Science.gov

Sample records for ray diffusion models

  1. Cosmic ray anisotropy in fractional differential models of anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Uchaikin, V. V.

    2013-06-15

    The problem of galactic cosmic ray anisotropy is considered in two versions of the fractional differential model for anomalous diffusion. The simplest problem of cosmic ray propagation from a point instantaneous source in an unbounded medium is used as an example to show that the transition from the standard diffusion model to the Lagutin-Uchaikin fractional differential model (with characteristic exponent {alpha} = 3/5 and a finite velocity of free particle motion), which gives rise to a knee in the energy spectrum at 10{sup 6} GeV, increases the anisotropy coefficient only by 20%, while the anisotropy coefficient in the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model (with exponents {alpha} = 0.3 and {beta} = 0.8, a long stay of particles in traps, and an infinite velocity of their jumps) is close to one. This is because the parameters of the Lagutin-Tyumentsev model have been chosen improperly.

  2. Diffuse Galactic Continuum Gamma Rays. A Model Compatible with EGRET Data and Cosmic-ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Andrew W.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Reimer, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of the compatibility of some current models of the diffuse Galactic continuum gamma-rays with EGRET data. A set of regions sampling the whole sky is chosen to provide a comprehensive range of tests. The range of EGRET data used is extended to 100 GeV. The models are computed with our GALPROP cosmic-ray propagation and gamma-ray production code. We confirm that the "conventional model" based on the locally observed electron and nucleon spectra is inadequate, for all sky regions. A conventional model plus hard sources in the inner Galaxy is also inadequate, since this cannot explain the GeV excess away from the Galactic plane. Models with a hard electron injection spectrum are inconsistent with the local spectrum even considering the expected fluctuations; they are also inconsistent with the EGRET data above 10 GeV. We present a new model which fits the spectrum in all sky regions adequately. Secondary antiproton data were used to fix the Galactic average proton spectrum, while the electron spectrum is adjusted using the spectrum of diffuse emission it- self. The derived electron and proton spectra are compatible with those measured locally considering fluctuations due to energy losses, propagation, or possibly de- tails of Galactic structure. This model requires a much less dramatic variation in the electron spectrum than models with a hard electron injection spectrum, and moreover it fits the y-ray spectrum better and to the highest EGRET energies. It gives a good representation of the latitude distribution of the y-ray emission from the plane to the poles, and of the longitude distribution. We show that secondary positrons and electrons make an essential contribution to Galactic diffuse y-ray emission.

  3. The Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission Model for GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, T.A.; Digel, S.W.; Grenier, I.A.; Moskalenko, I.V.; Strong, A.W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2007-06-13

    Diffuse emission from the Milky Way dominates the gamma-ray sky. About 80% of the high-energy luminosity of the Milky Way comes from processes in the interstellar medium. The Galactic diffuse emission traces interactions of energetic particles, primarily protons and electrons, with the interstellar gas and radiation field, thus delivering information about cosmic-ray spectra and interstellar mass in distant locations. Additionally, the Galactic diffuse emission is the celestial foreground for the study of gamma-ray point sources and the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission. We will report on the latest developments in the modeling of the Galactic diffuse emission, which will be used for the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) investigations.

  4. Measuring and modeling diffuse scattering in protein X-ray crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Liu, Lin; Gonzalez, Ana; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Fraser, James S.; Wall, Michael E.

    2016-03-28

    X-ray diffraction has the potential to provide rich information about the structural dynamics of macromolecules. To realize this potential, both Bragg scattering, which is currently used to derive macromolecular structures, and diffuse scattering, which reports on correlations in charge density variations, must be measured. Until now, measurement of diffuse scattering from protein crystals has been scarce because of the extra effort of collecting diffuse data. Here, we present 3D measurements of diffuse intensity collected from crystals of the enzymes cyclophilin A and trypsin. The measurements were obtained from the same X-ray diffraction images as the Bragg data, using best practices for standard data collection. To model the underlying dynamics in a practical way that could be used during structure refinement, we tested translation–libration–screw (TLS), liquid-like motions (LLM), and coarse-grained normal-modes (NM) models of protein motions. The LLM model provides a global picture of motions and was refined against the diffuse data, whereas the TLS and NM models provide more detailed and distinct descriptions of atom displacements, and only used information from the Bragg data. Whereas different TLS groupings yielded similar Bragg intensities, they yielded different diffuse intensities, none of which agreed well with the data. In contrast, both the LLM and NM models agreed substantially with the diffuse data. In conclusion, these results demonstrate a realistic path to increase the number of diffuse datasets available to the wider biosciences community and indicate that dynamics-inspired NM structural models can simultaneously agree with both Bragg and diffuse scattering.

  5. Measuring and modeling diffuse scattering in protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Liu, Lin; Gonzalez, Ana; ...

    2016-03-28

    X-ray diffraction has the potential to provide rich information about the structural dynamics of macromolecules. To realize this potential, both Bragg scattering, which is currently used to derive macromolecular structures, and diffuse scattering, which reports on correlations in charge density variations, must be measured. Until now, measurement of diffuse scattering from protein crystals has been scarce because of the extra effort of collecting diffuse data. Here, we present 3D measurements of diffuse intensity collected from crystals of the enzymes cyclophilin A and trypsin. The measurements were obtained from the same X-ray diffraction images as the Bragg data, using best practicesmore » for standard data collection. To model the underlying dynamics in a practical way that could be used during structure refinement, we tested translation–libration–screw (TLS), liquid-like motions (LLM), and coarse-grained normal-modes (NM) models of protein motions. The LLM model provides a global picture of motions and was refined against the diffuse data, whereas the TLS and NM models provide more detailed and distinct descriptions of atom displacements, and only used information from the Bragg data. Whereas different TLS groupings yielded similar Bragg intensities, they yielded different diffuse intensities, none of which agreed well with the data. In contrast, both the LLM and NM models agreed substantially with the diffuse data. In conclusion, these results demonstrate a realistic path to increase the number of diffuse datasets available to the wider biosciences community and indicate that dynamics-inspired NM structural models can simultaneously agree with both Bragg and diffuse scattering.« less

  6. Nonlocal relativistic diffusion (NoRD) model of cosmic ray propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchaikin, V. V.; Sibatov, R. T.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of physical interpretation of the nonlocal relativistic diffusion (NoRD model) for cosmic ray transport in the Galaxy is discussed. The model accounts for the turbulent character of the interstellar medium and the relativistic principle of the speed limitation. Involving fractional calculus and non-Gaussian Lévy statistics yields numerical results compatible with observation data. A special attention is paid to the knee problem. The relativistic speed limit requirement steepens theoretical background spectrum at certain energies, and the position of the break, its sharpness and slopes of asymptotes depend on Dα (E) and α.

  7. The diffuse galactic gamma ray emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope) detector will provide a much more detailed view of the diffuse galactic gamma ray intensity in terms of higher resolution, greater statistical significance, and broader energy range than earlier missions. These observations will furnish insight into a number of very important questions related to the dynamics and structure of the Galaxy. A diffuse emission model is being developed that incorporates the latest information on matter distribution and source functions. In addition, it is tailored to the EGRET instrument response functions. The analysis code of the model maintains flexibility to accommodate the quality of the data that is anticipated. The discussion here focuses on the issues of the distributions of matter, cosmic rays, and radiation fields, and on the important source functions that enter into the model calculation of diffuse emission.

  8. Meeting Review: Diffuse X-Ray Scattering to Model Protein Motions

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Michael E.; Adams, Paul D.; Fraser, James S.; Sautter, Nicholas K.

    2014-01-01

    Problems in biology increasingly need models of protein flexibility to understand and control protein function. At the same time, as they improve, crystallographic methods are marching closer to the limits of what can be learned from Bragg data in isolation. It is thus inevitable that mainstream protein crystallography will turn to diffuse scattering to model protein motions and improve crystallographic models. The time is ripe to make it happen. PMID:24507780

  9. Propagation of Cosmic Rays and Diffuse Galactic Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to the astrophysics of cosmic rays and diffuse gamma-rays and discusses some of the puzzles that have emerged recently due to more precise data and improved propagation models: the excesses in Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, secondary antiprotons and positrons, and the flatter than expected gradient of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. These also involve the dark matter, a challenge to modern physics, through its indirect searches in cosmic rays. Though the final solutions are yet to be found, I discuss some ideas and results obtained mostly with the numerical propagation model GALPROP. A fleet of spacecraft and balloon experiments targeting these specific issues is set to lift off in a few years, imparting a feeling of optimism that a new era of exciting discoveries is just around the corner. A complete and comprehensive discussion of all the recent results is not attempted here due to the space limitations.

  10. Diffuse Galactic Soft Gamma-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, S. E.; Lin, R. P.; Slassi-Sennou, S.; Coburn, W.; Pelling, R. M.

    2000-11-01

    The Galactic diffuse soft gamma-ray (30-800 keV) emission has been measured from the Galactic center by the High Resolution Gamma-Ray and Hard X-Ray Spectrometer balloon-borne germanium instrument to determine the spectral characteristics and origin of the emission. The resulting Galactic diffuse continuum is found to agree well with a single power law (plus positronium) over the entire energy range, consistent with RXTE and COMPTEL/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory observations at lower and higher energies, respectively. We find no evidence of spectral steepening below 200 keV, as has been reported in previous observations. The spatial distribution along the Galactic ridge is found to be nearly flat, with upper limits set on the longitudinal gradient and with no evidence of an edge in the observed region. The soft gamma-ray diffuse spectrum is well modeled by inverse Compton scattering of interstellar radiation off of cosmic-ray electrons, minimizing the need to invoke inefficient nonthermal bremsstrahlung emission. The resulting power requirement is well within that provided by Galactic supernovae. We speculate that the measured spectrum provides the first direct constraints on the cosmic-ray electron spectrum below 300 MeV.

  11. Reverse and forward shock X-ray emission in an evolutionary model of supernova remnants undergoing efficient diffusive shock acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick O.; Ellison, Donald C.; Nagataki, Shigehiro E-mail: shiu-hang.lee@riken.jp E-mail: slane@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: don_ellison@ncsu.edu

    2014-08-20

    We present new models for the forward and reverse shock thermal X-ray emission from core-collapse and Type Ia supernova remnants (SNRs) that include the efficient production of cosmic rays (CR) via nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Our CR-hydro-NEI code takes into account non-equilibrium ionization, hydrodynamic effects of efficient CR production on the SNR evolution, and collisional temperature equilibration among heavy ions and electrons in both the shocked supernova (SN) ejecta and the shocked circumstellar material. While X-ray emission is emphasized here, our code self-consistently determines both thermal and non-thermal broadband emission from radio to TeV energies. We include Doppler broadening of the spectral lines by thermal motions of the ions and by the remnant expansion. We study, in general terms, the roles that the ambient environment, progenitor models, temperature equilibration, and processes related to DSA have on the thermal and non-thermal spectra. The study of X-ray line emission from young SNRs is a powerful tool for determining specific SN elemental contributions and for providing critical information that helps to understand the type and energetics of the explosion, the composition of the ambient medium in which the SN exploded, and the ionization and dynamics of the hot plasma in the shocked SN ejecta and interstellar medium. With the approaching launch of the next-generation X-ray satellite Astro-H, observations of spectral lines with unprecedented high resolution will become a reality. Our self-consistent calculations of the X-ray spectra from various progenitors will help interpret future observations of SNRs.

  12. Cosmic ray diffusion: Report of the Workshop in Cosmic Ray Diffusion Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birmingham, T. J.; Jones, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    A workshop in cosmic ray diffusion theory was held at Goddard Space Flight Center on May 16-17, 1974. Topics discussed and summarized are: (1) cosmic ray measurements as related to diffusion theory; (2) quasi-linear theory, nonlinear theory, and computer simulation of cosmic ray pitch-angle diffusion; and (3) magnetic field fluctuation measurements as related to diffusion theory.

  13. Modeling of Cosmic-Ray Propagation and Galactic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission in Support of Current and Future NASA Missions, Phase 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Igor

    This is a "Phase 3" successor proposal that is a continuation of work funded by the Astrophysics Research and Analysis (APRA) Program through the sub-topic "Particle Astrophysics": Considerable advances in astrophysics of cosmic rays in recent years have become possible due to superior instrumentation launched into space and to the top of the atmosphere. The ACE-CRIS, AMS-02, Fermi-LAT, HAWC, PAMELA, SuperTIGER, Voyager 1,2, WMAP, and many other missions made a lot of breakthroughs and more is expected in the following years. Other high-expectations missions are recently launched (CALET) or are awaiting for launch (ISS-CREAM). The claimed precision of the AMS- 02 data reaches 1-3%. Taking full advantage of the high quality data requires numerical models of comparable accuracy. The current state-of-the-art cosmic ray propagation model is GALPROP, which has become a standard analysis tool in astrophysics of cosmic rays, studies of the diffuse emissions, and related fields. It provides a unified framework for the interpretation of data collected by many different kinds of experiments and emphasizes the inter-relationship between different types of data. We are proposing considerable improvements of the GALPROP model and tool that include generalization of the description of the components of the Galactic interstellar medium to the full 3D and extensive application of the Bayesian tools in building such data-sets, development of a heliospheric propagation tool fully compatible with GALPROP, development of a reliable diffuse emission model in the keV-TeV energy range, generalization of the nuclear reaction network and cross section routines to include trans-iron nuclides, improvements in the description of the production of secondary particles in cosmic ray interactions, various speed and memory optimizations. We will continue to support a dedicated website which hosts GALPROP WebRun, a user-friendly interface for running the GALPROP code on a dedicated cluster

  14. Constraining the fraction of Compton-thick AGN in the Universe by modelling the diffuse X-ray background spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akylas, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Brightman, M.; Nandra, K.

    2012-10-01

    This paper investigates which constraints can be placed on the fraction of Compton-thick active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the Universe from modelling the spectrum of the diffuse X-ray background (XRB). We present a model for the synthesis of the XRB that uses as input a library of AGN X-ray spectra generated by Monte Carlo simulations. This is essential to account for the Compton scattering of X-ray photons in a dense medium and the impact of that process on the spectra of heavily obscured AGN. We identify a small number of input parameters to the XRB synthesis code that encapsulate the minimum level of uncertainty in reconstructing the XRB spectrum. These are the power-law index and high-energy cutoff of the intrinsic X-ray spectra of AGN, the level of the reflection component in AGN spectra, and the fraction of Compton-thick AGN in the Universe. We then map the volume of the space allowed to these parameters by current observational determinations of the XRB spectrum in the range 3-100 keV. One of the least-constrained parameters is the fraction of Compton-thick AGN. Statistically acceptable fits to the XRB spectrum at the 68% confidence level can be obtained for Compton-thick AGN fractions in the range 5-50%. This is because of degeneracies among input parameters to the XRB synthesis code and uncertainties in the modelling of AGN spectra (e.g. level of reflection fraction). The most promising route for constraining the fraction of Compton-thick AGN in the Universe is via the direct detection of those sources in high-energy (≳ 10 keV) surveys. We show that the observed fraction of Compton-thick sources identified in the Swift/BAT serendipitous survey limits the intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN, at least at low redshift, to 10-20% (68% confidence level). We also make predictions on the number density of Compton-thick sources that current and future X-ray missions are expected to discover. Testing those predictions with data will place tight constraints on

  15. THE INTERACTION OF COSMIC RAYS WITH DIFFUSE CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, John E.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    2011-10-01

    We study the change in cosmic-ray pressure, the change in cosmic-ray density, and the level of cosmic-ray-induced heating via Alfven-wave damping when cosmic rays move from a hot ionized plasma to a cool cloud embedded in that plasma. The general analysis method outlined here can apply to diffuse clouds in either the ionized interstellar medium or in galactic winds. We introduce a general-purpose model of cosmic-ray diffusion building upon the hydrodynamic approximation for cosmic rays (from McKenzie and Voelk and Breitschwerdt and collaborators). Our improved method self-consistently derives the cosmic-ray flux and diffusivity under the assumption that the streaming instability is the dominant mechanism for setting the cosmic-ray flux and diffusion. We find that, as expected, cosmic rays do not couple to gas within cool clouds (cosmic rays exert no forces inside of cool clouds), that the cosmic-ray density does not increase within clouds (it may decrease slightly in general, and decrease by an order of magnitude in some cases), and that cosmic-ray heating (via Alfven-wave damping and not collisional effects as for {approx}10 MeV cosmic rays) is only important under the conditions of relatively strong (10 {mu}G) magnetic fields or high cosmic-ray pressure ({approx}10{sup -11} erg cm{sup -3}).

  16. Diffuse Gamma Rays Galactic and Extragalactic Diffuse Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Reimer, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Diffuse gamma rays consist of several components: truly diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, the extragalactic background, whose origin is not firmly established yet, and the contribution from unresolved and faint Galactic point sources. One approach to unravel these components is to study the diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, which traces the interactions of high energy particles with interstellar gas and radiation fields. Because of its origin such emission is potentially able to reveal much about the sources and propagation of cosmic rays. The extragalactic background, if reliably determined, can be used in cosmological and blazar studies. Studying the derived average spectrum of faint Galactic sources may be able to give a clue to the nature of the emitting objects.

  17. Diffusion-convection function of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, G.; Yang, G.

    1985-01-01

    The fundamental properties and some numerical results of the solution of the diffusion equation of an impulsive cosmic-ray point source in an uniform, unbounded and spherically symmetrical moving medium is presented. The diffusion-convection(D-C) function is an elementary composite function of the solution of the D-C equation for the particles injected impulsively from a diffusive point source into the medium. It is the analytic solution derived by the dimensional method for the propagation equation of solar cosmic rays in the heliosphere, i.e. the interplanetary space. Because of the introduction of convection effect of solar wind, a nonhomogeneous term appears in the propagation equation, it is difficult to express its solution in terms of the ordinary special functions. The research made so far has led to a solution containing only the first order approximation of the convection effect.

  18. Reconciling the diffuse Galactic γ-ray and the cosmic ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, Lara; Benyamin, David; Piran, Tsvi; Shaviv, Nir J.

    2017-04-01

    Most of the diffuse Galactic GeV γ-ray emission is produced via collisions of cosmic ray (CR) protons with ISM protons. As such the observed spectra of the γ-rays and the CRs should be strongly linked. Recent observations of Fermi-LAT exhibit a hardening of the γ-ray spectrum at around a hundred GeV, between the Sagittarius and Carina tangents, and a further hardening at a few degrees above and below the Galactic plane. However, standard CR propagation models that assume a time-independent source distribution and a location-independent diffusion cannot give rise to a spatially dependent CR (and hence γ-ray) spectral slopes. Here, we consider a dynamic spiral arm model in which the distribution of CR sources is concentrated in the (dynamic) spiral arms, and we study the effects of this model on the π0-decay-produced γ-ray spectra. Within this model, near the Galactic arms the observed γ-ray spectral slope is not trivially related to the CR injection spectrum and energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient. We find unique signatures that agree with the Fermi-LAT observations. This model also provides a physical explanation for the difference between the local CR spectral slope and the CR slope inferred from the average γ-ray spectrum.

  19. Diffuse X-ray scattering from 4,4'-dimethoxybenzil, C16H14O4: analysis via automatic refinement of a Monte Carlo model.

    PubMed

    Welberry, T R; Heerdegen, A P

    2003-12-01

    A recently developed method for fitting a Monte Carlo computer-simulation model to observed single-crystal diffuse X-ray scattering has been used to study the diffuse scattering in 4,4'-dimethoxybenzil, C16H14O4. A model involving only nine parameters, consisting of seven intermolecular force constants and two intramolecular torsional force constants, was refined to give an agreement factor, omegaR = [sigma omega(deltaI)2/sigma omegaI2(obs)](1/2), of 18.1% for 118 918 data points in two sections of data. The model was purely thermal in nature. The analysis has shown that the most prominent features of the diffraction patterns, viz. diffuse streaks that occur normal to the [101] direction, are due to longitudinal displacement correlations along chains of molecules extending in this direction. These displacements are transmitted from molecule to molecule via contacts involving pairs of hydrogen bonds between adjacent methoxy groups. In contrast to an earlier study of benzil itself, it was not found to be possible to determine, with any degree of certainty, the torsional force constants for rotations about the single bonds in the molecule. It is supposed that this result may be due to the limited data available in the present study.

  20. Diffuse Galactic low energy gamma ray continuum emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, J. G.; Ramaty, R.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the origin of diffuse low-energy Galactic gamma-ray continuum down to about 30 keV. We calculate gamma-ray emission via bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering by propagating an unbroken electron power law injection spectrum and employing a Galactic emmissivity model derived from COSB observations. To maintain the low energy electron population capable of producing the observed continuum via bremsstrahlung, a total power input of 4 x 10 exp 41 erg/s is required. This exceeds the total power supplied to the nuclear cosmic rays by about an order of magnitude.

  1. Diffuse Galactic gamma rays from shock-accelerated cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Dermer, Charles D

    2012-08-31

    A shock-accelerated particle flux is proportional to p(-s), where p is the particle momentum, follows from simple theoretical considerations of cosmic-ray acceleration at nonrelativistic shocks followed by rigidity-dependent escape into the Galactic halo. A flux of shock-accelerated cosmic-ray protons with s≈2.8 provides an adequate fit to the Fermi Large Area Telescope γ-ray emission spectra of high-latitude and molecular cloud gas when uncertainties in nuclear production models are considered. A break in the spectrum of cosmic-ray protons claimed by Neronov, Semikoz, and Taylor [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 051105 (2012)] when fitting the γ-ray spectra of high-latitude molecular clouds is a consequence of using a cosmic-ray proton flux described by a power law in kinetic energy.

  2. Pinpointing the knee of cosmic rays with diffuse PeV γ-rays and neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y. Q.; Hu, H. B.; Yuan, Q.; Tian, Z.; Gao, X. J.

    2014-11-01

    The origin of the knee in the cosmic ray spectrum remains to be an unsolved fundamental problem. There are various kinds of models that predict different break positions and the compositions of the knee. In this work, we suggest the use of diffuse γ-rays and neutrinos as probes to test these models. Based on several typical types of composition models, the diffuse γ-ray and neutrino spectra are calculated and show distinctive cutoff behaviors at energies from tens of TeV to multi-PeV. The expected flux will be observable by the newly upgraded Tibet-ASγ+MD (muon detector) experiment as well as more sensitive future projects, such as LHAASO and HiSCORE. By comparing the neutrino spectrum with the recent observations by the IceCube experiment, we find that the diffuse neutrinos from interactions between the cosmic rays and the interstellar medium may not be responsible to the majority of the IceCube events. Future measurements of the neutrinos may be able to identify the Galactic diffuse component and shed further light on the problem of the knee of cosmic rays.

  3. Diffuse γ-ray emission from galactic pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Calore, F.; Di Mauro, M.; Donato, F. E-mail: mattia.dimauro@to.infn.it

    2014-11-20

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are old fast-spinning neutron stars that represent the second most abundant source population discovered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). As guaranteed γ-ray emitters, they might contribute non-negligibly to the diffuse emission measured at high latitudes by Fermi-LAT (i.e., the Isotropic Diffuse γ-Ray Background (IDGRB)), which is believed to arise from the superposition of several components of galactic and extragalactic origin. Additionally, γ-ray sources also contribute to the anisotropy of the IDGRB measured on small scales by Fermi-LAT. In this manuscript we aim to assess the contribution of the unresolved counterpart of the detected MSPs population to the IDGRB and the maximal fraction of the measured anisotropy produced by this source class. To this end, we model the MSPs' spatial distribution in the Galaxy and the γ-ray emission parameters by considering observational constraints coming from the Australia Telescope National Facility pulsar catalog and the Second Fermi-LAT Catalog of γ-ray pulsars. By simulating a large number of MSP populations through a Monte Carlo simulation, we compute the average diffuse emission and the anisotropy 1σ upper limit. We find that the emission from unresolved MSPs at 2 GeV, where the peak of the spectrum is located, is at most 0.9% of the measured IDGRB above 10° in latitude. The 1σ upper limit on the angular power for unresolved MSP sources turns out to be about a factor of 60 smaller than Fermi-LAT measurements above 30°. Our results indicate that this galactic source class represents a negligible contributor to the high-latitude γ-ray sky and confirm that most of the intensity and geometrical properties of the measured diffuse emission are imputable to other extragalactic source classes (e.g., blazars, misaligned active galactic nuclei, or star-forming galaxies). Nevertheless, because MSPs are more concentrated toward the

  4. Diffuse X-rays from the galactic disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    An anisotropic feature of the diffuse hard X-ray background that tracks the concentration of interstellar hydrogen in the plane of the galaxy is reported. This feature supports a model of galactic X-ray emission by subrelativistic cosmic rays via a bremsstrahlung process. The measurement was carried out on August 9, 1971, using two multianode multilayer gas proportional counters onboard Aerobee 170 flight 13.08. A schematic diagram of the detectors is shown. This type of construction and the appropriate utilization of the signals from the many anodes result in a low detector background, a perequisite before undertaking a measurement of possible small variations in the brightness of the X-ray sky.

  5. A Generalized Two-component Model of Solar Wind Turbulence and ab initio Diffusion Mean-Free Paths and Drift Lengthscales of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiengarten, T.; Oughton, S.; Engelbrecht, N. E.; Fichtner, H.; Kleimann, J.; Scherer, K.

    2016-12-01

    We extend a two-component model for the evolution of fluctuations in the solar wind plasma so that it is fully three-dimensional (3D) and also coupled self-consistently to the large-scale magnetohydrodynamic equations describing the background solar wind. The two classes of fluctuations considered are a high-frequency parallel-propagating wave-like piece and a low-frequency quasi-two-dimensional component. For both components, the nonlinear dynamics is dominanted by quasi-perpendicular spectral cascades of energy. Driving of the fluctuations by, for example, velocity shear and pickup ions is included. Numerical solutions to the new model are obtained using the Cronos framework, and validated against previous simpler models. Comparing results from the new model with spacecraft measurements, we find improved agreement relative to earlier models that employ prescribed background solar wind fields. Finally, the new results for the wave-like and quasi-two-dimensional fluctuations are used to calculate ab initio diffusion mean-free paths and drift lengthscales for the transport of cosmic rays in the turbulent solar wind.

  6. Gamma-ray and neutrino diffuse emissions of the Galaxy above the TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, D.; Grasso, D.; Marinelli, A.; Urbano, A.; Valli, M.

    2016-05-01

    Conventional cosmic ray propagation models face problems reproducing the diffuse 7-ray spectrum measured by Fermi-LAT over the entire sky. Those models also fail to smoothly connect Fermi-LAT results with data above the TeV as those taken by Milagro in the inner Galactic plane. In this contribution we show that a representative model adopting a spatial dependent rigidity scaling of the diffusion coefficient can reproduce all those experimental results without spoiling the consistency with local cosmic-ray measurements. We use the same model to compute the diffuse neutrino emission of the Galaxy and compare it with IceCube and ANTARES results.

  7. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  8. Cosmic ray spectrum from diffusive shock acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2011-11-01

    It is now well established that cosmic rays (CRs) are accelerated at collisionless shocks through diffusive shock acceleration. However, some key physical processes, such as thermal leakage injection, self-excitation and dissipation of waves, and resonant scatterings of particles by those waves are nonlinear and not fully understood yet. Hence it is not possible to make precise quantitative predictions for the particle spectrum accelerated at shocks from first principles. If the fraction of particles injected into the CR population is smaller than 10-4, the CR acceleration efficiency is low and so the test-particle solutions are justified. At moderately strong shocks ( M 0≳5) with higher injection fractions, the shock structure is significantly modified by nonlinear feedback of CRs. According to time-dependent kinetic simulations of CR modified shocks, the precursor and subshock transition approach a time-asymptotic state, and then evolve in an approximately self-similar fashion, depending only on the similarity variable, x/( u s t). During this self-similar stage, the CR spectrum at the subshock maintains a characteristic form as it evolves: the sum of two power-laws with the slopes determined by the subshock and total compression ratios, along with an exponential cutoff at the highest accelerated momentum.

  9. Cosmic ray-driven galactic winds: streaming or diffusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Joshua; Pfrommer, Christoph; Peng Oh, S.

    2017-01-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) have recently re-emerged as attractive candidates for mediating feedback in galaxies because of their long cooling timescales. Simulations have shown that the momentum and energy deposited by CRs moving with respect to the ambient medium can drive galactic winds. However, simulations are hampered by our ignorance of the details of CR transport. Two key limits previously considered model CR transport as a purely diffusive process (with constant diffusion coefficient) and as an advective streaming process. With a series of GADGET simulations, we compare the results of these different assumptions. In idealised three-dimensional galaxy formation models, we show that these two cases result in significant differences for the galactic wind mass loss rates and star formation suppression in dwarf galaxies with halo masses M ≈ 1010 M⊙: diffusive CR transport results in more than ten times larger mass loss rates compared to CR streaming models. We demonstrate that this is largely due to the excitation of Alfvén waves during the CR streaming process that drains energy from the CR population to the thermal gas, which is subsequently radiated away. By contrast, CR diffusion conserves the CR energy in the absence of adiabatic changes and if CRs are efficiently scattered by Alfvén waves that are propagating up the CR gradient. Moreover, because pressure gradients are preserved by CR streaming, but not diffusion, the two can have a significantly different dynamical evolution regardless of this energy exchange. In particular, the constant diffusion coefficients usually assumed can lead to unphysically high CR fluxes.

  10. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; Sheu, Y.M.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  11. SMALL-SCALE ANISOTROPIES OF COSMIC RAYS FROM RELATIVE DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus; Mertsch, Philipp

    2015-12-10

    The arrival directions of multi-TeV cosmic rays show significant anisotropies at small angular scales. It has been argued that this small-scale structure can naturally arise from cosmic ray scattering in local turbulent magnetic fields that distort a global dipole anisotropy set by diffusion. We study this effect in terms of the power spectrum of cosmic ray arrival directions and show that the strength of small-scale anisotropies is related to properties of relative diffusion. We provide a formalism for how these power spectra can be inferred from simulations and motivate a simple analytic extension of the ensemble-averaged diffusion equation that can account for the effect.

  12. THE CHANDRA CARINA COMPLEX PROJECT: DECIPHERING THE ENIGMA OF CARINA'S DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Gagne, Marc; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Montmerle, Thierry; Naze, Yael; Oey, M. S.; Park, Sangwook; Petre, Robert; Pittard, Julian M.

    2011-05-01

    We present a 1.42 deg{sup 2} mosaic of diffuse X-ray emission in the Great Nebula in Carina from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer camera. After removing >14,000 X-ray point sources from the field, we smooth the remaining unresolved emission, tessellate it into segments of similar apparent surface brightness, and perform X-ray spectral fitting on those tessellates to infer the intrinsic properties of the X-ray-emitting plasma. By modeling faint resolved point sources, we estimate the contribution to the extended X-ray emission from unresolved point sources and show that the vast majority of Carina's unresolved X-ray emission is truly diffuse. Line-like correlated residuals in the X-ray spectral fits suggest that substantial X-ray emission is generated by charge exchange at the interfaces between Carina's hot, rarefied plasma and its many cold neutral pillars, ridges, and clumps.

  13. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  14. FERMI BUBBLE γ-RAYS AS A RESULT OF DIFFUSIVE INJECTION OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Thoudam, Satyendra

    2013-11-20

    Recently, the Fermi Space Telescope discovered two large γ-ray emission regions, the so-called Fermi bubbles, that extend up to ∼50° above and below the Galactic center (GC). The γ-ray emission from the bubbles is found to follow a hard spectrum with no significant spatial variation in intensity and spectral shape. The origin of the emission is still not clearly understood. Suggested explanations include the injection of cosmic-ray (CR) nuclei from the GC by high-speed Galactic winds, electron acceleration by multiple shocks, and stochastic electron acceleration inside the bubbles. In this Letter, it is proposed that the γ-rays may be the result of diffusive injection of Galactic CR protons during their propagation through the Galaxy. Considering that the bubbles are slowly expanding, and CRs undergo much slower diffusion inside the bubbles than in the average Galaxy and at the same time suffer losses due to adiabatic expansion and inelastic collisions with the bubble plasma, this model can explain the observed intensity profile, the emission spectrum and the measured luminosity without invoking any additional particle production processes, unlike other existing models.

  15. THE ROLE OF THE DIFFUSIVE PROTONS IN THE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7–3946—A TWO-ZONE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao; Chen, Yang

    2016-04-10

    RX J1713.7−3946 is a prototype in the γ-ray-bright supernova remnants (SNRs) and is in continuing debates on its hadronic versus leptonic origin of the γ-ray emission. We explore the role played by the diffusive relativistic protons that escape from the SNR shock wave in the γ-ray emission, apart from the high-energy particles’ emission from the inside of the SNR. In the scenario that the SNR shock propagates in a clumpy molecular cavity, we consider that the γ-ray emission from the inside of the SNR may arise either from the inverse Compton scattering or from the interaction between the trapped energetic protons and the shocked clumps. The dominant origin between them depends on the electron-to-proton number ratio. The diffusive protons that escaped from the shock wave during the expansion history can provide an outer hadronic γ-ray component by bombarding the surrounding dense matter. The broadband spectrum can be well explained by this two-zone model, in which the γ-ray emission from the inside governs the TeV band, while the outer emission component substantially contributes to the GeV γ-rays. The two-zone model can also explain the TeV γ-ray radial brightness profile that significantly stretches beyond the nonthermal X-ray-emitting region. In the calculation, we present a simplified algorithm for Li and Chen's “accumulative diffusion” model for escaping protons and apply the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to constrain the physical parameters.

  16. Diffuse synchrotron emission from galactic cosmic ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bernardo, G.; Grasso, D.; Evoli, C.; Gaggero, D.

    2015-09-01

    Synchrotron diffuse radiation (SDR) emission is one of the major Galactic components, in the 100 MHz up to 100 GHz frequency range. Its spectrum and sky map provide valuable measure of the galactic cosmic ray electrons (GCRE) in the relevant energy range, as well as of the strength and structure of the Galactic magnetic fields (GMF), both regular and random ones. This emission is an astrophysical sky foreground for the study of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and the extragalactic microwave measurements, and it needs to be modelled as better as possible. In this regard, in order to get an accurate description of the SDR in the Galaxy, we use - for the first time in this context - 3-dimensional GCRE models obtained by running the DRAGON code. This allows us to account for a realistic spiral arm pattern of the source distribution, demanded to get a self-consistent treatment of all relevant energy losses influencing the final synchrotron spectrum.

  17. FERMI-LAT OBSERVATIONS OF THE DIFFUSE {gamma}-RAY EMISSION: IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC RAYS AND THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Buehler, R.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bonamente, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: gudlaugu@glast2.stanford.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS and others

    2012-05-01

    The {gamma}-ray sky >100 MeV is dominated by the diffuse emissions from interactions of cosmic rays with the interstellar gas and radiation fields of the Milky Way. Observations of these diffuse emissions provide a tool to study cosmic-ray origin and propagation, and the interstellar medium. We present measurements from the first 21 months of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) mission and compare with models of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission generated using the GALPROP code. The models are fitted to cosmic-ray data and incorporate astrophysical input for the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, interstellar gas, and radiation fields. To assess uncertainties associated with the astrophysical input, a grid of models is created by varying within observational limits the distribution of cosmic-ray sources, the size of the cosmic-ray confinement volume (halo), and the distribution of interstellar gas. An all-sky maximum-likelihood fit is used to determine the X{sub CO} factor, the ratio between integrated CO-line intensity and H{sub 2} column density, the fluxes and spectra of the {gamma}-ray point sources from the first Fermi-LAT catalog, and the intensity and spectrum of the isotropic background including residual cosmic rays that were misclassified as {gamma}-rays, all of which have some dependency on the assumed diffuse emission model. The models are compared on the basis of their maximum-likelihood ratios as well as spectra, longitude, and latitude profiles. We also provide residual maps for the data following subtraction of the diffuse emission models. The models are consistent with the data at high and intermediate latitudes but underpredict the data in the inner Galaxy for energies above a few GeV. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed, including the contribution by undetected point-source populations and spectral variations of cosmic rays throughout the Galaxy. In the outer Galaxy, we find that the data prefer models with a flatter

  18. Explaining TeV cosmic-ray anisotropies with non-diffusive cosmic-ray propagation

    DOE PAGES

    Harding, James Patrick; Fryer, Chris Lee; Mendel, Susan Marie

    2016-05-11

    Constraining the behavior of cosmic ray data observed at Earth requires a precise understanding of how the cosmic rays propagate in the interstellar medium. The interstellar medium is not homogeneous; although turbulent magnetic fields dominate over large scales, small coherent regions of magnetic field exist on scales relevant to particle propagation in the nearby Galaxy. Guided propagation through a coherent field is significantly different from random particle diffusion and could be the explanation of spatial anisotropies in the observed cosmic rays. We present a Monte Carlo code to propagate cosmic particle through realistic magnetic field structures. We discuss the detailsmore » of the model as well as some preliminary studies which indicate that coherent magnetic structures are important effects in local cosmic-ray propagation, increasing the flux of cosmic rays by over two orders of magnitude at anisotropic locations on the sky. Furthermore, the features induced by coherent magnetic structure could be the cause of the observed TeV cosmic-ray anisotropy.« less

  19. Explaining TeV cosmic-ray anisotropies with non-diffusive cosmic-ray propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James Patrick; Fryer, Chris Lee; Mendel, Susan Marie

    2016-05-11

    Constraining the behavior of cosmic ray data observed at Earth requires a precise understanding of how the cosmic rays propagate in the interstellar medium. The interstellar medium is not homogeneous; although turbulent magnetic fields dominate over large scales, small coherent regions of magnetic field exist on scales relevant to particle propagation in the nearby Galaxy. Guided propagation through a coherent field is significantly different from random particle diffusion and could be the explanation of spatial anisotropies in the observed cosmic rays. We present a Monte Carlo code to propagate cosmic particle through realistic magnetic field structures. We discuss the details of the model as well as some preliminary studies which indicate that coherent magnetic structures are important effects in local cosmic-ray propagation, increasing the flux of cosmic rays by over two orders of magnitude at anisotropic locations on the sky. Furthermore, the features induced by coherent magnetic structure could be the cause of the observed TeV cosmic-ray anisotropy.

  20. Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; /more authors..

    2012-04-11

    The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

  1. Predicting X-ray diffuse scattering from translation-libration-screw structural ensembles.

    PubMed

    Van Benschoten, Andrew H; Afonine, Pavel V; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Wall, Michael E; Jackson, Colin J; Sauter, Nicholas K; Adams, Paul D; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Fraser, James S

    2015-08-01

    Identifying the intramolecular motions of proteins and nucleic acids is a major challenge in macromolecular X-ray crystallography. Because Bragg diffraction describes the average positional distribution of crystalline atoms with imperfect precision, the resulting electron density can be compatible with multiple models of motion. Diffuse X-ray scattering can reduce this degeneracy by reporting on correlated atomic displacements. Although recent technological advances are increasing the potential to accurately measure diffuse scattering, computational modeling and validation tools are still needed to quantify the agreement between experimental data and different parameterizations of crystalline disorder. A new tool, phenix.diffuse, addresses this need by employing Guinier's equation to calculate diffuse scattering from Protein Data Bank (PDB)-formatted structural ensembles. As an example case, phenix.diffuse is applied to translation-libration-screw (TLS) refinement, which models rigid-body displacement for segments of the macromolecule. To enable the calculation of diffuse scattering from TLS-refined structures, phenix.tls_as_xyz builds multi-model PDB files that sample the underlying T, L and S tensors. In the glycerophosphodiesterase GpdQ, alternative TLS-group partitioning and different motional correlations between groups yield markedly dissimilar diffuse scattering maps with distinct implications for molecular mechanism and allostery. These methods demonstrate how, in principle, X-ray diffuse scattering could extend macromolecular structural refinement, validation and analysis.

  2. Predicting X-ray diffuse scattering from translation–libration–screw structural ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Wall, Michael E.; Jackson, Colin J.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Adams, Paul D.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Fraser, James S.

    2015-07-28

    Identifying the intramolecular motions of proteins and nucleic acids is a major challenge in macromolecular X-ray crystallography. Because Bragg diffraction describes the average positional distribution of crystalline atoms with imperfect precision, the resulting electron density can be compatible with multiple models of motion. Diffuse X-ray scattering can reduce this degeneracy by reporting on correlated atomic displacements. Although recent technological advances are increasing the potential to accurately measure diffuse scattering, computational modeling and validation tools are still needed to quantify the agreement between experimental data and different parameterizations of crystalline disorder. A new tool, phenix.diffuse, addresses this need by employing Guinier's equation to calculate diffuse scattering from Protein Data Bank (PDB)-formatted structural ensembles. As an example case, phenix.diffuse is applied to translation–libration–screw (TLS) refinement, which models rigid-body displacement for segments of the macromolecule. To enable the calculation of diffuse scattering from TLS-refined structures, phenix.tls_as_xyz builds multi-model PDB files that sample the underlying T, L and S tensors. In the glycerophosphodiesterase GpdQ, alternative TLS-group partitioning and different motional correlations between groups yield markedly dissimilar diffuse scattering maps with distinct implications for molecular mechanism and allostery. These methods demonstrate how, in principle, X-ray diffuse scattering could extend macromolecular structural refinement, validation and analysis.

  3. Predicting X-ray diffuse scattering from translation–libration–screw structural ensembles

    DOE PAGES

    Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; ...

    2015-07-28

    Identifying the intramolecular motions of proteins and nucleic acids is a major challenge in macromolecular X-ray crystallography. Because Bragg diffraction describes the average positional distribution of crystalline atoms with imperfect precision, the resulting electron density can be compatible with multiple models of motion. Diffuse X-ray scattering can reduce this degeneracy by reporting on correlated atomic displacements. Although recent technological advances are increasing the potential to accurately measure diffuse scattering, computational modeling and validation tools are still needed to quantify the agreement between experimental data and different parameterizations of crystalline disorder. A new tool, phenix.diffuse, addresses this need by employing Guinier'smore » equation to calculate diffuse scattering from Protein Data Bank (PDB)-formatted structural ensembles. As an example case, phenix.diffuse is applied to translation–libration–screw (TLS) refinement, which models rigid-body displacement for segments of the macromolecule. To enable the calculation of diffuse scattering from TLS-refined structures, phenix.tls_as_xyz builds multi-model PDB files that sample the underlying T, L and S tensors. In the glycerophosphodiesterase GpdQ, alternative TLS-group partitioning and different motional correlations between groups yield markedly dissimilar diffuse scattering maps with distinct implications for molecular mechanism and allostery. These methods demonstrate how, in principle, X-ray diffuse scattering could extend macromolecular structural refinement, validation and analysis.« less

  4. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  5. Predicting X-ray diffuse scattering from translation–libration–screw structural ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benschoten, Andrew H.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Wall, Michael E.; Jackson, Colin J.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Adams, Paul D.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Fraser, James S.

    2015-07-28

    A method of simulating X-ray diffuse scattering from multi-model PDB files is presented. Despite similar agreement with Bragg data, different translation–libration–screw refinement strategies produce unique diffuse intensity patterns. Identifying the intramolecular motions of proteins and nucleic acids is a major challenge in macromolecular X-ray crystallography. Because Bragg diffraction describes the average positional distribution of crystalline atoms with imperfect precision, the resulting electron density can be compatible with multiple models of motion. Diffuse X-ray scattering can reduce this degeneracy by reporting on correlated atomic displacements. Although recent technological advances are increasing the potential to accurately measure diffuse scattering, computational modeling and validation tools are still needed to quantify the agreement between experimental data and different parameterizations of crystalline disorder. A new tool, phenix.diffuse, addresses this need by employing Guinier’s equation to calculate diffuse scattering from Protein Data Bank (PDB)-formatted structural ensembles. As an example case, phenix.diffuse is applied to translation–libration–screw (TLS) refinement, which models rigid-body displacement for segments of the macromolecule. To enable the calculation of diffuse scattering from TLS-refined structures, phenix.tls-as-xyz builds multi-model PDB files that sample the underlying T, L and S tensors. In the glycerophosphodiesterase GpdQ, alternative TLS-group partitioning and different motional correlations between groups yield markedly dissimilar diffuse scattering maps with distinct implications for molecular mechanism and allostery. These methods demonstrate how, in principle, X-ray diffuse scattering could extend macromolecular structural refinement, validation and analysis.

  6. Minimal model for anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2017-01-01

    A random walk model with a local probability of removal is solved exactly and shown to exhibit subdiffusive behavior with a mean square displacement the evolves as ˜t1 /2 at late times. This model is shown to be well described by a diffusion equation with a sink term, which also describes the evolution of a pressure or temperature field in a leaky environment. For this reason a number of physical processes are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion. The presence of the sink term is shown to change the late time behavior of the field from 1 /t1 /2 to 1 /t3 /2 .

  7. An insight into real and average structure from diffuse X-ray scattering - a case study.

    PubMed

    Chodkiewicz, Michał Leszek; Makal, Anna; Gajda, Roman; Vidovic, Dragoslav; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    Two-dimensional diffuse X-ray scattering from an organic salt [N-(3-(2,6-dimethylanilino)-1-methylbut-2-enylidene)-2,6-dimethylanilinium chloride, C21H27N2(+)Cl(-)] was interpreted with the help of an analytical model of diffuse scattering. An analysis of the relationship between symmetry and diffuse scattering for the studied system has been undertaken. The symmetry of the system explains the extinction pattern, taking the form of curves, on the diffuse scattering planes. We have also tested the relationship between the average structure model and scattering intensities. Two models, differing in their representation of overlapping atoms, were used. In the case of diffuse scattering the difference between resulting intensities is immense, while for the Bragg intensities it is much smaller. This sensitivity of diffuse scattering could potentially be used to improve the description of the average structure.

  8. COSMIC RAY DIFFUSION FRONTS IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, William G.; Guo Fulai

    2011-07-20

    The pair of large radio lobes in the Virgo cluster, each about 23 kpc in radius, have curiously sharp outer edges where the radio-synchrotron continuum flux declines abruptly. However, just adjacent to this sharp transition, the radio flux increases. This radio limb-brightening is observed over at least half of the perimeter of both lobes. We describe slowly propagating steady-state diffusion fronts that explain these counterintuitive features. Because of the natural buoyancy of radio lobes, the magnetic field is largely tangent to the lobe boundary, an alignment that polarizes the radio emission and dramatically reduces the diffusion coefficient of relativistic electrons. As cosmic ray electrons diffuse slowly into the cluster gas, the local magnetic field and gas density are reduced as gas flows back toward the radio lobe. Radio emission peaks can occur because the synchrotron emissivity increases with magnetic field and then decreases with the density of non-thermal electrons. A detailed comparison of steady diffusion fronts with quantitative radio observations may reveal information about the spatial variation of magnetic fields and the diffusion coefficient of relativistic electrons. On larger scales, some reduction of the gas density inside the Virgo lobes due to cosmic ray pressure must occur and may be measurable. Such X-ray observations could reveal important information about the presence of otherwise unobservable non-thermal components such as relativistic electrons of low energy or proton cosmic rays.

  9. Galactic Winds Driven by Isotropic and Anisotropic Cosmic-Ray Diffusion in Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmor, R.; Pfrommer, C.; Simpson, C. M.; Springel, V.

    2016-06-01

    The physics of cosmic rays (CRs) is a promising candidate for explaining the driving of galactic winds and outflows. Recent galaxy formation simulations have demonstrated the need for active CR transport either in the form of diffusion or streaming to successfully launch winds in galaxies. However, due to computational limitations, most previous simulations have modeled CR transport isotropically. Here, we discuss high-resolution simulations of isolated disk galaxies in a 1011 M ⊙ halo with the moving-mesh code Arepo that include injection of CRs from supernovae, advective transport, CR cooling, and CR transport through isotropic or anisotropic diffusion. We show that either mode of diffusion leads to the formation of strong bipolar outflows. However, they develop significantly later in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion compared to the simulation with isotropic diffusion. Moreover, we find that isotropic diffusion allows most of the CRs to quickly diffuse out of the disk, while in the simulation with anisotropic diffusion, most CRs remain in the disk once the magnetic field becomes dominated by its azimuthal component, which occurs after ˜300 Myr. This has important consequences for the gas dynamics in the disk. In particular, we show that isotropic diffusion strongly suppresses the amplification of the magnetic field in the disk compared to anisotropic or no diffusion models. We therefore conclude that reliable simulations which include CR transport inevitably need to account for anisotropic diffusion.

  10. Diffuse γ-ray emission from misaligned active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Di Mauro, M.; Donato, F.; Calore, F.; Ajello, M.; Latronico, L.

    2014-01-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with jets seen at small viewing angles are the most luminous and abundant objects in the γ-ray sky. AGNs with jets misaligned along the line of sight appear fainter in the sky but are more numerous than the brighter blazars. We calculate the diffuse γ-ray emission due to the population of misaligned AGNs (MAGNs) unresolved by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). A correlation between the γ-ray luminosity and the radio-core luminosity is established and demonstrated to be physical by statistical tests, as well as compatible with upper limits based on Fermi-LAT data for a large sample of radio-loud MAGNs. We constrain the derived γ-ray luminosity function by means of the source-count distribution of the radio galaxies detected by the Fermi-LAT. We finally calculate the diffuse γ-ray flux due to the whole MAGN population. Our results demonstrate that MAGNs can contribute from 10% up to nearly the entire measured isotropic gamma-ray background. We evaluate a theoretical uncertainty on the flux of almost an order of magnitude.

  11. The Gamma-ray galactic diffuse radiation and Cerenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Chardonnet, P. |; Salati, P. ||; Silk, J.; Grenier, I.; Smoot, G.

    1995-12-01

    By using the PYTHIA version of the Lund Monte Carlo program, we study the photon yield of proton-proton collisions in the energy range between 10 GeV and 1 TeV. The resulting photon spectrum turns out to scale roughly with incident energy. Then, by folding the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with the distribution of HI and CO, the Galactic diffuse emission of {gamma}-rays above 100 GeV is mapped. Prospects for observing that diffuse radiation with atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes are discussed. Present instruments are able to detect the {gamma}-ray glow of the Galactic center. The latter will be mapped by the next generation of telescopes if their energy threshold is decreased. However, a detailed survey of the Galactic ridge will be a real challenge, even in the long term. The MILAGRO project seems more appropriate. Finally, we investigate the {gamma}-ray emission from weakly interacting massive particles clustering at the Galactic center. It has been speculated that those species are a major component of the halo dark matter. We show that their {gamma}-ray signal is swamped in the Galactic diffuse radiation and cannot be observed at TeV energies. {copyright} {ital 1995 The American Astronomical Society.}

  12. Resolving the Origin of the Diffuse Soft X-ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.; Edgar, Ricard J.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Sanders, Wilton T.

    2012-01-01

    In January 1993, the Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer (DXS) measured the first high-resolution spectrum of the diffuse soft X-ray background between 44-80A. A line-dominated spectrum characteristic of a 10(exp 6)K collisionally ionized plasma' was expected but while the observed spectrum was clearly line-dominated, no model would fit. Then in 2003 the Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (CHIPS) launched and observed the diffuse extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectrum between 90- 265A. Although many emission lines were again expected; only Fe IX at 171.1A was detected. The discovery of X-rays from comets led to the realization that heavy ions (Z=6-28) in the solar wind will emit soft X-rays as the ions interact via charge exchange with neutral atoms in the heliosphere and geocorona. Using a new model for solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission, we show that the diffuse soft X-ray background can be understood as a combination of emission from charge exchange onto the slow and fast solar wind together with a more distant and diffuse hot (10(exp 6)K) plasma.

  13. Study of Diffuse X-ray Emission in Globular Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    1997-01-01

    This grant supported our analysis of ROSAT x-ray data on globular clusters. Although the grant title referred to our original ROSAT proposal (cycle 1) to study diffuse soft x-ray emission in three globulars (for which time was only granted in that original observing cycle for one cluster, 47 Tuc), the grant has also been maintained through several renewals and funding supplements to support our later ROSAT observations of point sources in globulars. The primary emphasis has been on the study of the dim sources, or low liuminosity globular cluster x-ray sources, which we had originally discovered with the Einstein Observatory and for which ROSAT provided the logical followup. In this Final Report, we summarize the Scientific Objectives of this investigation of both diffuse emission and dim sources in globular clusters and the Results Achieved; and finally the Papers Published.

  14. Diffuse flux of galactic neutrinos and gamma rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carceller, J. M.; Masip, M.

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays from interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar matter in our galaxy. We use EPOS-LHC, SIBYLL and GHEISHA to parametrize the yield of these particles in proton, helium and iron collisions at kinetic energies between 1 and 108 GeV, and we correlate the cosmic ray density with the mean magnetic field strength in the disk and the halo of our galaxy. We find that at E > 1 PeV the fluxes depend very strongly on the cosmic-ray composition, whereas at 1–5 GeV the main source of uncertainty is the cosmic-ray spectrum out of the heliosphere. We show that the diffuse flux of galactic neutrinos becomes larger than the conventional atmospheric one at E>1 PeV, but that at all IceCube energies it is 4 times smaller than the atmospheric flux from forward-charm decays.

  15. SPECTRA OF COSMIC RAY ELECTRONS AND DIFFUSE GAMMA RAYS WITH THE CONSTRAINTS OF AMS-02 AND HESS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ding; Jin, Hong-Bo; Huang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746–2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  16. Diffuse gamma rays from WIMP decay and annihilation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamionkowski, M.

