonance. We find that the measured spectral shifts correspond to the FMR, which is further verified from the spin-torque FMR measurement. Furthermore, the angular dependence of the mechanical reaction on an applied magnetic field reveals that the full accounting of FMR heat dissipation requires the time-dependent magnetoresistance effect.

  12. Nonmonotonic effects of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on current-driven vortex wall motions in magnetic nanostripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuan-Chang; Lei, Hai-Yang; Hu, Jing-Guo

    2015-09-01

    In a magnetic nanostripe, the effects of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) on the current-driven horizontal motion of vortex wall along the stripe and the vertical motion of the vortex core are studied by micromagnetic simulations. The results show that the horizontal and vertical motion can generally be monotonously enhanced by PMA. However, when the current is small, a nonmonotonic phenomenon for the horizontal motion is found. Namely, the velocity of the horizontal motion firstly decreases and then increases with the increase of the PMA. We find that the reason for this is that the PMA can firstly increase and then decrease the confining force induced by the confining potential energy. In addition, the PMA always enhances the driving force induced by the current. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11247026 and 11374253).

  13. Resonant field amplification with feedback-stabilized regime in current driven resistive wall mode

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yueqiang; In, Y.; Okabayashi, M.

    2010-07-15

    The stability and resonant field response of current driven resistive wall modes are numerically studied for DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low pressure plasmas. The resonant field response of the feedback-stabilized resistive wall mode is investigated both analytically and numerically, and compared with the response from intrinsically stable or marginally stable modes. The modeling qualitatively reproduces the experimental results. Furthermore, based on some recent results and on the indirect numerical evidence in this work, it is suggested that the mode stability behavior observed in DIII-D experiments is due to the kink-peeling mode stabilization by the separatrix geometry. The phase inversion radius of the computed plasma displacement does not generally coincide with the radial locations of rational surfaces, also supporting experimental observations.

  14. Current Driven Rotating Kink Mode in a Plasma Column with Non-Line-Tied Free End

    SciTech Connect

    Furno, I; Intrator, T P; Ryutov, D D; Abbate, S; Madziwa-Nussinov, T; Light, A; Dorf, L; Lapenta, G

    2006-03-28

    First experimental measurements are presented for the kink instability in a linear plasma column which is insulated from an axial boundary by finite sheath resistivity. Instability threshold below the classical Kruskal-Shafranov threshold, axially asymmetric mode structure and rotation are observed. These are accurately reproduced by a recent kink theory, which includes axial plasma flow and one end of the plasma column that is free to move due to a non-line-tied boundary condition.

  15. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, “native-roughness” modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.; Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-07-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15%–20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3–4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have

  16. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, "native-roughness" modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hoover, D. E.; Landen, O. L.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.

    2015-07-01

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications ("native roughness") used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ˜3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ˜15%-20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ˜3-4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have prompted

  17. The effect of intermediate frequency on sheath dynamics in collisionless current driven triple frequency capacitive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.; Turner, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The Capacitively Coupled Plasma discharge featuring operation in current driven triple frequency configuration has analytically been investigated, and the outcome is verified by utilising the 1D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code. In this analysis, the role of middle frequency component of the applied signal has precisely been explored. The discharge parameters are seen to be sensitive to the ratio of the chosen middle frequency to lower and higher frequencies for fixed amplitudes of the three frequency components. On the basis of analysis and PIC simulation results, the middle frequency component is demonstrated to act as additional control over sheath potential, electron sheath heating, and ion energy distribution function (iedf) of the plasma discharge. For the electron sheath heating, effect of the middle frequency is seen to be pronounced as it approaches to the lower frequency component. On the other hand, for the iedf, the control is more sensitive as the middle frequency approaches towards the higher frequency. The PIC estimate for the electron sheath heating is found to be in reasonably good agreement with the analytical prediction based on the Kaganovich formulation.

  18. Quantifying spin torque effects using a current-driven magnetic vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Kristen

    2013-03-01

    Spin transfer torques offer great potential for the development of spin-based devices for processing and storing information but there is still debate surrounding the relative contributions of the adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin torque effects. Magnetic vortices in patterned magnetic films provide a model system that can be used to quantify these effects. Micromagnetic calculations of the current-driven motion of a magnetic vortex in a patterned Permalloy element show that the two spin torque effects have distinguishable influences on the trajectories of the vortex core and, furthermore, that the effect of the current-generated magnetic fields (Oersted) that are often non-negligible when current flows through magnetic nanostructures can also be separated out. An analysis of a series of experimental images of vortex trajectories obtained using a recently developed dynamic Lorentz transmission electron microscopy technique provides a measure of the non-adiabatic spin torque parameter with greatly improved precision. The work described here was carried out in collaboration with Shawn Pollard, L. Huang, Dario Arena, and Yimei Zhu (Brookhaven). This work was supported by the NSF and the DOE.

  19. Current-driven vortex domain wall motion in wire-tube nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Espejo, A. P.; Vidal-Silva, N.; López-López, J. A.; Goerlitz, D.; Nielsch, K.; Escrig, J.

    2015-03-30

    We have investigated the current-driven domain wall motion in nanostructures comprised of a pair of nanotube and nanowire segments. Under certain values of external magnetic fields, it is possible to pin a vortex domain wall in the transition zone between the wire and tube segments. We explored the behavior of this domain wall under the action of an electron flow applied in the opposite direction to the magnetic field. Thus, for a fixed magnetic field, it is possible to release a domain wall pinned simply by increasing the intensity of the current density, or conversely, for a fixed current density, it is possible to release the domain wall simply decreasing the magnetic external field. When the domain wall remains pinned due to the competition between the current density and the magnetic external field, it exhibits a oscillation frequency close to 8 GHz. The amplitude of the oscillations increases with the current density and decreases over time. On the other hand, when the domain wall is released and propagated through the tube segment, this shows the standard separation between a steady and a precessional regime. The ability to pin and release a domain wall by varying the geometric parameters, the current density, or the magnetic field transforms these wire-tube nanostructures in an interesting alternative as an on/off switch nano-transistor.

  20. Effects of temporal dimensional instability on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF-I) high-resolution mirror assembly (HRMA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Lester M.

    1995-06-01

    The NASA Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility-Imaging (AXAF-I), one of NASA's Great Observatories, will be launched in 1998. The AXAF-I High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) will provide sub-arc second imaging resolution over the expected mission life of five years. During assembly and operational life of the telescope, small dimensional changes of the structural support system can degrade the telescopes resolving power by introducing unwanted forces. The forces that are introduced depend, in part, on the long term temporal dimensional stability of the materials that are used in the telescope. A year-long stability study carried out at the university of Arizona Dimensional Stability Laboratory recently concluded. Cyanate ester-based composites, 7050-T7451 aluminum, LR-35 invar, 6Al-4V titanium, 6061-T6 aluminum and Zerodur were studied. The Zerodur material was found to be stable to better than 0.03 ppm/yr. The titanium was found to be stable to better than 0.5 ppm/yr. The 7050- T7451 aluminum and cyanate ester-based composites were found relatively unstable but their instability improved significantly with time. Monte-Carlo and deterministic techniques were used to predict the effects of the instability on the telescopes' performance. Temporal instability effects were within the systems top level requirements.

  1. Nonlinear Evolution of the Nonresonant Instability Upstream of a Young Supernova Remnant Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzar, O.; Niemiec, J.; Pohl, M.

    2016-06-01

    Collisionless shocks of supernova remnants (SNR) are thought to be the acceleration sites of high-energy cosmic rays (CRs). Efficient particle production in the diffusive shock acceleration process requires turbulent amplified magnetic fields in the shock's precursor. Here we report results of new particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation studies of the nonresonant cosmic-ray-current-driven instability that operates upstream of young SNR shocks and may be responsible for magnetic-field amplification, plasma heating, and hydrodynamical turbulence. Earlier PIC simulations of this instability used computational boxes with periodic boundary conditions. Our current study for the first time applies a realistic setup with open boundaries in the CR drift direction, which accounts for mass conservation in decelerating flows. In this way both the temporal and the spatial development of the instability can be investigated. The results of our large-scale high-resolution PIC experiments demonstrate magnetic-field amplification as expected on the grounds of our earlier studies with periodic simulation boxes. The effects of backreaction on CRs that slow down the initial ambient plasma-CR relative drift velocity, limit further growth of the turbulence and lead to its saturation are also re-confirmed. We discuss a detailed spatio-temporal structure of the shock precursor, the evolution of CR distribution, and the microphysics of the saturation processes.

  2. Relativistic Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a decelerating shell and its implications for gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Amir

    2010-02-01

    Global linear stability analysis of a self-similar solution describing the interaction of a relativistic shell with an ambient medium is performed. The solution is shown to be unstable to convective Rayleigh-Taylor modes having angular scales smaller than the causality scale. Longer wavelength modes are stable and decay with time. For modes of sufficiently large spherical harmonic degree $l$ the dimensionless growth rate scales as $\\sqrt{l/\\Gamma}$, where $\\Gamma$ is the Lorentz factor of the shell. The instability commences at the contact interface separating the shocked eject a and shocked ambient gas and propagates to the shocks. The reverse shock front responds promptly to the in stability and exhibits rapidly growing distortions at early times. Propagation to the forward shock is slower, and it is anticipated that the region near the contact will become fully turbulent before the instability is communicated to the forward shock. The non-universality of the Blandford-McKee blast wave solution suggests that turbulence generated by the instability in the shocked ambient medium may decay slowly with time and may be the origin of magnetic fields over a long portion of the blast wave evolution. It is also speculated that the instability may affect the emission from the shocked ejecta in the early post-prompt phase of GRBs.

  3. X-ray shadow imprint of hydrodynamic instabilities on the surface of inertial confinement fusion capsules by the fuel fill tube.

    PubMed

    MacPhee, A G; Casey, D T; Clark, D S; Felker, S; Field, J E; Haan, S W; Hammel, B A; Kroll, J; Landen, O L; Martinez, D A; Michel, P; Milovich, J; Moore, A; Nikroo, A; Rice, N; Robey, H F; Smalyuk, V A; Stadermann, M; Weber, C R

    2017-03-01

    Measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth for a high-density carbon ablator for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility are reported. We observe significant unexpected features on the capsule surface created by shadows of the capsule fill tube, as illuminated by laser-irradiated x-ray spots on the hohlraum wall. These shadows increase the spatial size and shape of the fill tube perturbation in a way that can significantly degrade performance in layered implosions compared to previous expectations. The measurements were performed at a convergence ratio of ∼2 using in-flight x-ray radiography. The initial seed due to shadow imprint is estimated to be equivalent to ∼50-100 nm of solid ablator material. This discovery has prompted the need for a mitigation strategy for future inertial confinement fusion designs as proposed here.

  4. X-ray shadow imprint of hydrodynamic instabilities on the surface of inertial confinement fusion capsules by the fuel fill tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPhee, A. G.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Kroll, J.; Landen, O. L.; Martinez, D. A.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Moore, A.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Stadermann, M.; Weber, C. R.

    2017-03-01

    Measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth for a high-density carbon ablator for indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion implosions on the National Ignition Facility are reported. We observe significant unexpected features on the capsule surface created by shadows of the capsule fill tube, as illuminated by laser-irradiated x-ray spots on the hohlraum wall. These shadows increase the spatial size and shape of the fill tube perturbation in a way that can significantly degrade performance in layered implosions compared to previous expectations. The measurements were performed at a convergence ratio of ˜2 using in-flight x-ray radiography. The initial seed due to shadow imprint is estimated to be equivalent to ˜50-100 nm of solid ablator material. This discovery has prompted the need for a mitigation strategy for future inertial confinement fusion designs as proposed here.

  5. Current-driven nanowire formation on surfaces of crystalline conducting substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashish; Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2016-05-01

    The formation and precise manipulation of nanoscale features by controlling macroscopic forces is essential to advancing nanotechnology. Toward this end, we report here a theoretical study on formation of nanowires with precisely controlled widths, starting from single-layer conducting islands on crystalline conducting substrates under the controlled action of macroscopic forcing provided by an externally applied electric field that drives island edge electromigration. Numerical simulations based on an experimentally validated model and supported by linear stability theory show that large-size islands undergo a current-induced fingering instability, leading to nanowire formation after finger growth. Depending on the substrate surface crystallographic orientation, necking instabilities after fingering lead to the formation of multiple parallel nanowires per island. In all cases, the axis of the formed nanowires is aligned with the direction of the externally applied electric field. The nanowires have constant widths, on the order of 10 nm, which can be tuned by controlling the externally applied electric field strength. Our findings have important implications for developing future lithography-free nanofabrication and nanoelectronic patterning techniques.

  6. Investigation of domain wall motion in RE-TM magnetic wire towards a current driven memory and logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    Current driven magnetic domain wall (DW) motions of ferri-magnetic TbFeCo wires have been investigated. In the case of a Si substrate, the critical current density (Jc) of DW motion was successfully reduced to 3×106 A/cm2. Moreover, by using a polycarbonate (PC) substrate with a molding groove of 600 nm width, the Jc was decreased to 6×105 A/cm2. In order to fabricate a logic in memory, a current driven spin logics (AND, OR, NOT) have been proposed and successfully demonstrated under the condition of low Jc. These results indicate that TbFeCo nanowire is an excellent candidate for next generation power saving memory and logic.

  7. Current-Driven Magnetization Switching in CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Jun; Ikeda, Shoji; Lee, Young Min; Sasaki, Ryutaro; Meguro, Toshiyasu; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Ohno, Hideo

    2005-09-01

    Current-driven magnetization switching in low-resistance Co40Fe40B20/MgO/Co40Fe40B20 magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) is reported. The critical-current densities Jc required for current-driven switching in samples annealed at 270 and 300°C are found to be as low as 7.8× 105 and 8.8× 105 A/cm2 with accompanying tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) ratios of 49 and 73%, respectively. Further annealing of the samples at 350°C increases TMR ratio to 160%, while accompanying Jc increases to 2.5× 106 A/cm2. We attribute the low Jc to the high spin-polarization of tunnel current and small MsV product of the CoFeB single free layer, where Ms is the saturation magnetization and V the volume of the free layer.

  8. Current-driven dynamics of skyrmions stabilized in MnSi nanowires revealed by topological Hall effect

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dong; DeGrave, John P.; Stolt, Matthew J.; Tokura, Yoshinori; Jin, Song

    2015-01-01

    Skyrmions hold promise for next-generation magnetic storage as their nanoscale dimensions may enable high information storage density and their low threshold for current-driven motion may enable ultra-low energy consumption. Skyrmion-hosting nanowires not only serve as a natural platform for magnetic racetrack memory devices but also stabilize skyrmions. Here we use the topological Hall effect (THE) to study phase stability and current-driven dynamics of skyrmions in MnSi nanowires. THE is observed in an extended magnetic field-temperature window (15–30 K), suggesting stabilization of skyrmions in nanowires compared with the bulk. Furthermore, we show in nanowires that under the high current density of 108–109 A m−2, the THE decreases with increasing current densities, which demonstrates the current-driven motion of skyrmions generating the emergent electric field in the extended skyrmion phase region. These results open up the exploration of skyrmions in nanowires for fundamental physics and magnetic storage technologies. PMID:26400204

  9. Current-driven dynamics of skyrmions stabilized in MnSi nanowires revealed by topological Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong; Degrave, John P.; Stolt, Matthew J.; Tokura, Yoshinori; Jin, Song

    2015-09-01

    Skyrmions hold promise for next-generation magnetic storage as their nanoscale dimensions may enable high information storage density and their low threshold for current-driven motion may enable ultra-low energy consumption. Skyrmion-hosting nanowires not only serve as a natural platform for magnetic racetrack memory devices but also stabilize skyrmions. Here we use the topological Hall effect (THE) to study phase stability and current-driven dynamics of skyrmions in MnSi nanowires. THE is observed in an extended magnetic field-temperature window (15-30 K), suggesting stabilization of skyrmions in nanowires compared with the bulk. Furthermore, we show in nanowires that under the high current density of 108-109 A m-2, the THE decreases with increasing current densities, which demonstrates the current-driven motion of skyrmions generating the emergent electric field in the extended skyrmion phase region. These results open up the exploration of skyrmions in nanowires for fundamental physics and magnetic storage technologies.

  10. Linear calculations of edge current driven kink modes with BOUT++ code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. Q.; Xu, X. Q.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Xia, T. Y.; Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.

    2014-10-01

    This work extends previous BOUT++ work to systematically study the impact of edge current density on edge localized modes, and to benchmark with the GATO and ELITE codes. Using the CORSICA code, a set of equilibria was generated with different edge current densities by keeping total current and pressure profile fixed. Based on these equilibria, the effects of the edge current density on the MHD instabilities were studied with the 3-field BOUT++ code. For the linear calculations, with increasing edge current density, the dominant modes are changed from intermediate-n and high-n ballooning modes to low-n kink modes, and the linear growth rate becomes smaller. The edge current provides stabilizing effects on ballooning modes due to the increase of local shear at the outer mid-plane with the edge current. For edge kink modes, however, the edge current does not always provide a destabilizing effect; with increasing edge current, the linear growth rate first increases, and then decreases. In benchmark calculations for BOUT++ against the linear results with the GATO and ELITE codes, the vacuum model has important effects on the edge kink mode calculations. By setting a realistic density profile and Spitzer resistivity profile in the vacuum region, the resistivity was found to have a destabilizing effect on both the kink mode and on the ballooning mode. With diamagnetic effects included, the intermediate-n and high-n ballooning modes can be totally stabilized for finite edge current density.

  11. Linear calculations of edge current driven kink modes with BOUT++ code

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G. Q. Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Ma, C. H.; Xi, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    This work extends previous BOUT++ work to systematically study the impact of edge current density on edge localized modes, and to benchmark with the GATO and ELITE codes. Using the CORSICA code, a set of equilibria was generated with different edge current densities by keeping total current and pressure profile fixed. Based on these equilibria, the effects of the edge current density on the MHD instabilities were studied with the 3-field BOUT++ code. For the linear calculations, with increasing edge current density, the dominant modes are changed from intermediate-n and high-n ballooning modes to low-n kink modes, and the linear growth rate becomes smaller. The edge current provides stabilizing effects on ballooning modes due to the increase of local shear at the outer mid-plane with the edge current. For edge kink modes, however, the edge current does not always provide a destabilizing effect; with increasing edge current, the linear growth rate first increases, and then decreases. In benchmark calculations for BOUT++ against the linear results with the GATO and ELITE codes, the vacuum model has important effects on the edge kink mode calculations. By setting a realistic density profile and Spitzer resistivity profile in the vacuum region, the resistivity was found to have a destabilizing effect on both the kink mode and on the ballooning mode. With diamagnetic effects included, the intermediate-n and high-n ballooning modes can be totally stabilized for finite edge current density.

  12. Current-driven switching of exchange biased spin-valve giant magnetoresistive nanopillars using a conducting nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, J.; Ito, K.; Fujimori, M.; Heike, S.; Hashizume, T.; Steen, J.; Brugger, J.; Ohno, H.

    2004-09-01

    An array of exchange biased spin-valve giant-magnetoresistance nanopillars was fabricated and the current I dependence of the resistance R was investigated using an electrically conducting atomic-force microscope (AFM) probe contact at room temperature. We observed current induced switching in a MnIr /CoFe/Cu/CoFe/NiFe nanopillar using the AFM probe contact. Current-driven switching using nanoprobe contact is a powerful method for developing nonvolatile and rewritable magnetic memory with high density.

  13. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2001-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response.

  14. Low-Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Barry D.; Held, Kathryn D.

    2002-06-01

    This project is part of the DOE research program on the biological effects of low dose and dose rate ionizing radiation. This DOE program is designed to support and conduct science that can impact the subsequent development of health risk policy for low dose radiation exposures in the US. The overall, long-term goal of this project is to increase understanding of the responses of cells to the low doses of ionizing radiation typically encountered in environmental level exposures. To achieve this objective, we couple use of a unique focused soft X-ray facility for low dose irradiation of individual cells or irradiation of specific subcellular regions of cells with studies of the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in cells. The project includes seven specific goals: (1) Determine the response of individual cells to low doses of ionizing radiation from a focused soft X-ray beam with a 250 nm diameter beam spot. (2) Determine the response of cells to ROS generated by chemical agents in a fashion that mimics the endogenous cellular generation of ROS. (3) Study the interaction between cellular oxidative processes and ionizing radiation. (4) Determine the importance of the subcellular distribution of ROS from focused soft X-rays on cellular response. (5) Determine whether damage deposited in individual cells by focused soft X-rays or by chemically-generated ROS can elicit a response in other, surrounding, untreated cells, a ''bystander'' effect. (6) Quantify the low dose response and the targets involved in the genomic instability phenotype in cells exposed to low LET radiation and the relationship with the bystander response. (7) Develop tissue explant systems for the measurement of low dose effects in multicellular systems.

  15. Radio-protective effect of cinnamic acid, a phenolic phytochemical, on genomic instability induced by X-rays in human blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cinkilic, Nilufer; Tüzün, Ece; Çetintaş, Sibel Kahraman; Vatan, Özgür; Yılmaz, Dilek; Çavaş, Tolga; Tunç, Sema; Özkan, Lütfi; Bilaloğlu, Rahmi

    2014-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective activity of cinnamic acid against induction by X-rays of genomic instability in normal human blood lymphocytes. This radio-protective activity was assessed by use of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and the alkaline comet assay, with human blood lymphocytes isolated from two healthy donors. A Siemens Mevatron MD2 (Siemens AG, USA, 1994) linear accelerator was used for the irradiation with 1 or 2 Gy. Treatment of the lymphocytes with cinnamic acid prior to irradiation reduced the number of micronuclei when compared with that in control samples. Treatment with cinnamic acid without irradiation did not increase the number of micronuclei and did not show a cytostatic effect in the lymphocytes. The results of the alkaline comet assay revealed that cinnamic acid reduces the DNA damage induced by X-rays, showing a significant radio-protective effect. Cinnamic acid decreased the frequency of irradiation-induced micronuclei by 16-55% and reduced DNA breakage by 17-50%, as determined by the alkaline comet assay. Cinnamic acid may thus act as a radio-protective compound, and future studies may focus on elucidating the mechanism by which cinnamic acid offers radioprotection.

  16. Current-Driven Dynamics of Skyrmions Stabilized in MnSi Nanowires Revealed by Topological Hall Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dong; Degrave, John; Stolt, Matthew; Tokura, Yoshinori; Jin, Song

    2015-03-01

    Skyrmions, novel topologically stable spin vortices, hold promise for next-generation high-density magnetic storage technologies due to their nanoscale domains and ultralow energy consumption. One-dimensional (1D) nanowires are ideal hosts for skyrmions since they not only serve as a natural platform for magnetic racetrack memory devices but also can potentially stabilize skyrmions. We use the topological Hall effect (THE) to study the phase stability and current-driven dynamics of the skyrmions in MnSi nanowires. The THE was observed in an extended magnetic field-temperature window (15 to 30 K), suggesting stabilization of skyrmion phase in nanowires compared with the bulk (27 to 29.5 K). Furthermore, we study skyrmion dynamics in this extended skyrmion phase region and found that under the high current-density of 108-109Am-2 enabled by nanowire geometry, the THE decreases with increasing current densities, which demonstrates the current-driven motion of skyrmions generating the emergent electric field. These results open up the exploration of nanowires as an attractive platform for investigating skyrmion physics in 1D systems and exploiting skyrmions in magnetic storage concepts. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation (ECCS-1231916) and JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 24224009.

  17. Numerical calculations of non-inductive current driven by microwaves in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, K. K.; Baranov, Yu; Mailloux, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Contributors, JET

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies at JET focus on analysis of the lower hybrid (LH) wave power absorption and current drive (CD) calculations by means of a new ray tracing (RT)/Fokker-Planck (FP) package. The RT code works in real 2D geometry accounting for the plasma boundary and the launcher shape. LH waves with different parallel refractive index, {{N}\\parallel} , spectra in poloidal direction can be launched thus simulating authentic antenna spectrum with rows fed by different combinations of klystrons. Various FP solvers were tested most advanced of which is a relativistic bounce averaged FP code. LH wave power deposition profiles from the new RT/FP code were compared to the experimental results from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) analysis of pulses at 3.4 T low and high density. This kind of direct comparison between power deposition profiles from experimental ECE data and numerical model were carried out for the first time for waves in the LH range of frequencies. The results were in a reasonable agreement with experimental data at lower density, line averaged values of {{n}\\text{e}}≈ 2.4× {{10}19} {{\\text{m}}-3} . At higher density, {{n}\\text{e}}≈ 3× {{10}19} {{\\text{m}}-3} , the code predicted larger on-axis LH power deposition, which is inconsistent with the experimental observations. Both calculations were unable to produce LH wave absorption at the plasma periphery, which contradicts to the analysis of the ECE data and possible sources of these discrepancies have been briefly discussed in the paper. The code was also used to calculate the LH power deposition and CD profiles for the low-density preheat phase of JET’s advanced tokamak (AT) scenario. It was found that as the density evolves from hollow to flat and then to a more peaked profile the LH power and driven current move inward i.e. towards the plasma axis. A total driven current of about 70 kA for 1 MW of launched LH power was predicted in these conditions.

  18. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  19. [Intervertebral instability].

    PubMed

    Colaiacomo, M C; Tortora, A; Di Biasi, C; Polettini, E; Casciani, E; Gualdi, G F

    2009-01-01

    The clinic diagnosis of degenerative lumbar intervertebral instability is a controversial topic and have not yet been clarified clinical criteria for to define this condition with accuracy. Although the lumbar pain is the most common symptom in patients who have lumbar intervertebral instability its clinical presentation is not specific; moreover in patients with lumbar pain there are no agreed signs and symptoms that can be truly attributable to instability. Despite better imaging techniques of testing spinal instability there is not a clear relations between radiologic signs of instability and clinical symptoms. It is, however, still far from unanimous definition of degenerative lumbar intervertebral instability accepted from all specialists involved in diagnosis and treatment of this condition; however, seem there is most agree about suspected vertebral instability. Nevertheless this unresolved topic, it is possible to state that imaging play an increasing role in diagnosis and management of patients with suspected instability. The aim of this study is to investigate the different imaging modalities most indicated in diagnosis if vertebral instability and whether degenerative change can be associated with lower back pain.

  20. Are the Kinematics of the Knee Joint Altered during the Loading Response Phase of Gait in Individuals with Concurrent Knee Osteoarthritis and Complaints of Joint Instability? A Dynamic Stereo X-ray Study

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Shawn; Tashman, Scott; Gil, Alexandra B.; Klatt, Brian A.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Background Joint instability has been suggested as a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis and a cause of significant functional declines in those with symptomatic disease. However, the relationship between altered knee joint mechanics and self-reports of instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis remains unclear. Methods Fourteen subjects with knee osteoarthritis and complaints of joint instability and 12 control volunteers with no history of knee disease were recruited for this study. Dynamic stereo X-ray technology was used to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the knee joint during the loading response phase of gait. Findings Individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability demonstrated significantly reduced flexion and internal/external rotation knee motion excursions during the loading response phase of gait (P < 0.01), while the total abduction/adduction range of motion was increased (P < 0.05). In addition, the coronal and transverse plane alignment of the knee joint at initial contact was significantly different (P < 0.05) for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability. However, the anteroposterior and mediolateral tibiofemoral joint positions at initial contact and the corresponding total joint translations were similar between groups during the loading phase of gait. Interpretations The rotational patterns of tibiofemoral joint motion and joint alignments reported for individuals with concurrent knee osteoarthritis and joint instability are consistent with those previously established for individuals with knee osteoarthritis. Furthermore, the findings of similar translatory tibiofemoral motion between groups suggest that self-reports of episodic joint instability in individuals with knee osteoarthritis may not necessarily be associated with adaptive alterations in joint arthrokinematics. PMID:22071429

  1. Effect of a RF Wave on Ion Cyclotron Instability in Size Distributed Impurities Containing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    The effect of a large amplitude lower hybrid wave on current driven ion cyclotron waves in a dusty plasma where dust grains are size distributed is examined. The influence of the lower hybrid wave on the stabilization of the instability is studied. The efficacy of rf is dust density dependent.

  2. Diffusive Magnetohydrodynamic Instabilities beyond the Chandrasekhar Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüdiger, Günther; Schultz, Manfred; Stefani, Frank; Mond, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We consider the stability of axially unbounded cylindrical flows that contain a toroidal magnetic background field with the same radial profile as their azimuthal velocity. For ideal fluids, Chandrasekhar had shown the stability of this configuration if the Alfvén velocity of the field equals the velocity of the background flow, i.e., if the magnetic Mach number {Mm}=1. We demonstrate that magnetized Taylor-Couette flows with such profiles become unstable against non-axisymmetric perturbations if at least one of the diffusivities is finite. We also find that for small magnetic Prandtl numbers {Pm} the lines of marginal instability scale with the Reynolds number and the Hartmann number. In the limit {Pm}\\to 0 the lines of marginal instability completely lie below the line for {Mm}=1 and for {Pm}\\to ∞ they completely lie above this line. For any finite value of {Pm}, however, the lines of marginal instability cross the line {Mm}=1, which separates slow from fast rotation. The minimum values of the field strength and the rotation rate that are needed for the instability (slightly) grow if the rotation law becomes flat. In this case, the electric current of the background field becomes so strong that the current-driven Tayler instability (which also exists without rotation) appears in the bifurcation map at low Hartmann numbers.

  3. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic jets are associated with extreme astrophysical phenomena, like the core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the accretion on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetized rotation of a central compact object (black hole or neutron star). However, how the jets produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of relativistic, Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetized central object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a global, external kink mode that grows on long time-scales. It bodily twists the jet, reducing its propagation velocity. We show analytically that in flat density profiles, like the ones associated with galactic cores, the external mode grows and may stall the jet. In the steep profiles of stellar envelopes the external kink weakens as the jet propagates outward. (ii) a local, internal kink mode that grows over short time-scales and causes small-angle magnetic reconnection and conversion of about half of the jet electromagnetic energy flux into heat. We suggest that internal kink instability is the main dissipation mechanism responsible for powering GRB prompt emission.

  4. ELM phenomenon as an interaction between bootstrap-current driven peeling modes and pressure-driven ballooning modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarelma, S.; Günter, S.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    2000-05-01

    An ELMy ASDEX Upgrade plasma equilibrium is reconstructed taking into account the bootstrap current. The peeling mode stability of the equilibrium is numerically analysed using the GATO [1] code, and it is found that the bootstrap current can drive the plasma peeling mode unstable. A high-n ballooning mode stability analysis of the equilibria revealed that, while destabilizing the peeling modes, the bootstrap current has a stabilizing effect on the ballooning modes. A combination of these two instabilities is a possible explanation for the type I ELM phenomenon. A triangularity scan showed that increasing triangularity stabilizes the peeling modes and can produce ELM-free periods observed in the experiments.

  5. Wrist Instability After Injury

    PubMed Central

    Muminagic, Sahib; Kapidzic, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    Fractures of the bones that make the wrist joint together with injury to the ligaments and joint capsules are frequent traumas. It can cause besides limited movement also the pathological mobility. These mild injuries often do not provide the degree of recognizable symptoms and signs. They are diagnosed by X-ray imaging, stress images. Before arthrography was an important method, but nowadays arthroscopy has the advantage. Fresh bone and ligament injuries can be and should be repaired in the early posttraumatic period. Unrecognized and undiagnosed injuries are leading to instability of the wrist, to motion abnormalities or impingement overload syndrome. In the treatment of instability important place have reconstruction of the ligaments and arthrodesis of the wrist. PMID:23678318

  6. Hybrid rocket instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a brief review of theoretical and experimental studies concerned with hybrid rocket instability. The instabilities discussed include atomization and mixing instabilities, chuffing instabilities, pressure coupled combustion instabilities, and vortex shedding. It is emphasized that the future use of hybrid motor systems as viable design alternatives will depend on a better understanding of hybrid instability.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priest, E. R.; Cargill, P.; Forbes, T. G.; Hood, A. W.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    There have been major advances in the theory of magnetic reconnection and of magnetic instability, with important implications for the observations, as follows: (1) Fast and slow magnetic shock waves are produced by the magnetohydrodynamics of reconnection and are potential particle accelerators. (2) The impulsive bursty regime of reconnection gives a rapid release of magnetic energy in a series of bursts. (3) The radiative tearing mode creates cool filamentary structures in the reconnection process. (4) The stability analyses imply that an arcade can become unstable when either its height or twist of plasma pressure become too great.

  8. Complex Pattern Formation from Current-Driven Dynamics of Single-Layer Homoepitaxial Islands on Crystalline Conducting Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashish; Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-07-01

    We report a systematic study of complex pattern formation resulting from the driven dynamics of single-layer homoepitaxial islands on surfaces of face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline conducting substrates under the action of an externally applied electric field. The analysis is based on an experimentally validated nonlinear model of mass transport via island edge atomic diffusion, which also accounts for edge diffusional anisotropy. We analyze the morphological stability and simulate the field-driven evolution of rounded islands for an electric field oriented along the fast edge diffusion direction. For larger-than-critical island sizes on {110 } and {100 } fcc substrates, we show that multiple necking instabilities generate complex island patterns, including not-simply-connected void-containing islands mediated by sequences of breakup and coalescence events and distributed symmetrically with respect to the electric field direction. We analyze the dependence of the formed patterns on the original island size and on the duration of application of the external field. Starting from a single large rounded island, we characterize the evolution of the number of daughter islands and their average size and uniformity. The evolution of the average island size follows a universal power-law scaling relation, and the evolution of the total edge length of the islands in the complex pattern follows Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetics. Our study makes a strong case for the use of electric fields, as precisely controlled macroscopic forcing, toward surface patterning involving complex nanoscale features.

  9. Exact solutions and low-frequency instability of the adiabatic auroral arc model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, John M.

    1988-01-01

    The adiabatic auroral arc model couples a kinetic theory parallel current driven by mirror forces to horizontal ionospheric currents; the resulting equations are nonlinear. Some exact stationary solutions to these equations, some of them based on the Liouville equation, are developed, with both latitudinal and longitudinal spatial variations. These Liouville equation exact solutions are related to stability boundaries of low-frequency instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, as shown by a study of a simplified model.

  10. Exact solutions and low-frequency instability of the adiabatic auroral arc model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, John M.

    1988-01-01

    The adiabatic auroral arc model couples a kinetic theory parallel current driven by mirror forces to horizontal ionospheric currents; the resulting equations are nonlinear. Some exact stationary solutions to these equations, some of them based on the Liouville equation, are developed, with both latitudinal and longitudinal spatial variations. These Liouville equation exact solutions are related to stability boundaries of low-frequency instabilities such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, as shown by a study of a simplified model.

  11. Validating the Supernova Remnant Hypothesis of the Cosmic Ray Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Mikhail

    The century-old problem of the origin and acceleration of cosmic rays (CR) could soon be resolved. However, as it is impossible to trace CR back to their accelerators because of orbit scrambling in the galactic magnetic field, the solution will not be easy. Also the direct observations of a secondary gamma emission from supernova remnant (SNR) shocks, long suspected to be the main source of galactic CRs, are complicated by the contaminating electron emission. Therefore, the SNR hypothesis of the CR origin can be proven beyond a reasonable doubt only if the acceleration theory is fully consistent with the observations. However, the complexity of plasma dynamics in SNR shocks makes the validation of the SNR hypothesis very difficult. A study of the crucial plasma processes in SNR shocks is proposed. It will determine the three-way partitioning of the shock energy between accelerated particles (protons and electrons), turbulent magnetic fields and thermal plasma. The project includes a comparative analysis of three instabilities, arguably crucial to the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism: i.) the cyclotron resonance CR instability, ii.) the non- resonant CR-current driven (kink-type) instability and iii.) the acoustic CR-pressure gradient driven instability. By identifying the dominant instability depending on the local SNR environment, the spectra of different species of accelerated particles, their losses, and the broadband radiation will be calculated and compared to both direct observations of the secondary emission from major SNRs and to the measurements of the background CRs. The comparison will show whether the DSA mechanism production of CR in SNR is consistent with the observed emission. The remnants most visible in gamma rays expand into weakly ionized, dense gases. The physics of the CR production in such environments based on the three instabilities will be studied. The proposer's previous work has shown that the propagation of CRs in a dense SNR

  12. Spatio-temporal evolution of the non-resonant instability in shock precursors of young supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobzar, Oleh; Niemiec, Jacek; Pohl, Martin; Bohdan, Artem

    2017-08-01

    A non-resonant cosmic ray (CR) current-driven instability may operate in the shock precursors of young supernova remnants and be responsible for magnetic-field amplification, plasma heating and turbulence. Earlier simulations demonstrated magnetic-field amplification, and in kinetic studies a reduction of the relative drift between CRs and thermal plasma was observed as backreaction. However, all published simulations used periodic boundary conditions, which do not account for mass conservation in decelerating flows and only allow the temporal development to be studied. Here we report results of fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations with open boundaries that permit inflow of plasma on one side of the simulation box and outflow at the other end, hence allowing an investigation of both the temporal and the spatial development of the instability. Magnetic-field amplification proceeds as in studies with periodic boundaries and, observed here for the first time, the reduction of relative drifts causes the formation of a shock-like compression structure at which a fraction of the plasma ions are reflected. Turbulent electric field generated by the non-resonant instability inelastically scatters CRs, modifying and anisotropizing their energy distribution. Spatial CR scattering is compatible with Bohm diffusion. Electromagnetic turbulence leads to significant non-adiabatic heating of the background plasma maintaining bulk equipartition between ions and electrons. The highest temperatures are reached at sites of large-amplitude electrostatic fields. Ion spectra show supra-thermal tails resulting from stochastic scattering in the turbulent electric field. Together, these modifications in the plasma flow will affect the properties of the shock and particle acceleration there.

  13. Polygonal instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labousse, Matthieu

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of a vortex with a free surface is encountered in a series of experiments, the hydraulic jump, the hydraulic bump, the toroidal Leidenfrost experiment. All these experiments share in common an unstable configuration in which azimuthal perturbations give rise to polygonal patterns. We propose a unified theoretical framework to model the emergence of this instability by investigating the stability of a liquid torus with a poloidal motion. As simple as it is, we show that the model retains the necessary ingredients to account for the experimental observations. In this talk, I will first describe the model and compare it to the existing data. However this model is purely inviscid and reaches its limits when being applied to relatively moderate Reynolds flows. So in a second part, I will present a recent experimental and theoretical investigation in which polygonal patterns are now driven by Marangoni flows. To our great surprise, it extends the range of validity of the initial proposed framework, much more than initially expected.

  14. Double-Cross Instability: An Absolute Instability Caused by Counter-Propagating Positive- and Negative-Energy Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, A.J.; Morehead, J.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Tracy, E.R.

    1996-08-01

    The resonant interaction of a negative-energy wave with a positive-energy wave gives rise to a linear instability. Whereas a single crossing of rays in a nonuniform medium leads to a {ital convectively} saturated instability, we show that a double crossing can yield an {ital absolute} instability, if the two rays are oppositely directed. We obtain expressions for the growth rate and the threshold, and present one application. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Experiments on current-driven three-dimensional ion sound turbulence. I - Return-current limited electron beam injection. II - Wave dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Pulsed electron beam injection into a weakly collisional magnetized background plasma is investigated experimentally; properties of the electron beam and background plasma, as well as the low-frequency instabilities and wave dynamics, are discussed. The current of the injected beam closes via a field-aligned return current of background electrons. Through study of the frequency and wavenumber distribution, together with the electron distribution function, the low-frequency instabilities associated with the pulsed injection are identified as ion acoustic waves driven unstable by the return current. The frequency cut-off of the instabilities predicted from renormalized plasma turbulence theory, has been verified experimentally.

  16. Experiments on current-driven three-dimensional ion sound turbulence. I - Return-current limited electron beam injection. II - Wave dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Pulsed electron beam injection into a weakly collisional magnetized background plasma is investigated experimentally; properties of the electron beam and background plasma, as well as the low-frequency instabilities and wave dynamics, are discussed. The current of the injected beam closes via a field-aligned return current of background electrons. Through study of the frequency and wavenumber distribution, together with the electron distribution function, the low-frequency instabilities associated with the pulsed injection are identified as ion acoustic waves driven unstable by the return current. The frequency cut-off of the instabilities predicted from renormalized plasma turbulence theory, has been verified experimentally.

  17. Investigating the Marine Protected Areas most at risk of current-driven pollution in the Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea, using a Lagrangian transport model.

    PubMed

    Delpeche-Ellmann, Nicole C; Soomere, Tarmo

    2013-02-15

    The possibility of current-driven propagation of contaminants released along a major fairway polluting the Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in the Gulf of Finland, the Baltic Sea, is examined using a 3D circulation model, a Lagrangian transport model and statistics. Not surprisingly, the number of hits to the MPA decreases almost linearly with its distance from the fairway. In addition, the potential pollution released during a ship accident with the pollutants carried by currents may affect MPAs at very large distances. Typically, a fairway section approximately 125 km long (covering about 1/3 of the approximate 400-km-long gulf) may serve as a source of pollution for each MPA. The largest MPA (in the Eastern Gulf of Finland) may receive pollution from an approximately 210-km-long section (covering about 1/2 of the entire length of the gulf). This information may be useful in assisting maritime management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiative heat transport instability in a laser produced inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Rozmus, W.

    2015-08-15

    A laser produced high-Z plasma in which an energy balance is achieved due to radiation emission and radiative heat transfer supports ion acoustic instability. A linear dispersion relation is derived, and instability is compared to the radiation cooling instability [R. G. Evans, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 27, 751 (1985)]. Under conditions of indirect drive fusion experiments, the driving term for the instability is the radiative heat flux and, in particular, the density dependence of the radiative heat conductivity. A specific example of thermal Bremsstrahlung radiation source has been considered. This instability may lead to plasma jet formation and anisotropic x-ray generation, thus affecting inertial confinement fusion related experiments.

  19. Current driven weak double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chanteur, Gerard

    1987-01-01

    Double layers in plasmas can be created by different means. For example, a potential difference forms between two plasmas with different temperatures, in a plasma jet flowing along a converging magnetic field, in a quiescent plasma submitted to an external difference of potential, or in a turbulent plasma carrying an electric charge. The first three cases can be current-free, but not necessarily, although the numerical simulations were made under such conditions for the first two points. Apart from the third case, which is mainly of interest for laboratory experiments, these double layers are good candidates for accelerating the auroral electrons to the few kiloelectron volts observed.

  20. Electron heat flux instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  1. Kinesics of Affective Instability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dil, Nasim

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the rationale of studying kinesics of affective instability, describes the phenonmenon of affective instability, examines the role of kinesics in the overall process of communication, and presents three case studies. (Author/AM)

  2. Turbine instabilities: Case histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several possible causes of turbine rotor instability are discussed and the related design features of a wide range of turbomachinery types and sizes are considered. The instrumentation options available for detecting rotor instability and assessing its severity are also discussed.

  3. Is the large-scale sidereal anisotropy of the galactic cosmic-ray intensity really instable at TeV energies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenomori, M.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Chen, W. Y.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Ding, X. H.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, H. W.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; He, Z. T.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Jia, H. Y.; Jiang, L.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, W. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J. S.; Lu, H.; Meng, X. R.; Mizutani, K.; Munakata, K.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Ozawa, S.; Qian, X. L.; Qu, X. B.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Shao, J.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, H.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yasue, S.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhai, L. M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.

    2012-08-01

    The sidereal cosmic-ray anisotropy at TeV energies has a large-scale deficit region distributed between 150 and 240 degrees in right ascension, which is called the "loss-cone". The Milagro experiment reported the detection of a steady increase in the loss-cone amplitude at 6 TeV from July 2000 to July 2007. In this paper, we examine Milagro's claim using the data collected by the Tibet air-shower experiment from November 1999 through December 2008. No time dependence was found in the loss-cone amplitude at 4.4, 6.2, and 11 TeV. If the increase in the loss-cone amplitude were, as Milagro argued, due to variations in the heliosphere in relation to solar activities, the same tendency would be seen at sub-TeV energies where the anisotropy is far more sensitive to solar activities. At 0.6 TeV, however, Matsushiro underground muon observatory reported no significant increase in the loss-cone amplitude during the corresponding period.

  4. Current driven transition from Abrikosov-Josephson to Josephson-like vortex in mesoscopic lateral S/S'/S superconducting weak links.

    PubMed

    Carapella, G; Sabatino, P; Barone, C; Pagano, S; Gombos, M

    2016-10-18

    Vortices are topological defects accounting for many important effects in superconductivity, superfluidity, and magnetism. Here we address the stability of a small number of such excitations driven by strong external forces. We focus on Abrikosov-Josephson vortex that appears in lateral superconducting S/S'/S weak links with suppressed superconductivity in S'. In such a system the vortex is nucleated and confined in the narrow S' region by means of a small magnetic field and moves under the effect of a force proportional to an applied electrical current with a velocity proportional to the measured voltage. Our numerical simulations show that when a slow moving Abrikosov-Josephson vortex is driven by a strong constant current it becomes unstable with respect to a faster moving excitation: the Josephon-like vortex. Such a current-driven transition explains the structured dissipative branches that we observe in the voltage-current curve of the weak link. When vortex matter is strongly confined phenomena as magnetoresistance oscillations and reentrance of superconductivity can possibly occur. We experimentally observe these phenomena in our weak links.

  5. Effects of the radial dependence of the fast electron diffusion coefficient on the current driven by lower-hybrid waves in tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianmei; Wang, Yanhui; Yu, Limin; Shen, Xin; Wang, Jianbin

    2012-07-01

    The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is one of the promising methods not only for driving the non-inductive current required for steady-state tokamak operation, but also for controlling the plasma current profile to improve confinement in tokamak experiments. A direct consequence of experimental imperfection is difficult to obtain reliable estimate of the radial diffusion coefficient (Dst) of the lower hybrid driven current. In this paper, the radial profile of Dst is estimated to investigate its effect on the current driven by lower hybrid wave (LHW) in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. Compared with the case of the constant radial diffusion coefficient, the efficiency of LHW driven current with the radial dependent diffusion coefficient Dst (ρ) becomes either higher or lower with respect to the plasma parameters, such as the density and the magnetic fluctuation. It is also found that the profiles of the LHW driven current are different. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the radial dependence of Dst in order to get an accurate and reliable result in the numerical simulation of LHCD.

  6. Current-driven perpendicular magnetization switching in Ta/CoFeB/[TaOx or MgO/TaOx] films with lateral structural asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guoqiang; Chang, Li-Te; Akyol, Mustafa; Upadhyaya, Pramey; He, Congli; Li, Xiang; Wong, Kin L.; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2014-09-01

    We study the current-driven perpendicular magnetization switching in Ta/CoFeB(wedge)/[TaOx or MgO/TaOx] devices with a lateral structural asymmetry introduced by a varying CoFeB thickness. In these devices, an in-plane current can generate a field-like torque and its corresponding effective magnetic field ( H z F L) is out-of-plane, which can deterministically switch perpendicular magnetization at zero magnetic field. Experimental results indicate that the method used for breaking lateral structural symmetry greatly affects the resulting field-like torque, and that the gradient of perpendicular anisotropy, resulting from the CoFeB thickness variation, is not by itself sufficient to give rise to the current-induced H z F L. Analysis of the oxidation gradient at the CoFeB/TaOx interface indicates that the oxidation gradient may play a more important role than the gradient of magnetic anisotropy for the generation of H z F L. For practical applications, the demonstration of perpendicular magnetization switching in Ta/CoFeB(wedge)/MgO/TaOx devices potentially allows for using MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions for readout in three-terminal memory devices without the need for external magnetic fields.

  7. Current driven transition from Abrikosov-Josephson to Josephson-like vortex in mesoscopic lateral S/S’/S superconducting weak links

    PubMed Central

    Carapella, G.; Sabatino, P.; Barone, C.; Pagano, S.; Gombos, M.

    2016-01-01

    Vortices are topological defects accounting for many important effects in superconductivity, superfluidity, and magnetism. Here we address the stability of a small number of such excitations driven by strong external forces. We focus on Abrikosov-Josephson vortex that appears in lateral superconducting S/S’/S weak links with suppressed superconductivity in S’. In such a system the vortex is nucleated and confined in the narrow S’ region by means of a small magnetic field and moves under the effect of a force proportional to an applied electrical current with a velocity proportional to the measured voltage. Our numerical simulations show that when a slow moving Abrikosov-Josephson vortex is driven by a strong constant current it becomes unstable with respect to a faster moving excitation: the Josephon-like vortex. Such a current-driven transition explains the structured dissipative branches that we observe in the voltage-current curve of the weak link. When vortex matter is strongly confined phenomena as magnetoresistance oscillations and reentrance of superconductivity can possibly occur. We experimentally observe these phenomena in our weak links. PMID:27752137

  8. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  9. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  10. The modified two stream instability at nonmagnetic planets

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, R.; Kellett, B. J.; Shapiro, V. D.; Uecer, D.; Quest, K. B.

    2010-12-14

    We describe the role the modified two stream instability plays in the interaction of the solar wind with non-magnetized planets. The instability leads to the production of energetic electrons that can be responsible for the observed x-ray emission.

  11. Instability of a current-carrying finite-beta collisional plasma.

    PubMed

    Choueiri, E Y

    2001-12-01

    The microinstability of a cross-field current-carrying plasma in which the electron collisions are important on the time scale of the oscillations and can be modeled with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook operator is studied using linearized kinetic theory under conditions of finite electron beta. The finiteness of beta allows for coupling between electrostatic and electromagnetic modes and necessitates dealing with the entire dispersion tensor. Fundamental features of the resulting instability are identified and contrasted with those found in previous studies of the lower hybrid current-driven instability in which either collisions or finite-beta effects were neglected. As beta increases, collisions play a more important role in destabilization, alter the character and extent of electromagnetic coupling, shift the instability to more perpendicular modes, and lead to a recapturing of some of the fluidlike properties the modes have in the electrostatic limit in contrast with their highly kinetic character in the collisionless limit.

  12. Double-cross instability in nonuniform plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, A.J.; Kaufman, A.N.; Morehead, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    One fascinating characteristic associated with the presence of an energetic minority-ion population in a background magnetized plasma is that, if the population is inverted, it can support negative-energy waves (e.g., negative-energy energetic-minority-ion Bernstein waves supported by an inverted alpha-population in tokamak plasmas). In our continuing study of negative-energy waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas, we investigate a new type of linear absolute instability associated with the resonant interaction between a negative-energy wave and a positive-energy wave in a nonuniform plasma. According to the standard scenario for a linear convective instability associated with the resonant interaction between a negative-energy wave and a positive-energy wave in a one-dimensional background plasma, a negative-energy ray crosses transversely the dispersion surface of a positive-energy wave and resonantly transfers some of its action to create a positive-energy ray. Because of background plasma nonuniformity, however, the two waves interact resonantly only during a finite time interval and, consequently, this linear instability is convective. In this work, we investigate a new scenario for a linear absolute instability in which the negative-energy ray crosses the dispersion surface of the positive-energy wave twice. The new ray topology allows repeated resonant interactions between the two waves if they experience constructive interference at each crossing. This double-cross absolute instability is shown to have a threshold which depends on the area enclosed between the two dispersion curves and the strength of the wave coupling. Numerical and analytical descriptions of this new absolute instability will be presented as well as a discussion of its possible significance in magnetic fusion research.

  13. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  14. Ordinary electromagnetic mode instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, C. Z.

    1974-01-01

    The instability of the ordinary electromagnetic mode propagating perpendicular to an external magnetic field is studied for a single-species plasma with ring velocity distribution. The marginal instability boundaries for both the purely growing mode and the propagating growing modes are calculated from the instability criteria. The dispersion characteristics for various sets of plasma parameters are also given. The typical growth rates are of the order of the cyclotron frequency.

  15. Instability in Rotating Machinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings contain 45 papers on a wide range of subjects including flow generated instabilities in fluid flow machines, cracked shaft detection, case histories of instability phenomena in compressors, turbines, and pumps, vibration control in turbomachinery (including antiswirl techniques), and the simulation and estimation of destabilizing forces in rotating machines. The symposium was held to serve as an update on the understanding and control of rotating machinery instability problems.

  16. Generalities on combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuentzmann, Paul

    The main manifestations of combustion instabilities are reviewed, and the specific characteristics of instabilities in solid-propellant rocket engines are analyzed, with the Minuteman III third-stage engine and the SRB engine of Titan 34 D considered as examples. The main approaches for predicting combustion instabilities are discussed, including the linear approach based on the acoustic balance, the nonlinear mode-coupling approach, and the nonlinear approach using numerical calculation. Projected directions for future research are also examined.

  17. Absolute instability from linear conversion of counter-propagating positive and negative energy waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, A.N.; Brizard, A.J.; Morehead, J.J.; Tracy, E.R.

    1997-12-31

    The resonant interaction of a negative-energy wave with a positive-energy wave gives rise to a linear instability. Whereas a single crossing of rays in a nonuniform medium leads to a convectively saturated instability, we show that a double crossing can yield an absolute instability.

  18. THE PARKER INSTABILITY IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, L. F. S.; Sarson, G. R.; Shukurov, A.; Bushby, P. J.; Fletcher, A. E-mail: graeme.sarson@newcastle.ac.uk E-mail: paul.bushby@newcastle.ac.uk

    2016-01-01

    We examine the evolution of the Parker instability in galactic disks using 3D numerical simulations. We consider a local Cartesian box section of a galactic disk, where gas, magnetic fields, and cosmic rays are all initially in a magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. This is done for different choices of initial cosmic-ray density and magnetic field. The growth rates and characteristic scales obtained from the models, as well as their dependences on the density of cosmic rays and magnetic fields, are in broad agreement with previous (linearized, ideal) analytical work. However, this nonideal instability develops a multimodal 3D structure, which cannot be quantitatively predicted from the earlier linearized studies. This 3D signature of the instability will be of importance in interpreting observations. As a preliminary step toward such interpretations, we calculate synthetic polarized intensity and Faraday rotation measure (RM) maps, and the associated structure functions of the latter, from our simulations; these suggest that the correlation scales inferred from RM maps are a possible probe for the cosmic-ray content of a given galaxy. Our calculations highlight the importance of cosmic rays in these measures, making them an essential ingredient of realistic models of the interstellar medium.

  19. Pfirsch-Schlüter current-driven edge electric fields and their effect on the L-H transition power threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, A. Y.

    2012-06-01

    -D observations in low-power L-mode discharges. Thus, taken as a whole, the Pfirsch-Schlüter current-driven fields can explain a number of observations on the L-H or L-I transition and the required power threshold PLH levels not captured by simple scaling laws. They may indeed be an important ‘hidden variable’.

  20. Treatment of hip instability.

    PubMed

    Robbins, G M; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Greidanus, N; Duncan, C P

    2001-10-01

    Instability after total hip arthroplasty is a major source of patient morbidity, second only to aseptic loosening. Certain patient groups have been identified as having a greater risk of instability, including patients undergoing revision arthroplasty as early or late treatment for proximal femoral fractures.

  1. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  2. Chronic Ankle Instability

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk for Newly Active Baby Boomers The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons has a valuable lesson for Baby Boomers now getting back into fitness and sports: Get your ankles checked for chronic instability caused ...

  3. Evaporatively driven morphological instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Style, Robert W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2007-07-01

    Simple observations of evaporating solutions reveal a complex hierarchy of spatiotemporal instabilities. We analyze one such instability suggested by the qualitative observations of Du and Stone and find that it is driven by a variant of the classical morphological instability in alloy solidification. In the latter case a moving solid-liquid interface is accompanied by a solutally enriched boundary layer that is thermodynamically metastable due to constitutional supercooling. Here, we consider the evaporation of an impure film adjacent to a solid composed of the nonvolatile species. In this case, constitutional supercooling within the film is created by evaporation at the solution-vapor interface and this drives the corrugation of the solid-solution interface across the thickness of the film. The principal points of this simple theoretical study are to suggest an instability mechanism that is likely operative across a broad range of technological and natural systems and to focus future quantitative experimental searches.

  4. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  5. Mix and hydrodynamic instabilities on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Martinez, D.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Pickworth, L.; Pino, J. E.; Raman, K.; Tipton, R.; Weber, C. R.; Baker, K. L.; Bachmann, B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bond, E.; Caggiano, J. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Dixit, S. N.; Edwards, M. J.; Felker, S.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gharibyan, N.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatarik, R.; Hohenberger, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Masse, L.; Moore, A. S.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Remington, B. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Spears, B. K.; Stadermann, M.; Tommasini, R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C. B.; Crippen, J.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Rice, N.; Wilde, C. H.; Volegov, P. L.; Gatu Johnson, M.

    2017-06-01

    Several new platforms have been developed to experimentally measure hydrodynamic instabilities in all phases of indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosions on National Ignition Facility. At the ablation front, instability growth of pre-imposed modulations was measured with a face-on, x-ray radiography platform in the linear regime using the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. Modulation growth of "native roughness" modulations and engineering features (fill tubes and capsule support membranes) were measured in conditions relevant to layered DT implosions. A new experimental platform was developed to measure instability growth at the ablator-ice interface. In the deceleration phase of implosions, several experimental platforms were developed to measure both low-mode asymmetries and high-mode perturbations near peak compression with x-ray and nuclear techniques. In one innovative technique, the self-emission from the hot spot was enhanced with argon dopant to "self-backlight" the shell in-flight. To stabilize instability growth, new "adiabat-shaping" techniques were developed using the HGR platform and applied in layered DT implosions.

  6. Mix and hydrodynamic instabilities on NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Casey, D. T.; ...

    2017-06-01

    Several new platforms have been developed to experimentally measure hydrodynamic instabilities in all phases of indirect-drive, inertial confinement fusion implosions on National Ignition Facility. At the ablation front, instability growth of pre-imposed modulations was measured with a face-on, x-ray radiography platform in the linear regime using the Hydrodynamic Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. Modulation growth of "native roughness" modulations and engineering features (fill tubes and capsule support membranes) were measured in conditions relevant to layered DT implosions. A new experimental platform was developed to measure instability growth at the ablator-ice interface. Here in the deceleration phase of implosions, several experimental platformsmore » were developed to measure both low-mode asymmetries and high-mode perturbations near peak compression with x-ray and nuclear techniques. In one innovative technique, the self-emission from the hot spot was enhanced with argon dopant to "self-backlight" the shell in-flight. To stabilize instability growth, new "adiabat-shaping" techniques were developed using the HGR platform and applied in layered DT implosions.« less

  7. Parametric instabilities in picosecond time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Rozmus, W.; Labaune, C.; Mounaix, Ph.; Pesme, D.; Baton, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.

    1993-03-01

    The coupling of intense laser light with plasmas is a rich field of plasma physics, with many applications. Among these are inertial confinement fusion (ICF), x-ray lasers, particle acceleration, and x-ray sources. Parametric instabilities have been studied for many years because of their importance to ICF; with laser pulses with duration of approximately a nanosecond, and laser intensities in the range 10{sup 14}--10{sup 15}W/cm{sup 2} these instabilities are of crucial concern because of a number of detrimental effects. Although the laser pulse duration of interest for these studies are relatively long, it has been evident in the past years that to reach an understanding of these instabilities requires their characterization and analysis in picosecond time scales. At the laser intensities of interest, the growth rate for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is of the order of picoseconds, and of an order of magnitude shorter for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In this paper the authors discuss SBS and SRS in the context of their evolution in picosecond time scales. They describe the fundamental concepts associated with their growth and saturation, and recent work on the nonlinear treatment required for the modeling of these instabilities at high laser intensities.

  8. Distal Radioulnar Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mirghasemi, Ali R.; Lee, Daniel J.; Rahimi, Narges; Rashidinia, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability is a common clinical condition but a frequently missed diagnosis. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments are possible for chronic cases of DRUJ instability. Nonsurgical treatment can be considered as the primary therapy in less active patients, while surgery should be considered to recover bone and ligament injuries if nonsurgical treatment fails to restore forearm stability and function. The appropriate choice of treatment depends on the individual patient and specific derangement of the DRUJ PMID:26328241

  9. Rotor internal friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  10. State Instability and Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    terrorism is a form ( Durkheim , 1930 [1951]; Useem, 1998). In addition, different types of instability ought to invite different levels of terrorism...society. The effects of the disruption in controls should be to increase levels of nonroutine collective action, of which terrorism is a form ( Durkheim ...instability at the country-level using a modified breakdown theoretical framework. This framework is based especially upon the work of Emile Durkheim

  11. Prediction of Algebraic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretzky, Paula; King, Kristina; Hill, Nicole; Keithley, Kimberlee; Barlow, Nathaniel; Weinstein, Steven; Cromer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A widely unexplored type of hydrodynamic instability is examined - large-time algebraic growth. Such growth occurs on the threshold of (exponentially) neutral stability. A new methodology is provided for predicting the algebraic growth rate of an initial disturbance, when applied to the governing differential equation (or dispersion relation) describing wave propagation in dispersive media. Several types of algebraic instabilities are explored in the context of both linear and nonlinear waves.

  12. Equilibrium Electroconvective Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, I.; Zaltzman, B.

    2015-03-01

    Since its prediction 15 years ago, hydrodynamic instability in concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface has been attributed to nonequilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current. This attribution had a double basis. On the one hand, it has been recognized that neither equilibrium electro-osmosis nor bulk electroconvection can yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. On the other hand, it has been shown that nonequilibrium electro-osmosis can. The first theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this Letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential of counterions in the solid) allows for the equilibrium electroconvective instability. In addition, we suggest a simple experimental test for determining the true, either equilibrium or nonequilibrium, origin of instability in concentration polarization.

  13. Magnetic field-related heating instabilities in the surface layers of the sun and stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The stability of a magnetized low-density plasma to current-driven filamentation instabilities is investigated and the results are applied to the surface layers of stars. Unlike previous studies, the initial (i.e., precoronal) state of the stellar surface atmosphere is taken to be a low-density, optically thin magnetized plasma in radiative equilibrium. The linear analysis shows that the surface layers of main-sequence stars (including the sun) which are threaded by magnetic fields are unstable; the instabilities considered lead to structuring perpendicular to the ambient magnetic fields. These results suggest that relatively modest surface motions, in conjunction with the presence of magnetic fields, suffice to account for the presence of inhomogeneous chromospheric and coronal plasma overlying a star's surface.

  14. Magnetic field-related heating instabilities in the surface layers of the sun and stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1982-01-01

    The stability of a magnetized low-density plasma to current-driven filamentation instabilities is investigated and the results are applied to the surface layers of stars. Unlike previous studies, the initial (i.e., precoronal) state of the stellar surface atmosphere is taken to be a low-density, optically thin magnetized plasma in radiative equilibrium. The linear analysis shows that the surface layers of main-sequence stars (including the sun) which are threaded by magnetic fields are unstable; the instabilities considered lead to structuring perpendicular to the ambient magnetic fields. These results suggest that relatively modest surface motions, in conjunction with the presence of magnetic fields, suffice to account for the presence of inhomogeneous chromospheric and coronal plasma overlying a star's surface.

  15. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  16. Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Haan, S.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Glendinning, S.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Goldstein, W.H.; Wilson, B.G.; Nash, J.K.

    1993-02-17

    An extensive series of experiments has been conducted on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime. Two-mode foils allow a first direct observation of mode coupling. Surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes.

  17. Genomic Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Tarek; Keaton, Mignon A.; Dutta, Anindya

    2013-01-01

    One of the fundamental challenges facing the cell is to accurately copy its genetic material to daughter cells. When this process goes awry, genomic instability ensues in which genetic alterations ranging from nucleotide changes to chromosomal translocations and aneuploidy occur. Organisms have developed multiple mechanisms that can be classified into two major classes to ensure the fidelity of DNA replication. The first class includes mechanisms that prevent premature initiation of DNA replication and ensure that the genome is fully replicated once and only once during each division cycle. These include cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-dependent mechanisms and CDK-independent mechanisms. Although CDK-dependent mechanisms are largely conserved in eukaryotes, higher eukaryotes have evolved additional mechanisms that seem to play a larger role in preventing aberrant DNA replication and genome instability. The second class ensures that cells are able to respond to various cues that continuously threaten the integrity of the genome by initiating DNA-damage-dependent “checkpoints” and coordinating DNA damage repair mechanisms. Defects in the ability to safeguard against aberrant DNA replication and to respond to DNA damage contribute to genomic instability and the development of human malignancy. In this article, we summarize our current knowledge of how genomic instability arises, with a particular emphasis on how the DNA replication process can give rise to such instability. PMID:23335075

  18. Posterior Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Brelin, Alaina; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2017-09-01

    Posterior shoulder instability is a relatively uncommon condition, occurring in ∼10% of those with shoulder instability. Because of the rarity of the condition and the lack of knowledge in treatment, it is often misdiagnosed or patients experience a delay in diagnosis. Posterior instability typically affects athletes participating in contact or overhead sports and is usually the result of repetitive microtrauma or blunt force with the shoulder in the provocative position of flexion, adduction, and internal rotation, leading to recurrent subluxation events. Acute traumatic posterior dislocations are rare injuries with an incidence rate of 1.1 per 100,000 person years. This rate is ∼20 times lower than that of anterior shoulder dislocations. Risk factors for recurrent instability are: (1) age below 40 at time of first instability; (2) dislocation during a seizure; (3) a large reverse Hill-Sachs lesion; and (4) glenoid retroversion. A firm understanding of the pathoanatomy, along with pertinent clinical and diagnostic modalities is required to accurately diagnosis and manage this condition.

  19. Measurements of the momentum and current transport from tearing instability in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pincha)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuritsyn, A.; Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Miller, M. C.; Mirnov, V. V.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper measurements of momentum and current transport caused by current driven tearing instability are reported. The measurements are done in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch [R. N. Dexter, D. W. Kerst, T. W. Lovell, S. C. Prager, and J. C. Sprott, Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] in a regime with repetitive bursts of tearing instability causing magnetic field reconnection. It is established that the plasma parallel momentum profile flattens during these reconnection events: The flow decreases in the core and increases at the edge. The momentum relaxation phenomenon is similar in nature to the well established relaxation of the parallel electrical current and could be a general feature of self-organized systems. The measured fluctuation-induced Maxwell and Reynolds stresses, which govern the dynamics of plasma flow, are large and almost balance each other such that their difference is approximately equal to the rate of change of plasma momentum. The Hall dynamo, which is directly related to the Maxwell stress, drives the parallel current profile relaxation at resonant surfaces at the reconnection events. These results qualitatively agree with analytical calculations and numerical simulations. It is plausible that current-driven instabilities can be responsible for momentum transport in other laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

  20. Modulational instability of fast magnetosonic waves in a solar plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, J.-I.

    1983-04-01

    A set of coupled equations describing the modulational instability, including gravity, is derived from the MHD. It is noted that the results obtained here may figure prominently in processes of magnetic field line reconnection caused by nonlinear MHD waves (Sakai et al., 1982), as well as in explanations of the slow motions recently observed in the X-ray pictures during Skylab (Rust and Svestka, 1979). The modulational instability is discussed, and an estimate is made of the growth rate. Attention is also given to the applications of the modulational instability of fast modes to a solar plasma.

  1. Instability of the heliopause driven by charge exchange interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.; Zank, G. P.; Dasgupta, B.; Bhadoria, Shikha

    2014-08-20

    The stability of the heliopause that separates the tenuous hot magnetized heliosheath plasma from the dense cool local interstellar magnetized plasma is examined using a fully general model that includes all the essential physical processes. Charge exchange coupling between plasma protons and primary interstellar neutral atoms provides an effective gravity that drives Rayleigh-Taylor (RT)-like instabilities. The velocity difference or shear between the heliosheath and interstellar flows, when coupled to energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)-like instability on the heliopause. The shoulder region of the heliopause is unstable to a new instability that has characteristics of a mixed RT-KH-like mode. The instabilities are not stabilized by typical values of the magnetic fields in the inner and outer heliosheath (OHS). ENAs play an essential role in driving the KH-like instability, which is fully stabilized in their absence by magnetic fields. The nonlinear phase of these instabilities is briefly discussed. We also discuss the possibility that RT-like or mixed KH-RT-like instabilities drag outer heliosheath/very local interstellar medium (OHS/VLISM) magnetic field lines into the inner heliosheath (IHS) with the VLISM flow, and the possibility that IHS and VLISM magnetic field lines experience reconnection. Such reconnection may (1) greatly enhance the mixing of plasmas across the heliopause and (2) provide open magnetic field lines that allow easy ingress of galactic cosmic rays into the heliosphere and corresponding easy loss of anomalous cosmic rays from the heliosphere.

  2. On magnetohydrodynamic thermal instabilities in magnetic flux tubes. [in plane parallel stellar atmosphere in LTE and hydrostatic equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massaglia, S.; Ferrari, A.; Bodo, G.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.

    1985-01-01

    The stability of current-driven filamentary modes in magnetic flux tubes embedded in a plane-parallel atmosphere in LTE and in hydrostatic equilibrium is discussed. Within the tube, energy transport by radiation only is considered. The dominant contribution to the opacity is due to H- ions and H atoms (in the Paschen continuum). A region in the parameter space of the equilibrium configuration in which the instability is effective is delimited, and the relevance of this process for the formation of structured coronae in late-type stars and accretion disks is discussed.

  3. Entanglement production at Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Lucas; Bianchi, Eugenio; Yokomizo, Nelson

    2016-03-01

    Instabilities play a major role in various areas of physics. In this talk, I will present some new results on how instabilities produce entanglement between subsystems. We study the asymptotic behavior of the entanglement entropy when we evolve a squeezed vacuum with an unstable quadratic Hamiltonian. We show that in this setting the entanglement entropy always grows linearly with a slope determined by the classical Lyapunov exponents of the system, resembling the classical Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy rate. Our theorem applies to all bosonic quantum field theories with quadratic coupling, including the scalar Schwinger effect, the inverted mass scalar field and various complex field theory models.

  4. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  5. The effect of growth architecture on the induction and decay of bleomycin and X-ray-induced bystander response and genomic instability in lung adenocarcinoma cells and blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chinnadurai, Mani; Paul, Solomon F D; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2013-02-01

    Cancer patients treated with radiomimetic drug bleomycin (BLM) have shown incidence of 7% second malignancy. Studies regarding BLM-induced genomic instability in bystander cells are scarce, and experiments with cells grown on three-dimensional (3D) cultures to mimic the in-vivo condition have never been attempted. A549 and NCI-H23 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells were grown as 3D cultures using Cytomatrix(™), exposed to BLM or X-radiation and co-cultured with their respective unexposed cells. The DNA damage in direct and bystander cells were assessed by the induction of micronuclei (MN) or phosphorylated serine-15 residue in protein 53 (p53(ser-15)), a reflection of DNA damage, and by up-regulation of protein 21 (p21Waf1). The persistence of DNA damage was measured using MN assay and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in cancer cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) respectively. BLM or X-irradiation induced DNA damage in both A549 and NCI-H23 cells and their respective bystander cells grown in 2D or 3D cultures. Further persistence of these damages in bystander PBL at delayed times indicated genomic instability in these cells. BLM-induced genomic instability in the progeny of bystander cells and their significance in therapy-induced second malignancy may not be eliminated completely.

  6. Experimental Study of the Current Filamentation Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Brian; Muggli, Patric; Silva, Luis O.; Martins, Joana; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Fedurin, Mikhail; Kusche, Karl; Babzien, Marcus; Huang, Chengkun; Mori, Warren

    2012-10-01

    The Current Filamentation Instability (CFI) is of central importance for the propagation of relativistic electron beams in plasmas. CFI has potential relevance to astrophysics, afterglow of gamma ray bursts, inertial confinement fusion, energy transport in the fast-igniter concept, and places an upper limit on the plasma density and accelerating gradient in PWFA's. An experimental study at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory with the 60MeV e^- beam and cm length plasma. The experiment included the systematic study and characterization of the instability as a function of the beam charge and plasma density. The transverse beam profile is measured directly at the plasma exit using OTR. Experimental results show the transition from plasma focusing to CFI near kpσr=1 characterized by the appearance of multiple (1-5) beam filaments and scaling of the transverse filament size with the plasma skin depth. Suppression of the instability is seen by lowering the growth rate of the instability by reducing the beam charge. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with theory and simulations and we present and discuss simulation and experimental results.

  7. [Psychodynamics of childhood instability].