    The author discusses contributions to the diffuse gamma-ray background from decay and annihilation of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). He first reviews the calculation of the cosmological abundance of a WIMP and shows that it is simply related to the cross section for annihilation of the WIMP into lighter particles. The diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) from WIMP decay is then discussed. It is shown how observational upper limits to the DEBRA can be used to constrain properties of WIMPs that decay to photons, and the author presents additional new constraints that unitarity of the annihilation cross section imposes on such particles.

  17. Diffuse cosmic gamma rays: Present status of theory and observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Positive diffuse gamma ray flux measurements now exist for energies up to the 100 MeV range. The totality of the observations in the 0.001 to 100 MeV range follow an E to the minus 2nd power trend in the differential isotropic photon spectrum but significant features appear. Possible theoretical interpretations of these features are discussed. New results on the diffuse flux from the galaxy substantiate the pion-decay origin hypothesis for gamma radiation above 100 MeV.

  18. Hydromagnetic waves and cosmic-ray diffusion theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. A.; Voelk, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    Pitch-angle (and energy) diffusion of cosmic rays in hydromagnetic wave fields is considered. The treatment remains strictly within the quasi-linear approximation. It is shown that the popular assumption of an isotropic power spectrum tensor of magnetic fluctuations requires in this case equal forms and magnitudes of Alfven and magnetosonic wave spectra - a situation which is generally unlikely. The relative contributions to the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient from the cyclotron resonances and Landau resonance due to the different types of waves are evaluated for a typical situation in the solar wind. Since the Landau resonance in this approximation also does not lead to particle reflections, a proper consideration of the nonlinear particle orbits is indeed necessary to overcome the well-known difficulties of quasi-linear scattering theory for cosmic rays near 90 deg pitch angle.

  19. A survey of the cosmic ray diurnal variation during 1973-1979. I - Persistence of solar diurnal variation. II - Application of diffusion-convection model to diurnal anisotropy data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riker, J. F.; Ahluwalia, H. S.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of data obtained with the vertical underground muon telescope at Embudo, NM shows that the solar diurnal variation in cosmic ray intensity is a persistent phenomenon over the 1973-1979 period. Assuming that the daily fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of the diurnal variation are random perturbations about the mean vector, the relative magnitude of the random component is determined. In the second part, the Diffusion-Convection model of cosmic ray transport is applied to high rigidity particles detected at the earth in order to deduce the behavior of the heliospheric transport parameters between 1973 and 1979. It is suggested that the diurnal variation observed at Embudo during 1979 may require a contribution from the charged particle drifts.

  20. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the diffuse X-ray emission from the Milky Way has evolved. extensively with time from when it was first observed in the 1960's, and its origin is still the subject of debate as much now as ever. This presentation will provide an overview of that evolution, the various emission components, emission mechanisms, an assessment of the current state of the field, and implications for eROSITA.

  1. Diffuse X-ray Emission from M101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.; Pence, W. D.; Mukai, K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The total 0.45-2.0 keV luminosity of M101 is 3.1 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s, of which 2.2 x 10(exp 39) ergs/s is due to diffuse emission. Of the diffuse emission, no more than 6% can be due to unresolved point sources such as X-ray binaries, and approx. 11% is due to dwarf stars. The diffuse emission traces the spiral arms and is roughly correlated with the H alpha and FUV (far ultraviolet) emission. The radial distribution closely follows the optical profile. The bulk of the diffuse emission is characterized by a two thermal component spectrum with kT = 0.20,0.75 keV, and the ratios of the emission measures of the two components is roughly constant as a function of both radius and surface brightness. The softer component has a sufficiently large covering factor that the bulk of the emission is likely extra-planar. We find no evidence of an extended axisymmetric X-ray halo, suggesting that any such halo has a strength much smaller than current predictions.

  2. Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields and Diffuse Emissions: Combining Observations from Radio to Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter

    With the advent of WMAP, Planck, and Fermi-LAT telescopes the diffuse emission from the Milky Way has received renewed attention. Observations of the different components of the diffuse emission reveal information on Cosmic Rays (CRs), magnetic fields (B-fields) and the interstellar medium. CRs interact with the interstellar medium and the B-fields in the Milky Way, producing diffuse emission from radio to gamma rays. The fundamental problem is that CRs, B-fields, and the interstellar medium are not precisely known. In fact, despite intensive studies, the B-field intensity and topology, and CR spectra and distribution throughout the Galaxy are still uncertain. As a consequence unequivocally disentangling and describing the diffuse components simultaneously using a single wavelength domain is impossible. Our approach to disentangling and describing the diffuse emission components is to simultaneously consider the diffuse emission in multiple frequency domains. We propose to exploit the entire database of the present radio surveys, microwave observations (WMAP and Planck), X-ray observations (INTEGRAL) and gamma-ray observations (COMPTEL and Fermi-LAT) in order to analyze their diffuse emission in a combined multi-wavelength approach. We will jointly infer information on the spectra and distribution of CRs in the Galaxy, and on Galactic B-fields, with unprecedented accuracy. Finally we will be able to describe the baseline Galactic diffuse emissions and characterize Milky Way structures and their emission mechanisms, which have attracted the attention of the scientific community recently. This project is innovative and essential for maximizing the scientific return from the presently available data in a multidisciplinary view and uses novel approaches. The results will benefit NASA-related science generally and the return from the named missions specifically.

  3. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  4. A method to analyze the diffuse gamma-ray emission with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, Markus; Johannesson, Gueolaugur; Digel, Seth; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Reimer, Olaf; Porter, Troy; Strong, Andrew

    2008-12-24

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope with its main instrument the LAT is the most sensitive {gamma}-ray telescope in the energy region between 30 MeV and 100 GeV. One of the prime scientific goals of this mission is the measurement and interpretation of the diffuse Galactic and extragalactic {gamma}-ray emission. While not limited by photon statistics, this analysis presents several challenges: Instrumental response functions, residual background from cosmic rays as well as resolved and unresolved foreground {gamma}-ray sources have to be taken carefully into account in the interpretation of the data. Detailed modeling of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission is being performed and will form the basis of the investigations. We present the analysis approach to be applied to the Fermi LAT data, namely the modeling of the diffuse emission components and the background contributions, followed by an all-sky maximum-likelihood fitting procedure. We also report on the performance of this method evaluated in tests on simulated Fermi LAT and real EGRET data.

  5. Diffuse gamma-ray emission from pulsars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brown, Lawrence E.; Schnepf, Neil

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of pulsars to the diffuse gamma-ray emission from the LMC. The pulsar birth rate in the LMC is a factor of about 10 lower than that of the Galaxy and the distance to pulsars in the LMC is about 5-10 times larger than to Galactic pulsars. The resulting total integrated photon flux from LMC pulsars is thus reduced by a factor of about 100 to 1000. However, the surface brightness is not reduced by the same amount because of the much smaller angular extent of the LMC in comparison to the diffuse glow from the Galactic plane. We show that gamma-ray emission due to pulsars born in the LMC could produce gamma-ray fluxes that are larger than the inverse Compton component from relativistic cosmic-ray electrons and a significant fraction of the extragalactic isotropic background or the diffuse Galactic background in that direction. The diffuse pulsar glow above 100 MeV should therefore be included in models of high-energy emission from the LMC. For a gamma-ray beaming fraction of order unity the detected emissions from the LMC constrain the pulsar birth rate to less than one per 50 yr. This limit is about one order of magnitude above the supernova rate inferred from the historic record or from the star-formation rate.

  6. Theoretical Modelling of the Diffuse Emission of (gamma)-rays From Extreme Regions of Star Formation: The Case of Arp 220

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, D F

    2004-07-09

    Our current understanding of ultraluminous infrared galaxies suggest that they are recent galaxy mergers in which much of the gas in the former spiral disks, particularly that located at distances less than 5 kpc from each of the pre-merger nuclei, has fallen into a common center, triggering a huge starburst phenomenon. This large nuclear concentration of molecular gas has been detected by many groups, and estimates of molecular mass and density have been made. Not surprisingly, these estimates were found to be orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding values found in our Galaxy. In this paper, a self-consistent model of the high energy emission of the super-starburst galaxy Arp 220 is presented. The model also provides an estimate of the radio emission from each of the components of the central region of the galaxy (western and eastern extreme starbursts, and molecular disk). The predicted radio spectrum is found as a result of the synchrotron and free-free emission, and absorption, of the primary and secondary steady population of electrons and positrons. The latter is output of charged pion decay and knock-on leptonic production, subject to a full set of losses in the interstellar medium. The resulting radio spectrum is in agreement with sub-arcsec radio observations, what allows to estimate the magnetic field. In addition, the FIR emission is modeled with dust emissivity, and the computed FIR photon density is used as a target for inverse Compton process as well as to give account of losses in the {gamma}-ray scape. Bremsstrahlung emission and neutral pion decay are also computed, and the {gamma}-ray spectrum is finally predicted. Future possible observations with GLAST, and the ground based Cherenkov telescopes are discussed.

  7. MODEL OF DIFFUSERS / PERMEATORS FOR HYDROGEN PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T; William Jacobs, W

    2007-08-27

    Palladium-silver (Pd-Ag) diffusers are mainstays of hydrogen processing. Diffusers separate hydrogen from inert species such as nitrogen, argon or helium. The tubing becomes permeable to hydrogen when heated to more than 250 C and a differential pressure is created across the membrane. The hydrogen diffuses better at higher temperatures. Experimental or experiential results have been the basis for determining or predicting a diffuser's performance. However, the process can be mathematically modeled, and comparison to experimental or other operating data can be utilized to improve the fit of the model. A reliable model-based diffuser system design is the goal which will have impacts on tritium and hydrogen processing. A computer model has been developed to solve the differential equations for diffusion given the operating boundary conditions. The model was compared to operating data for a low pressure diffuser system. The modeling approach and the results are presented in this paper.

  8. Consequences of using nonlinear particle trajectories to compute spatial diffusion coefficients. [for cosmic ray propagation in interstellar and interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    In a study of cosmic ray propagation in interstellar and interplanetary space, a perturbed orbit resonant scattering theory for pitch angle diffusion in a slab model of magnetostatic turbulence is slightly generalized and used to compute the diffusion coefficient for spatial propagation parallel to the mean magnetic field. This diffusion coefficient has been useful for describing the solar modulation of the galactic cosmic rays, and for explaining the diffusive phase in solar flares in which the initial anisotropy of the particle distribution decays to isotropy.

  9. Resolving the origin of the diffuse soft X-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.; Edgar, Richard J.; Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    2014-05-20

    The ubiquitous diffuse soft (1/4 keV) X-ray background was one of the earliest discoveries of X-ray astronomy. At least some of the emission may arise from charge exchange between solar wind ions and neutral atoms in the heliosphere, but no detailed models have been fit to the available data. Here, we report on a new model for charge exchange in the solar wind, which, when combined with a diffuse hot plasma component, filling the Local Cavity provides a good fit to the only available high-resolution soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet spectra using plausible parameters for the solar wind. The implied hot plasma component is in pressure equilibrium with the local cloud that surrounds the solar system, creating for the first time a self-consistent picture of the local interstellar medium.

  10. X-RAY INVESTIGATION OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION AROUND PLAUSIBLE {gamma}-RAY EMITTING PULSAR WIND NEBULAE IN KOOKABURRA REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Kishishita, Tetsuichi; Bamba, Aya; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2012-05-10

    We report on the results from Suzaku X-ray observations of the radio complex region called Kookaburra, which includes two adjacent TeV {gamma}-ray sources HESS J1418-609 and HESS J1420-607. The Suzaku observation revealed X-ray diffuse emission around a middle-aged pulsar PSR J1420-6048 and a plausible pulsar wind nebula (PWN) Rabbit with elongated sizes of {sigma}{sub X} = 1.'66 and {sigma}{sub X} = 1.'49, respectively. The peaks of the diffuse X-ray emission are located within the {gamma}-ray excess maps obtained by H.E.S.S. and the offsets from the {gamma}-ray peaks are 2.'8 for PSR J1420-6048 and 4.'5 for Rabbit. The X-ray spectra of the two sources were well reproduced by absorbed power-law models with {Gamma} = 1.7-2.3. The spectral shapes tend to become softer according to the distance from the X-ray peaks. Assuming the one-zone electron emission model as the first-order approximation, the ambient magnetic field strengths of HESS J1420-607 and HESS J1418-609 can be estimated as 3 {mu}G and 2.5 {mu}G, respectively. The X-ray spectral and spatial properties strongly support that both TeV sources are PWNe, in which electrons and positrons accelerated at termination shocks of the pulsar winds are losing their energies via the synchrotron radiation and inverse Compton scattering as they are transported outward.

  11. Galactic Diffuse Gamma Ray Emission Is Greater than 10 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley D.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    AGILE and Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope (GLAST) are the next high-energy gamma-ray telescopes to be flown in space. These instruments will have angular resolution about 5 times better than Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) above 10 GeV and much larger field of view. The on-axis effective area of AGILE will be about half that of EGRET, whereas GLAST will have about 6 times greater effective area than EGRET. The capabilities of ground based very high-energy telescopes are also improving, e.g. Whipple, and new telescopes, e.g. Solar Tower Atmospheric Cerenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE), Cerenkov Low Energy Sampling and Timing Experiment (CELESTE), and Mars Advanced Greenhouse Integrated Complex (MAGIC) are expected to have low-energy thresholds and sensitivities that will overlap the GLAST sensitivity above approximately 10 GeV. In anticipation of the results from these new telescopes, our current understanding of the galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, including the matter and cosmic ray distributions is reviewed. The outstanding questions are discussed and the potential of future observations with these new instruments to resolve these questions is examined.

  12. The Spectrum of Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission Between 100 Mev and 820 Gev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Brandt, T. J.; Hays, E.; Perkins, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The gamma-ray sky can be decomposed into individually detected sources, diffuse emission attributed to the interactions of Galactic cosmic rays with gas and radiation fields, and a residual all-sky emission component commonly called the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background (IGRB). The IGRB comprises all extragalactic emissions too faint or too diffuse to be resolved in a given survey, as well as any residual Galactic foregrounds that are approximately isotropic. The first IGRB measurement with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) used 10 months of sky-survey data and considered an energy range between 200 MeV and 100 GeV. Improvements in event selection and characterization of cosmic-ray backgrounds, better understanding of the diffuse Galactic emission, and a longer data accumulation of 50 months, allow for a refinement and extension of the IGRB measurement with the LAT, now covering the energy range from 100 MeV to 820 GeV. The IGRB spectrum shows a significant high-energy cutoff feature, and can be well described over nearly four decades in energy by a power law with exponential cutoff having a spectral index of 2.32 plus or minus 0.02 and a break energy of (279 plus or minus 52) GeV using our baseline diffuse Galactic emission model. The total intensity attributed to the IGRB is (7.2 plus or minus 0.6) x 10(exp -6) cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) sr(exp -1) above 100 MeV, with an additional +15%/-30% systematic uncertainty due to the Galactic diffuse foregrounds.

  13. Celestial diffuse gamma-ray emission observed by SAS-2 and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Gelman, H.; Ozel, M.; Tumer, T.

    1977-01-01

    A clearly established diffuse celestial gamma-ray component was seen by SAS-2 above 35 MeV, after examining several regions of the sky at different latitudes, including the north celestial pole. For energies above 100 MeV the gamma ray results are consistent with an equation of the form I(b)=C1+C2/sin b with the second term being dominant, suggesting that the radiation above 100 MeV comes largely from the local regions of the galactic disk. Between 35 and 100 MeV, a similar equation is also a reasonable representation of the data, but here the two terms are comparable, with the first, or isotropic term, actually being the larger one. In addition to indicating that the diffuse radiation is partially galactic, these results imply a steepness for the energy spectrum of the diffuse isotropic component which places significant constraints on possible theoretical models of this radiation.

  14. DISCOVERY OF DIFFUSE HARD X-RAY EMISSION AROUND JUPITER WITH SUZAKU

    SciTech Connect

    Ezoe, Y.; Ishikawa, K.; Ohashi, T.; Miyoshi, Y.; Terada, N.; Uchiyama, Y.; Negoro, H.

    2010-02-01

    We report the discovery of diffuse hard (1-5 keV) X-ray emission around Jupiter in a deep 160 ks Suzaku X-ray Imaging Spectrometer data. The emission is distributed over {approx}16 x 8 Jovian radius and spatially associated with the radiation belts and the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). It shows a flat power-law spectrum with a photon index of 1.4 {+-} 0.2 with the 1-5 keV X-ray luminosity of (3.3 {+-} 0.5)x10{sup 15} erg s{sup -1}. We discussed its origin and concluded that it seems to be truly diffuse, although a possibility of multiple background point sources cannot be completely rejected with a limited angular resolution. If it is diffuse, the flat continuum indicates that X-rays arise by the nonthermal electrons in the radiation belts and/or the IPT. The synchrotron and bremsstrahlung models can be rejected from the necessary electron energy and X-ray spectral shape, respectively. The inverse-Compton scattering off solar photons by ultra-relativistic (several tens MeV) electrons can explain the energy and the spectrum but the necessary electron density is {approx}>10 times larger than the value estimated from the empirical model of Jovian charge particles.

  15. The Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background from Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, Amy; Fields, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    The origin of the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) has been intensively studied but remains unsettled. Current popular source candidates include unresolved star-forming galaxies, starburst galaxies, and blazars. In this paper we calculate the EGB contribution from the interactions of cosmic rays accelerated by Type Ia supernovae, extending earlier work which only included core-collapse supernovae. We consider Type Ia events in star-forming galaxies, but also in quiescent galaxies that lack star formation. In the case of star-forming galaxies, consistently including Type Ia events makes little change to the star-forming EGB prediction, so long as both supernova types have the same cosmic-ray acceleration efficiencies in star-forming galaxies. Thus our updated EGB estimate continues to show that star-forming galaxies can represent a substantial portion of the signal measured by Fermi. In the case of quiescent galaxies, conversely, we find a wide range of possibilities for the EGB contribution. The dominant uncertainty we investigated comes from the mass in hot gas in these objects, which provides targets for cosmic rays: total gas masses are as yet poorly known, particularly at larger radii. Additionally, the EGB estimation is very sensitive to the cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency and confinement, especially in quiescent galaxies. In the most optimistic allowed scenarios, quiescent galaxies can be an important source of the EGB. In this case, star-forming galaxies and quiescent galaxies together will dominate the EGB and leave little room for other contributions. If other sources, such as blazars, are found to have important contributions to the EGB, then either the gas mass or cosmic-ray content of quiescent galaxies must be significantly lower than in their star-forming counterparts. In any case, improved Fermi EGB measurements will provide important constraints on hot gas and cosmic rays in quiescent galaxies.

  16. Problems in measuring diffuse X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Welberry, T. Richard; Goossens, Darren J.; Heerdegen, Aidan P.; Lee, Peter L.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract

    Problems encountered in making measurements of diffuse X-ray scattering are discussed. These generally arise from the need to measure very weak scattering in the presence of very strong scattering (Bragg peaks) using multi-detectors of various kinds. The problems are not confined to synchrotron experiments but may even occur using a tube source in the home laboratory. Specific details are given of experiments using 80.725 keV X-rays and a mar345 Image Plate detector on the 1-ID beamline of XOR at the Advanced Photon Source. In these a severe ‘blooming’ artefact which occurred around some strong Bragg peaks was traced to fluorescence from a steel mounting plate in the detector when strong Bragg peaks were incident. Algorithms developed to remove these artefacts from the data are described.

  17. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 1: Diffuse emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitudes 310 deg and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7 kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315, 330, 345, 0, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with galactic features and components such as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic-ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  18. Methods for calculating X-ray diffuse scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punegov, V. I.; Sivkov, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    Two independent approaches to calculate the angular distribution of X-ray diffusion scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots (QDs) have been proposed. The first method is based on the analytical solution involving the multipole expansion of elastic strain fields beyond QDs. The second approach is based on calculations of atomic displacements near QDs by the Green's function method. An analysis of the diffuse scattering intensity distribution in the reciprocal space within these two approaches shows that both methods yield similar results for the chosen models of QD spatial distribution.

  19. ANALYSIS OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY WITH THE EFFECT OF COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Takuhito; Ko, Chung-Ming E-mail: cmko@astro.ncu.edu.tw

    2015-01-10

    We present the results obtained from the linear stability analysis and 2.5 dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of magnetorotational instability (MRI), including the effects of cosmic rays (CRs). We took into account the CR diffusion along the magnetic field but neglected the cross-field-line diffusion. Two models are considered in this paper: the shearing box model and differentially rotating cylinder model. We studied how MRI is affected by the initial CR pressure (i.e., energy) distribution. In the shearing box model, the initial state is uniform distribution. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI does not depend on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient. In the differentially rotating cylinder model, the initial state is a constant angular momentum polytropic disk threaded by a weak uniform vertical magnetic field. Linear analysis shows that the growth rate of MRI becomes larger if the CR diffusion coefficient is larger. Both results are confirmed by MHD simulations. The MHD simulation results show that the outward movement of matter by the growth of MRI is not impeded by the CR pressure gradient, and the centrifugal force that acts on the concentrated matter becomes larger. Consequently, the growth rate of MRI is increased. On the other hand, if the initial CR pressure is uniform, then the growth rate of the MRI barely depends on the value of the CR diffusion coefficient.

  20. COS-B gamma ray sources beyond the predicted diffuse emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Simpson, G.

    1990-01-01

    COS-B data were reanalyzed using for background subtraction the modeled galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission based on HI- and CO-line surveys and the gamma-ray data itself. A methodology was developed for this purpose with the following three features: automatic generation of source catalogs using correlation analysis, simulation of trials to derive significance thresholds for source detection, and bootstrap sampling to drive error boxes and confidence intervals for source parameters. The analysis shows that about half of the 2CG sources are explained by concentrations in the distribution of molecular hydrogen. Indication for a few weak new sources is also obtained.

  1. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The existing models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  2. Testing Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Models of the Galactic Cosmic Ray Environment are used for designing and planning space missions. The exising models will be reviewed. Spectral representations from these models will be compared with measurements of galactic cosmic ray spectra made on balloon flights and satellite flights over a period of more than 50 years.

  3. Diffuse X-ray emission from the Dumbbell Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kwitter, Karen B.; Kaler, James B.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter pointed observations of the Dumbbell Nebula and find that the previously reported 'extended' X-ray emission is an instrumental electronic ghost image at the softest energy band. At slightly higher energy bands, the image of the Dumbbell is not very different from that of the white dwarf HZ43. We conclude that the X-ray emission of the Dumbbell Nebula comes from its central star. A blackbody model is fitted to the spectrum and the best-fit temperature of not greater than 136,000 +/- 10,000 K is in excellent agreement with the Zanstra temperatures.

  4. Modeling of hydrogen diffusion in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Cao, M.Z.; Wan, X.J.; Shi, C.X.

    1989-02-01

    The study of the diffusion of hydrogen in metals is very important to further understand the hydrogen embrittlement of metals. To describe the diffusion of hydrogen in metals the diffusion equation deduced from Fick's law under an ideal condition has been generally used and the effect of hydrogen trapping in metals has been neglected. In the process of hydrogen diffusion through a metal, hydrogen fills the traps continuously and the fraction of the traps filled by hydrogen, which have only little effect on the diffusion of hydrogen, may be different at different places because the distribution of hydrogen concentration may be different at different places. Thus the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the metal may also be different at different positions, i.e., the diffusion coefficient should be affected by time in a dynamic process of hydrogen diffusion through a metal. But in the previous analyses, the above fact is not considered and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient is generally taken as a constant. In the present paper a new model of hydrogen diffusion in metals in which the effect of time is taken into account is developed.

  5. The soft X-ray diffuse background observed with the HEAO 1 low-energy detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Apparao, K. M. V.; Burrows, D. N.; Fink, R. L.; Kraft, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of the diffuse soft-X-ray background as observed by the low-energy detectors of the A-2 experiment aboard the HEAO 1 satellite are reported. The observed sky intensities are presented as maps of the diffuse X-ray background sky in several energy bands covering the energy range 0.15-2.8 keV. It is found that the soft X-ray diffuse background (SXDB) between 1.5 and 2.8 keV, assuming a power law form with photon number index 1.4, has a normalization constant of 10.5 +/- 1.0 photons/sq cm s sr keV. Below 1.5 keV the spectrum of the SXDB exceeds the extrapolation of this power law. The low-energy excess for the NEP can be fitted with emission from a two-temperature equilibrium plasma model with the temperatures given by log I1 = 6.16 and log T2 = 6.33. It is found that this model is able to account for the spectrum below 1 keV, but fails to yield the observed Galactic latitude variation.

  6. Study of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission from the Galactic Plane with ARGO-YBJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Camarri, P.; Cao, Z.; Cardarelli, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liguori, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Panareo, M.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Ruggieri, F.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zizzi, G.; ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The events recorded by ARGO-YBJ in more than five years of data collection have been analyzed to determine the diffuse gamma-ray emission in the Galactic plane at Galactic longitudes 25° < l < 100° and Galactic latitudes |b|\\lt 5{}^\\circ . The energy range covered by this analysis, from ˜350 GeV to ˜2 TeV, allows the connection of the region explored by Fermi with the multi-TeV measurements carried out by Milagro. Our analysis has been focused on two selected regions of the Galactic plane, i.e., 40° < l < 100° and 65° < l < 85° (the Cygnus region), where Milagro observed an excess with respect to the predictions of current models. Great care has been taken in order to mask the most intense gamma-ray sources, including the TeV counterpart of the Cygnus cocoon recently identified by ARGO-YBJ, and to remove residual contributions. The ARGO-YBJ results do not show any excess at sub-TeV energies corresponding to the excess found by Milagro, and are consistent with the predictions of the Fermi model for the diffuse Galactic emission. From the measured energy distribution we derive spectral indices and the differential flux at 1 TeV of the diffuse gamma-ray emission in the sky regions investigated.

  7. The Spectrum of the Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission Derived From First-Year Fermi Large Area Telescope Data

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.

    2011-08-19

    We report on the first Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) measurements of the so-called 'extra-galactic' diffuse {gamma}-ray emission (EGB). This component of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission is generally considered to have an isotropic or nearly isotropic distribution on the sky with diverse contributions discussed in the literature. The derivation of the EGB is based on detailed modelling of the bright foreground diffuse Galactic {gamma}-ray emission (DGE), the detected LAT sources and the solar {gamma}-ray emission. We find the spectrum of the EGB is consistent with a power law with differential spectral index {gamma} = 2.41 {+-} 0.05 and intensity, I(> 100 MeV) = (1.03 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -5} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}, where the error is systematics dominated. Our EGB spectrum is featureless, less intense, and softer than that derived from EGRET data.

  8. Diffusion Background Model for Moving Objects Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, B. V.; Sidyakin, S. V.; Vizilter, Y. V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach for moving objects detection in video surveillance systems. It is based on construction of the regression diffusion maps for the image sequence. This approach is completely different from the state of the art approaches. We show that the motion analysis method, based on diffusion maps, allows objects that move with different speed or even stop for a short while to be uniformly detected. We show that proposed model is comparable to the most popular modern background models. We also show several ways of speeding up diffusion maps algorithm itself.

  9. Background Error Correlation Modeling with Diffusion Operators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    a general procedure for constructing a BEC model as a rational function of the diffusion operator D is presented and analytic expressions for the...Under the assumption of local homogeneity of D , a heuristic method for computing the diagonal elements of B is proposed. It is shown that the...In this chap- ter, a general procedure for constructing a BEC model as a rational function of the diffusion operator D is presented and analytic

  10. EGRET Observations of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission in Orion: Analysis Through Cycle 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digel, S. W.; Aprile, E.; Hunter, S. D.; Mukherjee, R.; Xu, F.

    1999-01-01

    We present a study of the high-energy diffuse emission observed toward Orion by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The total exposure by EGRET in this region has increased by more than a factor of two since a previous study. A simple model for the diffuse emission adequately fits the data; no significant point sources are detected in the region studied (1 = 195 deg to 220 deg and b = -25 deg to -10 deg) in either the composite dataset or in two separate groups of EGRET viewing periods considered. The gamma-ray emissivity in Orion is found to be (1.65 +/- 0.11) x 10(exp -26)/s.sr for E > 100 MeV, and the differential emissivity is well-described as a combination of contributions from cosmic-ray electrons and protons with approximately the local density. The molecular mass calibrating ratio is N(H2)/W(sub CO) = (1.35 +/- 0.15) x 10(exp 20)/sq cm.(K.km/s).

  11. Diffuse x-ray scattering from weakly metamict zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ríos, S.; Salje, E. K. H.

    1999-11-01

    Diffuse x-ray (Cu Kicons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>1) scattering from icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>-decay radiation-damaged natural zircon has been investigated at room temperature. Huang scattering around Bragg reflections was observed in samples with radiation doses between 0.06 and 2 × 1018 icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>-decay events g-1, but none in a highly crystalline natural zircon sample (<0.01 × 1018 icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>-decay events g-1). Huang scattering (~q-2) dominates for small wavevectors, while Stokes-Wilson scattering (~q-4) is observed at larger values of q from the Bragg reflection. The displacement field produced by icons/Journals/Common/alpha" ALT="alpha" ALIGN="TOP"/>-decay radiation damage is shown to correspond to transverse shear waves. The unit-cell expansion observed in zircon is thus interpreted as originating as a consequence of the shear waves propagating in the crystal, rather than from simply longitudinal expansion waves. A cluster size between 70 and 140 Å, depending on the degree of damage, characterizes the defect accumulation.

  12. The partially averaged field approach to cosmic ray diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C.; Birmingham, T. J.; Kaiser, T. B.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetic equation for particles interacting with turbulent fluctuations is derived by a new nonlinear technique which successfully corrects the difficulties associated with quasilinear theory. In this new method the effects of the fluctuations are evaluated along particle orbits which themselves include the effects of a statistically averaged subset of the possible configurations of the turbulence. The new method is illustrated by calculating the pitch angle diffusion coefficient D sub Mu Mu for particles interacting with slab model magnetic turbulence, i.e., magnetic fluctuations linearly polarized transverse to a mean magnetic field. Results are compared with those of quasilinear theory and also with those of Monte Carlo calculations. The major effect of the nonlinear treatment in this illustration is the determination of D sub Mu Mu in the vicinity of 90 deg pitch angles where quasilinear theory breaks down. The spatial diffusion coefficient parallel to a mean magnetic field is evaluated using D sub Mu Mu as calculated by this technique. It is argued that the partially averaged field method is not limited to small amplitude fluctuating fields and is hence not a perturbation theory.

  13. Analysis and interpretation of diffuse x-ray emission using data from the Einstein satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1991-01-01

    An ambitious program to create a powerful and accessible archive of the HEAO-2 Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) database was outlined. The scientific utility of that database for studies of diffuse x ray emissions was explored. Technical and scientific accomplishments are reviewed. Three papers were presented which have major new scientific findings relevant to the global structure of the interstellar medium and the origin of the cosmic x ray background. An all-sky map of diffuse x ray emission was constructed.

  14. Diffuse Galactic gamma-ray emission with H.E.S.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Angüner, E. O.; Backes, M.; Balenderan, S.; Balzer, A.; Barnacka, A.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Birsin, E.; Biteau, J.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Bregeon, J.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Carrigan, S.; Casanova, S.; Chadwick, P. M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; deWilt, P.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Dyrda, M.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Espigat, P.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fernandez, D.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grudzińska, M.; Hadasch, D.; Häffner, S.; Hahn, J.; Harris, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hofverberg, P.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jahn, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, F.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kaufmann, S.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Lohse, T.; Lopatin, A.; Lu, C.-C.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; McComb, T. J. L.; Méhault, J.; Meintjes, P. J.; Menzler, U.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Morâ, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niemiec, J.; Nolan, S. J.; Oakes, L.; Odaka, H.; Ohm, S.; Opitz, B.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reichardt, I.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarzburg, S.; Schwemmer, S.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Valerius, K.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Völk, H. J.; Volpe, F.; Vorster, M.; Vuillaume, T.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Ward, M.; Weidinger, M.; Weitzel, Q.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zechlin, H.-S.; Fukui, Y.; H. E. S. S. Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    Diffuse γ -ray emission is the most prominent observable signature of celestial cosmic-ray interactions at high energies. While already being investigated at GeV energies over several decades, assessments of diffuse γ -ray emission at TeV energies remain sparse. After completion of the systematic survey of the inner Galaxy, the H.E.S.S. experiment is in a prime position to observe large-scale diffuse emission at TeV energies. Data of the H.E.S.S. Galactic Plane Survey are investigated in regions off known γ -ray sources. Corresponding γ -ray flux measurements were made over an extensive grid of celestial locations. Longitudinal and latitudinal profiles of the observed γ -ray fluxes show characteristic excess emission not attributable to known γ -ray sources. For the first time large-scale γ -ray emission along the Galactic plane using imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes has been observed. While the background subtraction technique limits the ability to recover modest variation on the scale of the H.E.S.S. field of view or larger, which is characteristic of the inverse Compton scatter-induced Galactic diffuse emission, contributions of neutral pion decay as well as emission from unresolved γ -ray sources can be recovered in the observed signal to a large fraction. Calculations show that the minimum γ -ray emission from π0 decay represents a significant contribution to the total signal. This detection is interpreted as a mix of diffuse Galactic γ -ray emission and unresolved sources.

  15. A Measurement of the Spatial Distribution of Diffuse TeV Gamma Ray Emission from the Galactic Plane with Milagro

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Allen, B.; Aune, T.; Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Casanova, S.; Chen, C.; Dingus, B.L.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Fleysher, L.; Fleysher, R.; Gonzalez, M.M.; Goodman, J.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; H'untemeyer, P.H.; Kolterman, B.E.; Lansdell, C.P.; Linnemann, J.T.; McEnery, J.E.; Mincer, A.I.; Nemethy, I.V.Moskalenko P.

    2008-05-14

    Diffuse {gamma}-ray emission produced by the interaction of cosmic-ray particles with matter and radiation in the Galaxy can be used to probe the distribution of cosmic rays and their sources in different regions of the Galaxy. With its large field of view and long observation time, the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is an ideal instrument for surveying large regions of the Northern Hemisphere sky and for detecting diffuse {gamma}-ray emission at very high energies. Here, the spatial distribution and the flux of the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission in the TeV energy range with a median energy of 15 TeV for Galactic longitudes between 30{sup o} and 110{sup o} and between 136{sup o} and 216{sup o} and for Galactic latitudes between -10{sup o} and 10{sup o} are determined. The measured fluxes are consistent with predictions of the GALPROP model everywhere except for the Cygnus region (l {element_of} [65{sup o}, 85{sup o}]). For the Cygnus region, the flux is twice the predicted value. This excess can be explained by the presence of active cosmic ray sources accelerating hadrons which interact with the local dense interstellar medium and produce gamma rays through pion decay.

  16. Gamma-ray spectroscopy: The diffuse galactic glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of a numerical code that provides statistical models of the sky distribution of gamma-ray lines due to the production of radioactive isotopes by ongoing Galactic nucleosynthesis. We are particularly interested in quasi-steady emission from novae, supernovae, and stellar winds, but continuum radiation and transient sources must also be considered. We have made significant progress during the first half period of this project and expect the timely completion of a code that can be applied to Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) Galactic plane survey data.

  17. DETECTION OF DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH NEBULAR O VI

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, N.; Guerrero, M. A.; Jacob, R.; Schoenberner, D.; Steffen, M.

    2013-04-10

    The presence of O VI ions can be indicative of plasma temperatures of a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K that are expected in heat conduction layers between the hot shocked stellar wind gas at several 10{sup 6} K and the cooler (10{sup 4} K) nebular gas of planetary nebulae (PNe). We have used FUSE observations of PNe to search for nebular O VI emission or absorption as a diagnostic of the conduction layer to ensure the presence of hot interior gas. Three PNe showing nebular O VI, namely IC 418, NGC 2392, and NGC 6826, have been selected for Chandra observations and diffuse X-ray emission is indeed detected in each of these PNe. Among the three, NGC 2392 has peculiarly high diffuse X-ray luminosity and plasma temperature compared with those expected from its stellar wind's mechanical luminosity and terminal velocity. The limited effects of heat conduction on the plasma temperature of a hot bubble at the low terminal velocity of the stellar wind of NGC 2392 may partially account for its high plasma temperature, but the high X-ray luminosity needs to be powered by processes other than the observed stellar wind, probably the presence of an unseen binary companion of the central star of the PN (CSPN) of NGC 2392. We have compiled relevant information on the X-ray, stellar, and nebular properties of PNe with a bubble morphology and found that the expectations of bubble models including heat conduction compare favorably with the present X-ray observations of hot bubbles around H-rich CSPNe, but have notable discrepancies for those around H-poor [WR] CSPNe. We note that PNe with more massive central stars can produce hotter plasma and higher X-ray surface brightness inside central hot bubbles.

  18. Diffuse X-Rays from the Inner 3 Parsecs of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockefeller, Gabriel; Fryer, Christopher L.; Melia, Fulvio; Warren, Michael S.

    2004-04-01

    Recent observations with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory have provided us with the capability to discriminate point sources, such as the supermassive black hole Sgr A*, from the diffuse emission within the inner 10" of the Galaxy. The hot plasma producing the diffuse X-radiation, estimated at ~7.6×1031 ergs s-1 arcsec-2 in the 2-10 keV band, has an rms electron density ~26 cm-3 and a temperature kT~1.3 keV, with a total inferred mass of ~0.1 Msolar. At least some of this gas must be injected into the interstellar medium via stellar winds. In the most recent census, about 25 bright, young stars have been identified as the dominant sources of the overall mass efflux from the Galactic center. In this paper we use detailed three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to study the wind-wind interactions occurring in the inner 3 pc of the Galaxy, with a goal of understanding what fraction, if any, of the diffuse X-ray flux measured by Chandra results from the ensuing shock heating of the ambient medium. We conclude that this process alone can account for the entire X-ray flux observed by Chandra in the inner 10" of the Galaxy. Understanding the X-ray morphology of the environment surrounding Sgr A* will ultimately provide us with a greater precision in modeling the accretion of gas onto this object, which appears to be relatively underluminous compared to its brethren in the nuclei of other galaxies.

  19. The diffuse gamma-ray flux associated with sub-PEV/PEV neutrinos from starburst galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Xiao-Chuan; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2014-10-01

    One attractive scenario for the excess of sub-PeV/PeV neutrinos recently reported by IceCube is that they are produced by cosmic rays in starburst galaxies colliding with the dense interstellar medium. These proton-proton (pp) collisions also produce high-energy gamma rays, which finally contribute to the diffuse high-energy gamma-ray background. We calculate the diffuse gamma-ray flux with a semi-analytic approach and consider that the very high energy gamma rays will be absorbed in the galaxies and converted into electron-positron pairs, which then lose almost all of their energy through synchrotron radiation in the strong magnetic fields in the starburst region. Since the synchrotron emission goes into energies below GeV, this synchrotron loss reduces the diffuse high-energy gamma-ray flux by a factor of about two, thus leaving more room for other sources to contribute to the gamma-ray background. For an E{sub ν}{sup −2} neutrino spectrum, we find that the diffuse gamma-ray flux contributes about 20% of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background in the 100 GeV range. However, for a steeper neutrino spectrum, this synchrotron loss effect is less important, since the energy fraction in absorbed gamma rays becomes lower.

  20. THE INTEGRATED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION OF THE CARINA NEBULA COMPARED TO OTHER MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.; Oey, M. S.; Pittard, Julian M.

    2011-05-01

    The Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) has shown that the Carina Nebula displays bright, spatially-complex soft diffuse X-ray emission. Here, we 'sum up' the CCCP diffuse emission work by comparing the global morphology and spectrum of Carina's diffuse X-ray emission to other famous sites of massive star formation with pronounced diffuse X-ray emission: M17, NGC 3576, NGC 3603, and 30 Doradus. All spectral models require at least two diffuse thermal plasma components to achieve adequate spectral fits, a softer component with kT = 0.2-0.6 keV and a harder component with kT = 0.5-0.9 keV. In several cases these hot plasmas appear to be in a state of non-equilibrium ionization that may indicate recent and current strong shocks. A cavity north of the embedded giant H II region NGC 3576 is the only region studied here that exhibits hard diffuse X-ray emission; this emission appears to be nonthermal and is likely due to a recent cavity supernova, as evidenced by a previously-known pulsar and a newly-discovered pulsar wind nebula also seen in this cavity. All of these targets exhibit X-ray emission lines that are not well modeled by variable-abundance thermal plasmas and that might be attributed to charge exchange at the shock between the hot, tenuous, X-ray-emitting plasma and cold, dense molecular material; this is likely evidence for dust destruction at the many hot/cold interfaces that characterize massive star-forming regions.

  1. CHANDRA DETECTION OF A NEW DIFFUSE X-RAY COMPONENT FROM THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, E. M. H.; Cheng, K. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Dogiel, V. A.

    2014-06-20

    In re-analyzing the archival Chandra data of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, we have detected a new diffuse X-ray emission feature within the half-mass radius of the cluster. The spectrum of the diffuse emission can be described by a power-law model plus a plasma component with photon index Γ ∼ 1.0 and plasma temperature kT ∼ 0.2 keV. While the thermal component is apparently uniform, the non-thermal contribution falls off exponentially from the core. The observed properties could possibly be explained in the context of multiple shocks resulting from the collisions among the stellar wind in the cluster and the inverse Compton scattering between the pulsar wind and the relic photons.

  2. Simple diffusion hopping model with convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Barry W.; Padding, Johan T.; van Santen, Rutger

    2017-01-01

    We present results from a new variant of a diffusion hopping model, the convective diffusive lattice model, to describe the behavior of a particulate flux around bluff obstacles. Particle interactions are constrained to an underlying square lattice where particles are subject to excluded volume conditions. In an extension to previous models, we impose a real continuous velocity field upon the lattice such that particles have an associated velocity vector. We use this velocity field to mediate the position update of the particles through the use of a convective update after which particles also undergo diffusion. We demonstrate the emergence of an expected wake behind a square obstacle which increases in size with increasing object size. For larger objects we observe the presence of recirculation zones marked by the presence of symmetric vortices in qualitative agreement with experiment and previous simulations.

  3. Mathematical modeling of molecular diffusion through mucus

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The rate of molecular transport through the mucus gel can be an important determinant of efficacy for therapeutic agents delivered by oral, intranasal, intravaginal/rectal, and intraocular routes. Transport through mucus can be described by mathematical models based on principles of physical chemistry and known characteristics of the mucus gel, its constituents, and of the drug itself. In this paper, we review mathematical models of molecular diffusion in mucus, as well as the techniques commonly used to measure diffusion of solutes in the mucus gel, mucus gel mimics, and mucosal epithelia. PMID:19135488

  4. On the Fermi Large Area Telescope Surplus of Diffuse Galactic Gamma-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völk, H. J.; Berezhko, E. G.

    2013-11-01

    Recent observations of diffuse Galactic γ-ray emission (DGE) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) have shown significant deviations, above a few GeV to about 100 GeV, from DGE models that use the GALPROP code for the propagation of cosmic ray (CR) particles outside their sources in the Galaxy and their interaction with the target distributions of the interstellar gas and radiation fields. The surplus of radiation observed is most pronounced in the inner Galaxy, where the concentration of CR sources is strongest. The present study investigates this "Fermi-LAT Galactic Plane Surplus" by estimating the γ-ray emission from the sources themselves, which is disregarded in the above DGE models. It is shown that the expected hard spectrum of CRs, still confined in their sources (source cosmic rays, SCRs), can indeed explain this surplus. The method is based on earlier studies regarding the so-called EGRET GeV excess, which by now is generally interpreted as an instrumental effect. The contribution from SCRs is also predicted to increasingly exceed the DGE models above 100 GeV, up to γ-ray energies of about 10 TeV, where the corresponding surplus exceeds the hadronic part of the DGE by about one order of magnitude. Above such energies, the emission surplus should decrease again with energy due to the finite lifetime of the assumed supernova remnant sources. Observations of the DGE in the inner Galaxy at 15 TeV with the ground-based Milagro γ-ray detector and, at TeV energies, with the ARGO-YBJ detector are interpreted to provide confirmation of a significant SCR contribution to the DGE.

  5. Models of anomalous diffusion: the subdiffusive case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piryatinska, A.; Saichev, A. I.; Woyczynski, W. A.

    2005-04-01

    The paper discusses a model for anomalous diffusion processes. Their one-point probability density functions (p.d.f.) are exact solutions of fractional diffusion equations. The model reflects the asymptotic behavior of a jump (anomalous random walk) process with random jump sizes and random inter-jump time intervals with infinite means (and variances) which do not satisfy the Law of Large Numbers. In the case when these intervals have a fractional exponential p.d.f., the fractional Komogorov-Feller equation for the corresponding anomalous diffusion is provided and methods of finding its solutions are discussed. Finally, some statistical properties of solutions of the related Langevin equation are studied. The subdiffusive case is explored in detail. The emphasis is on a rigorous presentation which, however, would be accessible to the physical sciences audience.

  6. Diffusion and Advection using Cellular Potts Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Debasis; Glazier, James

    2005-03-01

    The Cellular Potts Model (CPM) is a robust cell level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Standard diffusion solvers in the CPM use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. These methods have difficulty in simulating local advection in the ECM due to physiology and morphogenesis. To circumvent the problem of instabilities we simulate advection-diffusion within the framework of CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalised fluid "cells" or particles which separate advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid cells by local averaging rules which approximate the Laplacian. CPM movement of the cells by spin flips handles the advection. The extension allows the CPM to model viscosity explicitly by including a relative velocity constraint on the fluid. The extended CPM correctly reproduces flow profiles of viscous fluids in cylindrical tube, during Stokes flow across a sphere and in flow in concentric cylindrical shells. We illustrate various conditions for diffusion including multiple instantaneous sources, continuous sources, moving sources and different boundary geometries and conditions to validate our approximation by comparing with analytical and established numerical solutions.

  7. Leader in a diffusion competition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzhevaikin, V. N.

    2015-03-01

    A one-dimensional Cauchy problem is considered for a system of reaction-diffusion equations that, in the point version, generalizes the Volterra competition model. It is proved that the number of the leader in the propagation velocity of nonvanishing solution values at the periphery is independent of nonnegative finite initial distributions.

  8. Modelling Diffusion of a Personalized Learning Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmeshu; Raman, Raghu; Nedungadi, Prema

    2012-01-01

    A new modelling approach for diffusion of personalized learning as an educational process innovation in social group comprising adopter-teachers is proposed. An empirical analysis regarding the perception of 261 adopter-teachers from 18 schools in India about a particular personalized learning framework has been made. Based on this analysis,…

  9. A Systems Model for Assessment and Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toomb, Kevin; And Others

    The Florida Assessment and Diffusion System (FADS) represents a systematic approach to organizational change, emphasizing the interpersonal communication dimension of the change process. FADS encourages a systems approach to change, but is flexible enough to allow for procedural changes in response to specific user needs. The model assumes a…

  10. A study of diffuse radio sources and X-ray emission in six massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, V.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; Kale, R.; Intema, H.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to extend our current knowledge of the diffuse radio source (halo and relic) populations to z > 0.3. Here, we report GMRT and EVLA radio observations of six galaxy clusters taken from the MAssive Cluster Survey (MACS) catalogue to detect diffuse radio emission. We used archival GMRT (150, 235, and 610 MHz) and EVLA (L band) data and made images at multiple radio frequencies of the following six clusters - MACSJ0417.5-1154, MACSJ1131.8-1955, MACSJ0308.9+2645, MACSJ2243.3-0935, MACSJ2228.5+2036, and MACSJ0358.8-2955. We detect diffuse radio emission (halo or relic, or both) in the first four clusters. In the last two clusters, we do not detect any diffuse radio emission but we put stringent upper limits on their radio powers. We also use archival Chandra X-ray data to carry out morphology and substructure analysis of these clusters. We find that based on X-ray data, these MACS clusters are non-relaxed and show substructures in their temperature distribution. The radio powers of the first four MACS clusters are consistent with their expected values in the LX-P1.4 GHz plot. However, we found ultrasteep spectrum radio halo in the MACSJ0417.5-1154 cluster whose rest-frame cut-off frequency is at ˜900 MHz. The remaining two clusters whose radio powers are ˜11 times below the expected values are most likely to be in the `off-state' as has been postulated in some of the models of radio halo formation.

  11. Generalized Drift-Diffusion Model In Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mesbah, S.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    A new drift-diffusion model is proposed based on the computation of the stationary nonlocal current density. The semi classical Boltzmann equation is solved keeping all the anisotropies of the distribution function with the use of the continued fractions. The conductivity is calculated in the linear approximation and for arbitrary collision frequency with respect to Kv{sub t} where K{sup -1} is the characteristic length scale of the system and V{sub t} is the thermal velocity. The nonlocal conductivity can be used to close the generalized drift-diffusion equations valid for arbitrary collisionality.

  12. New Solution of Diffusion-Advection Equation for Cosmic-Ray Transport Using Ultradistributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we exactly solve the diffusion-advection equation (DAE) for cosmic-ray transport. For such a purpose we use the Theory of Ultradistributions of J. Sebastiao e Silva, to give a general solution for the DAE. From the ensuing solution, we obtain several approximations as limiting cases of various situations of physical and astrophysical interest. One of them involves Solar cosmic-rays' diffusion.

  13. Improved cosmic-ray injection models and the Galactic Center gamma-ray excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Eric; Linden, Tim; Profumo, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Fermi-LAT observations of the Milky Way Galactic Center (GC) have revealed a spherically symmetric excess of GeV γ rays extending to at least 10° from the dynamical center of the Galaxy. A critical uncertainty in extracting the intensity, spectrum, and morphology of this excess concerns the accuracy of astrophysical diffuse γ -ray emission models near the GC. Recently, it has been noted that many diffuse emission models utilize a cosmic-ray injection rate far below that predicted based on the observed star-formation rate in the Central Molecular Zone. In this study, we add a cosmic-ray injection component which nonlinearly traces the Galactic H2 density determined in three dimensions, and find that the associated γ -ray emission is degenerate with many properties of the GC γ -ray excess. Specifically, in models that utilize a large sideband (4 0 ° ×4 0 ° surrounding the GC) to normalize the best-fitting diffuse emission models, the intensity of the GC excess decreases by approximately a factor of 2, and the morphology of the excess becomes less peaked and less spherically symmetric. In models which utilize a smaller region of interest (1 5 ° ×1 5 ° ) the addition of an excess template instead suppresses the intensity of the best-fit astrophysical diffuse emission, and the GC excess is rather resilient to changes in the details of the astrophysical diffuse modeling. In both analyses, the addition of a GC excess template still provides a statistically significant improvement to the overall fit to the γ -ray data. We also implement advective winds at the GC, and find that the Fermi-LAT data strongly prefer outflows of order several hundred km/s, whose role is to efficiently advect low-energy cosmic rays from the inner-few kpc of the Galaxy. Finally, we perform numerous tests of our diffuse emission models, and conclude that they provide a significant improvement in the physical modeling of the multiwavelength nonthermal emission from the GC region.

  14. Theoretical uncertainties in extracting cosmic-ray diffusion parameters: the boron-to-carbon ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genolini, Y.; Putze, A.; Salati, P.; Serpico, P. D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. PAMELA and, more recently, AMS-02, are ushering us into a new era of greatly reduced statistical uncertainties in experimental measurements of cosmic-ray fluxes. In particular, new determinations of traditional diagnostic tools such as the boron-to-carbon ratio (B/C) are expected to significantly reduce errors on cosmic-ray diffusion parameters, with important implications for astroparticle physics, ranging from inferring primary source spectra to indirect dark matter searches. Aims: It is timely to stress, however, that the conclusions obtained crucially depend on the framework in which the data are interpreted as well as on some nuclear input parameters. We aim at assessing the theoretical uncertainties affecting the outcome, with models as simple as possible while still retaining the key dependencies. Methods: We compared different semi-analytical, two-zone model descriptions of cosmic-ray transport in the Galaxy: infinite slab(1D), cylindrical symmetry (2D) with homogeneous sources, cylindrical symmetry (2D) with inhomogeneous source distribution. We tested for the effect of a primary source contamination in the boron flux by parametrically altering its flux. We also tested for nuclear cross-section uncertainties. All hypotheses were compared by χ2 minimisation techniques to preliminary results from AMS-02. Results: We find that the main theoretical bias on the determination of the diffusion coefficient index δ (up to a factor two) is represented by the assumption that no injection of boron takes place at the source. The next most important uncertainty is represented by cross-section uncertainties, which reach ± 20% in δ. As a comparison, nuclear uncertainties are more important than the shift in the best-fit when introducing a convective wind of velocity ≲30 km s-1, with respect to a pure diffusive baseline model. Perhaps surprisingly, homogeneous 1D vs. 2D performances are similar in determining diffusion parameters. An inhomogeneous source

  15. Theoretical uncertainties in extracting cosmic-ray diffusion parameters: the boron-to-carbon ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genolini, Yoann

    2016-05-01

    PAMELA and, more recently, AMS-02, are ushering us into a new era of greatly reduced statistical uncertainties in experimental measurements of cosmic ray fluxes. In particular, new determinations of traditional diagnostic tools such as the boron to carbon ratio (B/C) are expected to significantly reduce errors on cosmic-ray diffusion parameters, with important implications for astroparticle physics, ranging from inferring primary source spectra to indirect dark matter searches. It is timely to stress, however, that the conclusions inferred crucially depend on the framework in which the data are interpreted as well as on some nuclear input parameters. We aim at assessing the theoretical uncertainties affecting the outcome, with models as simple as possible while still retaining the key dependences. We compare different semi-analytical, two-zone model descriptions of cosmic ray transport in the Galaxy: infinite slab(lD), cylindrical symmetry (2D) with homogeneous sources, cylindrical symmetry (2D) with inhomogeneous source distribution. We tested for the effect of a primary source contamination in the boron flux by parametrically altering its flux. We also tested for nuclear cross-section uncertainties.