    PubMed

    Flavigny, C

    1988-01-01

    This work focuses on the Anglo-Saxon idea concerning "hyperactivity" and "hyperkinesis" and the French-language idea of "child psycho-motor instability". The author's own personal study (having two separate parts, on the one hand studying the psychic functioning of parent and their interaction with their child, and on the other, studying material gathered on the individual psychotherapy of unstable children), goes along with the French school of thought, highlighting the extent of incestuous sexual advances toward children (especially boys) in the family unit and the sexual nature (in the sense of child sexuality) of this excitement as the source of their instability, justifying a comparison between the unstable child and a Don Juan-type of instability. What comes out is epistemological thinking on Anglo-Saxon and French-language ideas, in particular criticism of the pre-suppositions in the Anglo-Saxon way of seeing things, which seems only to envisage the characterization of a syndromic range, rather than an organic etiology, this being more often implicit; distanced by the idea of psychodynamics, which predominate in the French-language studies, integrating the symptom of "psycho-motor instability" in the general "wholeness" of the child and evaluating ways of parent-child interaction.

  8. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, J.

    2010-05-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its instability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, the partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches one, the critical index goes to a maximum value that depends on the distribution of the external magnetic field. We demonstrate that the partial torus instability helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux rope CME.

  9. Electromagnetic ion beam instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Foosland, D. W.; Smith, C. W.; Lee, M. A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The linear theory of electromagnetic instabilities driven by an energetic ion beam streaming parallel to a magnetic field in a homogeneous Vlasov plasma is considered. Numerical solutions of the full dispersion equation are presented. At propagation parallel to the magnetic field, there are four distinct instabilities. A sufficiently energetic beam gives rise to two unstable modes with right-hand polarization, one resonant with the beam, the other nonresonant. A beam with sufficiently large T (perpendicular to B)/T (parallel to B) gives rise to the left-hand ion cyclotron anisotropy instability at relatively small beam velocities, and a sufficiently hot beam drives unstable a left-hand beam resonant mode. The parametric dependences of the growth rates for the three high beam velocity instabilities are presented here. In addition, some properties at oblique propagation are examined. It is demonstrated that, as the beam drift velocity is increased, relative maxima in growth rates can arise at harmonics of the ion cyclotron resonance for both right and left elliptically polarized modes.

  10. Multidirectional Shoulder Instability: Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Ibán, Miguel Angel; Díaz Heredia, Jorge; García Navlet, Miguel; Serrano, Francisco; Santos Oliete, María

    2017-01-01

    Background: The treatment of multidirectional instability of the shoulder is complex. The surgeon should have a clear understanding of the role of hiperlaxity, anatomical variations, muscle misbalance and possible traumatic incidents in each patient. Methods: A review of the relevant literature was performed including indexed journals in English and Spanish. The review was focused in both surgical and conservative management of multidirectional shoulder instability. Results: Most patients with multidirectional instability will be best served with a period of conservative management with physical therapy; this should focus in restoring strength and balance of the dynamic stabilizers of the shoulder. The presence of a significant traumatic incident, anatomic alterations and psychological problems are widely considered to be poor prognostic factors for conservative treatment. Patients who do not show a favorable response after 3 months of conservative treatment seem to get no benefit from further physical therapy. When conservative treatment fails, a surgical intervention is warranted. Both open capsular shift and arthroscopic capsular plication are considered to be the treatment of choice in these patients and have similar outcomes. Thermal or laser capsuloraphy is no longer recommended. Conclusion: Multidirectional instability is a complex problem. Conservative management with focus on strengthening and balancing of the dynamic shoulder stabilizers is the first alternative. Some patients will fare poorly and require either open or arthroscopic capsular plication.

  11. The Tayler instability at low magnetic Prandtl numbers: between chiral symmetry breaking and helicity oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Norbert; Galindo, Vladimir; Stefani, Frank; Weier, Tom

    2015-11-01

    The Tayler instability is a kink-type, current driven instability that plays an important role in plasma physics but might also be relevant in liquid metal applications with high electrical currents. In the framework of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo model of stellar magnetic field generation (Spruit 2002 Astron. Astrophys. 381 923-32), the question of spontaneous helical (chiral) symmetry breaking during the saturation of the Tayler instability has received considerable interest (Zahn et al 2007 Astron. Astrophys. 474 145-54 Gellert et al 2011 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 414 2696-701 Bonanno et al 2012 Phys. Rev. E 86 016313). Focusing on fluids with low magnetic Prandtl numbers, for which the quasistatic approximation can be applied, we utilize an integro-differential equation approach (Weber et al 2013 New J. Phys.15 043034) in order to investigate the saturation mechanism of the Tayler instability. Both the exponential growth phase and the saturated phase are analysed in terms of the action of the α and β effects of mean-field magnetohydrodynamics. In the exponential growth phase we always find a spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking which, however, disappears in the saturated phase. For higher degrees of supercriticality, we observe helicity oscillations in the saturated regime. For Lundquist numbers in the order of one we also obtain chiral symmetry breaking of the saturated magnetic field.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic study for three-dimensional instability of the Petschek type magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, T.; Kondoh, K.

    2013-12-15

    The 3D instability of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection process is studied with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, where the 2D model of the spontaneous fast magnetic reconnection is destabilized in three dimension. As well known in many 2D numerical MHD studies, when a 1D current sheet is destabilized with the current-driven anomalous resistivity, the 2D Petschek type fast magnetic reconnection is established. This paper shows that the 2D Petschek type fast magnetic reconnection can be destabilized in three dimension by an initial resistive disturbance which includes a weak fluctuation in the sheet current direction, i.e., along the magnetic neutral line. The resulting 3D fast magnetic reconnection finally becomes intermittent and random through a 3D instability. In addition, it is also shown that the 3D instability is suppressed by the uniform resistivity. It suggests that the 3D instability is caused in the Petschek-type reconnection process which is characterized by a strongly localized magnetic diffusion region and the slow shock acceleration of the plasma jets and is suppressed in the Sweet-Parker type reconnection process.

  13. Experimental, Numerical and Analytical Studies of the MHD-driven plasma jet, instabilities and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiang

    This thesis describes a series of experimental, numerical, and analytical studies involving the Caltech magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven plasma jet experiment. The plasma jet is created via a capacitor discharge that powers a magnetized coaxial planar electrodes system. The jet is collimated and accelerated by the MHD forces. We present three-dimensional ideal MHD finite-volume simulations of the plasma jet experiment using an astrophysical magnetic tower as the baseline model. A compact magnetic energy/helicity injection is exploited in the simulation analogous to both the experiment and to astrophysical situations. Detailed analysis provides a comprehensive description of the interplay of magnetic force, pressure, and flow effects. We delineate both the jet structure and the transition process that converts the injected magnetic energy to other forms. When the experimental jet is sufficiently long, it undergoes a global kink instability and then a secondary local Rayleigh-Taylor instability caused by lateral acceleration of the kink instability. We present an MHD theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the cylindrical surface of a plasma flux rope in the presence of a lateral external gravity. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. In the experiment, this instability cascade from macro-scale to micro-scale eventually leads to the failure of MHD. When the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes nonlinear, it compresses and pinches the plasma jet to a scale smaller than the ion skin depth and triggers a fast magnetic reconnection. We built a specially designed high-speed 3D magnetic probe and

  14. Chromosomal instability induced by heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Ponnaiya, B.; Corcoran, J. J.; Giedzinski, E.; Morgan, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish the dose-response relationship for the induction of chromosomal instability in GM10115 cells exposed to high-energy iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 146 keV/microm) and gold ions (11 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 1450 keV/microm). Past work has established that sparsely ionizing X-rays can induce a long-lived destabilization of chromosomes in a dose-dependent manner at an incidence of approximately 3% per gray. The present investigation assesses the capacity of High-Z and High-energy (HZE) particles to elicit this same endpoint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving heavy-ion irradiation were analyzed cytogenetically to identify those clones showing a persistent destablization of chromosomes. RESULTS: Dose-response data, with a particular emphasis at low dose (< 1.0 Gy), indicate a frequency of approximately 4% per gray for the induction of chromosomal instability in clones derived from single progenitor cells surviving exposure to iron ions. The induction of chromosomal instability by gold ions was, however, less responsive to applied dose, as the observed incidence of this phenotype varied from 0 to 10% over 1-8 Gy. Both iron and gold ions gave dose-dependent increases in the yield of chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome- and chromatid-type) measured at the first mitosis following irradiation, as well as shoulderless survival curves having D0=0.87 and 1.1 Gy respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present dose-response data, the relative biological effectiveness of iron ions is 1.3 for the induction of chromosomal instability, and this indicates that heavy ions are only slightly more efficient than X-rays at eliciting this delayed phenotype.

  15. Chromosomal instability induced by heavy ion irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limoli, C. L.; Ponnaiya, B.; Corcoran, J. J.; Giedzinski, E.; Morgan, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish the dose-response relationship for the induction of chromosomal instability in GM10115 cells exposed to high-energy iron ions (1 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 146 keV/microm) and gold ions (11 GeV/nucleon, mean LET 1450 keV/microm). Past work has established that sparsely ionizing X-rays can induce a long-lived destabilization of chromosomes in a dose-dependent manner at an incidence of approximately 3% per gray. The present investigation assesses the capacity of High-Z and High-energy (HZE) particles to elicit this same endpoint. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonal populations derived from single progenitor cells surviving heavy-ion irradiation were analyzed cytogenetically to identify those clones showing a persistent destablization of chromosomes. RESULTS: Dose-response data, with a particular emphasis at low dose (< 1.0 Gy), indicate a frequency of approximately 4% per gray for the induction of chromosomal instability in clones derived from single progenitor cells surviving exposure to iron ions. The induction of chromosomal instability by gold ions was, however, less responsive to applied dose, as the observed incidence of this phenotype varied from 0 to 10% over 1-8 Gy. Both iron and gold ions gave dose-dependent increases in the yield of chromosomal aberrations (both chromosome- and chromatid-type) measured at the first mitosis following irradiation, as well as shoulderless survival curves having D0=0.87 and 1.1 Gy respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present dose-response data, the relative biological effectiveness of iron ions is 1.3 for the induction of chromosomal instability, and this indicates that heavy ions are only slightly more efficient than X-rays at eliciting this delayed phenotype.

  16. Instability in poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Wettlaufer, John

    2016-11-01

    Fluid flow in deformable porous materials, which play significant role in different biological and geological systems of wide range of scales, is a highly nonlinear problem. Feedback from the elastic deformation of the solid skeleton on the fluid flow and vice-versa gives rise to pattern formation in the porosity structure of the skeleton. We view some of these patterns as instabilities of the coupled fluid-solid system. Due to highly nonlinear nature of the problem, very little has been understood about this instability. Here, we use a minimal poroelastic theory to understand the pattern formation in a fluid-saturated poroelastic material and discuss the similarities/differences with viscous fingering in non-deformable porous media.

  17. Open field lines instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzoli, R. |

    1995-09-01

    The results of some recent theoretical papers dealing with flute-like instabilities in the scrape-off layer of a tokamak with limiter configuration, where the magnetic field intersects conducting walls, are briefly recalled. Attention is then paid to the instability driven by the electron temperature gradient across the field in conjunction with the formation of the Debye sheath at the boundary, and to the effects due to the inclination of the end walls with respect to the magnetic field. When a divertor configuration is considered, important modifications are found owing to the strong deformations of the flux tubes passing near the {ital x}-point, which contrast the onset of flute-like perturbations, and to the stochasticity of field lines that can be excited by magnetic field perturbations. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Modulation instability: The beginning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noskov, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Kivshar, Yuri

    2012-11-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles plays a central role in the emerging novel technologies employing optics beyond the diffraction limit. Combining strong surface plasmon resonances, high intrinsic nonlinearities and deeply subwavelength scales, arrays of metal nanoparticles offer a unique playground to develop novel concepts for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we suggest a novel principle to control localized optical energy in chains of nonlinear subwavelength metal nanoparticles based on the fundamental nonlinear phenomenon of modulation instability. In particular, we demonstrate that modulation instability can lead to the formation of long-lived standing and moving nonlinear localized modes of several distinct types such as bright and dark solitons, oscillons, and domain walls. We analyze the properties of these nonlinear localized modes and reveal different scenarios of their dynamics including transformation of one type of mode to another. We believe this work paves a way towards the development of nonlinear nanophotonics circuitry.

  19. Instabilities in sensory processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    In any organism there are different kinds of sensory receptors for detecting the various, distinct stimuli through which its external environment may impinge upon it. These receptors convey these stimuli in different ways to an organism's information processing region enabling it to distinctly perceive the varied sensations and to respond to them. The behavior of cells and their response to stimuli may be captured through simple mathematical models employing regulatory feedback mechanisms. We argue that the sensory processes such as olfaction function optimally by operating in the close proximity of dynamical instabilities. In the case of coupled neurons, we point out that random disturbances and fluctuations can move their operating point close to certain dynamical instabilities triggering synchronous activity.

  20. [Orthostatic tremor inducing instability].

    PubMed

    Manrique-Huarte, Raquel; Arcocha, Juan; Pérez-Fernández, Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    Orthostatic tremor (OT) is a neurological disease of unknown aetiology. It is defined by the presence of a 10-20 Hz tremor in the legs while standing still. Symptoms described are dizziness and instability that diminish if the patient sits down or leans on something; drinking small amounts of alcohol significantly reduces OT. Due to the dizziness and/or unsteadiness, these patients are usually referred to the neuro-otology department. We report 4 cases diagnosed with OT. The diagnosis of OT should be considered for patients with instability. The clinical history is a key factor to suspect this entity, and the diagnosis is given by the register of 10-20 Hz contractions on limb electromyography. Treatment for this disease consists of medical treatment; the first option is clonazepam.

  1. Modulation instability: The beginning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Ostrovsky, L. A.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the early history of an important field of “sturm and drang” in modern theory of nonlinear waves. It is demonstrated how scientific demand resulted in independent and almost simultaneous publications by many different authors on modulation instability, a phenomenon resulting in a variety of nonlinear processes such as envelope solitons, envelope shocks, freak waves, etc. Examples from water wave hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, nonlinear optics, and convection theory are given.

  2. Combustion instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    A theory and computer program for combustion instability analysis are presented. The basic theoretical foundation resides in the concept of entropy-controlled energy growth or decay. Third order perturbation expansion is performed on the entropy-controlled acoustic energy equation to obtain the first order integrodifferential equation for the energy growth factor in terms of the linear, second, and third order energy growth parameters. These parameters are calculated from Navier-Stokes solutions with time averages performed on as many Navier-Stokes time steps as required to cover at least one peak wave period. Applications are made for a 1-D Navier-Stokes solution for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) thrust chamber with cross section area variations taken into account. It is shown that instability occurs when the mean pressure is set at 2000 psi with 30 percent disturbances. Instability also arises when the mean pressure is set at 2935 psi with 20 percent disturbances. The system with mean pressures and disturbances more adverse that these cases were shown to be unstable.

  3. Chronic ankle instability: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A.; Al-Kenani, Nader S.

    2016-01-01

    Ankle sprain is reported to be among the most common recurrent injuries. About 20% of acute ankle sprain patients develop chronic ankle instability. The failure of functional rehabilitation after acute ankle sprain leads to the development of chronic ankle instability. Differentiation between functional and anatomical ankle instability is very essential to guide the proper treatment. Stability testing by varus stress test and anterior drawer test should be carried out. Subtalar instability is an important pathology that is commonly by passed during the assessment of chronic ankle instability. Unlike acute ankle sprain, chronic ankle instability might require surgical intervention. The surgical and conservative management options can be very much developed by in-depth knowledge of the ankle anatomy, biomechanics, and pathology. Anatomical repair, augmentation by tendon, or both are the basic methods of surgical intervention. Arthroscopy is becoming more popular in the management of chronic ankle instability. PMID:27843798

  4. Robust dynamic mitigation of instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kawata, S.; Karino, T.

    2015-04-15

    A dynamic mitigation mechanism for instability growth was proposed and discussed in the paper [S. Kawata, Phys. Plasmas 19, 024503 (2012)]. In the present paper, the robustness of the dynamic instability mitigation mechanism is discussed further. The results presented here show that the mechanism of the dynamic instability mitigation is rather robust against changes in the phase, the amplitude, and the wavelength of the wobbling perturbation applied. Generally, instability would emerge from the perturbation of the physical quantity. Normally, the perturbation phase is unknown so that the instability growth rate is discussed. However, if the perturbation phase is known, the instability growth can be controlled by a superposition of perturbations imposed actively: If the perturbation is induced by, for example, a driving beam axis oscillation or wobbling, the perturbation phase could be controlled, and the instability growth is mitigated by the superposition of the growing perturbations.

  5. Magnetorotational instability in cool cores of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, L.; Ettori, S.; Bianconi, M.

    2015-10-01

    > Clusters of galaxies are embedded in halos of optically thin, gravitationally stratified, weakly magnetized plasma at the system's virial temperature. Owing to radiative cooling and anisotropic heat conduction, such intracluster medium (ICM) is subject to local instabilities, which are combinations of the thermal, magnetothermal and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. If the ICM rotates significantly, its stability properties are substantially modified and, in particular, also the magnetorotational instability (MRI) can play an important role. We study simple models of rotating cool-core clusters and we demonstrate that the MRI can be the dominant instability over significant portions of the clusters, with possible implications for the dynamics and evolution of the cool cores. Our results give further motivation for measuring the rotation of the ICM with future X-ray missions such as ASTRO-H and ATHENA.

  6. Ion-cyclotron instability in current-carrying Lorentzian (kappa) and Maxwellian plasmas with anisotropic temperatures: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, B.; Grossbard, N. J.

    2011-09-15

    Current-driven electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability has so far been studied for Maxwellian plasma with isotropic and anisotropic temperatures. Since satellite-measured particle velocity distributions in space are often better modeled by the generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distributions and since temperature anisotropy is quite common in space plasmas, theoretical analysis of the current-driven, electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability is carried out in this paper for electron-proton plasma with anisotropic temperatures, where the particle parallel velocity distributions are modeled by kappa distributions and the perpendicular velocity distributions are modeled by Maxwellian distributions. Stability properties of the excited ion cyclotron modes and, in particular, their dependence on electron to ion temperature ratio and ion temperature anisotropy are presented in more detail. For comparison, the corresponding results for bi-Maxwellian plasma are also presented. Although the stability properties of the ion cyclotron modes in the two types of plasmas are qualitatively similar, significant quantitative differences can arise depending on the values of {kappa}{sub e} and {kappa}{sub i}. The comparative study is based on the numerical solutions of the respective linear dispersion relations. Quasilinear estimates of the resonant ion heating rates due to ion-cyclotron turbulence in the two types of plasma are also presented for comparison.

  7. Pulsational Pair-instability Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 70-140 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ is explored. Depending upon their mass loss history and rotation rates, these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae (PPISN) producing a great variety of observational transients with total durations ranging from weeks to millennia and luminosities from 1041 to over 1044 erg s-1. No nonrotating model radiates more than 5× {10}50 erg of light or has a kinetic energy exceeding 5× {10}51 erg, but greater energies are possible, in principle, in magnetar-powered explosions, which are explored. Many events resemble SNe Ibn, SNe Icn, and SNe IIn, and some potential observational counterparts are mentioned. Some PPISN can exist in a dormant state for extended periods, producing explosions millennia after their first violent pulse. These dormant supernovae contain bright Wolf-Rayet stars, possibly embedded in bright X-ray and radio sources. The relevance of PPISN to supernova impostors like Eta Carinae, to superluminous supernovae, and to sources of gravitational radiation is discussed. No black holes between 52 and 133 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ are expected from stellar evolution in close binaries.

  8. Suppressing shape instabilities to discover the Bjerknes force instability (L).

    PubMed

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad A; Holt, R Glynn

    2011-11-01

    For sufficiently strong acoustic forcing in a standing wave field, subresonant size bubbles are predicted to be repelled from the pressure antinode. Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) conditions in water do not allow the observation of this instability. This study investigates the possibility that increasing the viscosity of the host liquid can preferentially suppress shape instabilities of a bubble and allow SBSL experiments to be limited by the Bjerknes force instability.

  9. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  10. Radiative-convective instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, Kerry; Wing, Allison A.; Vincent, Emmanuel M.

    2014-03-01

    equilibrium (RCE) is a simple paradigm for the statistical equilibrium the earth's climate would exhibit in the absence of lateral energy transport. It has generally been assumed that for a given solar forcing and long-lived greenhouse gas concentration, such a state would be unique, but recent work suggests that more than one stable equilibrium may be possible. Here we show that above a critical specified sea surface temperature, the ordinary RCE state becomes linearly unstable to large-scale overturning circulations. The instability migrates the RCE state toward one of the two stable equilibria first found by Raymond and Zeng (2000). It occurs when the clear-sky infrared opacity of the lower troposphere becomes so large, owing to high water vapor concentration, that variations of the radiative cooling of the lower troposphere are governed principally by variations in upper tropospheric water vapor. We show that the instability represents a subcritical bifurcation of the ordinary RCE state, leading to either a dry state with large-scale descent, or to a moist state with mean ascent; these states may be accessed by finite amplitude perturbations to ordinary RCE in the subcritical state, or spontaneously in the supercritical state. As first suggested by Raymond (2000) and Sobel et al. (2007), the latter corresponds to the phenomenon of self-aggregation of moist convection, taking the form of cloud clusters or tropical cyclones. We argue that the nonrobustness of self-aggregation in cloud system resolving models may be an artifact of running such models close to the critical temperature for instability.

  11. Chromosome instability syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 11, discusses chromosome instability syndromes. The focus is on the most extensively studied genotypic chromosomal aberrations which include Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, ataxia telangiectasia, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The great interest in these syndromes is out of proportion to their rare occurrence; however, studies of genotypic chromosome breakage have been inspired by the hope of throwing light on chromosome structure and behavior. A table is given which relates chromosomal aberrations in Bloom syndrome which may cause or promote cancer. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Non-conventional Fishbone Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko; R.B. White

    2004-11-10

    New instabilities of fishbone type are predicted. First, a trapped-particle-induced m = n = 1 instability with the mode structure having nothing to do with the conventional rigid kink displacement. This instability takes place when the magnetic field is weak, so that the precession frequency of the energetic ions is not small as compared to the frequency of the corresponding Alfven continuum at r = 0 and the magnetic shear is small inside the q = 1 radius [the case relevant to spherical tori]. Second, an Energetic Particle Mode fishbone instability driven by circulating particles. Third, a double-kink-mode instability driven by the circulating energetic ions. In particular, the latter can have two frequencies simultaneously: we refer to it as ''doublet'' fishbones. This instability can occur when the radial profile of the energetic ions has an off-axis maximum inside the region of the mode localization.

  13. Weibel instability with nonextensive distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Hui-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2013-10-15

    Weibel instability in plasma, where the ion distribution is isotropic and the electron component of the plasma possesses the anisotropic temperature distribution, is investigated based on the kinetic theory in context of nonextensive statistics mechanics. The instability growth rate is shown to be dependent on the nonextensive parameters of both electron and ion, and in the extensive limit, the result in Maxwellian distribution plasma is recovered. The instability growth rate is found to be enhanced as the nonextensive parameter of electron increases.

  14. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  15. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  16. Novel Cauchy-horizon instability

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Hideki; Torii, Takashi; Harada, Tomohiro

    2005-03-15

    The evolution of weak discontinuity is investigated on horizons in the n-dimensional static solutions in the Einstein-Maxwell-scalar-{lambda} system, including the Reissner-Nordstroem-(anti) de Sitter black hole. The analysis is essentially local and nonlinear. We find that the Cauchy horizon is unstable, whereas both the black hole event horizon and the cosmological event horizon are stable. This new instability, the so-called kink instability, of the Cauchy horizon is completely different from the well-known 'infinite-blueshift' instability. The kink instability makes the analytic continuation beyond the Cauchy horizon unstable.

  17. PARTIAL TORUS INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-20

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  18. [Genomic instability in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Dzhokhadze, T A; Buadze, T Zh; Gaiozishvili, M N; Kakauridze, N G; Lezhava, T A

    2014-11-01

    A comparative study of the level of genomic instability, parameters of quantitative and structural mutations of chromosomes (aberration, aneuploidy, polyploidy) in lymphocyte cultures from patients with atherosclerosis of age 80 years and older (control group - 30-35 years old) was conducted. The possibility of correction of disturbed genomic indicators by peptide bioregulators - Livagen (Lys-Glu-Asp-Ala) and cobalt ions with separate application or in combination was also studied. Control was lymphocyte culture of two healthy respective age groups. It was also shown that patients with atherosclerosis exhibit high level of genomic instability in all studied parameters, regardless of age, which may suggest that there is marked increase in chromatin condensation in atherosclerosis. It was also shown that Livagen (characterized by modifying influence on chromatin) separately and in combination with cobalt ions, promotes normalization of altered genomic indicators of atherosclerosis in both age groups. The results show that Livagen separately and in combination with cobalt ions has impact on chromatin of patients with atherosclerosis. The identified protective action of Livagen proves its efficacy in prevention of atherosclerosis.

  19. Microtearing instability in ITER*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, King-Lap; Mikkelsen, David; Budny, Robert; Breslau, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    Microtearing modes are found to be unstable in some regions of a simulated ITER H-mode plasma [1] with the GS2 code [2]. Modes with kρs>1 are in the interior (r/a˜0.65-0.85) while longer wavelength modes are in the pedestal region. This instability may keep the pedestal within the peeling-ballooning stability boundary [3]. Microtearing modes can produce stochastic magnetic field similar to RMP coils; they may have similar effects on ELMs by increasing the pedestal width. The possibility of using this technique for ELM mitigation in ITER is explored. We propose to use a deuterium gas jet to control the microtearing instability and the Chirikov parameter at the edge. Preliminary evaluation of its effectiveness will be presented and the limitations of the GS2 code will be discussed based on our understanding from NSTX [4]. *This work is supported by USDoE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466. [4pt] [1] R. V. Budny, Nucl. Fusion (2009)[0pt] [2] W. Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2000).[0pt] [3] P. B. Snyder et al.,Nucl. Fusion (2009).[0pt] [4] K. L. Wong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2007).

  20. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, Jie

    2010-07-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  1. Tunable room temperature terahertz sources based on two dimensional plasma instability in GaN HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fatimy, A.; Suemitsu, T.; Otsuji, T.; Dyakonova, N.; Knap, W.; Meziani, Y. M.; Vandenbrouk, S.; Madjour, K.; Théron, D.; Gaquiere, Ch; Prystawko, P.; Skierbiszewski, C.

    2009-11-01

    In this work, we report on room temperature terahertz radiation from sub-micron size GaN/AlGaN based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). They could successfully replace the standard Fourier Transform spectrometer source and were investigated with a standard Si-bolometer as a detector. The relatively broad (~1THz) emission line was observed. The maxima were found to be tunable by the gate voltage between 0.75 and 2.1 THz. The observed emission was interpreted as due to the current driven plasma waves instability in the two-dimensional electron gas. The emitted power from a single device reached 150 nW, showing possible application of these transistors as compact sources for terahertz spectroscopy and imaging.

  2. Experimental Evidence for a Transient Tayler Instability in a Cylindrical Liquid-Metal Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seilmayer, Martin; Stefani, Frank; Gundrum, Thomas; Weier, Tom; Gerbeth, Gunter; Gellert, Marcus; Rüdiger, Günther

    2012-06-01

    In the current-driven, kink-type Tayler instability (TI) a sufficiently strong azimuthal magnetic field becomes unstable against nonaxisymmetric perturbations. The TI has been discussed as a possible ingredient of the solar dynamo mechanism and a source of the helical structures in cosmic jets. It is also considered as a size-limiting factor for liquid metal batteries. We report on a liquid metal TI experiment using a cylindrical column of the eutectic alloy GaInSn to which electrical currents of up to 8 kA are applied. We present results of external magnetic field measurements that indicate the transient occurrence of the TI in good agreement with numerical predictions. The interference of TI with the competing large-scale convection, resulting from Joule heating, is also discussed.

  3. Instability vaccination: A structural design to reduce Rayleigh Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Amin

    2013-10-01

    Instability vaccination can be defined as designing a structure to stimulate the system in order to develop immunity against its instability. In this work we have tried to do this stabilization by a new technique. Previously some suppression of R-M instability was done by insertion of magnetic field, but in this work we have tried to do this suppression by proposing a configuration similar to the shape of instability, we call it instability vaccination. This design will reduce the rotations (mostly rotations of Rayleigh Taylor instability) in the fluids that cause more mixing and instabilities. In this paper, we consider the evolution of the interface between two ideal semi-infinite fluid surfaces, using two-dimensional Riemann solver, to solve the Euler equations. First, we performed evolution of a rectangular disorder between the 2 surfaces using two-dimensional Riemann problem for the equations of Euler. Next, the interface was replaced with a perturbation that was part rectangular and part semi-circular (like a mushroom). The simulation was continued till some time steps using the HLL method. We have seen that the rotations of Rayleigh Taylor (R-T) instability were decreased in the second case. Email: amin@cavelab.cs.tsukuba.ac.jp

  4. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Jets Due to Weibel Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  5. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Jets due to Weibel Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Hardee, P. E.; Richardson, G. A.; Preece, R. D.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shock acceleration is an ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a 3-D relativistic electromagnetic particle (REMP) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The jitter radiation (Medvedev 2000) from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  6. Weibel Instability Driven by Spatially Anisotropic Density Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Sara; Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Observations of afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggest that post-shock magnetic fields are strongly amplified to about 100 times the shock-compressed value. The Weibel instability appears to play an important role in generating the magnetic field. However, recent simulations of collisionless shocks in homogeneous plasmas show that the magnetic field generated by the Weibel instability rapidly decays. There must be some density fluctuations in interstellar and circumstellar media. The density fluctuations are anisotropically compressed in the downstream region of relativistic shocks. In this paper, we study the Weibel instability in electron-positron plasmas with spatially anisotropic density distributions by means of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that large magnetic fields are maintained for a longer time by the Weibel instability driven by spatially anisotropic density structure. Particles anisotropically escape from the high density region, so that a temperature anisotropy is generated and the Weibel instability becomes unstable. Our simulation results suggest that the Weibel instability driven by an anisotropic density structure can generate sufficiently large magnetic fields and they can cover sufficiently large regions to explain the afterglow emission of GRBs.

  7. Chromosomal Instability in the progeny of human irradiated cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testard, I.; Boissière, A.; Martins, L. M.; Sabatier, L.

    Manned space missions recently increased in number and duration, thus it became important to estimate the biological risks encountered by astronauts. They are exposed to cosmic and galactic rays, a complex mixture of different radiations. In addition to the measurements realized by physical dosimeters, it becomes essential to estimate real biologically effective doses and compare them to physical doses. Biological dosimetry of radiation exposures has been widely performed using cytogenetic analysis of chromosomes. This approach has been used for many years in order to estimate absorbed doses in accidental or chronic overexposures of humans. Recent studies show that some alterations can appear many cell generations after the initial radiation exposure as a delayed genomic instability. This delayed instability is characterized by the accumulation of cell alterations leading to cell transformation, delayed cell death and mutations. Chromosome instability was shown in vitro in different model systems (Sabatier et al., 1992; Marder and Morgan, 1993; Kadhim et al., 1994 and Holmberg et al., 1993, 1995). All types of radiation used induce chromosome instability; however, heavy ions cause the most damage. The period of chromosome instability followed by the formation of clones with unbalanced karyotypes seems to be shared by cancer cells. The shortening of telomere sequences leading to the formation of telomere fusions is an important factor in the appearance of this chromosome instability.

  8. A current-driven nanometer water pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Yang, Keda

    2016-03-01

    The design of a water pump, which has huge potential for applications in nanotechnology and daily life, is the dream of many scientists. In this paper, we successfully design a nanometer water pump by using molecular dynamics simulations. Ions of either sodium or chlorine in a narrow channel will generate electric current under electric fields, which then drives the water through a wider channel, similar to recent experimental setups. Considerable water flux is achieved within small field strengths that are accessible by experimentation. Of particular interest, is that for sodium the water flux increases almost linearly with field strengths; while for chlorine there exists a critical field strength, the water flux exhibits a plateau before the critical value and increases linearly after it. This result follows the behavior of ion velocity, which is related to friction behavior. We also estimate the power and energy consumption for such a pump, and compare it to the macroscopic mechanical pumps. A further comparison suggests that different ions will have different pumping abilities. This study not only provides new, significant results with possible connection to existing research, but has tremendous potential application in the design of nanofluidic devices.

  9. A current-driven nanometer water pump.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaye; Yang, Keda

    2016-03-04

    The design of a water pump, which has huge potential for applications in nanotechnology and daily life, is the dream of many scientists. In this paper, we successfully design a nanometer water pump by using molecular dynamics simulations. Ions of either sodium or chlorine in a narrow channel will generate electric current under electric fields, which then drives the water through a wider channel, similar to recent experimental setups. Considerable water flux is achieved within small field strengths that are accessible by experimentation. Of particular interest, is that for sodium the water flux increases almost linearly with field strengths; while for chlorine there exists a critical field strength, the water flux exhibits a plateau before the critical value and increases linearly after it. This result follows the behavior of ion velocity, which is related to friction behavior. We also estimate the power and energy consumption for such a pump, and compare it to the macroscopic mechanical pumps. A further comparison suggests that different ions will have different pumping abilities. This study not only provides new, significant results with possible connection to existing research, but has tremendous potential application in the design of nanofluidic devices.

  10. Tokamak current driven by poloidally asymmetric fueling

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Fueloep, T.; Lisak, M.

    2006-10-15

    It is shown that poloidally asymmetric particle transport or fueling in a tokamak generally produces an electric current parallel to the magnetic field, in particular if the transport or fueling is up-down asymmetric. For instance, a current arises in the edge region if most particle transport across the last closed flux surface occurs in the midplane while most refueling comes from recycling near the X-point. This current is negative relative to the bulk plasma current (and thus stabilizing to peeling modes) if the ion drift is toward the X-point, and changes direction if the magnetic field is reversed. However, this current appears to be smaller than the pedestal bootstrap current under typical conditions.

  11. Currents driven by electron cyclotron waves

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1981-07-01

    Certain aspects of the generation of steady-state currents by electron cyclotron waves are explored. A numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is used to verify the theory of Fisch and Boozer and to extend their results into the nonlinear regime. Relativistic effects on the current generated are discussed. Applications to steady-state tokamak reactors are considered.

  12. Sausage Instabilities on top of Kinking Lengthening Current-Carrying Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2015-11-01

    Observations indicate that the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in our cosmos and terrestrial experiments involve fast topological change beyond MHD reconnection. Recent experiments suggest that hierarchies of instabilities coupling disparate plasma scales could be responsible for this fast topological change by accessing two-fluid and kinetic scales. This study will explore the possibility of sausage instabilities developing on top of a kink instability in lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. Current driven flux tubes evolve over a wide range of aspect ratios k and current to magnetic flux ratios λ . An analytical stability criterion and numerical investigations, based on applying Newcomb's variational approach to idealized magnetic flux tubes with core and skin currents, indicate a dependence of the stability boundaries on current profiles and overlapping kink and sausage unstable regions in the k - λ trajectory of the flux tubes. A triple electrode planar plasma gun (Mochi.LabJet) is designed to generate flux tubes with discrete core and skin currents. Measurements from a fast-framing camera and a high resolution magnetic probe are being assembled into stability maps of the k - λ space of flux tubes. This work was sponsored in part by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  13. Instability saturation by the oscillating two-stream instability in a weakly relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Barnali; Poria, Swarup; Sahu, Biswajit

    2015-04-15

    The two-stream instability has wide range of astrophysical applications starting from gamma-ray bursts and pulsar glitches to cosmology. We consider one dimensional weakly relativistic Zakharov equations and describe nonlinear saturation of the oscillating two-stream instability using a three dimensional dynamical system resulting form a truncation of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation to three modes. The equilibrium points of the model are determined and their stability natures are discussed. Using the tools of nonlinear dynamics such as the bifurcation diagram, Poincaré maps, and Lyapunav exponents, existence of periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic solutions are established in the dynamical system. Interestingly, we observe the multistable behavior in this plasma model. The system has multiple attractors depending on the initial conditions. We also notice that the relativistic parameter plays the role of control parameter in the model. The theoretical results presented in this paper may be helpful for better understanding of space and astrophysical plasmas.

  14. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriz, A. R.; Cortázar, O. D.; López Cela, J. J.; Tahir, N. A.