  16. Computer simulations of cosmic-ray diffusion near supernova remnant shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, C. E.; Zachary, A. L.; Arons, J.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma simulation model was used to study the resonant interactions between streaming cosmic-ray ions and a self-consistent spectrum of Alfven waves, such as might exist in the interstellar medium upstream of a supernova remnant shock wave. The computational model is a hybrid one, in which the background interstellar medium is an MHD fluid and the cosmic-rays are discrete kinetic particles. The particle sources for the electromagnetic fields are obtained by averaging over the fast cyclotron motions. When the perturbed magnetic field is larger than 10 percent of the background field, the macro- and microphysics are no longer correctly predicted by quasi-linear theory. The particles are trapped by the waves and show sharp jumps in their pitch-angles relative to the background magnetic field, and the effective ninety-degree scattering time for diffusion parallel to the background magnetic field is reduced to between 5 and 30 cyclotron periods. Simulation results suggest that Type 1 supernova remnants may be the principal sites of cosmic ray acceleration.

  17. Diffuse scattering from interface roughness in grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, S. A.; Kondrashkina, E. A.; Schmidbauer, M.; Köhler, R.; Pfeiffer, J.-U.; Jach, T.; Souvorov, A. Yu.

    1996-09-01

    A theory of x-ray diffuse scattering from interface roughness in grazing-incidence diffraction (GID) is presented. The theory assumes dynamical diffraction of x rays from perfect multilayers with the diffuse scattering from roughness calculated in the distorted-wave Born approximation. This permits the calculation of scattering due to roughness at all points on the diffraction curves, including the vicinity of the Bragg peaks. It is shown that the measurements of diffuse scattering in GID can provide information on atomic ordering at crystal interfaces which is not accessible by usual x-ray specular reflection and nonspecular x-ray scattering. The theory is found to be in good agreement to the two GID experiments carried out with an etched Ge surface and an AlAs/GaAs superlattice at the Cornell High-Energy Synchrotron Source and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, respectively. In the case of the etched Ge surface, an anti-Yoneda dip in the diffuse scattering pattern at the Bragg peak and two symmetrical shoulders on the Bragg curve wings have been found and explained. In the case of the AlAs/GaAs superlattice, the diffuse scattering has been separated from GID by means of high-resolution measurements. A comparison between diffuse scattering in GID and diffuse scattering in grazing incidence far from the diffraction conditions has shown that the atomic ordering was preserved in the interface roughness, while it was partially destroyed in the surface roughness.

  18. Diffuse gamma-ray emission from the Galactic center and implications of its past activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Yutaka; Kimura, Shigeo S.; Murase, Kohta

    2017-01-01

    It has been indicated that low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs) are accelerating high-energy cosmic-ray (CR) protons in their radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs). If this is the case, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) should also be generating CR protons, because Sgr A* is a LLAGN. Based on this scenario, we calculate a production rate of CR protons in Sgr A* and their diffusion in the central molecular zone (CMZ) around Sgr A*. The CR protons diffusing in the CMZ create gamma-rays through pp interaction. We show that the gamma-ray luminosity and spectrum are consistent with observations if Sgr A* was active in the past.

  19. SLOW DIFFUSION OF COSMIC RAYS AROUND A SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-04-01

    We study the escape of cosmic-ray protons accelerated at a supernova remnant (SNR). We are interested in their propagation in the interstellar medium (ISM) after they leave the shock neighborhood where they are accelerated, but when they are still near the SNR with their energy density higher than that in the average ISM. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the cosmic rays with energies of {approx}< TeV excite Alfven waves around the SNR on a scale of the SNR itself if the ISM is highly ionized. Thus, even if the cosmic rays can leave the shock, scattering by the waves prevents them from moving further away from the SNR. The cosmic rays form a slowly expanding cosmic-ray bubble, and they spend a long time around the SNR. This means that the cosmic rays cannot actually escape from the SNR until a fairly late stage of the SNR evolution. This is consistent with some results of Fermi and H.E.S.S. observations.

  20. A gravitational diffusion model without dark matter

    PubMed Central

    Britten, Roy J.

    1998-01-01

    In this model, without dark matter, the flat rotation curves of galaxies and the mass-to-light ratios of clusters of galaxies are described quantitatively. The hypothesis is that the agent of gravitational force is propagated as if it were scattered with a mean free path of ≈5 kiloparsecs. As a result, the force between moderately distant masses, separated by more than the mean free path, diminishes as the inverse first power of the distance, following diffusion equations, and describes the flat rotation curves of galaxies. The force between masses separated by <1 kiloparsec diminishes as the inverse square of distance. The excess gravitational force (ratio of 1/r:1/r2) increases with the scale of structures from galaxies to clusters of galaxies. However, there is reduced force at great distances because of the ≈12 billion years that has been available for diffusion to occur. This model with a mean free path of ≈5 kiloparsecs predicts a maximum excess force of a few hundredfold for objects the size of galactic clusters a few megaparsecs in size. With only a single free parameter, the predicted curve for excess gravitational force vs. size of structures fits reasonably well with observations from those for dwarf galaxies through galactic clusters. Under the diffusion model, no matter is proposed in addition to the observed baryons plus radiation and thus the proposed density of the universe is only a few percent of that required for closure. PMID:9520368

  1. The Spectrum of Isotropic Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission between 100 MeV and 820 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashi, K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Ippoliti, P.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Manfreda, A.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-01-01

    The γ-ray sky can be decomposed into individually detected sources, diffuse emission attributed to the interactions of Galactic cosmic rays with gas and radiation fields, and a residual all-sky emission component commonly called the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background (IGRB). The IGRB comprises all extragalactic emissions too faint or too diffuse to be resolved in a given survey, as well as any residual Galactic foregrounds that are approximately isotropic. The first IGRB measurement with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) used 10 months of sky-survey data and considered an energy range between 200 MeV and 100 GeV. Improvements in event selection and characterization of cosmic-ray backgrounds, better understanding of the diffuse Galactic emission (DGE), and a longer data accumulation of 50 months allow for a refinement and extension of the IGRB measurement with the LAT, now covering the energy range from 100 MeV to 820 GeV. The IGRB spectrum shows a significant high-energy cutoff feature and can be well described over nearly four decades in energy by a power law with exponential cutoff having a spectral index of 2.32 ± 0.02 and a break energy of (279 ± 52) GeV using our baseline DGE model. The total intensity attributed to the IGRB is (7.2 ± 0.6) × 10-6 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 above 100 MeV, with an additional +15%/-30% systematic uncertainty due to the Galactic diffuse foregrounds.

  2. Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborra, Irene; Ando, Shin'ichiro E-mail: s.ando@uva.nl

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that GRBs could contribute up to a few % to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin. Gamma-ray bursts, especially low-luminosity ones, could however be the main sources of the IceCube high-energy neutrino flux in the PeV range. While high-luminosity and low-luminosity GRBs have comparable intensities, the contribution from the short-duration component is significantly smaller. Our findings confirm the most-recent IceCube results on the GRB searches and suggest that larger exposure is mandatory to detect high-energy neutrinos from high-luminosity GRBs in the near future.

  3. A Diffuse Interface Model with Immiscibility Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Arpit; Freund, Jonathan B.; Pantano, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and computationally efficient interface capturing scheme based on a diffuse interface approach is presented for simulation of compressible multiphase flows. Multi-fluid interfaces are represented using field variables (interface functions) with associated transport equations that are augmented, with respect to an established formulation, to enforce a selected interface thickness. The resulting interface region can be set just thick enough to be resolved by the underlying mesh and numerical method, yet thin enough to provide an efficient model for dynamics of well-resolved scales. A key advance in the present method is that the interface regularization is asymptotically compatible with the thermodynamic mixture laws of the mixture model upon which it is constructed. It incorporates first-order pressure and velocity non-equilibrium effects while preserving interface conditions for equilibrium flows, even within the thin diffused mixture region. We first quantify the improved convergence of this formulation in some widely used one-dimensional configurations, then show that it enables fundamentally better simulations of bubble dynamics. Demonstrations include both a spherical bubble collapse, which is shown to maintain excellent symmetry despite the Cartesian mesh, and a jetting bubble collapse adjacent a wall. Comparisons show that without the new formulation the jet is suppressed by numerical diffusion leading to qualitatively incorrect results. PMID:24058207

  4. A diffuse interface model with immiscibility preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Arpit; Freund, Jonathan B.; Pantano, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    A new, simple, and computationally efficient interface capturing scheme based on a diffuse interface approach is presented for simulation of compressible multiphase flows. Multi-fluid interfaces are represented using field variables (interface functions) with associated transport equations that are augmented, with respect to an established formulation, to enforce a selected interface thickness. The resulting interface region can be set just thick enough to be resolved by the underlying mesh and numerical method, yet thin enough to provide an efficient model for dynamics of well-resolved scales. A key advance in the present method is that the interface regularization is asymptotically compatible with the thermodynamic mixture laws of the mixture model upon which it is constructed. It incorporates first-order pressure and velocity non-equilibrium effects while preserving interface conditions for equilibrium flows, even within the thin diffused mixture region. We first quantify the improved convergence of this formulation in some widely used one-dimensional configurations, then show that it enables fundamentally better simulations of bubble dynamics. Demonstrations include both a spherical-bubble collapse, which is shown to maintain excellent symmetry despite the Cartesian mesh, and a jetting bubble collapse adjacent a wall. Comparisons show that without the new formulation the jet is suppressed by numerical diffusion leading to qualitatively incorrect results.

  5. Creatinine Diffusion Modeling in Capacitive Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohabbati-Kalejahi, Elham; Azimirad, Vahid; Bahrami, Manouchehr

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, creatinine diffusion in capacitive sensors is discussed. The factors influencing the response time of creatinine biosensors are mathematically formulated and then three novel approaches for decreasing the response time are presented. At first, a piezoelectric actuator is used to vibrate the microtube that contains the blood sample, in order to reduce the viscosity of blood, and thus to increase the coefficient of diffusion. Then, the blood sample is assumed to be pushed through a porous medium, and the relevant conditions are investigated. Finally, the effect of the dentate shape of dielectric on response time is studied. The algorithms and the mathematical models are presented and discussed, and the results of simulations are illustrated. The response times for the first, second and third method are 60, 0.036 and about 31 s, respectively. It is also found that pumping results in very fast responses.

  6. A High Diffusive Model for Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Di Sia, P; Dallacasa, V

    2011-12-01

    Considerable attention is today devoted to the engineering of films widely used in photocatalytic, solar energy converters, photochemical and photoelectrochemical cells, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), to optimize electronic time response following photogeneration. However, the precise nature of transport processes in these systems has remained unresolved. To investigate such aspects of carrier dynamics, we have suggested a model for the calculation of correlation functions, expressed as the Fourier transform of the frequency-dependent complex conductivity σ(ω). Results are presented for the velocity correlation functions, the mean square deviation of position and the diffusion coefficient in systems, like TiO2 and doped Si, of large interest in present devices. Fast diffusion occurs in short time intervals of the order of few collision times. Consequences for efficiency of this fast response are discussed in relation to nanostructured devices.

  7. Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maribu, Karl Magnus; Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui,Afzal S.

    2006-06-16

    Distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as gas-fired reciprocating engines and microturbines, have been found to be economically beneficial in meeting commercial-sector electrical, heating, and cooling loads. Even though the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that offered by traditional central stations, combined heat and power (CHP) applications using recovered heat can make the overall system energy efficiency of distributed energy resources (DER) greater. From a policy perspective, however, it would be useful to have good estimates of penetration rates of DER under various economic and regulatory scenarios. In order to examine the extent to which DER systems may be adopted at a national level, we model the diffusion of DER in the US commercial building sector under different technical research and technology outreach scenarios. In this context, technology market diffusion is assumed to depend on the system's economic attractiveness and the developer's knowledge about the technology. The latter can be spread both by word-of-mouth and by public outreach programs. To account for regional differences in energy markets and climates, as well as the economic potential for different building types, optimal DER systems are found for several building types and regions. Technology diffusion is then predicted via two scenarios: a baseline scenario and a program scenario, in which more research improves DER performance and stronger technology outreach programs increase DER knowledge. The results depict a large and diverse market where both optimal installed capacity and profitability vary significantly across regions and building types. According to the technology diffusion model, the West region will take the lead in DER installations mainly due to high electricity prices, followed by a later adoption in the Northeast and Midwest regions. Since the DER market is in an early stage, both technology research and outreach programs have the potential to increase

  8. Effects of spatially heterogeneous porosity on matrix diffusion as investigated by X-ray absorption imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, Vincent C.; Meigs, Lucy C.; Christian-Frear, Tracy; Boney, Craig M.

    2000-03-01

    High-resolution X-ray absorption imaging was used to investigate the effects of spatially heterogeneous porosity on matrix diffusion. Experiments were performed on four, centimeter-scale slabs of Culebra dolomite taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site. These tests involved the diffusion of potassium iodide into a single edge of each brine-saturated rock slab, while X-ray absorption imaging was used to measure the two-dimensional relative concentration distribution at different times during the experiment. X-ray imaging was also used to measure the heterogeneous, two-dimensional porosity distribution of each rock slab. The resulting high-resolution data provide unique insight into the spatially varying diffusion characteristics of each heterogeneous rock sample, which traditional methods such as through-diffusion experiments cannot. In these tests, significant variations in the diffusion coefficient were calculated over the relatively small length (centimeter) and time scales (months) investigated. Results also indicated that these variations were related to the heterogeneous porosity characteristics of each rock sample. Not only were the diffusion coefficients found to depend on the magnitude of the porosity but also on its spatial distribution. Specifically, the geometry, position, and orientation of the heterogeneous porosity features populating each rock slab appeared to influence the diffusion characteristics.

  9. Diffusion through thin membranes: Modeling across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Vesa; Mattila, Keijo; Kühn, Thomas; Kekäläinen, Pekka; Pulkkinen, Otto; Minussi, Roberta Brondani; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    From macroscopic to microscopic scales it is demonstrated that diffusion through membranes can be modeled using specific boundary conditions across them. The membranes are here considered thin in comparison to the overall size of the system. In a macroscopic scale the membrane is introduced as a transmission boundary condition, which enables an effective modeling of systems that involve multiple scales. In a mesoscopic scale, a numerical lattice-Boltzmann scheme with a partial-bounceback condition at the membrane is proposed and analyzed. It is shown that this mesoscopic approach provides a consistent approximation of the transmission boundary condition. Furthermore, analysis of the mesoscopic scheme gives rise to an expression for the permeability of a thin membrane as a function of a mesoscopic transmission parameter. In a microscopic model, the mean waiting time for a passage of a particle through the membrane is in accordance with this permeability. Numerical results computed with the mesoscopic scheme are then compared successfully with analytical solutions derived in a macroscopic scale, and the membrane model introduced here is used to simulate diffusive transport between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm through the nuclear envelope in a realistic cell model based on fluorescence microscopy data. By comparing the simulated fluorophore transport to the experimental one, we determine the permeability of the nuclear envelope of HeLa cells to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein.

  10. OBSERVATION OF DIFFUSE COSMIC AND ATMOSPHERIC GAMMA RAYS AT BALLOON ALTITUDES WITH AN ELECTRON-TRACKING COMPTON CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Atsushi; Nonaka, Naoki; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Nishimura, Hironobu; Ueno, Kazuki; Hattori, Kaori; Kabuki, Shigeto; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Miuchi, Kentaro; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Okada, Yoko; Orito, Reiko; Sekiya, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Atsushi; Tanimori, Toru; Mizuta, Eiichi

    2011-05-20

    We observed diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays at balloon altitudes with the Sub-MeV gamma-ray Imaging Loaded-on-balloon Experiment I (SMILE-I) as the first step toward a future all-sky survey with a high sensitivity. SMILE-I employed an electron-tracking Compton camera comprised of a gaseous electron tracker as a Compton-scattering target and a scintillation camera as an absorber. The balloon carrying the SMILE-I detector was launched from the Sanriku Balloon Center of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency on 2006 September 1, and the flight lasted for 6.8 hr, including level flight for 4.1 hr at an altitude of 32-35 km. During the level flight, we successfully detected 420 downward gamma rays between 100 keV and 1 MeV at zenith angles below 60 deg. To obtain the flux of diffuse cosmic gamma rays, we first simulated their scattering in the atmosphere using Geant4, and for gamma rays detected at an atmospheric depth of 7.0 g cm{sup -2} we found that 50% and 21% of the gamma rays at energies of 150 keV and 1 MeV, respectively, were scattered in the atmosphere prior to reaching the detector. Moreover, by using Geant4 simulations and the QinetiQ atmospheric radiation model, we estimated that the detected events consisted of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays (79%), secondary photons produced in the instrument through the interaction between cosmic rays and materials surrounding the detector (19%), and other particles (2%). The obtained growth curve was comparable to Ling's model, and the fluxes of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma rays were consistent with the results of previous experiments. The expected detection sensitivity of a future SMILE experiment measuring gamma rays between 150 keV and 20 MeV was estimated from our SMILE-I results and was found to be 10 times better than that of other experiments at around 1 MeV.

  11. Elements of a Model State Education Agency Diffusion System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mojkowski, Charles

    A study, presented to the National Dissemination Conference, provides a conceptualization of a model diffusion system as it might exist within a state education agency (SEA) and places this diffusion model within the context of the SEA's expanding role as an educational service. Five conclusions were reached regarding a model diffusion system.…

  12. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  13. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  14. Direction dependent diffusion of aligned magnetic rods by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Joachim; Märkert, Christian; Fischer, Birgit; Müller, Leonard

    2013-01-25

    Rodlike hematite particles in suspension align perpendicular to an external magnetic field due to a negative anisotropy of their magnetic susceptibility Δχ. The diffusion tensor consists of two principal constants D(∥) and D(⊥) for the diffusion parallel and perpendicular to the long particle axis. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy is capable of probing the diffusive motion in optically opaque suspensions of rodlike hematite particles parallel to the direction of the scattering vector Q. Choosing Q parallel or perpendicular to the direction of an external magnetic field H the direction dependent intermediate scattering function is measured by means of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. From the intermediate scattering function in both directions the principal diffusion constants D(∥) and D(⊥) are determined. The ratio D(∥)/D(⊥) increases with increasing aspect ratio of the particles and can be described via a rescaled theoretical approach for prolate ellipsoids of revolution.

  15. High-Pressure Study of X-Ray Diffuse Scattering in Ferroelectric Perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Ravy, Sylvain; Itie, Jean-Paul; Polian, Alain; Hanfland, Michael

    2007-09-14

    We present a high-pressure x-ray diffuse scattering study of the ABO{sub 3} ferroelectric perovskites BaTiO{sub 3} and KNbO{sub 3}. The well-known diffuse lines are observed in all the phases studied. In KNbO{sub 3}, we show that the lines are present up to 21.8 GPa, with constant width and a slightly decreasing intensity. At variance, the intensity of the diffuse lines observed in the cubic phase of BaTiO{sub 3} linearly decreases to zero at {approx}11 GPa. These results are discussed with respect to x-ray absorption measurements, which leads to the conclusion that the diffuse lines are only observed when the B atom is off the center of the oxygen tetrahedron. The role of such disorder on the ferroelectric instability of perovskites is discussed.

  16. Analytic model for the runaway distribution function in the presence of spatial diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, P.J. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 ); Myra, J.R. ); Wootton, A.J. )

    1994-03-01

    A steady-state kinetic model for runaway electrons in the presence of radial diffusion in a stochastic magnetic field is adopted and solved for a constant magnetic diffusivity. The model is constructed to recover the correct runaway production rate in the absence of spatial diffusion. The parallel energetic electron distribution function [ital f] is found by matching the solutions from three regions in parallel velocity space and is employed to form moments of [ital f]. Upper and lower bounds on the spatial diffusion are obtained by using these moments and the model exhibits the strong sensitivity to collisionality needed to explain the difference between similar plasmas with little or no hard x-ray signal and those with significant hard x-ray signals.

  17. Diffusion and nucleation in multilayer growth of PTCDI-C8 studied with in situ X-ray growth oscillations and real-time small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, Anton; Bommel, Sebastian; Wolf, Christopher; Pithan, Linus; Weber, Christopher; Beyer, Paul; Santoro, Gonzalo; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Kowarik, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    We study nucleation and multilayer growth of the perylene derivative PTCDI-C8 and find a persistent layer-by-layer growth, transformation of island shapes, and an enhancement of molecular diffusivity in upper monolayers (MLs). These findings result from the evaluation of the ML-dependent island densities, obtained by in situ real-time grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements and simultaneous X-ray growth oscillations. Complementary ex situ atomic force microscopy snapshots of different growth stages agree quantitatively with both X-ray techniques. The rate and temperature-dependent island density is analyzed using different mean-field nucleation models. Both a diffusion limited aggregation and an attachment limited aggregation model yield in the first two MLs the same critical nucleus size i, similar surface diffusion attempt frequencies in the 1019-1020 s-1 range, and a decrease of the diffusion barrier Ed in the 2nd ML by 140 meV.

  18. Origin of the Galactic Diffuse X-ray Emission: Iron K-Shell Line Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Hideki; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Koyama, Katsuji

    2017-01-01

    An unresolved X-ray emission extends along the Galactic plane, so-called the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission (GDXE). The characteristic feature is three K-shell lines of Fe at 6.4, 6.7, and 6.9 keV. Recently, superposition of faint point sources, such as Cataclysmic variables (CVs) and Active binaries (ABs) is thought to be a major origin, although it is under debate which sub-class mostly contribute. We re-analyzed the Suzaku archive data and constructed spectral models of ABs, magnetic CVs (mCVs), and non-magnetic CVs (non-mCVs). The GBXE is explained by combination of those models; non-mCVs and ABs mainly contribute while mCVs account for ~10% or less of the 5-10 keV flux. On the other hand, the GCXE and GRXE spectra cannot be represented by any combination of the point sources, indicating another origin would be required.

  19. On the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ji-Ren; Mao, Shu-De

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse soft X-ray emission from the nuclear region of M51 combining both XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra data. Most of the RGS spectrum of M51 can be fitted with a thermal model with a temperature of ∼ 0.5 keV except for the O VII triplet, which is forbidden-line dominated. The Fe L-shell lines peak around the southern cloud, where the O VIII and N VII Lyα lines also peak. In contrast, the peak of the O VII forbidden line is about 10″ offset from that of the other lines, indicating that it is from a spatially distinct component. The spatial distribution of the O VII triplet mapped by the Chandra data shows that most of the O VII triplet flux is located at faint regions near edges, instead of the southern cloud where other lines peak. This distribution of the O VII triplet is inconsistent with the photoionization model. Other mechanisms that could produce the anomalous O VII triplet, including a recombining plasma and charge exchange X-ray emission, are discussed.

  20. Suzaku observations of the diffuse X-ray emission across the Fermi bubbles' edges

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeuchi, Y.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Stawarz, Ł.; Kimura, M.; Takei, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Cheung, C. C.; Inoue, Y.; Nakamori, T.

    2013-12-10

    We present Suzaku X-ray observations along two edge regions of the Fermi Bubbles, with eight ≅ 20 ks pointings across the northern part of the North Polar Spur (NPS) surrounding the north bubble and six across the southernmost edge of the south bubble. After removing compact X-ray features, diffuse X-ray emission is clearly detected and is well reproduced by a three-component spectral model consisting of unabsorbed thermal emission (temperature kT ≅ 0.1 keV) from the Local Bubble, absorbed kT ≅ 0.3 keV thermal emission related to the NPS and/or Galactic halo (GH), and a power-law component at a level consistent with the cosmic X-ray background. The emission measure (EM) of the 0.3 keV plasma decreases by ≅ 50% toward the inner regions of the northeast bubble, with no accompanying temperature change. However, such a jump in the EM is not clearly seen in the south bubble data. While it is unclear whether the NPS originates from a nearby supernova remnant or is related to previous activity within or around the Galactic center, our Suzaku observations provide evidence that suggests the latter scenario. In the latter framework, the presence of a large amount of neutral matter absorbing the X-ray emission as well as the existence of the kT ≅ 0.3 keV gas can be naturally interpreted as a weak shock driven by the bubbles' expansion in the surrounding medium, with velocity v {sub exp} ∼ 300 km s{sup –1} (corresponding to shock Mach number M≃1.5), compressing the GH gas to form the NPS feature. We also derived an upper limit for any non-thermal X-ray emission component associated with the bubbles and demonstrate that, in agreement with the aforementioned findings, the non-thermal pressure and energy estimated from a one-zone leptonic model of its broadband spectrum, are in rough equilibrium with that of the surrounding thermal plasma.

  1. Local structure of Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O by the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering - from average-structure to microdomain model

    SciTech Connect

    Komornicka, Dorota; Wolcyrz, Marek; Pietraszko, Adam

    2012-08-15

    Local structure of dirubidium tetralithium tris(selenate(VI)) dihydrate - Rb{sub 2}Li{sub 4}(SeO{sub 4}){sub 3}{center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O has been determined basing on the modeling of X-ray diffuse scattering. The origin of observed structured diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching between two alternative positions in two quasi-planar layers existing in each unit cell and formation of domains with specific SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra configuration locally fulfilling condition for C-centering in the 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b Multiplication-Sign c superstructure cell. The local structure solution is characterized by a uniform distribution of rather large domains (ca. thousand of unit cells) in two layers, but also monodomains can be taken into account. Inside a single domain SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra are ordered along ab-diagonal forming two-string ribbons. Inside the ribbons SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} tetrahedra share the oxygen corners, whereas ribbons are bound to each other by a net of hydrogen bonds and fastened by corner sharing SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra of the neighboring layers. - Graphical abstract: Experimental sections of the reciprocal space showing diffraction effects observed for RLSO. Bragg spots are visible on sections with integer indices (1 kl section - on the left), streaks - on sections with fractional ones (1.5 kl section - on the right). At the center: resulting local structure of the A package modeled as a microdomain: two-string ribbons of ordered oxygen-corners-sharing SeO{sub 4} and LiO{sub 4} terahedra extended along ab-diagonal are seen; ribbons are bound by hydrogen bonds (shown in pink); the multiplied 2a Multiplication-Sign 2b unit cell is shown. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray diffuse scattering in RLSO was registered and modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The origin of diffuse streaks is SeO{sub 4} tetrahedra switching in two structure layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The local structure is characterized by a uniform

  2. Cosmic rays from multi-wavelength observations of the Galactic diffuse emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Cosmic rays (CRs) generate diffuse emission while interacting with the Galactic magnetic field (B-field), the interstellar gas and the radiation field. This diffuse emission extends from radio, microwaves, through X-rays, to high-energy gamma rays. Diffuse emission has considerably increased the interest of the astrophysical community due to recent detailed observations by Planck, Fermi-LAT, and by very-high energy Cherenkov telescopes. Observations of this diffuse emission and comparison with detailed predictions are used to gain information on the properties of CRs, such as their density, spectra, distribution and propagation in the Galaxy. Unfortunately disentangling and characterizing this diffuse emission strongly depends on uncertainties in the knowledge of unresolved sources, gas, radiation fields, and B-fields, other than CRs throughout the Galaxy. We discuss here the diffuse emission produced by CRs and its uncertainties, and the comparison of this predicted emission with recent multi-wavelength observations. We show insights on CR spectra and intensities. Then we address the importance for forthcoming telescopes, especially for the Square Kilometre Array telescope (SKA) and the Cherencov Telescope Array (CTA), and for missions at MeV.

  3. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2016-07-19

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  4. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2016-07-19

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numericalmore » simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.« less

  5. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-01

    A new spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence is proposed. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  6. Diffusion of strongly magnetized cosmic ray particles in a turbulent medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptuskin, V. S.

    1985-01-01

    Cosmic ray (CR) propagation in a turbulent medium is usually considered in the diffusion approximation. Here, the diffusion equation is obtained for strongly magnetized particles in the general form. The influence of a large-scale random magnetic field on CR propagation in interstellar medium is discussed. Cosmic rays are assumed to propagate in a medium with a regular field H and an ensemble of random MHD waves. The energy density of waves on scales smaller than the free path 1 of CR particles is small. The collision integral of the general form which describes interaction between relativistic particles and waves in the quasilinear approximation is used.

  7. The diffusion approximation and transport theory for cosmic rays in relativistic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Equations describing the transport of cosmic rays in relativistic flows in the diffusion approximation are obtained. The analysis is based on the zeroth, first, and second differential moment equations of the relativistic Boltzmann equation with a BGK collision term. A perturbation solution of the moment equations in the diffusion approximation yields both the co-moving frame particle current and viscous stresses. The resultant cosmic-ray continuity equation contains three readily recognized energy change terms: the adiabatic energy change term; the viscous shear energy change term; and a term proportional to the scalar product of the acceleration vector of the scattering frame and the heat flux.

  8. CUBIC - A non-dispersive Diffuse X-ray Background spectrometer. [Cosmic Unresolved X-ray Background Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, David N.; Skinner, Mark A.; Antunes, Alexander J. D.; Catalano, Mark A.; Cocklin, Eric J.; Engel, Leland G.; Entingh, Timothy J.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Green, Roland; Kelly, Douglas A.

    1992-01-01

    The Cosmic Unresolved X-ray Background Instrument using CCDs (CUBIC) is designed to obtain spectral observations of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXRB) with moderate spectral resolution over the energy range 0.2-10 keV, using mechanically-collimated CCDs. At this time, it is the only planned satellite payload devoted to the study of the spectrum of the DXRB. Over the anticipated 3 year lifetime of the satellite, CUBIC will be able to study up to 50 percent of the sky with 5 x 5 deg spatial resolution for the subkilovolt Galactic diffuse background, and with 10 x 10 deg spatial resolution for the extragalactic diffuse background above 2 keV. CUBIC will obtain high quality nondispersive spectra of soft X-ray emission from the interstellar medium, supernova remnants, and some bright sources, and will make a sensitive seach for line emission or other features in the extragalactic cosmic X-ray background from 2-10 keV.

  9. Thermal diffuse X-ray scattering in simple metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, D. M.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations are reported for the ionic structure factor and X-ray scattering cross section of sodium (at T=0 K and 90 K) and lithium (both isotopes at T=0 K) within the harmonic approximation. An evaluation of the appropriate displacement- displacement correlation function by the special point method circumvents the need for a multiphonon expansion. In the case of sodium, the structure in the one-phonon scattering was straightforwardly accounted for, and an approximate expansion was obtained for all multiphonon scattering. By treating core and conduction electrons on an equal footing, it is shown that information on the conduction electron system is present in the forward scattering component. In lithium the one-phonon cross section at small angles aids in the determination of the effective electron-ion interaction.

  10. Extended source model for diffusive coupling.

    PubMed

    González-Ochoa, Héctor O; Flores-Moreno, Roberto; Reyes, Luz M; Femat, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the prevailing approach to diffusion coupling phenomena which considers point-like diffusing sources, we derived an analogous expression for the concentration rate of change of diffusively coupled extended containers. The proposed equation, together with expressions based on solutions to the diffusion equation, is intended to be applied to the numerical solution of systems exclusively composed of ordinary differential equations, however is able to account for effects due the finite size of the coupled sources.

  11. IMF-sense-dependent cosmic ray anisotropy produced from diffusion-convection in heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagashima, K.; Munakata, K.; Tatsuoka, R.

    1985-01-01

    It was demonstrated that an interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) sense dependent 2nd order anisotropy is produced by the diffusion convection of cosmic rays in the heliomagnetosphere. The result implies that the anisotropy cannot be expressed only by the pitch angle with respect to the IMF axis.

  12. Diffuse X-Ray Emission from the Hot ISM in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Wilton

    2002-09-01

    We propose 100-ks observations of two nearby face-on galaxies with the ACIS S3 chip to measure the X-ray emission from their hot ISM. We have selected NGC 3631 and NGC 3938 because of their relatively high star formation rates. Our primary goal is to characterize the spatial distribution and spectral characteristics of the hot interstellar plasma in spiral galaxies similar to the Milky Way. The CXO angular resolution allows us to separate diffuse and point source emission, and the ACIS spectral resolution allows us to find the temperature and abundance parameters of the hot ISM. Other goals are to better understand the diffuse X-ray emission seen in some edge-on galaxy halos, to study the point sources in the galactic disk, and to study the cosmological diffuse background below 0.5 keV.

  13. Effects of Spatially Heterogeneous Porosity on Matrix-Diffusion as Investigated by X ray Absorption Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Boney, C.; Christian-Frear, T.; Meigs, L.C.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1998-10-20

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the effects of spatial variation in porosity on matrix-diffusion processes. Four centimeter-scale slabs of Culebra dolomite taken from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site were used in the tests. Experiments involved the simple diffusion of iodine into a single edge of each rock slab while X ray absorption imaging was used to measure the resulting two-dmensional solute concentration field as a function of time. X ray imaging was also used to quantify the two-dimensional porosity field of each rock slab. Image analysis provided a unique opportunity to both visuake and quantifj the effects of the spatially variable porosi~ on matrixdMusion. Four key results were obtained. First, significant variation in rates of diffusion were realized over the relatively small length (centimeter) and time scales (months) investigated. Second, clear evidence of diffusion preferentially following zones of relatively higher porosity was noted. Third, rate of difhion was found to vary as tracer diffused into the rock slabs encountering changing porosity conditions. Fourth, strong correlation between porosi~ and the calculated diffusion coefficients was found. In fact, the nature of the correlation can be related to the geometry, position, and orientation of the heterogeneous porosity features populating each rock slab.

  14. Mathematical model for radon diffusion in earthen materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-10-01

    Radon migration in porous, earthen materials is characterized by diffusion in both the air and water components of the system as well as by the interaction of the radon between the air and water. The size distribution and configuration of the pore spaces and their moisture distributions are key parameters in determining the radon diffusion coefficient for the bulk material. A mathematical model is developed and presented for calculating radon diffusion coefficients solely from the moisture content and pore size distribution of a soil, reducing the need for resorting to radon diffusion measurements. The resulting diffusion coefficients increase with the median pore diameter of the soil and decrease with increasing widths of the pore size distribution. The calculated diffusion coefficients are suitable for use in simple homogeneous-medium diffusion expressions for predicting radon transport and compare well with measured diffusion coefficients and with empirical diffusion coefficient correlations.

  15. Cosmic Ray Hysteresis as Evidence for Time-dependent Diffusive Processes in the Long Term Solar Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogallagher, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional time-dependent diffusion-convection model for the modulation of cosmic rays is presented. This model predicts that the observed intensity at a given time is approximately equal to the intensity given by the time independent diffusion convection solution under interplanetary conditions which existed a time iota in the past, (U(t sub o) = U sub s(t sub o - tau)) where iota is the average time spent by a particle inside the modulating cavity. Delay times in excess of several hundred days are possible with reasonable modulation parameters. Interpretation of phase lags observed during the 1969 to 1970 solar maximum in terms of this model suggests that the modulating region is probably not less than 10 a.u. and maybe as much as 35 a.u. in extent.

  16. Evaluation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Heiblim, Samuel; Malott, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Models of the galactic cosmic ray spectra have been tested by comparing their predictions to an evaluated database containing more than 380 measured cosmic ray spectra extending from 1960 to the present.

  17. COSMIC RAY MODULATION BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE: A HYBRID MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, R. D.; Potgieter, M. S.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Fichtner, H.; Scherer, K.

    2013-03-01

    Results from a newly developed hybrid cosmic ray (CR) modulation model are presented. In this approach, the transport of CRs is computed by incorporating the plasma flow from a magnetohydrodynamic model for the heliospheric environment, resulting in representative CR transport. The model is applied to the modulation of CRs beyond the heliopause (HP) and we show that (1) CR modulation persists beyond the HP, so it is unlikely that the Voyager spacecraft will measure the pristine local interstellar spectra of galactic CRs when crossing the HP. (2) CR modulation in the outer heliosheath could maintain solar-cycle-related changes. (3) The modulation of CRs in the outer heliosheath is primarily determined by the ratio of perpendicular to parallel diffusion, so that the value of the individual diffusion coefficients cannot be determined uniquely using this approach. (4) CRs can efficiently diffuse between the nose and tail regions of the heliosphere.

  18. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    DOE PAGES

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; ...

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found tomore » be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.« less

  19. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations ℏ ωj (q), phonon densities of states g (ℏ ω ), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv(T ) . We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv(T ) , computed within the harmonic approximation from ℏ ωj (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 100 K to 1.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 200 K and 1.9 ×10-4eV /atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp(T ) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲θc , where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲10 nm .

  20. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.

  1. GVF-based anisotropic diffusion models.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongchuan; Chua, Chin-Seng

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, the gradient vector flow fields are introduced in image restoration. Within the context of flow fields, the shock filter, mean curvature flow, and Perona-Malik equation are reformulated. Many advantages over the original models can be obtained; these include numerical stability, large capture range, and high-order derivative estimation. In addition, a fairing process is introduced in the anisotropic diffusion, which contains a fourth-order derivative and is reformulated as the intrinsic Laplacian of curvature under the level set framework. By applying this fairing process, the shape boundaries will become more apparent. In order to overcome numerical errors, the intrinsic Laplacian of curvature is computed from the gradient vector flow fields instead of the observed images.

  2. A ray tracing model for leaf bidirectional scattering studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, T. W.; Smith, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    A leaf is modeled as a deterministic two-dimensional structure consisting of a network of circular arcs designed to represent the internal morphology of major species. The path of an individual ray through the leaf is computed using geometric optics. At each intersection of the ray with an arc, the specular reflected and transmitted rays are calculated according to the Snell and Fresnel equations. Diffuse scattering is treated according to Lambert's law. Absorption is also permitted but requires a detailed knowledge of the spectral attenuation coefficients. An ensemble of initial rays are chosen for each incident direction with the initial intersection points on the leaf surface selected randomly. The final equilibrium state after all interactions then yields the leaf bidirectional reflectance and transmittance distributions. The model also yields the internal two dimensional light gradient profile of the leaf.

  3. Implications of the Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray measurements on annihilating or decaying dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hütsi, Gert; Hektor, Andi; Raidal, Martti E-mail: andi.hektor@cern.ch

    2010-07-01

    We analyze the recently published Fermi-LAT diffuse gamma-ray measurements in the context of leptonically annihilating or decaying dark matter (DM) with the aim to explain simultaneously the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and the PAMELA, Fermi and HESS (PFH) anomalous e{sup ±} data. Five different DM annihilation/decay channels 2e, 2μ, 2τ, 4e, or 4μ (the latter two via an intermediate light particle φ) are generated with PYTHIA. We calculate both the Galactic and extragalactic prompt and inverse Compton (IC) contributions to the resulting gamma-ray spectra. To find the Galactic IC spectra we use the interstellar radiation field model from the latest release of GALPROP. For the extragalactic signal we show that the amplitude of the prompt gamma-emission is very sensitive to the assumed model for the extragalactic background light. For our Galaxy we use the Einasto, NFW and cored isothermal DM density profiles and include the effects of DM substructure assuming a simple subhalo model. Our calculations show that for the annihilating DM the extragalactic gamma-ray signal can dominate only if rather extreme power-law concentration-mass relation C(M) is used, while more realistic C(M) relations make the extragalactic component comparable or subdominant to the Galactic signal. For the decaying DM the Galactic signal always exceeds the extragalactic one. In the case of annihilating DM the PFH favored parameters can be ruled out by gamma-ray constraints only if power-law C(M) relation is assumed. For DM decaying into 2μ or 4μ the PFH favored DM parameters are not in conflict with the gamma-ray data. We find that, due to the (almost) featureless Galactic IC spectrum and the DM halo substructure, annihilating DM may give a good simultaneous fit to the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray and to the PFH e{sup ±} data without being in clear conflict with the other Fermi-LAT gamma-ray measurements.

  4. a Diffusivity Model for Gas Diffusion in Dry Porous Media Composed of Converging-Diverging Capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shifang; Wu, Tao; Deng, Yongju; Zheng, Qiusha; Zheng, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Gas diffusion in dry porous media has been a hot topic in several areas of technology for many years. In this paper, a diffusivity model for gas diffusion in dry porous media is developed based on fractal theory and Fick’s law, which incorporates the effects of converging-diverging pores and tortuous characteristics of capillaries as well as Knudsen diffusion. The effective gas diffusivity model is expressed as a function of the fluctuation amplitude of the capillary cross-section size variations, the porosity, the pore area fractal dimension and the tortuosity fractal dimension. The results show that the relative diffusivity decreases with the increase of the fluctuation amplitude and increases with the increase of pore area fractal dimension. To verify the validity of the present model, the relative diffusivity from the proposed fractal model is compared with the existing experimental data as well as two available models of Bruggeman and Shou. Our proposed diffusivity model with pore converging-diverging effect included is in good agreement with reported experimental data.

  5. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. I: spectrum and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the spectrum and chemical composition of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. In particular, at high energies we assume that D(E)∝E{sup δ}, with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars, with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. We find that the stochastic fluctuations induced by the spatial and temporal distribution of supernovae, together with the effect of spallation of nuclei, lead to mild but sensible violations of the simple, leaky-box-inspired rule that the spectrum observed at Earth is N(E)∝E{sup −α} with α = γ+δ, where γ is the slope of the cosmic ray injection spectrum at the sources. Spallation of nuclei, even with the small rates appropriate for He, may account for small differences in spectral slopes between different nuclei, possibly providing an explanation for the recent CREAM observations. For δ = 1/3 we find that the slope of the proton and helium spectra are ∼ 2.67 and ∼ 2.6 respectively (with fluctuations depending on the realization of source distribution) at energies around ∼ 1 TeV (to be compared with the measured values of 2.66±0.02 and 2.58±0.02). For δ = 0.6 the hardening of the He spectra is not observed. The stochastic effects discussed above cannot be found in ordinary propagation calculations, such as GALPROP, where these effects and the point like nature of the sources are not taken into account. We also comment on the effect of time dependence of the escape of cosmic rays from supernova remnants, and of a possible clustering of the sources in superbubbles. In a second paper we will discuss the

  6. Ray-tracing optical modeling of negative dysphotopsia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xin; Liu, Yueai; Karakelle, Mutlu; Masket, Samuel; Fram, Nicole R.

    2011-12-01

    Negative dysphotopsia is a relatively common photic phenomenon that may occur after implantation of an intraocular lens. The etiology of negative dysphotopsia is not fully understood. In this investigation, optical modeling was developed using nonsequential-component Zemax ray-tracing technology to simulate photic phenomena experienced by the human eye. The simulation investigated the effects of pupil size, capsulorrhexis size, and bag diffusiveness. Results demonstrated the optical basis of negative dysphotopsia. We found that photic structures were mainly influenced by critical factors such as the capsulorrhexis size and the optical diffusiveness of the capsular bag. The simulations suggested the hypothesis that the anterior capsulorrhexis interacting with intraocular lens could induce negative dysphotopsia.

  7. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: Models and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D. W.; Oster, C. A.; Nelson, R. W.; Gee, G. W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems were investigated. The theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion were developed. The theory was incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. The theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems are discussed.

  8. Improved input parameters for diffusion models of skin absorption.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steffi; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F

    2013-02-01

    To use a diffusion model for predicting skin absorption requires accurate estimates of input parameters on model geometry, affinity and transport characteristics. This review summarizes methods to obtain input parameters for diffusion models of skin absorption focusing on partition and diffusion coefficients. These include experimental methods, extrapolation approaches, and correlations that relate partition and diffusion coefficients to tabulated physico-chemical solute properties. Exhaustive databases on lipid-water and corneocyte protein-water partition coefficients are presented and analyzed to provide improved approximations to estimate lipid-water and corneocyte protein-water partition coefficients. The most commonly used estimates of lipid and corneocyte diffusion coefficients are also reviewed. In order to improve modeling of skin absorption in the future diffusion models should include the vertical stratum corneum heterogeneity, slow equilibration processes, the absorption from complex non-aqueous formulations, and an improved representation of dermal absorption processes. This will require input parameters for which no suitable estimates are yet available.

  9. Some Problems in Using Diffusion Models for New Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhardt, Irwin; Mackenzie, Kenneth D.

    1972-01-01

    Analyzes some of the problems involved in using diffusion models to formulate marketing strategies for introducing new products. Six models, which remove some of the theoretical and methodological restrictions inherent in current models of the adoption and diffusion process, are presented. (Author/JH)

  10. X-Ray Studies of Diffusion Dynamics in Nano-Confined Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, Leandra

    Since their discovery in the late 1800s, x-rays have taken the stage as one of the most powerful research techniques for materials science. Their element-specific absorption has allowed for everyday applications in security and medical imaging, while their short wavelength has a tremendous ability to resolve materials on a molecular or even atomic level. In this dissertation, I will discuss basic properties of x-rays as well as how they are produced and detected. I will also present x-ray scattering and analysis techniques before moving onto a discussion of my research on diffusion in soft-matter systems. I provide a full alignment guide for a lab-based dynamic light scattering (DLS) goniometer system, which I used for some preliminary studies of systems. I proceed to discuss diffusion on the nanoscale in quasi-1D (nanopores) and quasi-2D (liquid surface) systems. The latter of these systems was the main focus of my dissertation research. I utilized x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) to study the diffusion and interparticle dynamics of iron oxide nanoparticles at the air-water interface. Autocorrelation analysis revealed that these particles show signatures of a jammed system under lateral compression. I present these results as well as a description of their interpretation and importance in the main text.

  11. Multiple mode x-ray ptychography using a lens and a fixed diffuser optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Batey, Darren J.; Edo, Tega B.; Parsons, Aaron D.; Rau, Christoph; Rodenburg, John M.

    2016-05-01

    We employ a novel combination of a Fresnel lens and a diffuser for x-ray ptychography. The setup uses increased flux by enlarging the width of the coherence-defining slits upstream of the experimental station. In the reconstruction algorithm, modal decomposition is used to account for the resulting partial coherence in the beam. We show that if the object has sparse feactures and large areas of flat contrast, the diffuser facilitates a better reconstruction and the extra diversity in the data also allows cleaner separation of the constituent modes in the illumination. The setup also allows a quick, real-time measure of the beam coherence.

  12. Modeling the Gamma-Ray Emission in the GALACTIC CENTER with a Fading Cosmic-ray Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Prosekin, Anton; Chang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Recent HESS observations of the ∼200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic center shows a cutoff at ∼10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma-rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma-rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the CMZ region and HESS J1745-290 can be reproduced simultaneously. Meanwhile, we find that the cosmic-ray energy density profile in the CMZ region may also be reproduced in the fading accelerator model when appropriate combinations of the particle injection history and the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays are adopted.

  13. Diffusive propagation of cosmic rays from supernova remnants in the Galaxy. II: anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Blasi, Pasquale; Amato, Elena E-mail: amato@arcetri.astro.it

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of stochasticity in the spatial and temporal distribution of supernova remnants on the anisotropy of cosmic rays observed at Earth. The calculations are carried out for different choices of the diffusion coefficient D(E) experienced by cosmic rays during propagation in the Galaxy. The propagation and spallation of nuclei (with charge 1 ≤ Z ≤ 26) are taken into account. At high energies (E > 1 TeV) we assume that D(E)∝(E/Z){sup δ}, with δ = 1/3 and δ = 0.6 being the reference scenarios. The large scale distribution of supernova remnants in the Galaxy is modeled following the distribution of pulsars with and without accounting for the spiral structure of the Galaxy. Our calculations allow us to determine the contribution to anisotropy resulting from both the large scale distribution of SNRs in the Galaxy and the random distribution of the nearest remnants. The naive expectation that the anisotropy amplitude scales as δ{sub A}∝D(E) is shown to be a wild oversimplification of reality which does not reflect in the predicted anisotropy for any realistic distribution of the sources. The fluctuations in the anisotropy pattern are dominated by nearby sources, so that predicting or explaining the observed anisotropy amplitude and phase becomes close to impossible. Nevertheless, the results of our calculations, when compared to the data, allow us to draw interesting conclusions in terms of the propagation scenario to be preferred both in terms of the energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient and of the size of the halo. We find that the very weak energy dependence of the anisotropy amplitude below 10{sup 5} GeV, as observed by numerous experiments, as well as the rise at higher energies, can best be explained if the diffusion coefficient is D(E)∝E{sup 1/3}. Faster diffusion, for instance with δ = 0.6, leads in general to an exceedingly large anisotropy amplitude. The spiral structure introduces interesting trends in

  14. MODIS Solar Diffuser Attenuation Screen Modeling Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Xuong, Xiaoxiong; Guenther, Bruce; Barnes, William

    2004-01-01

    On-orbit calibration of the reflected solar bands on the EOS Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is accomplished by have the instrument view a high reflectance diffuse surface illuminated by the sun. For some of the spectral bands this proves to be much too bright a signal that results in the saturation of detectors designed for measuring low reflectance (ocean) surfaces signals. A mechanical attenuation device in the form of a pin hole screen is used to reduce the signals to calibrate these bands. The sensor response to solar illumination of the SD with and without the attenuation screen in place will be presented. The MODIS detector response to the solar diffuser is smooth when the attenuation screen is absent, but has structures up to a few percent when the attenuation screen is present. This structure corresponds to non-uniform illumination from the solar diffuser. Each pin hole produces a pin-hole image of the sun on the solar diffuser, and there are very many pin hole images of the sun on the solar diffuser for each MODIS detector. Even though there are very many pin-hole images of the sun on the solar diffuser, it is no longer perfectly uniformly illuminated. This non-uniformly illuminated solar diffuser produces intensity variation on the focal planes. The results of a very detailed simulation will be discussed which show how the illumination of the focal plane changes as a result of the attenuation, and the impacts on the calibration will be discussed.

  15. Cosmic X-ray Physics: Sounding rocket investigations of the diffuse X-ray background, including instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, Dan

    We propose an investigation to improve our understanding of the Galactic diffuse X-ray background. The ultimate purpose of this is to determine the role of hot phases of the interstellar medium in mediating stellar feedback in star formation, in transport of metals, and in determining the structure and evolution of the Galaxy. It directly addresses SMD's astrophysics goal No. 2, to explore the origin and evolution of the galaxies, stars and planets that make up our universe. This work will involve a flight of an existing payload with small modifications in Woomera, South Australia, to observe the Galactic soft X-ray bulge and attempt to determine its nature and emission mechanisms. This flight should also either confirm or put strict upper limits on the "sterile neutrino" model for the 3.5 keV signal observed near the Galactic Center by XMM-Newton. Our investigation includes the development of thermal detectors with superconducting transition edge thermometers capable of 1-2 eV FWHM energy resolution in the 100-400 eV range with the intent of obtaining a scientifically useful spectrum on a sounding rocket flight of the emission from one million degree gas in this energy range. This will require a total area of 1-2 square centimeters for the detector array. To enable routine testing of such detectors in the lab and for necessary in-flight gain and resolution monitoring, we are trying to develop a pulsed-UV laser calibration source. In collaboration with Goddard Space Flight Center, we are investigating the practicality of waveguide-below-cutoff filters to provide the necessary attenuation of infrared radiation for these detectors while still allowing good x-ray transmission below 150 eV. The detectors, calibration source, filters, optimal high-rate pulse analysis and flight experience with the detector readouts are all relevant to future NASA major missions. The detectors we're working on for a low-energy sounding rocket flight would be an excellent match to what is

  16. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    DOE PAGES

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-09

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes,more » radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2(+25.4)(-9.4)% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.« less

  17. Radio galaxies dominate the high-energy diffuse gamma-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Linden, Tim; Lopez, Alejandro

    2016-08-09

    It has been suggested that unresolved radio galaxies and radio quasars (sometimes referred to as misaligned active galactic nuclei) could be responsible for a significant fraction of the observed diffuse gamma-ray background. In this study, we use the latest data from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to characterize the gamma-ray emission from a sample of 51 radio galaxies. In addition to those sources that had previously been detected using Fermi data, we report here the first statistically significant detection of gamma-ray emission from the radio galaxies 3C 212, 3C 411, and B3 0309+411B. Combining this information with the radio fluxes, radio luminosity function, and redshift distribution of this source class, we find that radio galaxies dominate the diffuse gamma-ray background, generating 77.2(+25.4)(-9.4)% of this emission at energies above ~1 GeV . We discuss the implications of this result and point out that it provides support for scenarios in which IceCube's high-energy astrophysical neutrinos also originate from the same population of radio galaxies.

  18. A lattice-Boltzman model for noble gas diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Huber, C.; Renne, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Thermochronometry by the 40Ar/39Ar, 4He/3He, and (U-Th)/He techniques provides insights into a array of planetary processes that span immense time and temperature regimes, from rapid and high temperature asteroid impact events to mountain uplift occurring over plate tectonic timescales at near surface temperatures. Thermal modeling has expanded from simple calculations for quantifying diffusion from a single spherical domain or log normal distributions of domains to include crystals having discrete domain distributions, fast diffusion pathways, diffusive anisotropy, complex crystal geometries, alpha damage, and alpha ejection. Despite these advances, our understanding of diffusion within crystals that have complex microstructural features (e.g., exsolution and diffusive sinks) or highly asymmetric concentration gradients remains fragmentary. Improved computational speeds now enable thermochronologists to quantitatively explore many such problems. We have developed a code based on the lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method to model diffusion from a variety of complex 2-D geometries having isotropic, temperature-independent anisotropic, and temperature-dependent anisotropic diffusivity. We utilize the LB diffusion code to examine the effects of non-zero concentration boundaries, fast diffusion pathways, diffusive sinks, exsolution lamellae, asymmetrical concentration distributions, and temperature gradients on calculated diffusion parameters, age data, and inferred thermal histories. Animations and geological examples illustrate the applicability of the code to natural settings.

  19. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

  20. A numerical assessment of cosmic-ray energy diffusion through turbulent media

    SciTech Connect

    Fatuzzo, M.; Melia, F. E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu

    2014-04-01

    How and where cosmic rays are produced, and how they diffuse through various turbulent media, represent fundamental problems in astrophysics with far-reaching implications, both in terms of our theoretical understanding of high-energy processes in the Milky Way and beyond, and the successful interpretation of space-based and ground based GeV and TeV observations. For example, recent and ongoing detections, e.g., by Fermi (in space) and HESS (in Namibia), of γ-rays produced in regions of dense molecular gas hold important clues for both processes. In this paper, we carry out a comprehensive numerical investigation of relativistic particle acceleration and transport through turbulent magnetized environments in order to derive broadly useful scaling laws for the energy diffusion coefficients.

  1. A Social Diffusion Model with an Application on Election Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Min; Hung, San-Chuan; Kung, Perng-Hwa; Lin, Shou-De

    2014-01-01

    Issues about opinion diffusion have been studied for decades. It has so far no empirical approach to model the interflow and formation of crowd's opinion in elections due to two reasons. First, unlike the spread of information or flu, individuals have their intrinsic attitudes to election candidates in advance. Second, opinions are generally simply assumed as single values in most diffusion models. However, in this case, an opinion should represent preference toward multiple candidates. Previously done models thus may not intuitively interpret such scenario. This work is to design a diffusion model which is capable of managing the aforementioned scenario. To demonstrate the usefulness of our model, we simulate the diffusion on the network built based on a publicly available bibliography dataset. We compare the proposed model with other well-known models such as independent cascade. It turns out that our model consistently outperforms other models. We additionally investigate electoral issues with our model simulator. PMID:24995351

  2. A social diffusion model with an application on election simulation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jing-Kai; Wang, Fu-Min; Tsai, Chin-Hua; Hung, San-Chuan; Kung, Perng-Hwa; Lin, Shou-De; Chen, Kuan-Ta; Lei, Chin-Laung

    2014-01-01

    Issues about opinion diffusion have been studied for decades. It has so far no empirical approach to model the interflow and formation of crowd's opinion in elections due to two reasons. First, unlike the spread of information or flu, individuals have their intrinsic attitudes to election candidates in advance. Second, opinions are generally simply assumed as single values in most diffusion models. However, in this case, an opinion should represent preference toward multiple candidates. Previously done models thus may not intuitively interpret such scenario. This work is to design a diffusion model which is capable of managing the aforementioned scenario. To demonstrate the usefulness of our model, we simulate the diffusion on the network built based on a publicly available bibliography dataset. We compare the proposed model with other well-known models such as independent cascade. It turns out that our model consistently outperforms other models. We additionally investigate electoral issues with our model simulator.

  3. Diffusion of cosmic rays at EeV energies in inhomogeneous extragalactic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Rafael Alves; Sigl, Günter E-mail: guenter.sigl@desy.de

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays can propagate diffusively in cosmic magnetic fields. When their propagation time is comparable to the age of the universe, a suppression in the flux relative to the case in the absence of magnetic fields will occur. In this work we find an approximate parametrization for this suppression for energies below ∼ Z EeV using several magnetic field distributions obtained from cosmological simulations of the magnetized cosmic web. We assume that the magnetic fields have a Kolmogorov power spectrum with the field strengths distributed according to these simulations. We show that, if magnetic fields are coupled to the matter distribution, low field strengths will fill most of the volume, making the suppression milder compared to the case of a constant magnetic field with strength equal to the mean value of this distribution. We also derive upper limits for this suppression to occur for some models of extragalactic magnetic fields, as a function of the coherence length of these fields.

  4. Explicit melioration by a neural diffusion model

    PubMed Central

    Simen, Patrick; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    When faced with choices between two sources of reward, animals can rapidly adjust their rates of responding to each so that overall reinforcement increases. Herrnstein's ‘matching law’ provides a simple description of the equilibrium state of this choice allocation process: animals reallocate behavior so that relative rates of responding equal, or match, the relative rates of reinforcement obtained for each response. Herrnstein and colleagues proposed ‘melioration’ as a dynamical process for achieving this equilibrium, but left details of its operation unspecified. Here we examine a way of filling in the details that links the decision-making and operant-conditioning literatures and extends choice-proportion predictions into predictions about inter-response times. Our approach implements melioration in an adaptive version of the drift-diffusion model (DDM), which is widely used in decision-making research to account for response-time distributions. When the drift parameter of the DDM is 0 and its threshold parameters are inversely proportional to reward rates, its choice proportions dynamically track a state of exact matching. A DDM with fixed thresholds and drift that is determined by differences in reward rates can produce similar, but not identical, results. We examine choice probability and inter-response time predictions of these models, separately and in combination, and possible implications for brain organization provided by neural network implementations of them. Results suggest that melioration and matching may derive from synapses that estimate reward rates by a process of leaky integration, and that link together the input and output stages of a two-stage stimulus-response mechanism. PMID:19646968

  5. Sodium Chloride Diffusion during Muscle Salting Evidenced by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, Rénata; Peyrin, Frédéric; Vénien, Annie; Hénot, Jean Marc; Astruc, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    To better understand the relationship between the muscle structure and NaCl transfers in meat, we used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze brined and dry-salted rat muscles. The muscles were freeze-dried to avoid the delocalization of soluble ions that happens in regular dehydration through a graded series of ethanol. Na and Cl maps were superimposed on SEM images to combine the muscle structure and NaCl diffusion. Brining causes rapid diffusion of NaCl through the tissue. Most brine diffuses in a linear front from the muscle surface, but a small proportion enters through the perimysium network. The muscle area penetrated by brine shows heterogeneous patterns of NaCl retention, with some connective tissue islets containing more NaCl than other parts of perimysium. NaCl penetration is considerably slower after dry salting than after brining.

  6. Galactic cosmic ray transport in the heliosphere: diffusive anisotropy 1965-1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, H. S.; Xue, S. S.; Fikani, M. M.

    Preliminary information pertaining to the diffusive anisotropy of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in the inner heliosphere is derived from the study of the steady state solar diurnal variation (SDV) for the period 1965 to 1994. This time period spans three solar activity cycles. Data obtained with the neutron monitors (NM) at Deep River and Huancayo and the underground vertical muon telescopes (UT) at Embudo, are used in our analysis.

  7. Parameter Variability and Distributional Assumptions in the Diffusion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger

    2013-01-01

    If the diffusion model (Ratcliff & McKoon, 2008) is to account for the relative speeds of correct responses and errors, it is necessary that the components of processing identified by the model vary across the trials of a task. In standard applications, the rate at which information is accumulated by the diffusion process is assumed to be normally…

  8. A Comparison of Competing Models of the News Diffusion Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Michael E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the diffusion of information about the space shuttle Challenger explosion by comparing loglinear models of the diffusion process. Finds that the most parsimonious model with adequate goodness of fit was a linear one in which a person's location affected how the information was heard, which in turn affected when the information was…

  9. Some Problems in Using Diffusion Models for New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernhardt, Irwin; Mackenzie, Kenneth D.

    This paper analyzes some of the problems of using diffusion models to formulate marketing strategies for new products. Though future work in this area appears justified, many unresolved problems limit its application. There is no theory for adoption and diffusion processes; such a theory is outlined in this paper. The present models are too…

  10. Diffusion-driven precipitate growth and ripening of oxygen precipitates in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Will, J. Gröschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A.; Spiecker, E.

    2014-03-28

    X-ray Pendellösung fringes from three silicon single crystals measured at 900 °C are analyzed with respect to density and size of oxygen precipitates within a diffusion-driven growth model and compared with TEM investigations. It appears that boron doped (p+) material shows a higher precipitate density and a higher strain than moderately (p-) boron crystals. In-situ diffraction reveals a diffusion-driven precipitate growth followed by a second growth regime in both materials. An interpretation of the second growth regime in terms of Ostwald ripening yields surface energy values (around 70 erg/cm{sup 2}) similar to published data. Further, an increased nucleation rate by a factor of ∼13 is found in the p+ sample as compared to a p- sample at a nucleation temperature of 450 °C.

  11. Anisotropies in the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Background Measured by the Fermi LAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; McEnery, J. E.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of unresolved sources to the diffuse gamma-ray background could induce anisotropies in this emission on small angular scales. We analyze the angular power spectrum of the diffuse emission measured by the Fermi LAT at Galactic latitudes absolute value of b > 30 deg in four energy bins spanning 1 to 50 GeV. At multipoles l >= 155, corresponding to angular scales approx < 2 deg, angular power above the photon noise level is detected at > 99.99% CL in the 1-2 GeV, 2- 5 GeV, and 5- 10 GeV energy bins, and at > 99% CL at 10-50 GeV. Within each energy bin the measured angular power takes approximately the same value at all multipoles l >= 155, suggesting that it originates from the contribution of one or more unclustered source populations. The amplitude of the angular power normalized to the mean intensity in each energy bin is consistent with a constant value at all energies, C(sub p) / (I)(exp 2) = 9.05 +/- 0.84 x 10(exp -6) sr, while the energy dependence of C(sub p) is consistent with the anisotropy arising from one or more source populations with power-law photon spectra with spectral index Gamma (sub s) = 2.40 +/- 0.07. We discuss the implications of the measured angular power for gamma-ray source populations that may provide a contribution to the diffuse gamma-ray background.

  12. Lévy flight with absorption: A model for diffusing diffusivity with long tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rohit; Sebastian, K. L.

    2017-03-01

    We consider diffusion of a particle in rearranging environment, so that the diffusivity of the particle is a stochastic function of time. In our previous model of "diffusing diffusivity" [Jain and Sebastian, J. Phys. Chem. B 120, 3988 (2016), 10.1021/acs.jpcb.6b01527], it was shown that the mean square displacement of particle remains Fickian, i.e., ∝T at all times, but the probability distribution of particle displacement is not Gaussian at all times. It is exponential at short times and crosses over to become Gaussian only in a large time limit in the case where the distribution of D in that model has a steady state limit which is exponential, i.e., πe(D ) ˜e-D /D0 . In the present study, we model the diffusivity of a particle as a Lévy flight process so that D has a power-law tailed distribution, viz., πe(D ) ˜D-1 -α with 0 <α <1 . We find that in the short time limit, the width of displacement distribution is proportional to √{T }, implying that the diffusion is Fickian. But for long times, the width is proportional to T1 /2 α which is a characteristic of anomalous diffusion. The distribution function for the displacement of the particle is found to be a symmetric stable distribution with a stability index 2 α which preserves its shape at all times.

  13. [Diffusion and diffusion-osmosis models of the charged macromolecule transfer in barriers of biosystems].

    PubMed

    Varakin, A I; Mazur, V V; Arkhipova, N V; Serianov, Iu V

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical models of the transfer of charged macromolecules have been constructed on the basis of the classical equations of electromigration diffusion of Helmholtz-Smolukhovskii, Goldman, and Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz. It was shown that ion transfer in placental (mimicking lipid-protein barriers) and muscle barriers occurs by different mechanisms. In placental barriers, the electromigration diffusion occurs along lipid-protein channels formed due to the conformational deformation of phospholipid and protein molecules with the coefficients of diffusion D = (2.6-3.6) x 10(-8) cm2/s. The transfer in muscle barriers is due to the migration across charged interfibrillar channels with the negative diffusion activation energy, which is explained by changes in the structure of muscle fibers and expenditures of thermal energy for the extrusion of Cl- from channel walls with the diffusion coefficient D = (6.0-10.0) x 10(-6) cm2/s.

  14. A memory diffusion model for molecular anisotropic diffusion in siliceous β-zeolite.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiangfei; An, Zhuanzhuan; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    A memory diffusion model of molecules on β-zeolite is proposed. In the model, molecular diffusion in β-zeolites is treated as jumping from one adsorption site to its neighbors and the jumping probability is a compound probability which includes that provided by the transitional state theory as well as that derived from the information about which direction the target molecule comes from. The proposed approach reveals that the diffusivities along two crystal axes on β-zeolite are correlated. The model is tested by molecular dynamics simulations on diffusion of benzene and other simple molecules in β-zeolites. The results show that the molecules with larger diameters fit the prediction much better and that the "memory effects" are important in all cases.

  15. Intragroup and Galaxy-linked Diffuse X-ray Emission In Hickson Compact Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Mulchaey, John S.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Cardiff, Ann; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis, S.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L(sub X-Tau) relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L(sub X-sigma) relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L(sub X) increases with decreasing group Hi to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on Hi morphology whereby systems with intragroup Hi indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L(sub X) of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  16. Fermi LAT Observation of Diffuse Gamma-Rays Produced through Interactions Between Local Interstellar Matter and High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T.H.; /more authors..

    2012-03-30

    Observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi mission of diffuse {gamma}-rays in a mid-latitude region in the third quadrant (Galactic longitude l from 200{sup o} to 260{sup o} and latitude |b| from 22{sup o} to 60{sup o}) are reported. The region contains no known large molecular cloud and most of the atomic hydrogen is within 1 kpc of the solar system. The contributions of {gamma}-ray point sources and inverse Compton scattering are estimated and subtracted. The residual {gamma}-ray intensity exhibits a linear correlation with the atomic gas column density in energy from 100 MeV to 10 GeV. The measured integrated {gamma}-ray emissivity is (1.63 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} and (0.66 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} above 100 MeV and above 300 MeV, respectively, with an additional systematic error of {approx}10%. The differential emissivity from 100 MeV to 10 GeV agrees with calculations based on cosmic ray spectra consistent with those directly measured, at the 10% level. The results obtained indicate that cosmic ray nuclei spectra within 1 kpc from the solar system in regions studied are close to the local interstellar spectra inferred from direct measurements at the Earth within {approx}10%.

  17. An ion diffusion model in semi-permeable clay materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan

    2007-08-01

    Clay materials typically contain negative surface charges that induce electrostatic fields (or diffuse double layers) in electrolytes. During ion diffusion in a porous medium of clay materials, ions dynamically interact with the electrostatic fields associated with individual clay grains by depressing or expanding the electrostatic double layers, which subsequently affects ionic fluxes. Current theory of ion transport in porous media, however, cannot explicitly account for the dynamic interactions. Here we proposed a model by coupling electrodynamics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics (EDNT) to describe ion diffusion in clay materials as a complex function of factors including clay surface charge density, tortuosity, porosity, chemicoosmotic coefficient, and ion self-diffusivity. The model was validated by comparing the calculated and measured apparent ion diffusion coefficients in clay materials as a function of ionic strength. At transitional states, ion diffusive fluxes are dynamically related to the electrostatic fields, which shrink or expand as ion diffusion occurs. At steady states, the electrostatic fields are time-invariant and ion diffusive fluxes conform to flux and concentration gradient relationships; and apparent diffusivity can be approximated by the ion diffusivity in bulk electrolytes corrected by a tortuosity factor and macroscopic concentration discontinuities at the interfaces between clay materials and bulk solutions.

  18. Modeling diffusion and adsorption in compacted bentonite: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Bourg, Alain C. M.; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-03-01

    The current way of describing diffusive transport through compacted clays is a simple diffusion model coupled to a linear adsorption coefficient ( Kd). To fit the observed results of cation diffusion, this model is usually extended with an adjustable "surface diffusion" coefficient. Description of the negative adsorption of anions calls for a further adjustment through the use of an "effective porosity". The final model thus includes many fitting parameters. This is inconvenient where predictive modeling is called for (e.g., for waste confinement using compacted clay liners). The diffusion/adsorption models in current use have been derived from the common hydrogeological equation of advection/dispersion/adsorption. However, certain simplifications were also borrowed without questioning their applicability to the case of compacted clays. Among these simplifications, the assumption that the volume of the adsorbed phase is negligible should be discussed. We propose a modified diffusion/adsorption model that accounts for the volume of the adsorbed phase. It suggests that diffusion through highly compacted clay takes place through the interlayers (i.e., in the adsorbed phase). Quantitative prediction of the diffusive flux will necessitate more detailed descriptions of surface reactivity and of the mobility of interlayer species.

  19. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  20. Exact curvilinear diffusion coefficients in the repton model.

    PubMed

    Buhot, A

    2005-10-01

    The Rubinstein-Duke or repton model is one of the simplest lattice model of reptation for the diffusion of a polymer in a gel or a melt. Recently, a slightly modified model with hardcore interactions between the reptons has been introduced. The curvilinear diffusion coefficients of both models are exactly determined for all chain lengths. The case of periodic boundary conditions is also considered.

  1. Phonon spectroscopy with sub-meV resolution by femtosecond x-ray diffuse scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric; Henighan, Tom; ...

    2015-08-10

    We present a reconstruction of the transverse acoustic phonon dispersion of germanium from femtosecond time-resolved x-ray diffuse scattering measurements at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate an energy resolution of 0.3 meV with a momentum resolution of 0.01 nm-1 using 10-keV x rays with a bandwidth of ~ 1 eV. This high resolution was achieved simultaneously for a large section of reciprocal space including regions closely following three of the principal symmetry directions. The phonon dispersion was reconstructed with less than 3 h of measurement time, during which neither the x-ray energy, the sample orientation, nor the detector positionmore » were scanned. In conclusion, these results demonstrate how time-domain measurements can complement conventional frequency domain inelastic-scattering techniques.« less

  2. Imaging osteoarthritis in the knee joints using x-ray guided diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qizhi; Yuan, Zhen; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-02-01

    In our previous studies, near-infrared (NIR) diffuse optical tomography (DOT) had been successfully applied to imaging osteoarthritis (OA) in the finger joints where significant difference in optical properties of the joint tissues was evident between healthy and OA finger joints. Here we report for the first time that large joints such as the knee can also be optically imaged especially when DOT is combined with x-ray tomosynthesis where the 3D image of the bones from x-ray is incorporated into the DOT reconstruction as spatial a priori structural information. This study demonstrates that NIR light can image large joints such as the knee in addition to finger joints, which will drastically broaden the clinical utility of our x-ray guided DOT technique for OA diagnosis.

  3. Phonon spectroscopy with sub-meV resolution by femtosecond x-ray diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Diling; Robert, Aymeric; Lemke, Henrik T.; Trigo, Mariano

    2015-08-10

    We present a reconstruction of the transverse acoustic phonon dispersion of germanium from femtosecond time-resolved x-ray diffuse scattering measurements at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We demonstrate an energy resolution of 0.3 meV with a momentum resolution of 0.01 nm-1 using 10-keV x rays with a bandwidth of ~ 1 eV. This high resolution was achieved simultaneously for a large section of reciprocal space including regions closely following three of the principal symmetry directions. The phonon dispersion was reconstructed with less than 3 h of measurement time, during which neither the x-ray energy, the sample orientation, nor the detector position were scanned. In conclusion, these results demonstrate how time-domain measurements can complement conventional frequency domain inelastic-scattering techniques.

  4. Modeling boron diffusion gettering of iron in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarahiltunen, A.; Talvitie, H.; Savin, H.; Yli-Koski, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Sinkkonen, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a model is presented for boron diffusion gettering of iron in silicon during thermal processing. In the model, both the segregation of iron due to high boron doping concentration and heterogeneous precipitation of iron to the surface of the wafer are taken into account. It is shown, by comparing simulated results with experimental ones, that this model can be used to estimate boron diffusion gettering efficiency of iron under a variety of processing conditions. Finally, the application of the model to phosphorus diffusion gettering is discussed.

  5. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  6. Calculating model of light transmission efficiency of diffusers attached to a lighting cavity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Chien, Wei-Ting; Moreno, Ivan; Hsieh, Chih-To; Lin, Mo-Cha; Hsiao, Shu-Li; Lee, Xuan-Hao

    2010-03-15

    A lighting cavity is a reflecting box with light sources inside. Its exit side is covered with a diffuser plate to mix and distribute light, which addresses a key issue of luminaires, display backlights, and other illumination systems. We derive a simple but precise formula for the optical efficiency of diffuser plates attached to a light cavity. We overcome the complexity of the scattering theory and the difficulty of the multiple calculations involved, by carrying out the calculation with a single ray of light that statistically represents all the scattered rays. We constructed and tested several optical cavities using light-emitting diodes, bulk-scattering diffusers, white scatter sheets, and silver coatings. All measurements are in good agreement with predictions from our optical model.

  7. A diffusivity model for predicting VOC diffusion in porous building materials based on fractal theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Dengjia; Song, Cong; Liu, Jiaping

    2015-12-15

    Most building materials are porous media, and the internal diffusion coefficients of such materials have an important influences on the emission characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The pore structure of porous building materials has a significant impact on the diffusion coefficient. However, the complex structural characteristics bring great difficulties to the model development. The existing prediction models of the diffusion coefficient are flawed and need to be improved. Using scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) tests of typical porous building materials, this study developed a new diffusivity model: the multistage series-connection fractal capillary-bundle (MSFC) model. The model considers the variable-diameter capillaries formed by macropores connected in series as the main mass transfer paths, and the diameter distribution of the capillary bundles obeys a fractal power law in the cross section. In addition, the tortuosity of the macrocapillary segments with different diameters is obtained by the fractal theory. Mesopores serve as the connections between the macrocapillary segments rather than as the main mass transfer paths. The theoretical results obtained using the MSFC model yielded a highly accurate prediction of the diffusion coefficients and were in a good agreement with the VOC concentration measurements in the environmental test chamber.

  8. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10-100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS.

  9. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10–100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS. PMID:24089741

  10. Modeling cosmic ray propagation and associated interstellar emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalenko, Igor

    2012-07-01

    Last several years were highlighted by many breakthroughs and discoveries in astrophysics of cosmic rays (CRs), thanks to superior instruments such as BESS, PAMELA, Fermi-LAT, Agile, INTEGRAL, HESS, VERITAS, Milagro, ATIC, CREAM, ACE and others. They provide key pieces of information that may lead to the solution of the century-old puzzle of the origin of CRs and may contain signatures of new physics. Exploiting the data collected by the scientific missions to the fullest requires reliable and detailed model of the Milky Way galaxy. GALPROP is the current state-of-the-art numerical CR propagation code that has become a standard analysis tool in CR and gamma-ray research. It uses extensive astrophysical information along with nuclear and particle data as input to self-consistently predict CRs, diffuse gamma rays, synchrotron emission and other observables. I will review recent GALPROP developments and results.

  11. Comparison of Turbulent Thermal Diffusivity and Scalar Variance Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper will include a detailed comparison of heat transfer models that rely upon the thermal diffusivity. The goals are to inform users of the development history of the various models and the resulting differences in model formulations, as well as to evaluate the models on a variety of validation cases so that users might better understand which models are more broadly applicable.

  12. Diffusion in different models of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, B.; Nicola, E. M.

    2008-04-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABP) have served as phenomenological models of self-propelled motion in biology. We study the effective diffusion coefficient of two one-dimensional ABP models (simplified depot model and Rayleigh-Helmholtz model) differing in their nonlinear friction functions. Depending on the choice of the friction function the diffusion coefficient does or does not attain a minimum as a function of noise intensity. We furthermore discuss the case of an additional bias breaking the left-right symmetry of the system. We show that this bias induces a drift and that it generally reduces the diffusion coefficient. For a finite range of values of the bias, both models can exhibit a maximum in the diffusion coefficient vs. noise intensity.

  13. Improved knowledge diffusion model based on the collaboration hypernetwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiang-Pan; Guo, Qiang; Yang, Guang-Yong; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2015-06-01

    The process for absorbing knowledge becomes an essential element for innovation in firms and in adapting to changes in the competitive environment. In this paper, we present an improved knowledge diffusion hypernetwork (IKDH) model based on the idea that knowledge will spread from the target node to all its neighbors in terms of the hyperedge and knowledge stock. We apply the average knowledge stock V(t) , the variable σ2(t) , and the variance coefficient c(t) to evaluate the performance of knowledge diffusion. By analyzing different knowledge diffusion ways, selection ways of the highly knowledgeable nodes, hypernetwork sizes and hypernetwork structures for the performance of knowledge diffusion, results show that the diffusion speed of IKDH model is 3.64 times faster than that of traditional knowledge diffusion (TKDH) model. Besides, it is three times faster to diffuse knowledge by randomly selecting "expert" nodes than that by selecting large-hyperdegree nodes as "expert" nodes. Furthermore, either the closer network structure or smaller network size results in the faster knowledge diffusion.

  14. Angular Signatures of Dark Matter in the Diffuse Gamma Ray Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

    2007-02-01

    Dark matter annihilating in our Galaxy's halo and elsewhere in the universe is expected to generate a diffuse flux of gamma rays, potentially observable with next generation satellite-based experiments, such as GLAST. In this article, we study the signatures of dark matter in the angular distribution of this radiation. Pertaining to the extragalactic contribution, we discuss the effect of the motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmological rest frame, and anisotropies due to the structure of our local universe. For the gamma ray flux from dark matter in our own Galactic halo, we discuss the effects of the offset position of the solar system, the Compton-Getting effect, the asphericity of the Milky Way halo, and the signatures of nearby substructure. We explore the prospects for the detection of these features by the GLAST satellite and find that, if {approx} 10% or more of the diffuse gamma ray background observed by EGRET is the result of dark matter annihilations, then GLAST should be sensitive to anisotropies down to the 0.1% level. Such precision would be sufficient to detect many, if not all, of the signatures discussed in this paper.

  15. Net diffusivity in ocean general circulation models with nonuniform grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, F. L.; Fung, I. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The numerical vertical diffusivity K(num), embedded in a numerical ocean general circulation model with nonuniform vertical grid, is estimated. It is shown that in a downwelling region, K(num) is negative for a grid with grid size increasing with depth. When the grid size increment, or the downward vertical velocity, is large, K(num) may exceed the vertical diffusivity specified and may result in a negative effective vertical diffusivity. Therefore care needs to be taken to specify the vertical diffusivity in a numerical model with nonuniform grid, and a lower bound is generally imposed in order to avoid an unphysical negative value. Some possible effects of the negative effective diffusivity are discussed.

  16. Modeling Intragranular Diffusion in Low-Connectivity Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Qinhong

    2012-03-20

    Diffusive exchange of solutes between bulk water in an aquifer and water in the intragranular pores of the solid phase remains confusing after decades of study. In a previous paper, we reviewed some of the explanations, and suggested that the disparities between observation and theory were largely due to low connectivity of the intragranular pores. Low connectivity indicates that a useful conceptual framework is percolation theory, which guided our analysis. The present study was initiated to improve the finite difference (FD) model presented in the previous paper, and to test that new model rigorously against new random walk (RW) simulations of diffusion in low-connectivity porous spheres starting from non-equilibrium. The new FD model calculates diffusion separately in the infinite cluster and the finite clusters, and closely matches the new, more complex RW results. The percolation-theory based description of the new model is fairly simple, and can readily be incorporated into existing FD models. The simulations showed that the combination of low intragranular pore connectivity, and out-diffusion initiated at diffusive non-equilibrium, can produce diffusive behavior that appears as if the solute had undergone slow sorption, even in the absence of any sorption process. This mechanism may help explain some hitherto confusing aspects of intragranular diffusion.

  17. A universal model of restricted diffusion for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piskorz, Tomasz K; Ochab-Marcinek, Anna

    2014-05-08

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is frequently used to study the processes of restricted diffusion. The most important quantity to determine is the size of the structures that hinder the Brownian motion of the molecules. We study three qualitatively different models of restricted diffusion, widely applied in biophysics and material science: Diffusion constrained by elastic force (i), walking confined diffusion (ii), and hop diffusion (iii). They cover the diversity of statistical behaviors, from purely Gaussian (i) to sharply non-Gaussian on intermediate time scales (ii) and, additionally, discrete (iii). We test whether one can use the Gaussian approximation of the FCS autocorrelation function to interpret the non-Gaussian data. We show that (i-iii) have approximately the same mean square displacements. Using simulations, we show that the FCS data suspected of restricted diffusion can be reliably interpreted using one archetypal model (i). Even if the underlying mechanism of the restriction is different or unknown, the accuracy of fitting the confinement size is excellent, and diffusion coefficients are also estimated with a good accuracy. This study gives a physical insight into the statistical behavior of different types of restricted diffusion and into the ability of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to distinguish between them.

  18. Modeling diffuse reflectance measurements of light scattered by layered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Shelley B.

    In this dissertation, we first present a model for the diffuse reflectance due to a continuous beam incident normally on a half space composed of a uniform scattering and absorbing medium. This model is the result of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption and a defined beam width. Through comparison with the diffuse reflectance computed using the numerical solution of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for small source-detector separation distances. We then present an explicit model for the diffuse reflectance due to a collimated beam of light incident normally on layered tissues. This model is derived using the corrected diffusion approximation applied to a layered medium, and it takes the form of a convolution with an explicit kernel and the incident beam profile. This model corrects the standard diffusion approximation over all source-detector separation distances provided the beam is sufficiently wide compared to the scattering mean-free path. We validate this model through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Then we use this model to estimate the optical properties of an epithelial layer from Monte Carlo simulation data. Using measurements at small source-detector separations and this model, we are able to estimate the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of epithelial tissues efficiently with reasonable accuracy. Finally, we present an extension of the corrected diffusion approximation for an obliquely incident beam. This model is formed through a Fourier Series representation in the azimuthal angle which allows us to exhibit the break in axisymmetry when combined with the previous analysis. We validate this model with Monte Carlo simulations. This model can also be written in the form of a convolution of an explicit kernel with the incident beam profile. Additionally, it can be used to

  19. Diffusion in pulsar wind nebulae: an investigation using magnetohydrodynamic and particle transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, O.; Vorster, M. J.; Lyutikov, M.; Engelbrecht, N. E.

    2016-08-01

    We study the transport of high-energy particles in pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and test-particle simulations, as well as a Fokker-Planck particle transport model. The latter includes radiative and adiabatic losses, diffusion, and advection on the background flow of the simulated MHD nebula. By combining the models, the spatial evolution of flux and photon index of the X-ray synchrotron emission is modelled for the three nebulae G21.5-0.9, the inner regions of Vela, and 3C 58, thereby allowing us to derive governing parameters: the magnetic field strength, average flow velocity, and spatial diffusion coefficient. For comparison, the nebulae are also modelled with the semi-analytic Kennel & Coroniti model but the Porth et al. model generally yields better fits to the observational data. We find that high velocity fluctuations in the turbulent nebula (downstream of the termination shock) give rise to efficient diffusive transport of particles, with average Péclet number close to unity, indicating that both advection and diffusion play an important role in particle transport. We find that the diffusive transport coefficient of the order of ˜ 2 × 1027(Ls/0.42 Ly) cm2 s- 1 (Ls is the size of the termination shock) is independent of energy up to extreme particle Lorentz factors of γp ˜ 1010.

  20. Modelling oxygen self-diffusion in UO2 under pressure

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, Michael William D.; Grimes, R. W.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; ...

    2015-10-22

    Access to values for oxygen self-diffusion over a range of temperatures and pressures in UO2 is important to nuclear fuel applications. Here, elastic and expansivity data are used in the framework of a thermodynamic model, the cBΩ model, to derive the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient in UO2 over a range of pressures (0–10 GPa) and temperatures (300–1900 K). Furthermore, the significant reduction in oxygen self-diffusion as a function of increasing hydrostatic pressure, and the associated increase in activation energy, is identified.

  1. Analysis of XMM-Newton Data from Extended Sources and the Diffuse X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of X-ray data from extended objects and the diffuse background is a complicated process that requires attention to the details of the instrumental response as well as an understanding of the multiple background components. We present methods and software that we have developed to reduce data from XMM-Newton EPIC imaging observations for both the MOS and PN instruments. The software has now been included in the Science Analysis System (SAS) package available through the XMM-Newton Science Operations Center (SOC).

  2. The sensitivity of Cherenkov telescopes to dark matter and astrophysical anisotropies in the diffuse gamma-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripken, Joachim; Cuoco, Alessandro; Zechlin, Hannes-S.; Conrad, Jan; Horns, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the capability of present (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and planned (CTA) ground-based Cherenkov telescope systems for detecting angular anisotropies in the diffuse gamma-ray background is investigated. Following up on a study of the impact of instrumental characteristics (effective area, field of view, angular resolution, and background rejection efficiency), the first part examines the influence of different observational strategies, i.e. whether a single deep observation or a splitting over multiple shallow fields is preferred. In the second part, the sensitivity to anisotropies generated by self-annihilating dark matter is studied for different common dark matter models. We find that a relative contribution of ~ 10% from dark matter annihilation to the extra-galactic diffuse gamma-ray background can be detected with planned configurations of CTA. In terms of the thermally-averaged self-annihilation cross section, the sensitivity of CTA corresponds to values below the thermal freeze-out expectation langleσvrangle = 3 × 10-26 cm3 s-1 for dark matter particles lighter than ~ 200 GeV. We stress the importance of constraining anisotropies from unresolved astrophysical sources with currently operating instruments already, as a novel and complementary method for investigating the properties of TeV sources.

  3. Second launch of the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Sapkota, Dhaka

    2016-04-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) is a sounding rocket mission to study the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) and Local Hot Bubble (LHB) X-ray emission. After a successful launch of December 2012, DXL’s capabilities were expanded by using two additional proportional counters and three unique filters for the launch of December 2015. Employing Be-, B- and C-based plastic filters, DXL mission re-scanned the Helium Focusing Cone for better spectral and positional information (to address the IBEX controversy). In this paper, we will review the upgraded mission hardware and performance, while sharing some preliminary results from the latest observation.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  4. Evaluating the accuracy of diffusion MRI models in white matter.

    PubMed

    Rokem, Ariel; Yeatman, Jason D; Pestilli, Franco; Kay, Kendrick N; Mezer, Aviv; van der Walt, Stefan; Wandell, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Models of diffusion MRI within a voxel are useful for making inferences about the properties of the tissue and inferring fiber orientation distribution used by tractography algorithms. A useful model must fit the data accurately. However, evaluations of model-accuracy of commonly used models have not been published before. Here, we evaluate model-accuracy of the two main classes of diffusion MRI models. The diffusion tensor model (DTM) summarizes diffusion as a 3-dimensional Gaussian distribution. Sparse fascicle models (SFM) summarize the signal as a sum of signals originating from a collection of fascicles oriented in different directions. We use cross-validation to assess model-accuracy at different gradient amplitudes (b-values) throughout the white matter. Specifically, we fit each model to all the white matter voxels in one data set and then use the model to predict a second, independent data set. This is the first evaluation of model-accuracy of these models. In most of the white matter the DTM predicts the data more accurately than test-retest reliability; SFM model-accuracy is higher than test-retest reliability and also higher than the DTM model-accuracy, particularly for measurements with (a) a b-value above 1000 in locations containing fiber crossings, and (b) in the regions of the brain surrounding the optic radiations. The SFM also has better parameter-validity: it more accurately estimates the fiber orientation distribution function (fODF) in each voxel, which is useful for fiber tracking.

  5. Studies of electron diffusion in photo-excited Ni using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, A. I. H.; Jarnac, A.; Wang, Xiaocui; Enquist, H.; Jurgilaitis, A.; Larsson, J.

    2016-11-01

    We show that the heat deposition profile in a laser-excited metal can be determined by time-resolved X-ray diffraction. In this study, we investigated the electron diffusion in a 150 nm thick nickel film deposited on an indium antimonide substrate. A strain wave that mimics the heat deposition profile is generated in the metal and propagates into the InSb, where it influences the temporal profile of X-rays diffracted from InSb. We found that the strain pulse significantly deviated from a simple exponential profile, and that the two-temperature model was needed to reproduce the measured heat deposition profile. Experimental results were compared to simulations based on the two-temperature model carried out using commercial finite-element software packages and on-line dynamical diffraction tools. To reproduce the experimental data, the electron-phonon coupling factor was lowered compared to previously measured values. The experiment was carried out at a third-generation synchrotron radiation source using a high-brightness beam and an ultrafast X-ray streak camera with a temporal resolution of 3 ps.

  6. Suzaku Detection of Diffuse Hard X-Ray Emission Outside Vela X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Bamba, Aya; Miceli, Marco; Hewitt, John W.; Temim, Tea; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshii, Rie

    2011-01-01

    Vela X is a large, 3 deg x 2 deg, radio-emitting pulsar wind nebula (PWN) powered by the Vela pulsar in the Vela supernova remnant. Using four Suzaku/XIS observations pointed just outside Vela X, we find hard X-ray emission extending throughout the fields of view. The hard X-ray spectra are well represented by a power-law. The photon index is measured to be constant at Gamma approximates 2.4, similar to that of the southern outer part of Vela X. The power-law flux decreases with increasing distance from the pulsar. These properties lead us to propose that the hard X-ray emission is associated with the Vela PWN. The larger X-ray extension found in this work strongly suggests that distinct populations relativistic electrons form the X-ray PWN and Vela X, as was recently inferred from multiwavelength spectral modeling of Vela X.

  7. When Is a Diffusion Profile Not a Diffusion Profile? the Importance of Initial State Assumptions in Diffusion Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. J.; Chamberlain, K. J.; Kahl, M.; Potts, N. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.; Wilson, C. J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, diffusion chronometers have evolved from a niche tool into one of routine application, with more practitioners, new tools and increasingly large datasets. As we expand the horizons of diffusional geochronometry, it is worth taking stock of developments in methodologies and data acquisition, and taking time to revisit the underpinnings of the technique. Data collected as part of recent projects on Campi Flegrei, the Bishop Tuff and Fimmvörðuháls-Eyjafjallajökull are here used to investigate the initial state assumption, an absolutely vital aspect underpinning most diffusional work and one that is rarely evaluated despite its fundamental importance. To illustrate the nature of the problem we consider two widely-used element-mineral systems for felsic and mafic systems, respectively. First, barium and strontium profiles within sanidine crystals, modelled independently, can give strongly contrasting timescales from the same crystal zone. We can reconcile the datasets only for a situation where the initial boundary within the crystal was not a sharp step function, but relatively fuzzy before diffusion onset. This fuzziness effectively starts both chronometers off with an apparent, and false, pre-existing timescale, impacting the slower-diffusing barium much more strongly than the faster-diffusing strontium, yielding thousands of years of non-existent diffusion history. By combining both elements, a starting width of tens of microns can be shown, shortening the true diffusive timescales from tens of thousands of years to hundreds. Second, in olivine, we encounter different growth-related problems. Here, Fe-Mg interdiffusion occurs at a rate comparable to growth, with the compound nature of zonation making it difficult to extract the diffusion component. This requires a treatment of changing boundary conditions and sequential growth to generate the curvature seen in natural data, in order to recover timescales for anything but the outermost

  8. Cosmic ray knee and diffuse {gamma}, e{sup +} and p-bar fluxes from collisions of cosmic rays with dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Masip, Manuel; Mastromatteo, Iacopo E-mail: iacopomas@infis.univ.trieste.it

    2008-12-15

    In models with extra dimensions the fundamental scale of gravity M{sub D} could be of the order of TeV. In that case the interaction cross section between a cosmic proton of energy E and a dark matter particle {chi} will grow fast with E for center-of-mass energies {radical}(2m{sub {chi}}E) above M{sub D}, and it could reach 1 mbarn at E Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 9} GeV. We show that these gravity-mediated processes would break the proton and produce a diffuse flux of particles/antiparticles, while boosting {chi} with a fraction of the initial proton energy. We find that the expected cross sections and dark matter densities are not enough to produce an observable asymmetry in the flux of the most energetic (extragalactic) cosmic rays. However, we propose that unsuppressed TeV interactions may be the origin of the knee observed in the spectrum of galactic cosmic rays. The knee would appear at the energy threshold for the interaction of dark matter particles with cosmic protons trapped in the galaxy by Micro-Sign G magnetic fields, and it would imply a well-defined flux of secondary antiparticles and TeV gamma rays.

  9. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  10. Comptonization of diffuse ambient radiation by a relativistic jet: The source of gamma rays from blazars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rees, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent Energy Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) observations of blazars have revealed strong, variable gamma-ray fluxes with no signatures of gamma-ray absorption by pair production. This radiation probably originates from the inner parts of relativistic jets which are aimed nearly toward us. On sub-parsec scales, the jet will be pervaded by radiation from the broad-line region, as well as by photons from the central continuum source (some of which will be scattered by thermal plasma). In a frame moving with the relativistic outflow, the energy of this ambient radiation would be enhanced. This radiation would be Comptonized by both cold and relativistic electrons in the jet, yielding (in the observer's frame) a collimated beam of X-rays and gamma rays. On the assumption that this process dominates self-Comptonization of synchrotron radiation, we develop a self-consistent model for variable gamma-ray emission, involving a single population of relativistic electrons accelerated by a disturbance in the jet. The spectral break between the X-ray and gamma-ray band, observed in 3C 279 and deduced for other blazars, results from inefficient radiative cooling of lower energy electrons. The existence of such a break strongly favors a model involving Comptonization of an external radiation field over a synchrotron self-Compton model. We derive constraints on such model parameters as the location and speed of the source, its dimensions and internal physical parameters, the maximum photon energies produced in the source, and the density and distribution of ambient radiation. Finally, we discuss how observations might discriminate between our model and alternative ones invoking Comptonization of ambient radiation.

  11. Future Japanese X-ray TES Calorimeter Satellite: DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, S.; Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Miyazaki, N.; Kuwabara, K.; Kuromaru, G.; Suzuki, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Sakai, K.; Nagayoshi, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Hayashi, T.; Muramatsu, H.; Tawara, Y.; Mitsuishi, I.; Babazaki, Y.; Nakamichi, R.; Bandai, A.; Yuasa, T.; Ota, N.

    2016-08-01

    We present the latest update and progress on the future Japanese X-ray satellite mission Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor (DIOS). DIOS is proposed to JAXA as a small satellite mission, and would be launched with an Epsilon rocket. DIOS would carry on the legacy of ASTRO-H, which carries semiconductor-based microcalorimeters and is scheduled to be launched in 2016, in high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. A 400-pixel array of transition-edge sensors (TESs) would be employed, so DIOS would also provide valuable lessons for the next ESA X-ray mission ATHENA on TES operation and cryogen-free cooling in space. We have been sophisticating the entire design of the satellite to meet the requirement for the Epsilon payload for the next call. The primary goal of the mission is to search for warm-hot intergalactic medium with high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy by detecting redshifted emission lines from OVII and OVIII ions. The results would have significant impacts on our understanding of the nature of "dark baryons," their total amount and spatial distribution, as well as their evolution over cosmological timescales.

  12. Theoretical model of blood flow measurement by diffuse correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakadžić, Sava; Boas, David A.; Carp, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a noninvasive method to quantify tissue perfusion from measurements of the intensity temporal autocorrelation function of diffusely scattered light. However, DCS autocorrelation function measurements in tissue better match theoretical predictions based on the diffusive motion of the scatterers than those based on a model where the advective nature of blood flow dominates the stochastic properties of the scattered light. We have recently shown using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and assuming a simplistic vascular geometry and laminar flow profile that the diffusive nature of the DCS autocorrelation function decay is likely a result of the shear-induced diffusion of the red blood cells. Here, we provide theoretical derivations supporting and generalizing the previous MC results. Based on the theory of diffusing-wave spectroscopy, we derive an expression for the autocorrelation function along the photon path through a vessel that takes into account both diffusive and advective scatterer motion, and we provide the solution for the DCS autocorrelation function in a semi-infinite geometry. We also derive the correlation diffusion and correlation transfer equation, which can be applied for an arbitrary sample geometry. Further, we propose a method to take into account realistic vascular morphology and flow profile.

  13. Innovation Diffusion Model in Higher Education: Case Study of E-Learning Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buc, Sanjana; Divjak, Blaženka

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion of innovation (DOI) is critical for any organization and especially nowadays for higher education institutions (HEIs) in the light of vast pressure of emerging educational technologies as well as of the demand of economy and society. DOI takes into account the initial and the implementation phase. The conceptual model of DOI in…

  14. Spatial dependent diffusion of cosmic rays and the excess of primary electrons derived from high precision measurements by AMS-02

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chao; Guo, Yi-Qing; Hu, Hong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The precise spectra of Cosmic Ray (CR) electrons and positrons have been published by the measurement of AMS-02. It is reasonable to regard the difference between the electron and positron spectra (ΔΦ = Φe- -Φe+) as being dominated by primary electrons. The resulting electron spectrum shows no sign of spectral softening above 20 GeV, which is in contrast with the prediction of the standard model of CR propagation. In this work, we generalize the analytic one-dimensional two-halo model of diffusion to a three-dimensional realistic calculation by implementing spatial variant diffusion coefficients in the DRAGON package. As a result, we can reproduce the spectral hardening of protons observed by several experiments, and predict an excess of high energy primary electrons which agrees with the measurement reasonably well. Unlike the break spectrum obtained for protons, the model calculation predicts a smooth electron excess and thus slightly over-predicts the flux from tens of GeV to 100 GeV. To understand this issue, further experimental and theoretical studies are necessary. Supported by Natural Sciences Foundation of China (11135010)

  15. Diffusion of Li in olivine. Part I: Experimental observations and a multi species diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohmen, Ralf; Kasemann, Simone A.; Coogan, Laurence; Chakraborty, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    There are an increasing number of studies that focus on the systematics of the distribution of Li and its isotopes among different geochemical reservoirs. These studies have found that Li is relatively mobile compared to many other elements (e.g., Fe, Mg), and diffusion has been considered as a mechanism to generate large isotopic fractionations even at high temperatures. In order to quantify some of these aspects, we have measured Li diffusion rates experimentally along [0 0 1] of single crystals of olivines from San Carlos, Arizona and Pakistan, at 800-1200 °C at a total pressure of 100 kPa and fO 2 ≈ WM buffer. A complex diffusion behavior of Li is observed, indicating that two mechanisms of diffusion (a fast and a slower one) operate simultaneously. The behavior is well described by a model that partitions Li between two different sites in olivine - an octahedral site (Li Me) and an interstitial site (Li i). Transport of Li is a combination of hopping within and between each of these kinds of sites involving also vacancies on the octahedral site (V Me). It is assumed that the homogeneous reaction (Li Me = V Me + Li i) that maintains equilibrium distribution of Li between the sites is instantaneous compared to the timescales of all other processes associated with diffusive transport. One consequence of this mode of transport of Li in olivine is that the shape and length of diffusion profiles depend on the boundary conditions imposed at the surface of a crystal; i.e., the chemical environment (e.g., fO 2, aLi 4SiO 4), in addition to temperature and pressure. Our model describes the variable experimentally determined Li-profile shapes produced at different temperatures and with different boundary conditions, as well as their time evolution, quantitatively. Modeling the observed isotopic fractionation shows that 6Li diffuses about 5% faster than 7Li on the interstitial site. Inspection of published data on Li distribution in natural olivines that are available

  16. Reaction-diffusion-branching models of stock price fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei-Han; Tian, Guang-Shan

    Several models of stock trading (Bak et al., Physica A 246 (1997) 430.) are analyzed in analogy with one-dimensional, two-species reaction-diffusion-branching processes. Using heuristic and scaling arguments, we show that the short-time market price variation is subdiffusive with a Hurst exponent H=1/4. Biased diffusion towards the market price and blind-eyed copying lead to crossovers to the empirically observed random-walk behavior ( H=1/2) at long times. The calculated crossover forms and diffusion constants are shown to agree well with simulation data.

  17. Update on Advection-Diffusion Purge Flow Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brieda, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous purge is commonly used in sensitive spacecraft optical or electronic instruments to prevent infiltration of contaminants and/or water vapor. Typically, purge is sized using simplistic zero-dimensional models that do not take into account instrument geometry, surface effects, and the dependence of diffusive flux on the concentration gradient. For this reason, an axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation was recently developed to model contaminant infiltration and removal by purge. The solver uses a combined Navier-Stokes and Advection-Diffusion approach. In this talk, we report on updates in the model, namely inclusion of a particulate transport model.

  18. On modeling pressure diffusion in non-homogeneous shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.; Rogers, M. M.; Durbin, P.; Lele, S. K.

    1996-01-01

    New models are proposed for the 'slow and 'rapid' parts of the pressure diffusive transport based on the examination of DNS databases for plane mixing layers and wakes. The model for the 'slow' part is non-local, but requires the distribution of the triple-velocity correlation as a local source. The latter can be computed accurately for the normal component from standard gradient diffusion models, but such models are inadequate for the cross component. More work is required to remedy this situation.

  19. SOLVING THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL DIFFUSION FLOW MODEL.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.; Lai, Chintu

    1985-01-01

    A simplification of the two-dimensional (2-D) continuity and momentum equations is the diffusion equation. To investigate its capability, the numerical model using the diffusion approach is applied to a hypothetical failure problem of a regional water reservoir. The model is based on an explicit, integrated finite-difference scheme, and the floodplain is simulated by a popular home computer which supports 64K FORTRAN. Though simple, the 2-D model can simulate some interesting flooding effects that a 1-D full dynamic model cannot.

  20. THE SPECTRUM OF ISOTROPIC DIFFUSE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION BETWEEN 100 MeV AND 820 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bechtol, K.; Bissaldi, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Université Montpellier 2, CNRS Bruel, P. E-mail: bechtol@kicp.uchicago.edu [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, École Polytechnique, CNRS and others

    2015-01-20

    The γ-ray sky can be decomposed into individually detected sources, diffuse emission attributed to the interactions of Galactic cosmic rays with gas and radiation fields, and a residual all-sky emission component commonly called the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background (IGRB). The IGRB comprises all extragalactic emissions too faint or too diffuse to be resolved in a given survey, as well as any residual Galactic foregrounds that are approximately isotropic. The first IGRB measurement with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) used 10 months of sky-survey data and considered an energy range between 200 MeV and 100 GeV. Improvements in event selection and characterization of cosmic-ray backgrounds, better understanding of the diffuse Galactic emission (DGE), and a longer data accumulation of 50 months allow for a refinement and extension of the IGRB measurement with the LAT, now covering the energy range from 100 MeV to 820 GeV. The IGRB spectrum shows a significant high-energy cutoff feature and can be well described over nearly four decades in energy by a power law with exponential cutoff having a spectral index of 2.32 ± 0.02 and a break energy of (279 ± 52) GeV using our baseline DGE model. The total intensity attributed to the IGRB is (7.2 ± 0.6) × 10{sup –6} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} above 100 MeV, with an additional +15%/–30% systematic uncertainty due to the Galactic diffuse foregrounds.

  1. Evolution Nonlinear Diffusion-Convection PDE Models for Spectrogram Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugnol, B.; Fernández, C.; Galiano, G.; Velasco, J.

    2008-09-01

    In previous works we studied the application of PDE-based image processing techniques applied to the spectrogram of audio signals in order to improve the readability of the signal. In particular we considered the implementation of the nonlinear diffusive model proposed by Álvarez, Lions and Morel [1](ALM) combined with a convective term inspired by the differential reassignment proposed by Chassandre-Mottin, Daubechies, Auger and Flandrin [2]-[3]. In this work we consider the possibility of replacing the diffusive model of ALM by diffusive terms in divergence form. In particular we implement finite element approximations of nonlinear diffusive terms studied by Chen, Levine, Rao [4] and Antontsev, Shmarev [5]-[8] with a convective term.

  2. Evolution of a simple inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmological model with diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Shogin, Dmitry; Hervik, Sigbjørn E-mail: sigbjorn.hervik@uis.no

    2013-10-01

    We investigate a simple inhomogeneous anisotropic cosmology (plane symmetric G{sub 2} model) filled with a tilted perfect fluid undergoing velocity diffusion on a scalar field. Considered are two types of fluid: dust and radiation. We solve the system of Einstein field equations and diffusion equations numerically and demonstrate how the universe evolves towards its future asymptotic state. Also, typical time scales of characteristic processes are determined. The obtained results for dust- and radiation-filled cosmologies are compared to each other and to those in the diffusionless case, giving a hint on which effects can be the result of including diffusion in more complicated models. For example, diffusion causes the accelerated expansion stage to arrive at later times.

  3. Anomalies in the gamma-ray diffuse emission of the Galaxy and implications for the interpretation of IceCube results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Gaggero, D.; Marinelli, A.; Taoso, M.; Urbano, A.; Valli, M.

    2017-03-01

    Several independent analyzes of Fermi-LAT results found evidences of an excess of γ -ray diffuse emission along the inner Galactic plane and of a related spatial dependence of the cosmic ray (CR) proton spectral index. These features are not accounted for by conventional models of CR transport. We show that a phenomenological model accounting for those results in terms of spatial dependent CR transport also reproduces the γ -ray excess found by Milagro at 15 TeV in the inner Galactic plane and by H.E.S.S. in the Galactic center. We then use that model to compute the neutrino emission along the Galactic plane finding that is significantly larger than expected on the basis of conventional models. This emission is compatible with ANTARES upper limits and may soon be detected by IceCube or, more likely, by Km3NeT.