    2006-12-01

    A new approach to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is presented that yields exact solutions for the simplest cases and provides approximate but still very accurate analytical expressions for important and more complex cases involving nonideal fluids. The approach is based on Newton's second law and allows for an intuitive and physically appealing explanation of the mechanisms underlying the instability.

  15. Liquid propellant rocket combustion instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrje, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The solution of problems of combustion instability for more effective communication between the various workers in this field is considered. The extent of combustion instability problems in liquid propellant rocket engines and recommendations for their solution are discussed. The most significant developments, both theoretical and experimental, are presented, with emphasis on fundamental principles and relationships between alternative approaches.

  16. Bony instability of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Creighton, R Alexander; Herring, Marion M

    2008-09-01

    Instability of the shoulder is a common problem treated by many orthopaedists. Instability can result from baseline intrinsic ligamentous laxity or a traumatic event-often a dislocation that injures the stabilizing structures of the glenohumeral joint. Many cases involve soft-tissue injury only and can be treated successfully with repair of the labrum and ligamentous tissues. Both open and arthroscopic approaches have been well described, with recent studies of arthroscopic soft-tissue techniques reporting results equal to those of the more traditional open techniques. Over the last decade, attention has focused on the concept of instability of the shoulder mediated by bony pathology such as a large bony Bankart lesion or an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent literature has identified unrecognized large bony lesions as a primary cause of failure of arthroscopic reconstruction for instability, a major cause of recurrent instability, and a difficult diagnosis to make. Thus, although such bony lesions may be relatively rare compared with soft-tissue pathology, they constitute a critically important entity in the management of shoulder instability. Smaller bony lesions may be amenable to arthroscopic treatment, but larger lesions often require open surgery to prevent recurrent instability. This article reviews recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of bony instability.

  17. Research on aviation fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    The underlying causes of fuel thermal degradation are discussed. Topics covered include: nature of fuel instability and its temperature dependence, methods of measuring the instability, chemical mechanisms involved in deposit formation, and instrumental methods for characterizing fuel deposits. Finally, some preliminary thoughts on design approaches for minimizing the effects of lowered thermal stability are briefly discussed.

  18. Marital instability after midlife.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z; Penning, M J

    1997-09-01

    "Divorce in later life has been shown to produce dramatic declines in the economic, psychological, and physical well-being of marital partners. This study examines the prevalence and determinants of marital disruption after midlife using Becker's theory of marital instability. Using recent Canadian national data, the marital outcomes of women and men who were married as of age 40 are tracked across the remaining years of the marriage. Cox proportional hazard regression models indicate stabilizing effects of the duration of the marriage, the age at first marriage, the presence of young children, as well as of remarriage for middle-aged and older persons. Other significant risk factors include education, heterogamous marital status, premarital cohabitation, number of siblings, and region."

  19. [Treatment of patellar instability].

    PubMed

    Lind, Martin; Faunø, Peter; Sørensen, Ole Gade; Mygind-Klavsen, Bjarne

    2017-09-18

    First-time patellar luxation appears typically in teenagers and young adults below the age of 16 years, with a prevalence of 45/100,000/year. This luxation is treated with brief limited mobility in a bandage, and with a complementary physiotherapy if the mobility is influenced afterwards. Risk factors for patellar instability are patellofemoral dysplasia, hyperlaxity, patella alta and valgus malalignment in the knee joint. In case of repeated luxation the treatment is surgical, i.e. reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament recreating the medial patella-stabilizing structures. If the dysplasia is severe, tuberositas tibiae-osteotomy and trochlea plastic can correct a lateral tracking of the knee joint. Generally, patella-stabilizing surgery is successful with a reluxation rate of only a few per cent.

  20. Instabilities in uranium plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidman, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of unstable sound waves in a uranium plasma has been calculated using a multiple time-scale asymptotic expansion scheme. The fluid equations used include the fission power density, radiation diffusion, and the effects of the changing degree of ionization of the uranium atoms. The nonlinear growth of unstable waves is shown to be limited by mode coupling to shorter wavelength waves which are damped by radiation diffusion. This mechanism limits the wave pressure fluctuations to values of order delta P/P equal to about .00001 in the plasma of a typical gas-core nuclear rocket engine. The instability is thus not expected to present a control problem for this engine.

  1. Neurocardiovascular Instability and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, Susan; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurocardiovascular instability (NCVI) refers to abnormal neural control of the cardiovascular system affecting blood pressure and heart rate behavior. Autonomic dysfunction and impaired cerebral autoregulation in aging contribute to this phenomenon characterized by hypotension and bradyarrhythmia. Ultimately, this increases the risk of falls and syncope in older people. NCVI is common in patients with neurodegenerative disorders including dementia. This review discusses the various syndromes that characterize NCVI icluding hypotension, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, postprandial hypotension and vasovagal syncope and how they may contribute to the aetiology of cognitive decline. Conversely, they may also be a consequence of a common neurodegenerative process. Regardless, recognition of their association is paramount in optimizing management of these patients. PMID:27505017

  2. Instabilities in uranium plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidman, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of unstable sound waves in a uranium plasma has been calculated using a multiple time-scale asymptotic expansion scheme. The fluid equations used include the fission power density, radiation diffusion, and the effects of the changing degree of ionization of the uranium atoms. The nonlinear growth of unstable waves is shown to be limited by mode coupling to shorter wavelength waves which are damped by radiation diffusion. This mechanism limits the wave pressure fluctuations to values of order delta P/P equal to about .00001 in the plasma of a typical gas-core nuclear rocket engine. The instability is thus not expected to present a control problem for this engine.

  3. MHD instabilities in accretion mounds - I. 2D axisymmetric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Bhattacharya, Dipankar; Mignone, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    We have performed stability analysis of axisymmetric accretion mounds on neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries by 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with the PLUTO MHD code. We find that the mounds are stable with respect to interchange instabilities, but the addition of excess mass destabilizes the equilibria. Our simulations confirm that accretion mounds are unstable with respect to MHD instabilities beyond a threshold mass. We investigate both filled and hollow mounds and for the latter also compute the expected profile of cyclotron resonance scattering features (CRSF). In comparison to the CRSF from filled mounds reported in our earlier work, hollow mounds display wider and more complex line profiles.

  4. Combustion Instabilities Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Advanced Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch is investigating active control strategies to mitigate or eliminate the combustion instabilities prevalent in lean-burning, low-emission combustors. These instabilities result from coupling between the heat-release mechanisms of the burning process and the acoustic flow field of the combustor. Control design and implementation require a simulation capability that is both fast and accurate. It must capture the essential physics of the system, yet be as simple as possible. A quasi-one-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based simulation has been developed which may meet these requirements. The Euler equations of mass, momentum, and energy have been used, along with a single reactive species transport equation to simulate coupled thermoacoustic oscillations. A very simple numerical integration scheme was chosen to reduce computing time. Robust boundary condition procedures were incorporated to simulate various flow conditions (e.g., valves, open ends, and choked inflow) as well as to accommodate flow reversals that may arise during large flow-field oscillations. The accompanying figure shows a sample simulation result. A combustor with an open inlet, a choked outlet, and a large constriction approximately two thirds of the way down the length is shown. The middle plot shows normalized, time-averaged distributions of the relevant flow quantities, and the bottom plot illustrates the acoustic mode shape of the resulting thermoacoustic oscillation. For this simulation, the limit cycle peak-to-peak pressure fluctuations were 13 percent of the mean. The simulation used 100 numerical cells. The total normalized simulation time was 50 units (approximately 15 oscillations), which took 26 sec on a Sun Ultra2.

  5. Internal rotor friction instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  6. Fingering instability of Bingham fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Shilpa; Myers, Tim

    2005-11-01

    Contact line instabilities have been extensively studied and many useful results obtained for industrial applications. Our research in this area is to explore these instabilities for non-Newtonian fluids which has wide scope in geological, biological as well as industrial areas. In this talk, we will present an analysis of fingering instability near a contact line of the thin sheet of fluid flowing down on a moderately inclined plane. This instability has been well studied for Newtonian fluids. We explore the effect of a yield strength of the fluid on this instability. We have conveniently assumed the presence of the precussor film of small thickness ahead of the fluid film to avoid some mathematical singularities. Using a lubrication-type approximation, we perform a linear stability analysis of a straight contact line. We will show comparison with some experimental results using suspensions of kaolin in silicone oil as a yield strength fluid.

  7. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  8. The nucleus is the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. I.; Morgan, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously described chromosomal instability in cells of a human-hamster hybrid cell line after exposure to X rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds and frozen. Radioactive decays from 125I cause damage to the cell primarily at the site of their decay, and freezing the cells allows damage to accumulate in the absence of other cellular processes. We found that the decay of 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which is incorporated into the DNA, caused chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Chromosomal instability could also be induced from incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine without freezing the cells for accumulation of decays. This indicates that DNA double-strand breaks in frozen cells resulting from 125I decays failed to lead to instability. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein (125I-succinyl-concanavalin A), which was internalized into the cell and/or bound to the plasma membrane, neither caused chromosomal instability nor potentiated chromosomal instability induced by 125I-iododeoxyuridine. These results show that the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability in these cells is the nucleus.

  9. The nucleus is the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. I.; Morgan, W. F.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously described chromosomal instability in cells of a human-hamster hybrid cell line after exposure to X rays. Chromosomal instability in these cells is characterized by the appearance of novel chromosomal rearrangements multiple generations after exposure to ionizing radiation. To identify the cellular target(s) for radiation-induced chromosomal instability, cells were treated with 125I-labeled compounds and frozen. Radioactive decays from 125I cause damage to the cell primarily at the site of their decay, and freezing the cells allows damage to accumulate in the absence of other cellular processes. We found that the decay of 125I-iododeoxyuridine, which is incorporated into the DNA, caused chromosomal instability. While cell killing and first-division chromosomal rearrangements increased with increasing numbers of 125I decays, the frequency of chromosomal instability was independent of dose. Chromosomal instability could also be induced from incorporation of 125I-iododeoxyuridine without freezing the cells for accumulation of decays. This indicates that DNA double-strand breaks in frozen cells resulting from 125I decays failed to lead to instability. Incorporation of an 125I-labeled protein (125I-succinyl-concanavalin A), which was internalized into the cell and/or bound to the plasma membrane, neither caused chromosomal instability nor potentiated chromosomal instability induced by 125I-iododeoxyuridine. These results show that the target for radiation-induced chromosomal instability in these cells is the nucleus.

  10. Temperature anisotropy and beam type whistler instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    1976-01-01

    Whistler instabilities have been investigated for two different types; i.e., a temperature-anisotropy type instability and a beam-type instability. A comparison between the two types of whistler instabilities is made within the framework of linear theory. A transition from one type to the other is also discussed, which is an extension of the work on electrostatic beam and Landau instabilities performed by O'Neil and Malmberg (1968) for electromagnetic whistler instabilities. It is clarified that the essential source of the whistler instability is not beam kinetic energy but a temperature anisotropy, even for the beam-type whistler instability.

  11. ROTATIONAL INSTABILITIES AND CENTRIFUGAL HANGUP

    SciTech Connect

    K. NEW; J. CENTRELLA

    2000-12-01

    One interesting class of gravitational radiation sources includes rapidly rotating astrophysical objects that encounter dynamical instabilities. We have carried out a set of simulations of rotationally induced instabilities in differentially rotating polytropes. An n=1.5 polytrope with the Maclaurin rotation law will encounter the m=2 bar instability at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0.27. Our results indicate that the remnant of this in-stability is a persistent bar-like structure that emits a long-lived gravitational radiation signal. Furthermore, dynamical instability is shown to occur in n=3.33 polytropes with the j-constant rotation law at T/{vert_bar}W{vert_bar} {ge} 0:14. In this case, the dominant mode of instability is m=1. Such instability may allow a centrifugally-hung core to begin collapsing to neutron star densities on a dynamical timescale. If it occurs in a supermassive star, it may produce gravitational radiation detectable by LISA.

  12. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    DOE PAGES

    Park, H. -S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; ...

    2015-05-13

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagneticmore » in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.« less

  13. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. -S.; Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Drake, R. P.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Kuranz, C. C.; Lamb, D. Q.; Levy, M. C.; Li, C. K.; Meinecke, J.; Morita, T.; Petrasso, R. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Spitkovsky, A.; Takabe, H.; Turnbull, D. P.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weber, S. V.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2015-05-13

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without preexisting magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ~1% These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  14. Analysis of structures causing instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    We present a simple new method to systematically identify all topological structures (e.g., positive feedback loops) potentially leading to locally unstable steady states: ICSA-The instability causing structure analysis. Systems without any instability causing structure (i.e., not fulfilling the necessary topological condition for instabilities) cannot have unstable steady states. It follows that common bistability or multistability and Hopf bifurcations are excluded and sustained oscillations and deterministic chaos are most unlikely. The ICSA leads to new insights into the topological organization of chemical and biochemical systems, such as metabolic, gene regulatory, and signal transduction networks.

  15. Simulations of Astrophysical fluid instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Rosner, R.; Dursi, L. J.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; MacNeice, P.; Tufo, H. M.

    2001-10-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of mixing at Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces performed with the FLASH code, developed at the ASCI/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes at the University of Chicago. We present initial results of single-mode studies in two and three dimensions. Our results indicate that three-dimensional instabilities grow significantly faster than two-dimensional instabilities and that grid resolution can have a significant effect on instability growth rates. We also find that unphysical diffusive mixing occurs at the fluid interface, particularly in poorly resolved simulations. .

  16. Instability of a bubble chain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjuan; An, Yu

    2013-05-01

    Based on the theory of shape instability and diffusive instability for single bubbles, we have studied the instability of an individual bubble in a bubble chain and found that its stable area enlarges the narrower the distance between bubbles. The spatial stability of the bubble chain is due to the secondary Bjerknes force between bubbles. Numerical calculations show the tension of the bubble chain varies with bubble distance and maxima appear at certain distances which could correspond to the stable states of the bubble chain.

  17. Phase Instability in Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, L.; Lippi, G. L.

    2014-11-01

    For many years, the apparent absence of a phase instability has characterized lasers as peculiar nonlinear oscillators. We show that this unusual feature is solely due to the approximations used in writing the standard models. A new, careful derivation of the fundamental equations, based on codimension 2 bifurcation theory, shows the possible existence of dynamical regimes displaying either a pure phase instability, or mixed phase-amplitude turbulence. A comparison to existing experimental results convincingly shows that the Benjamin-Feir instability, common to all nonlinear wave problems, is a fundamental, satisfactory interpretation for their deterministic multimode dynamics.

  18. Chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Gerstner Garces, Juan Bernardo

    2012-09-01

    Chronic instability of the ankle and anterolateral impingement syndrome are abnormalities that present as a result of inversion and forced plantar-flexion traumas of the foot, despite strict conservative management in the ER and in rehabilitation. A conservative approach is always the first choice of treatment, including anti-inflammatory medications, rehabilitation and proprioception, infiltration with steroids in impingement cases, and use of orthotics, whose true effectiveness is the subject of multiple studies and much debate. Good to excellent results can be obtained surgically with a minimally invasive approach, such as the arthroscopic technique presented herein. Such an approach is useful in managing a combination of conditions such as anterolateral impingement, synovitis, and osteochondral lesions of the talus. The method is easily reproducible, its learning curve is rapid, and it has the advantage of not preventing the use other arthroscopic methods, or open anatomic or nonanatomic methods (tendon transfers), in the case of failure. No nerve lesion was recorded, probably owing to the use of the security zone, and neither was there any arthrofibrosis, possibly related to the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications in the immediate postsurgical period coupled with aggressive rehabilitation from the fourth week. The success of the technique is due to multidisciplinary team work leading to the ultimate achievement of patient satisfaction. This technique is not indicated for patients with a high sports demand or for sport professionals, until further biomechanical studies on its use and success are completed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Resistive instabilities in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, P.H.

    1985-10-01

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this lecture, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0)-values slightly less than unit are reviewed; ''sawtooth'' reconnection to q(0)-values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 modes, and severely limits the range of stable profile shapes. Feedback stabilization of m greater than or equal to 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, then feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 mode - although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0)-values substantially below unity - is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal-MHD mode can be made positively stable by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces. Feedback techniques require a detectable, rotating MHD-like signal; the slowing of mode rotation - or the excitation of non-rotating modes - by an imperfectly conducting wall is also discussed.

  20. Instabilities of Charged Polyampholytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardar, Mehran

    1996-03-01

    We consider polymers formed from a (quenched) random sequence of charged monomers of opposite signs. Such polymers, known as polyampholytes (PAs), are compact when completely neutral and expanded when highly charged.footnote Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Europhys. Lett. 27, 643 (1994). We examine the transition between the two regimes by Monte Carlo simulations, exact enumeration studies, and by analogies to charged drops. We find that the overall excess charge, Q, is the main determinant of the size of the PA. A polymer composed of N charges of ± q0 is compact for Qinstability of a charged drop. A uniform excess charge causes the breakup of a fluid drop. We speculate that a uniformly charged polymer stretches out to a necklace shape. The inhomogeneities in charge distort the shape away from an ordered necklace.footnote Y. Kantor and M. Kardar, Phys. Rev. E 51, 1299 (1995).

  1. Instabilities in the aether

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Sean M.; Dulaney, Timothy R.; Gresham, Moira I.; Tam, Heywood

    2009-03-15

    We investigate the stability of theories in which Lorentz invariance is spontaneously broken by fixed-norm vector 'aether' fields. Models with generic kinetic terms are plagued either by ghosts or by tachyons, and are therefore physically unacceptable. There are precisely three kinetic terms that are not manifestly unstable: a sigma model ({partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}A{sub {nu}}){sup 2}, the Maxwell Lagrangian F{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}F{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}}, and a scalar Lagrangian ({partial_derivative}{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}}){sup 2}. The timelike sigma-model case is well defined and stable when the vector norm is fixed by a constraint; however, when it is determined by minimizing a potential there is necessarily a tachyonic ghost, and therefore an instability. In the Maxwell and scalar cases, the Hamiltonian is unbounded below, but at the level of perturbation theory there are fewer degrees of freedom and the models are stable. However, in these two theories there are obstacles to smooth evolution for certain choices of initial data.

  2. Emergent superstructural dynamic order due to competing antiferroelectric and antiferrodistortive instabilities in bulk EuTiO3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Woo; Thompson, Paul; Brown, Simon; Normile, Peter S; Schlueter, John A; Shkabko, Andrey; Weidenkaff, Anke; Ryan, Philip J

    2013-01-11

    Microscopic structural instabilities of EuTiO3 single crystals were investigated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Antiferrodistortive (AFD) oxygen octahedron rotational order was observed alongside Ti derived antiferroelectric distortions. The competition between the two instabilities is reconciled through a cooperatively modulated structure allowing both to coexist. The combination of electric and magnetic fields increases the population of the modulated AFD order, illustrating how the origin of the large magnetoelectric coupling derives from the dynamic equilibrium between AFD and polar instabilities.

  3. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  4. The TP53 dependence of radiation-induced chromosome instability in human lymphoblastoid cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Jordan, Robert; Evans, Helen H.; Lenarczyk, Marek; Liber, Howard

    2003-01-01

    The dose and TP53 dependence for the induction of chromosome instability were examined in cells of three human lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from WIL2 cells: TK6, a TP53-normal cell line, NH32, a TP53-knockout created from TK6, and WTK1, a WIL2-derived cell line that spontaneously developed a TP53 mutation. Cells of each cell line were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, and then surviving clones were isolated and expanded in culture for approximately 35 generations before the frequency and characteristics of the instability were analyzed. The presence of dicentric chromosomes, formed by end-to-end fusions, served as a marker of chromosomal instability. Unexposed TK6 cells had low levels of chromosomal instability (0.002 +/- 0.001 dicentrics/cell). Exposure of TK6 cells to doses as low as 5 cGy gamma rays increased chromosome instability levels nearly 10-fold to 0.019 +/- 0.008 dicentrics/cell. There was no further increase in instability levels beyond 5 cGy. In contrast to TK6 cells, unexposed cultures of WTK1 and NH32 cells had much higher levels of chromosome instability of 0.034 +/- 0.007 and 0.041 +/- 0.009, respectively, but showed little if any effect of radiation on levels of chromosome instability. The results suggest that radiation exposure alters the normal TP53-dependent cell cycle checkpoint controls that recognize alterations in telomere structure and activate apoptosis.

  5. Evaporative instabilities in climbing films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoi, A. E.; Bush, John W. M.

    2001-09-01

    We consider flow in a thin film generated by partially submerging an inclined rigid plate in a reservoir of ethanol or methanol water solution and wetting its surface. Evaporation leads to concentration and surface tension gradients that drive flow up the plate. An experimental study indicates that the climbing film is subject to two distinct instabilities. The first is a convective instability characterized by flattened convection rolls aligned in the direction of flow and accompanied by free-surface deformations; in the meniscus region, this instability gives rise to pronounced ridge structures aligned with the mean flow. The second instability, evident when the plate is nearly vertical, takes the form of transverse surface waves propagating up the plate.

  6. Kinetic theory of Jeans instability.

    PubMed

    Trigger, S A; Ershkovich, A I; van Heijst, G J F; Schram, P P J M

    2004-06-01

    Kinetic treatment of the Jeans gravitational instability, with collisions taken into account, is presented. The initial-value problem for the distribution function which obeys the kinetic equation, with the collision integral conserving the number of particles, is solved. Dispersion relation is obtained and analyzed. New modes are found. Collisions are shown not to affect the Jeans instability criterion. Although the instability growth rate diminishes, the collisions they cannot quench the instability. However, the oscillation spectrum is modified significantly: even in the neighborhood of the threshold frequency omega=0 (separating stable and unstable modes) the spectrum of oscillations can strongly depend on the collision frequency. Propagating (rather than aperiodic) modes are also found. These modes, however, are strongly damped.

  7. Fluid Instabilities inside Astrophysical Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann; Zheng, Weiqun

    2014-11-01

    We present our results from the simulations of fluid instabilities inside supernovae with a new radiation-hydrodynamic code, CASTRO. Massive stars are ten times more massive than Sun. Observational and theoretical studies suggest that these massive stars tend to end their lives with energetic explosions, so-called supernovae. Many fluid instabilities occur during the supernova explosions. The fluid instabilities can be driven by hydrodynamics, nuclear burning, or radiation. In this talk, we discuss about the possible physics of fluid instabilities found in our simulations and how the resulting mixing affects the observational signatures of supernovae. This work was supported by the DOE HEP Program under contract DE-SC0010676; the National Science Foundation (AST 0909129) and the NASA Theory Program (NNX14AH34G).

  8. Clustering instability of focused swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Nadal, Francois

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of active matter is its rich nonlinear dynamics and instabilities. Recent numerical simulations of phototactic algae showed that a thin jet of swimmers, obtained from hydrodynamic focusing inside a Poiseuille flow, was unstable to longitudinal perturbations with swimmers dynamically clustering (Jibuti L. et al., Phys. Rev. E, 90, (2014) 063019). As a simple starting point to understand these instabilities, we consider in this paper an initially homogeneous one-dimensional line of aligned swimmers moving along the same direction, and characterise its instability using both a continuum framework and a discrete approach. In both cases, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmers lead to instabilities in density for which we compute the growth rate analytically. Lines of pusher-type swimmers are predicted to remain stable while lines of pullers (such as flagellated algae) are predicted to always be unstable.

  9. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN THE TREATMENT OF GROSS PATELLOFEMORAL INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Grant; Czarkowski, Brian; Giangarra, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral instability is a painful and commonly recurring condition, which often must be managed surgically. Diagnosis can be aided by the use of a variety of physical exam signs, such as the Q angle, Beighton hypermobility score, glide test, J sign, patellar tilt test, and apprehension test. Imaging modalities including x-ray, CT, and MRI guide both diagnosis and management by revealing trochlear dysplasia, bony malalignment, and ligamentous injury that contribute to instability. Following an initial patellar dislocation, nonoperative management with bracing and physical therapy is an acceptable option, despite limited evidence that operative management may improve functional outcome and reduce recurrent dislocations. For recurrent dislocations, operative management is indicated, and the appropriate procedure depends on the patient's anatomy and the cause of instability. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) restores the primary soft tissue restraint to lateral patellar dislocations, and can be performed using a variety of techniques. In patients whose instability is related to bony malalignment, a tibial tubercle osteotomy is commonly performed to realign the extensor mechanism and establish proper patellar tracking. In patients with trochlear dysplasia, a trochleoplasty may be performed to create a sufficient groove for the patella to traverse. Often these procedures must be combined to address all causes of instability. The reported outcomes following all three of these procedures are generally very good, with the majority of patients experiencing functional improvements and a low rate of recurrent instability, although more large randomized controlled trials are needed to determine which techniques are most effective. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of the current methods employed by orthopedic surgeons to diagnose and manage patellar instability. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904790

  10. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN THE TREATMENT OF GROSS PATELLOFEMORAL INSTABILITY.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Grant; Torres, LeeAnne; Czarkowski, Brian; Giangarra, Charles E

    2016-12-01

    Patellofemoral instability is a painful and commonly recurring condition, which often must be managed surgically. Diagnosis can be aided by the use of a variety of physical exam signs, such as the Q angle, Beighton hypermobility score, glide test, J sign, patellar tilt test, and apprehension test. Imaging modalities including x-ray, CT, and MRI guide both diagnosis and management by revealing trochlear dysplasia, bony malalignment, and ligamentous injury that contribute to instability. Following an initial patellar dislocation, nonoperative management with bracing and physical therapy is an acceptable option, despite limited evidence that operative management may improve functional outcome and reduce recurrent dislocations. For recurrent dislocations, operative management is indicated, and the appropriate procedure depends on the patient's anatomy and the cause of instability. Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) restores the primary soft tissue restraint to lateral patellar dislocations, and can be performed using a variety of techniques. In patients whose instability is related to bony malalignment, a tibial tubercle osteotomy is commonly performed to realign the extensor mechanism and establish proper patellar tracking. In patients with trochlear dysplasia, a trochleoplasty may be performed to create a sufficient groove for the patella to traverse. Often these procedures must be combined to address all causes of instability. The reported outcomes following all three of these procedures are generally very good, with the majority of patients experiencing functional improvements and a low rate of recurrent instability, although more large randomized controlled trials are needed to determine which techniques are most effective. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview of the current methods employed by orthopedic surgeons to diagnose and manage patellar instability. 5.

  11. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  12. Aerodynamic instability: A case history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenmann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The identification, diagnosis, and final correction of complex machinery malfunctions typically require the correlation of many parameters such as mechanical construction, process influence, maintenance history, and vibration response characteristics. The progression is reviewed of field testing, diagnosis, and final correction of a specific machinery instability problem. The case history presented addresses a unique low frequency instability problem on a high pressure barrel compressor. The malfunction was eventually diagnosed as a fluidic mechanism that manifested as an aerodynamic disturbance to the rotor assembly.

  13. Magnetothermal instability in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on thermal instability in cooling flows is investigated using linear, Eulerian perturbation analysis. As contrasted with the zero magnetic-field case, hydromagnetic stresses support perturbations against acceleration caused by buoyancy - comoving evolution results and global growth rates are straightforward to obtain for a given cooling flow entropy distribution. In addition, background and induced magnetic fields ensure that conductive damping of thermal instability is greatly reduced.

  14. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations.

  15. Magnetothermal instability in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Michael

    1990-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on thermal instability in cooling flows is investigated using linear, Eulerian perturbation analysis. As contrasted with the zero magnetic-field case, hydromagnetic stresses support perturbations against acceleration caused by buoyancy - comoving evolution results and global growth rates are straightforward to obtain for a given cooling flow entropy distribution. In addition, background and induced magnetic fields ensure that conductive damping of thermal instability is greatly reduced.

  16. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  17. Instability of enclosed horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  18. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  19. Vertical Instability at IPNS RCS.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Brumwell, F. R.; Dooling, J. C.; Harkay, K. C.; Kustom, R.; McMichael, G. E.; Middendorf, M. E.; Nassiri, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2008-01-01

    The rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the intense pulsed neutron source (IPNS) at ANL accelerates > 3.0 times 10{sup 12} protons from 50 MeV to 450 MeV with 30-Hz repetition frequency. During the acceleration cycle, the rf frequency varies from 2.21 MHz to 5.14 MHz. Presently, the beam current is limited by a vertical instability. By analyzing turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data, large- amplitude mode 0 and mode 1 vertical beam centroid oscillations were observed in the later part of the acceleration cycle. The oscillations start in the tail of the bunch, build up, and remain localized in the tail half of the bunch. This vertical instability was compared with a head-tail instability that was intentionally induced in the RCS by adjusting the trim sextupoles. It appears that our vertical instability is not a classical head-tail instability [1]. More data analysis and experiments were performed to characterize the instability.

  20. Vector-Resonance-Multimode Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kbashi, H.; Tarasov, N.; Loiko, Yu.; Kolpakov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The modulation and multimode instabilities are the main mechanisms which drive spontaneous spatial and temporal pattern formation in a vast number of nonlinear systems ranging from biology to laser physics. Using an Er-doped fiber laser as a test bed, here for the first time we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically a new type of a low-threshold vector-resonance-multimode instability which inherits features of multimode and modulation instabilities. The same as for the multimode instability, a large number of longitudinal modes can be excited without mode synchronization. To enable modulation instability, we modulate the state of polarization of the lasing signal with the period of the beat length by an adjustment of the in-cavity birefringence and the state of polarization of the pump wave. As a result, we show the regime's tunability from complex oscillatory to periodic with longitudinal mode synchronization in the case of resonance matching between the beat and cavity lengths. Apart from the interest in laser physics for unlocking the tunability and stability of dynamic regimes, the proposed mechanism of the vector-resonance-multimode instability can be of fundamental interest for the nonlinear dynamics of various distributed systems.

  1. Influence of the equatorial irregularities and precipitations in the South Atlantic magnetic anomaly on the generation of auroral-type plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Prange, R.; Bruston, P.

    1980-08-01

    Observational evidence of upward field-aligned beams in the keV range has been obtained in the sub-equatorial ionosphere above South America. These events can be related to coupled magnetic and ionospheric activity (magnetic storm, ionospheric irregularities). This result is in opposition with the current theory of the low-latitude ionosphere. Its interpretation must assume that conditions exist for the growth of plasma instabilities. This implies a low plasma density, a close coupling between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, and field-aligned currents. Such suitable conditions have independently been observed in ionospheric irregularities (density, currents) or during magnetic storms (energetic particle precipitation) or they are deduced from the structure of the Anomaly (field-aligned currents). This allows us to suggest that the South Atlantic Anomaly sometimes compares to the auroral oval and may develop some current-driven plasma instabilities.

  2. [Chronic instability in the ankle area].

    PubMed

    Dubrana, F; Poichotte, A; Toullec, E; Colin, D; Guillodo, Y; Moati, J-C; Brilhauht, J; Musset, T; Feron, F; Richou, J; Henri, M; Guillemot, E

    2006-06-01

    For ankle sprains, the initial radiological work-up must include weight-bearing AP and lateral stress views of the sprained and healthy ankle. Films are taken in auto-varus. Other explorations included arthroMRI, arthroscanner or MRI which can be indicated preoperatively to confirm suspected cartilage injury or an associated ligament tear. These techniques should be employed when pertinent information can be expected according to the clinical situation and the operator's experience. In the emergency setting, ultrasonography can provide a simple low-cost confirmation of joint hematoma which is more precise than x-rays with a positive predictive value of nearly 100%. The objective and subjective clinical outcome after surgical anatomic repair or ligamentoplasty are quite similar. The two principal differences relate to persistent subjective instability and post-operative surgical complications. Thus there are advantages and disadvantages for each option advantage for anatomical repair because of the low rate of surgical complications and advantage for ligament repairs which stabilize the subtalar joint with a low rate of residual instability.

  3. [Surgical treatment of craniocervical instability. Review paper].

    PubMed

    Alpizar-Aguirre, Armando; Lara Cano, Jorge Giovanni; Rosales, Luis; Míramontes, Victor; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The concept of spinal instability is still controversial. Anatomical, biomechanical, clinical and radiographic variants are involved and make the definition complicated. There are solid diagnostic bases in cases of fractures and degenerative disorders; however, pure spinal instability is still under study. The latter may be defined as increased mobility that goes beyond the physiological limits of one vertebra over another in at least one of the three spinal planes of motion. In the case of the craniocervical region, its understanding becomes even more challenging, since its anatomy and physiology are more complex and it is more mobile. Surgical treatment is possible with either an anterior or a posterior approach. Best results are obtained with occipitocervical or atlantoaxial stabilization through a posterior approach, since the anterior one has its limitations. For example, a transoral approach with a bone graft provides compression strength but does not enable immediate appropriate fixation and involves the risk of infection. The choice of the surgical approach must consider the patient's medical status, the specific spine levels involved, the extent of neurological compromise, the X-ray abnormalities and the individual pathology. The goals of surgery are achieved through an appropriate anatomical alignment, assuring the protection of the neural elements and achieving proper spine stabilization with as much preservation of the mobile vertebral segments as possible.

  4. Velocity shear driven instability and its effect on magnetic reconnection: MMS observations compared with PIC simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K. J.; Choi, E.; Sibeck, D. G.; Giles, B. L.; Goldstein, M.; Pollock, C.; Ergun, R.; Gershman, D. J.; Dorelli, J.; Avanov, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    Both observations and simulations indicate the frequent occurrence, often simultaneously, of current-driven magnetic reconnection and velocity shear driven flow vortices on the Earth's dayside magnetopause. MMS spacecraft observations not only enable the quantitative testing of micro and meso-scale reconnection physics but also permit the calculation of flow vorticities. Here we inspect MMS observations including an event on 19 September 2015 to determine how the current-driven and shear-driven instabilities interact to determine microscopic (magnetic topology) to macroscopic (merging rate) aspects of dayside reconnection. In particular, we examine the effects of flow vorticity on dayside dynamics in terms of R, the ratio between the plasma vorticity parallel to the magnetic field and the cyclotron frequency for each relevant species. We consider two cases: (1) the dusk magnetopause where the flow vorticity is parallel to the magnetic field and ions gyrate opposite the vortex and (2) the dawn magnetopause where the flow vorticity is antiparallel to the magnetic field and ions gyrate with the vortex. Our synthesized MMS observations and PIC simulation results show that flow vorticity, a fluid quantity, when it is sufficiently large (i.e., greater than the relevant gyro-frequencies), becomes an important parameter indicating coupling to the kinetic regime.

  5. Nebular spectra of pair-instability supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerkstrand, A.; Smartt, S. J.; Heger, A.

    2016-01-01

    If very massive stars (M ≳ 100 M⊙) can form and avoid too strong mass-loss during their evolution, they are predicted to explode as pair-instability supernovae (PISNe). One critical test for candidate events is whether their nucleosynthesis yields and internal ejecta structure, being revealed through nebular-phase spectra at t ≳ 1 yr, match those of model predictions. Here, we compute theoretical spectra based on model PISN ejecta at 1-3 yr post-explosion to allow quantitative comparison with observations. The high column densities of PISNe lead to complete gamma-ray trapping for t ≳ 2 yr which, combined with fulfilled conditions of steady state, leads to bolometric supernova luminosities matching the 56Co decay. Most of the gamma-rays are absorbed by the deep-lying iron and silicon/sulphur layers. The ionization balance shows a predominantly neutral gas state, which leads to emission lines of Fe I, Si I, and S I. For low-mass PISNe, the metal core expands slowly enough to produce a forest of distinct lines, whereas high-mass PISNe expand faster and produce more featureless spectra. Line blocking is complete below ˜5000 Å for several years, and the model spectra are red. The strongest line is typically [Ca II] λλ7291, 7323, one of few lines from ionized species. We compare our models with proposed PISN candidates SN 2007bi and PTF12dam, finding discrepancies for several key observables and thus no support for a PISN interpretation. We discuss distinct spectral features predicted by the models, and the possibility of detecting pair-instability explosions among non-superluminous supernovae.

  6. Libration-driven multipolar instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cébron, D.; Vantieghem, S.; Herreman, W.

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that the LDMI results from a parametric resonance of inertial modes. Performing numerical simulations of this librating cylinder, we confirm that the basic flow is indeed established and report the first numerical evidence of the LDMI. Numerical results, in excellent agreement with the stability results, are used to explore the non-linear regime of the instability (amplitude and viscous dissipation of the driven flow). We finally provide an example of LDMI in a deformed spherical container to show that the instability mechanism is generic. Our results show that the previously studied libration driven elliptical instability simply corresponds to the particular case $n=2$ of a wider class of instabilities. Summarizing, this work shows that any oscillating non-axisymmetric container in rotation may excite intermittent, space-filling LDMI flows, and this instability should thus be easy to observe experimentally.