  4. Starburst Galaxies: Hard X-ray spectra and contribution to the diffuse background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Duane E.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this grant two main tasks were performed: a determination of a selection criterion for starburst galaxies most likely to emit X-rays, and performance of a pilot study of the X-ray emission from nine such systems. Starburst galaxies may be expected to emit flat-spectrum X-ray at energies above 10 keV resulting from the various remnants of the short-lived massive stars which characterize the starburst. The investigation to determine the optimum sample resulted in a change from an X-ray selected (HEAO-2) sample to infrared selection based on the IRAS catalogue. A much broader sample thereby available for study, and selection could be limited to only the nearest objects and still obtain a reasonably large sample. A sample of 99 of the brightest infrared starburst galaxies was settled on for the X-ray survey. For a set of practical size, this was then reduced to a subset of 53, based on luminosity and nearness. X-ray emission from these objects was individually measured from the UCSD HEAO-1 all-sky survey in four energy bands between 13 keV to 160 keV. This data base consists of about 20 optical disk volumes. Net significance for the result was roughly two sigma, and a very hard spectral shape is indicated for the net spectrum of the surveyed galaxies. With the possibility of detection of the class, it was then felt worthwhile to examine fluxes from these sources in other archival data. This was performed with the HEAO-1 A2 data and the HEAO-2 (EINSTEIN) main archive and slew survey. Positive results were also obtained for the sample, but again at weak significance. With three independent measures of weak X-ray fluxes from nearby starburst galaxies, we wrote a letter to the Astrophysical Journal (enclosed) discussing these results and their likely significance, in particular, for the contribution to the cosmic diffuse x-ray background, perhaps as much as 25 percent.

  5. Laminar flamelet modeling of turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mell, W. E.; Kosaly, G.; Planche, O.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1990-12-01

    In modeling turbulent combustion, decoupling the chemistry from the turbulence is of great practical significance. In cases in which the equilibrium chemistry model breaks down, laminar flamelet modeling (LFM) is a promising approach to decoupling. Here, the validity of this approach is investigated using direct numerical simulation of a simple chemical reaction in two-dimensional turbulence.

  6. Mesoscale modelling of crack-induced diffusivity in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilenius, Filip; Larsson, Fredrik; Lundgren, Karin; Runesson, Kenneth

    2015-02-01

    Cracks have large impact on the diffusivity of concrete since they provide low-resistance pathways for moisture and chloride ions to migrate through the material. In this work, crack-induced diffusivity in concrete is modelled on the heterogeneous mesoscale and computationally homogenized to obtain macroscale diffusivity properties. Computations are carried out using the finite element method on three-dimensional statistical volume elements (SVEs) comprising the mesoscale constituents in terms of cement paste, aggregates and the interfacial transition zone (ITZ). The SVEs are subjected to uni-axial tension loading and cracks are simulated by use of an isotropic damage model. In a damaged finite element, the crack plane is assumed to be perpendicular to the largest principle strain, and diffusivity properties are assigned to the element only in the in-plane direction of the crack by anisotropic constitutive modelling. The numerical results show that the macroscale diffusivity of concrete can be correlated to the applied mechanical straining of the SVE and that the macroscale diffusivity increases mainly in the transversal direction relative to the axis of imposed mechanical straining.

  7. Turbulent eddy diffusion models in exposure assessment - Determination of the eddy diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuan; Ramachandran, Sandhya; Arnold, Susan; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2017-03-01

    The use of the turbulent eddy diffusion model and its variants in exposure assessment is limited due to the lack of knowledge regarding the isotropic eddy diffusion coefficient, DT. But some studies have suggested a possible relationship between DT and the air changes per hour (ACH) through a room. The main goal of this study was to accurately estimate DT for a range of ACH values by minimizing the difference between the concentrations measured and predicted by eddy diffusion model. We constructed an experimental chamber with a spatial concentration gradient away from the contaminant source, and conducted 27 3-hr long experiments using toluene and acetone under different air flow conditions (0.43-2.89 ACHs). An eddy diffusion model accounting for chamber boundary, general ventilation, and advection was developed. A mathematical expression for the slope based on the geometrical parameters of the ventilation system was also derived. There is a strong linear relationship between DT and ACH, providing a surrogate parameter for estimating DT in real-life settings. For the first time, a mathematical expression for the relationship between DT and ACH has been derived that also corrects for non-ideal conditions, and the calculated value of the slope between these two parameters is very close to the experimentally determined value. The values of DT obtained from the experiments are generally consistent with values reported in the literature. They are also independent of averaging time of measurements, allowing for comparison of values obtained from different measurement settings. These findings make the use of turbulent eddy diffusion models for exposure assessment in workplace/indoor environments more practical.

  8. Suzaku Observation of Diffuse X-ray Emission from the Carina Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Petre, Robert; Matsumoti, Hironori; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Holt, Stephan S.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Hideki; Tsuboi, Yohko; Soong, Yang; Kitamoto, Shunji; Sekiguchi, Akiko; Kokubun, Motohide

    2007-01-01

    We studied extended X-ray emission from the Carina Nebula taken with the Suzaku CCD camera XIS on 2005 Aug. 29. The X-ray morphology, plasma temperature and absorption to the plasma are consistent with the earlier Einstein results. The Suzaku spectra newly revealed emission lines from various spices including oxygen, but not from nitrogen. This result restricts the N/O ratio significantly low, compared with evolved massive stellar winds, suggesting that the diffuse emission is originated in an old supernova remnant or a super shell produced by multiple supernova remnants. The X-ray spectra from the north and south of eta Car showed distinct differences between 0.3-2 keV. The south spectrum shows strong L-shell lines of iron ions and K-shell lines of silicon ions, while the north spectrum shows them weak in intensity. This means that silicon and iron abundances are a factor of 2-4 higher in the south region than in the north region. The abundance variation may be produced by an SNR ejecta, or relate to the dust formation around the star forming core.

  9. A Novel Restricted Diffusion Model of Evoked Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry provides high-fidelity recordings of electrically evoked dopamine release in the rat striatum. The evoked responses are suitable targets for numerical modeling because the frequency and duration of the stimulus are exactly known. Responses recorded in the dorsal and ventral striatum of the rat do not bear out the predictions of a numerical model that assumes the presence of a diffusion gap interposed between the recording electrode and nearby dopamine terminals. Recent findings, however, suggest that dopamine may be subject to restricted diffusion processes in brain extracellular space. A numerical model cast to account for restricted diffusion produces excellent agreement between simulated and observed responses recorded under a broad range of anatomical, stimulus, and pharmacological conditions. The numerical model requires four, and in some cases only three, adjustable parameters and produces meaningful kinetic parameter values. PMID:24983330

  10. Guideline for fluid modeling of atmospheric diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, W. H.

    1981-04-01

    The usefulness of fluid models are evaluated from both scientific and engineering viewpoints. Because many detailed decisions must be made during the design and execution of each model study, and because the fundamental principles frequency do not provide enough guidance, extensive discussion of the details of the most common types of modeling problems are provided. The hardware requirements are also discussed. This guidance is intended to be of use both to scientists and engineering involved in operating fluid modeling facilities and to air pollution control officials in evaluating the quality and credibility of the reports from such studies.

  11. Modelling neutron transport in planetary media via analytical multigroup diffusion theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panfili, P.; Luciani, A.; Furfaro, R.; Ganapol, B. D.; Mostacci, D.

    A novel analytical solution to the 1D, steady-state, multi-slab, multi-group diffusion equation is proposed as a mean to compute the energy-dependent galactic cosmic ray-induced neutron fluxes established in planetary media. More specifically, the proposed algorithm is implemented to allow fast and highly accurate determination of low-energy cosmic ray neutrons inside the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Two sets of experimental measurements have been considered to validate our model. In both cases, a good agreement between the calculated and observed neutron fluxes is achieved. Subsequently, neutron diffusion calculations have been performed for various Earth-based scenarios comprising (a) two-slab (air-soil) configuration and (b) three-slab (air-soil-ice) configuration to investigate the functional relationship between soil composition and neutron spatial distribution.

  12. X-Ray-Based Imaging for Characterizing Heterogeneous Gas Diffusion Layers for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Michael G.

    Characterization of gas diffusion layers (GDLs) for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells informs modeling studies and the manufacturers of next generation fuel cell materials. Identifying the physical properties related to the primary functions of the modern GDL (thermal, electrical, and mass transport) is necessary for understanding the impact of GDL design choices. X-ray micro-computed tomographic reconstructions of GDLs were studied to isolate GDL surface morphologies. Surface roughness was measured for a wide variety of samples and a sensitivity study highlighted the scale-dependence of surface roughness measurements. Furthermore, a spatially resolved distribution map of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in the microporous layer (MPL), critical for water management and mass transport, was identified and the existence of PTFE agglomerations was highlighted. Finally, the impact of accelerated degradation on GDL wettability and water transport increases in liquid water accumulation and oxygen mass transport resistance were quantified as a result of accelerated GDL degradation.

  13. Determination of late-time Gamma-Ray (60Co) sensitivity of single diffusion Lot 2N2222A transistors.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Kajder, Karen C.; Peters, Curtis D.

    2008-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has embarked on a program to develop a methodology to use damage relations techniques (alternative experimental facilities, modeling, and simulation) to understand the time-dependent effects in transistors (and integrated circuits) caused by neutron irradiations in the Sandia Pulse Reactor-III (SPR-III) facility. The development of these damage equivalence techniques is necessary since SPR-III was shutdown in late 2006. As part of this effort, the late time {gamma}-ray sensitivity of a single diffusion lot of 2N2222A transistors has been characterized using one of the {sup 60}Co irradiation cells at the SNL Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF). This report summarizes the results of the experiments performed at the GIF.

  14. Direct Observations of Rapid Diffusion of Cu in Au Thin Films using In-Situ X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2005-11-28

    In-situ x-ray diffraction was performed while annealing thin-film Au/Cu binary diffusion couples to directly observe diffusion at elevated temperatures. The temperature dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient was determined from isothermal measurements at 700 C, 800 C, and 900 C, where Cu and Au form a disordered continuous face centered cubic solid solution. Large differences in the lattice parameters of Au and Cu allowed the initial diffraction peaks to be easily identified, and later tracked as they merged into one diffraction peak with increased diffusion time. Initial diffusion kinetics were studied by measuring the time required for the Cu to diffuse through the Au thin film of known thickness. The activation energy for interdiffusion was measured to be 65.4 kJ/mole during this initial stage, which is approximately 0.4x that for bulk diffusion and 0.8x that for grain boundary diffusion. The low activation energy is attributed to the high density of columnar grain boundaries combined with other defects in the sputter deposited thin film coatings. As interdiffusion continues, the two layers homogenize with an activation energy of 111 kJ/mole during the latter stages of diffusion. This higher activation energy falls between the reported values for grain boundary and bulk diffusion, and may be related to grain growth occurring at these temperatures which accounts for the decreasing importance of grain boundaries on diffusion.

  15. Coherent X-ray and laser spectroscopy measurements of diffusion in concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunaratne, V. N. C.

    The mammalian eye lens is composed of a concentrated solution of water soluble proteins called crystallins. Alpha-crystallin, the most abundant protein found in the lens, plays a crucial role in maintaining lens transparency and lens accommodation. However, alpha-crystallins along with other ocular proteins suffer from irreversible processes such as oxidation. One cause of oxidation is radiation-induced radical formation which alters the inter-molecular interactions, thereby degrading the normal function of ocular proteins. The main goal of this thesis is to quantify molecular scale dynamics of concentrated solutions of alpha-crystallins using coherent X-rays and visible laser light. I believe a detailed analysis of the dynamics pertaining to alpha-crystallin will provide the foundation to understand molecular scale mechanisms that lead to conditions like cataract and presbyopia. I explore the dynamics of concentrated alpha-crystallin solutions by measuring diffusive motion over a range of length scales using Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). To a certain extent, the dynamical properties of crystallins obtained in this manner are consistent with established theories in colloidal physics. However, there are some deviations, which I will address in this thesis. In terms of X-ray data, I employed a new, efficient photon correlation technique to obtain the best possible signal, furthermore this technique is embedded in a stand-alone software program that has the ability to provide real time results, quickly and efficiently with the help of high performance computing resources available at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The technique has potential to be used by the coherent X-ray spectroscopy community in the future. In addition, by using X-ray scattering data, I probe potential modifications and or damage effects on alpha-crystallins due to radiation exposure. The damage analysis methodology described in this thesis

  16. Modeling phosphorus diffusion gettering of iron in single crystal silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarahiltunen, A.; Savin, H.; Yli-Koski, M.; Talvitie, H.; Sinkkonen, J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for phosphorus diffusion gettering (PDG) of iron in silicon, which is based on a special fitting procedure to experimental data. We discuss the possibilities of the underlying physics of the segregation coefficient. Finally, we show that the proposed PDG model allows quantitative analysis of gettering efficiency of iron at various processing conditions.

  17. Restabilizing Forcing for a Diffusive Prey-Predator Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonomo, Bruno; Rionero, Salvatore

    2008-04-01

    We consider a diffusive prey-predator model and find conditions under which a relevant non trivial equilibrium undergoes to Turing bifurcation. Then, a forcing is applied to the model and values of forcing able to regain the (nonlinear) stability are detected. A maximal restabilizing region is derived.

  18. An Urban Diffusion Simulation Model for Carbon Monoxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, W. B.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A relatively simple Gaussian-type diffusion simulation model for calculating urban carbon (CO) concentrations as a function of local meteorology and the distribution of traffic is described. The model can be used in two ways: in the synoptic mode and in the climatological mode. (Author/BL)

  19. A combinatorial model of malware diffusion via bluetooth connections.

    PubMed

    Merler, Stefano; Jurman, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We outline here the mathematical expression of a diffusion model for cellphones malware transmitted through Bluetooth channels. In particular, we provide the deterministic formula underlying the proposed infection model, in its equivalent recursive (simple but computationally heavy) and closed form (more complex but efficiently computable) expression.

  20. A Diffusion Model Account of the Lexical Decision Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, Roger; Gomez, Pablo; McKoon, Gail

    2004-01-01

    The diffusion model for 2-choice decisions (R. Ratcliff, 1978) was applied to data from lexical decision experiments in which word frequency, proportion of high- versus low-frequency words, and type of nonword were manipulated. The model gave a good account of all of the dependent variables--accuracy, correct and error response times, and their…

  1. A three-dimensional spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Hrkac, Gino; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2015-10-07

    We solve a time-dependent three-dimensional spin-diffusion model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. The presented model is validated by comparison to two established spin-torque models: The model of Slonzewski that describes spin-torque in multi-layer structures in the presence of a fixed layer and the model of Zhang and Li that describes current driven domain-wall motion. It is shown that both models are incorporated by the spin-diffusion description, i.e., the nonlocal effects of the Slonzewski model are captured as well as the spin-accumulation due to magnetization gradients as described by the model of Zhang and Li. Moreover, the presented method is able to resolve the time dependency of the spin-accumulation.

  2. A three-dimensional spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics

    PubMed Central

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Hrkac, Gino; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    We solve a time-dependent three-dimensional spin-diffusion model coupled to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation numerically. The presented model is validated by comparison to two established spin-torque models: The model of Slonzewski that describes spin-torque in multi-layer structures in the presence of a fixed layer and the model of Zhang and Li that describes current driven domain-wall motion. It is shown that both models are incorporated by the spin-diffusion description, i.e., the nonlocal effects of the Slonzewski model are captured as well as the spin-accumulation due to magnetization gradients as described by the model of Zhang and Li. Moreover, the presented method is able to resolve the time dependency of the spin-accumulation. PMID:26442796

  3. A molecular diffusion based utility model for Drosophila larval phototaxis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Generally, utility based decision making models focus on experimental outcomes. In this paper we propose a utility model based on molecular diffusion to simulate the choice behavior of Drosophila larvae exposed to different light conditions. Methods In this paper, light/dark choice-based Drosophila larval phototaxis is analyzed with our molecular diffusion based model. An ISCEM algorithm is developed to estimate the model parameters. Results By applying this behavioral utility model to light intensity and phototaxis data, we show that this model fits the experimental data very well. Conclusions Our model provides new insights into decision making mechanisms in general. From an engineering viewpoint, we propose that the model could be applied to a wider range of decision making practices. PMID:22300450

  4. Fine Structure of Diffuse Scattering Rings in Al-Li-Cu Quasicrystal: A Comparative X-ray and Electron Diffraction Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnadieu, P.; Dénoyer, F.

    1996-11-01

    A comparative X-ray and electron diffraction study has been performed on Al-Li-Cu icosahedral quasicrystal in order to investigate the diffuse scattering rings revealed by a previous work. Electron diffraction confirms the existence of rings but shows that the rings have a fine structure. The diffuse aspect on the X-ray diffraction patterns is then due to an averaging effect. Recent simulations based on the model of canonical cells related to the icosahedral packing give diffractions patterns in agreement with this fine structure effect. Nous comparons les diagrammes de diffraction des rayon-X et des électrons obtenus sur les mêmes échantillons du quasicristal icosaèdrique Al-Li-Cu. Notre but est d'étudier les anneaux de diffusion diffuse mis en évidence par un travail précédent. Les diagrammes de diffraction électronique confirment la présence des anneaux mais ils montrent aussi que ces anneaux possèdent une structure fine. L'aspect diffus des anneaux révélés par la diffraction des rayons X est dû à un effet de moyenne. Des simulations récentes basées sur la décomposition en cellules canoniques de l'empilement icosaédrique produisent des diagrammes de diffraction en accord avec ces effects de structure fine.

  5. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  6. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  7. Relaxation and diffusion models with non-singular kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, HongGuang; Hao, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yong; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2017-02-01

    Anomalous relaxation and diffusion processes have been widely quantified by fractional derivative models, where the definition of the fractional-order derivative remains a historical debate due to its limitation in describing different kinds of non-exponential decays (e.g. stretched exponential decay). Meanwhile, many efforts by mathematicians and engineers have been made to overcome the singularity of power function kernel in its definition. This study first explores physical properties of relaxation and diffusion models where the temporal derivative was defined recently using an exponential kernel. Analytical analysis shows that the Caputo type derivative model with an exponential kernel cannot characterize non-exponential dynamics well-documented in anomalous relaxation and diffusion. A legitimate extension of the previous derivative is then proposed by replacing the exponential kernel with a stretched exponential kernel. Numerical tests show that the Caputo type derivative model with the stretched exponential kernel can describe a much wider range of anomalous diffusion than the exponential kernel, implying the potential applicability of the new derivative in quantifying real-world, anomalous relaxation and diffusion processes.

  8. A technique for estimating one-dimensional diffusion coefficients in low-permeability sedimentary rock using X-ray radiography: comparison with through-diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Cavé, Lisa; Al, Tom; Xiang, Yan; Vilks, Peter

    2009-01-07

    The measurement of diffusive properties of low-permeability rocks is of interest to the nuclear power industry, which is considering the option of deep geologic repositories for management of radioactive waste. We present a simple, non-destructive, constant source in-diffusion method for estimating one-dimensional pore diffusion coefficients (D(p)) in geologic materials based on X-ray radiography. Changes in X-ray absorption coefficient (Deltamicro) are used to quantify changes in relative concentration (C/C(0)) of an X-ray attenuating iodide tracer as the tracer solution diffuses through the rock pores. Estimated values of D(p) are then obtained by fitting an analytical solution to the measured concentration profiles over time. Measurements on samples before and after saturation with iodide can also be used to determine iodide-accessible porosity (phi(I)). To evaluate the radiography method, results were compared with traditional steady-state through-diffusion measurements on two rock types: shale and limestone. Values of D(p) of (4.8+/-2.5)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) (mean+/-standard deviation) were measured for samples of Queenston Formation shale and (2.6+/-1.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for samples of Cobourg Formation limestone using the radiography method. The range of results for each rock type agree well with D(p) values of (4.6+/-2.0)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for shale and (3.5+/-1.8)x10(-11) m(2).s(-1) for limestone, calculated from through-diffusion experiments on adjacent rock samples. Low porosity (0.01 to 0.03) and heterogeneous distribution of porosity in the Cobourg Formation may be responsible for the slightly poorer agreement between radiography and through-diffusion results for limestones. Mean values of phi(I) for shales (0.060) and limestones (0.028) were close to mean porosity measurements made on bulk samples by the independent water loss technique (0.062 and 0.020 for shales and limestones, respectively). Radiography measurements offer the advantage of time

  9. Ultrasonic ray models for complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, A.

    2000-05-01

    Computer Aided Design techniques have become an inherent part of many industrial applications and are also gaining popularity in Nondestructive Testing. In sound field calculations, CAD representations can contribute to one of the generic problem in ultrasonic modeling, the wave propagation in complex geometries. Ray tracing codes were the first to take account of the geometry, providing qualitative information on beam propagation, such as geometrical echoes, multiple sound paths and possible conversions between wave modes. The forward ray tracing approach is intuitive and straightforward and can evolve towards a more quantitative code if transmission, divergence and polarization information is added. If used to evaluate the impulse response of a given geometry, an approximated time-dependent received signal can be obtained after convolution with the excitation signal. The more accurate reconstruction of a sound field after interaction with a geometrical interface according to ray theory requires inverse (or Fermat) ray-tracing to obtain the contribution of each elementary point source to the field at a given observation point. The resulting field of a finite transducer can then be obtained after integration over all point sources. While conceptionally close to classical ray tracing, this approach puts more stringent requirements on the CAD representation employed and is more difficult to extend towards multiple interfaces. In this communication we present examples for both approaches. In a prospective step, the link between both ray techniques is shown, and we illustrate how a combination of both approaches contributes to the solution of an industrial problem.

  10. Energy Spectra of the Soft X-Ray Diffuse Emission in Fourteen Fields Observed with Suzaku

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Tomotaka; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Hagihara, Toshishige; Masui, Kensuke; Bauer, Michael; McCammon, Dan; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Wang, Q. Daniel; Yao, Yangsen

    2009-08-01

    The soft diffuse X-ray emission of twelve fields observed with Suzaku are presented together with two additional fields from previous analyses. All have galactic longitudes 65° < l < 295° to avoid contributions from the very bright diffuse source that extends at least 30° from the Galactic center. The surface brightnesses of the Suzaku nine fields for which apparently uncontaminated ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) were available were statistically consistent with the RASS values, with an upper limit for differences of 17 × 10-6 c s-1 arcmin-2 in R45-band. The OVII and OVIII intensities are well correlated to each other, and OVII emission shows an intensity floor at ˜2 photons s-1 cm-2 str-1 (LU). The high-latitude O VIII emission shows a tight correlation with excess of O VII emission above the floor, with (O VIII intensity) = 0.5 × [(OVII intensity) - 2LU], suggesting that temperatures averaged over different line-of-sight show a narrow distribution around ˜0.2keV. We consider that the offset intensity of OVII arises from the Heliospheric solar wind charge exchange and perhaps from the local hot bubble, and that the excess OVII (2--7LU) is emission from more distant parts of the Galaxy. The total bolometric luminosity of this galactic emission is estimated to be 4 × 1039erg s-1, and its characteristic temperature may be related to the virial temperature of the Galaxy.

  11. Coupled chemical and diffusion model for compacted bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Olin, M.; Lehikoinen, J.; Muurinen, A.

    1995-12-31

    A chemical equilibrium model has been developed for ion-exchange and to a limited extent for other reactions, such as precipitation or dissolution of calcite or gypsum, in compacted bentonite water systems. The model was successfully applied to some bentonite experiments, especially as far as monovalent ions were concerned. The fitted log-binding constants for the exchange of sodium for potassium, magnesium, and calcium were 0.27, 1.50, and 2.10, respectively. In addition, a coupled chemical and diffusion model has been developed to take account of diffusion in pore water, surface diffusion and ion-exchange.d the model was applied to the same experiments as the chemical equilibrium model, and its validation was found partly successful. The above values for binding constants were used also in the coupled model. The apparent (both for anions and cations) and surface diffusion (only for cations) constants yielding the best agreement between calculated and experimental data were 3.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}/s and 6.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. These values are questionable, however, as experimental results good enough for fitting are currently not available.

  12. A Mathematical Model of Diffusion-Limited Gas Bubble Dynamics in Tissue with Varying Diffusion Region Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A three-region mathematical model of gas bubble dynamics has been shown suitable for describing diffusion-limited dynamics of more than one bubble in a given volume of extravascular tissue. The model is based on the dynamics of gas exchange between a bubble and a well-stirred tissue region through an intervening unperfused diffusion region previously assumed to have constant thickness and uniform gas diffusivity. As a result, the gas content of the diffusion region remains constant as the volume of the region increases with bubble growth, causing dissolved gas in the region to violate Henry's law. Earlier work also neglected the relationship between the varying diffusion region volume and the fixed total tissue volume, because only cases in which the diffusion region volume is a small fraction of the overall tissue volume were considered. We herein extend the three-region model to correct these theoretical inconsistencies by allowing both the thickness and gas content of the diffusion region to vary during bubble evolution. A postulated difference in gas diffusivity between an infinitesimally thin layer at the bubble surface and the remainder of the diffusion region leads to variation in diffusion region gas content and thickness during bubble growth and resolution. This variable thickness, differential diffusivity (VTDD) model can yield bubble lifetimes considerably longer than those yielded by earlier three-region models for given model and decompression parameters, and meets a need for theoretically consistent but relatively simple bubble dynamics models for use in studies of decompression sickness (DCS) in human subjects, Keywords: decompression sickness, gas diffusion in tissue, diffusivity

  13. Structural disorder in the decagonal Al-Co-Ni. I. Patterson analysis of diffuse x-ray scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Kobas, Miroslav; Weber, Thomas; Steurer, Walter

    2005-06-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) difference Patterson (autocorrelation) function of a disordered quasicrystal (Edagawa phase) has been analyzed. 3D diffuse x-ray diffraction data were collected in situ at 300, 1070, and 1120 K. A method, the punch-and-fill technique, has been developed for separating diffuse scattering and Bragg reflections. Its potential and limits are discussed in detail. The different Patterson maps are interpreted in terms of intercluster correlations as a function of temperature. Both at high and low temperatures, the clusters decorate the vertices of the same quasiperiodic covering. At low temperatures, for the disordered part of the structure, short-range intercluster correlations are present, whereas at higher temperatures, medium-range intercluster correlations are formed. This indicates disorder mainly inside clusters at low temperatures, whereas at higher temperatures disorder takes place inside larger superclusters. Qualitatively, the Patterson maps may be interpreted by intercluster correlations mainly inside pentagonal superclusters below 1120 K, and inside the larger decagonal superclusters at 1120 K. The results of our diffraction study are published in two parts. Part I focuses on the 3D Patterson analysis based on experimental data, Part II reports modeling of structural disorder in decagonal Al-Co-Ni.

  14. An improved time of flight gamma-ray telescope to monitor diffuse gamma-ray in the energy range 5 MeV - 50 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacostafereiraneri, A.; Bui-Van, A.; Lavigne, J. M.; Sabaud, C.; Vedrenne, G.; Agrinier, B.; Gouiffes, C.

    1985-01-01

    A time of flight measuring device is the basic triggering system of most of medium and high energy gamma-ray telescopes. A simple gamma-ray telescope has been built in order to check in flight conditions the functioning of an advanced time of flight system. The technical ratings of the system are described. This telescope has been flown twice with stratospheric balloons, its axis being oriented at various Zenital directions. Flight results are presented for diffuse gamma-rays, atmospheric secondaries, and various causes of noise in the 5 MeV-50 MeV energy range.

  15. MESOI: an interactive Lagrangian trajectory puff diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.

    1981-12-01

    MESOI is an interactive Lagrangian trajectory puff diffusion model based on an earlier model by Start and Wendell at the Air Resources Laboratory Field Office at Idaho Falls, Idaho. Puff trajectories are determined using spatially and temporally varying wind fields. Diffusion in the puffs is computed as a function of distance traveled and atmospheric stability. Exposures are computed at nodes of a 31 by 31 grid. There is also provision for interpolation of short term exposures at off-grid locations. This report discusses: the theoretical bases of the model, the numerical approach used in the model, and the sensitivity and accuracy of the model. It contains a description of the computer program and a listing of the code. MESOI is written in FORTRAN. A companion report (Athey, Allwine and Ramsdell, 1981) contains a user's guide to MESOI and documents utility programs that maintain the data files needed by the model.

  16. Gamma-ray Pulsars: Models and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding Alice K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is, dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10(exp 12) - 10(exp 13) G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers of the primary curvature emission around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. Next-generation gamma-ray telescopes sensitive to GeV-TeV emission will provide critical tests of pulsar acceleration and emission mechanisms.

  17. THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES BY GASEOUS DIFFUSION: A LINEAR PROGRAMMING MODEL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    URANIUM, ISOTOPE SEPARATION), (*GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION, LINEAR PROGRAMMING ), (* LINEAR PROGRAMMING , GASEOUS DIFFUSION SEPARATION), MATHEMATICAL MODELS, GAS FLOW, NUCLEAR REACTORS, OPERATIONS RESEARCH

  18. An effective diffusivity model based on Koopman mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi, Hassan; Mezic, Igor

    2016-11-01

    In the previous work, we had shown that the Koopman mode decomposition (KMD) can be used to analyze mixing of passive tracers in time-dependent flows. In this talk, we discuss the extension of this type of analysis to the case of advection-diffusion transport for passive scalar fields. Application of KMD to flows with complex time-dependence yields a decomposition of the flow into mean, periodic and chaotic components. We briefly discuss the computation of these components using a combination of harmonic averaging and Discrete Fourier Transform. We propose a new effective diffusivity model in which the advection is dominated by mean and periodic components whereas the effect of chaotic motion is absorbed into an effective diffusivity tensor. The performance of this model is investigated in the case of lid-driven cavity flow.

  19. The diffuse soft X-ray background as seen with the Einstein Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Rosner, R.

    1991-01-01

    A systematic survey of the diffuse soft X-ray background as seen directly with the Einstein Observatory is presented. With the aid of 1633 selected 1 x 1 deg fields of view obtained by the IPC to provide about 5-percent sky coverage, with some bias toward the Galactic plane, the background in the 0.16-3.5 keV spectral region was spatially resolved on this angular scale. Maps of the background are characterized and produced at different energies within the Einstein passband. It is confirmed that the Galactic ridge is not present at energies below 0.33 keV and it is demonstrated that the appearance of the ridge above this energy is not due to hard Galactic sources with a flux above 10 exp -13 ergs/sq cm/s. A southern Galactic region is identified, with l between 80 and 180 deg and b less than -5 deg, where the mean background intensity has the lowest value and is homogeneous within better than 9 percent. The implications of these results for the Galactic structure and for the nature of the extragalactic X-ray background are discussed.

  20. Computer modelling of nanoscale diffusion phenomena at epitaxial interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailov, M.; Ranguelov, B.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines an important area in the application of computer modelling to interface phenomena. Being relevant to the fundamental physical problem of competing atomic interactions in systems with reduced dimensionality, these phenomena attract special academic attention. On the other hand, from a technological point of view, detailed knowledge of the fine atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces correlates with a large number of practical problems in materials science. Typical examples are formation of nanoscale surface patterns, two-dimensional superlattices, atomic intermixing at an epitaxial interface, atomic transport phenomena, structure and stability of quantum wires on surfaces. We discuss here a variety of diffusion mechanisms that control surface-confined atomic exchange, formation of alloyed atomic stripes and islands, relaxation of pure and alloyed atomic terraces, diffusion of clusters and their stability in an external field. The computational model refines important details of diffusion of adatoms and clusters accounting for the energy barriers at specific atomic sites: smooth domains, terraces, steps and kinks. The diffusion kinetics, integrity and decomposition of atomic islands in an external field are considered in detail and assigned to specific energy regions depending on the cluster stability in mass transport processes. The presented ensemble of diffusion scenarios opens a way for nanoscale surface design towards regular atomic interface patterns with exotic physical features.

  1. Application of the high-temperature x-ray diffraction method to the diffusion study in the MgO-AI2O3 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Karwan-Baczewska, J.; Du, S.; Seetharaman, S.

    1996-10-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to study the kinetics of formation of spinel (MgAl2O4) using the high-temperature X-ray diffraction method. Experiments have been carried out for the MgO-Al2O3 system on an X-ray diffractometer in the temperature range of 1373 to 1673 K. Equimolar mixtures of MgO and A12O3 powders have been employed as the starting samples. The interdiffusivity values calculated from the high-temperature X-ray diffraction data using the present model are in good agreement with those obtained by diffusion couple experiments. The activation energy for the interdiffusion process has been found to be 354.2 kJ/mol in the temperature range 1473 to 1873 K.

  2. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N.; BURIAN, STEVEN J.

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  3. Approximating nonequilibrium processes using a collection of surrogate diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Christopher P.; Chelli, Riccardo

    2008-04-01

    The surrogate process approximation (SPA) is applied to model the nonequilibrium dynamics of a reaction coordinate (RC) associated with the unfolding and refolding processes of a deca-alanine peptide at 300K. The RC dynamics, which correspond to the evolution of the end-to-end distance of the polypeptide, are produced by steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and approximated using overdamped diffusion models. We show that the collection of (estimated) SPA models contain structural information "orthogonal" to the RC monitored in this study. Functional data analysis ideas are used to correlate functions associated with the fitted SPA models with the work done on the system in SMD simulations. It is demonstrated that the shape of the nonequilibrium work distributions for the unfolding and refolding processes of deca-alanine can be predicted with functional data analysis ideas using a relatively small number of simulated SMD paths for calibrating the SPA diffusion models.

  4. Mathematical properties of models of the reaction-diffusion type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, M.; Soliani, G.

    Nonlinear systems of the reaction-diffusion (RD) type, including Gierer-Meinhardt models of autocatalysis, are studied using Lie algebras coming from their prolongation structure. Depending on the form of the functions of the fields characterizing the reactions among them, we consider both quadratic and cubic RD equations. On the basis of the prolongation algebra associated with a given RD model, we distinguish the model as a completely linearizable or a partially linearizable system. In this classification a crucial role is played by the relative sign of the diffusion coefficients, which strongly influence the properties of the system. In correspondence to the above situations, different algebraic characterizations, together with exact and approximate solutions, are found. Interesting examples are the quadratic RD model, which admits an exact solution in terms of the elliptic Weierstrass function, and the cubic Gierer-Meinhardt model, whose prolongation algebra leads to the similitude group in the plane.

  5. Modeling intragranular diffusion in low-connectivity granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Robert P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Qinhong

    2012-03-01

    Characterizing the diffusive exchange of solutes between bulk water in an aquifer and water in the intragranular pores of the solid phase is still challenging despite decades of study. Many disparities between observation and theory could be attributed to low connectivity of the intragranular pores. The presence of low connectivity indicates that a useful conceptual framework is percolation theory. The present study was initiated to develop a percolation-based finite difference (FD) model, and to test it rigorously against both random walk (RW) simulations of diffusion starting from nonequilibrium, and data on Borden sand published by Ball and Roberts (1991a,b) and subsequently reanalyzed by Haggerty and Gorelick (1995) using a multirate mass transfer (MRMT) approach. The percolation-theoretical model is simple and readily incorporated into existing FD models. The FD model closely matches the RW results using only a single fitting parameter, across a wide range of pore connectivities. Simulation of the Borden sand experiment without pore connectivity effects reproduced the MRMT analysis, but including low pore connectivity effects improved the fit. Overall, the theory and simulation results show that low intragranular pore connectivity can produce diffusive behavior that appears as if the solute had undergone slow sorption, despite the absence of any sorption process, thereby explaining some hitherto confusing aspects of intragranular diffusion.

  6. Decomposing Task-Switching Costs with the Diffusion Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Florian; Voss, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    In four experiments, task-switching processes were investigated with variants of the alternating runs paradigm and the explicit cueing paradigm. The classical diffusion model for binary decisions (Ratcliff, 1978) was used to dissociate different components of task-switching costs. Findings can be reconciled with the view that task-switching…

  7. Modeling development of inhibition zones in an agar diffusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Knabel, Stephen J; Anantheswaran, Ramaswamy C

    2015-09-01

    A two-temperature agar diffusion bioassay is commonly used to quantify the concentration of nisin using Micrococcus luteus as the indicator microorganism. A finite element computational model based on Fick's second law of diffusion was used to predict the radius of the inhibition zone in this diffusion bioassay. The model developed was used to calculate nisin concentration profiles as a function of time and position within the agar. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nisin against M. luteus was determined experimentally. The critical time (T c) for growth of M. luteus within the agar diffusion bioassay was experimentally determined using incubation studies with nisin. The radius of the inhibition zone was predicted from the computational model as the location where the predicted nisin concentration at T c was equal to MIC. The MIC was experimentally determined to be 0.156 μg mL(-1), and T c was determined to be 7 h. Good agreement (R (2) = 0.984) was obtained between model-predicted and experimentally determined inhibition zone radii.

  8. Reaction Diffusion Modeling of Calcium Dynamics with Realistic ER Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Means, Shawn; Smith, Alexander J.; Shepherd, Jason; Shadid, John; Fowler, John; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J. H.; Mazel, Tomas; Smith, Gregory D.; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a finite-element model of mast cell calcium dynamics that incorporates the endoplasmic reticulum's complex geometry. The model is built upon a three-dimensional reconstruction of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from an electron tomographic tilt series. Tetrahedral meshes provide volumetric representations of the ER lumen, ER membrane, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane. The reaction-diffusion model simultaneously tracks changes in cytoplasmic and ER intraluminal calcium concentrations and includes luminal and cytoplasmic protein buffers. Transport fluxes via PMCA, SERCA, ER leakage, and Type II IP3 receptors are also represented. Unique features of the model include stochastic behavior of IP3 receptor calcium channels and comparisons of channel open times when diffusely distributed or aggregated in clusters on the ER surface. Simulations show that IP3R channels in close proximity modulate activity of their neighbors through local Ca2+ feedback effects. Cytoplasmic calcium levels rise higher, and ER luminal calcium concentrations drop lower, after IP3-mediated release from receptors in the diffuse configuration. Simulation results also suggest that the buffering capacity of the ER, and not restricted diffusion, is the predominant factor influencing average luminal calcium concentrations. PMID:16617072

  9. A simple reaction-rate model for turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    A simple reaction rate model is proposed for turbulent diffusion flames in which the reaction rate is proportional to the turbulence mixing rate. The reaction rate is also dependent on the mean mass fraction and the mean square fluctuation of mass fraction of each reactant. Calculations are compared with experimental data and are generally successful in predicting the measured quantities.

  10. User's Manual for the APRAC-1A Urban Diffusion Model Computer Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancuso, R. L.; And Others

    The APRAC-1A diffusion model was developed as a versatile and practical model for computing the concentrations of pollutants at any point within a city. The model calculates pollutant contributions from diffusion on various scales, including: extra-urban diffusion, mainly from sources in upwind cities; intra-urban diffusion from freeway, arterial,…

  11. Numerical Model for Cosmic Rays Species Production and Propagation in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farahat, Ashraf; Zhang, Ming; Rassoul, Hamid; Connell, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, considerable progress has been made in studying the propagation and origin of cosmic rays, as new and more accurate data have become available. Many models have been developed to study cosmic ray interactions and propagation showed flexibility in resembling various astrophysical conditions and good agreement with observational data. However, some astrophysical problems cannot be addressed using these models, such as the stochastic nature of the cosmic rays source, small-scale structures and inhomogeneities in the interstellar gas that can affect radioactive secondary abundance in cosmic rays. We have developed a new model and a corresponding computer code that can address some of these limitations. The model depends on the expansion of the backward stochastic solution of the general diffusion transport equation (Zhang 1999) starting from an observer position to solve a group of diffusion transport equations each of which represents a particular element or isotope of cosmic ray nuclei. In this paper we are focusing on key abundance ratios such as B/C, sub-Fe/Fe, (10)Be/(9)Be, (26)Al/(27)Al, (36)Cl/(37)Cl and (54)Mn/(55)Mn, which all have well established cross sections, to evaluate our model. The effect of inhomogeneity in the interstellar medium is investigated. The contribution of certain cosmic ray nuclei to the production of other nuclei is addressed. The contribution of various galactic locations to the production of cosmic ray nuclei observed at solar system is also investigated.

  12. ZGB surface reaction model with high diffusion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.

    1993-02-01

    The diffusionless ZGB (monomer-dimer) surface reaction model exhibits a discontinuous transition to a monomer-poisoned state when the fraction of monomer adsorption attempts exceeds 0.525. It has been claimed that this transition shifts to 2/3 with introduction of rapid diffusion of the monomer species, or of both species. We show this is not the case, 2/3 representing the spinodal rather than the transition point. For equal diffusion rates of both species, we find that the transition only shifts to 0.5951±0.0002.

  13. ZGB surface reaction model with high diffusion rates

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W. )

    1993-02-01

    The diffusionless ZGB (monomer--dimer) surface reaction model exhibits a discontinuous transition to a monomer-poisoned state when the fraction of monomer adsorption attempts exceeds 0.525. It has been claimed that this transition shifts to 2/3 with introduction of rapid diffusion of the monomer species, or of both species. We show this is not the case, 2/3 representing the spinodal rather than the transition point. For equal diffusion rates of both species, we find that the transition only shifts to 0.5951[plus minus]0.0002.

  14. Modeling the diffusion of phosphorus in silicon in 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K.R.

    1994-12-31

    The use of matrix preconditioning in semiconductor process simulation is examined. The simplified nonlinear single-species model for the diffusion of phosphorus into silicon is considered. The experimental three-dimensional simulator, PEPPER3, which uses finite differences and the numerical method of lines to implement the reaction-diffusion equation is modified to allow NSPCG to be called to solve the linear system in the inner Newton loop. Use of NSPCG allowed various accelerators such as Generalized Minimal Residual (GMRES) and Conjugate Gradient (CG) to be used in conjunction with preconditioners such as Richardson, Jacobi, and Incomplete Cholesky.

  15. Chromium oxide as a metal diffusion barrier layer: An x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Lakshun Naidu, K.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.; Dalba, G.; Ahmed, S. I.; Rocca, F.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction at the interface between chromium and amorphous Silicon (a-Si) films in the presence of a sandwich layer of chromium oxide is investigated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The oxidized interface was created, in situ, prior to the deposition of a 400 nm tick a-Si layer over a 50 nm tick Cr layer. The entire stack of substrate/metallic Cr/Cr2O3/a-Si was then annealed at temperatures from 300 up to 700 °C. Analysis of the near edge and extended regions of each XAFS spectrum shows that only a small fraction of Cr is able to diffuse through the oxide layer up to 500 °C, while the remaining fraction is buried under the oxide layer in the form of metallic Cr. At higher temperatures, diffusion through the oxide layer is enhanced and the diffused metallic Cr reacts with a-Si to form CrSi2. At 700 °C, the film contains Cr2O3 and CrSi2 without evidence of unreacted metallic Cr. The activation energy and diffusion coefficient of Cr are quantitatively determined in the two temperature regions, one where the oxide acts as diffusion barrier and another where it is transparent to Cr diffusion. It is thus demonstrated that chromium oxide can be used as a diffusion barrier to prevent metal diffusion into a-Si.

  16. Infrasound ray tracing models for real events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averbuch, Gil; Applbaum, David; Price, Colin; Ben Horin, Yochai

    2015-04-01

    Infrasound ray tracing models for real events C. Price1, G. Averbuch1, D. Applbaum1, Y. Ben Horin2 (1) Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel (2) Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne, Israel Ray tracing models for infrasound propagation require two atmospheric parameters: the speed of sound profile and the wind profile. The usage of global atmospheric models for the speed of sound and wind profiles raises a fundamental question: can these models provide accurate results for modeling real events that have been detected by the infrasound arrays? Moreover, can these models provide accurate results for events that occurred during extreme weather conditions? We use 2D and 3D ray tracing models based on a modified Hamiltonian for a moving medium. Radiosonde measurements enable us to update the first 20 km of both speed of sound and wind profiles. The 2009 and 2011 Sayarim calibration experiments in Israel served us as a test for the models. In order to answer the question regarding the accuracy of the model during extreme weather conditions, we simulate infrasound sprite signals that were detected by the infrasound array in Mt. Meron, Israel. The results from modeling the Sayarim experiment provided us sufficient insight to conclude that ray tracing modeling can provide accurate results for real events that occurred during fair weather conditions. We conclude that the time delay in the model of the 2009 experiment is due to lack of accuracy in the wind and speed of sound profiles. Perturbed profiles provide accurate results. Earlier arrivals in 2011 are a result of the assumption that the earth is flat (no topography) and the use of local radiosonde measurements for the entire model. Using local radiosonde measurements only for part of the model and neglecting them on other parts prevents the early arrivals. We were able to determine which sprite is the one that got detected in the infrasound array as well as providing a height range for the sprite

  17. AN AB INITIO MODEL FOR COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.

    2013-07-20

    A proper understanding of the effects of turbulence on the diffusion and drift of cosmic rays (CRs) is of vital importance for a better understanding of CR modulation in the heliosphere. This study presents an ab initio model for CR modulation, incorporating for the first time the results yielded by a two-component turbulence transport model. This model is solved for solar minimum heliospheric conditions, utilizing boundary values chosen so that model results are in reasonable agreement with spacecraft observations of turbulence quantities in the solar ecliptic plane and along the out-of-ecliptic trajectory of the Ulysses spacecraft. These results are employed as inputs for modeled slab and two-dimensional (2D) turbulence energy spectra. The modeled 2D spectrum is chosen based on physical considerations, with a drop-off at the very lowest wavenumbers. There currently exist no models or observations for the wavenumber where this drop-off occurs, and it is considered to be the only free parameter in this study. The modeled spectra are used as inputs for parallel mean free path expressions based on those derived from quasi-linear theory and perpendicular mean free paths from extended nonlinear guiding center theory. Furthermore, the effects of turbulence on CR drifts are modeled in a self-consistent way, also employing a recently developed model for wavy current sheet drift. The resulting diffusion and drift coefficients are applied to the study of galactic CR protons and antiprotons using a 3D, steady-state CR modulation code, and sample solutions in fair to good agreement with multiple spacecraft observations are presented.

  18. Pressure swing adsorption processes: Intraparticle diffusion/convection models

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zuping; Loureiro, J.M.; LeVan, M.D. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rodrigues, A.E. . School of Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The dynamic behavior of a three-step one-column isothermal PSA process is assessed by simulation; three models are used: equilibrium, intraparticle diffusion, and intraparticle diffusion/convection. Two process performance parameters, product enrichment and recovery of the light component, are used to measure the separation performance. The effects of several operating variables on the process performance are addressed. Higher pressure ratios (P[sub h]/P[sub l]) and higher adsorption capacities increase the process performance. The process performance is practically independent of the step rates, although it can decrease if high feed rates are used together with large feed duration times. The limiting performance of the system is found in the absence of mass-transfer resistances. Intraparticle convection, enhancing mass transfer inside particles, increases the process performance relative to intraparticle diffusion alone; the improvement is limited by the equilibrium situation.

  19. Modelling the cosmic ray electron propagation in M 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, D. D.; Fletcher, A.; Beck, R.; Mitra, D.; Scaife, A. M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Cosmic ray electrons (CREs) are a crucial part of the interstellar medium and are observed via synchrotron emission. While much modelling has been carried out on the CRE distribution and propagation of the Milky Way, little has been done on normal external star-forming galaxies. Recent spectral data from a new generation of radio telescopes enable us to find more robust estimations of the CRE propagation. Aims: To model the synchrotron spectral index of M 51 using the diffusion energy-loss equation and to compare the model results with the observed spectral index determined from recent low-frequency observations with LOFAR. Methods: We solve the time-dependent diffusion energy-loss equation for CREs in M 51. This is the first time that this model for CRE propagation has been solved for a realistic distribution of CRE sources, which we derive from the observed star formation rate, in an external galaxy. The radial variation of the synchrotron spectral index and scale-length produced by the model are compared to recent LOFAR and older VLA observational data and also to new observations of M 51 at 325 MHz obtained with the GMRT. Results: We find that propagation of CREs by diffusion alone is sufficient to reproduce the observed spectral index distribution in M 51. An isotropic diffusion coefficient with a value of 6.6 ± 0.2 × 1028 cm2 s-1 is found to fit best and is similar to what is seen in the Milky Way. We estimate an escape time of 11 Myr from the central galaxy to 88 Myr in the extended disk. It is found that an energy dependence of the diffusion coefficient is not important for CRE energies in the range 0.01 GeV-3 GeV. We are able to reproduce the dependence of the observed synchrotron scale-lengths on frequency, with l ∝ ν- 1 / 4 in the outer disk and l ∝ ν- 1 / 8 in the inner disk. The reduced 325 MHz image as a FITS file is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  20. Diffusion models in experimental psychology: a practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Voss, Andreas; Nagler, Markus; Lerche, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic diffusion models (Ratcliff, 1978) can be used to analyze response time data from binary decision tasks. They provide detailed information about cognitive processes underlying the performance in such tasks. Most importantly, different parameters are estimated from the response time distributions of correct responses and errors that map (1) the speed of information uptake, (2) the amount of information used to make a decision, (3) possible decision biases, and (4) the duration of nondecisional processes. Although this kind of model can be applied to many experimental paradigms and provides much more insight than the analysis of mean response times can, it is still rarely used in cognitive psychology. In the present paper, we provide comprehensive information on the theory of the diffusion model, as well as on practical issues that have to be considered for implementing the model.

  1. Transport Corrections in Nodal Diffusion Codes for HTR Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Frederick N. Gleicher

    2010-08-01

    The cores and reflectors of High Temperature Reactors (HTRs) of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) type are dominantly diffusive media from the point of view of behavior of the neutrons and their migration between the various structures of the reactor. This means that neutron diffusion theory is sufficient for modeling most features of such reactors and transport theory may not be needed for most applications. Of course, the above statement assumes the availability of homogenized diffusion theory data. The statement is true for most situations but not all. Two features of NGNP-type HTRs require that the diffusion theory-based solution be corrected for local transport effects. These two cases are the treatment of burnable poisons (BP) in the case of the prismatic block reactors and, for both pebble bed reactor (PBR) and prismatic block reactor (PMR) designs, that of control rods (CR) embedded in non-multiplying regions near the interface between fueled zones and said non-multiplying zones. The need for transport correction arises because diffusion theory-based solutions appear not to provide sufficient fidelity in these situations.

  2. An ab initio model for the modulation of galactic cosmic-ray electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A.

    2013-12-20

    The modulation of galactic cosmic-ray electrons is studied using an ab initio three-dimensional steady state cosmic-ray modulation code in which the effects of turbulence on both the diffusion and drift of these cosmic-rays are treated as self-consistently as possible. A significant refinement is that a recent two-component turbulence transport model is used. This model yields results in reasonable agreement with observations of turbulence quantities throughout the heliosphere. The sensitivity of computed galactic electron intensities to choices of various turbulence parameters pertaining to the dissipation range of the slab turbulence spectrum, and to the choice of model of dynamical turbulence, is demonstrated using diffusion coefficients derived from the quasi-linear and extended nonlinear guiding center theories. Computed electron intensities and latitude gradients are also compared with spacecraft observations.

  3. Modeling Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Flares Within the Internal Shock Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxham, Amanda; Zhang, Bing

    2009-12-01

    X-ray afterglow light curves have been collected for over 400 Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with nearly half of them having X-ray flares superimposed on the regular afterglow decay. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge, and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares, but do not calculate the shock dynamics and radiation processes in detail. Using the empirical Ep -E iso (Amati) relation with an assumed Band function spectrum for each collision and an empirical flare temporal profile, we calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width, and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width, and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. The same shell model predicts an external shock X-ray afterglow component, which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave. However, the predicted X-ray afterglow is too bright as compared with the observed flux level, unless epsilon e is

  4. MODELING GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY FLARES WITHIN THE INTERNAL SHOCK MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Maxham, Amanda; Zhang Bing

    2009-12-20

    X-ray afterglow light curves have been collected for over 400 Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with nearly half of them having X-ray flares superimposed on the regular afterglow decay. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge, and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares, but do not calculate the shock dynamics and radiation processes in detail. Using the empirical E{sub p} -E{sub iso} (Amati) relation with an assumed Band function spectrum for each collision and an empirical flare temporal profile, we calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width, and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width, and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. The same shell model predicts an external shock X-ray afterglow component, which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave. However, the predicted X-ray afterglow is too bright as compared with the observed flux level, unless

  5. Diffuse X-Ray Scattering and Oxygen Short-Range Ordering Studies of Tetragonal Yttrium BARIUM(2) (COPPER(1 - ALUMINUM(X))(3) OXYGEN(7) Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaogang

    1992-01-01

    Single crystals of tetragonal YBa_2(Cu _{1-x}Al_{x})_3O _7 were studied by means of x-ray diffraction. It was found from crystallography that Al impurities essentially go to Cu(1) sites in the chain plane. Diffuse synchrotron x-ray scattering from tetragonal single crystals of YBa _2(Cu_{1-x}Al_{x}) _3O_7 showed streaking in (110) directions about Bragg peaks. Through quantitative calculations using a coupled concentration wave, static displacement wave approach, we have shown that this is essentially attributable to the displacement field produced by a disordered oxygen array on the Cu(1)-O "chain" plane. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the asymmetric next nearest neighbor interaction (ASNNNI) model. From the resulting oxygen concentration fluctuations, the displacement-induced diffuse x-ray scattering intensity was calculated. By comparing the calculation with the measured diffuse intensity, we determined the effective Al-O binding energy which is used in the final Monte Carlo simulation. From the oxygen configurations in a typical Monte Carlo snapshot the average length of the Cu-O chain in tetragonal YBa_2(Cu_ {1-x}Al_{x})_3O_7, with x = 0.045, was found to be ~ 30A.