  7. Ab initio determination of the instability growth rate of warm dense beryllium-deuterium interface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping; Li, Zi; Li, DaFang

    2015-10-15

    Accurate knowledge about the interfacial unstable growth is of great importance in inertial confinement fusion. During implosions, the deuterium-tritium capsule is driven by laser beams or X-rays to access the strongly coupled and partially degenerated warm dense matter regime. At this stage, the effects of dissipative processes, such as diffusion and viscosity, have significant impact on the instability growth rates. Here, we present ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to determine the equations of state and the transport coefficients. Several models are used to estimate the reduction in the growth rate dispersion curves of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities with considering the presence of these dissipative effects. We show that these instability growth rates are effectively reduced when considering diffusion. The findings provide significant insights into the microscopic mechanism of the instability growth at the ablator-fuel interface and will refine the models used in the laser-driven hydrodynamic instability experiments.

  8. Robustness of the filamentation instability as shock mediator in arbitrarily oriented magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.; Alvaro, E. Perez

    2011-08-15

    The filamentation instability (sometimes also referred to as ''Weibel'') is a key process in many astrophysical scenario. In the Fireball model for gamma ray bursts, this instability is believed to mediate collisionless shock formation from the collision of two plasma shells. It has been known for long that a flow aligned magnetic field can completely cancel this instability. We show here that in the general case where there is an angle between the field and the flow, the filamentation instability can never be stabilized, regardless of the field strength. The presented model analyzes the stability of two symmetric counter-streaming cold electron/proton plasma shells. Relativistic effects are accounted for, and various exact analytical results are derived. This result guarantees the occurrence of the instability in realistic settings fulfilling the cold approximation.

  9. Quantum well structures for plasma instability-based terahertz radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Justin John

    This thesis is a theoretical study of the electron transport and response properties of epitaxially grown, low-dimensional semiconductor quantum well heterostructures, under steady-state, current driven (nonequilibrium) conditions. These structures operate in the Terahertz (THz) frequency and submillimeter wavelength range, and are the leading candidates for compact, coherent sources of THz radiation. This work is divided into two parts: Part I consists of an analytical study of the individual quantum well units, and the tunneling transmission characteristics, for which reasonably accurate algebraic expressions are obtained. An underlying philosophy of this work is the desire to describe each of the key components involved, independently, through these simple analytical expressions. In Part II the numerical study of the transport and radiation response of the quantum well structures specially designed to generate THz radiation based on the plasma instability concept is presented. Several models are proposed which describe the overall electron transport and which determine the underlying nonequilibrium steady state. In particular, the key features of the experimental current-voltage (IV) curves for such structures are explained, and the corresponding response properties are determined. The modeling and simulation of these potential optoelectronic devices is a crucial tool for elucidating the precise mechanisms and interplay of the many microscopic processes which give rise to the observed behavior. Key features of the radiation response arise from the intersubband plasma instability which occurs due to the resonant interaction of an emission and an absorption mode, and these features are compared with the experimental observations.

  10. Suppression of drift wave instability due to sheared field-aligned flow and negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiki, Ryuta; Hayashi, Kenichiro; Kaneko, Toshiro; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2006-10-01

    Sheared field-aligned plasma flow is a significant topic in space/circumterrestrial plasmas. Taking into account negative ions or dust grains will make the space plasma physics more general and accurate. Using the QT-Upgrade Machine, we have conducted laboratory experiments to examine negative ion effects on shear-modified drift waves. Field-aligned K^+ ion flow and its shear strength are controlled with a concentrically segmented W hot plate. Negative ions SF6^- are produced by introducing SF6 gas in the plasma. The drift wave shows a gradual monotonic decrease in amplitude as the shear strength is increased from zero. However, as the shear strength is decreased from zero to negative values, the amplitude increases up to a certain shear strength and rapidly decreases after the peaking. The negative ion introduction, in general, suppresses this instability while retaining the dependence of the amplitude on the shear. These wave characteristics are interpreted using the theories of current-driven (kinetic) and of D’Angelo (fluid) instabilities.

  11. Interfacial Instabilities on a Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Mehravaran, Kian

    2013-11-01

    The fragmentation of droplets is an essential stage of several natural and industrial applications such as fuel atomization and rain phenomena. In spite of its relatively long history, the mechanism of fragmentation is not clear yet. This is mainly due to small length and time scales as well as the non-linearity of the process. In the present study, two and three-dimensional numerical simulations have been performed to understand the early stages of the fragmentation of an initially spherical droplet. Simulations are performed for high Reynolds and a range of relatively high Weber numbers (shear breakup). To resolve the small-scale instabilities generated over the droplet, a second-order adaptive finite volume/volume of fluids (FV/VOF) method is employed, where the grid resolution is increased with the curvature of the gas-liquid interface as well as the vorticity magnitude. The study is focused on the onset and growth of interfacial instabilities. The role of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (in surface wave formation) and Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in azimuthal transverse modulation) are shown and the obtained results are compared with the linear instability theories for zero and non-zero vorticity layers. Moreover, the analogy between the fragmentation of a single drop and a co-axial liquid jet is discussed. The current results can be used for the further development of the current secondary atomization models.

  12. EXPLOSIVE INSTABILITY AND CORONAL HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Liu, J.-H.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Nigro, G.

    2009-10-20

    The observed energy-loss rate from the solar corona implies that the coronal magnetic field has a critical angle at which energy is released. It has been hypothesized that at this critical angle an 'explosive instability' would occur, leading to an enhanced conversion of magnetic energy into heat. In earlier investigations, we have shown that a shear-dependent magnetohydrodynamic process called 'secondary instability' has many of the distinctive features of the hypothetical 'explosive instability'. In this paper, we give the first demonstration that this 'secondary instability' occurs in a system with line-tied magnetic fields and boundary shearing-basically the situation described by Parker. We also show that, as the disturbance due to secondary instability attains finite amplitude, there is a transition to turbulence which leads to enhanced dissipation of magnetic and kinetic energy. These results are obtained from numerical simulations performed with a new parallelized, viscoresistive, three-dimensional code that solves the cold plasma equations. The code employs a Fourier collocation-finite difference spatial discretization, and uses a third-order Runge-Kutta temporal discretization.

  13. Kozai-Lidov disc instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2017-08-01

    Recent results by Martin et al. showed in 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that tilted discs in binary systems can be unstable to the development of global, damped Kozai-Lidov (KL) oscillations in which the discs exchange tilt for eccentricity. We investigate the linear stability of KL modes for tilted inviscid discs under the approximations that the disc eccentricity is small and the disc remains flat. By using 1D equations, we are able to probe regimes of large ratios of outer to inner disc edge radii that are realistic for binary systems of hundreds of astronomical unit separations and are not easily probed by multidimensional simulations. For order unity binary mass ratios, KL instability is possible for a window of disc aspect ratios H/r in the outer parts of a disc that roughly scale as (nb/n)2 ≲ H/r ≲ nb/n, for binary orbital frequency nb and orbital frequency n at the disc outer edge. We present a framework for understanding the zones of instability based on the determination of branches of marginally unstable modes. In general, multiple growing eccentric KL modes can be present in a disc. Coplanar apsidal-nodal precession resonances delineate instability branches. We determine the range of tilt angles for unstable modes as a function of disc aspect ratio. Unlike the KL instability for free particles that involves a critical (minimum) tilt angle, disc instability is possible for any non-zero tilt angle depending on the disc aspect ratio.

  14. Beta-limiting Instabilities and Global Mode Stabilization in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Steven

    2001-10-01

    Low aspect ratio and high edge q theoretically alter the plasma stability and mode structure compared to standard tokamak configurations. Below the no-wall limit, stability calculations with PEST, GATO, and DCON show the perturbed radial field is maximized near the center column and DCON and VALEN calculations show that mode stability is not greatly improved by a nearby conducting wall due to the short poloidal wavelength in this region. In contrast, as beta reaches and exceeds the no-wall limit, the mode becomes strongly ballooning with long poloidal wavelength at large major radius and is highly wall stabilized. In this way, wall stabilization is more effective at higher beta in low aspect ratio geometry. Research on the stability of spherical torus plasmas at and above the no-wall beta limit is being addressed on NSTX, which has produced low aspect ratio plasmas, R/a = 1.27 at plasma current up to 1.4 MA with high energy confinement (TauE/TauE-ITER89P = 2). Toroidal and normalized beta have reached 22%, and 4.3, respectively in q = 7 plasmas. The beta limit is observed to increase with increasing plasma internal inductance, li, and the stability factor betaN/li has reached 5.8, limited by sudden beta collapses at low li that was achieved by use of high-harmonic fast wave heating (HHFW). DCON stability analysis of equilibria reconstructed with EFIT using external magnetics show that the plasmas are below or at the no-wall beta limit for the n = 1 mode, which has characteristics of a current-driven kink. With more peaked current profiles (li greater than 0.7), core MHD instabilities are observed which saturate or slowly degrade beta. Sawteeth with large inversion radii can also cause substantial beta collapses, although current profile modification using HHFW, altered plasma growth, and increased toroidal field have each been successful in mitigating this effect.

  15. Microbunch Instability Observations from a THz Detector at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, W.; Bartolini, R.; Boorman, G.; Karataev, P.; Lyapin, A.; Puntree, J.; Rehm, G.

    2012-05-01

    Diamond Light source is a third generation synchrotron facility dedicated to producing radiation of outstanding brightness, ranging from infra-red to x-rays. The short electron bunches that are accelerated around the storage ring are susceptible to the phenomenon of microbunching instabilities when the bunch charge exceeds a threshold. The primary feature of the microbunch instabilities is the onset of bursts of radiation in the THz range. The high frequencies involved in the emissions make detection and analysis challenging. A 60-90 GHz Schottky Barrier Diode detector was installed to investigate turn by turn evolution of the instabilities.

  16. [Radiological and clinical study of the ulna's end instability after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure].

    PubMed

    Brunet, P; Moineau, G; Liot, M; Burgaud, A; Dubrana, F; Le Nen, D

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the ulnar proximal stump's behaviour after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure. The procedure was performed for post-traumatic disorders of the distal radio-ulnar joint. This is a retrospective study of 14 patients. The mean age of patients at the operation was 49 years. Most of them began immediate mobilisation into pronation and supination. After a 5 year follow-up period, the clinical examination was centred on the ulnar proximal stump. An original radiologic study was made with static and dynamic X-Ray. Seven patients indicated pain on the ulnar stump during pronosupination. A clunk on the ulnar side of the wrist was noticed by three patients and an instability of the ulnar stump was observed two times. Clinically, there were a sagittal instability in all patients and a frontal instability four times. The sagittal instability was confirmed by dynamic X-Ray on each occasion, but the frontal instability was never confirmed. Every patient had instability of the ulnar stump; however, it was well tolerated. In practice, 12 patients were satisfied or very satisfied (86%). Instability of the proximal ulnar stump remains a problem, because it occurs despite a strict technique.

  17. Instability of EDS maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1993-09-01

    Instabilities of an EDS maglev suspension system with 3 D.O.F. and 5 D.O.F. vehicles traveling on a double L-shaped set of guideway conductors have been investigated with various experimentally measured magnetical force data incorporated into the theoretical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained from both analytical and numerical solutions for coupled vibration of the 3 D.O.F. maglev vehicle model. Instabilities of five direction motions (heave, slip, rill, pitch and yaw) are observed for the 4 D.O.F. vehicle model. It demonstrates that system parameters, such as, system damping, vehicle geometry and coupling effects among five different motions play very important roles in the occurrence of dynamic instabilities of maglev vehicles.

  18. Thermocapillary instabilities with gravity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebib, Abdelfattah

    2002-11-01

    We study vibrational thermocapillary instabilities in an infinite layer with one bounding surface rigid, the other free and nondeformable, and both adiabatic. A constant temperature gradient imposed on the free surface drives a return flow, and a zero-mean harmonic gravitational acceleration is assumed to model g-jitter. Linear stability of the time-periodic base state is determined by calculating the Floquet exponents in the parameter space of: the Marangoni number Ma, Rayleigh number Ra, dimensionless frequency Ω, Prandtl number Pr, and wavenumbers α and β. The stability boundaries are composed of two intersecting branches emanating from the points of pure thermocapilary or buoyant instabilities as was found in the 2D study β=0 by Suresh & Homsy (Phys. Fluids 2001). However, 3D instabilities continue to dominate as was found by Smith & Davis (JFM 1983) with Ra=0. We also find that the region of stablity grows with increasing Ω.

  19. Compressive Instability Phenomena During Springback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-B.; Yoon, J. W.; Yang, D. Y.

    2007-05-01

    Springback in sheet metal product makes difficulties in die design because small strain causes large displacement. Especially for the sheet metal product having small geometric constraints, springback displacement may become severe. After first stage of stamping of outer case of washing machine, a large amount of springback is observed. The stamping depth of the outer case is small while stamping area is very large compared to the stamping depth, and therefore, there exists small geometric constraints in the formed part. Also, a compressive instability during the elastic recovery takes place and this instability enlarged the elastic recovery and dimensional error. In this paper, the compressive instability during the elastic recovery is analyzed using bifurcation theory. The final deformed shape after springback is obtained by bifurcating the solution path from primary to secondary. The deformed shapes obtained by the finite element analysis are in good agreement with the experimental data. The bifurcation behavior and the springback displacement for different forming depth are investigated.

  20. Compressive Instability Phenomena During Springback

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.-B.; Yoon, J. W.; Yang, D. Y.

    2007-05-17

    Springback in sheet metal product makes difficulties in die design because small strain causes large displacement. Especially for the sheet metal product having small geometric constraints, springback displacement may become severe. After first stage of stamping of outer case of washing machine, a large amount of springback is observed. The stamping depth of the outer case is small while stamping area is very large compared to the stamping depth, and therefore, there exists small geometric constraints in the formed part. Also, a compressive instability during the elastic recovery takes place and this instability enlarged the elastic recovery and dimensional error. In this paper, the compressive instability during the elastic recovery is analyzed using bifurcation theory. The final deformed shape after springback is obtained by bifurcating the solution path from primary to secondary. The deformed shapes obtained by the finite element analysis are in good agreement with the experimental data. The bifurcation behavior and the springback displacement for different forming depth are investigated.

  1. Hydrodynamick instabilities on ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S.W.

    1991-06-07

    This article summarizes our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities as relevant to ICF. First we discuss classical, single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and nonlinear effects in the evolution of a single mode. Then we discuss multimode systems, considering: (1) the onset of nonlinearity; (2) a second order mode coupling theory for weakly nonlinear effects, and (3) the fully nonlinear regime. Two stabilization mechanisms relevant to ICF are described next: gradient scale length and convective stabilization. Then we describe a model which is meant to estimate the weakly nonlinear evolution of multi-mode systems as relevant to ICF, given the short-wavelength stabilization. Finally, we discuss the relevant code simulation capability, and experiments. At this time we are quite optimistic about our ability to estimate instability growth on ICF capsules, but further experiments and simulations are needed to verify the modeling. 52 refs.

  2. Gravitational instabilities in protostellar disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tohline, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The nonaxisymmetric stability of self-gravitating, geometrically thick accretion disks has been studied for protostellar systems having a wide range of disk-to-central object mass ratios. Global eigenmodes with four distinctly different characters were identified using numerical, nonlinear hydrodynamic techniques. The mode that appears most likely to arise in normal star formation settings, however, resembles the 'eccentric instability' that was identified earlier in thin, nearly Keplerian disks: It presents an open, one-armed spiral pattern that sweeps continuously in a trailing direction through more than 2-pi radians, smoothly connecting the inner and outer edges of the disk, and requires cooperative motion of the point mass for effective amplification. This particular instability promotes the development of a single, self-gravitating clump of material in orbit about the point mass, so its routine appearance in our simulations supports the conjecture that the eccentric instability provides a primary route to the formation of short-period binaries in protostellar systems.

  3. Chondral Injury in Patellofemoral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Sébastien; Servien, Elvire; Neyret, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Patellofemoral instability is common and affects a predominantly young age group. Chondral injury occurs in up to 95%, and includes osteochondral fractures and loose bodies acutely and secondary degenerative changes in recurrent cases. Biomechanical abnormalities, such as trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, and increased tibial tuberosity-trochlear groove distance, predispose to both recurrent dislocations and patellofemoral arthrosis. Design: In this article, we review the mechanisms of chondral injury in patellofemoral instability, diagnostic modalities, the distribution of lesions seen in acute and episodic dislocation, and treatments for articular cartilage lesions of the patellofemoral joint. Results: Little specific evidence exists for cartilage treatments in patellofemoral instability. In general, the results of reparative and restorative procedures in the patellofemoral joint are inferior to those observed in other compartments of the knee. Conclusion: Given the increased severity of chondral lesions and progression to osteoarthritis seen with recurrent dislocations, careful consideration should be given to early stabilisation in patients with predisposing factors. PMID:26069693

  4. Faraday instability in deformable domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Ben Amar, Martine; Couder, Yves

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the Faraday instability in floating liquid lenses, as an example of hydrodynamic instability that develops in a domain with flexible boundaries. We show that a mutual adaptation of the instability pattern and the domain shape occurs, as a result of the competition between the wave radiation pressure and the capillary response of the lens border. Two archetypes of behaviour are observed. In the first, stable shapes are obtained experimentally and predicted theoretically as the exact solutions of a Riccati equation, and they result from the equilibrium between wave radiation pressure and capillarity. In the second, the radiation pressure exceeds the capillary response of the lens border and leads to non-equilibrium behaviours, with breaking into smaller domains that have a complex dynamics including spontaneous propagation. The authors are grateful to Université Franco-Italienne (UFI) for financial support.

  5. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-12

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results.

  6. Stellar explosions, instabilities, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Miles, A. R.; Muthsam, H. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-04-15

    It has become very clear that the evolution of structure during supernovae is centrally dependent on the pre-existing structure in the star. Modeling of the pre-existing structure has advanced significantly, leading to improved understanding and to a physically based assessment of the structure that will be present when a star explodes. It remains an open question whether low-mode asymmetries in the explosion process can produce the observed effects or whether the explosion mechanism somehow produces jets of material. In any event, the workhorse processes that produce structure in an exploding star are blast-wave driven instabilities. Laboratory experiments have explored these blast-wave-driven instabilities and specifically their dependence on initial conditions. Theoretical work has shown that the relative importance of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities varies with the initial conditions and does so in ways that can make sense of a range of astrophysical observations.

  7. X-RAY TRANSIENTS: HYPER- OR HYPO-LUMINOUS?

    SciTech Connect

    Lasota, Jean-Pierre; Dubus, Guillaume; King, Andrew R. E-mail: lasota@iap.fr

    2015-03-01

    The disk instability picture gives a plausible explanation for the behavior of soft X-ray transient systems if self-irradiation of the disk is included. We show that there is a simple relation between the peak luminosity (at the start of an outburst) and the decay timescale. We use this relation to place constraints on systems assumed to undergo disk instabilities. The observable X-ray populations of elliptical galaxies must largely consist of long-lived transients, as deduced on different grounds by Piro and Bildsten (2002). The strongly varying X-ray source HLX-1 in the galaxy ESO 243-49 can be modeled as disk instability of a highly super-Eddington stellar-mass binary similar to SS 433. A fit to the disk instability picture is not possible with an intermediate-mass black hole model for HLX-1. Other recently identified super-Eddington ULXs might be subject to disk instability.

  8. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    We study theoretically the morphologies of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated: varicose, dilated, sinuous, or sausagelike. They are all found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes, or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues: Young’s modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  9. Beam instabilities in hadron synchrotrons

    DOE PAGES

    Metral, E.; T. Argyropoulos; Bartosik, H.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Beam instabilities cover a wide range of effects in particle accelerators and they have been the subjects of intense research for several decades. As the machines performance was pushed new mechanisms were revealed and nowadays the challenge consists in studying the interplays between all these intricate phenomena, as it is very often not possible to treat the different effects separately. Furthermore, the aim of this paper is to review the main mechanisms, discussing in particular the recent developments of beam instability theories and simulations.

  10. Beam instabilities in hadron synchrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Metral, E.; T. Argyropoulos; Bartosik, H.; Biancacci, N.; Buffat, X.; Esteban Muller, J. F.; Herr, W.; Iadarola, G.; Lasheen, A.; Li, K.; Pieloni, T.; Quartullo, D.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Tambasco, C.; Timko, H.; Zannini, C.; Burov, A.; Banfi, D.; Barranco, J.; Mounet, N.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Niedermayer, U.; Kornilov, V.; White, S.

    2016-04-01

    Beam instabilities cover a wide range of effects in particle accelerators and they have been the subjects of intense research for several decades. As the machines performance was pushed new mechanisms were revealed and nowadays the challenge consists in studying the interplays between all these intricate phenomena, as it is very often not possible to treat the different effects separately. Furthermore, the aim of this paper is to review the main mechanisms, discussing in particular the recent developments of beam instability theories and simulations.

  11. Political instability and illegal immigration.

    PubMed

    Campos, J E; Lien, D

    1995-01-01

    "Economic theory suggests that transnational migration results from the push-pull effect of wage differentials between host and source countries. In this paper, we argue that political instability exacerbates the migration flow, with greater instability leading to relatively larger flows. We conclude then that an optimal solution to the illegal immigration problem requires proper coordination of immigration and foreign policies by the host country. A narrow preoccupation with tougher immigration laws is wasteful and may be marginally effective." Emphasis is on the United States as a host country.

  12. Undulation Instability of Epithelial Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basan, Markus; Joanny, Jean-François; Prost, Jacques; Risler, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Treating the epithelium as an incompressible fluid adjacent to a viscoelastic stroma, we find a novel hydrodynamic instability that leads to the formation of protrusions of the epithelium into the stroma. This instability is a candidate for epithelial fingering observed in vivo. It occurs for sufficiently large viscosity, cell-division rate and thickness of the dividing region in the epithelium. Our work provides physical insight into a potential mechanism by which interfaces between epithelia and stromas undulate and potentially by which tissue dysplasia leads to cancerous invasion.

  13. Research on aviation fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with aircraft fuel instability are discussed. What is currently known about the problem is reviewed and a research program to identify those areas where more research is needed is discussed. The term fuel instability generally refers to the gums, sediments, or deposits which can form as a result of a set of complex chemical reactions when a fuel is stored for a long period at ambient conditions or when the fuel is thermally stressed inside the fuel system of an aircraft.

  14. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and a frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterion for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasiflat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for large wavelengths.

  15. Eta Carinae: X-ray Line Variations during the 2003 X-ray Minimum, and the Orbit Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.; Henley, D.; Hamaguchi, K.; Khibashi, K.; Pittard, J. M.; Stevens, I. R.; Gull, T. R.

    2007-01-01

    The future evolution of Eta Carinae will be as a supernova (or hypernova) and black hole. The evolution is highly contingent on mass and angular momentum changes and instabilities. The presence of a companion can serve to trigger instabilities and provide pathways for mass and angular momentum exchange loss. X-rays can be used a a key diagnostic tool: x-ray temperatures trace pre-shock wind velocities, periodic x-ray variability traces the orbit, and x-ray line variations traces the flow and orientation of shocked gas. This brief presentation highlights x-ray line variations from the HETG and presents a model of the colliding wind flow.

  16. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. III - Anomalous transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Kelly, Arnold J.; Jahn, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    In the present paper the linear stability description and weak turbulence theory are used to develop a second order description of wave-particle transport and anomalous dissipation. The goal is to arrive at anomalous transport coefficients that can be readily included in fluid flow codes. In particular, expressions are derived for the heating rates of ions and electrons by the unstable waves and for the electron-wave momentum exchange rate that controls the anomalous resistivity effect. Comparative calculations were undertaken assuming four different saturation models: ion trapping, electron trapping, ion resonance broadening, and thermodynamic bound. A foremost finding is the importance of the role of electron Hall parameter in scaling the level of anomalous dissipation for the parameter range of the MPD thruster plasma. Polynomial expressions of the relevant transport coefficients cast solely in terms of macroscopic parameters are also obtained for inclusion in plasma fluid codes for the self-consistent numerical simulation of real thruster flows including microturbulent effects.

  17. Collisionless shock experiments with lasers and observation of Weibel instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.-S. Huntington, C. M.; Fiuza, F.; Levy, M. C.; Pollock, B. B.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Turnbull, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Froula, D. H.; Rosenberg, M.; Gregori, G.; Meinecke, J.; Koenig, M.; Kugland, N. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Tzeferacos, P.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Astrophysical collisionless shocks are common in the universe, occurring in supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, and protostellar jets. They appear in colliding plasma flows when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions is much larger than the system size. It is believed that such shocks could be mediated via the electromagnetic Weibel instability in astrophysical environments without pre-existing magnetic fields. Here, we present laboratory experiments using high-power lasers and investigate the dynamics of high-Mach-number collisionless shock formation in two interpenetrating plasma streams. Our recent proton-probe experiments on Omega show the characteristic filamentary structures of the Weibel instability that are electromagnetic in nature with an inferred magnetization level as high as ∼1% [C. M. Huntington et al., “Observation of magnetic field generation via the weibel instability in interpenetrating plasma flows,” Nat. Phys. 11, 173–176 (2015)]. These results imply that electromagnetic instabilities are significant in the interaction of astrophysical conditions.

  18. Non-linear growth of the line-driving instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, Achim; Thomas, Timon

    2017-08-01

    Winds from hot massive stars are driven by scattering of continuum radiation in bound-bound transitions. This radiative driving is subject to a strong instability, leading to shocks and X-ray emission. Time-dependent simulations of the instability encounter problems both for absorption and scattering lines, and it is necessary to introduce an artificially low opacity cut-off κm. The non-linear growth of the instability in the inner steeply accelerating wind is, so far, badly resolved. We present simulations with time-dependent Euler and Lagrange codes for pure line absorption at maximum growth rates of the instability in winds with a linear velocity law. This allows us to study the onset of non-linear growth in detail, and to follow unstable growth over orders of magnitude in velocity perturbations and length-scales. We find that distance-stretching in the accelerating wind causes unstable growth to proceed beyond the limit of a few thermal speeds that applies for short-scale perturbations. We increase the opacity cut-off to realistic values and find that the rarefied intershell gas is more strongly accelerated at larger κm, as is expected.

  19. Lending sociodynamics and economic instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2011-11-01

    We show how the dynamics of economic instability and financial crises articulated by Keynes in the General Theory and developed by Minsky as the Financial Instability Hypothesis can be formalized using Weidlich’s sociodynamics of opinion formation. The model addresses both the lending sentiment of a lender in isolation as well as the impact on that lending sentiment of the behavior of other lenders. The risk associated with lending is incorporated through a stochastic treatment of loan dynamics that treats prepayment and default as competing risks. With this model we are able to generate endogenously the rapid changes in lending opinion that attend slow changes in lending profitability and find these dynamics to be consistent with the rise and collapse of the non-Agency mortgage-backed securities market in 2007/2008. As the parameters of this model correspond to well-known phenomena in cognitive and social psychology, we can both explain why economic instability has proved robust to advances in risk measurement and suggest how policy for reducing economic instability might be formulated in an experimentally sound manner.

  20. Biomechanics of complex shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Degen, Ryan M; Giles, Joshua W; Thompson, Stephen R; Litchfield, Robert B; Athwal, George S

    2013-10-01

    Identification and treatment of the osseous lesions associated with complex shoulder instability remains challenging. Further biomechanical testing is required to delineate critical defect values and determine which treatments provide improved glenohumeral joint stability for the various defect sizes, while minimizing the associated complications.

  1. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-01-01

    Brewing of beer, one of the oldest biotechnology industries was one of the earliest processes to be undertaken on commercial basis. Biological instability involves contamination of bacteria, yeast, or mycelia fungi and there is always a risk in brewing that beer can become contaminated by micro-organisms.

  2. Confinement effects on electroconvective instability.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mathias B; Wang, Karen M; Schiffbauer, Jarrod; Mani, Ali

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of hydrodynamic effects in systems involving ion transport from an aqueous electrolyte to an ion-selective surface. These systems are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier-Stokes equations. Historically, such systems were modeled by one-dimensional geometries with spatial coordinate in the direction of transport and normal to the ion-selective surface. Rubinstein and Zaltzman [JFM 579, 173-226 (2007)] showed that when such systems are unbounded in the transverse directions, a hydrodynamic instability can occur. This instability, referred to as electroconvective instability, leads to advective mixing, which results in overlimiting transport rates significantly beyond what is predicted from one-dimensional models. In this study, we present an analysis of electroconvection in confined systems, considering a broad range of applications including microfluidic systems and porous media. Our analysis reveals that full confinement in the transverse directions significantly suppresses electroconvection and overlimiting current. However, when at least one transverse direction allows for flow escape, such as in thin but wide channels or in porous media, the onset of instability is only weakly affected by confinement. We will also present a review of relevant literature and discuss how the present study resolves the contradictory contrasts between the results of recent work on this topic. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Finite element shell instability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Formulation procedures and the associated computer program for finite element thin shell instability analysis are discussed. Data cover: (1) formulation of basic element relationships, (2) construction of solution algorithms on both the conceptual and algorithmic levels, and (3) conduction of numerical analyses to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the theory and related programs therein are described.

  4. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  5. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-01-01

    Brewing of beer, one of the oldest biotechnology industries was one of the earliest processes to be undertaken on commercial basis. Biological instability involves contamination of bacteria, yeast, or mycelia fungi and there is always a risk in brewing that beer can become contaminated by micro-organisms.

  6. Weathering instability and landscape evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-04-01

    The argument in this paper is that the fundamental control on landscape evolution in erosional landscapes is weathering. The possibility of and evidence for instability in weathering at four scales is examined. The four scales are concerned with weathering processes, allocation of weathered products, the interrelations of weathering and denudation, and the topographic and isostatic responses to weathering-limited denudation (the regolith, hillslope, landscape unit, and landscape scales, respectively). The stability conditions for each model, and the circumstances under which the models themselves are relevant, are used to identify scale-related domains of stability and instability. At the regolith scale, the interactions among weathering rates, resistance, and moisture are unstable, but there are circumstances—over long timescales and where weathering is well advanced—under which the instability is irrelevant. At the hillslope scale, the system is stable when denudation is transport rather than weathering limited and where no renewal of exposure via regolith stripping occurs. At the level of landscape units, the stability model is based entirely on the mutual reinforcements of weathering and erosion. While this should generally lead to instability, the model would be stable where other, external controls of both weathering and erosion rates are stronger than the weathering-erosion feedbacks. At the broadest landscape scale, the inclusion of isostatic responses destabilizes erosion-topography-uplift relationships. Thus, if the spatial or temporal scale is such that isostatic responses are not relevant, the system may be stable. Essentially, instability is prevalent at local spatial scales at all but the longest timescales. Stability at intermediate spatial scales is contingent on whether weathering-erosion feedbacks are strong or weak, with stability being more likely at shorter and less likely at longer timescales. At the broadest spatial scales, instability is

  7. Singlet and triplet instability theorems

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tomonori; Hirata, So

    2015-09-21

    A useful definition of orbital degeneracy—form-degeneracy—is introduced, which is distinct from the usual energy-degeneracy: Two canonical spatial orbitals are form-degenerate when the energy expectation value in the restricted Hartree–Fock (RHF) wave function is unaltered upon a two-electron excitation from one of these orbitals to the other. Form-degenerate orbitals tend to have isomorphic electron densities and occur in the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) of strongly correlated systems. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the existence of a triplet instability in a real or complex RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of real or complex unrestricted Hartree–Fock wave functions when HOMO and LUMO are energy- or form-degenerate. We also show that a singlet instability always exists in a real RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of complex RHF wave functions, when HOMO and LUMO are form-degenerate, but have nonidentical electron densities, or are energy-degenerate. These theorems provide Hartree–Fock-theory-based explanations of Hund’s rule, a singlet instability in Jahn–Teller systems, biradicaloid electronic structures, and a triplet instability during some covalent bond breaking. They also suggest (but not guarantee) the spontaneous formation of a spin density wave (SDW) in a metallic solid. The stability theory underlying these theorems extended to a continuous orbital-energy spectrum proves the existence of an oscillating (nonspiral) SDW instability in one- and three-dimensional homogeneous electron gases, but only at low densities or for strong interactions.

  8. Singlet and triplet instability theorems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tomonori; Hirata, So

    2015-09-01

    A useful definition of orbital degeneracy—form-degeneracy—is introduced, which is distinct from the usual energy-degeneracy: Two canonical spatial orbitals are form-degenerate when the energy expectation value in the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave function is unaltered upon a two-electron excitation from one of these orbitals to the other. Form-degenerate orbitals tend to have isomorphic electron densities and occur in the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) of strongly correlated systems. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the existence of a triplet instability in a real or complex RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of real or complex unrestricted Hartree-Fock wave functions when HOMO and LUMO are energy- or form-degenerate. We also show that a singlet instability always exists in a real RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of complex RHF wave functions, when HOMO and LUMO are form-degenerate, but have nonidentical electron densities, or are energy-degenerate. These theorems provide Hartree-Fock-theory-based explanations of Hund's rule, a singlet instability in Jahn-Teller systems, biradicaloid electronic structures, and a triplet instability during some covalent bond breaking. They also suggest (but not guarantee) the spontaneous formation of a spin density wave (SDW) in a metallic solid. The stability theory underlying these theorems extended to a continuous orbital-energy spectrum proves the existence of an oscillating (nonspiral) SDW instability in one- and three-dimensional homogeneous electron gases, but only at low densities or for strong interactions.

  9. Singlet and triplet instability theorems.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomonori; Hirata, So

    2015-09-21

    A useful definition of orbital degeneracy—form-degeneracy—is introduced, which is distinct from the usual energy-degeneracy: Two canonical spatial orbitals are form-degenerate when the energy expectation value in the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave function is unaltered upon a two-electron excitation from one of these orbitals to the other. Form-degenerate orbitals tend to have isomorphic electron densities and occur in the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) of strongly correlated systems. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the existence of a triplet instability in a real or complex RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of real or complex unrestricted Hartree-Fock wave functions when HOMO and LUMO are energy- or form-degenerate. We also show that a singlet instability always exists in a real RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of complex RHF wave functions, when HOMO and LUMO are form-degenerate, but have nonidentical electron densities, or are energy-degenerate. These theorems provide Hartree-Fock-theory-based explanations of Hund's rule, a singlet instability in Jahn-Teller systems, biradicaloid electronic structures, and a triplet instability during some covalent bond breaking. They also suggest (but not guarantee) the spontaneous formation of a spin density wave (SDW) in a metallic solid. The stability theory underlying these theorems extended to a continuous orbital-energy spectrum proves the existence of an oscillating (nonspiral) SDW instability in one- and three-dimensional homogeneous electron gases, but only at low densities or for strong interactions.

  10. Instabilities in foil implosions and the effect of radiation output

    SciTech Connect

    Oona, H.; Peterson, D.L.; Goforth, J.H.

    1995-08-01

    One of the aims of the Athena program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is the generation of a high fluence of soft x-rays from the thermalization of an radially imploding foil. In the experiments in Athena program, a large axial current is passed through a cylindrical aluminum foil. Under the action of the Lorentz force, the resulting plasma accelerates toward the axis, thermalizes, and produces a fast soft x-ray pulse with a blackbody temperature up to several hundred electron volts. In order that there be the maximum power compression and the highest x-ray fluence and temperature, the plasma stagnation on axis must occur very promptly. This requires that the imploding plasma be as thin and symmetric as possible. A serious problem in the thermalization process is the formation of instabilities in the plasma due to the self-magnetic field that governs the implosion of foil. A large diagnostic effort was developed to capture the details of the implosion and instability growth in several foil implosion experiments. In this report, we will present visible light images and x-ray data designed to study the effects of foil mass, current, and initial perturbations on the instability growth during foil implosion. Representative data is presented from several experiments using the Pegasus capacitor bank system and the explosively driven Procyon system. These experiments are labeled Peg 25 and Peg 33 for the Pegasus experiments and PDD1, PDD2 and PRF0 for the Procyon experiments. In these experiments, all foils had radii of 5 centimeters but varied in mass and initial conditions. Experimental data from several shots were compared with each other and to a radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) computation and described in a separate paper.

  11. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Matthew; Gras, Slawek; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana X.; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Adams, Carl; Aston, Stuart; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; Pele, Arnaud; Romie, Janeen; Thomas, Michael; Thorne, Keith; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Sigg, Daniel; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J.; Staley, Alexa; Heinze, Matthew; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-04-01

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this Letter, we describe the first observation of parametric instability in a gravitational wave detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  12. Particular Threshold Behavior of Dusty Plasma Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mikikian, M.; Cavarroc, M.; Coueedel, L.; Tessier, Y.; Boufendi, L.

    2008-09-07

    We show that some experimentally observed instabilities, concerning the void region of a dust cloud, are similar to oscillations obtained in chemical systems or neuronal dynamics. The time evolution of these instabilities follows a well-defined process particularly visible in the instability shape and frequency.

  13. Transverse instability of a rectangular bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01

    Transverse instability of a rectangular bunch is investigated. Known theory of bunched beam instability is modified to take into account 100% spread of synchrotron frequency. Series of equations adequately describing the instability is derived and solved analytically and numerically. The theory is applied to the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  14. Transverse instability at the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.

  15. Interface instability modes in freezing colloidal suspensions: revealed from onset of planar instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lilin; You, Jiaxue; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Jincheng; Lin, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Freezing colloidal suspensions widely exists in nature and industry. Interface instability has attracted much attention for the understandings of the pattern formation in freezing colloidal suspensions. However, the interface instability modes, the origin of the ice banding or ice lamellae, are still unclear. In-situ experimental observation of the onset of interface instability remains absent up to now. Here, by directly imaging the initial transient stage of planar interface instability in directional freezing colloidal suspensions, we proposed three interface instability modes, Mullins-Sekerka instability, global split instability and local split instability. The intrinsic mechanism of the instability modes comes from the competition of the solute boundary layer and the particle boundary layer, which only can be revealed from the initial transient stage of planar instability in directional freezing. PMID:26996630

  16. Forecasting Plasma Disruptions Instabilities Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresia de Oliveira, Kenya; Vannucci, Alvaro; da Silva, Elton Cesar

    2000-10-01

    Two-layer feedforward neural network was used to forecast the disruptive instabilities observed in the TEXT tokamak plasma discharges. For this task, soft X-ray experimental signals were used with very promising results. It was verified that a neural network with an architecture of the type m:2m:m:1 (where m=15) was capable, for example, to forecast the disruptive instabilities up to 4 ms in advance. This period of time is about four times larger than the one obtained previously, when experimental magnetic signals from Mirnov coils were used. From these very good forecasting results obtained it can be concluded that neural networks might be considered an important tool for making predictions over the time evolution of nonlinear systems.

  17. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; Flicker, Felix; Silevitch, D. M.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-07-27

    Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here in this study we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviour of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.

  18. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; Flicker, Felix; Silevitch, D. M.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2015-10-01

    Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviour of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.

  19. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; ...

    2015-07-27

    Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here in this study we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviourmore » of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.« less

  20. Repeat instability: mechanisms of dynamic mutations.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Christopher E; Nichol Edamura, Kerrie; Cleary, John D

    2005-10-01

    Disease-causing repeat instability is an important and unique form of mutation that is linked to more than 40 neurological, neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. DNA repeat expansion mutations are dynamic and ongoing within tissues and across generations. The patterns of inherited and tissue-specific instability are determined by both gene-specific cis-elements and trans-acting DNA metabolic proteins. Repeat instability probably involves the formation of unusual DNA structures during DNA replication, repair and recombination. Experimental advances towards explaining the mechanisms of repeat instability have broadened our understanding of this mutational process. They have revealed surprising ways in which metabolic pathways can drive or protect from repeat instability.

  1. Developmental instability of gynodioecious Teucrium lusitanicum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Navarro, T.; Cabezudo, B.; Emlen, J.M.; Freeman, C.

    1998-01-01

    Developmental instability was assessed in two geographical races of Teucrium lusitanicum using morphometric measures of vegetative and reproductive structures. T. lusitanicum is a gynodioecious species. Male sterile (female) individuals showed greater developmental instability at all sites. Plants located inland had higher developmental instability of vegetative characters and lower developmental instability of reproductive characters than coastal plants. These results support the contentions that (1) developmental instability is affected more by the disruption of co-adapted gene complexes than by lower heterozygosity, and (2) different habitat characteristics result in the differential response of vegetative and reproductive structures.

  2. A new classification system for shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2010-04-01

    Glenohumeral joint instability is extremely common yet the definition and classification of instability remains unclear. In order to find the best ways to treat instability, the condition must be clearly defined and classified. This is particularly important so that treatment studies can be compared or combined, which can only be done if the patient population under study is the same. The purpose of this paper was to review the problems with historical methods of defining and classifying instability and to introduce the FEDS system of classifying instability, which was developed to have content validity and found to have high interobserver and intraobserver agreement.

  3. History and Physical Examination for Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Haley, Col Chad A

    2017-09-01

    Glenohumeral instability frequently occurs in young active individuals especially those engaged in athletic and military activities. With advanced imaging and arthroscopic evaluation, our understanding of the injury patterns associated with instability has significantly improved. The majority of instability results from a traumatic anterior event which presents with common findings in the history, examination, and imaging studies. As such, a comprehensive evaluation of the patient is important to correctly diagnose the instability patterns and thus provide appropriate treatment intervention. With the correct diagnosis and improved surgical techniques, the majority of patients with instability can return to preinjury levels.

  4. A Numerical Study of Feathering Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wing-Kit; Wang, Hsiang-Hsu

    2016-06-01

    The stability of a spiral shock of self-gravitating, magnetized interstellar medium is studied by performing two-dimensional numerical simulations of a local patch of tight-winding spiral arm. As previously suggested by the linear studies, two types of instabilities are identified, namely, wiggle instability and feathering instability. The former instability occurs in the hydrodynamics limit and results in short wavelength perturbations. On the other hand, the feathering instability requires both self-gravitating and magnetic fields and results in wider structures.

  5. COSMIC-RAY STREAMING FROM SUPERNOVA REMNANTS AND GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Huirong; Lazarian, A.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-02-01

    High-energy gamma-ray emission has been detected recently from supernova remnants (SNRs) and their surroundings. The existence of molecular clouds near some of the SNRs suggests that the gamma rays originate predominantly from p-p interactions with cosmic rays (CRs) accelerated at a closeby SNR shock wave. Here we investigate the acceleration of CRs and the gamma-ray production in the cloud self-consistently by taking into account the interactions of the streaming instability and the background turbulence both at the shock front and in the ensuing propagation to the clouds. We focus on the later evolution of SNRs, when the conventional treatment of the streaming instability is valid but the magnetic field is enhanced due to Bell's current instability and/or the dynamo generation of magnetic field in the precursor region. We calculate the time dependence of the maximum energy of the accelerated particles. This result is then used to determine the diffusive flux of the runaway particles escaping the shock region, from which we obtain the gamma spectrum consistent with observations. Finally, we check the self-consistency of our results by comparing the required level of diffusion with the level of the streaming instability attainable in the presence of turbulence damping. The energy range of CRs subject to the streaming instability is able to produce the observed energy spectrum of gamma rays.

  6. Modern management of patellar instability.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Shin-Jae; Pavlou, George; Oakley, Jeremy; Barlow, David; Haddad, Farres

    2012-12-01

    Recurrent patellofemoral instability is a disabling condition, attributed to a variety of anatomical aetiologies. Trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, an increased tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance of greater than 20 mm and soft tissue abnormalities such as a torn medial patellofemoral ligament and inadequate vastus medialis obliquus are all factors to be considered. Management of this condition remains difficult and controversial and knowledge of the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint, a detailed history and clinical examination, and an accurate patient assessment are all imperative to formulate an appropriate management plan. Surgical treatment is based on the underlying anatomical pathology with an aim to restore normal patellofemoral kinematics. We summarise aspects of assessment, treatment and outcome of patellofemoral instability and propose an algorithm of treatment.

  7. Granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Oistein; Flekkoey, Eirik G.; Maaloey, Knut Joergen; Toussaint, Renaud

    2009-06-18

    A granular instability driven by gravity is studied experimentally and numerically. The instability arises as grains fall in a closed Hele-Shaw cell where a layer of dense granular material is positioned above a layer of air. The initially flat front defined by the grains subsequently develops into a pattern of falling granular fingers separated by rising bubbles of air. A transient coarsening of the front is observed right from the start by a finger merging process. The coarsening is later stabilized by new fingers growing from the center of the rising bubbles. The structures are quantified by means of Fourier analysis and quantitative agreement between experiment and computation is shown. This analysis also reveals scale invariance of the flow structures under overall change of spatial scale.

  8. Numerical analysis of engine instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiballah, M.; Dubois, I.

    Following a literature review on numerical analyses of combustion instability, to give the state of the art in the area, the paper describes the ONERA methodology used to analyze the combustion instability in liquid propellant engines. Attention is also given to a model (named Phedre) which describes the unsteady turbulent two-phase reacting flow in a liquid rocket engine combustion chamber. The model formulation includes axial or radial propellant injection, baffles, and acoustic resonators modeling, and makes it possible to treat different engine types. A numerical analysis of a cryogenic engine stability is presented, and the results of the analysis are compared with results of tests of the Viking engine and the gas generator of the Vulcain engine, showing good qualitative agreement and some general trends between experiments and numerical analysis.

  9. Circulation in blast driven instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Mixing in many natural phenomena (e.g. supernova collapse) and engineering applications (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) is often initiated through hydrodynamic instabilities. Explosions in these systems give rise to blast waves which can interact with perturbations at interfaces between different fluids. Blast waves are formed by a shock followed by a rarefaction. This wave profile leads to complex time histories of interface acceleration. In addition to the instabilities induced by the acceleration field, the rarefaction from the blast wave decompresses the material at the interface, further increasing the perturbation growth. After the passage of the wave, circulation circulation generated by the blast wave through baroclinic vorticity continues to act upon the interface. In this talk, we provide scaling laws for the circulation and amplitude growth induced by the blast wave. Numerical simulations of the multifluid Euler equations solved using a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method are used to validate the theoretical results.

  10. Instability of colliding metastable strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Eto, Minoru; Kamada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Ookouchi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The breaking of U(1) R symmetry plays a crucial role in modeling the breaking of supersymmetry (SUSY). In the models that possess both SUSY preserving and SUSY breaking vacua, tube-like cosmic strings called R-tubes, whose surfaces are constituted by domain walls interpolating a false and a true vacuum with some winding numbers, can exist. Their (in)stability can strongly constrain SUSY breaking models theirselves. In the present study, we investigate the dynamical (in)stability of two colliding metastable tube-like strings by field-theoretic simulations. From them, we find that the strings become unstable, depending on the relative collision angle and speed of two strings, and the false vacuum is eventually filled out by the true vacuum owing to rapid expansion of the strings or unstable bubbles created as remnants of the collision.

  11. Morphological instability of failure fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Grinfeld, M.A.; Schoenfeld, S.E.; Wright, T.W.

    2006-03-06

    There are various observations and experiments showing that, in addition to standard shock-wave fronts, which propagate with high trans-sonic velocities, some other much slower wave fronts can propagate within substance undergoing intensive damage. These moving fronts propagate within intact substance leaving behind them intensively damaged substance. These fronts were coined as failure waves. The failure waves can be modeled differently--in this letter they are modeled as sharp interfaces separating two states: the intact and comminuted states. Several penetration experiments with transparent glasses and ceramics have shown that failure fronts have an extremely rough morphology. We suggest a simple thermodynamic theory which allows interpreting appearance of the roughness as a manifestation of morphological instability of failure fronts. For the case of isotropic phases the instability criterion is presented in explicit form.

  12. Research on aviation fuel instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    Current aircraft turbine fuels do not present a significant problem with fuel thermal stability. However, turbine fuels with broadened properties or nonpetroleum derived fuels may have reduced thermal stability because of their higher content of olefins, heteroatoms, and trace metals. Moreover, advanced turbine engines will increase the thermal stress on fuels because of their higher pressure ratios and combustion temperature. In recognition of the importance of this problem, NASA Lewis is currently engaged in a broadly based research effort to better understand the underlying causes of fuel thermal degradation. The progress and status of our various activities in this area are discussed. Topics covered include: nature of fuel instability and its temperature dependence, methods of measuring the instability, chemical mechanisms involved in deposit formation, and instrumental methods for characterizing fuel deposits. Finally, some preliminary thoughts on design approaches for minimizing the effects of lowered thermal stability are briefly discussed.

  13. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    mentedwith 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin /streptomycin at 37 °C in a humidified incubatorwith 5% CO2 (v/v). Mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells...weremaintained in RPMI medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin and streptomycin. Human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC...integrity. Accordingly, tumor cells derived from these patients exhibit hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and display genomic instability (2–4

  14. [Instrumental diagnosis in shoulder instability].

    PubMed

    Lalla, E; Rosa, D; Grillo, G; Belfiore, G

    1989-01-01

    The authors call attention to the pathology caused by glenohumeral instability and, in particular, to painful shoulders in athletes which so often cause problems in diagnosis. An instrumental protocol for diagnosis is suggested, based on several specific radiographic views, Ct scan and arthro-Ct scan, with double contrast medium, the latter having the task of determining lesion which would not otherwise be able to be studied.

  15. Morphological instabilities of lamellar eutectics

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, A.; Sarkissian, A.

    1996-03-01

    The authors present the results of a numerical study based on the boundary integral technique of interfacial pattern formation in directional solidification of thin-film lamellar eutectics at low velocity. Microstructure selection maps that identify the stability domains of various steady-state and nonsteady-state growth morphologies in the spacing-composition ({lambda} {minus} C{sub 0}) plane are constructed for the transparent organic alloy CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6} and for a model eutectic alloy with two solid phases of identical physical properties. In CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}, the basic set of instabilities that limit steady-state growth is richer than expected. It consists of three primary instabilities, two of which are oscillatory, which bound the domain of the commonly observed axisymmetric lamellar morphology, and two secondary oscillatory instabilities, which bound the domain of the nonaxisymmetric (tilted) lamellar morphology. Four stable oscillatory microstructures, at least three of which have been seen experimentally, are predicted to occur in unstable regimes. In the model alloy, the structure is qualitatively similar, except that a stable domain of tilted steady-state growth is not found, in agreement with previous random-walk simulations. Furthermore, the composition range of stability of the axisymmetric morphology decreases sharply with increasing spacing away from minimum undercooling but extends further off-eutectic than predicted by the competitive growth criterion. In addition, oscillations with a wavelength equal to two {lambda} lead to lamella termination at a small distance above the onset of instability. The implications of these two features for the eutectic to dendrite transition are examined with the conclusion that in the absence of heterogeneous nucleation, this transition should be histeritic at small velocity and temperature gradient.

  16. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.; Sheppard, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

  17. Finite temperature instability for compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Accetta, F.S.; Kolb, E.W.

    1986-03-01

    We consider finite temperature effects upon theories with extra dimensions compactified via vacuum stress energy (Casimir) effects. For sufficiently high temperature, a static configuration for the internal space is impossible. At somewhat lower temperatures, there is an instability due to thermal fluctuations of radius of the compact dimensions. For both cases, the Universe can evolve to a de Sitter-like expansion of all dimensions. Stability to late times constrains the initial entropy of the universe. 28 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Migrational Instabilities in Particle Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, Joe D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with an instability arising from the shear-induced migration of particles in dense suspensions coupled with a dependence of viscosity on particle concentration. The analysis summarized here treats the inertialess (Re = O) linear stability of homogeneous simple shear flows for a Stokesian suspension model of the type proposed by Leighton and Acrivos (1987). Depending on the importance of shear-induced migration relative to concentration-driven diffusion, this model admits short-wave instability arising from wave-vector stretching by the base flow and evolving into particle-depleted shear bands. Moreover, this instability in the time-dependent problem corresponds to loss of ellipticity in the associated static problem (Re = O, Pe = O). While the isotropic version of the Leighton-Acrivos model is found to be stable with their experimentally determined parameters for simple shear, it is known that the stable model does not give a good quantitative description of particle clustering in the core of pipe flow (Nott and Brady 1994). This leads to the conjecture that an appropriate variant on the above model could explain such clustering as a two-phase bifurcation in the base flow.

  19. Gravitational instabilities in astrophysical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohline, Joel E.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade, the significant advancements that have been made in the development of computational tools and numerical techniques have allowed astrophysicists to begin to model accurately the nonlinear growth of gravitational instabilities in a variety of physical systems. The fragmentation or rotationally driven fission of dynamically evolving, self-gravitating ``drops and bubbles'' is now routinely modeled in full three-dimensional generality as we attempt to understand the behavior of protostellar clouds, rotating stars, galaxies, and even the primordial soup that defined the birth of the universe. A brief review is presented here of the general insights that have been gained from studies of this type, followed by a somewhat more detailed description of work, currently underway, that is designed to explain the process of binary star formation. A short video animation sequence, developed in conjunction with some of the research being reviewed, illustrates the basic-nature of the fission instability in rotating stars and of an instability that can arise in a massive disk that forms in a protostellar cloud.

  20. Soft Dielectrics: Heterogeneity and Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudykh, Stephan; Debotton, Gal; Bhattacharya, Kaushik

    2012-02-01

    Dielectric Elastomers are capable of large deformations in response to electrical stimuli. Heterogeneous soft dielectrics with proper microstructures demonstrate much stronger electromechanical coupling than their homogeneous constituents. In turn, the heterogeneity is an origin for instability developments leading to drastic change in the composite microstructure. In this talk, the electromechanical instabilities are considered. Stability of anisotropic soft dielectrics is analyzed. Ways to achieve giant deformations and manipulating extreme material properties are discussed. 1. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Instabilities of Hyperelastic Fiber Composites: Micromechanical Versus Numerical Analyses.'' Journal of Elasticity, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/2010.1007/s10659-011-9313-x 2. S. Rudykh, K. Bhattacharya and G. deBotton, ``Snap-through actuation of thick-wall electroactive balloons.'' International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijnonlinmec.2011.05.006 3. S. Rudykh and G. deBotton, ``Stability of Anisotropic Electroactive Polymers with Application to Layered Media.'' Zeitschrift f"ur angewandte Mathematik und Physik, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00033-011-0136-1 4. S. Rudykh, A. Lewinstein, G. Uner and G. deBotton, ``Giant Enhancement of the Electromechanical Coupling in Soft Heterogeneous Dielectrics.'' 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.4217v1

  1. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability.

    PubMed

    Perego, A M; Tarasov, N; Churkin, D V; Turitsyn, S K; Staliunas, K

    2016-01-15

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems.

  2. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A. M.; Tarasov, N.; Churkin, D. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems.

  3. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  4. Lightman-Eardley instabilities and accretion disk thickening. [for compact astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    After reviewing the role of Compton scattering in accretion disks around black holes, it is discussed whether Lightman-Eardley (LE) secular instabilities can trigger and maintain Pringle-Rees (PR) thermal instabilities. The radiative-transfer-equation and equation-of-state criteria for LE stability in alpha-viscosity-law disk models and dynamic viscosity criteria for more general situations is derived. On the basis of these considerations the LE instability is insufficient for inducing PR instabilities and hot thick inner regions important in accretion-disk models of compact hard X-ray sources. The density thinning due to radial velocity gradients in the accretion flow is suggested as a more likely and satisfactory mechanism.

  5. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Petra; Booth, Nicola; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Labate, Luca; Levato, Tadzio; Li, Bin; Makita, Mikako; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev; Riley, David; Woolsey, Nigel; Gizzi, Leonida A.

    2015-02-01

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 1019 W/cm2. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  6. Impact of the gravity of a Schwarzschild black hole upon the Rossby wave instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casse, F.; Varniere, P.; Meliani, Z.

    2017-01-01

    In an early work, the Rossby wave instability was proposed to explain the variability thought to originate in the close vicinity of black holes but this was done in the pseudo-Newtonian approach. Here we present the first general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics simulations of this instability not only proving its theorized existence in a full GR environment but also studying the effect of the strong gravity on the instability. To that end, we performed a set of simulations increasingly closer to the black hole with our new GR version of the MPI-AMRVAC code. This allows us to study the minute changes in the behaviour of the instability. We found that a pseudo-Newtonian approach gives adequate results provided that the time-shifting induced by the black hole gravity is taken into account. Hence, to view the disc as a distant observer would, a full GR ray-tracing post-treatment of the simulations is a must.

  7. Lightman-Eardley instabilities and accretion disk thickening. [for compact astronomical objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1979-01-01

    After reviewing the role of Compton scattering in accretion disks around black holes, it is discussed whether Lightman-Eardley (LE) secular instabilities can trigger and maintain Pringle-Rees (PR) thermal instabilities. The radiative-transfer-equation and equation-of-state criteria for LE stability in alpha-viscosity-law disk models and dynamic viscosity criteria for more general situations is derived. On the basis of these considerations the LE instability is insufficient for inducing PR instabilities and hot thick inner regions important in accretion-disk models of compact hard X-ray sources. The density thinning due to radial velocity gradients in the accretion flow is suggested as a more likely and satisfactory mechanism.

  8. Temporal and spatial evolution of runaway electrons at the instability moments in Damavand tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Pourshahab, B.; Abdi, M. R.; Sadighzadeh, A.; Rasouli, C.

    2016-07-15

    The time and position behavior of runaway electrons at the Parail–Pogutse instability moments has been investigated using experimental observations in plasma current, loop voltage, the Hard X-ray (HXR) radiations, and 18 poloidal pickup coils signals received by data acquisition system simultaneously. The conditional average sampling (CAS) method was used to analyze the output data. Moreover, a filament current code was modified to study the runaway electrons beam movement in the event of instabilities. The results display a rapid drift of runaway beam toward the inner wall of the vacuum vessel and the collision with the wall components at the instability moments. The existence of the collisions in these experiments is evident in the HXR bursts which are considered as the main trigger for CAS Analysis. Also, the variation of HXR bursts with the toroidal magnetic field shows that the hard X-ray bursts drop with increase in the toroidal magnetic field and runaway electrons confinement quality.

  9. Microscale instabilities in stream interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The microstructure of solar wind stream interaction regions is considered theoretically with emphasis on the role of several electrostatic kinetic instabilities which may be important within the stream interface and the compression region. Inside of 1 AU, the interface is likely to be stable against the electrostatic streaming instabilities considered. Between 1 and 2 AU, the interface will excite the magnetized ion-ion instability. The compression region is also found to be unstable beyond 1 AU where the modified two-stream instability, beam-cyclotron instability, and ion-acoustic instability are important in determining the structure of the compressive pulses as they evolve into forward and reverse shocks. It is concluded that the modified two-stream instability and beam-cyclotron instability predominately play a role in heating the electrons to the threshold for the ion-acoustic instability. Various electrostatic plasma waves, ranging in frequency from the lower-hybrid to harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, would be produced by these instabilities. Their signature should also be seen by high time resolution measurements of the temperature of the various plasma species.

  10. Clinicians' perceptions of minor cervical instability.

    PubMed

    Niere, Kenneth Robert; Torney, Sarah Kathryn

    2004-08-01

    Appropriate musculoskeletal physiotherapy management of spinal conditions requires recognition of clinical patterns in order to make a provisional diagnosis. This study aimed to assist the recognition of minor cervical instability (MCI) by surveying clinicians experienced in the management of neck conditions. A total of 153 Australian physiotherapists with postgraduate qualifications in manipulative physiotherapy and experience in the management of neck conditions completed a questionnaire that required them to indicate the importance of 15 clinical findings in the diagnosis of MCI. The responses were examined descriptively then subjected to factor analysis to identify possible groupings of findings. Clinical findings considered by greater than 50% of respondents to be either very important or vitally important in the diagnosis of MCI were: a history of major trauma; reports of the neck catching or locking or giving way; poor muscular control; signs of hypermobility on X-ray; excessively free end-feel on passive motion testing and unpredictability of symptoms. The factor analysis resulted in four distinct factors, each clinically interpretable. Therapists treating patients with neck conditions should at least consider the possibility of MCI when presented with any of the six findings reported above or with any of the groupings of findings identified by the factor analysis.

  11. Symmetry breaking and wake instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Raja

    A numerical technique has been developed in the context of spatio-temporal stability analysis. The convective/absolute nature of instability determines the time-asymptotic response of a linearly unstable flow, either in the form an oscillator or in the form of a noise amplifier. This depends on the location of pinch point singularities of the dispersion relations obtained via linear stability analyses. A new and efficient approach to locate such singularities is presented. Local analyticity of the dispersion relations was exploited via the Cauchy-Riemann equations in a quasi-Newton's root- finding procedure employing numerical Jacobians. Initial guesses provided by temporal stability analyses have been shown to converge to the pinch points even in the presence of multiple saddle points for various Falkner- Skan wedge profiles. This effort was motivated by the phenomenon of spontaneous symmetry breaking in flow over a cone. At large enough incidence, a pair of vortices develop on the leeward side of the cone which eventually become asymmetric as the angle of attack is increased further. A conical, thin-layer Navier-Stokes solver was employed to investigate the effect of flowfield saddles in this process. The approximate factorization scheme incorporated in the solver was shown analytically to be symmetric to eliminate possible sources of asymmetry. Local grid resolution studies were performed to demonstrate the importance of correctly computing the leeside saddle point and the secondary separation and reattchment points. Topological studies of the flow field as it loses symmetry agreed well with previous qualitative experimental observations. However, the original goal of this study, to settle an ongoing controversy regarding the nature of the instability responsible for symmetry breaking, could not be realized due to computational inadequacy. It is conjectured that the process is governed by an absolute instability similar to that observed in a flow over a circular

  12. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  13. Microbunch Instability Theory and Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.

    2005-01-26

    Over the last years there have been several reports of quasiperiodic bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in electron rings in the microwave and far-infrared range. The observations were made on synchrotron radiation light sources which include the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF II [1], the VUV ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source at BNL [2, 3], second generation light sources MAX-I [4], BESSY II [5], and ALS [6]. General features of those observations can be summarized as follows. Above a threshold current, there is a strongly increased radiation of the beam in the range of wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, {lambda} < {sigma}{sub 2}. At large currents, this radiation is observed as a sequence of random bursts. In the bursting regime, intensity of the radiation scales approximately as square of the number of particles in the bunch, indicating a coherent nature of the phenomenon. It is generally accepted that the source of this radiation is related to the microbunching of the beam arising from development of a microwave instability caused by the coherent synchrotron radiation of the beam. A relativistic electron beam moving in a circular orbit in free space can radiate coherently if the wavelength of the synchrotron radiation exceeds the length of the bunch. In accelerators coherent radiation of the bunch is usually suppressed by the shielding effect of the conducting walls of the vacuum chamber [7-9], which gives an exponential cutoff of wavelengths greater than a certain threshold. However, an initial density fluctuation with a characteristic length much shorter than the shielding threshold would radiate coherently. If the radiation reaction force is such that it results in the growth of the initial fluctuation one can expect an instability that leads to micro-bunching of the beam and an increased coherent radiation at short wavelengths. A possibility of CSR instability was pointed out in Refs. [10, 11].

  14. Risk bubbles and market instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsili, Matteo; Raffaelli, Giacomo

    2006-10-01

    We discuss a simple model of correlated assets capturing the feedback effects induced by portfolio investment in the covariance dynamics. This model predicts an instability when the volume of investment exceeds a critical value. Close to the critical point the model exhibits dynamical correlations very similar to those observed in real markets. Maximum likelihood estimates of the model's parameter for empirical data indeed confirms this conclusion. We show that this picture is confirmed by the empirical analysis for different choices of the time horizon.

  15. Convective Instabilities in Liquid Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veretennikov, Igor; Glazier, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to better understand foam behavior both on the Earth and in microgravity conditions and to determine the relation between a foam's structure and wetness and its rheological properties. Our experiments focused on the effects of the bubble size distribution (BSD) on the foam behavior under gradual or stepwise in the liquid flow rate and on the onset of the convective instability. We were able to show experimentally, that the BSD affects foam rheology very strongly so any theory must take foam texture into account.

  16. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  17. Carpal instability of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Caggiano, Nicholas; Matullo, Kristofer S

    2014-01-01

    The scaphoid is stabilized by the scapholunate ligament (directly) and lunotriquetral ligament (indirectly). Disruption of either of these ligaments leads to a pattern of instability that, left untreated, leads to altered mechanics of the wrist and ultimately debilitating arthritis and collapse. Although arthroscopy remains the gold standard for diagnosis of these injuries, plain films and advanced imaging are useful adjuncts. In the acute setting, conservative treatment may be attempted, but recalcitrant cases require surgical stabilization. Salvage procedures are also available for those patients who fail initial stabilization or present with late degeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic Instability of Barlike Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durisen, Richard H.; Pickett, Brian K.; Bate, Matthew R.; Imamura, James N.; Brandl, Andreas; Sterzik, Michael F.

    Numerical simulations during the 1980's established that prompt binary formation (or ``fission'') through dynamic growth of barlike modes is aborted by gravitational torques. Because these instabilities may occur during star formation and because their outcome over long times is still uncertain, we have combined various linear analyses with simulations by hydrodynamics codes to refine our understanding. We show that it is in fact the torques which cause nonlinear saturation of the mode amplitude. Excellent agreement for the early nonlinear phase is obtained using radically different hydrodynamics codes. However, the ultimate outcome is sensitive to assumptions about dissipative heating and is also somewhat code-dependent.

  19. Imaging of postoperative shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, M; Pesce, A; Barile, A; Borgia, D; Zappia, M; Romano, A; Pogliacomi, F; Verdano, M; Pellegrini, A; Johnson, K

    2017-03-01

    Postoperative imaging in shoulder instability is still a challenge for radiologists due to various postsurgical anatomical findings that could be considered pathologic in treated shoulder. For this reason is very important a deep knowledge about surgical procedures, anatomical changes after surgery and the appropriate diagnostic imaging modalities to work up the symptomatic postoperative shoulder. Postoperative imaging options include use conventional radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI arthrography, computed tomography (CT) and CT arthrography. The purpose of our review is to explain the different surgical procedures and to describe postoperative changes detected with radiological imaging.

  20. Theory on instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank T.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental fluid dynamics governing instability and transition to turbulence in boundary layers are considered, and attention is focused on the key aspects of nonlinear dynamics central to the transition process and to turbulent boundary-layer phenomena. Emphasis is placed on truly nonlinear theories, in which the boundary layer mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original form. Nonlinear TS transitions, Euler-stage interactions, and vortex/wave interactions are discussed, and compressible boundary layers are analyzed. Connections with experiments and computations are outlined, along with overall trends including the extension of the nonlinear theory and the advancement in the compressible and other flow regimes.

  1. Shrinking instability of toroidal droplets.

    PubMed

    Fragkopoulos, Alexandros A; Pairam, Ekapop; Berger, Eric; Segre, Phil N; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-03-14

    Toroidal droplets are inherently unstable due to surface tension. They can break up, similar to cylindrical jets, but also exhibit a shrinking instability, which is inherent to the toroidal shape. We investigate the evolution of shrinking toroidal droplets using particle image velocimetry. We obtain the flow field inside the droplets and show that as the torus evolves, its cross-section significantly deviates from circular. We then use the experimentally obtained velocities at the torus interface to theoretically reconstruct the internal flow field. Our calculation correctly describes the experimental results and elucidates the role of those modes that, among the many possible ones, are required to capture all of the relevant experimental features.

  2. Nonlinear Instability of Liquid Layers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhouse, Lori Ann

    The nonlinear instability of two superposed viscous liquid layers in planar and axisymmetric configurations is investigated. In the planar configuration, the light layer fluid is bounded below by a wall and above by a heavy semiinfinite fluid. Gravity drives the instability. In the first axisymmetric configuration, the layer is confined between a cylindrical wall and a core of another fluid. In the second, a thread is suspended in an infinite fluid. Surface tension forces drive the instability in the axisymmetric configurations. The nonlinear evolution of the fluid-fluid interface is computed for layers of arbitrary thickness when their dynamics are fully coupled to those of the second fluid. Under the assumption of creeping flow, the flow field is represented by an interfacial distribution of Green's functions. A Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the strength of the distribution is derived and then solved using an iterative technique. The Green's functions produce flow fields which are periodic in the direction parallel to the wall and have zero velocity on the wall. For small and moderate surface tension, planar layers evolve into a periodic array of viscous plumes which penetrate into the overlying fluid. The morphology of the plumes depends on the surface tension and the ratio of the fluid viscosities. As the viscosity of the layer increases, the plumes change from a well defined drop on top of a narrow stem to a compact column of rising fluid. The capillary instability of cylindrical interfaces and interfaces in which the core thickness varies in the axial direction are investigated. In both the unbounded and wall bounded configurations, the core evolves into a periodic array of elongated fluid drops connected by thin, almost cylindrical fluid links. The characteristics of the drop-link structure depend on the core thickness, the ratio of the core radius to the wall radius, and the ratio of the fluid viscosities. The factors controlling the

  3. Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scase, M. M.; Baldwin, K. A.; Hill, R. J. A.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of rotation upon the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. We consider a two-layer system with an axis of rotation that is perpendicular to the interface between the layers. In general, we find that a wave mode's growth rate may be reduced by rotation. We further show that in some cases, unstable axisymmetric wave modes may be stabilized by rotating the system above a critical rotation rate associated with the mode's wavelength, the Atwood number, and the flow's aspect ratio.

  4. Spatiotemporal chaos involving wave instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, Igal; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in a model of a reaction confined in a microemulsion, in a regime where both Turing and wave instability occur. In one-dimensional systems, the pattern corresponds to spatiotemporal intermittency where the behavior of the systems alternates in both time and space between stationary Turing patterns and traveling waves. In two-dimensional systems, the behavior initially may correspond to Turing patterns, which then turn into wave patterns. The resulting pattern also corresponds to a chaotic state, where the system alternates in both space and time between standing wave patterns and traveling waves, and the local dynamics may show vanishing amplitude of the variables.

  5. Transverse Instabilities in the Fermilab Recycler

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Burov, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.M.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Transverse instabilities of the antiproton beam have been observed in the Recycler ring soon after its commissioning. After installation of transverse dampers, the threshold for the instability limit increased significantly but the instability is still found to limit the brightness of the antiprotons extracted from the Recycler for Tevatron shots. In this paper, we describe observations of the instabilities during the extraction process as well as during dedicated studies. The measured instability threshold phase density agrees with the prediction of the rigid beam model within a factor of 2. Also, we conclude that the instability threshold can be significantly lowered for a bunch contained in a narrow and shallow potential well due to effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping.

  6. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  7. Late instability following total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Luis; Restrepo, Camilo; Parvizi, Javad

    2007-06-01

    Instability is one of the most common complications after total hip arthroplasty and can present early or late after hip replacement. Late instability is considered if the event occurs five or more years after the primary arthroplasty, and in contrast to early dislocation, it appears to require operative intervention. The incidence of late instability may be greater than initially appreciated, and the cumulative rate rises with longer follow-up. The etiology of hip instability is often multifactorial with the presumed risk factors for late instability including long standing malposition of the components, trauma, deterioration in muscle mass, neurological status impairment and polyethylene wear. This article presents a synopsis of published studies on late instability and outlines our institutional experience with treatment of late dislocation following total hip arthroplasty occurring due to polyethylene wear.

  8. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    PubMed Central

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin–Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system—spectrally dependent losses—achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin–Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering. PMID:27503708

  9. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  10. Infrequent microsatellite instability in oesophageal cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Muzeau, F.; Fléjou, J. F.; Belghiti, J.; Thomas, G.; Hamelin, R.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of microsatellites have been found at relatively high frequency in hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer and gastric and pancreatic cancers and at lower frequency in some other cancers. We determined the frequency of instability at 39 poly-CA microsatellite loci in 20 squamous cell carcinomas and 26 Barrett's adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. None of the tumours presented instability for a high percentage of the tested loci. Four squamous cell carcinomas and six Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at one locus, and three Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at two loci. The presence of few loci showing microsatellite instability could be due to an instability background. We conclude that genetic defects in the DNA mismatch repair system do not play an important role in oesophageal cancers. Images Figure 1 PMID:9155055

  11. Absolute instability of the Gaussian wake profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Aggarwal, Arun K.

    1987-01-01

    Linear parallel-flow stability theory has been used to investigate the effect of viscosity on the local absolute instability of a family of wake profiles with a Gaussian velocity distribution. The type of local instability, i.e., convective or absolute, is determined by the location of a branch-point singularity with zero group velocity of the complex dispersion relation for the instability waves. The effects of viscosity were found to be weak for values of the wake Reynolds number, based on the center-line velocity defect and the wake half-width, larger than about 400. Absolute instability occurs only for sufficiently large values of the center-line wake defect. The critical value of this parameter increases with decreasing wake Reynolds number, thereby indicating a shrinking region of absolute instability with decreasing wake Reynolds number. If backflow is not allowed, absolute instability does not occur for wake Reynolds numbers smaller than about 38.