  6. Modeling of lamps through a diffuser with 2D and 3D picket-fence backlight models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belshaw, Richard J.; Wilmott, Roger; Thomas, John T.

    2002-08-01

    Laboratory photometric measurements are taken of a display backlight one metre away from the emission surface (diffuser) with a whole acceptance angle on the photometer of about 0.125 degrees (2.182mm spot size at emission surface). A simulation method was sought to be able to obtain the brightness uniformity (luminance peak to trough ratio from above one lamp to the null between lamps in a picket-fence backlight). A 3D raytrace BackLight model in TracePro and a 2D Mathematical model in Matlab have been developed. With a specimen backlight in the laboratory, a smooth luminance profile was measured by the photometer on the diffuser surface. Ray Trace models in both 3D and 2D take too long to produce smooth 'continuous filled' distributions. The Mathematical 2D approach, although with limitations, yielded smooth solutions in a very reasonable time frame.

  7. Spatial Fluctuations in the Diffuse Cosmic X-Ray Background. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The bright, essentially isotropic, X-ray sky flux above 2 keV yields information on the universe at large distances. However, a definitive understanding of the origin of the flux is lacking. Some fraction of the total flux is contributed by active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, but less than one percent of the total is contributed by the or approximately 3 keV band resolved sources, which is the band where the sky flux is directly observed. Parametric models of AGN (quasar) luminosity function evolution are examined. Most constraints are by the total sky flux. The acceptability of particular models hinges on assumptions currently not directly testable. The comparison with the Einstein Observatory 1 to keV low flux source counts is hampered by spectral uncertainties. A tentative measurement of a large scale dipole anisotropy is consistent with the velocity and direction derived from the dipole in the microwave background. The impact of the X-ray anisotropy limits for other scales on studies of large-scale structure in the universe is sketched. Models of the origins of the X-ray sky flux are reviewed, and future observational programs outlined.

  8. X-ray diffuse scattering study of local distortions in Fe1+xTe induced by excess Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Lee, C.-C.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Gu, G.; Ku, W.; Tranquada, J. M.; Hill, J. P.

    2011-05-01

    We report x-ray diffuse scattering studies of the iron chalcogenide Fe1+xTe as a function of doping and temperature for x=0.03, 0.08, and 0.12. In all cases, remarkably strong, characteristic diffuse scattering is observed. This scattering extends throughout the Brillouin zone and exhibits a nonmonotonic decay away from the fundamental Bragg peaks, with a peaklike structure at a reduced q≈(0.3,0,0.6). We interpret this scattering as Huang diffuse scattering resulting from distortions induced by the interaction between the excess Fe and the FeTe layers. The form of the scattering indicates that this interaction is strong and extends a number of unit cells away from the interstitial Fe site. Further, the diffuse scattering shows a sudden decrease on cooling through the structural and magnetic phase transition, reflecting the first-order change of the electronic structure of FeTe.

  9. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer from poor spatial resolution due to the diffuse propagation of light in biological tissue. The application of model-based image reconstruction is reviewed in this paper, together with a numerical modelling approach to light propagation in tissue as well as generalized image reconstruction using boundary data. A comprehensive review and details of the basis for using spatial and structural prior information are also discussed, whereby the use of spectral and dual-modality systems can improve contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:19581256

  10. Modeling aerosol formation in opposed-flow diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Violi, Angela; D'Anna, Andrea; D'Alessio, Antonio; Sarofim, Adel F

    2003-06-01

    The microstructures of atmospheric pressure, counter-flow, sooting, flat, laminar ethylene diffusion flames have been studied numerically by using a new kinetic model developed for hydrocarbon oxidation and pyrolysis. Modeling results are in reasonable agreement with experimental data in terms of concentration profiles of stable species and gas-phase aromatic compounds. Modeling results are used to analyze the controlling steps of aromatic formation and soot growth in counter-flow configurations. The formation of high molecular mass aromatics in diffusion controlled conditions is restricted to a narrow area close to the flame front where these species reach a molecular weight of about 1000 u. Depending on the flame configuration, soot formation is controlled by the coagulation of nanoparticles or by the addition of PAH to soot nuclei.

  11. Semiparametric Bayesian local functional models for diffusion tensor tract statistics☆

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhaowei; Dunson, David B.; Gilmore, John H.; Styner, Martin A.; Zhu, Hongtu

    2012-01-01

    We propose a semiparametric Bayesian local functional model (BFM) for the analysis of multiple diffusion properties (e.g., fractional anisotropy) along white matter fiber bundles with a set of covariates of interest, such as age and gender. BFM accounts for heterogeneity in the shape of the fiber bundle diffusion properties among subjects, while allowing the impact of the covariates to vary across subjects. A nonparametric Bayesian LPP2 prior facilitates global and local borrowings of information among subjects, while an infinite factor model flexibly represents low-dimensional structure. Local hypothesis testing and credible bands are developed to identify fiber segments, along which multiple diffusion properties are significantly associated with covariates of interest, while controlling for multiple comparisons. Moreover, BFM naturally group subjects into more homogeneous clusters. Posterior computation proceeds via an efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. A simulation study is performed to evaluate the finite sample performance of BFM. We apply BFM to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the splenium of the corpus callosum tract and the right internal capsule tract in a clinical study of neurodevelopment in new born infants. PMID:22732565

  12. Non-linear diffusion of cosmic rays escaping from supernova remnants - I. The effect of neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, L.; Gabici, S.; Marcowith, A.; Morlino, G.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    2016-10-01

    Supernova remnants are believed to be the main sources of galactic cosmic rays (CR). Within this framework, particles are accelerated at supernova remnant shocks and then released in the interstellar medium. The mechanism through which CRs are released and the way in which they propagate still remain open issues. The main difficulty is the high non-linearity of the problem: CRs themselves excite the magnetic turbulence that confines them close to their sources. We solve numerically the coupled differential equations describing the evolution in space and time of the escaping particles and of the waves generated through the CR streaming instability. The warm ionized and warm neutral phases of the interstellar medium are considered. These phases occupy the largest fraction of the disc volume, where most supernovae explode, and are characterized by the significant presence of neutral particles. The friction between those neutrals and ions results in a very effective wave damping mechanism. It is found that streaming instability affects the propagation of CRs even in the presence of ion-neutral friction. The diffusion coefficient can be suppressed by more than a factor of ˜2 over a region of few tens of pc around the remnant. The suppression increases for smaller distances. The propagation of ≈10 GeV particles is affected for several tens of kiloyears after escape, while ≈1 TeV particles are affected for few kiloyears. This might have a great impact on the interpretation of gamma-ray observations of molecular clouds located in the vicinity of supernova remnants.

  13. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  14. Elementary models for turbulent diffusion with complex physical features: eddy diffusivity, spectrum and intermittency.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Gershgorin, Boris

    2013-01-13

    This paper motivates, develops and reviews elementary models for turbulent tracers with a background mean gradient which, despite their simplicity, have complex statistical features mimicking crucial aspects of laboratory experiments and atmospheric observations. These statistical features include exact formulas for tracer eddy diffusivity which is non-local in space and time, exact formulas and simple numerics for the tracer variance spectrum in a statistical steady state, and the transition to intermittent scalar probability density functions with fat exponential tails as certain variances of the advecting mean velocity are increased while satisfying important physical constraints. The recent use of such simple models with complex statistics as unambiguous test models for central contemporary issues in both climate change science and the real-time filtering of turbulent tracers from sparse noisy observations is highlighted throughout the paper.

  15. Ray Tracing Modeling of Gravity Wave Propagation and Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, Sharon; Crowley, Geoff

    In this paper, we describe a ray trace model which calculates the wavevector, location and phase of a gravity wave (GW) as it propagates in the lower atmosphere and thermosphere. If used for a discreet transient source (such as a deep convective plume), we describe how this model can calculate the body forcing and the heat/cooling that are created when the GWs within a wave packet dissipate in the thermosphere from kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity. Although the body force calculation requires only the divergence of the momentum flux, the heat/cooling calculation requires the reconstructed GW field (e.g., density, velocity perturbations), which in turn requires the GW dissipative polarization relations. We describe these relations. We then describe the results of a recent study involving GWs identified from TIDDBIT HF Doppler sounder data taken at Wallops Island, VI, USA. Using this ray trace model, we determine if the unusual neutral wind profile measured by a rocket experiment at high altitudes (~290-370 km) could have been caused by the propagation and dissipation of several waves observed by TIDDBIT at lower altitudes.

  16. Performance of turbulence models for transonic flows in a diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangwei; Wu, Jianuo; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-09-01

    Eight turbulence models frequently used in aerodynamics have been employed in the detailed numerical investigations for transonic flows in the Sajben diffuser, to assess the predictive capabilities of the turbulence models for shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI) in internal flows. The eight turbulence models include: the Spalart-Allmaras model, the standard k - 𝜀 model, the RNG k - 𝜀 model, the realizable k - 𝜀 model, the standard k - ω model, the SST k - ω model, the v2¯ - f model and the Reynolds stress model. The performance of the different turbulence models adopted has been systematically assessed by comparing the numerical results with the available experimental data. The comparisons show that the predictive performance becomes worse as the shock wave becomes stronger. The v2¯ - f model and the SST k - ω model perform much better than other models, and the SST k - ω model predicts a little better than the v2¯ - f model for pressure on walls and velocity profile, whereas the v2¯ - f model predicts a little better than the SST k - ω model for separation location, reattachment location and separation length for strong shock case.

  17. Countercurrent Gaseous Diffusion Model of Oxidation Through a Porous Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    1996-07-01

    A countercurrent gaseous diffusion model was developed to describe oxidation through porous coatings and scales. The specific system modeled involved graphite oxidized through a porous alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) overcoat between 570 C (1,058 F) and 975 C (1,787 F). The model separated the porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating into two gas diffusion regions separated by a flame front, where oxygen (O{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO) react to form carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). In the outer region O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} counterdiffused. In the inner region, CO{sub 2} and CO counterdiffused. Concentration gradients of each gaseous specie in the pores of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were determined, and the oxidation rate was calculated. The model was verified by oxidation experiments using graphite through various porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overcoats. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overcoats ranged in fractional porosity and in average pore radius from 0.077 {micro}m (3.0 x 10{sup -6} in., Knudsen diffusion) to 10.0 {micro}m (3.9 x 10{sup -4} in., molecular diffusion). Predicted and measured oxidation rates were shown to have the same dependence upon porosity, pore radius, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure (P{sub O{sub 2}}). Use of the model was proposed for other oxidation systems and for chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This work was part of the U.S. Bureau of Mines corrosion research program.

  18. X-RAY AND GAMMA-RAY POLARIZATION IN LEPTONIC AND HADRONIC JET MODELS OF BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Boettcher, M.

    2013-09-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the expected X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarization signatures resulting from synchrotron self-Compton emission in leptonic models compared to the polarization signatures from proton synchrotron and cascade synchrotron emission in hadronic models for blazars. Source parameters resulting from detailed spectral-energy-distribution modeling are used to calculate photon-energy-dependent upper limits on the degree of polarization, assuming a perfectly organized mono-directional magnetic field. In low-synchrotron-peaked blazars, hadronic models exhibit substantially higher maximum degrees of X-ray and gamma-ray polarization than leptonic models, which may be within reach of existing X-ray and {gamma}-ray polarimeters. In high-synchrotron-peaked blazars (with electron-synchrotron-dominated X-ray emission), leptonic and hadronic models predict the same degree of X-ray polarization but substantially higher maximum {gamma}-ray polarization in hadronic models than leptonic ones. These predictions are particularly relevant in view of the new generation of balloon-borne X-ray polarimeters (and possibly GEMS, if revived), and the ability of Fermi-LAT to measure {gamma}-ray polarization at <200 MeV. We suggest observational strategies combining optical, X-ray, and {gamma}-ray polarimetry to determine the degree of ordering of the magnetic field and to distinguish between leptonic and hadronic high-energy emissions.

  19. Observed Limits on Charge Exchange Contributions to the Diffuse X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowder, S. G.; Barger, K. A.; Brandl, D. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Pfendner, C. G.; Porter, F. S.; Rocks, L.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Teplin, I. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-resolution spectrum of the diffuse X-ray background from 0.1 to 1 keV for an approximately 1 sr region of the sky centered at l = 90 degrees b = +60 degrees using a 36 pixel array of microcalorimeters flown on a sounding rocket. With an energy resolution of 11 eV FWHM below 1 keV, the spectrum s observed line ratios help separate charge exchange contributions originating within the heliosphere from thermal emission of hot gas in the interstellar medium. The X-ray sensitivity below 1 keV was reduced by about a factor of four from contamination that occurred early in the flight, limiting the significance of the results. The observed centroid of helium-like O VII is 568 (sup +2 (sub -3) eV at 90% confidence. Since the centroid expected for thermal emission is 568.4 eV and for charge exchange is 564.2 eV, thermal emission appears to dominate for this line complex. The dominance of thermal emission is consistent with much of the high-latitude O VII emission originating in 2-3 x 10(exp 6) K gas in the Galactic halo. On the other hand, the observed ratio of C VI Lygamma to Lyalpha is 0.3 plus or minus 0.2. The expected ratios are 0.04 for thermal emission and 0.24 for charge exchange, indicating that charge exchange must contribute strongly to this line and therefore potentially to the rest of the ROSAT R12 band usually associated with 10(sup 6) K emission from the Local Hot Bubble. The limited statistics of this experiment and systematic uncertainties due to the contamination require only greater than 32% thermal emission for O VII and greater than 20% from charge exchange for C VI at the 90% confidence level. An experimental gold coating on the silicon substrate of the array greatly reduced extraneous signals induced on nearby pixels from cosmic rays passing through the substrate, reducing the triggered event rate by a factor of 15 from a previous flight of the instrument.

  20. Determination of Diffusion Profiles in Altered Wellbore Cement Using X-ray Computed Tomography Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Harris E.; Walsh, Stuart D. C.; DuFrane, Wyatt L.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-06-17

    The development of accurate, predictive models for use in determining wellbore integrity requires detailed information about the chemical and mechanical changes occurring in hardened Portland cements. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) provides a method that can nondestructively probe these changes in three dimensions. Here, we describe a method for extracting subvoxel mineralogical and chemical information from synchrotron XRCT images by combining advanced image segmentation with geochemical models of cement alteration. The method relies on determining “effective linear activity coefficients” (ELAC) for the white light source to generate calibration curves that relate the image grayscales to material composition. The resulting data set supports the modeling of cement alteration by CO2-rich brine with discrete increases in calcium concentration at reaction boundaries. The results of these XRCT analyses can be used to further improve coupled geochemical and mechanical models of cement alteration in the wellbore environment.

  1. Modeling of diffuse-diffuse photon coupling via a nonscattering region: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Youn Tae

    2004-06-20

    It is well established that diffusion approximation is valid for light propagation in highly scattering media, but it breaks down in nonscattering regions. The previous methods that manipulate nonscattering regions are essentially boundary-to-boundary coupling (BBC) methods through a nonscattering void region based on the radiosity theory. We present a boundary-to-interior coupling (BIC) method. BIC is based on the fact that the collimated pencil beam incident on the medium can be replaced by an isotropic point source positioned at one reduced scattering length inside the medium from an illuminated point. A similar replacement is possible for the nondiffuse lights that enter the diffuse medium through the void, and it is formulated as the BIC method. We implemented both coupling methods using the finite element method (FEM) and tested for the circle with a void gap and for a four-layer adult head model. For mean time of flight, the BIC shows better agreement with Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results than BBC. For intensity, BIC shows a comparable match with MC data compared with that of BBC. The effect of absorption of the clear layer in the adult head model was investigated. Both mean time and intensity decrease as absorption of the clear layer increases.

  2. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Constant Behavior: IV. Diffuse Layer Charge/Potential Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most current electrostatic surface complexation models describing ionic binding at the particle/water interface rely on the use of Poisson - Boltzmann (PB) theory for relating diffuse layer charge densities to diffuse layer electrostatic potentials. PB theory is known to contain ...

  3. A model of the gamma-ray background on the BATSE experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, B. C.; Lei, F.; Fishman, G. J.; Finger, M. H.; Harmon, B. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Wilson, R. B.; Zhang, S. N.

    1996-12-01

    The BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory is a nearly uninterrupted all-sky monitor in the hard X-ray/gamma-ray energy range. Count rate data continuously transmitted to the ground from Low Earth Orbit (altitude ~450km) is dominated, in the 20-300keV energy range, by diffuse cosmic background modulated by blocking effects of the Earth. Other background sources include atmospheric gamma-rays and the decay of radionuclides created in cosmic ray and radiation belt trapped particle interactions with the detector. Numerous discrete cosmic sources are also present in these data. In this paper we describe a semi-empirical background model which has been used to reduce the effect of dominant background sources. The use of this model can increase the sensitivity of the experiment to sources observed with the Earth occultation technique; to long period pulsed sources; to analysis of flickering noise; and to transient events.

  4. Experimental exploration of diffusion panel labyrinth in scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Mandi M.

    Small rehearsal and performance venues often lack the rich reverberation found in larger spaces. Higini Arau-Puchades has designed and implemented a system of diffusion panels in the Orchestra Rehearsal Room at the Great Theatre Liceu and the Tonhalle St. Gallen that lengthen the reverberation time. These panels defy traditional room acoustics theory which holds that adding material to a room will shorten the reverberation time. This work explores several versions of Arau-Puchades' panels and room characteristics in scale model. Reverberation times are taken from room impulse response measurements in order to better understand the unusual phenomenon. Scale modeling enables many tests but has limitations in its accuracy due to the higher frequency range involved. Further investigations are necessary to establish how the sound energy interacts with the diffusion panels and confirm their validity in a range of applications.

  5. Thermomechanics of damageable materials under diffusion: modelling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent general-purpose model describing diffusion of a solute or a fluid in a solid undergoing possible phase transformations and damage, beside possible visco-inelastic processes. Also heat generation/consumption/transfer is considered. Damage is modelled as rate-independent. The applications include metal-hydrogen systems with metal/hydride phase transformation, poroelastic rocks, structural and ferro/para-magnetic phase transformation, water and heat transport in concrete, and if diffusion is neglected, plasticity with damage and viscoelasticity, etc. For the ensuing system of partial differential equations and inclusions, we prove existence of solutions by a carefully devised semi-implicit approximation scheme of the fractional-step type.

  6. Forecasting Diffusion of Technology by using Bass Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hoi; Shin, Young-Geun; Park, Sang-Sung; Jang, Dong-Sik

    2009-08-01

    Generally, researching method of technology forecasting has been depended on intuition of expert until now. So there were many defects like consuming much time and money and so on. In this paper, we forecast diffusion of technology by using Bass model that is one of the quantitative analysis methods. We applied this model at technology market. And for input data of experiment, we use patent data that is representing each technology in technology market. We expect this research will be suggest new possibility that patent data can be applied in Bass model.

  7. Reaction-diffusion processes and metapopulation models on duplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Du, Fang; Yu, Li; Chen, Guanrong

    2013-03-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes, used to model various spatially distributed dynamics such as epidemics, have been studied mostly on regular lattices or complex networks with simplex links that are identical and invariant in transferring different kinds of particles. However, in many self-organized systems, different particles may have their own private channels to keep their purities. Such division of links often significantly influences the underlying reaction-diffusion dynamics and thus needs to be carefully investigated. This article studies a special reaction-diffusion process, named susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics, given by the reaction steps β→α and α+β→2β, on duplex networks where links are classified into two groups: α and β links used to transfer α and β particles, which, along with the corresponding nodes, consist of an α subnetwork and a β subnetwork, respectively. It is found that the critical point of particle density to sustain reaction activity is independent of the network topology if there is no correlation between the degree sequences of the two subnetworks, and this critical value is suppressed or extended if the two degree sequences are positively or negatively correlated, respectively. Based on the obtained results, it is predicted that epidemic spreading may be promoted on positive correlated traffic networks but may be suppressed on networks with modules composed of different types of diffusion links.

  8. Modeling diffusive transport with a fractional derivative without singular kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; López-López, M. G.; Alvarado-Martínez, V. M.; Reyes-Reyes, J.; Adam-Medina, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present an alternative representation of the diffusion equation and the diffusion-advection equation using the fractional calculus approach, the spatial-time derivatives are approximated using the fractional definition recently introduced by Caputo and Fabrizio in the range β , γ ∈(0 ; 2 ] for the space and time domain respectively. In this representation two auxiliary parameters σx and σt are introduced, these parameters related to equation results in a fractal space-time geometry provide an entire new family of solutions for the diffusion processes. The numerical results showed different behaviors when compared with classical model solutions. In the range β , γ ∈(0 ; 1) , the concentration exhibits the non-Markovian Lévy flights and the subdiffusion phenomena; when β = γ = 1 the classical case is recovered; when β , γ ∈(1 ; 2 ] the concentration exhibits the Markovian Lévy flights and the superdiffusion phenomena; finally when β = γ = 2 the concentration is anomalous dispersive and we found ballistic diffusion.

  9. Modelling of diffusion and conductivity relaxation of oxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    A two-dimensional square grain model has been applied to simulate simultaneously the diffusion process and relaxation of the dc conduction of polycrystalline oxide materials due to a sudden change of the oxygen partial pressure of the surrounding gas phase. The numerical calculations are performed by employing the finite element approach. The grains are squares of equal side length (average grain size) and the grain boundaries may consist of thin slabs of uniform thickness. An additional (space charge) layer adjacent to the grain boundary cores (thin slabs) either blocking (depletion layer) or highly conductive for electronic charge carriers may surround the grains. The electronic transport number of the mixed ionic-electronic conducting oxide ceramics may be close to unity (predominant electronic conduction). If the chemical diffusion coefficient of the neutral mobile component (oxygen) of the grain boundary core regions is assumed to be higher by many orders of magnitude than that in the bulk, the simulated relaxation curves for mass transport (diffusion) and dc conduction can deviate remarkably from each other. Deviations between the relaxation of mass transport and dc conduction are found in the case of considerably different electronic conductivities of grain boundary core regions, space charge layers, and bulk. On the contrary, the relaxation curves of mass transport and electronic conductivity are in perfect coincidence, when either effective medium diffusion occurs or the effective conductivity is unaffected by the individual conductivities of core regions and possible space charge layers, i.e. the grain boundary resistivity is negligible.

  10. Consistent flamelet modeling of differential molecular diffusion for turbulent non-premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng

    2016-03-01

    Treating differential molecular diffusion correctly and accurately remains as a great challenge to the modeling of turbulent non-premixed combustion. The aim of this paper is to develop consistent modeling strategies for differential molecular diffusion in flamelet models. Two types of differential molecular diffusion models are introduced, linear differential diffusion models and nonlinear differential diffusion models. A multi-component turbulent mixing layer problem is analyzed in detail to gain insights into differential molecular diffusion and its characteristics, particularly the dependence of differential molecular diffusion on the Reynolds number and the Lewis number. These characteristics are then used to validate the differential molecular diffusion models. Finally, the new models are applied to the modeling of a series of laboratory-scale turbulent non-premixed jet flames with different Reynolds number (Sandia Flames B, C, and D) to further assess the models' performance.

  11. Modeling of Diffusion in Liquid Ge and Its Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, David G.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes progress made on NASA Grant NAG3-1437, Modeling of diffusion in Liquid Ge and Its Alloys, which was in effect from January 15, 1993 through July 10, 1997. It briefly describes the purpose of the grant, and the work accomplished in simulations and other studies of thermophysical properties of liquid semiconductors and related materials. A list of publications completed with the support of the grant is also given.

  12. Particle Tracking Model Transport Process Verification: Diffusion Algorithm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    requires the input of hydrodynamics (i.e., water surface elevation and velocities), defined upon a bathymetry grid that is provided through an external...without the computational overhead of regenerating flow conditions for each hydrodynamic run. PTM operates within the Surface- water Modeling System (SMS...particle’s vertical position in the water column (m). It is seen that the vertical eddy diffusivity has a parabolic dependence upon the vertical

  13. 3-D Model of Broadband Emission from Supernova Remnants Undergoing Non-linear Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Ellison, Donald C.

    2008-07-02

    We present a 3-dimensional model of supernova remnants (SNRs) where the hydrodynamical evolution of the remnant is modeled consistently with nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration occurring at the outer blast wave. The model includes particle escape and diffusion outside of the forward shock, and particle interactions with arbitrary distributions of external ambient material, such as molecular clouds. We include synchrotron emission and cooling, bremsstrahlung radiation, neutral pion production, inverse-Compton (IC), and Coulomb energy-loss. Boardband spectra have been calculated for typical parameters including dense regions of gas external to a 1000 year old SNR. In this paper, we describe the details of our model but do not attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. We also do not include magnetic field amplification (MFA), even though this effect may be important in some young remnants. In this first presentation of the model we don't attempt a detailed fit to any specific remnant. Our aim is to develop a flexible platform, which can be generalized to include effects such as MFA, and which can be easily adapted to various SNR environments, including Type Ia SNRs, which explode in a constant density medium, and Type II SNRs, which explode in a pre-supernova wind. When applied to a specific SNR, our model will predict cosmic-ray spectra and multi-wavelength morphology in projected images for instruments with varying spatial and spectral resolutions. We show examples of these spectra and images and emphasize the importance of measurements in the hard X-ray, GeV, and TeV gamma-ray bands for investigating key ingredients in the acceleration mechanism, and for deducing whether or not TeV emission is produced by IC from electrons or pion-decay from protons.

  14. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    M. WILLIAMS

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  15. A nonlinear theory of cosmic ray pitch angle diffusion in homogeneous magnetostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    A plasma strong turbulence, weak coupling, theory is applied to the problem of cosmic ray pitch angle scattering in magnetostatic turbulence. The theory used is a rigorous generalization of Weinstock's resonance-broadening theory and contains no ad hoc approximations. A detailed calculation is presented for a model of slab turbulence with an exponential correlation function. The results agree well with numerical simulations. The rigidity dependence of the pitch angle scattering coefficient differs from that found by previous researchers. The differences result from an inadequate treatment of particle trajectories near 90 deg pitch angle in earlier work.

  16. Analysis of diffusion models for protein adsorption to porous anion-exchange adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Dong; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2002-07-12

    The ion-exchange adsorption kinetics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and gamma-globulin to an anion exchanger, DEAE Spherodex M, has been studied by batch adsorption experiments. Various diffusion models, that is, pore diffusion, surface diffusion, homogeneous diffusion and parallel diffusion models, are analyzed for their suitabilities to depict the adsorption kinetics. Protein diffusivities are estimated by matching the models with the experimental data. The dependence of the diffusivities on initial protein concentration is observed and discussed. The adsorption isotherm of BSA is nearly rectangular, so there is little surface diffusion. As a result, the surface and homogeneous diffusion models do not fit to the kinetic data of BSA adsorption. The adsorption isotherm of gamma-globulin is less favorable, and the surface diffusion contributes greatly to the mass transport. Consequently, both the surface and homogeneous diffusion models fit to the kinetic data of gamma-globulin well. The adsorption kinetics of BSA and gamma-globulin can be very well fitted by parallel diffusion model, because the model reflects correctly the intraparticle mass transfer mechanism. In addition, for both the favorably bound proteins, the pore diffusion model fits the adsorption kinetics reasonably well. The results here indicate that the pore diffusion model can be used as a good approximate to depict protein adsorption kinetics for protein adsorption systems from rectangular to linear isotherms.

  17. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  18. Stochastic Functional Data Analysis: A Diffusion Model-based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bin; Song, Peter X.-K.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary This paper presents a new modeling strategy in functional data analysis. We consider the problem of estimating an unknown smooth function given functional data with noise. The unknown function is treated as the realization of a stochastic process, which is incorporated into a diffusion model. The method of smoothing spline estimation is connected to a special case of this approach. The resulting models offer great flexibility to capture the dynamic features of functional data, and allow straightforward and meaningful interpretation. The likelihood of the models is derived with Euler approximation and data augmentation. A unified Bayesian inference method is carried out via a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm including a simulation smoother. The proposed models and methods are illustrated on some prostate specific antigen data, where we also show how the models can be used for forecasting. PMID:21418053

  19. Simultaneous estimation of model parameters and diffuse pollution sources for river water quality modeling.

    PubMed

    Jun, K S; Kang, J W; Lee, K S

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse pollution sources along a stream reach are very difficult to both monitor and estimate. In this paper, a systematic method using an optimal estimation algorithm is presented for simultaneous estimation of diffuse pollution and model parameters in a stream water quality model. It was applied with the QUAL2E model to the South Han River in South Korea for optimal estimation of kinetic constants and diffuse loads along the river. Initial calibration results for kinetic constants selected from a sensitivity analysis reveal that diffuse source inputs for nitrogen and phosphorus are essential to satisfy the system mass balance. Diffuse loads for total nitrogen and total phosphorus were estimated by solving the expanded inverse problem. Comparison of kinetic constants estimated simultaneously with diffuse sources to those estimated without diffuse loads, suggests that diffuse sources must be included in the optimization not only for its own estimation but also for adequate estimation of the model parameters. Application of the optimization method to river water quality modeling is discussed in terms of the sensitivity coefficient matrix structure.

  20. A Temporal Model of Technology Diffusion into Small Firms in Wales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Brychan; Packham, Gary; Miller, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Discusses technology diffusion through formal and informal networks. Develops a model that includes channels and mechanisms involved in transferring technology into innovative small businesses. The model depicts influences that increase or slow the rate of diffusion. (SK)

  1. Estimation of kinetic model parameters in fluorescence optical diffusion tomography.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Adam B; Webb, Kevin J; Bouman, Charles A

    2005-07-01

    We present a technique for reconstructing the spatially dependent dynamics of a fluorescent contrast agent in turbid media. The dynamic behavior is described by linear and nonlinear parameters of a compartmental model or some other model with a deterministic functional form. The method extends our previous work in fluorescence optical diffusion tomography by parametrically reconstructing the time-dependent fluorescent yield. The reconstruction uses a Bayesian framework and parametric iterative coordinate descent optimization, which is closely related to Gauss-Seidel methods. We demonstrate the method with a simulation study.

  2. Affinity based information diffusion model in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Xie, Yun; Hu, Haibo; Chen, Zhigao

    2014-12-01

    There is a widespread intuitive sense that people prefer participating in spreading the information in which they are interested. The affinity of people with information disseminated can affect the information propagation in social networks. In this paper, we propose an information diffusion model incorporating the mechanism of affinity of people with information which considers the fitness of affinity values of people with affinity threshold of the information. We find that the final size of information diffusion is affected by affinity threshold of the information, average degree of the network and the probability of people's losing their interest in the information. We also explore the effects of other factors on information spreading by numerical simulations and find that the probabilities of people's questioning and confirming the information can affect the propagation speed, but not the final scope.

  3. A model for the distribution of material generating the soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Cox, D. P.; Mccammon, D.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The observational evidence relating to the soft X-ray diffuse background is discussed, and a simple model for its source and spatial structure is presented. In this simple model with one free parameter, the observed 1/4 keV X-ray intensity originates as thermal emission from a uniform hot plasma filling a cavity in the neutral material of the Galactic disk which contains the sun. Variations in the observed X-ray intensity are due to variations in the extent of the emission volume and therefore the emission measure of the plasma. The model reproduces the observed negative correlation between X-ray intensity and H I column density and predicts reasonable values for interstellar medium parameters.

  4. Diffusive Models of Membrane Permeation with Explicit Orientational Freedom.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Schulten, Klaus; Chipot, Christophe

    2014-07-08

    Accurate calculation of permeabilities from first-principles has been a long-standing challenge for computer simulations, notably in the context of drug discovery, as a route to predict the propensity of small, organic molecules to spontaneously translocate biological membranes. Of equal importance is the understanding of the permeation process and the pathway followed by the permeant from the aqueous medium to the interior of the lipid bilayer, and back out again. A convenient framework for the computation of permeabilities is provided by the solubility-diffusion model, which requires knowledge of the underlying free-energy and diffusivity landscapes. Here, we develop a formalism that includes an explicit description of the orientational motion of the solute as it diffuses across the membrane. Toward this end, we have generalized a recently proposed method that reconciles thermodynamics and kinetics in importance-sampling simulations by means of a Bayesian-inference scheme to reverse-solve the underlying Smoluchowski equation. Performance of the proposed formalism is examined in the model cases of a water and an ethanol molecule crossing a fully hydrated lipid bilayer. Our analysis reveals a conspicuous dependence of the free-energy and rotational diffusivity on the orientation of ethanol when it lies within the headgroup region of the bilayer. Specifically, orientations for which the hydroxyl group lies among the polar lipid head groups, while the ethyl group recedes toward the hydrophobic interior are associated with free-energy minima ∼2kBT deep, as well as significantly slower orientational kinetics compared to the bulk solution or the core of the bilayer. The conspicuous orientational anisotropy of ethanol at the aqueous interface is suggestive of a complete rotation of the permeant as it crosses the hydrophobic interior of the membrane.

  5. An extended diffusive model for calculating thermal diffusivity from single monopole tokamak heat pulse propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M. )

    1990-02-01

    The problem of deducing {chi}{sub e} from measurements of the propagation of a monopole heatpulse is considered. An extended diffusive model, which takes into account perturbed sources and sinks is extended to the case of a monopole heat input. {chi}{sub e} is expressed as a function of two observables, the heat pulse velocity and the radial damping rate. Two simple expressions valid for two different ranges of the radius of the poloidal waist of the beam power profile are given. The expressions are valid in the heat pulse measurement region, extending radially 0.05a beyond the beam power waist to near 0.6a. The inferred {chi}{sub e} is a local value, not an average value of the radial {chi}{sub e} profile. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Diffusion of Ag into organic semiconducting materials: a combined analytical study using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Fladischer, Stefanie; Neuhold, Alfred; Kraker, Elke; Haber, Thomas; Lamprecht, Bernhard; Salzmann, Ingo; Resel, Roland; Grogger, Werner

    2012-10-24

    This study shows that the morphology of organic/metal interfaces strongly depends on process parameters and the involved materials. The interface between organic n-type blocking layer materials and the top Ag cathode within an organic photodiode was investigated. Ag was deposited on either amorphous tris-8-hydroxyquinolinato-aluminum (Alq(3)) or crystalline 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) using different deposition techniques such as electron beam deposition, ion beam sputtering, and vacuum thermal evaporation at various deposition rates. The interfaces were studied by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. It was found that Bphen does not show any Ag diffusion no matter which deposition technique was used, whereas the Ag diffusion into Alq(3) depends on the deposition technique and the deposition rate. The highest amount of Ag diffusion into Alq(3) occurred by using thermal vacuum deposition at low deposition rates.

  7. A Discrete Model to Study Reaction-Diffusion-Mechanics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Louis D.; Nash, Martyn P.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects. PMID:21804911

  8. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    PubMed

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  9. A simple diffusion-reaction model for resid hydroprocessing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.D.; Limmer, K.R. )

    1990-08-01

    It is commonly accepted that the intraparticle diffusion characteristics of resid hydroprocessing catalysts can play an important role in determining their performance. It is also commonly accepted that diffusion characteristics are determined by properties of the catalyst which are at least partially reflected in measurements such as surface area and pore size. One approach to experimentally determine the appropriate region on the diffusion-reaction curve is to vary V{sub P}/S{sub P} for a fixed pore structure. One example (among many) of this approach is the paper of Gosselink and Stork in which the authors modeled the fixed-bed HDS performance of Shell 444 catalyst on heavy gasoil in crushed (particle diameter 0.2 mm) and uncrushed (1.5 mm) form. The method has the advantage of minimizing unaccountable differences in pore structures, but is susceptible to major variations in external mass and heat transfer. An alternative is to vary the pore structure widely while exploring only commercially meaningful variations in V{sub P}/S{sub P}. This is the approach used in the study.

  10. Diffusion models for innovation: s-curves, networks, power laws, catastrophes, and entropy.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Joseph J; Guastello, Stephen J

    2011-04-01

    This article considers models for the diffusion of innovation would be most relevant to the dynamics of early 21st century technologies. The article presents an overview of diffusion models and examines the adoption S-curve, network theories, difference models, influence models, geographical models, a cusp catastrophe model, and self-organizing dynamics that emanate from principles of network configuration and principles of heat diffusion. The diffusion dynamics that are relevant to information technologies and energy-efficient technologies are compared. Finally, principles of nonlinear dynamics for innovation diffusion that could be used to rehabilitate the global economic situation are discussed.

  11. Bayesian Model Selection with Network Based Diffusion Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Andrew; Hoppitt, William J. E.

    2016-01-01

    A number of recent studies have used Network Based Diffusion Analysis (NBDA) to detect the role of social transmission in the spread of a novel behavior through a population. In this paper we present a unified framework for performing NBDA in a Bayesian setting, and demonstrate how the Watanabe Akaike Information Criteria (WAIC) can be used for model selection. We present a specific example of applying this method to Time to Acquisition Diffusion Analysis (TADA). To examine the robustness of this technique, we performed a large scale simulation study and found that NBDA using WAIC could recover the correct model of social transmission under a wide range of cases, including under the presence of random effects, individual level variables, and alternative models of social transmission. This work suggests that NBDA is an effective and widely applicable tool for uncovering whether social transmission underpins the spread of a novel behavior, and may still provide accurate results even when key model assumptions are relaxed. PMID:27092089

  12. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  13. Anomalous diffusion in neutral evolution of model proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-06-01

    Protein evolution is frequently explored using minimalist polymer models, however, little attention has been given to the problem of structural drift, or diffusion. Here, we study neutral evolution of small protein motifs using an off-lattice heteropolymer model in which individual monomers interact as low-resolution amino acids. In contrast to most earlier models, both the length and folded structure of the polymers are permitted to change. To describe structural change, we compute the mean-square distance (MSD) between monomers in homologous folds separated by n neutral mutations. We find that structural change is episodic, and, averaged over lineages (for example, those extending from a single sequence), exhibits a power-law dependence on n . We show that this exponent depends on the alignment method used, and we analyze the distribution of waiting times between neutral mutations. The latter are more disperse than for models required to maintain a specific fold, but exhibit a similar power-law tail.

  14. A study of hydrogen diffusion flames using PDF turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.

    1991-01-01

    The application of probability density function (pdf) turbulence models is addressed. For the purpose of accurate prediction of turbulent combustion, an algorithm that combines a conventional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow solver with the Monte Carlo simulation of the pdf evolution equation was developed. The algorithm was validated using experimental data for a heated turbulent plane jet. The study of H2-F2 diffusion flames was carried out using this algorithm. Numerical results compared favorably with experimental data. The computations show that the flame center shifts as the equivalence ratio changes, and that for the same equivalence ratio, similarity solutions for flames exist.

  15. Reading and a Diffusion Model Analysis of Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Adam; Katz, Leonard; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is associated with reading performance. However, the literature is not clear either on the definition of processing speed or on why and how it contributes to reading performance. In this study we demonstrated that processing speed, as measured by reaction time, is not a unitary construct. Using the diffusion model of two-choice reaction time, we assessed processing speed in a series of same-different reaction time tasks for letter and number strings. We demonstrated that the association between reaction time and reading performance is driven by processing speed for reading-related information, but not motor or sensory encoding speed. PMID:22612543

  16. SHIR competitive information diffusion model for online social media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Diao, Su-Meng; Zhu, Yi-Xiang; Liu, Qing

    2016-11-01

    In online social media, opinion divergences and differentiations generally exist as a result of individuals' extensive participation and personalization. In this paper, a Susceptible-Hesitated-Infected-Removed (SHIR) model is proposed to study the dynamics of competitive dual information diffusion. The proposed model extends the classical SIR model by adding hesitators as a neutralized state of dual information competition. It is both hesitators and stable spreaders that facilitate information dissemination. Researching on the impacts of diffusion parameters, it is found that the final density of stiflers increases monotonically as infection rate increases and removal rate decreases. And the advantage information with larger stable transition rate takes control of whole influence of dual information. The density of disadvantage information spreaders slightly grows with the increase of its stable transition rate, while whole spreaders of dual information and the relaxation time remain almost unchanged. Moreover, simulations imply that the final result of competition is closely related to the ratio of stable transition rates of dual information. If the stable transition rates of dual information are nearly the same, a slightly reduction of the smaller one brings out a significant disadvantage in its propagation coverage. Additionally, the relationship of the ratio of final stiflers versus the ratio of stable transition rates presents power characteristic.

  17. A chaotic model for advertising diffusion problem with competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W. H.; Yung, K. L.; Wang, Dingwei

    2012-08-01

    In this article, the author extends Dawid and Feichtinger's chaotic advertising diffusion model into the duopoly case. A computer simulation system is used to test this enhanced model. Based on the analysis of simulation results, it is found that the best advertising strategy in duopoly is to increase the advertising investment to reach the best Win-Win situation where the oscillation of market portion will not occur. In order to effectively arrive at the best situation, we define a synthetic index and two thresholds. An estimation method for the parameters of the index and thresholds is proposed in this research. We can reach the Win-Win situation by simply selecting the control parameters to make the synthetic index close to the threshold of min-oscillation state. The numerical example and computational results indicated that the proposed chaotic model is useful to describe and analyse advertising diffusion process in duopoly, it is an efficient tool for the selection and optimisation of advertising strategy.

  18. Global Structure of Isothermal Diffuse X-Ray Emission along the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    In our previous works, we found absorbed thermal X-ray plasma with kT ≃ 0.3 keV observed ubiquitously near the edges of the Fermi bubbles and interpreted this emission as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo gas. Here we present a systematic and uniform analysis of archival Suzaku (29 pointings; 6 newly presented) and Swift (68 pointings; 49 newly presented) data within Galactic longitudes | l| < 20° and latitude 5°≲ | b| < 60°, covering the whole extent of the Fermi bubbles. We show that the plasma temperature is constant at kT ≃ 0.30 ± 0.07 keV, while the emission measure (EM) varies by an order of magnitude, increasing toward the Galactic center (i.e., low | b| ) with enhancements at the North Polar Spur (NPS), SE-claw, and NW-clump features. Moreover, the EM distribution of kT ≃ 0.30 keV plasma is highly asymmetric in the northern and southern bubbles. Although the association of the X-ray emission with the bubbles is not conclusive, we compare the observed EM properties with simple models assuming (i) a filled halo without bubbles, whose gas density follows a hydrostatic isothermal model (King profile), and (ii) a bubble-in-halo in which two identical bubbles expand into the halo, forming thick shells of swept halo gas. We argue that the EM profile in the north (b > 0°) favors (ii), whereas that of the south (b < 0°) is rather close to (i), but a weak excess signature is clearly detected also in the south like NPS (South Polar Spur). Such an asymmetry, if due to the bubbles, cannot be fully understood only by the inclination of bubbles’ axis against the Galactic disk normal, thus suggesting asymmetric outflow due to different environmental/initial conditions.

  19. Modeling the Determinants Influencing the Diffusion of Mobile Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwahaishi, Saleh; Snášel, Václav

    2013-04-01

    Understanding individual acceptance and use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is one of the most mature streams of information systems research. In Information Technology and Information System research, numerous theories are used to understand users' adoption of new technologies. Various models were developed including the Innovation Diffusion Theory, Theory of Reasoned Action, Theory of Planned Behavior, Technology Acceptance Model, and recently, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. This research composes a new hybrid theoretical framework to identify the factors affecting the acceptance and use of Mobile Internet -as an ICT application- in a consumer context. The proposed model incorporates eight constructs: Performance Expectancy (PE), Effort Expectancy (EE), Facilitating Conditions (FC), Social Influences (SI), Perceived Value (PV), Perceived Playfulness (PP), Attention Focus (AF), and Behavioral intention (BI). Individual differences-namely, age, gender, education, income, and experience are moderating the effects of these constructs on behavioral intention and technology use.

  20. How Far Away Are the Sources of IceCube Neutrinos? Constraints from the Diffuse Teraelectronvolt Gamma-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Xiao-Chuan; Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-07-01

    The nearly isotropic distribution of teraelectronvolt to petaelectronvolt neutrinos recently detected by the IceCube Collaboration suggests that they come from sources at a distance beyond our Galaxy, but how far away they are is largely unknown because of a lack of any associations with known sources. In this paper, we propose that the cumulative TeV gamma-ray emission accompanying the production of neutrinos can be used to constrain the distance of these neutrino sources, since the opacity of TeV gamma rays due to absorption by the extragalactic background light depends on the distance these TeV gamma rays have traveled. As the diffuse extragalactic TeV background measured by Fermi is much weaker than the expected cumulative flux associated with IceCube neutrinos, the majority of IceCube neutrinos, if their sources are transparent to TeV gamma rays, must come from distances larger than the horizon of TeV gamma rays. We find that above 80% of the IceCube neutrinos should come from sources at redshift z > 0.5. Thus, the chance of finding nearby sources correlated with IceCube neutrinos would be small. We also find that, to explain the flux of neutrinos under the TeV gamma-ray emission constraint, the redshift evolution of neutrino source density must be at least as fast as the cosmic star formation rate.

  1. Effect of numerical diffusion on the water mass transformation in eddy-resolving models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, L. Shogo; Hasumi, Hiroyasu

    2014-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of numerical diffusion associated with advection schemes on water mass transformation in an eddy-resolving model. The effect of numerical diffusion is evaluated as a residual between the total water mass transformation and the explicit water mass transformation: the former is calculated as the sum of meridional streamfunction and the temporal change rate of an isopycnal surface depth, and the latter is directly calculated with the use of the tendency equation of density. This method is used for investigating a dependency of numerical diffusion on explicit diffusivity. It is found that idealized channel experiments are categorized into three regimes according to a magnitude of explicit diffusivity: numerical diffusion, transitional, and explicit diffusion regimes. The numerical diffusion regime is defined as the regime where explicit diffusion changes do not significantly impact the solution. The magnitude of numerical diffusion is independent of the explicit diffusivity there. In the transitional regime, explicit (numerical) diffusion works more (less) with higher explicit diffusivity. Explicit and numerical diffusions are comparably important there. The explicit diffusion becomes significantly large and the numerical diffusion is almost negligible in the explicit diffusion regime. The total diffusion effect on water mass transformation there is considerably larger than those in the two other regimes. Two experiments are conducted with a Southern Ocean model under a realistic configuration. These belong to the numerical diffusion and transitional regimes. The model becomes a little too diffusive in the latter experiment. This result and results of channel experiments indicate that it is not an adequate option for a realistic Southern Ocean simulation that we adopt a diffusion coefficient in the explicit diffusion regime in order to reduce levels of numerical diffusion. It indicates that numerical diffusion is inevitable for eddy

  2. Validation of pore network simulations of ex-situ water distributions in a gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with X-ray tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaesse, Tristan; Lamibrac, Adrien; Büchi, Felix N.; Pauchet, Joel; Prat, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Understanding and modeling two-phase flows in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of proton exchange membrane fuel cells are important in order to improve fuel cells performance. They are scientifically challenging because of the peculiarities of GDLs microstructures. In the present work, simulations on a pore network model are compared to X-ray tomographic images of water distributions during an ex-situ water invasion experiment. A method based on watershed segmentation was developed to extract a pore network from the 3D segmented image of the dry GDL. Pore network modeling and a full morphology model were then used to perform two-phase simulations and compared to the experimental data. The results show good agreement between experimental and simulated microscopic water distributions. Pore network extraction parameters were also benchmarked using the experimental data and results from full morphology simulations.

  3. Modeling X-ray emission around galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2014-04-10

    Extended X-ray emission can be studied by spatial surface brightness measurements or by spectral analysis, but the two methods can disagree at low intensity levels. Here we present an improved method for spatial analysis that can be extended to include spectral information simultaneously. We construct a model for the entire image in a given energy band and generate a likelihood function to compare the model to the data. A critical goal is disentangling vignetted and unvignetted backgrounds through their different spatial distributions. Employing either maximum likelihood or Markov Chain Monte Carlo, we can derive probability distributions for the source and background parameters together, or we can fit and subtract the background, leaving the description of the source non-parametric. We calibrate this method against a variety of simulated images, and apply it to Chandra observations of the hot gaseous halo around the elliptical galaxy NGC 720. We follow the emission below a tenth of the background and infer a hot gas mass within 35 kpc of 4-5 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with some indication that the profile continues to at least 50 kpc and that it steepens. We derive stronger constraints on the surface brightness profile than previous studies that employed the spectral method, and we show that the density profiles inferred from these studies are in conflict with the observed surface brightness profile. Contrary to a previous claim, we find that the X-ray halo does not contain the full complement of missing baryons within the virial radius.

  4. NuSTAR Hard X-Ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region I: Hard X-Ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Tomsick, John A.; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Canipe, Alicia M.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hornstrup, Allan; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Luu, Vy; Madsen, Kristen K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Perri, Matteo; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Westergaard, Niels J.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ˜ 1.3-2.3 up to ˜50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (˜1023 cm-2), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ˜ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to LX ≳ 1038 erg s-1. Above ˜20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95-0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses MWD ˜ 0.9 M⊙. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95-0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745-290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  5. Analysis of a diffuse interface model of multispecies tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mimi; Feireisl, Eduard; Rocca, Elisabetta; Schimperna, Giulio; Schonbek, Maria E.

    2017-04-01

    We consider a diffuse interface model for tumor growth recently proposed in Chen et al (2014 Int. J. Numer. Methods Biomed. Eng. 30 726–54). In this new approach sharp interfaces are replaced by narrow transition layers arising due to adhesive forces among the cell species. Hence, a continuum thermodynamically consistent model is introduced. The resulting PDE system couples four different types of equations: a Cahn–Hilliard type equation for the tumor cells (which include proliferating and dead cells), a Darcy law for the tissue velocity field, whose divergence may be different from 0 and depend on the other variables, a transport equation for the proliferating (viable) tumor cells, and a quasi-static reaction diffusion equation for the nutrient concentration. We establish existence of weak solutions for the PDE system coupled with suitable initial and boundary conditions. In particular, the proliferation function at the boundary is supposed to be nonnegative on the set where the velocity \\mathbf{u} satisfies \\mathbf{u}\\centerdot ν >0 , where ν is the outer normal to the boundary of the domain.

  6. Pharmacokinetic modeling of ascorbate diffusion through normal and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Caroline; Vissers, Margreet C M; Hicks, Kevin O

    2014-12-01

    Ascorbate is delivered to cells via the vasculature, but its ability to penetrate into tissues remote from blood vessels is unknown. This is particularly relevant to solid tumors, which often contain regions with dysfunctional vasculature, with impaired oxygen and nutrient delivery, resulting in upregulation of the hypoxic response and also the likely depletion of essential plasma-derived biomolecules, such as ascorbate. In this study, we have utilized a well-established multicell-layered, three-dimensional pharmacokinetic model to measure ascorbate diffusion and transport parameters through dense tissue in vitro. Ascorbate was found to penetrate the tissue at a slightly lower rate than mannitol and to travel via the paracellular route. Uptake parameters into the cells were also determined. These data were fitted to the diffusion model, and simulations of ascorbate pharmacokinetics in normal tissue and in hypoxic tumor tissue were performed with varying input concentrations, ranging from normal dietary plasma levels (10-100 μM) to pharmacological levels (>1 mM) as seen with intravenous infusion. The data and simulations demonstrate heterogeneous distribution of ascorbate in tumor tissue at physiological blood levels and provide insight into the range of plasma ascorbate concentrations and exposure times needed to saturate all regions of a tumor. The predictions suggest that supraphysiological plasma ascorbate concentrations (>100 μM) are required to achieve effective delivery of ascorbate to poorly vascularized tumor tissue.

  7. Diffusion dynamics in the disordered Bose Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadleigh, Laura; Russ, Philip; Demarco, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We explore the dynamics of diffusion for out-of-equilibrium superfluid, Mott insulator, and Bose glass states using an atomic realization of the disordered Bose Hubbard (DBH) model. Dynamics in strongly correlated systems, especially far from equilibrium, are not well understood. The introduction of disorder further complicates these systems. We realize the DBH model--which has been central to our understanding of quantum phase transitions in disordered systems--using ultracold Rubidium-87 atoms trapped in a cubic disordered optical lattice. By tightly focusing a beam into the center of the gas, we create a hole in the atomic density profile. We achieve Mott insulator, superfluid, or Bose glass states by varying the interaction and disorder strength, and measure the time evolution of the density profile after removing the central barrier. This allows us to infer diffusion rates from the velocities at the edge of the hole and to look for signatures of superfluid puddles in the Bose glass state. We acknowledge funding from NSF Grant PHY 15-05468, NSF Grant DGE-1144245, and ARO Grant W911NF-12-1-0462.

  8. A dedicated compression device for high resolution X-ray tomography of compressed gas diffusion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tötzke, C.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.; Gaiselmann, G.; Schmidt, V.; Bohner, J.; Müller, B. R.; Kupsch, A.; Hentschel, M. P.; Lehnert, W.