  12. Instability of time-periodic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P.

    1985-01-01

    The instabilities of some spatially and/or time-periodic flows are discussed, in particular, flows with curved streamlines which can support Taylor-Gortler vortices are described in detail. The simplest flow where this type of instability can occur is that due to the torsional oscillations of an infinitely long circular cylinder. For more complicated spatially varying time-periodic flows, a similar type of instability can occur and is spatially localized near the most unstable positions. When nonlinear effects are considered it is found that the instability modifies the steady streaming boundary layer induced by the oscillatory motion. It is shown that a rapidly rotating cylinder in a uniform flow is susceptible to a related type of instability; the appropriate stability equations are shown to be identical to those which govern the instability of a boussinesq fluid of Prandtl number unity heated time periodically from below.

  13. Baryon loading and the Weibel instability in GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiore, M.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Ren, C.; Tzoufras, M. A.; Mori, W. B.

    2004-11-01

    One of the unsolved problems in the astrophysics of extreme events is the magnetic field generation in gamma-ray bursts. Synchrotron radiation measurements indicate the presence of near-equipartition magnetic fields, but the origin of these fields is still under strong debate [1]. The Weibel instability seems to be a good candidate to explain magnetic fields in GRBs [2]. Using relativistic kinetic theory we show that, even if thermal effects may slow down the instability, the thermal spread does not shutdown the Weibel instability due to the ion presence. Baryons lead to a non-negligible growth rate beyond the threshold predicted for purely electromagnetic waves in electron-positron counter-streaming shells. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional fully relativistic particle-in-cell simulations, carried out with the OSIRIS framework [3], confirm our theoretical results for these scenarios. [1] E. Waxman, Nature 423, 388 (2003); W. E. Coburn, S. E. Boggs, Nature 423, 415 (2003) [2] M. Medvedev and A. Loeb, ApJ 526, 697 (1999); L. O. Silva et al., ApJLett 596, 121 (2003) [3] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342 (2002)

  14. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  15. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-09

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  16. Drying paint: from micro-scale dynamics to mechanical instabilities.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Lucas; Li, Joaquim; Kiatkirakajorn, Pree-Cha

    2017-05-13

    Charged colloidal dispersions make up the basis of a broad range of industrial and commercial products, from paints to coatings and additives in cosmetics. During drying, an initially liquid dispersion of such particles is slowly concentrated into a solid, displaying a range of mechanical instabilities in response to highly variable internal pressures. Here we summarize the current appreciation of this process by pairing an advection-diffusion model of particle motion with a Poisson-Boltzmann cell model of inter-particle interactions, to predict the concentration gradients in a drying colloidal film. We then test these predictions with osmotic compression experiments on colloidal silica, and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments on silica dispersions drying in Hele-Shaw cells. Finally, we use the details of the microscopic physics at play in these dispersions to explore how two macroscopic mechanical instabilities-shear-banding and fracture-can be controlled.This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications.' © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Drying paint: from micro-scale dynamics to mechanical instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, Lucas; Li, Joaquim; Kiatkirakajorn, Pree-Cha

    2017-04-01

    Charged colloidal dispersions make up the basis of a broad range of industrial and commercial products, from paints to coatings and additives in cosmetics. During drying, an initially liquid dispersion of such particles is slowly concentrated into a solid, displaying a range of mechanical instabilities in response to highly variable internal pressures. Here we summarize the current appreciation of this process by pairing an advection-diffusion model of particle motion with a Poisson-Boltzmann cell model of inter-particle interactions, to predict the concentration gradients in a drying colloidal film. We then test these predictions with osmotic compression experiments on colloidal silica, and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments on silica dispersions drying in Hele-Shaw cells. Finally, we use the details of the microscopic physics at play in these dispersions to explore how two macroscopic mechanical instabilities-shear-banding and fracture-can be controlled. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications.'

  18. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  19. Planetesimal Formation by the Streaming Instability in a Photoevaporating Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Daniel; Gorti, Uma; Johansen, Anders; Davies, Melvyn B.

    2017-04-01

    Recent years have seen growing interest in the streaming instability as a candidate mechanism to produce planetesimals. However, these investigations have been limited to small-scale simulations. We now present the results of a global protoplanetary disk evolution model that incorporates planetesimal formation by the streaming instability, along with viscous accretion, photoevaporation by EUV, FUV, and X-ray photons, dust evolution, the water ice line, and stratified turbulence. Our simulations produce massive (60-130 M ⊕) planetesimal belts beyond 100 au and up to ˜20 M ⊕ of planetesimals in the middle regions (3-100 au). Our most comprehensive model forms 8 M ⊕ of planetesimals inside 3 au, where they can give rise to terrestrial planets. The planetesimal mass formed in the inner disk depends critically on the timing of the formation of an inner cavity in the disk by high-energy photons. Our results show that the combination of photoevaporation and the streaming instability are efficient at converting the solid component of protoplanetary disks into planetesimals. Our model, however, does not form enough early planetesimals in the inner and middle regions of the disk to give rise to giant planets and super-Earths with gaseous envelopes. Additional processes such as particle pileups and mass loss driven by MHD winds may be needed to drive the formation of early planetesimal generations in the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks.

  20. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  1. Modulational instabilities in relativistic pair plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.

    2016-05-15

    We study the modulational instability of an intense photon beam in a relativistic pair plasma. We use the wave-kinetic description of the photon field and relativistic fluid equations for electrons and positrons. This allows us to consider the influence of the photon spectral distribution and photon recoil effects on the instability threshold and growth rates. The case of very low frequencies modulations, well below plasma frequency, is compared to that of high-frequency modulations corresponding to the plasmon decay instability.

  2. Laser driven instabilities in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1990-06-04

    Parametric instabilities excited by an intense electromagnetic wave in a plasma is a fundamental topic relevant to many applications. These applications include laser fusion, heating of magnetically-confined plasmas, ionospheric modification, and even particle acceleration for high energy physics. In laser fusion, these instabilities have proven to play an essential role in the choice of laser wavelength. Characterization and control of the instabilities is an ongoing priority in laser plasma experiments. Recent progress and some important trends will be discussed. 8 figs.

  3. Filamentation instability in a quantum magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bret, A.

    2008-02-15

    The filamentation instability occurring when a nonrelativistic electron beam passes through a quantum magnetized plasma is investigated by means of a cold quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. It is proved that the instability can be completely suppressed by quantum effects if and only if a finite magnetic field is present. A dimensionless parameter is identified that measures the strength of quantum effects. Strong quantum effects allow for a much smaller magnetic field to suppress the instability than in the classical regime.

  4. Two-Beam Instability in Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, Alexey V.; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    The drift motion of cooling electrons makes them able to respond to transverse perturbations of a cooled ion beam. This response may lead to dipole or quadrupole transverse instabilities at specific longitudinal wave numbers. While the dipole instabilities can be suppressed by a combination of the Landau damping, machine impedance, and the active damper, the quadrupole and higher order modes can lead to either emittance growth, or a lifetime degradation, or both. The growth rates of these instabilities are strongly determined by the machine x-y coupling. Thus, tuning out of the coupling resonance and/or reduction of the machine coupling can be an efficient remedy for these instabilities.

  5. Measuring Frequency Instability Of A Large Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, Tom Y.; Lutes, George F.; Franco, Manuel M.

    1994-01-01

    Frequency instability of antenna under test determined from measurement of phase deviation between outputs of two antennas. Fiber-optic system used to minimize spurious component of frequency instability contributed by propagation of signal from reference antenna to Allan-variance-measuring instrument. Intended primarily to reveal contributions of wind and air-temperature effects on antenna and beam-waveguide structures to overall frequency instabilities of received signals. Technique simpler, less expensive, potentially capable of providing instability data in shorter measuring times, and more precise.

  6. Marangoni instability in a liquid sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oron, A.; Deissler, R. J.; Duh, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    We study the onset of a pure Marangoni convection in a liquid layer with two deformable interfaces in the no-gravity environment. Both oscillatory and stationary instabilities are considered for a wide range of parameters. It is shown that only stationary instability is possible when surface tension at the colder interface is lower than that at the hotter one. Oscillatory instability tends to disappear and to be replaced by the stationary instability with increase of the Prandtl number and decrease of surface tension at the colder interface.

  7. Two-Fluid Interface Instability Being Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    The interface between two fluids of different density can experience instability when gravity acts normal to the surface. The relatively well known Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability results when the gravity is constant with a heavy fluid over a light fluid. An impulsive acceleration applied to the fluids results in the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. The RM instability occurs regardless of the relative orientation of the heavy and light fluids. In many systems, the passing of a shock wave through the interface provides the impulsive acceleration. Both the RT and RM instabilities result in mixing at the interface. These instabilities arise in a diverse array of circumstances, including supernovas, oceans, supersonic combustion, and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The area with the greatest current interest in RT and RM instabilities is ICF, which is an attempt to produce fusion energy for nuclear reactors from BB-sized pellets of deuterium and tritium. In the ICF experiments conducted so far, RM and RT instabilities have prevented the generation of net-positive energy. The $4 billion National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed to study these instabilities and to attempt to achieve net-positive yield in an ICF experiment.

  8. Internet worms and global routing instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, James; Ogielski, Andy T.; Premore, B. J.; Yuan, Yougu

    2002-07-01

    We analyze the global BGP routing instabilities observed during the Code Red II and Nimda worm attacks in July and September 2001, respectively. Compelling analysis is shown on the correlation between the observed instabilities and the worm attacks. We analyze router failure modes that can be triggered by the abnormal traffic during the worm attack and how they can lead to global routing instability. Independent research has partially confirmed that such failure modes can and likely do occur in practice. Highly detailed large-scale simulations help close the loop, indicating that such failure modes do in fact trigger the kind of widespread BGP instabilities that were observed empirically.

  9. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  10. Low-frequency ionization-driven instability of a discrete auroral arc model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The low-frequency (time scales of tens of seconds) dynamics of the auroral ionosphere differs from that of the nonauroral ionosphere by the presence of strong, unstable space- and time-dependent ionospheric ionization produced by precipitating auroral electrons. If recombination is relatively unimportant (as at high ionospheric heights), it is shown that, in general, transport processes cannot remove this ionization as fast as it is created, and no equilibrium is possible. These nonequilibrium phenomena are investigated in the context of a nonlinear adiabatic auroral model, which has previously been studied in static situations. A linearized local perturbation analysis is given of what amounts to a current-driven E x B gradient-drift instability with an ionization source, as well as some exact nonlinear solutions valid in a finite but limited spatial region. These solutions show continuing motion of auroral potential and plasma density, as the aurora tries to shift its ionization problems from one place to another. The analysis gives clues to the possibility of generation of chaos and of fine-scale spatial structure.

  11. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-07-01

    Compared to most other alcoholic beverages, beer is unique because it is unstable when in the final package. This instability can be divided into biological and nonbiological instability. Nonbiological stability of beer involves a wide range of chemical processes and can be considered in a number of categories: physical, flavor, light, foam, and gushing. It is the balance between flavanoid polyphenols (tannoids) and sensitive proteins that specifically combine with polyphenols to form haze that largely dictates physical stability. The flavor stability of beer primarily depends on the oxygen concentration of packaged beer but is influenced by all stages of the brewing process. Foam stability in a glass of beer reflects the quality of the beverage. The backbone of foam is hydrophobic polypeptides. Novel brewing processes such as high-gravity brewing result in a disproportionate loss of these polypeptides and have a negative effect on the foam stability of the resulting beer. Beer is light sensitive, especially in the 350 500 nm range. Beer exposed to this wavelength range in clear or green glass containers quickly develop nauseous skunky-like off-flavors resulting from the formation of 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. Methods of enhancing all of these types of beer stability are discussed.

  12. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  13. Rogue Waves and Modulational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Dyachenko, A.

    2015-12-01

    The most plausible cause of rogue wave formation in a deep ocean is development of modulational instability of quasimonochromatic wave trains. An adequate model for study of this phenomenon is the Euler equation for potential flow of incompressible fluid with free surface in 2-D geometry. Numerical integration of these equations confirms completely the conjecture of rogue wave formation from modulational instability but the procedure is time consuming for determination of rogue wave appearance probability for a given shape of wave energy spectrum. This program can be realized in framework of simpler model using replacement of the exact interaction Hamiltonian by more compact Hamiltonian. There is a family of such models. The popular one is the Nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE). This model is completely integrable and suitable for numerical simulation but we consider that it is oversimplified. It misses such important phenomenon as wave breaking. Recently, we elaborated much more reliable model that describes wave breaking but is as suitable as NLSE from the point of numerical modeling. This model allows to perform massive numerical experiments and study statistics of rogue wave formation in details.

  14. Option price and market instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Yu, Miao

    2017-04-01

    An option pricing formula, for which the price of an option depends on both the value of the underlying security as well as the velocity of the security, has been proposed in Baaquie and Yang (2014). The FX (foreign exchange) options price was empirically studied in Baaquie et al., (2014), and it was found that the model in general provides an excellent fit for all strike prices with a fixed model parameters-unlike the Black-Scholes option price Hull and White (1987) that requires the empirically determined implied volatility surface to fit the option data. The option price proposed in Baaquie and Cao Yang (2014) did not fit the data during the crisis of 2007-2008. We make a hypothesis that the failure of the option price to fit data is an indication of the market's large deviation from its near equilibrium behavior due to the market's instability. Furthermore, our indicator of market's instability is shown to be more accurate than the option's observed volatility. The market prices of the FX option for various currencies are studied in the light of our hypothesis.

  15. Radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the heritable somatic effects of ionizing radiation exposures has relied upon the assumption that radiation-induced lesions were 'fixed' in the DNA prior to the first postirradiation mitosis. Lesion conversion was thought to occur during the initial round of DNA replication or as a consequence of error-prone enzymatic processing of lesions. The standard experimental protocols for the assessment of a variety of radiation-induced endpoints (cell death, specific locus mutations, neoplastic transformation and chromosome aberrations) evaluate these various endpoints at a single snapshot in time. In contrast with the aforementioned approaches, some studies have specifically assessed radiation effects as a function of time following exposure. Evidence has accumulated in support of the hypothesis that radiation exposure induces a persistent destabilization of the genome. This instability has been observed as a delayed expression of lethal mutations, as an enhanced rate of accumulation of non-lethal heritable alterations, and as a progressive intraclonal chromosomal heterogeneity. The genetic controls and biochemical mechanisms underlying radiation-induced genomic instability have not yet been delineated. The aim is to integrate the accumulated evidence that suggests that radiation exposure has a persistent effect on the stability of the mammalian genome.

  16. Combustion instability modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. Clearly, the key to successful gas turbine development is based on understanding the effects of geometry and operating conditions on combustion instability, emissions (including UHC, CO and NO{sub x}) and performance. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors.

  17. Adhesional instabilities and gecko locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Geckos possess a remarkable ability to run rapidly on both walls and ceilings and in recent years the mechanisms that underlie this facility have come under close scrutiny. It is now generally agreed that one of the principal mechanisms of adhesion relies on the action of van der Waal forces acting between the final extremely fine structure of the gecko toe and the underlying substrate. High speed video analysis shows that adhesive contact is both made and broken in intervals of less than 20 ms and this suggests that the mechanism of detachment is one of adhesive instability rather than steady-state peeling. By considering the gecko seta/spatula as a Euler-Bernoulli cantilever it is possible to model this instability in non-dimensional terms and thus to test the analysis at a much larger scale with more conventional engineering materials. When applied to the scale and material combination appropriate to a gecko spatula, the predicted critical load, of around 10 nN, is close to values that have been observed using and AFM cantilever and a single detached spatula.

  18. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  19. Manual testing for ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Emily Jane; Hunt, Adrienne; Nightingale, Elizabeth Jean; Munn, Joanne; Kilbreath, Sharon Lynne; Refshauge, Kathryn Margaret

    2012-12-01

    To assess inter-rater reliability of ankle manual tests. We also correlated the manual tests with the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT). One ankle from each of 60 participants was assessed using four different manual tests (anterior drawer in supine and crook lying, talar tilt, inversion tilt). Three different raters, varying in experience, tested each participant. The CAIT questionnaire was also administered. The study received ethics approval from the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), standard error of the mean (SEM) and percent close agreement (PCA) were used to determine reliability of the four tests. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships between the manual tests and CAIT scores. Inter-rater reliability for the four manual tests was poor regardless of therapist's experience (ICC([1,1]) -0.12 to 0.33; SEM 0.93-1.69). Correlations between the CAIT and manual tests were also low varying between r = -0.12 and -0.42. Inter-rater reliability was poor for manual tests of ankle stability. Reliability may be improved by using a grading scale with fewer intervals. The CAIT scores and manual tests correlated poorly, potentially reflecting the variety of conditions leading to ankle instability. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-Lun; Onuki, Akira

    1996-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, nonpolar, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In zero gravity, the interface is unstable at all long wavelengths in the presence of a field applied across it. It is conjectured that this will cause the binary fluid to break up into domains small enough to be outside the instability condition. The resulting pattern formation, and the effects on the critical properties as the domains approach the correlation length are of acute interest. With direct observation, laser light scattering, and interferometry, the phenomena can be probed to gain further understanding of interfacial instabilities and the pattern formation which results, and dimensional crossover in critical systems as the critical fluctuations in a particular direction are suppressed by external forces.

  1. Genome instability in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yujun; Song, Hyundong; Croteau, Deborah L; Akbari, Mansour; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Autosomal dominant, familial AD (fAD) is very rare and caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN-2) genes. The pathogenesis of sporadic AD (sAD) is more complex and variants of several genes are associated with an increased lifetime risk of AD. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA integrity is pivotal during neuronal development, maintenance and function. DNA damage and alterations in cellular DNA repair capacity have been implicated in the aging process and in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. These findings are supported by research using animal models of AD and in DNA repair deficient animal models. In recent years, novel mechanisms linking DNA damage to neuronal dysfunction have been identified and have led to the development of noninvasive treatment strategies. Further investigations into the molecular mechanisms connecting DNA damage to AD pathology may help to develop novel treatment strategies for this debilitating disease. Here we provide an overview of the role of genome instability and DNA repair deficiency in AD pathology and discuss research strategies that include genome instability as a component. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Genome instability, cancer and aging

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Alexander Y.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage-driven genome instability underlies the diversity of life forms generated by the evolutionary process but is detrimental to the somatic cells of individual organisms. The cellular response to DNA damage can be roughly divided in two parts. First, when damage is severe, programmed cell death may occur or, alternatively, temporary or permanent cell cycle arrest. This protects against cancer but can have negative effects on the long term, e.g., by depleting stem cell reservoirs. Second, damage can be repaired through one or more of the many sophisticated genome maintenance pathways. However, erroneous DNA repair and incomplete restoration of chromatin after damage is resolved, produce mutations and epimutations, respectively, both of which have been shown to accumulate with age. An increased burden of mutations and/or epimutations in aged tissues increases cancer risk and adversely affects gene transcriptional regulation, leading to progressive decline in organ function. Cellular degeneration and uncontrolled cell proliferation are both major hallmarks of aging. Despite the fact that one seems to exclude the other, they both may be driven by a common mechanism. Here, we review age related changes in the mammalian genome and their possible functional consequences, with special emphasis on genome instability in stem/progenitor cells. PMID:19344750

  3. Start-to-end simulation of the shot-noise driven microbunching instability experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Qiang, J.; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; ...

    2017-05-23

    The shot-noise driven microbunching instability can significantly degrade electron beam quality in x-ray free electron laser light sources. Experiments were carried out at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study this instability. Here in this paper, we present start-to-end simulations of the shot-noise driven microbunching instability experiment at the LCLS using the real number of electrons. The simulation results reproduce the measurements quite well. A microbunching self-heating mechanism is also illustrated in the simulation, which helps explain the experimental observation.

  4. Start-to-end simulation of the shot-noise driven microbunching instability experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, J.; Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Huang, Z.; Ratner, D.; Raubenheimer, T. O.; Venturini, M.; Zhou, F.

    2017-05-01

    The shot-noise driven microbunching instability can significantly degrade electron beam quality in x-ray free electron laser light sources. Experiments were carried out at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) to study this instability. In this paper, we present start-to-end simulations of the shot-noise driven microbunching instability experiment at the LCLS using the real number of electrons. The simulation results reproduce the measurements quite well. A microbunching self-heating mechanism is also illustrated in the simulation, which helps explain the experimental observation.

  5. Magnetorotational instability in galaxy clusters: looking forward to ATHENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, Lorenzo; Ettori, Stefano; Bianconi, Matteo

    2015-09-01

    Clusters of galaxies are embedded in halos of weakly magnetized plasma at the system's virial temperature. Though mainly pressure supported,such intracluster medium (ICM) might rotate significantly. Currentlyavailable measures of X-ray emission lines, X-ray isophote flatteningand hydrostatic mass bias leave ample room for rotational motions. If the ICM rotates significantly, its stability properties aresubstantially modified and, in particular, the magnetorotationalinstability (MRI) can play an important role. We present simplemodels of rotating cool-core clusters and we demonstrate that the MRIcan be the dominant instability over significant portions of theclusters, with possible implications for the dynamics of the coolcores. The direct measures of the ICM rotation that will be obtainedwith ATHENA will allow us to gauge the importance of the MRI for theevolution of galaxy clusters.

  6. First-Time Patellofemoral Dislocation: Risk Factors for Recurrent Instability.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Laura; McIntosh, Amy; Dahm, Diane

    2015-08-01

    Patellofemoral instability is a complex problem, which can be difficult to manage. The purpose of this study was to describe the demographics of patients with a first-time patellofemoral dislocation, and identify risk factors for recurrent instability. This was a single institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective review of >2,000 patients with a patellar dislocation between 1998 and 2010. Inclusion criteria are as follows: (1) no prior history of patellofemoral subluxation or dislocation of the affected knee; (2) X-rays within 4 weeks of the initial instability episode; and (3) a dislocated patella requiring reduction, or history/findings suggestive of acute patellar dislocation (effusion/hemarthrosis, tenderness along the medial parapatellar structures, and apprehension with lateral patellar translation). Clinical records and radiographs were reviewed. The Caton-Deschamps and Insall-Salvati indices were used to evaluate patella alta. Trochlear dysplasia was assessed using the Dejour classification system. Skeletal maturity was graded based on the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes, using one of the following categories: open, closing, or closed. Three hundred twenty-six knees (312 patients) met the aforementioned criteria. There were 145 females (46.5%) and 167 males (53.5%), with an average age of 19.6 years (range, 9-62 years). Thirty-five patients (10.7%) were treated with surgery after the initial dislocation. All others were initially managed nonoperatively. Of the 291 patients managed nonoperatively, 89 (30.6%) had recurrent instability, 44 (49.4%) of which eventually required surgery. Several risk factors for recurrent instability were identified, including younger age (p < 0.01), immature physes (p < 0.01), sports-related injuries (p < 0.01), patella alta (p = 0.02), and trochlear dysplasia (p < 0.01). Sixty-nine percent of patients with a first-time patellofemoral dislocation will stabilize with conservative

  7. Thin current sheet instabilities relevant to the onset of reconnection in the geomagnetotail: Theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Sharma, A. S.; Lui, A. T.; Yoon, P. H.; Guzdar, P. N.

    2002-12-01

    Two basic families of thin current sheet instabilities responsible for the onset of X- and Y-line reconnection in the tail current sheet of Earth's magnetosphere are discussed. The X-line reconnection onset becomes possible due to the growth of the tearing mode. Its stability is shown to crucially depend on the presence of a transient electron population and as a result the X-line can be formed only far enough from the Earth. Earthward of this critical distance the tail current sheet is tearing-stable and evolves into a thin current sheet (TCS). These results are fully consistent with recent Geotail observations [Asano, 2001], which show that the X-line is initially formed near the tailward edge of the evolved TCS. On the other hand, the formation of TCS creates the free energy source for current-driven instabilities that are not significant in the case of the conventional Harris equilibrium [Daughton, 1999]. This arises due to the bulk flow velocity shear provided by the nonadiabatic motion of ions. We provide the new results of the nonlocal stability analysis of TCS taking into account the effect of bulk flow velocity shear. In contrast to recent results [Shinohara et al., 2001; Daughton, 2002], where the shear appeared as a nonlinear effect resulting from the lower-hybrid turbulence in the pure Harris sheet with zero normal component of the magnetic field, we explore the stability of more realistic self-consistent TCS models with nonzero normal magnetic field that already have the velocity shear [Sitnov et al., 2000]. A distinctive feature of these models is the bean-shaped ion distribution at the center of the sheet. It is consistent with the characteristic ion distributions prior to the onset of the current disruption in the magnetotail [Lui, 2002].

  8. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  9. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  10. THE EFFECT OF NONLINEAR LANDAU DAMPING ON ULTRARELATIVISTIC BEAM PLASMA INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Philip; Lamberts, Astrid; Broderick, Avery E.; Shalaby, Mohamad; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald

    2014-12-20

    Very high energy gamma-rays from extragalactic sources produce pairs from the extragalactic background light, yielding an electron-positron pair beam. This pair beam is unstable to various plasma instabilities, especially the ''oblique'' instability, which can be the dominant cooling mechanism for the beam. However, recently, it has been claimed that nonlinear Landau damping renders it physically irrelevant by reducing the effective damping rate to a low level. Here we show with numerical calculations that the effective damping rate is 8 × 10{sup –4} the growth rate of the linear instability, which is sufficient for the ''oblique'' instability to be the dominant cooling mechanism of these pair beams. In particular, we show that previous estimates of this rate ignored the exponential cutoff in the scattering amplitude at large wave numbers and assumed that the damping of scattered waves entirely depends on collisions, ignoring collisionless processes. We find that the total wave energy eventually grows to approximate equipartition with the beam by increasingly depositing energy into long-wavelength modes. As we have not included the effect of nonlinear wave-wave interactions on these long-wavelength modes, this scenario represents the ''worst case'' scenario for the oblique instability. As it continues to drain energy from the beam at a faster rate than other processes, we conclude that the ''oblique'' instability is sufficiently strong to make it the physically dominant cooling mechanism for high-energy pair beams in the intergalactic medium.

  11. Simultaneous Excitation and Analysis of Three Instabilities in Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitriu, D. G.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R. W.

    2008-03-19

    Experimental results are presented on the simultaneous excitation of three low-frequency instabilities in the magnetized plasma column of a Q-machine, namely the potential relaxation instability, the electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The influence of the magnetic field intensity on the appearance of these instabilities was investigated.

  12. Chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Kenji Ota, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okada, Mika; Oshimura, Nobumitsu; Tofuku, Atsushi

    2013-11-21

    Nanoparticles of alkali-doped tungsten bronzes are an excellent near-infrared shielding material, but exhibit slight chromatic instabilities typically upon applications of strong ultra-violet light or heating in humid environment, which acts detrimentally to long-life commercial applications. Origin of the chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze has been investigated, and it has been found that the coloration and bleaching processes comprised electronic exchanges which accelerate or depress the polaron excitation and the localized surface plasmon resonance. Coloration on UV illumination is evidenced by electron diffraction as due to the formation of H{sub x}WO{sub 3}, which is considered to take place in the surface Cs-deficient WO{sub 3} region via the double charge injection mechanism. On the other hand, bleaching on heating in air and in humid environment is shown to accompany the extraction of Cs and electrons from Cs{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis and is concluded to be an oxidation of Cs{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} on the particle surface.

  13. Chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kenji; Ota, Yosuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Okada, Mika; Oshimura, Nobumitsu; Tofuku, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Nanoparticles of alkali-doped tungsten bronzes are an excellent near-infrared shielding material, but exhibit slight chromatic instabilities typically upon applications of strong ultra-violet light or heating in humid environment, which acts detrimentally to long-life commercial applications. Origin of the chromatic instabilities in cesium-doped tungsten bronze has been investigated, and it has been found that the coloration and bleaching processes comprised electronic exchanges which accelerate or depress the polaron excitation and the localized surface plasmon resonance. Coloration on UV illumination is evidenced by electron diffraction as due to the formation of HxWO3, which is considered to take place in the surface Cs-deficient WO3 region via the double charge injection mechanism. On the other hand, bleaching on heating in air and in humid environment is shown to accompany the extraction of Cs and electrons from Cs0.33WO3 by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis and is concluded to be an oxidation of Cs0.33WO3 on the particle surface.

  14. Instability heating of solid-fiber Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Jr., Ronald Alan

    1994-02-01

    The Los Alamos High Density Z Pinch-II (HDZP-II) facility is used to study the dynamics of z-pinch plasmas generated from solid fibers of deuterated polyethylene CD2 with a range in radii of 3--60 μm. HDZP-II is a pulsed-power generator that delivers a current that rises to 700 kA in 100 ns through an inductive load. A multiframe circular schlieren records the evolution of the shape and size of the plasma on seven images taken at 10-ns intervals. These circular-schlieren images show very strong m=0 instability at the onset of current and a rapid radial expansion of the plasma. No higher-order instabilities are observed. An interferometer is used to infer the electron density and electron line density, giving a measure of the fraction of plasma contained within the outline of the circular-schlieren image at one time during the multiframe sequence. A three-channel x-ray crystal-reflection spectrometer provides the time-resolved, spatially-averaged electron temperature. The magnitude of the x-ray emission at these energies also gives qualitative information about the electron temperature and density at late times. A lower bound on the ion temperature is inferred from the particle pressure needed to balance the magnetic field pressure. The ion temperature rose above that of the electrons, strongly suggesting an additional heating term that puts energy directly into the ions. An ion heating term is proposed to explain the observed rapid radial expansion and elevated ion temperatures. This heating term is based on the assumption that the observed m=0 instabilities reconnect, enclosing magnetic flux which degenerates into turbulence in the plasma. A 0-D simulation is developed to investigate the relevance of different physical models to the data presented.

  15. Testing the gravitational instability hypothesis?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babul, Arif; Weinberg, David H.; Dekel, Avishai; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    We challenge a widely accepted assumption of observational cosmology: that successful reconstruction of observed galaxy density fields from measured galaxy velocity fields (or vice versa), using the methods of gravitational instability theory, implies that the observed large-scale structures and large-scale flows were produced by the action of gravity. This assumption is false, in that there exist nongravitational theories that pass the reconstruction tests and gravitational theories with certain forms of biased galaxy formation that fail them. Gravitational instability theory predicts specific correlations between large-scale velocity and mass density fields, but the same correlations arise in any model where (a) structures in the galaxy distribution grow from homogeneous initial conditions in a way that satisfies the continuity equation, and (b) the present-day velocity field is irrotational and proportional to the time-averaged velocity field. We demonstrate these assertions using analytical arguments and N-body simulations. If large-scale structure is formed by gravitational instability, then the ratio of the galaxy density contrast to the divergence of the velocity field yields an estimate of the density parameter Omega (or, more generally, an estimate of beta identically equal to Omega(exp 0.6)/b, where b is an assumed constant of proportionality between galaxy and mass density fluctuations. In nongravitational scenarios, the values of Omega or beta estimated in this way may fail to represent the true cosmological values. However, even if nongravitational forces initiate and shape the growth of structure, gravitationally induced accelerations can dominate the velocity field at late times, long after the action of any nongravitational impulses. The estimated beta approaches the true value in such cases, and in our numerical simulations the estimated beta values are reasonably accurate for both gravitational and nongravitational models. Reconstruction tests

  16. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  17. Testing the gravitational instability hypothesis?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babul, Arif; Weinberg, David H.; Dekel, Avishai; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    We challenge a widely accepted assumption of observational cosmology: that successful reconstruction of observed galaxy density fields from measured galaxy velocity fields (or vice versa), using the methods of gravitational instability theory, implies that the observed large-scale structures and large-scale flows were produced by the action of gravity. This assumption is false, in that there exist nongravitational theories that pass the reconstruction tests and gravitational theories with certain forms of biased galaxy formation that fail them. Gravitational instability theory predicts specific correlations between large-scale velocity and mass density fields, but the same correlations arise in any model where (a) structures in the galaxy distribution grow from homogeneous initial conditions in a way that satisfies the continuity equation, and (b) the present-day velocity field is irrotational and proportional to the time-averaged velocity field. We demonstrate these assertions using analytical arguments and N-body simulations. If large-scale structure is formed by gravitational instability, then the ratio of the galaxy density contrast to the divergence of the velocity field yields an estimate of the density parameter Omega (or, more generally, an estimate of beta identically equal to Omega(exp 0.6)/b, where b is an assumed constant of proportionality between galaxy and mass density fluctuations. In nongravitational scenarios, the values of Omega or beta estimated in this way may fail to represent the true cosmological values. However, even if nongravitational forces initiate and shape the growth of structure, gravitationally induced accelerations can dominate the velocity field at late times, long after the action of any nongravitational impulses. The estimated beta approaches the true value in such cases, and in our numerical simulations the estimated beta values are reasonably accurate for both gravitational and nongravitational models. Reconstruction tests

  18. Testing the gravitational instability hypothesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babul, Arif; Weinberg, David H.; Dekel, Avishai; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-05-01

    We challenge a widely accepted assumption of observational cosmology: that successful reconstruction of observed galaxy density fields from measured galaxy velocity fields (or vice versa), using the methods of gravitational instability theory, implies that the observed large-scale structures and large-scale flows were produced by the action of gravity. This assumption is false, in that there exist nongravitational theories that pass the reconstruction tests and gravitational theories with certain forms of biased galaxy formation that fail them. Gravitational instability theory predicts specific correlations between large-scale velocity and mass density fields, but the same correlations arise in any model where (a) structures in the galaxy distribution grow from homogeneous initial conditions in a way that satisfies the continuity equation, and (b) the present-day velocity field is irrotational and proportional to the time-averaged velocity field. We demonstrate these assertions using analytical arguments and N-body simulations. If large-scale structure is formed by gravitational instability, then the ratio of the galaxy density contrast to the divergence of the velocity field yields an estimate of the density parameter Omega (or, more generally, an estimate of beta identically equal to Omega0.6/b, where b is an assumed constant of proportionality between galaxy and mass density fluctuations. In nongravitational scenarios, the values of Omega or beta estimated in this way may fail to represent the true cosmological values. However, even if nongravitational forces initiate and shape the growth of structure, gravitationally induced accelerations can dominate the velocity field at late times, long after the action of any nongravitational impulses. The estimated beta approaches the true value in such cases, and in our numerical simulations the estimated beta values are reasonably accurate for both gravitational and nongravitational models. Reconstruction tests that show

  19. Electric Field Induced Interfacial Instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusner, Robert E.; Min, Kyung Yang; Wu, Xiao-lun; Onuki, Akira

    1999-01-01

    The study of the interface in a charge-free, critical and near-critical binary fluid in the presence of an externally applied electric field is presented. At sufficiently large fields, the interface between the two phases of the binary fluid should become unstable and exhibit an undulation with a predefined wavelength on the order of the capillary length. As the critical point is approached, this wavelength is reduced, potentially approaching length-scales such as the correlation length or critical nucleation radius. At this point the critical properties of the system may be affected. In this paper, the flat interface of a marginally polar binary fluid mixture is stressed by a perpendicular alternating electric field and the resulting instability is characterized by the critical electric field E(sub c) and the pattern observed. The character of the surface dynamics at the onset of instability is found to be strongly dependent on the frequency f of the field applied. The plot of E(sub c) vs. f for a fixed temperature shows a sigmoidal shape, whose low and high frequency limits are well described by a power-law relationship, E(sub c) = epsilon(exp zeta) with zeta = 0.35 and zeta = 0.08, respectively. The low-limit exponent compares well with the value zeta = 4 for a system of conducting and non-conducting fluids. On the other hand, the high-limit exponent coincides with what was first predicted by Onuki. The instability manifests itself as the conducting phase penetrates the non-conducting phase. As the frequency increases, the shape of the pattern changes from an array of bifurcating strings to an array of column-like (or rod-like) protrusions, each of which spans the space between the plane interface and one of the electrodes. For an extremely high frequency, the disturbance quickly grows into a parabolic cone pointing toward the upper plate. As a result, the interface itself changes its shape from that of a plane to that of a high sloping pyramid.

  20. Active control of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoud, Nidal A.

    A theoretical analysis of active control of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities is developed in this dissertation. The theoretical combustion model is based on the dynamics of a two-phase flow in a liquid-fueled propulsion system. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation with pressure as the dependent variable, and accommodates all influences of combustion, mean flow, unsteady motions and control inputs. The governing partial differential equations are converted to an equivalent set of ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method by expressing the unsteady pressure and velocity fields as functions of normal mode shapes of the chamber. This procedure yields a representation of the unsteady flow field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators that is used as a basis for controllers design. Major research attention is focused on the control of longitudinal oscillations with both linear and nonlinear processes being considered. Starting with a linear model using point actuators, the optimal locations of actuators and sensors are developed. The approach relies on the quantitative measures of the degree of controllability and component cost. These criterion are arrived at by considering the energies of the system's inputs and outputs. The optimality criteria for sensor and actuator locations provide a balance between the importance of the lower order (controlled) and the higher (residual) order modes. To address the issue of uncertainties in system's parameter, the minimax principles based controller is used. The minimax corresponds to finding the best controller for the worst parameter deviation. In other words, choosing controller parameters to minimize, and parameter deviation to maximize some quadratic performance metric. Using the minimax-based controller, a remarkable improvement in the control system's ability to handle parameter uncertainties is achieved when compared to the robustness of the regular control schemes such as LQR

  1. Cannonballs in the context of gamma ray bursts. Formation sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, J. E.; Fendt, C.; Ouyed, R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate possible formation sites of the cannonballs (in the gamma ray bursts context) by calculating their physical parameters, such as density, magnetic field, and temperature close to the origin. Our results favor scenarios where the cannonballs form as instabilities (knots) within magnetized jets from hyperaccreting disks. These instabilities would most likely set in beyond the light cylinder where flow velocity with Lorentz factors as high as 2000 can be achieved. The cannonball model for gamma ray bursts requires that cannonballs form inside core-collapse supernovae. Our findings challenge the cannonball model of gamma ray bursts, unless hyperaccreting disks and the corresponding jets are common occurrences in core-collapse SNe.

  2. Is delayed genomic instability specifically induced by high-LET particles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testard, Isabelle; Sabatier, Laure

    1998-12-01

    Ionizing radiation can induce a large variety of damages in the DNA. The processing or repair of this damage occurs in the first minutes up to several hours after irradiation. Afterwhile the remaining lesions are fixed in an irreparable state. However, in recent years, data have accumulated to suggest that genomic instability can manifest in the progeny of irradiated cells leading to accumulation of damage through cell generations. Different biological endpoints were described: delayed cell death, delayed mutations, de novo chromosomal instability. The question regarding the ability of sparsely ionizing X-or γ-rays to induce such phenomenon is still unclear for normal cells. In most of the reports, high linear energy transfer (LET) particles are able to induce genomic instability but not low-LET particles. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unknown. In human fibroblasts irradiated by heavy ions in a large range of LETs, we showed that the chromosomal instability is characterized by telomeric associations (TAS) involving specific chromosomes. The same instability is observed during the senescence process and during the first passages after viral transfection. The specific chromosomal instability that we observed after irradiation would not be a direct consequence of irradiation but would be a natural phenomenon occurring after many cell divisions. The effect of the irradiation would lie on the bypass of the senescence process that would permit cells with end to end fusions to survive and be transmitted through cell generations, accumulating chromosome rearrangements and chromosome imbalances. Research on molecular mechanisms of chromosomal instability is focused on the role of telomeres in end to end fusions. Such observations could contribute to understand why chromosomal instability is not a dose dependant phenomenon. Why high-LET particles would be so potent in inducing delayed instability? The answer might lie in the study of primary effects of

  3. Dynamical instability of the aerogravity assist maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInner, Colin R.

    1994-09-01

    Fundamental dynamical equations are used to form a single expression for vertical acceleration. It is shown that the AGA (aerogravity assist) maneuver is dynamically unstable with respect to altitude errors. However, this instability can be controlled using feedback linearization. The existence of instability further emphasizes the need for robust guidance during the atmospheric pass.

  4. Recurrent Shoulder Instability After Primary Bankart Repair.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Michael A; Mauntel, Timothy C; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2017-09-01

    The glenohumeral joint is one of the most frequently dislocated joints and occurs with increasing frequency in collision and contact athletes, especially those in sports that repeatedly place the glenohumeral joint in a position of vulnerability. Nonoperative management of shoulder instability especially in young contact athletes results in unacceptably high recurrence rates; thus, early surgical stabilization has become commonplace. Surgical stabilization typically yields acceptable outcomes. However, recurrent anterior instability may occur following a previous stabilization procedure at rates of 7% to 12%. Recurrent glenohumeral instability represents a treatment challenge for orthopedic surgeons as it not only has the potential to result in subsequent surgery, therapy, and missed activity time, but also has been associated with long-term degenerative joint changes. Thus, recurrent instability requires close examination to determine underlying pathology leading to failure. Evaluation of underlying pathology requires consideration of patient activity-related factors, hyperlaxity and multidirectional instability, glenoid bone loss, glenoid track lesions, and other pathologic lesions. Revision surgical stabilization approaches include arthroscopic and open stabilization, as well as glenoid osseous augmentation procedures. Postoperative rehabilitation and release to sports and activity must be tailored to protect the shoulder from continued instability. Understanding that risk of recurrent glenohumeral instability and the risk factors associated with it are essential so that these factors may be mitigated and recurrent instability prevented.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in glenohumeral instability

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manisha; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2011-01-01

    The glenohumeral joint is the most commonly dislocated joint of the body and anterior instability is the most common type of shoulder instability. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and more recently, MR arthrography, have become the essential investigation modalities of glenohumeral instability, especially for pre-procedure evaluation before arthroscopic surgery. Injuries associated with glenohumeral instability are variable, and can involve the bones, the labor-ligamentous components, or the rotator cuff. Anterior instability is associated with injuries of the anterior labrum and the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, in the form of Bankart lesion and its variants; whereas posterior instability is associated with reverse Bankart and reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. Multidirectional instability often has no labral pathology on imaging but shows specific osseous changes such as increased chondrolabral retroversion. This article reviews the relevant anatomy in brief, the MR imaging technique and the arthrographic technique, and describes the MR findings in each type of instability as well as common imaging pitfalls. PMID:22007285

  6. Field Dependence, Perceptual Instability, and Sex Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergum, Judith E.; Bergum, Bruce O.

    Recent studies have shown perceptual instability to be related to visual creativity as reflected in career choice. In general, those who display greater perceptual instability perceive themselves to be more creative and tend to choose careers related to visual creativity, regardless of their gender. To test the hypothesis that field independents…

  7. Ion-cyclotron instability in magnetic mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlstein, L.D.

    1987-02-02

    This report reviews the role of ion-cyclotron frequency instability in magnetic mirrors. The modes discussed here are loss-cone or anisotropy driven. The discussion includes quasilinear theory, explosive instabilities of 3-wave interaction and non-linear Landau damping, and saturation due to non-linear orbits. (JDH)

  8. Estimating the instability of a composite clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    A composite clock created from a local clock ensemble is known by its time offsets from the ensemble clocks. By a geometrical argument, estimate for the instability of the composite clock are calculated from the instabilities of the ensemble clocks, individually and against the composite clock. The method is illustrated by examples using simulated and real ensembles.

  9. Multiscale instabilities in soft heterogeneous dielectric elastomers

    PubMed Central

    Rudykh, S.; Bhattacharya, K.; deBotton, G.

    2014-01-01

    The development of instabilities in soft heterogeneous dielectric elastomers is investigated. Motivated by experiments and possible applications, we use in our analysis the physically relevant referential electric field instead of electric displacement. In terms of this variable, a closed form solution is derived for the class of layered neo-Hookean dielectrics. A criterion for the onset of electromechanical multiscale instabilities for the layered composites with anisotropic phases is formulated. A general condition for the onset of the macroscopic instability in soft multiphase dielectrics is introduced. In the example of the layered dielectrics, the essential influence of the microstructure on the onset of instabilities is revealed. We found that: (i) macroscopic instabilities dominate at moderate volume fractions of the stiffer phase, (ii) interface instabilities appear at small volume fractions of the stiffer phase and (iii) instabilities of a finite scale, comparable to the microstructure size, occur at large volume fractions of the stiffer phase. The latest new type of instabilities does not appear in the purely mechanical case and dominates in the region of large volume fractions of the stiff phase. PMID:24511258

  10. Plasma, fluid instabilities in ionospheric holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    Instabilities can be both triggered and quenched by chemical releases which generate ionospheric holes. Vapors, such as H/sub 2/O, H/sub 2/, and CO/sub 2/, rapidly react with the O/sup +/ ions in the upper atmosphere, producing polyatomic ions such as H/sub 2/O/sup +/, H/sub 3/O/sup +/, OH/sup +/ an O/sub 2//sup +/. These ions quickly combine with electrons, leaving natural species. The enhanced F region neutralization initially tends to quench the fluid instabilities in the modified region. After the injected vapors dissipate, chemical quenching becomes unimportant. At late times, the sides of the ionospheric hole may become unstable to fluid instabilities. The wind-driven gradient-drift instability, the current-convective instability, and the gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor instability are three classes of instabilities which may produce irregularities in ionospheric holes. These instabilities are investigated by using local, linear perturbation analysis. The removal of preexisting plasma irregularities by reactive chemical releases is also investigated.

  11. Experimental Observation of Sheath-presheath Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kella, Vara Prasad; Ghosh, Joydeep; Sharma, Devendra; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Instabilities in the Sheath-presheath regime are most important phenomena that can affect the plasma-wall interaction. These instabilities can modify the particle flow velocities and distribution functions in that regime. In this present work, instabilities exists in the sheath-presheath in a low temperature plasma are observed. Experiments are carried in single ion species argon plasma and multi ion species Ar-He plasma. Experiments are carried in a stainless steel chamber with filament discharge plasma. Sheath is produced around a stainless steel grid at center of the chamber. Fluctuations from the grid and cylindrical Langmuir probe are recorded. Langmuir probe is used to get the floating potential fluctuations from presheath and bulk plasma as well. In single ion species argon plasma, there are two instabilities observed namely ion-ion counter streaming instability through mesh grid and ion acoustic instability respectively arises in the presheath. In case of multi-ion Ar-He plasma, two stream instability also explored. The neutral pressure threshold for the sustain of these instabilities also observed.

  12. Cultural Diversity, Economic Development and Societal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Nettle, Daniel; Grace, James B.; Choisy, Marc; Cornell, Howard V.; Guégan, Jean-François; Hochberg, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Background Social scientists have suggested that cultural diversity in a nation leads to societal instability. However, societal instability may be affected not only by within-nation or α diversity, but also diversity between a nation and its neighbours or β diversity. It is also necessary to distinguish different domains of diversity, namely linguistic, ethnic and religious, and to distinguish between the direct effects of diversity on societal instability, and effects that are mediated by economic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings We assembled a large cross-national dataset with information on α and β cultural diversity, economic conditions, and indices of societal instability. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of cultural diversity on economics and societal stability. Results show that different types and domains of diversity have interacting effects. As previously documented, linguistic α diversity has a negative effect on economic performance, and we show that it is largely through this economic mechanism that it affects societal instability. For β diversity, the higher the linguistic diversity among nations in a region, the less stable the nation. But, religious β diversity has the opposite effect, reducing instability, particularly in the presence of high linguistic diversity. Conclusions Within-nation linguistic diversity is associated with reduced economic performance, which, in turn, increases societal instability. Nations which differ linguistically from their neighbors are also less stable. However, religious diversity between neighboring nations has the opposite effect, decreasing societal instability. PMID:17895970

  13. Cultural diversity, economic development and societal instability.

    PubMed

    Nettle, Daniel; Grace, James B; Choisy, Marc; Cornell, Howard V; Guégan, Jean-François; Hochberg, Michael E

    2007-09-26

    Social scientists have suggested that cultural diversity in a nation leads to societal instability. However, societal instability may be affected not only by within-nation or alpha diversity, but also diversity between a nation and its neighbours or beta diversity. It is also necessary to distinguish different domains of diversity, namely linguistic, ethnic and religious, and to distinguish between the direct effects of diversity on societal instability, and effects that are mediated by economic conditions. We assembled a large cross-national dataset with information on alpha and beta cultural diversity, economic conditions, and indices of societal instability. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of cultural diversity on economics and societal stability. Results show that different types and domains of diversity have interacting effects. As previously documented, linguistic alpha diversity has a negative effect on economic performance, and we show that it is largely through this economic mechanism that it affects societal instability. For beta diversity, the higher the linguistic diversity among nations in a region, the less stable the nation. But, religious beta diversity has the opposite effect, reducing instability, particularly in the presence of high linguistic diversity. Within-nation linguistic diversity is associated with reduced economic performance, which, in turn, increases societal instability. Nations which differ linguistically from their neighbors are also less stable. However, religious diversity between neighboring nations has the opposite effect, decreasing societal instability.

  14. Cultural diversity, economic development and societal instability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nettle, D.; Grace, J.B.; Choisy, M.; Cornell, H.V.; Guegan, J.-F.; Hochberg, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Social scientists have suggested that cultural diversity in a nation leads to societal instability. However, societal instability may be affected not only by within-nation on ?? diversity, but also diversity between a nation and its neighbours or ?? diversity. It is also necessary to distinguish different domains of diversity, namely linguistic, ethnic and religious, and to distinguish between the direct effects of diversity on societal instability, and effects that are mediated by economic conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings. We assembled a large cross-national dataset with information on ?? and ?? cultural diversity, economic conditions, and indices of societal instability. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of cultural diversity on economics and societal stability. Results show that different type and domains of diversity have interacting effects. As previously documented, linguistic ?? diversity has a negative effect on economic performance, and we show that it is largely through this economic mechanism that it affects societal instability. For ?? diversity, the higher the linguistic diversity among nations in a region, the less stable the nation. But, religious ?? diversity has the opposite effect, reducing instability, particularly in the presence of high linguistic diversity. Conclusions. Within-nation linguistic diversity is associated with reduced economic performance, which, in turn, increases societal instability. Nations which differ linguistically from their neighbors are also less stable. However, religious diversity between, neighboring nations has the opposite effect, decreasing societal instability.

  15. Electromagnetic instability in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Oka, Takashi; Sonoda, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we calculate the vacuum decay rate for the Schwinger effect in confining large N c gauge theories. The instability is induced by thecorrespondence, we calculate the vacuum quark antiquark pair creation triggered by strong electromagnetic fields. The decay rate is obtained as the imaginary part of the Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian evaluated from the D-brane action with a constant electromagnetic field in holographic QCD models such as the Sakai-Sugimoto model and the deformed Sakai-Sugimoto model. The decay rate is found to increase with the magnetic field parallel to the electric field, while it decreases with the magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field. We discuss generic features of a critical electric field as a function of the magnetic field and the QCD string tension in the Sakai-Sugimoto model.

  16. Shrinking instability of toroidal droplets

    PubMed Central

    Fragkopoulos, Alexandros A.; Pairam, Ekapop; Berger, Eric; Segre, Phil N.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Toroidal droplets are inherently unstable due to surface tension. They can break up, similar to cylindrical jets, but also exhibit a shrinking instability, which is inherent to the toroidal shape. We investigate the evolution of shrinking toroidal droplets using particle image velocimetry. We obtain the flow field inside the droplets and show that as the torus evolves, its cross-section significantly deviates from circular. We then use the experimentally obtained velocities at the torus interface to theoretically reconstruct the internal flow field. Our calculation correctly describes the experimental results and elucidates the role of those modes that, among the many possible ones, are required to capture all of the relevant experimental features. PMID:28251927

  17. Theory of instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Thorwald

    1990-01-01

    The strongly nonlinear area of theory is discussed, as well as linear and weakly nonlinear (i.e., perturbation) theories, and it is noted that the weaknesses of the weakly nonlinear theory are essentially the inappropriate formulation in earlier works and the lack of guidance for the choice of the lowest-order basis. Attention is focused on the areas of theoretical/numerical development contributing to understanding the transition mechanism and new means for analyzing and predicting transition quantitatively. The nonlinear stability of nonparallel flows, linear secondary instability, and nonlinear wave interaction are analyzed. The incompressible flow over a flat plate with zero-pressure gradient is chosen as an example, while applications range to other shear flows including three-dimensional and compressible boundary layers.

  18. Gravitational Instability in Suspension Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpen, Ileana C.; Brady, John F.

    2002-01-01

    The gravity-driven flow of non-neutrally buoyant suspensions is shown to be unstable to spanwise perturbations when the shearing motion generates a density profile that increases with height. The instability is simply due to having heavier material over light. The wavelength of the perturbation is found to be on the order of the thickness of the suspension layer. The parameters important to the problem are the angle of inclination of the layer relative to gravity, the relative density difference between the particles and fluid, the ratio of the particle size to the suspension layer, and the bulk volume fraction of particles. An example showing the growth rate as a function of wave number is shown.

  19. Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a hypermutable phenotype caused by the loss of DNA mismatch repair activity. MSI is detected in about 15% of all colorectal cancers; 3% are of these are associated with Lynch syndrome and the other 12% are caused by sporadic, acquired hypermethylation of the promoter of the MLH1 gene, which occurs in tumors with the CpG island methylator phenotype. Colorectal tumors with MSI have distinctive features, including a tendency to arise in the proximal colon, lymphocytic infiltrate, and a poorly differentiated, mucinous or signet ring appearance. They have a slightly better prognosis than colorectal tumors without MSI and do not have the same response to chemotherapeutics. Discovery of MSI in colorectal tumors has increased awareness of the diversity of colorectal cancers and implications for specialized management of patients. PMID:20420947

  20. Morphological instabilities of polymer crystals.

    PubMed

    Grozev, N; Botiz, I; Reiter, G

    2008-09-01

    We present experimental observations at comparatively low supercooling of morphology transitions from dendritic to faceted structures in polymer crystals growing in thin films of a poly-2-vinylpyridine-block-polyethyleneoxid copolymer. Our results are compared with theoretical concepts describing morphological instabilities of single crystals. Although these concepts originally were not developed for polymers, they allow to describe and interpret our experimental results quite well. In particular, the measured temperature dependence of the width W and frequency of dendritic side branches and the radius of curvature p of the growth tips of the crystals follow these concepts. We present preliminary evidence for the influence of polymer attachment kinetics and reorganisation processes behind the growth front. Polymer thin films provide valuable model systems for studying general concepts of crystallisation and allow to distinguish at which point the connectivity of the crystallising units within chain-like molecules starts to play a measurable role.

  1. Mapping Instabilities in Polymer Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, Charles; Crosby, Alfred

    2005-03-01

    Schallamach waves are instabilities that occur as interfaces between a soft elastomer and rigid surface slide past each other.(1) The presence of Schallamach waves can lead to drastic changes in frictional properties. Although the occurrence of Schallamach waves has been studied for the past several decades, a general map relating fundamental material properties, geometry, and operating conditions (i.e. speed and temperature) has not been established. Using a combinatorial approach, we illustrate the role of modulus, testing velocity and surface energetics of crosslinked poly(dimethyl siloxane) on the generation Schallamach waves. This knowledge will be used with polymer patterning processes to fabricate responsive coatings for applications such as anti-fouling coatings. (1)Schallamach, A.;Wear 1971,17, 301-312.

  2. Instability of cyclonic convective vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanovskii, A.; Evgrafova, A.; Popova, E.

    2017-06-01

    Localized heating in the rotating layer of fluid leads to the formation of intensive cyclonic vortex. Cyclonic vortex becomes unstable at low values of viscosity and fast rotation of the experimental model. The instability of the vortex is tightly connected with a structure of the radial inflow. For moderate values of rotational Reynolds number Re the radial flows consist of several branches which transport angular momentum to the center of the model. When Re exceeds critical value (about 23) radial inflow changes its structure and appears as one wide branch which does not reach the center. As a result of strong anisotropy of radial inflow the cyclonic vortex is formed at some distance from the center. Further increase of Re leads to chaotic state with several vortices which appears at different locations near the periphery of the heating area. The map of regimes with stable and unstable vortices is presented.

  3. Resonant instability near the two-ion crossover frequency in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Moses, J. J.

    1985-07-01

    Thorne and Scarf (1984) have presented evidence for the existence of intense low-frequency fluctuating electric fields in the Io plasma torus. Two distinct mechanisms have been proposed for this phenomenon, namely, ion cyclotron instability which occurs at intermediate latitude, and whistler instability near the equator. The present investigation is concerned with a quantitative appraisal of each of these mechanisms, taking into account an evaluation of the net convective growth rate of waves along ray paths which traverse the Io torus. Aspects of wave propagation near the crossover frequency are considered along with questions regarding the resonant interaction with energetic particles.

  4. Shoulder electromyography in multidirectional instability.

    PubMed

    Morris, Alfred D; Kemp, Graham J; Frostick, Simon P

    2004-01-01

    We studied shoulder muscle activity in multidirectional instability (MDI) and multidirectional laxity (MDL) of the shoulder, our hypothesis being that altered muscle activity plays a role in their pathogenesis. Six muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, anterior deltoid, middle deltoid, and posterior deltoid) were investigated by use of intramuscular dual fine-wire electrodes in 7 normal shoulders, 5 MDL shoulders, and 6 MDI shoulders. Each subject performed 5 types of exercise (rotation in neutral, 45 degrees of abduction, 90 degrees of abduction, flexion/extension, and abduction/adduction) on an isokinetic muscle dynamometer at two rates, 90 degrees /s and 180 degrees /s. After filtering, rectification, and smoothing, the electromyography signal was normalized by using the peak voltage of the movement cycle. In subjects with MDI, compared with normal subjects, activity patterns of the anterior deltoid were different during rotation in neutral and 90 degrees of abduction, whereas those of the middle and posterior deltoid were different during rotation in 90 degrees of abduction. In subjects with MDL, the posterior deltoid showed increased activity compared with normal subjects during adduction. Activity patterns of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis appeared similar in both groups. Dual fine-wire electromyography offers insight into the complex role of shoulder girdle muscle function in normal movement and in instability. Altered patterns of shoulder girdle muscle activity and imbalances in muscle forces support the theory that impaired coordination of shoulder girdle muscle activity and inefficiency of the dynamic stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint are involved in the etiology of MDI. Interestingly, the abnormalities are in the deltoid rather than the muscles of the rotator cuff.

  5. Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iacopetta, Barry; Grieu, Fabienne; Amanuel, Benhur

    2010-12-01

    Approximately 20 percent of right-sided colon cancers and 5 percent of left-sided colon and rectal cancers have a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. This results in the widespread accumulation of mutations to nucleotide repeats, some of which occur within the coding regions of cancer-related genes such as TGFβRII and BAX. A standardized definition for microsatellite instability (MSI) based on the presence of deletions to mononucleotide repeats is gaining widespread acceptance in both research and the clinic. Colorectal cancer (CRC) with MSI are characterized histologically by an abundance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, poor differentiation and a signet ring or mucinous phenotype. In younger patients these tumors usually develop along the chromosomal instability pathway, in which case the mismatch repair genes are inactivated by germline mutation, somatic mutation and loss of heterozygosity. In older patients MSI CRC usually develops against a background of widespread hypermethylation that includes methylation-induced silencing of the mismatch repair gene MLH1. The overall biological and clinical phenotype of MSI CRC that arise in these two pathways is likely to be different and may account for some of the discordant results reported in the literature relating to the clinical properties of these tumors. The available evidence indicates that MSI is unlikely to be a clinically useful marker for the prognostic stratification of early-stage CRC. The predictive value of MSI for response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy remains controversial, while for other agents the predictive value is difficult to assess because they are used in combination regimens. The MSI phenotype is being actively investigated for novel therapeutic approaches based on the principle of synthetic lethality. Finally, the MSI status of CRC is an extremely useful marker for population-based screening programs that aim to identify individuals and families with the hereditary cancer

  6. Visco-resistive plasmoid instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comisso, Luca; Grasso, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    The plasmoid instability in visco-resistive current sheets is analyzed in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. The linear growth rate and the wavenumber are found to scale as S1 /4(1+Pm ) -5 /8 and S3 /8(1+Pm ) -3 /16 with respect to the Lundquist number S and the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. Furthermore, the linear layer width is shown to scale as S-1 /8(1+Pm ) 1 /16 . The growth of the plasmoids slows down from an exponential growth to an algebraic growth when they enter into the nonlinear regime. In particular, the time-scale of the nonlinear growth of the plasmoids is found to be τNL˜S-3 /16(1+Pm) 19 /32τA,L . The nonlinear growth of the plasmoids is radically different from the linear one, and it is shown to be essential to understand the global current sheet disruption. It is also discussed how the plasmoid instability enables fast magnetic reconnection in visco-resistive plasmas. In particular, it is shown that the recursive plasmoid formation can trigger a collisionless reconnection regime if S ≳Lc s(ɛclk) -1(1+Pm) 1 /2 , where Lcs is the half-length of the global current sheet and lk is the relevant kinetic length scale. On the other hand, if the current sheet remains in the collisional regime, the global (time-averaged) reconnection rate is shown to be ≈ɛcvA ,uBu(1+Pm) -1 /2 , where ɛc is the critical inverse aspect ratio of the current sheet, while vA,u and Bu are the Alfvén speed and the magnetic field upstream of the global reconnection layer.

  7. Plasma effects on extragalactic ultra-high-energy cosmic ray hadron beams in cosmic voids

    SciTech Connect

    Krakau, S.; Schlickeiser, R. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2014-07-01

    The linear instability of an ultrarelativistic hadron beam (Γ {sub b} ≈ 10{sup 6}) in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium (IGM) is investigated with respect to the excitation of collective electrostatic and aperiodic electromagnetic fluctuations. This analysis is important for the propagation of extragalactic ultrarelativistic cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 15} eV) from their distant sources to Earth. We calculate minimum instability growth times that are orders of magnitude shorter than the cosmic ray propagation time in the IGM. Due to nonlinear effects, especially the modulation instability, the cosmic ray beam stabilizes and can propagate with nearly no energy loss through the IGM.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriz, A. R.; Cela, J. J. López; Cortázar, O. D.; Tahir, N. A.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2005-11-01

    We present an analytical model for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that allows for an approximate but still very accurate and appealing description of the instability physics in the linear regime. The model is based on the second law of Newton and it has been developed with the aim of dealing with the instability of accelerated elastic solids. It yields the asymptotic instability growth rate but also describes the initial transient phase determined by the initial conditions. We have applied the model to solid/solid and solid/fluid interfaces with arbitrary Atwood numbers. The results are in excellent agreement with previous models that yield exact solutions but which are of more limited validity. Our model allows for including more complex physics. In particular, the present approach is expected to lead to a more general theory of the instability that would allow for describing the transition to the plastic regime.

  9. The electromagnetic ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter Gary, S.; Schriver, David

    1987-01-01

    Electromagnetic instabilities driven by an anisotropic, relatively cool ion beam are studied for the case in which both the beam and the instabilities propagate parallel or antiparallel to a uniform magnetic field. At modest beam-core relative drift speeds, sufficiently large perpendicular-to-parallel beam temperature ratios and sufficiently large plasma beta, the mode of fastest growth rate is the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability. Because the right-hand polarized waves observed upstream of slow shocks in the earth's magnetotail can lead to the appropriate beam anisotropy, the ion cyclotron instability may be present and account for the left-hand polarized magnetic waves observed there. Also, because of its relatively low phase speed, the ion cyclotron beam anisotropy instability may provide the scattering necessary for ion Fermi acceleration at slow shocks of sufficiently high plasma beta.

  10. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  11. Analysis of nuclear reactor instability phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The phenomena known as density-wave instability often occurs in phase change systems, such as boiling water nuclear reactors (BWRS). Our current understanding of density-wave oscillations is in fairly good shape for linear phenomena (eg, the onset of instabilities) but is not very advanced for non-linear phenomena [Lahey and Podowski, 1989]. In particular, limit cycle and chaotic instability modes are not well understood in boiling systems such as current and advanced generation BWRs (eg, SBWR). In particular, the SBWR relies on natural circulation and is thus inherently prone to problems with density-wave instabilities. The purpose of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of nonlinear nuclear-coupled density-wave instability phenomena in BWRS. This research builds on the work of Achard et al [1985] and Clausse et al [1991] who showed, respectively, that Hopf bifurcations and chaotic oscillations may occur in boiling systems.

  12. Shock Driven Multiphase Instabilities in Scramjet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Shock driven multiphase instabilities (SDMI) arise in many applications from dust production in supernovae to ejecta distribution in explosions. At the limit of small, fast reacting particles the instability evolves similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. However, as additional particle effects such as lag, phase change, and collisions become significant the required parameter space becomes much larger and the instability deviates significantly from the RM instability. In scramjet engines the SDMI arises during a cold start where liquid fuel droplets are injected and processed by shock and expansion waves. In this case the particle evaporation and mixing is important to starting and sustaining combustion, but the particles are large and slow to react, creating significant multiphase effects. This talk will examine multiphase mixing in scramjet relevant conditions in 3D multiphase hydrodynamic simulations using the FLASH code from the University of Chicago FLASH center.

  13. Magnetothermal instability with generalized Ohm's law

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, M.P.; Talwar, S.P. )

    1993-03-01

    The problem of thermal instability, having bearing on the formation of astrophysical condensations, is investigated for a hydromagnetic fluid obeying generalized Ohm's law, both for self-gravitating and nongravitating configurations. Effects of finite Larmor frequency, resistivity, and finite plasma frequency on the stability of the system are studied and the condition of instabilities are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function. It is found that the condition of instability for propagation parallel to the ambient magnetic field is independent of finite resistivity, Hall current, and electron inertia effects and also of the magnetic field strength. For transverse propagation, however, the instability criterion involves the field strength, resistivity, and electron inertia terms. The Hall current is found to modify the growth rates for generally inclined propagation only. Both monotonically unstable and overstable modes of instability arise in the system depending on the dependence of the heat-loss function on the local density and temperature.

  14. Simulation of the Magneto-Thermal Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Ian; Stone, James

    2004-11-01

    Recent work by Balbus has shown that there exists an instability in convectively stable atmospheres in the presence of anisotropic thermal conductivity.^1,2 An analogy can be made between this instability and the well-studied magneto-thermal instability.^3 We simulate this instability by using the Athena magnetohydrodynamics code with the addition of anisotropic heat conduction.^4 We compare the analytical expression for the linear behavior of this instability with the computational model. The computational results are extended to the non-linear regime to study its saturation. ^1. Balbus, S. Astrophysical Journal 534 (2000) 420-427. ^2. Balbus, S. Astrophysical Journal 562 (2001) 909-917. ^3. Balbus, S. and Hawley J. Rev. Mod. Phys. 70 (1998) 1. ^4. Gardiner, T. and Stone, J. J. Comp. Phys., Submitted.

  15. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  16. Submesoscale baroclinic instability and the Balance Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian

    2015-11-01

    Ocean submesoscale baroclinic instability is studied in the framework of the Balance Equations. The Balance Equations are an intermediate model that includes balanced ageostrophic effects with higher accuracy than the quasigeostrophic approximation, but rules out unbalanced wave motions; as such, they are particularly suited to the study of baroclinic instability in submesoscale ocean dynamics. The linear baroclinic instability problem is developed in generality and then specialized to the case of constant vertical shear. The primary finding is that at low Richardson numbers the growth rate of some instability modes is increased compared to larger-scale quasigeostrophic dynamics, and that the increase can be attributed to both ageostrophic baroclinic production and shear production of perturbation energy. This suggests that the nonlinear development of submesoscale baroclinic instability will proceed more vigorously than mesoscale/quasigeostrophic, and may include a downscale/forward transfer of kinetic energy.

  17. Taming contact line instability for pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Deblais, A.; Harich, R.; Colin, A.; Kellay, H.

    2016-01-01

    Coating surfaces with different fluids is prone to instability producing inhomogeneous films and patterns. The contact line between the coating fluid and the surface to be coated is host to different instabilities, limiting the use of a variety of coating techniques. Here we take advantage of the instability of a receding contact line towards cusp and droplet formation to produce linear patterns of variable spacings. We stabilize the instability of the cusps towards droplet formation by using polymer solutions that inhibit this secondary instability and give rise to long slender cylindrical filaments. We vary the speed of deposition to change the spacing between these filaments. The combination of the two gives rise to linear patterns into which different colloidal particles can be embedded, long DNA molecules can be stretched and particles filtered by size. The technique is therefore suitable to prepare anisotropic structures with variable properties. PMID:27506626

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic solids.

    PubMed

    Piriz, A R; Cela, J J López; Cortázar, O D; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2005-11-01

    We present an analytical model for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that allows for an approximate but still very accurate and appealing description of the instability physics in the linear regime. The model is based on the second law of Newton and it has been developed with the aim of dealing with the instability of accelerated elastic solids. It yields the asymptotic instability growth rate but also describes the initial transient phase determined by the initial conditions. We have applied the model to solid/solid and solid/fluid interfaces with arbitrary Atwood numbers. The results are in excellent agreement with previous models that yield exact solutions but which are of more limited validity. Our model allows for including more complex physics. In particular, the present approach is expected to lead to a more general theory of the instability that would allow for describing the transition to the plastic regime.

  19. Nonlinear Dynamics of Single Bunch Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.S.; /Texas U.

    2011-09-09

    A nonlinear equation is derived that governs the evolution of the amplitude of unstable oscillations with account of quantum diffusion effects due to the synchrotron radiation. Numerical solutions to this equation predict a variety of possible scenarios of nonlinear evolution of the instability some of which are in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations. Microwave single bunch instability in circular accelerators has been observed in many machines. The instability usually arises when the number of particles in the bunch exceeds some critical value, Nc, which varies depending on the parameters of the accelerating regime. Recent observations on the SLC damping rings at SLAC with a new low-impedance vacuum chamber revealed new interesting features of the instability. In some cases, after initial exponential growth, the instability eventually saturated at a level that remained constant through the accumulation cycle. In other regimes, relaxation-type oscillations were measured in nonlinear phase of the instability. In many cases, the instability was characterized by a frequency close to the second harmonic of the synchrotron oscillations. Several attempts have been made to address the nonlinear stage of the instability based on either computer simulations or some specific assumptions regarding the structure of the unstable mode. An attempt of a more general consideration of the problem is carried out in this paper. We adopt an approach recently developed in plasma physics for analysis of nonlinear behavior of weakly unstable modes in dynamic systems. Assuming that the growth rate of the instability is much smaller than its frequency, we find a time dependent solution to Vlasov equation and derive an equation for the complex amplitude of the oscillations valid in the nonlinear regime. Numerical solutions to this equation predict a variety of possible scenarios of nonlinear evolution of the instability some of which are in good qualitative agreement

  20. Parametric instabilities in large nonuniform laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Moody, J.D.; Estabrook, K.G.; Berger, R.L.; Kruer, W.L.; Labaune, C.; Batha, S.H.

    1992-09-01

    The study of parametric instabilities in laser plasmas is of vital importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The long scale-length plasma encountered in the corona of an ICF target provides ideal conditions for the growth of instabilities such as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and filamentation. These instabilities can have detrimental effects in ICF and their characterization and understanding is of importance. Scattering instabilities are driven through a feedback loop by which the beating between the electromagnetic EM fields of the laser and the scattered light matches the frequency of a local longitudinal mode of the plasma. Any process which interferes with the coherence of this mechanism can substantially alter the behavior of the instability. Of particular interest is the study of laser beam smoothing techniques on parametric instabilities. These techniques are used to improve irradiation uniformity which can suppress hydrodynamic instabilities. Laser beam smoothing techniques have the potential to control the scattering level from parametric instabilities since they provide not only a smoother laser intensity distribution, but also reduced coherence. Beam smoothing techniques that affect the growth of parametric instabilities include spatial smoothing and temporal smoothing by laser bandwidth. Spatial smoothing modifies the phase fronts and temporal distribution of intensities in the focal volume. The transverse intensity spectrum is shifted towards higher spatial wavenumber and can significantly limit the growth of filamentation. Temporal smoothing reduces the coherence time and consequently limits the growth time. Laser bandwidth is required for most smoothing techniques, and can have an independent effect on the instabilities as well.