    2015-04-15

    We present an experimental approach to study the three-dimensional microstructure of gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials under realistic compression conditions. A dedicated compression device was designed that allows for synchrotron-tomographic investigation of circular samples under well-defined compression conditions. The tomographic data provide the experimental basis for stochastic modeling of nonwoven GDL materials. A plain compression tool is used to study the fiber courses in the material at different compression stages. Transport relevant geometrical parameters, such as porosity, pore size, and tortuosity distributions, are exemplarily evaluated for a GDL sample in the uncompressed state and for a compression of 30 vol.%. To mimic the geometry of the flow-field, we employed a compression punch with an integrated channel-rib-profile. It turned out that the GDL material is homogeneously compressed under the ribs, however, much less compressed underneath the channel. GDL fibers extend far into the channel volume where they might interfere with the convective gas transport and the removal of liquid water from the cell.

  9. Comparison of Turbulent Thermal Diffusivity and Scalar Variance Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, Dennis A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, several variable turbulent Prandtl number formulations are examined for boundary layers, pipe flow, and axisymmetric jets. The model formulations include simple algebraic relations between the thermal diffusivity and turbulent viscosity as well as more complex models that solve transport equations for the thermal variance and its dissipation rate. Results are compared with available data for wall heat transfer and profile measurements of mean temperature, the root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuating temperature, turbulent heat flux and turbulent Prandtl number. For wall-bounded problems, the algebraic models are found to best predict the rise in turbulent Prandtl number near the wall as well as the log-layer temperature profile, while the thermal variance models provide a good representation of the RMS temperature fluctuations. In jet flows, the algebraic models provide no benefit over a constant turbulent Prandtl number approach. Application of the thermal variance models finds that some significantly overpredict the temperature variance in the plume and most underpredict the thermal growth rate of the jet. The models yield very similar fluctuating temperature intensities in jets from straight pipes and smooth contraction nozzles, in contrast to data that indicate the latter should have noticeably higher values. For the particular low subsonic heated jet cases examined, changes in the turbulent Prandtl number had no effect on the centerline velocity decay.

  10. On Modeling Viral Diffusion in Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoai-Nam; Shinoda, Yoichi

    Smart phones and computers now are able to co-work in a wireless environment where malware can propagate. Although many investigations have modeled the spread of malware, little has been done to take into account different characteristics of items to see how they affect disease diffusion in an ad hoc network. We have therefore developed a novel framework, consisting of two models, which consider diversity of objects as well as interactions between their different classes. Our framework is able to produce a huge result space thus makes it appropriate to describe many viral proliferating scenarios. Additionally, we have developed a formula to calculate the possible average number of newly infected devices in the considered system. An important contribution of our work is the comprehension of item diversity, which states that a mixture of device types causes a bigger malware spread as the number of device types in the network increases.

  11. A self-consistent spin-diffusion model for micromagnetics.

    PubMed

    Abert, Claas; Ruggeri, Michele; Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Manchon, Aurelien; Praetorius, Dirk; Suess, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    We propose a three-dimensional micromagnetic model that dynamically solves the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation coupled to the full spin-diffusion equation. In contrast to previous methods, we solve for the magnetization dynamics and the electric potential in a self-consistent fashion. This treatment allows for an accurate description of magnetization dependent resistance changes. Moreover, the presented algorithm describes both spin accumulation due to smooth magnetization transitions and due to material interfaces as in multilayer structures. The model and its finite-element implementation are validated by current driven motion of a magnetic vortex structure. In a second experiment, the resistivity of a magnetic multilayer structure in dependence of the tilting angle of the magnetization in the different layers is investigated. Both examples show good agreement with reference simulations and experiments respectively.

  12. A Lattice Boltzmann Model for Oscillating Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi; Ibañez-Orozco, Oscar; Sosa-Herrera, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    A computational algorithm based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed to model reaction-diffusion systems. In this paper, we focus on how nonlinear chemical oscillators like Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) and the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reactions can be modeled by LBM and provide with new insight into the nature and applications of oscillating reactions. We use Gaussian pulse initial concentrations of sulfuric acid in different places of a bidimensional reactor and nondiffusive boundary walls. We clearly show how these systems evolve to a chaotic attractor and produce specific pattern images that are portrayed in the reactions trajectory to the corresponding chaotic attractor and can be used in robotic control.

  13. An HBV model with diffusion and time delay.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Ma, Zhien

    2009-04-07

    In this paper, a hepatitis B virus (HBV) model with spatial diffusion and saturation response of the infection rate is investigated, in which the intracellular incubation period is modelled by a discrete time delay. By analyzing the corresponding characteristic equations, the local stability of an infected steady state and an uninfected steady state is discussed. By comparison arguments, it is proved that if the basic reproductive number is less than unity, the uninfected steady state is globally asymptotically stable. If the basic reproductive number is greater than unity, by successively modifying the coupled lower-upper solution pairs, sufficient conditions are obtained for the global stability of the infected steady state. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the main results.

  14. Complex Spatio-Spectral Structure of Diffuse X-ray Emission in the Central 20 Parsecs of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Baganoff, F. K.; Bautz, M. W.; Garmire, G. P.; Maeda, Y.; Morris, M.; Muno, M. P.

    2002-12-01

    Over the last three years, the Galactic center region has been monitored with a series of the Chandra/ACIS observations. Besides the target object Sgr A*, the massive Galactic black hole candidate, the surrounding diffuse X-ray emission has been detected within the ~17' x 17' ACIS field of view. As of 2002 June, combining 11 GTO and GO observations, the total effective exposure reaches ~590 ks, which reveals the details of the faint diffuse X-ray emission with significant photon statistics. We here present early results from the imaging/spectral analyses of these data. The ``true-color'' X-ray images of this region indicate that the diffuse X-ray emission features have complex spatio-spectral structures represented by various atomic line emission and hard continuum. We construct the equivalent width (EW) images for the detected elemental species Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe in order to map the distributions of these atomic emission lines in the Galactic center. We detect strong enhancements of He-like Fe within the ~1.3' diameter region to the immediate east of Sgr A*. This is most likely emission from the highly ionized Fe associated with the recently X-ray identified supernova remnant (SNR) Sgr A East. A large-scale enhancement of the 6.4 keV Fe EW in the north-east of Sgr A* is in general spatially coincident with the molecular cloud M-0.02-0.07, which may be interpreted as emission from the X-ray reflection nebulae or fast-moving SN ejecta fragments. In the soft band (1.5 - 4.5 keV), we detect a network of loop-like structures with a few arcmin angular scales around the Galactic center. The soft X-ray loop in the southeast of Sgr A* is identified with the Galactic radio SNR G359.92-0.09, where we detect thermal emission interior to the soft X-ray loops. We detect a bright non-thermal X-ray knot as a part of the southwest boundary of G359.92-0.09 which is spatially coincident with a bright radio knot of the SNR. The best-fit power law spectrum appears harder than

  15. Modeling Periodic Impulsive Effects on Online TV Series Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qiwen; Wang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Background Online broadcasting substantially affects the production, distribution, and profit of TV series. In addition, online word-of-mouth significantly affects the diffusion of TV series. Because on-demand streaming rates are the most important factor that influences the earnings of online video suppliers, streaming statistics and forecasting trends are valuable. In this paper, we investigate the effects of periodic impulsive stimulation and pre-launch promotion on on-demand streaming dynamics. We consider imbalanced audience feverish distribution using an impulsive susceptible-infected-removed(SIR)-like model. In addition, we perform a correlation analysis of online buzz volume based on Baidu Index data. Methods We propose a PI-SIR model to evolve audience dynamics and translate them into on-demand streaming fluctuations, which can be observed and comprehended by online video suppliers. Six South Korean TV series datasets are used to test the model. We develop a coarse-to-fine two-step fitting scheme to estimate the model parameters, first by fitting inter-period accumulation and then by fitting inner-period feverish distribution. Results We find that audience members display similar viewing habits. That is, they seek new episodes every update day but fade away. This outcome means that impulsive intensity plays a crucial role in on-demand streaming diffusion. In addition, the initial audience size and online buzz are significant factors. On-demand streaming fluctuation is highly correlated with online buzz fluctuation. Conclusion To stimulate audience attention and interpersonal diffusion, it is worthwhile to invest in promotion near update days. Strong pre-launch promotion is also a good marketing tool to improve overall performance. It is not advisable for online video providers to promote several popular TV series on the same update day. Inter-period accumulation is a feasible forecasting tool to predict the future trend of the on-demand streaming amount

  16. Modeling the role of diffusion coefficients on Turing instability in a reaction-diffusion prey-predator system.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, B; Bhattacharyya, R

    2006-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the effect of variable dispersal rates on Turing instability of a non-Lotka-Volterra reaction-diffusion system. In ecological applications, the dispersal rates of different species tends to oscillate in time. This oscillation is modeled by temporal variation in the diffusion coefficient with large as well as small periodicity. The case of large periodicity is analyzed using the theory of Floquet multipliers and that of the small periodicity by using Hill's equation. The effect of such variation on the resulting Turing space is studied. A comparative analysis of the Turing spaces with constant diffusivity and variable diffusivities is performed. Numerical simulations are carried out to support analytical findings.

  17. The dependence of gamma-ray burst X-ray column densities on the model for Galactic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcodia, R.; Campana, S.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-05-01

    We study the X-ray absorption of a complete sample of 99 bright Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In recent years, a strong correlation has been found between the intrinsic X-ray absorbing column density (NH(z)) and the redshift. This absorption excess in high-z GRBs is now thought to be due to the overlooked contribution of the absorption along the intergalactic medium (IGM), by means of both intervening objects and the diffuse warm-hot intergalactic medium along the line of sight. In this work we neglect the absorption along the IGM, because our purpose is to study the eventual effect of a radical change in the Galactic absorption model on the NH(z) distribution. Therefore, we derive the intrinsic absorbing column densities using two different Galactic absorption models: the Leiden Argentine Bonn HI survey and the more recent model that includes molecular hydrogen. We find that if, on the one hand, the new Galactic model considerably affects the single column density values, on the other hand, there is no drastic change in the distribution as a whole. It becomes clear that the contribution of Galactic column densities alone, no matter how improved, is not sufficient to change the observed general trend and it has to be considered as a second order correction. The cosmological increase of NH(z) as a function of redshift persists and, to explain the observed distribution, it is necessary to include the contribution of both the diffuse intergalactic medium and the intervening systems along the line of sight of the GRBs.

  18. DIFFUSE EMISSION MEASUREMENT WITH THE SPECTROMETER ON INTEGRAL AS AN INDIRECT PROBE OF COSMIC-RAY ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, Laurent; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Roques, Jean-Pierre; Strong, Andrew W.; Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2011-09-20

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the diffuse Galactic hard X-ray continuum emission using data from the INTEGRAL observatory. The diffuse hard power-law component seen with the SPectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) has been identified with inverse-Compton emission from relativistic (GeV) electrons on the cosmic microwave background and Galactic interstellar radiation field. In the present analysis, SPI data from 2003 to 2009, with a total exposure time of {approx}10{sup 8} s, are used to derive the Galactic ridge hard X-ray spatial distribution and spectrum between 20 keV and 2.4 MeV. Both are consistent with predictions from the GALPROP code. The good agreement between measured and predicted emission from keV to GeV energies suggests that the correct production mechanisms have been identified. We discuss the potential of the SPI data to provide an indirect probe of the interstellar cosmic-ray electron distribution, in particular for energies below a few GeV.

  19. Testing astrophysical models for the PAMELA positron excess with cosmic ray nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2009-08-21

    The excess in the positron fraction measured by PAMELA has been interpreted as due to annihilation or decay of dark matter in the Galaxy. More prosaically it has been ascribed to direct production of positrons by nearby pulsars or due to pion production during diffusive shock acceleration of hadronic cosmic rays in nearby sources. We point out that measurements of secondary cosmic ray nuclei can discriminate between these possibilities. New data on the titanium-to-iron ratio support the hadronic source model above and enable a prediction for the boron-to-carbon ratio at energies above 100 GeV.

  20. An intravoxel oriented flow model for diffusion-weighted imaging of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Fabian; Bock, Maximilian; Neubauer, Henning; Veldhoen, Simon; Wech, Tobias; Bley, Thorsten Alexander; Köstler, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    By combining intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) we introduce a new diffusion model called intravoxel oriented flow (IVOF) that accounts for anisotropy of diffusion and the flow-related signal. An IVOF model using a simplified apparent flow fraction tensor (IVOFf ) is applied to diffusion-weighted imaging of human kidneys. The kidneys of 13 healthy volunteers were examined on a 3 T scanner. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with six b values between 0 and 800 s/mm(2) and 30 diffusion directions. Diffusivity and flow fraction were calculated for different diffusion models. The Akaike information criterion was used to compare the model fit of the proposed IVOFf model to IVIM and DTI. In the majority of voxels the proposed IVOFf model with a simplified apparent flow fraction tensor performs better than IVIM and DTI. Mean diffusivity is significantly higher in DTI compared with models that account for the flow-related signal. The fractional anisotropy of diffusion is significantly reduced when flow fraction is considered to be anisotropic. Anisotropy of the apparent flow fraction tensor is significantly higher in the renal medulla than in the cortex region. The IVOFf model describes diffusion-weighted data in the human kidney more accurately than IVIM or DTI. The apparent flow fraction in the kidney proved to be anisotropic.

  1. Mechanism of diffusive transport in molecular spider models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Oleg; Olah, Mark J.; Stefanovic, Darko

    2011-02-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule chemistry have led to designs for artificial multipedal walkers that follow tracks of chemicals. We investigate the motion of a class of walkers, called molecular spiders, which consist of a rigid chemically inert body and several flexible enzymatic legs. The legs can reversibly bind to chemical substrates on a surface and through their enzymatic action convert them to products. The legs can also reversibly bind to products, but at a different rate. Antal and Krapivsky have proposed a model for molecular spider motion over regular one-dimensional lattices [T. Antal and P. L. Krapivsky, Phys. Rev. ENATUAS1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.76.021121 76, 021121 (2007).]. In the model the legs hop from site to site under constraints imposed by connection to a common body. The first time a leg visits a site, the site is an uncleaved substrate, and the leg hops from this site only once it has cleaved it into a product. This cleavage happens at a rate r<1, slower than dissociation from a product site, r=1. The effect of cleavage is to slow down the hopping rate for legs that visit a site for the first time. Along with the constraints imposed on the legs, this leads to an effective bias in the direction of unvisited sites that decreases the average time needed to visit n sites. The overall motion, however, remains diffusive in the long time limit. We have reformulated the Antal-Krapivsky model as a continuous-time Markov process and simulated many traces of this process using kinetic Monte Carlo techniques. Our simulations show a previously unpredicted transient behavior wherein spiders with small r values move superdiffusively over significant distances and times. We explain this transient period of superdiffusive behavior by describing the spider process as switching between two metastates: a diffusive state D wherein the spider moves in an unbiased manner over previously visited sites, and a boundary state B wherein the spider is on the

  2. Modeling geomagnetic storms on prompt and diffusive time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao

    The discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts in the 1958 was the first major discovery of the Space Age. There are two belts of energetic particles. The inner belt is very stable, but the outer belt is extremely variable, especially during geomagnetic storms. As the energetic particles are hazardous to spacecraft, understanding the source of these particles and their dynamic behavior driven by solar activity has great practical importance. In this thesis, the effects of magnetic storms on the evolution of the electron radiation belts, in particular the outer zone, is studied using two types of numerical simulation: radial diffusion and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) test-particle simulation. A radial diffusion code has been developed at Dartmouth, applying satellite measurements to model flux as an outer boundary condition, exploring several options for the diffusion coefficient and electron loss time. Electron phase space density is analyzed for July 2004 coronal mass ejection (CME) driven storms and March-April 2008 co-rotating interaction region (CIR) driven storms, and compared with Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite measurements within 5 degrees of the magnetic equator at L=4.16. A case study of a month-long interval in the Van Allen Probes satellite era, March 2013, confirms that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant <400~MeV/G, but peaks in phase space density observed by the ECT instrument suite at higher first invariant are not reproduced by radial transport from a source at higher L. A 3D guiding center code with plasmasheet injection is used to simulate particle motion in time-dependent MHD fields calculated from the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD code, as an extension of the Hudson et al. (2012) study of the Whole Heliosphere Interval of CIR-driven storms in March-April 2008. Direct comparison with measured fluxes at GOES show improved comparison with observations relative to

  3. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.; Firago, V. A.; Sobchuk, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions.

  4. Analytical model of diffuse reflectance spectrum of skin tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenko, S A; Kugeiko, M M; Firago, V A; Sobchuk, A N

    2014-01-31

    We have derived simple analytical expressions that enable highly accurate calculation of diffusely reflected light signals of skin in the spectral range from 450 to 800 nm at a distance from the region of delivery of exciting radiation. The expressions, taking into account the dependence of the detected signals on the refractive index, transport scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient and anisotropy factor of the medium, have been obtained in the approximation of a two-layer medium model (epidermis and dermis) for the same parameters of light scattering but different absorption coefficients of layers. Numerical experiments on the retrieval of the skin biophysical parameters from the diffuse reflectance spectra simulated by the Monte Carlo method show that commercially available fibre-optic spectrophotometers with a fixed distance between the radiation source and detector can reliably determine the concentration of bilirubin, oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin in the dermis tissues and the tissue structure parameter characterising the size of its effective scatterers. We present the examples of quantitative analysis of the experimental data, confirming the correctness of estimates of biophysical parameters of skin using the obtained analytical expressions. (biophotonics)

  5. Radiative striped wind model for gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, D.; Pe'er, A.; Lyubarsky, Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we revisit the striped wind model in which the wind is accelerated by magnetic reconnection. In our treatment, radiation is included as an independent component, and two scenarios are considered. In the first one, radiation cannot stream efficiently through the reconnection layer, while the second scenario assumes that radiation is homogeneous in the striped wind. We show how these two assumptions affect the dynamics. In particular, we find that the asymptotic radial evolution of the Lorentz factor is not strongly modified whether radiation can stream through the reconnection layer or not. On the other hand, we show that the width, density and temperature of the reconnection layer are strongly dependent on these assumptions. We then apply the model to the gamma-ray burst context and find that photons cannot diffuse efficiently through the reconnection layer below radius r_D^{Δ } ˜ 10^{10.5} cm, which is about an order of magnitude below the photospheric radius. Above r_D^{Δ }, the dynamics asymptotes to the solution of the scenario in which radiation can stream through the reconnection layer. As a result, the density of the current sheet increases sharply, providing efficient photon production by the Bremsstrahlung process which could have profound influence on the emerging spectrum. This effect might provide a solution to the soft photon problem in GRBs.

  6. Physical re-examination of parameters on a molecular collisions-based diffusion model for diffusivity prediction in polymers.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Hidenori; Tamaki, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Takeo

    2011-12-29

    Molecular collisions, which are the microscopic origin of molecular diffusive motion, are affected by both the molecular surface area and the distance between molecules. Their product can be regarded as the free space around a penetrant molecule defined as the "shell-like free volume" and can be taken as a characteristic of molecular collisions. On the basis of this notion, a new diffusion theory has been developed. The model can predict molecular diffusivity in polymeric systems using only well-defined single-component parameters of molecular volume, molecular surface area, free volume, and pre-exponential factors. By consideration of the physical description of the model, the actual body moved and which neighbor molecules are collided with are the volume and the surface area of the penetrant molecular core. In the present study, a semiempirical quantum chemical calculation was used to calculate both of these parameters. The model and the newly developed parameters offer fairly good predictive ability.

  7. BF{sub 3} PIII modeling: Implantation, amorphisation and diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Essa, Z.; Cristiano, F.; Spiegel, Y.; Boulenc, P.; Qiu, Y.; Quillec, M.; Taleb, N.; Burenkov, A.; Hackenberg, M.; Bedel-Pereira, E.; Mortet, V.; Torregrosa, Frank; Tavernier, C.

    2012-11-06

    In the race for highly doped ultra-shallow junctions (USJs) in complementary metal oxide semi-conductor (CMOS) technologies, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a promising alternative to traditional beamline implantation. Currently, no commercial technology computer aided design (TCAD) process simulator allows modeling the complete USJ fabrication process by PIII, including as-implanted dopant profiles, damage formation, dopant diffusion and activation. In this work, a full simulation of a p-type BF{sub 3} PIII USJ has been carried out. In order to investigate the various physical phenomena mentioned above, process conditions included a high energy/high dose case (10 kV, 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}), specifically designed to increase damage formation, as well as more technology relevant implant conditions (0.5 kV) for comparison. All implanted samples were annealed at different temperatures and times. As implanted profiles for both boron and fluorine in BF{sub 3} implants were modeled and compared to Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements. Amorphous/crystalline (a/c) interface depths were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and successfully simulated. Diffused profiles simulations agreed with SIMS data at low thermal budgets. A boron peak behind the a/c interface was observed in all annealed SIMS profiles for the 10 kV case, indicating boron trapping from EOR defects in this region even after high thermal budgets. TEM measurements on the annealed samples showed an end of range (EOR) defects survival behind the a/c interface, including large dislocation loops (DLs) lying on (001) plane parallel to the surface. In the last part of this work, activation simulations were compared to Hall measurements and confirmed the need to develop a (001) large BICs model.

  8. Postural control model interpretation of stabilogram diffusion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Collins and De Luca [Collins JJ. De Luca CJ (1993) Exp Brain Res 95: 308-318] introduced a new method known as stabilogram diffusion analysis that provides a quantitative statistical measure of the apparently random variations of center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories recorded during quiet upright stance in humans. This analysis generates a stabilogram diffusion function (SDF) that summarizes the mean square COP displacement as a function of the time interval between COP comparisons. SDFs have a characteristic two-part form that suggests the presence of two different control regimes: a short-term open-loop control behavior and a longer-term closed-loop behavior. This paper demonstrates that a very simple closed-loop control model of upright stance can generate realistic SDFs. The model consists of an inverted pendulum body with torque applied at the ankle joint. This torque includes a random disturbance torque and a control torque. The control torque is a function of the deviation (error signal) between the desired upright body position and the actual body position, and is generated in proportion to the error signal, the derivative of the error signal, and the integral of the error signal [i.e. a proportional, integral and derivative (PID) neural controller]. The control torque is applied with a time delay representing conduction, processing, and muscle activation delays. Variations in the PID parameters and the time delay generate variations in SDFs that mimic real experimental SDFs. This model analysis allows one to interpret experimentally observed changes in SDFs in terms of variations in neural controller and time delay parameters rather than in terms of open-loop versus closed-loop behavior.

  9. A model for the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Du, Ke-Ping; Arnone, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance (Kd) is an important parameter for ocean studies. For the vast ocean the only feasible means to get fine-scale measurements of Kd is by ocean color remote sensing. At present, values of Kd from remote sensing are estimated using empirical algorithms. Such an approach is insufficient to provide an understanding regarding the variation of Kd and contains large uncertainties in the derived values. In this study a semianalytical model for Kd is developed based on the radiative transfer equation, with values of the model parameters derived from Hydrolight simulations using the averaged particle phase function. The model is further tested with data simulated using significantly different particle phase functions, and the modeled Kd are found matching Hydrolight Kd very well (˜2% average error and ˜12% maximum error). Such a model provides an improved interpretation about the variation of Kd and a basis to more accurately determine Kd (especially using data from remote sensing).

  10. Reactor-Diffusion Models For Cartilage Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimm, Tilmann; Hentschel, H. G. E.

    2004-03-01

    In the early stages of the development of the embryonic chick limb, the sites of future skeletal elements are marked by a prepattern formed by condensations of precartilage cells. A number of different theories have been proposed as to what mechanism determines the characteristic size, shape and number of these condensations. Nevertheless, there is still little definite knowledge on this question. In this talk, we present a model of the limb based on recent experiments and additional hypotheses. In this model, it is a ``reactor-diffusion'' mechanism which gives rise to precartilage condensation. The model consists of a system of nonlinear partial differential equations which govern the spatiotemporal distribution of various types of mesenchymal cells and relevant biomolecules. These biomolecules include Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-βs), the extracellular matrix protein Fibronectin, as well as a laterally-acting inhibitor. We present the results of numerical simulations for the system of PDEs. Also addressed are preliminary results on how this PDE model can be tied in with more biologically realistic cellular automata based models.

  11. Cosmic-Ray Spectrum Approximation Model: Experimental Results and Comparison with Other Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchvarova, M.; Draganov, D.

    2013-06-01

    We discuss a model which parameterizes the cosmic-ray (CR) spectrum at different physical conditions, which include the most important effects controlling the CR intensity, like convection-diffusion and energy losses. By a suitable choice of parameters the proposed model results in two approximations: one close to a "force-field" model (describing the energy losses of CRs in the inner heliosphere) and a "convection-diffusion" equation (giving the reduction of CR intensity in the outer heliosphere). The BESS ( Balloon-borne Experiment with Superconducting Spectrometer) experimental spectra of galactic protons and helium nuclei are fitted by the model spectra. The calculation of the unknown parameters is performed using a constrained least squares method as an alternative to the standard chi-square minimization method, because the data contain not only random errors, but also systematic ones. The CR spectrum approximation (CRSA) model is compared to the Moscow State University (MSU) model and the Badhwar and O'Neill (Badhwar and O'Neill, Adv. Space. Res. 14, 749, 1994; Adv. Space Res. 17, 7, 1994) model; we show that depending on the choice of the model parameters it can be examined in the context of one of these two models. We derive a relation between the parameters of the CRSA and MSU models for rigidities above about 10 GV (drift effects are ignored) during periods of low to approximately average levels of solar activity. The drawbacks of the proposed approximation are that: i) the model parameters do not depend on rigidity and ii) the model does not take into account general trends in the variations of the heliospheric magnetic field; thus, the influence of the drift effects on the shape of the spectral curves for different magnetic field polarity swings is ignored.

  12. Assessment of non-Gaussian diffusion with singly and doubly stretched biexponential models of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) signal attenuation in prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Hall, Matt G; Bongers, Andre; Sved, Paul; Watson, Geoffrey; Bourne, Roger M

    2015-04-01

    Non-Gaussian diffusion dynamics was investigated in the two distinct water populations identified by a biexponential model of diffusion in prostate tissue. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) signal attenuation was measured ex vivo in two formalin-fixed prostates at 9.4 T with diffusion times Δ = 10, 20 and 40 ms, and b values in the range 0.017-8.2 ms/µm(2) . A conventional biexponential model was compared with models in which either the lower diffusivity component or both of the components of the biexponential were stretched. Models were compared using Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) and a leave-one-out (LOO) test of model prediction accuracy. The doubly stretched (SS) model had the highest LOO prediction accuracy and lowest AIC (highest information content) in the majority of voxels at Δ = 10 and 20 ms. The lower diffusivity stretching factor (α2 ) of the SS model was consistently lower (range ~0.3-0.9) than the higher diffusivity stretching factor (α1 , range ~0.7-1.1), indicating a high degree of diffusion heterogeneity in the lower diffusivity environment, and nearly Gaussian diffusion in the higher diffusivity environment. Stretched biexponential models demonstrate that, in prostate tissue, the two distinct water populations identified by the simple biexponential model individually exhibit non-Gaussian diffusion dynamics.

  13. NEUTRINO CONSTRAINTS TO THE DIFFUSE GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM ACCRETION SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dobardžić, A.; Prodanović, T. E-mail: prodanvc@df.uns.ac.rs

    2015-06-20

    Accretion of gas during the large-scale structure formation has been thought to give rise to shocks that can accelerate cosmic rays. This process then results in an isotropic extragalactic gamma-ray emission contributing to the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB) observed by Fermi-LAT. Unfortunately, this emission has been difficult to constrain and thus presents an uncertain foreground to any attempts to extract a potential dark matter signal. Recently, IceCube has detected high-energy isotropic neutrino flux that could be of an extragalactic origin. In general, neutrinos can be linked to gamma rays since cosmic-ray interactions produce neutral and charged pions where neutral pions decay into gamma rays, while charged pions decay to give neutrinos. By assuming that isotropic high-energy IceCube neutrinos are entirely produced by cosmic rays accelerated in accretion shocks during the process of structure formation, we obtain the strongest constraint to the gamma-ray emission from large-scale structure formation (strong) shocks and find that they can make at best ∼20% of the EGRB, corresponding to neutrino flux with spectral index α{sub ν} = 2, or ∼10% for spectral index α{sub ν} = 2.46. Since typical objects where cosmic rays are accelerated in accretion shocks are galaxy clusters, observed high-energy neutrino fluxes can then be used to determine the gamma-ray emission of a dominant cluster type and constrain acceleration efficiency, and thus probe the process of large-scale structure formation.

  14. Phase behavior and crystallogenesis under counter-diffusion conditions of the collagen-model peptide (Pro-Pro-Gly) 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Alessandro; Castagnolo, Dario; Carotenuto, Luigi; Vitagliano, Luigi; Berisio, Rita; Sorrentino, Giosué; González-Ramírez, Luis; García-Ruiz, Juan; Zagari, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Single chains of the collagen-model polypeptide with sequence (Pro-Pro-Gly) 10, hereafter referred to as (PPG) 10, aggregate to form rod-shaped triple helices. Precipitation diagrams of (PPG) 10 as a function of pH and various molecular mass poly(ethylene glycol) concentrations have been measured. These results were used to design experiments to test the quality of (PPG) 10 crystal grown on ground (in gelled and free solutions) and in space in two different facilities, the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility based on the free-interface diffusion technique and the Granada Crystallization Facility based on counter-diffusion technique. Experiments were monitored by optical microscopy on earth. X-ray diffraction analysis of the grown crystals reveals the benefit of the counter-diffusion technique.

  15. Diffuse X-ray emission from the NGC 2300 group of galaxies - Implications for dark matter and galaxy evolution in small groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulchaey, John S.; Davis, David S.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Burstein, David

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of diffuse X-ray emission from the NGC 2300 group of galaxies using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter is reported. The gas distributions is roughly symmetric and extends to a radius of at least 0.2/h(50) Mpc. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit the X-ray spectrum with a best-fit value temperature of 0.9 + -/15 or - 0.14 keV and abundance 0.06 + 0/.12 or - 0.05 solar. The assumption of gravitational confinement leads to a total mass of the group of 3.0 + 0.4 or - 0.5 x 10 exp 13 solar. Baryons can reasonably account for 4 percent of this mass, and errors could push this number not higher than 10-15 percent. This is one of the strongest pieces of evidence that dark matter dominates small groups such as this one. The intragroup medium in this system has the lowest metal abundance yet found in diffuse gas in a group or cluster.

  16. The small ice cap instability in diffusive climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    Simple climate models which invoke diffusive heat transport and ice cap albedo feedback have equilibrium solutions with no stable ice cap smaller than a radius of about 20 deg on a great circle. Attention is presently given to a solution of this phenomenon which is physically appealing. The ice-free solution has a thermal minimum, and if the minimum temperature is just above the critical value for ice formation, then the artificial addition of a patch of ice leads to a widespread depression of the temperature below the critical freezing temperature. A second stable solution will then exist whose spatial extent is determined by the range of the influence function of a point sink of heat, due to the albedo shift in the patch.

  17. A reaction-diffusion model of cytosolic hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joseph B; Langford, Troy F; Huang, Beijing K; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-01-01

    As a signaling molecule in mammalian cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determines the thiol/disulfide oxidation state of several key proteins in the cytosol. Localization is a key concept in redox signaling; the concentrations of signaling molecules within the cell are expected to vary in time and in space in manner that is essential for function. However, as a simplification, all theoretical studies of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and many experimental studies to date have treated the cytosol as a well-mixed compartment. In this work, we incorporate our previously reported reduced kinetic model of the network of reactions that metabolize hydrogen peroxide in the cytosol into a model that explicitly treats diffusion along with reaction. We modeled a bolus addition experiment, solved the model analytically, and used the resulting equations to quantify the spatiotemporal variations in intracellular H2O2 that result from this kind of perturbation to the extracellular H2O2 concentration. We predict that micromolar bolus additions of H2O2 to suspensions of HeLa cells (0.8 × 10(9)cells/l) result in increases in the intracellular concentration that are localized near the membrane. These findings challenge the assumption that intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are increased uniformly throughout the cell during bolus addition experiments and provide a theoretical basis for differing phenotypic responses of cells to intracellular versus extracellular perturbations to H2O2 levels.

  18. Stochastic fire-diffuse-fire model with realistic cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Ana; Fraiman, Daniel; Zysman, Daniel; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2010-09-01

    Living organisms use waves that propagate through excitable media to transport information. Ca2+ waves are a paradigmatic example of this type of processes. A large hierarchy of Ca2+ signals that range from localized release events to global waves has been observed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In these cells, Ca2+ release occurs trough inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) which are organized in clusters of channels located on the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. In this article we construct a stochastic model for a cluster of IP3R ’s that replicates the experimental observations reported in [D. Fraiman , Biophys. J. 90, 3897 (2006)10.1529/biophysj.105.075911]. We then couple this phenomenological cluster model with a reaction-diffusion equation, so as to have a discrete stochastic model for calcium dynamics. The model we propose describes the transition regimes between isolated release and steadily propagating waves as the IP3 concentration is increased.

  19. The Defect Diffusion Model of Glass-Forming Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontanella, John; Bendler, John; Wintersgill, Mary; Shlesinger, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The defect diffusion model (DDM) provides an explanation of many properties of glass-forming liquids. For example, it has been used to interpret dielectric relaxation (alpha and beta relaxations and the boson peak), viscosity, ionic conductivity, (including the effects of temperature and pressure) positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy data, the physical basis of fragility, scaling, the ratio of the apparent isochoric activation energy to the isobaric activation enthalpy and its relationship to monomer volume, and correlation lengths. In the model, the glass transition, Tg, occurs because of rigidity percolation. In addition the transition at TB (or TLL) is associated with mobility percolation. In the simplest form of the DDM, a supercooled liquid contains mobile single defects (MSDs) and immobile, clustered single defects (ICSDs). Consequently, dynamic heterogeneity is a natural feature of the model. If the glass transition did not intervene, all MSDs would disappear at a critical temperature Tc. In the present talk, the model will be used to comment on the change of heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient and compressibility at Tg. Work supported in part by the Office of Naval Research

  20. Random shearing direction models for isotropic turbulent diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Andrew J.

    1994-06-01

    Recently, a rigorous renormalization theory for various scalar statistics has been developed for special modes of random advection diffusion involving random shear layer velocity fields with long-range spatiotemporal correlations. New random shearing direction models for isotropic turbulent diffusion are introduced here. In these models the velocity field has the spatial second-order statistics of an arbitrary prescribed stationary incompressible isotropic random field including long-range spatial correlations with infrared divergence, but the temporal correlations have finite range. The explicit theory of renormalization for the mean and second-order statistics is developed here. With ɛ the spectral parameter, for -∞<ɛ<4 and measuring the strength of the infrared divergence of the spatial spectrum, the scalar mean statistics rigorously exhibit a phase transition from mean-field behavior for ɛ<2 to anomalous behavior for ɛ with 2<ɛ<4 as conjectured earlier by Avellaneda and the author. The universal inertial range renormalization for the second-order scalar statistics exhibits a phase transition from a covariance with a Gaussian functional form for ɛ with ɛ<2 to an explicit family with a non-Gaussian covariance for ɛ with 2<ɛ<4. These non-Gaussian distributions have tails that are broader than Gaussian as ɛ varies with 2<ɛ<4 and behave for large values like exp(- C c | x|4-ɛ), with C c an explicit constant. Also, here the attractive general principle is formulated and proved that every steady, stationary, zero-mean, isotropic, incompressible Gaussian random velocity field is well approximated by a suitable superposition of random shear layers.

  1. TeV gamma rays from the blazar H 1426+428 and the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.; Barrio, J.; Beilicke, M.; Bernlöhr, K.; Börst, H.; Bojahr, H.; Bolz, O.; Contreras, J.; Cornils, R.; Cortina, J.; Denninghoff, S.; Fonseca, V.; Girma, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Götting, N.; Heinzelmann, G.; Hermann, G.; Heusler, A.; Hofmann, W.; Horns, D.; Jung, I.; Kankanyan, R.; Kestel, M.; Kettler, J.; Kohnle, A.; Konopelko, A.; Kornmeyer, H.; Kranich, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Lampeitl, H.; Lopez, M.; Lorenz, E.; Lucarelli, F.; Magnussen, N.; Mang, O.; Meyer, H.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Ona, E.; Padilla, L.; Panter, M.; Plaga, R.; Plyasheshnikov, A.; Pühlhofer, G.; Rauterberg, G.; Röhring, A.; Rhode, W.; Robrade, J.; Rowell, G.; Sahakian, V.; Samorski, M.; Schilling, M.; Schröder, F.; Sevilla, I.; Siems, M.; Stamm, W.; Tluczykont, M.; Völk, H. J.; Wiedner, C. A.; Wittek, W.

    2002-03-01

    The detection of TeV gamma -rays from the blazar H 1426+428 at an integral flux level of (4 +/- 2stat +/- 1syst) x 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 above 1 TeV with the HEGRA imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system is reported. H 1426+428 is located at a redshift of z = 0.129, which makes it the most distant source detected in TeV gamma -rays so far. The TeV radiation is expected to be strongly absorbed by the diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA). The observed energy spectrum of TeV photons is in good agreement with an intrinsic power law spectrum of the source ~ E-1.9 corrected for DEBRA absorption. Statistical errors as well as uncertainties about the intrinsic source spectrum, however, do not permit strong statements about the density of the DEBRA infrared photon field.

  2. The diffuse X-ray spectrum from 14-200 keV as measured on OSO-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Suri, A. N.; Frost, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement of energy spectrum of the diffuse component of cosmic X-ray flux made on the OSO-5 spacecraft is described. The contributions to the total counting rate of the actively shielded X-ray detector are considered in some detail and the techniques used to eliminate the non-cosmic components are described. Positive values for the cosmic flux are obtained in seven energy channels between 14 and 200 keV and two upper limits are obtained between 200 and 254 keV. The results can be fitted by a power law spectrum. A critical comparison is made with the OSO-3 results. Conclusions show that the reported break in the energy spectrum at 40 keV is probably produced by an erroneous correction for the radioactivity induced in the detector on each passage through the intense charged particle fluxes in the South Atlantic anomaly.

  3. Protein folding dynamics: the diffusion-collision model and experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M.; Weaver, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The diffusion-collision model of protein folding is assessed. A description is given of the qualitative aspects and quantitative results of the diffusion-collision model and their relation to available experimental data. We consider alternative mechanisms for folding and point out their relationship to the diffusion-collision model. We show that the diffusion-collision model is supported by a growing body of experimental and theoretical evidence, and we outline future directions for developing the model and its applications. PMID:8003983

  4. NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models and computer programs, version 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bjorklund, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The transport and diffusion models and algorithms developed for use by NASA in predicting concentrations and dosages downwind from normal and abnormal launches of rocket vehicles are described along with the associated computer programs for use in performing the calculations. Topics discussed include: the mathematical specifications and procedures used in the Preprocessor Program to calculate rocket exhaust cloud rise, cloud dimensions, and other input parameters to the transport and diffusion models; the revised mathematical specifications for the Multilayer Diffusion Models; users' instructions for implementing the Preprocessor and Multilayer Diffusion Models Programs; and worked example problems illustrating the use of the models and computer programs.

  5. A scintillator fabricated by solid-state diffusion bonding for high spatial resolution x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameshima, Takashi; Sato, Takahiro; Kudo, Togo; Ono, Shun; Ozaki, Kyosuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-07-01

    Lens-coupled two-dimensional indirect X-ray detectors with thin-film scintillators are important for high spatial resolution X-ray imaging. To achieve high quality high-resolution images, we propose a novel fabrication method for thin-film scintillators based on solid-state diffusion bonding. Scintillators were successfully produced with thicknesses of 5, 10, and 20 μm, with a surface flatness better than λ/10. X-ray imaging performance with a point spread function of 8 μm FWHM was demonstrated with a prototype X-ray detector equipped with a 20-μm-thick scintillator, at an effective spatial sampling of 4 μm/pixel and a field of view of 2.56 x 1.92 mm2. At the request of all authors of the paper and with the agreement of the proceedings editors an updated version of this article was published on 1 September 2016. An older version of the paper was inadvertently supplied to AIP Publishing and the final version is now available.

  6. Eulerian CFD modeling and X-ray validation of non-evaporating diesel spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qingluan; Som, Sibendu; Quan, Shaoping; Pomraning, Eric; Senecal, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    This work implemented an Eulerian single-phase approach by Vallet et al. into CFD software (Convergent) for diesel spray simulations. This Eulerian approach considers liquid and gas phase as a complex mixture of a single flow with a highly variable density to describe the near nozzle dense sprays. The mean density is obtained form the Favre-averaged liquid mass fraction. Liquid mass fraction is transported with a model for the turbulent liquid diffusion flux into the gas. A mean gradient-based model is employed for the diffusion flux in this study. A non-evaporating diesel spray was measured using x-ray radiography at Argonne National Laboratory. The quantitative and time-resolved data of liquid penetration and mass distribution in the dense spray region are used to validate this approach. The different turbulence models are also used for the simulations. The comparison between the simulated results and experimental data and the turbulence model effect are discussed.

  7. Models of collective cell spreading with variable cell aspect ratio: A motivation for degenerate diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Matthew J.; Baker, Ruth E.; McCue, Scott W.

    2011-02-01

    Continuum diffusion models are often used to represent the collective motion of cell populations. Most previous studies have simply used linear diffusion to represent collective cell spreading, while others found that degenerate nonlinear diffusion provides a better match to experimental cell density profiles. In the cell modeling literature there is no guidance available with regard to which approach is more appropriate for representing the spreading of cell populations. Furthermore, there is no knowledge of particular experimental measurements that can be made to distinguish between situations where these two models are appropriate. Here we provide a link between individual-based and continuum models using a multiscale approach in which we analyze the collective motion of a population of interacting agents in a generalized lattice-based exclusion process. For round agents that occupy a single lattice site, we find that the relevant continuum description of the system is a linear diffusion equation, whereas for elongated rod-shaped agents that occupy L adjacent lattice sites we find that the relevant continuum description is connected to the porous media equation (PME). The exponent in the nonlinear diffusivity function is related to the aspect ratio of the agents. Our work provides a physical connection between modeling collective cell spreading and the use of either the linear diffusion equation or the PME to represent cell density profiles. Results suggest that when using continuum models to represent cell population spreading, we should take care to account for variations in the cell aspect ratio because different aspect ratios lead to different continuum models.

  8. Positron fraction in cosmic rays and models of cosmic-ray propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Cowsik, R.; Burch, B.

    2010-07-15

    The positron fraction observed by PAMELA and other experiments up to {approx}100 GeV is analyzed in terms of models of cosmic-ray propagation. It is shown that generically we expect the positron fraction to reach {approx}0.6 at energies of several TeV, and its energy dependence bears an intimate but subtle connection with that of the boron to carbon ratio in cosmic rays. The observed positron fraction can be fit in a model that assumes a significant fraction of the boron below {approx}10 GeV is generated through spallation of cosmic-ray nuclei in a cocoonlike region surrounding the sources, and the positrons of energy higher than a few GeV are almost exclusively generated through cosmic-ray interactions in the general interstellar medium. Such a model is consistent with the bounds on cosmic-ray anisotropies and other observations.

  9. A reaction-diffusion model for long bones growth.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Alvarado, D A; García-Aznar, J M; Doblaré, M

    2009-10-01

    Bone development is characterized by differentiation and growth of chondrocytes from the proliferation zone to the hypertrophying one. These two cellular processes are controlled by a complex signalling regulatory loop between different biochemical signals, whose production depends on the current cell density, constituting a coupled cell-chemical system. In this work, a mathematical model of the process of early bone growth is presented, extending and generalizing other earlier approaches on the same topic. A reaction-diffusion regulatory loop between two chemical factors: parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is hypothesized, where PTHrP is activated by Ihh and inhibits Ihh production. Chondrocytes proliferation and hypertrophy are described by means of population equations being both regulated by the PTHrP and Ihh concentrations. In the initial stage of bone growth, these two cellular proceses are considered to be directionally dependent, modelling the well known column cell formation, characteristic of endochondral ossification. This coupled set of equations is solved within a finite element framework, getting an estimation of the chondrocytes spatial distribution, growth of the diaphysis and formation of the epiphysis of a long bone. The results obtained are qualitatively similar to the actual physiological ones and quantitatively close to some available experimental data. Finally, this extended approach allows finding important relations between the model parameters to get stability of the physiological process and getting additional insight on the spatial and directional distribution of cells and paracrine factors.

  10. Extreme Events and Their Predictability in a Branching Diffusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielov, A.; Zaliapin, I.; Keilis-Borok, V.

    2009-05-01

    Studies in prediction of extreme events, based on real observations and numerical modeling of complex systems, suggest universal patterns of system's behavior signaling approach of an extreme event. These patterns include deviation from self-similarity, increase in background activity, clustering, and long-range correlation. In the absence of a closed theory describing critical transitions in complex systems, and with insufficient and noisy observations, numerical parameters of the patterns have to be data-fitted, creating the risk of self-deception ("With four exponents I can fit the elephant" - J. von Neumann). Here, we introduce a model which provides analytical definition of at least two parameters, intensity and deviation from self-similarity. That drastically reduces non-uniqueness of parametrization, suggesting a simple universal mechanism of premonitory patterns and natural framework for their analytical study. Major conceptual parts of the model - direct cascading or fragmentation, spatial dynamics, and external driving - are combined in a classical age-dependent multi-type branching diffusion process with immigration. A complete analytic description of the size- and space-dependent distributions of particles and their correlations is derived using the generating function approach.

  11. The dynamics of multimodal integration: The averaging diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brandon M; Gao, Juan; Koenig, Scott; Palfy, Dylan; L McClelland, James

    2017-03-08

    We combine extant theories of evidence accumulation and multi-modal integration to develop an integrated framework for modeling multimodal integration as a process that unfolds in real time. Many studies have formulated sensory processing as a dynamic process where noisy samples of evidence are accumulated until a decision is made. However, these studies are often limited to a single sensory modality. Studies of multimodal stimulus integration have focused on how best to combine different sources of information to elicit a judgment. These studies are often limited to a single time point, typically after the integration process has occurred. We address these limitations by combining the two approaches. Experimentally, we present data that allow us to study the time course of evidence accumulation within each of the visual and auditory domains as well as in a bimodal condition. Theoretically, we develop a new Averaging Diffusion Model in which the decision variable is the mean rather than the sum of evidence samples and use it as a base for comparing three alternative models of multimodal integration, allowing us to assess the optimality of this integration. The outcome reveals rich individual differences in multimodal integration: while some subjects' data are consistent with adaptive optimal integration, reweighting sources of evidence as their relative reliability changes during evidence integration, others exhibit patterns inconsistent with optimality.

  12. Background-Error Correlation Model Based on the Implicit Solution of a Diffusion Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    1 Background- Error Correlation Model Based on the Implicit Solution of a Diffusion Equation Matthew J. Carrier* and Hans Ngodock...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Background- Error Correlation Model Based on the Implicit Solution of a Diffusion Equation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...2001), which sought to model error correlations based on the explicit solution of a generalized diffusion equation. The implicit solution is

  13. Random walks models with intermediate fractional diffusion asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, Alexander I.; Utkin, Sergei G.

    2004-05-01

    Random walk process was investigated with PDF of random time intervals similar to fractional exponential law on small times and to regular exponential law on long times. Generalized fractional Kolmogorov-Feller equation was derived for such kind of process. Asymptotics of its PDF in the long time limit and for intermediate times were found. They obey standard diffusion law or fractional diffusion law respectively. Exact solutions of mentioned equations were numerically calculated, demonstrating crossover of fractional diffusion law into the linear one.

  14. Modeling of Terahertz Ray Signals for Nde Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Thompson, R. Bruce; Blackshire, James L.

    2008-02-01

    Recently, terahertz ray (T-ray) imaging has emerged as one of the most promising new techniques for NDE applications. This technique, however, is still in its early development, and requires further studies. This work explores the use of state-of-the-art computer modeling technologies to study T-ray radiation in media. A series of point source synthesis models have been developed, using both the classic Fresnel-Kirchhoff and the refined Rayleigh-Sommerfeld formulations. The flexibility of these models enables us to investigate T-ray propagation through interfaces of various geometry and morphology. That in turn allows us to simulate T-ray interaction with flaws and hence to predict the flaw responses. In this paper, we present preliminary results of simulating T-ray inspection of space shuttle's spray-on foam insulation structure. Included are comparisons with experimental data of drilled holes embedded in foam sample.

  15. Relativistic feedback models of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and gamma-ray glows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic feedback discharges, also known as dark lightning, are capable of explaining many of the observed properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and gamma-ray glows, both created within thunderstorms. During relativistic feedback discharges, the generation of energetic electrons is self-sustained via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays, resulting in very larges fluxes of energetic radiation. In addition, ionization produces large electric currents that generate LF/VLF radio emissions and eventually discharge the electric field, terminating the gamma-ray production. In this presentation, new relativistic feedback model results will be presented and compared to recent observations.

  16. HLW glass dissolution in the presence of magnesium carbonate: Diffusion cell experiment and coupled modeling of diffusion and geochemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debure, Mathieu; De Windt, Laurent; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    The influence of diffusion of reactive species in aqueous solutions on the alteration rate of borosilicate glass of nuclear interest in the presence of magnesium carbonate (hydromagnesite: 4MgCO3·Mg(OH)2·4H2O) is investigated together with the ability of coupled chemistry/transport models to simulate the processes involved. Diffusion cells in which the solids are separated by an inert stainless steel sintered filter were used to establish parameters for direct comparison with batch experiments in which solids are intimately mixed. The chemistry of the solution and solid phases was monitored over time by various analytical techniques including ICP-AES, XRD, and SEM. The primary mechanism controlling the geochemical evolution of the system remains the consumption of silicon from the glass by precipitation of magnesium silicates. The solution chemistry and the dissolution and precipitation of solid phases are correctly described by 2D modeling with the GRAAL model implemented in the HYTEC reactive transport code. The spatial symmetry of the boron concentrations in both compartments of the cells results from dissolution coupled with simple diffusion, whereas the spatial asymmetry of the silicon and magnesium concentrations is due to strong coupling between dissolution, diffusion, and precipitation of secondary phases. A sensitivity analysis on the modeling of glass alteration shows that the choice of these phases and their thermodynamic constants have only a moderate impact whereas the thickness of the filter has a greater barrier effect.

  17. Influence of diffusion on the stability of equilibria in a reaction-diffusion system modeling cholera dynamic.

    PubMed

    Capone, Florinda; De Cataldis, Valentina; De Luca, Roberta

    2015-11-01

    A reaction-diffusion system modeling cholera epidemic in a non-homogeneously mixed population is introduced. The interaction between population and toxigenic Vibrio cholerae concentration in contaminated water has been taken into account. The existence of biologically meaningful equilibria is investigated together with their linear and nonlinear stability. Using the data collected during the Haiti cholera epidemic, a numerical simulation is performed.

  18. Energy sources in gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of energy sources in models of gamma-ray bursts is examined. Special emphasis is placed on the thermonuclear flash model which has been the most developed model to date. Although there is no generally accepted model, if the site for the gamma-ray burst is on a strongly magnetized neutron star, the thermonuclear model can qualitatively explain the energetics of some, but probably not all burst events. The critical issues that may differentiate between the possible sources of energy for gamma-ray bursts are listed and briefly discussed.

  19. NuSTAR HARD X-RAY SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION. I. HARD X-RAY MORPHOLOGY AND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE DIFFUSE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Perez, Kerstin; Nynka, Melania; Zhang, Shuo; Canipe, Alicia M.; Krivonos, Roman; Tomsick, John A.; Barrière, Nicolas; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Hong, Jaesub; Ponti, Gabriele; Bauer, Franz; Alexander, David M.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Barret, Didier; Christensen, Finn E.; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; and others

    2015-12-01

    We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456–2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). NuSTAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Γ ∼ 1.3–2.3 up to ∼50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). NuSTAR detects non-thermal X-ray continuum emission spatially correlated with the 6.4 keV Fe Kα fluorescence line emission associated with two Sgr A molecular clouds: MC1 and the Bridge. Broadband X-ray spectral analysis with a Monte-Carlo based X-ray reflection model self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (∼10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Γ ∼ 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L{sub X} ≳ 10{sup 38} erg s{sup −1}. Above ∼20 keV, hard X-ray emission in the central 10 pc region around Sgr A* consists of the candidate PWN G359.95–0.04 and the CHXE, possibly resulting from an unresolved population of massive CVs with white dwarf masses M{sub WD} ∼ 0.9 M{sub ⊙}. Spectral energy distribution analysis suggests that G359.95–0.04 is likely the hard X-ray counterpart of the ultra-high gamma-ray source HESS J1745–290, strongly favoring a leptonic origin of the GC TeV emission.

  20. Diffusion Models of the Flanker Task: Discrete versus Gradual Attentional Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Corey N.; Ratcliff, Roger; Starns, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    The present study tested diffusion models of processing in the flanker task, in which participants identify a target that is flanked by items that indicate the same (congruent) or opposite response (incongruent). Single- and dual-process flanker models were implemented in a diffusion-model framework and tested against data from experiments that…

  1. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Medlin, Douglas; Zimmerman, Jonathan; Hattar, Khalid; Foiles, Stephen

    Incorporating anisotropy into thermodynamic treatments of interfaces dates back to over a century ago. For a given orientation of two abutting grains in a pure metal, depressions in the grain boundary (GB) energy may exist as a function of GB inclination, defined by the plane normal. Therefore, an initially flat GB may facet resulting in a hill-and-valley structure. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model of GB faceting that is capable of capturing anisotropic GB energies and mobilities, and accounting for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the role of each of the interface properties on the faceting behavior. As a demonstration, we consider the Σ 5 < 001 > tilt GB in iron, where faceting along the { 310 } and { 210 } planes was experimentally observed. Linear stability analysis and numerical examples highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. On the whole, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of highly anisotropic GBs in polycrystalline metals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast by counter-diffusion and preliminary X-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Maes, Dominique Crabeel, Marjolaine; Van de Weerdt, Cécile; Martial, Joseph; Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniël; Decanniere, Klaas; Vanhee, Celine; Wyns, Lode; Zegers, Ingrid

    2006-12-01

    A study on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, catalysing the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis, is presented. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either batch or hanging-drop techniques. A study is presented on the crystallization of ornithine acetyltransferase from yeast, which catalyzes the fifth step in microbial arginine synthesis. The use of the counter-diffusion technique removes the disorder present in one dimension in crystals grown by either the batch or hanging-drop techniques. This makes the difference between useless crystals and crystals that allow successful determination of the structure of the protein. The crystals belong to space group P4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 66.98, c = 427.09 Å, and a data set was collected to 2.76 Å.

  3. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David H; Lim, Hyunkyung; Li, Xiao - Lin; Gilmm, James G

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without resolving the

  4. Soft X-ray radiation due to a nanosecond diffuse discharge in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2010-02-01

    A source of soft X-rays with an effective photon energy of 9 keV and a subnanosecond pulse width is built around a gas diode filled with atmospheric-pressure air and a UAEB-150 generator. A collector placed behind a grounded mesh electrode detects an electron beam and a pulse with positive polarity, the latter being due to an electric field surrounding the mesh. It is shown that the intensity of soft X-rays from the gas-diode-based source depends on the material of a massive potential anode; namely, it grows with an increase in the atomic number of the cathode material. In the case of a tantalum anode, X-ray photons with an effective energy of 9 and 17 keV contribute to the exposure dose.

  5. Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging for Silicide Diffusion Coating Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, E.R.; Havrilla, G.J.; Miller, T.C.

    2004-02-26

    Micro Xray fluorescence (MXRF) imaging is a relatively new method to map the constituent elements of a surface to a depth of tens to hundreds of microns, and at high spatial resolution, i.e., 40 to 50 microns. The feasibility of MXRF imaging is investigated as a potential NDE method to detect and characterize spalling failure of chromium disilicide diffusion coatings on Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster chambers.

  6. Testing a Dynamical Equilibrium Model of the Extraplanar Diffuse Ionized Gas in NGC 891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Erin; Zweibel, Ellen G.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Benjamin, Robert A.

    2016-12-01

    The observed scale heights of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (eDIG) layers exceed their thermal scale heights by a factor of a few in the Milky Way and other nearby edge-on disk galaxies. Here, we test a dynamical equilibrium model of the eDIG layer in NGC 891, where we ask whether the thermal, turbulent, magnetic field, and cosmic-ray pressure gradients are sufficient to support the layer. In optical emission-line spectroscopy from the SparsePak integral field unit on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope, the Hα emission in position-velocity space suggests that the eDIG is found in a ring between galactocentric radii of {R}\\min ≤slant R≤slant 8 {kpc}, where {R}\\min ≥slant 2 {kpc}. We find that the thermal ({σ }{th}=11 km s-1) and turbulent ({σ }{turb}=25 km s-1) velocity dispersions are insufficient to satisfy the hydrostatic equilibrium equation given an exponential electron scale height of {h}z=1.0 {kpc}. Using a literature analysis of radio continuum observations from the CHANG-ES survey, we demonstrate that the magnetic field and cosmic-ray pressure gradients are sufficient to stably support the gas at R≥slant 8 kpc if the cosmic rays are sufficiently coupled to the system ({γ }{cr}=1.45). Thus, a stable dynamical equilibrium model is viable only if the eDIG is found in a thin ring around R = 8 kpc, and nonequilibrium models such as a galactic fountain flow are of interest for further study.

  7. Recent Flash X-Ray Injector Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Blackfield, D; Burke, J; Chen, Y; Javedani, J; Paul, A C

    2004-11-10

    The injector of the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator has a significantly larger than expected beam emittance. A computer modeling effort involving three different injector design codes was undertaken to characterize the FXR injector and determine the cause of the large emittance. There were some variations between the codes, but in general the simulations were consistent and pointed towards a much smaller normalized, rms emittance (36 cm-mr) than what was measured (193 cm-mr) at the exit of the injector using a pepperpot technique. The simulations also indicated that the present diode design was robust with respect to perturbations to the nominal design. Easily detected mechanical alignment/position errors and magnet errors did not lead to appreciable increase in the simulated emittance. The physics of electron emission was not modeled by any of the codes and could be the source of increased emittance. The nominal simulation assumed uniform Child-Langmuir Law emission from the velvet cathode and no shroud emission. Simulations that looked at extreme non-uniform cathode and shroud emission scenarios resulted in doubling of the emittance. An alternative approach was to question the pepperpot measurement. Simulations of the measurement showed that the pepperpot aperture foil could double the emittance with respect to the non-disturbed beam. This leads to a diplomatic explanation of the discrepancy between predicted and measured emittance where the fault is shared. The measured value is too high due to the effect of the diagnostic on the beam and the simulations are too low because of unaccounted cathode and/or shroud emission physics. Fortunately there is a relatively simple experiment that can resolve the emittance discrepancy. If the large measured emittance value is correct, the beam envelope is emittance dominated at modest values of focusing field and beam radius. Measurements of the beam envelope on an imaging foil at the exit of the injector would lead to an

  8. A numerical study of diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, C. M.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays accelerated by the first order Fermi mechanism, by a supernova remnant shock wave, including adiabatic deceleration effects behind the front, is carried out by means of a time-dependent numerical code. The calculations apply to the adiabatic stage (or Sedov stage) of the supernova explosion, and the energetic particle spectrum is calculated in the test particle limit (i.e., the back reaction of the cosmic rays on the flow is not included). The particles are injected mono-energetically at the shock. The radial distribution, The radial distribution, and the spectrum of the accelerated and decelerated particles is shown.

  9. Perceptual decision making: drift-diffusion model is equivalent to a Bayesian model

    PubMed Central

    Bitzer, Sebastian; Park, Hame; Blankenburg, Felix; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral data obtained with perceptual decision making experiments are typically analyzed with the drift-diffusion model. This parsimonious model accumulates noisy pieces of evidence toward a decision bound to explain the accuracy and reaction times of subjects. Recently, Bayesian models have been proposed to explain how the brain extracts information from noisy input as typically presented in perceptual decision making tasks. It has long been known that the drift-diffusion model is tightly linked with such functional Bayesian models but the precise relationship of the two mechanisms was never made explicit. Using a Bayesian model, we derived the equations which relate parameter values between these models. In practice we show that this equivalence is useful when fitting multi-subject data. We further show that the Bayesian model suggests different decision variables which all predict equal responses and discuss how these may be discriminated based on neural correlates of accumulated evidence. In addition, we discuss extensions to the Bayesian model which would be difficult to derive for the drift-diffusion model. We suggest that these and other extensions may be highly useful for deriving new experiments which test novel hypotheses. PMID:24616689

  10. Cosmic ray models for early galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1994-01-01

    To better understand the early galactic production of Li, Be, and B by cosmic ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic ray models and model parameters is examined. The sensitivity of elemental and isotropic production to the cosmic ray pathlength magnitude and energy dependence, source spectrum spallation kinematics, and cross section uncertainties is studied. Changes in these model features, particularly those features related to confinement, are shown to alter the Be- and B-versus-Fe slopes from a naive quadratic relation. The implications of our results for the diffuse gamma-ray background are examined, and the role of chemical evolution and its relation to our results is noted. It is also noted that the unmeasured high energy behavior of alpha + alpha fusion can lead to effects as large as a factor of 2 in the resultant yields. Future data should enable Population II Li, Be, and B abundances to constrain cosmic ray models for the early Galaxy.

  11. Cosmic-ray models for early Galactic Lithium, Beryllium, and Boron production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1994-01-01

    To understand better the early Galactic production of Li, Be, and B by comsmic-ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic-ray models and model parameters is examined. The sensitivity of elemental and isotopic production to the cosmic-ray path length magnitude and energy dependence, source spectrum, spallation kinematics, and cross section uncertainties is studied. Changes in these model features, particularly those features related to confinement, are shown to alter the Be- and B- versus-Fe slopes from a naive quadratic relation. The implications of our results for the diffuse gamma-ray background are examined, and the role of chemical evolution and its relation to our results is noted. It is also noted that the unmeasured high-energy behavior of alpha + alpha fusion can lead to effects as large as a factor of 2 in the resultant yields. Future data should enable Population II Li, Be, and B abundances to constrain cosmic-ray models for the early Galaxy.

  12. Monte Carlo Modeling of Diffuse Scattering from Single Crystals: The Program ZMC

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, D.J.; Heerdegen, A.P.; Chan, E.J.; Welberry, T.R.

    2012-04-30

    Diffuse scattering probes the local ordering in a crystal, whereas Bragg peaks are descriptive of the average long-range ordering. The population of local configurations can be explored by modeling the three-dimensional distribution of diffuse scattering. Local configurations are not constrained by the average crystallographic symmetry, so one way of modeling diffuse scattering is by modeling a disordered (short-range-ordered) structure and then calculating its diffuse scattering. The structure must contain enough unit cells to give a statistically valid model of the populations of local configurations, and so requirements for a program to model this ordering are very different from programs that model average crystal structures (used to fit the Bragg diffraction). ZMC is a program that has been developed to model diffuse scattering, particularly from molecular crystals. The strategies used to tackle the problem and the way in which they are implemented will be discussed.

  13. Spatiotemporal Patterns Induced by Cross-Diffusion in a Three-Species Food Chain Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhan-Ping; Li, Wan-Tong; Wang, Yu-Xia

    This paper focuses on a three-species Lotka-Volterra food chain model with cross-diffusion under homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions. The known results indicate that no spatiotemporal patterns happen in the corresponding reaction-diffusion system. When some cross-diffusion terms are introduced in the system, the existence of nonconstant positive steady-states as well as the Hopf bifurcation is studied. Our result shows that cross-diffusion plays a crucial role in the formation of spatiotemporal patterns, that is, it can create not only stationary patterns but also spatially inhomogeneous periodic oscillatory patterns, which is a strong contrast to the case without cross-diffusion.

  14. Model Complexity in Diffusion Modeling: Benefits of Making the Model More Parsimonious

    PubMed Central

    Lerche, Veronika; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion model (Ratcliff, 1978) takes into account the reaction time distributions of both correct and erroneous responses from binary decision tasks. This high degree of information usage allows the estimation of different parameters mapping cognitive components such as speed of information accumulation or decision bias. For three of the four main parameters (drift rate, starting point, and non-decision time) trial-to-trial variability is allowed. We investigated the influence of these variability parameters both drawing on simulation studies and on data from an empirical test-retest study using different optimization criteria and different trial numbers. Our results suggest that less complex models (fixing intertrial variabilities of the drift rate and the starting point at zero) can improve the estimation of the psychologically most interesting parameters (drift rate, threshold separation, starting point, and non-decision time). PMID:27679585

  15. Investigation of the best model to characterize diffuse correlation spectroscopy measurements acquired directly on the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdecchia, K.; Diop, M.; St. Lawrence, K.

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) is a non-invasive optical technique capable of monitoring tissue perfusion changes, particularly in the brain. The normalized temporal intensity autocorrelation function generated by DCS is typically characterized by assuming that the movement of erythrocytes can be modeled as a Brownian diffusion-like process instead of the expected random flow model. Carp et al. [Biomedical Optics Express, 2011] proposed a hybrid model, referred to as the hydrodynamic diffusion model, to capture both the random ballistic and diffusive nature of erythrocyte motion. The purpose of this study was to compare how well the Brownian diffusion and the hydrodynamic diffusion models characterized DCS data acquired directly on the brain, avoiding the confounding effects of scalp and skull. Data were acquired from seven pigs during normocapnia (39.9 +/- 0.7 mmHg) and hypocapnia (22.1 +/- 1.6 mmHg) with the DCS fibers placed 7 mm apart, directly on the cerebral cortex. The hydrodynamic diffusion model was found to provide a consistently better fit to the autocorrelation functions compared to the Brownian diffusion model and was less sensitive to the chosen start and end time points used in the fitting. However, the decrease in cerebral blood flow from normocapnia to hypocapnia determined was similar for the two models (-42.6 +/- 8.6 % for the Brownian model and -42.2 +/- 10.2 % for the hydrodynamic model), suggesting that the latter is reasonable for monitoring flow changes.

  16. Diffuse γ-ray emission near the young massive cluster NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui-zhi; Aharonian, Felix

    2017-04-01

    We report the detailed analysis of Fermi Large Area Telescope's data towards the direction of the young massive star cluster NGC 3603. The emission shows a hard spectrum with a photon index of 2.3 ± 0.1 from 1 GeV to 250 GeV. The spatial correlation with the ionised gas indicates a hadronic origin. The total cosmic ray (CR) protons energy budget is estimated to be of the order of 1050 erg assuming the γ-rays are produced in the interaction of CRs with ambient gas. The environment and spectral features show significant similarity with the GeV emission seen from the Cygnus cocoon. The emission can be produced by a pulsar wind nebular or by the super bubble associated with the young star clusters. In the latter case, it further establishes that young star clusters may be a γ-ray source population and that they can potentially accelerate a significant fraction of the Galactic cosmic rays.

  17. Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Smith; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Barry H. Rabin

    2014-07-01

    12. Other advances in QNDE and related topics: Preferred Session Laser-ultrasonics Developing A Laser Shockwave Model For Characterizing Diffusion Bonded Interfaces 41st Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation Conference QNDE Conference July 20-25, 2014 Boise Centre 850 West Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702 James A. Smith, Jeffrey M. Lacy, Barry H. Rabin, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID ABSTRACT: The US National Nuclear Security Agency has a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) which is assigned with reducing the worldwide use of high-enriched uranium (HEU). A salient component of that initiative is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. An innovative fuel is being developed to replace HEU. The new LEU fuel is based on a monolithic fuel made from a U-Mo alloy foil encapsulated in Al-6061 cladding. In order to complete the fuel qualification process, the laser shock technique is being developed to characterize the clad-clad and fuel-clad interface strengths in fresh and irradiated fuel plates. The Laser Shockwave Technique (LST) is being investigated to characterize interface strength in fuel plates. LST is a non-contact method that uses lasers for the generation and detection of large amplitude acoustic waves to characterize interfaces in nuclear fuel plates. However the deposition of laser energy into the containment layer on specimen’s surface is intractably complex. The shock wave energy is inferred from the velocity on the backside and the depth of the impression left on the surface from the high pressure plasma pulse created by the shock laser. To help quantify the stresses and strengths at the interface, a finite element model is being developed and validated by comparing numerical and experimental results for back face velocities and front face depressions with experimental results. This paper will report on initial efforts to develop a finite element model for laser

  18. Reaction time in ankle movements: a diffusion model analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) is one of the most commonly used measures of neurological function and dysfunction. Despite the extensive studies on it, no study has ever examined the RT in the ankle. Twenty-two subjects were recruited to perform simple, 2- and 4-choice RT tasks by visually guiding a cursor inside a rectangular target with their ankle. RT did not change with spatial accuracy constraints imposed by different target widths in the direction of the movement. RT increased as a linear function of potential target stimuli, as would be predicted by Hick–Hyman law. Although the slopes of the regressions were similar, the intercept in dorsal–plantar (DP) direction was significantly smaller than the intercept in inversion–eversion (IE) direction. To explain this difference, we used a hierarchical Bayesian estimation of the Ratcliff's (Psychol Rev 85:59, 1978) diffusion model parameters and divided processing time into cognitive components. The model gave a good account of RTs, their distribution and accuracy values, and hence provided a testimony that the non-decision processing time (overlap of posterior distributions between DP and IE < 0.045), the boundary separation (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.1) and the evidence accumulation rate (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.01) components of the RT accounted for the intercept difference between DP and IE. The model also proposed that there was no systematic change in non-decision processing time or drift rate when spatial accuracy constraints were altered. The results were in agreement with the memory drum hypothesis and could be further justified neurophysiologically by the larger innervation of the muscles controlling DP movements. This study might contribute to assessing deficits in sensorimotor control of the ankle and enlighten a possible target for correction in the framework of our on-going effort to develop robotic therapeutic interventions to the ankle of children with cerebral palsy

  19. Scale heights and equivalent widths of the iron K-shell lines in the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Shigeo; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Hideki; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the analysis of the X-ray spectra of the Galactic diffuse X-ray emission (GDXE) in the Suzaku archive. The fluxes of the Fe I Kα (6.4 keV), Fe XXV Heα (6.7 keV), and Fe XXVI Lyα (6.97 keV) lines are separately determined. From the latitude distributions, we confirm that the GDXE is decomposed into the Galactic center (GCXE), the Galactic bulge (GBXE) and the Galactic ridge (GRXE) X-ray emissions. The scale heights (SHs) of the Fe XXV Heα line of the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE are determined to be ˜40, ˜310, and ˜140 pc, while those of the Fe I Kα line are ˜30, ˜160, and ˜70 pc, respectively. The mean equivalent widths (EWs) of the sum of the Fe XXV Heα and Fe XXVI Lyα lines are ˜750 eV, ˜600 eV, and ˜550 eV, while those of the Fe I Kα line are ˜150 eV, ˜60 eV, and ˜100 eV for the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE, respectively. The origin of the GBXE, GRXE, and GCXE is separately discussed based on the new results of the SHs and EWs, in comparison with those of the cataclysmic variables, active binaries and coronal active stars.

  20. A Review of the Ginzburg-Syrovatskii's Galactic Cosmic-Ray Propagation Model and its Leaky-Box Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Phenomenological models of galactic cosmic-ray propagation are based on a diffusion equation known as the Ginzburg-Syrovatskii s equation, or variants (or limits) of this equation. Its one-dimensional limit in a homogeneous volume, known as the leaky-box limit or model, is sketched here. The justification, utility, limitations, and a typical numerical implementation of the leaky-box model are examined in some detail.

  1. Comparison of non-Gaussian and Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer at 3.0 T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guangwen; Wang, Shuangshuang; Wen, Didi; Zhang, Jing; Wei, Xiaocheng; Ma, Wanling; Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Mian; Wu, Guosheng; Zhang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Water molecular diffusion in vivo tissue is much more complicated. We aimed to compare non-Gaussian diffusion models of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) including intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM), stretched-exponential model (SEM) and Gaussian diffusion model at 3.0 T MRI in patients with rectal cancer, and to determine the optimal model for investigating the water diffusion properties and characterization of rectal carcinoma. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with 16 b-values at a 3.0 T MRI system. DWI signals were fitted to the mono-exponential and non-Gaussian diffusion models (IVIM-mono, IVIM-bi and SEM) on primary tumor and adjacent normal rectal tissue. Parameters of standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow- and fast-ADC, fraction of fast ADC (f), α value and distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC) were generated and compared between the tumor and normal tissues. The SEM exhibited the best fitting results of actual DWI signal in rectal cancer and the normal rectal wall (R2 = 0.998, 0.999 respectively). The DDC achieved relatively high area under the curve (AUC = 0.980) in differentiating tumor from normal rectal wall. Non-Gaussian diffusion models could assess tissue properties more accurately than the ADC derived Gaussian diffusion model. SEM may be used as a potential optimal model for characterization of rectal cancer. PMID:27934928

  2. Y genetic data support the Neolithic demic diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Chikhi, Lounes; Nichols, Richard A; Barbujani, Guido; Beaumont, Mark A

    2002-08-20

    There still is no general agreement on the origins of the European gene pool, even though Europe has been more thoroughly investigated than any other continent. In particular, there is continuing controversy about the relative contributions of European Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers and of migrant Near Eastern Neolithic farmers, who brought agriculture to Europe. Here, we apply a statistical framework that we have developed to obtain direct estimates of the contribution of these two groups at the time they met. We analyze a large dataset of 22 binary markers from the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome (NRY), by using a genealogical likelihood-based approach. The results reveal a significantly larger genetic contribution from Neolithic farmers than did previous indirect approaches based on the distribution of haplotypes selected by using post hoc criteria. We detect a significant decrease in admixture across the entire range between the Near East and Western Europe. We also argue that local hunter-gatherers contributed less than 30% in the original settlements. This finding leads us to reject a predominantly cultural transmission of agriculture. Instead, we argue that the demic diffusion model introduced by Ammerman and Cavalli-Sforza [Ammerman, A. J. & Cavalli-Sforza, L. L. (1984) The Neolithic Transition and the Genetics of Populations in Europe (Princeton Univ. Press, Princeton)] captures the major features of this dramatic episode in European prehistory.

  3. An electrodynamics-based model for ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M; Felmy, Andrew; Gorby, Yuri

    2004-10-10

    An electrodynamics-based model was formulated for simulation of ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides. The fixed charges and electrostatic double layers that may associate with microbial polysaccharides and their effects on ion diffusion were explicitly built into the model. The model extends a common multicomponent ion diffusion formulation that is based on irreversible thermodynamics under a zero ionic charge flux condition, which is only applicable to the regions without fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. An efficient numerical procedure was presented to solve the differential equations in the model. The model well described key features of experimental observations of ion diffusion in negatively charged microbial polysaccharides including accelerated diffusive transport of cations, exclusion of anions, and increased rate of cation transport with increasing negative charge density. The simulated diffusive fluxes of cations and anions were consistent with a cation exchange diffusion concept in negatively charged polysaccharides at the interface of plant roots and soils; and the developed model allows to mathematically study such diffusion phenomena. An illustrative example was also provided to simulate dynamic behavior of ionic current during ion diffusion within a charged bacterial cell wall polysaccharide and the effects of the ionic current on the compression or expansion of the bacterial electrostatic double layer at the interface of the cell wall and bulk solution.

  4. Gamma-ray constraints on maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes and UHECR source evolution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Kalashev, Oleg; Semikoz, Dmitri V.

    2012-01-01

    The dip model assumes that the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) above 1018 eV consist exclusively of protons and is consistent with the spectrum and composition measure by HiRes. Here we present the range of cosmogenic neutrino fluxes in the dip-model which are compatible with a recent determination of the extragalactic very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray diffuse background derived from 2.5 years of Fermi/LAT data. We show that the largest fluxes predicted in the dip model would be detectable by IceCube in about 10 years of observation and are within the reach of a few years of observation with the ARA project. In the incomplete UHECR model in which protons are assumed to dominate only above 1019 eV, the cosmogenic neutrino fluxes could be a factor of 2 or 3 larger. Any fraction of heavier nuclei in the UHECR at these energies would reduce the maximum cosmogenic neutrino fluxes. We also consider here special evolution models in which the UHECR sources are assumed to have the same evolution of either the star formation rate (SFR), or the gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate, or the active galactic nuclei (AGN) rate in the Universe and found that the last two are disfavored (and in the dip model rejected) by the new VHE gamma-ray background.

  5. MODEL ATMOSPHERES FOR X-RAY BURSTING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Zachary James; Steinkirch, Marina von; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-11-21

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Also, observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Lastly, here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  6. Model Atmospheres for X-Ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Zach; von Steinkirch, Marina; Calder, Alan C.; Fontes, Christopher J.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hungerford, Aimee L.

    2016-12-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts (XRBs) are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where XRBs occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  7. Onion-shell model for cosmic ray electrons and radio synchrotron emission in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.; Voelk, H. J.; Bogdan, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    The spectrum of cosmic ray electrons, accelerated in the shock front of a supernova remnant (SNR), is calculated in the test-particle approximation using an onion-shell model. Particle diffusion within the evolving remnant is explicity taken into account. The particle spectrum becomes steeper with increasing radius as well as SNR age. Simple models of the magnetic field distribution allow a prediction of the intensity and spectrum of radio synchrotron emission and their radial variation. The agreement with existing observations is satisfactory in several SNR's but fails in other cases. Radiative cooling may be an important effect, especially in SNR's exploding in a dense interstellar medium.

  8. Quantifying the effect of tissue deformation on diffusion-weighted MRI: a mathematical model and an efficient simulation framework applied to cardiac diffusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekkaoui, Imen; Moulin, Kevin; Croisille, Pierre; Pousin, Jerome; Viallon, Magalie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac motion presents a major challenge in diffusion weighted MRI, often leading to large signal losses that necessitate repeated measurements. The diffusion process in the myocardium is difficult to investigate because of the unqualified sensitivity of diffusion measurements to cardiac motion. A rigorous mathematical formalism is introduced to quantify the effect of tissue motion in diffusion imaging. The presented mathematical model, based on the Bloch-Torrey equations, takes into account deformations according to the laws of continuum mechanics. Approximating this mathematical model by using finite elements method, numerical simulations can predict the sensitivity of the diffusion signal to cardiac motion. Different diffusion encoding schemes are considered and the diffusion weighted MR signals, computed numerically, are compared to available results in literature. Our numerical model can identify the existence of two time points in the cardiac cycle, at which the diffusion is unaffected by myocardial strain and cardiac motion. Of course, these time points depend on the type of diffusion encoding scheme. Our numerical results also show that the motion sensitivity of the diffusion sequence can be reduced by using either spin echo technique with acceleration motion compensation diffusion gradients or stimulated echo acquisition mode with unipolar and bipolar diffusion gradients.

  9. Quantifying the effect of tissue deformation on diffusion-weighted MRI: a mathematical model and an efficient simulation framework applied to cardiac diffusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Mekkaoui, Imen; Moulin, Kevin; Croisille, Pierre; Pousin, Jerome; Viallon, Magalie

    2016-08-07

    Cardiac motion presents a major challenge in diffusion weighted MRI, often leading to large signal losses that necessitate repeated measurements. The diffusion process in the myocardium is difficult to investigate because of the unqualified sensitivity of diffusion measurements to cardiac motion. A rigorous mathematical formalism is introduced to quantify the effect of tissue motion in diffusion imaging. The presented mathematical model, based on the Bloch-Torrey equations, takes into account deformations according to the laws of continuum mechanics. Approximating this mathematical model by using finite elements method, numerical simulations can predict the sensitivity of the diffusion signal to cardiac motion. Different diffusion encoding schemes are considered and the diffusion weighted MR signals, computed numerically, are compared to available results in literature. Our numerical model can identify the existence of two time points in the cardiac cycle, at which the diffusion is unaffected by myocardial strain and cardiac motion. Of course, these time points depend on the type of diffusion encoding scheme. Our numerical results also show that the motion sensitivity of the diffusion sequence can be reduced by using either spin echo technique with acceleration motion compensation diffusion gradients or stimulated echo acquisition mode with unipolar and bipolar diffusion gradients.

  10. A Numerical Model for Coupling of Neutron Diffusion and Thermomechanics in Fast Burst Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Samet Y. Kadioglu; Dana A. Knoll; Cassiano De Oliveira

    2008-11-01

    We develop a numerical model for coupling of neutron diffusion adn termomechanics in order to stimulate transient behavior of a fast burst reactor. The problem involves solving a set of non-linear different equations which approximate neutron diffusion, temperature change, and material behavior. With this equation set we will model the transition from a supercritical to subcritical state and possible mechanical vibration.

  11. Boundedness in a chemotaxis-haptotaxis model with nonlinear diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Lankeit, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with an initial-boundary value problem for the coupled chemotaxis-haptotaxis system with nonlinear diffusion under homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions in a bounded smooth domain Ω \\subset {{{R}}n} , n  =  2, 3, 4, where χ,ξ and μ are given nonnegative parameters. The diffusivity D(u) is assumed to satisfy D(u)≥slant δ {{u}m-1} for all u  >  0 with some δ >0 . It is proved that for sufficiently regular initial data global bounded solutions exist whenever m>2-\\frac{2}{n} . For the case of non-degenerate diffusion (i.e. D(0)  >  0) the solutions are classical; for the case of possibly degenerate diffusion (D(0)≥slant 0 ), the existence of bounded weak solutions is shown.

  12. Abundance constraints and direct redshift measurement of the diffuse X-ray emission from a distant cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Barcons, X.; Böhringer, H.; Fabian, A. C.; Hasinger, G.; Mainieri, V.; Brunner, H.

    2004-04-01

    We report on the XMM-Newton (XMM) observation of RX J1053.7+5735, one of the most distant X-ray selected clusters of galaxies, which also shows an unusual double-lobed X-ray morphology, indicative of a possible equal-mass cluster merger. The cluster was discovered during the ROSAT deep pointings in the direction of the Lockman Hole. All XMM Lockman Hole observations (PV, AO-1 & AO-2 phases) with the European Photon Imaging Camera (EPIC) were combined for the analysis, totaling exposure times ˜648 ks, 738 ks, and 758 ks for pn, MOS1, and MOS2, respectively. With this ``deep'' dataset, we could detect the Fe K line and obtain a strong constraint on cluster metallicity, which is difficult to achieve for clusters at z > 1. The best-fit abundance is 0.46+0.11-0.07 times the solar value. The Fe line emission also allows us to directly estimate the redshift of diffuse gas, with a value z = 1.14+0.01-0.01. This is one of the first clusters whose X-ray redshift is directly measured prior to the secure knowledge of cluster redshift by optical/NIR spectroscopy. We could also estimate the X-ray redshift separately for each of the two lobes in the double-lobed structure, and the result is consistent with the two lobes being part of one cluster system at the same redshift. Comparison with other metallicity measurements of nearby and distant clusters shows that there is little evolution in the ICM metallicity from z ˜ 1 to the present.

  13. Drift diffusion model of reward and punishment learning in schizophrenia: Modeling and experimental data.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A; Kéri, Szabolcs; Somlai, Zsuzsanna; Balsdon, Tarryn; Frydecka, Dorota; Misiak, Blazej; White, Corey

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we tested reward- and punishment learning performance using a probabilistic classification learning task in patients with schizophrenia (n=37) and healthy controls (n=48). We also fit subjects' data using a Drift Diffusion Model (DDM) of simple decisions to investigate which components of the decision process differ between patients and controls. Modeling results show between-group differences in multiple components of the decision process. Specifically, patients had slower motor/encoding time, higher response caution (favoring accuracy over speed), and a deficit in classification learning for punishment, but not reward, trials. The results suggest that patients with schizophrenia adopt a compensatory strategy of favoring accuracy over speed to improve performance, yet still show signs of a deficit in learning based on negative feedback. Our data highlights the importance of applying fitting models (particularly drift diffusion models) to behavioral data. The implications of these findings are discussed relative to theories of schizophrenia and cognitive processing.

  14. Modeling Simple Driving Tasks with a One-Boundary Diffusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, Roger; Strayer, David

    2014-01-01

    A one-boundary diffusion model was applied to the data from two experiments in which subjects were performing a simple simulated driving task. In the first experiment, the same subjects were tested on two driving tasks using a PC-based driving simulator and the psychomotor vigilance test (PVT). The diffusion model fit the response time (RT) distributions for each task and individual subject well. Model parameters were found to correlate across tasks which suggests common component processes were being tapped in the three tasks. The model was also fit to a distracted driving experiment of Cooper and Strayer (2008). Results showed that distraction altered performance by affecting the rate of evidence accumulation (drift rate) and/or increasing the boundary settings. This provides an interpretation of cognitive distraction whereby conversing on a cell phone diverts attention from the normal accumulation of information in the driving environment. PMID:24297620

  15. Modeling simple driving tasks with a one-boundary diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Roger; Strayer, David

    2014-06-01

    A one-boundary diffusion model was applied to the data from two experiments in which subjects were performing a simple simulated driving task. In the first experiment, the same subjects were tested on two driving tasks using a PC-based driving simulator and the psychomotor vigilance test. The diffusion model fit the response time distributions for each task and individual subject well. Model parameters were found to correlate across tasks, which suggests that common component processes were being tapped in the three tasks. The model was also fit to a distracted driving experiment of Cooper and Strayer (Human Factors, 50, 893-902, 2008). Results showed that distraction altered performance by affecting the rate of evidence accumulation (drift rate) and/or increasing the boundary settings. This provides an interpretation of cognitive distraction whereby conversing on a cell phone diverts attention from the normal accumulation of information in the driving environment.

  16. The development of a through-diffusion model with a parent-daughter decay chain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Lung; Wang, Tsing-Hai; Lee, Ching-Hor; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2012-09-01

    A valid performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories strongly depends on the reliability of nuclide transport parameters, including distribution and diffusion coefficients. To reduce the waste produced and time spent conducting diffusion experiments, a robust model is required to accurately interpret the experiment results. Therefore, we developed a through-diffusion model with parent-daughter nuclide decay chain. We validated our model through comparisons with the Moridis model (Moridis, 1999) and Bharat model (Bharat et al., 2009), assessing our model and these two models using the distribution of parent nuclide concentrations. This strongly supports the rationality and functionality of extending our proposed model to daughter nuclides. In this study, we derived analytical solutions for the parent nuclides of the through-diffusion experiment using the multicompartment (MC) model. We also propose a simplified formula for estimating the apparent diffusion coefficient of parent nuclides based on the analytical solutions. Through numerical experiments, we verified the feasibility of the formula. Our models are useful for determining the apparent diffusion coefficient of daughter nuclides when conducting through-diffusion experiments with parent-daughter nuclide decay chains. Additionally, the proposed models offer the advantages of saving time and reducing experimental waste.

  17. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M.A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davidkova, M.; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Mantero, A.; Nieminem, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H.N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  18. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M. A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davidkova, M.; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Mantero, A.; Nieminem, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H. N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k-d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  19. [A study of brain inner tissue water molecule self-diffusion model based on Monte Carlo simulation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhanxiong; Zhu, Shanan; Bin, He

    2010-06-01

    The study of water molecule self-diffusion process is of importance not only for getting anatomical information of brain inner tissue, but also for shedding light on the diffusion process of some medicine in brain tissue. In this paper, we summarized the self-diffusion model of water molecule in brain inner tissue, and calculated the self-diffusion coefficient based on Monte Carlo simulation under different conditions. The comparison between this result and that of Latour model showed that the two self-diffusion coefficients were getting closer when the diffusion time became longer, and that the Latour model was a long time-depended self-diffusion model.

  20. Color diffusion model for active contours - an application to skin lesion segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ivanovici, Mihai; Stoica, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Most of the existing diffusion models are defined for gray-scale images. We propose a diffusion model for color images to be used as external energy for active contours. Our diffusion model is based on the first-order moment of the correlation integral expressed using ΔE distances in the CIE Lab color space. We use a multi-scale approach for active contours, the diffusion being independently computed at various scales. We validate the model on synthetic images, including multi-fractal color textures, as well as medical images representing melanoma. We conclude that the proposed diffusion model is valid for use in skin lesion segmentation in color images using active contours.

  1. High-Energy Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction for In Situ Diffuse Scattering Studies of Bulk Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, John E.; Jo, Wook; Donner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron x-ray scattering offers a powerful technique for investigation of single-crystal material structures. Large, mm-sized crystals can be used, allowing complex in situ sample environments to be employed. Here, we demonstrate how this technique can be applied for the collection of single-crystal diffuse scattering volumes from the electro-active material 96%Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-4%BaTiO3 while electric fields are applied in situ. The data obtained allow correlation of the atomic and nanoscale structures with the observed macroscopic electro-active properties of interest. This article presents a recent study relating the nanoscale stacking fault structure in BNT-BT to the relaxor-ferroelectric nature of the material [Daniels et al. in Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 252904 (2011)], and extends this study with further experimental description and analysis.

  2. Combining the diffusion approximation and Monte Carlo modeling in analysis of diffuse reflectance spectra from human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naglič, Peter; Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Randeberg, Lise L.; Majaron, Boris

    2014-03-01

    Light propagation in highly scattering biological tissues is often treated in the so-called diffusion approximation (DA). Although the analytical solutions derived within the DA are known to be inaccurate near tissue boundaries and absorbing layers, their use in quantitative analysis of diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) is quite common. We analyze the artifacts in assessed tissue properties which occur in fitting of numerically simulated DRS with the DA solutions for a three-layer skin model. In addition, we introduce an original procedure which significantly improves the accuracy of such an inverse analysis of DRS. This procedure involves a single comparison run of a Monte Carlo (MC) numerical model, yet avoids the need to implement and run an inverse MC. This approach is tested also in analysis of experimental DRS from human skin.

  3. Ray tracing in discontinuous velocity model with implicit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxing; Yang, Qin; Meng, Xianhai; Li, Jigang

    2016-07-01

    Ray tracing in the velocity model containing complex discontinuities is still facing many challenges. The main difficulty arises from the detection of the spatial relationship between the rays and the interfaces that are usually described in non-linear parametric forms. We propose a novel model representation method that can facilitate the implementation of classical shooting-ray methods. In the representation scheme, each interface is expressed as the zero contour of a signed distance field. A multi-copy strategy is adopted to describe the volumetric properties within blocks. The implicit description of the interface makes it easier to detect the ray-interface intersection. The direct calculation of the intersection point is converted into the problem of judging the signs of a ray segment's endpoints. More importantly, the normal to the interface at the intersection point can be easily acquired according to the signed distance field of the interface. The multiple storage of the velocity property in the proximity of the interface can provide accurate and unambiguous velocity information of the intersection point. Thus, the departing ray path can be determined easily and robustly. In addition, the new representation method can describe velocity models containing very complex geological structures, such as faults, salt domes, intrusions, and pinches, without any simplification. The examples on synthetic and real models validate the robustness and accuracy of the ray tracing based on the proposed model representation scheme.

  4. Modeling Grain-Scale Diffusion Kinetics Controlling Uranium Sorption and Transport in Contaminated Sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, M. B.; Stoliker, D. L.; Johnson, K. J.; Curtis, G. P.; Kent, D. B.; Davis, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    The mobility of U(VI) in contaminated aquifers is limited by adsorption to mineral surfaces. While the chemical sorption step proceeds rapidly, the achievement of equilibrium can be kinetically limited by the diffusion of U(VI) through soil aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral coatings. The diffusion kinetics are in turn dependent on the adsorption equilibrium, due to the sorptive retardation effect that occurs within the intragranular diffusion regime. Since adsorption equilibrium is dependent on chemical conditions (e.g., pH, alkalinity, Ca concentration), diffusion of these chemical species as solution conditions change may also affect U(VI) kinetics. These coupled effects are difficult to capture in generic rate models that do not explicitly include a diffusion mechanism, particularly when the diffusion regime is heterogeneous. We present a grain-scale diffusion model for contaminated sediments from Naturita, CO and Hanford, WA, constrained by kinetic U(VI) desorption data and non-reactive tracer uptake and release measurements with tritiated water. Batch and column-scale tracer results are modeled using a multi-rate mass transfer scheme to extract intragranular diffusion parameters. These results suggest a high degree of heterogeneity in the diffusivity of the intragranular pore space, as indicated by a wide, bi/multimodal distribution of mass transfer rates. These results are used to constrain a U(VI) diffusion model with surface complexation and multicomponent diffusion that can be incorporated into field-scale reactive transport models. Preliminary results suggest that the sorptive retardation effect is significant; U(VI) batch-scale diffusion kinetics requiring hundreds to thousands of hours for equilibration appear to be controlled by intragranular pore space that requires less than 24 hours for equilibration of a non-reactive tracer.

  5. Diffusive Cosmic Ray Acceleration at Relativistic Shock Waves with Magnetostatic Turbulence II. Influence of a Finite Downstream Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antecki, T.; Schlickeiser, R.; Krakau, S.

    2016-12-01

    The diffusive acceleration of relativistic cosmic rays at parallel shock waves with magnetostatic turbulence and a finite size of the downstream medium is investigated. For ultrarelativistic shock speeds with Lorentz factor {{{Γ }}}1\\gg 1, both the differential momentum spectrum at the shock and the volume-integrated momentum spectrum are power-law distribution functions with different spectral indices as compared to the case of an infinitely extended downstream medium. However, the spectral differences are only modest as compared to the case of nonrelativistic shocks. The behavior of the momentum spectrum of shock-accelerated particles depends sensitively on the relativistic shock wave Peclet number G(p)={τ }D(p)/{τ }C, i.e., the ratio between the diffusion and convection timescales of cosmic rays to propagate from the shock position to the downstream boundary z 0. For large values of G(p)\\gg 1 the free-escape boundary has no influence on the effectiveness of particle acceleration, still providing a flat momentum power-law spectrum of the accelerated particles. In the opposite case of small Peclet numbers G(p)\\ll 1 at all momenta, the momentum spectrum at the shock steepens to the greater spectral index {ξ }0=3-s+(3.18/{{{Γ }}}1), whereas the volume-integrated momentum spectrum flattens by the same factor 2-s for its power-law spectral index, where s denotes the spectral index of the downstream power spectrum of magnetostatic turbulence. This effectiveness of relativistic shocks in generating flat power-law momentum spectra irrespective of the Peclet number G(p) differs completely from the behavior of nonrelativistic shocks.

  6. Radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers exposed to irradiation with {sup 60}Co{gamma}-ray photons

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A. E.; Boltovets, N. S.; Konakova, R. V. Milenin, V. V.; Sveshnikov, Yu. N.; Sheremet, V. N.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of ionizing radiation of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray photons in the dose range 10{sup 4}-2 x 10{sup 9} rad on metal-semiconductor Au-ZrB{sub x}-AlGaN/GaN and Au-TiB{sub x}-Al-Ti-n-GaN contacts and Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes is examined. The contacts with the TiB{sub x} and ZrB{sub x} diffusion barriers do not degrade under the effect of ionizing radiation if the dose does not exceed 10{sup 8} rad. The Au-ZrB{sub x}-n-GaN Schottky diodes remain stable in the dose range 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} rad. As the radiation dose is increased to {>=}10{sup 8} rad, the damage to the contact metallization increases and is accompanied by formation of through pores, which is conducive to accumulation of oxygen at the Au-ZrB{sub x}(TiB{sub x}) interfaces and to an increase in mass transport of atoms in contact-forming layers. In this case, irradiation-caused degradation of the Schottky diodes is observed. Possible mechanisms of radiation damage of contact structures with diffusion barriers are analyzed.

  7. Synchrotron X ray induced axonal transections in the brain of rats assessed by high-field diffusion tensor imaging tractography.

    PubMed

    Serduc, Raphaël; Bouchet, Audrey; Pouyatos, Benoît; Renaud, Luc; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Le Duc, Géraldine; Laissue, Jean A; Bartzsch, Stefan; Coquery, Nicolas; van de Looij, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    Since approximately two thirds of epileptic patients are non-eligible for surgery, local axonal fiber transections might be of particular interest for them. Micrometer to millimeter wide synchrotron-generated X-ray beamlets produced by spatial fractionation of the main beam could generate such fiber disruptions non-invasively. The aim of this work was to optimize irradiation parameters for the induction of fiber transections in the rat brain white matter by exposure to such beamlets. For this purpose, we irradiated cortex and external capsule of normal rats in the antero-posterior direction with a 4 mm×4 mm array of 25 to 1000 µm wide beamlets and entrance doses of 150 Gy to 500 Gy. Axonal fiber responses were assessed with diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography; myelin fibers were examined histopathologically. Our study suggests that high radiation doses (500 Gy) are required to interrupt axons and myelin sheaths. However, a radiation dose of 500 Gy delivered by wide minibeams (1000 µm) induced macroscopic brain damage, depicted by a massive loss of matter in fiber tractography maps. With the same radiation dose, the damage induced by thinner microbeams (50 to 100 µm) was limited to their paths. No macroscopic necrosis was observed in the irradiated target while overt transections of myelin were detected histopathologically. Diffusivity values were found to be significantly reduced. A radiation dose ≤ 500 Gy associated with a beamlet size of < 50 µm did not cause visible transections, neither on diffusion maps nor on sections stained for myelin. We conclude that a peak dose of 500 Gy combined with a microbeam width of 100 µm optimally induced axonal transections in the white matter of the brain.

  8. Origin of the Galactic Diffuse X-Ray Emission: Iron K-shell Line Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Uchiyama, Hideki; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Koyama, Katsuji

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports detailed K-shell line profiles of iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) of the Galactic Center X-ray Emission (GCXE), Galactic Bulge X-ray Emission (GBXE), Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE), magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs), non-magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (non-mCVs), and coronally Active Binaries (ABs). For the study of the origin of the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE, the spectral analysis is focused on equivalent widths of the Fe i-Kα, Fe xxv-Heα, and Fe xxvi-Lyα lines. The global spectrum of the GBXE is reproduced by a combination of the mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs spectra. On the other hand, the GRXE spectrum shows significant data excesses at the Fe i-Kα and Fe xxv-Heα line energies. This means that additional components other than mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs are required, which have symbiotic phenomena of cold gas and very high-temperature plasma. The GCXE spectrum shows larger excesses than those found in the GRXE spectrum at all the K-shell lines of iron and nickel. Among them the largest ones are the Fe i-Kα, Fe xxv-Heα, Fe xxvi-Lyα, and Fe xxvi-Lyβ lines. Together with the fact that the scale heights of the Fe i-Kα, Fe xxv-Heα, and Fe xxvi-Lyα lines are similar to that of the central molecular zone (CMZ), the excess components would be related to high-energy activity in the extreme envelopment of the CMZ.

  9. Radiative Striped Wind Model for Gamma-Ray Busrts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bégué, D. P.; Pe'er, A.; Lyubarski, Y.

    2016-10-01

    I will show how the inclusion of radiation in the striped wind model changes the dynamics and the radial evolution of the hydrodynamical parameters. I will conclude by discussing the implications for gamma-ray bursts.

  10. Model for radon diffusion through the lunar regolith.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, L. J.; Heymann, D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a model for radon diffusion through the lunar regolith in which the atom migrates by random walk. The regolith is represented by a system of randomly oriented baffles in which the mean distance which the atom travels between two collisions takes on the role of a mean free path. The effective mean time between two collisions depends on two entities: the actual mean time-of-flight and the mean sticking time on grain surfaces for one collision. The latter depends strongly on the temperature and the heat of adsorption of radon on regolith materials. Both the mean free path as well as the heat of adsorption are either poorly known or unknown for the lunar regolith; hence these quantities are treated as free parameters. Because of the greatly different mean lifetimes against radioactive decay of Rn219, Rn220, and Rn222, the regolith acts as a powerful 'filter' for these species. Rn222 escape is significant (32%) even for a mean free path of 1 micron, a heat of adsorption of 7.0 kcal/mole and a regolith depth of 4 m. Calculations of radon escape from a 4 m thick regolith, using mean free paths of 1, 10, and 80 microns and heats of adsorption of 4.0, 5.2, and 7.0 kcal/mole show that the Rn222/Rn220 escape ratio can be as small as 7.7 and as large as, or larger than 47. The small value of 7.7 is of particular interest, because it is nearly equal to the escape ratio inferred by Turkevich et al. (1970) from their Surveyor 5 results.

  11. Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion models for transport in semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    De Falco, Carlo; Gatti, Emilio; Lacaita, Andrea L.; Sacco, Riccardo . E-mail: riccardo.sacco@mate.polimi.it

    2005-04-10

    In this paper, we propose a unified framework for Quantum-corrected drift-diffusion (QCDD) models in nanoscale semiconductor device simulation. QCDD models are presented as a suitable generalization of the classical drift-diffusion (DD) system, each particular model being identified by the constitutive relation for the quantum-correction to the electric potential. We examine two special, and relevant, examples of QCDD models; the first one is the modified DD model named Schroedinger-Poisson-drift-diffusion, and the second one is the quantum-drift-diffusion (QDD) model. For the decoupled solution of the two models, we introduce a functional iteration technique that extends the classical Gummel algorithm widely used in the iterative solution of the DD system. We discuss the finite element discretization of the various differential subsystems, with special emphasis on their stability properties, and illustrate the performance of the proposed algorithms and models on the numerical simulation of nanoscale devices in two spatial dimensions.

  12. Wolter X-Ray Microscope Computed Tomography Ray-Trace Model with Preliminary Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J A

    2006-02-27

    It is proposed to build a Wolter X-ray Microscope Computed Tomography System in order to characterize objects to sub-micrometer resolution. Wolter Optics Systems use hyperbolic, elliptical, and/or parabolic mirrors to reflect x-rays in order to focus or magnify an image. Wolter Optics have been used as telescopes and as microscopes. As microscopes they have been used for a number of purposes such as measuring emission x-rays and x-ray fluoresce of thin biological samples. Standard Computed Tomography (CT) Systems use 2D radiographic images, from a series of rotational angles, acquired by passing x-rays through an object to reconstruct a 3D image of the object. The x-ray paths in a Wolter X-ray Microscope will be considerably different than those of a standard CT system. There is little information about the 2D radiographic images that can be expected from such a system. There are questions about the quality, resolution and focusing range of an image created with such a system. It is not known whether characterization information can be obtained from these images and whether these 2D images can be reconstructed to 3D images of the object. A code has been developed to model the 2D radiographic image created by an object in a Wolter X-ray Microscope. This code simply follows the x-ray through the object and optics. There is no modeling at this point of other effects, such as scattering, reflection losses etc. Any object, of appropriate size, can be used in the model code. A series of simulations using a number of different objects was run to study the effects of the optics. The next step will be to use this model to reconstruct an object from the simulated data. Funding for the project ended before this goal could be accomplished. The following documentation includes: (1) background information on current X-ray imaging systems, (2) background on Wolter Optics, (3) description of the Wolter System being used, (4) purpose, limitations and development of the modeling

  13. A lattice Boltzmann model for noble gas diffusion in solids: The importance of domain shape and diffusive anisotropy and implications for thermochronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Cassata, William S.; Renne, Paul R.

    2011-04-01

    Thermochronometry based on radiogenic noble gases is critically dependent upon accurate knowledge of the kinetics of diffusion. With few exceptions, complex natural crystals are represented by ideal geometries such as infinite sheets, infinite cylinders, or spheres, and diffusivity is assumed to be isotropic. However, the physical boundaries of crystals generally do not conform to ideal geometries and diffusion within some crystals is known to be anisotropic. Our failure to incorporate such complexities into diffusive models leads to inaccuracies in both thermal histories and diffusion parameters calculated from fractional release data. To address these shortcomings we developed a code based on the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method to model diffusion from complex 3D geometries having isotropic, temperature-independent anisotropic, and temperature-dependent anisotropic diffusivity. In this paper we outline the theoretical basis for the LB code and highlight several advantages of this model relative to more traditional finite difference approaches. The LB code, along with existing analytical solutions for diffusion from simple geometries, is used to investigate the affect of intrinsic crystallographic features (e.g., crystal topology and diffusion anisotropy) on calculated diffusion parameters and a novel method for approximating thermal histories from crystals with complex topologies and diffusive anisotropy is presented.

  14. An Electrodynamics-Based Model for Ion Diffusion in Microbial Polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2004-08-03

    An electrodynamics-based model was formulated for simulation of ion diffusion in microbial polysaccharides with fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. The model extends a common multicomponent ion diffusion model that is based on irreversible thermodynamics under a zero ionic charge flux condition, which is only applicable to the regions without fixed charges and electrostatic double layers. An efficient numerical procedure was presented to solve the differential equations in the model. The model well described key features of experimental observations of ion diffusion in negatively charged microbial polysaccharides including accelerated diffusive transport of cations, exclusion of anions, and increased rate of cation transport with increasing negative charge density. The simulated diffusive fluxes of cations and anions were consistent with a classic exchange diffusion concept in negatively charged polysaccharides at the interface of plant roots and soils; and the developed model allows to mathematically study such diffusion phenomena. Numerical simulations also showed that ion diffusive transport within a bacterial cell wall polysaccharide may induce an ionic current that compresses or expands the bacterial electrostatic double layer at the interface of the cell wall and bulk solution.

  15. MARX: Model of AXAF Response to X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Davis, John E.; Huenemoerder, David P.; Houck, John C.; Dewey, Dan

    2013-02-01

    MARX (Model of AXAF Response to X-rays) is a suite of programs designed to enable the user to simulate the on-orbit performance of the Chandra satellite. MARX provides a detailed ray-trace simulation of how Chandra responds to a variety of astrophysical sources and can generate standard FITS events files and images as output. It contains models for the HRMA mirror system onboard Chandra as well as the HETG and LETG gratings and all focal plane detectors.

  16. Bass-SIR model for diffusion of new products in social networks.

    PubMed

    Fibich, Gadi

    2016-09-01

    We consider the diffusion of new products in social networks, where consumers who adopt the product can later "recover" and stop influencing others to adopt the product. We show that the diffusion is not described by the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model, but rather by a new model, the Bass-SIR model, which combines the Bass model for diffusion of new products with the SIR model for epidemics. The phase transition of consumers from nonadopters to adopters is described by a nonstandard Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model, in which clusters growth is limited by adopters' recovery. Therefore, diffusion in the Bass-SIR model only depends on the local structure of the social network, but not on the average distance between consumers. Consequently, unlike the SIR model, a small-worlds structure has a negligible effect on the diffusion. Moreover, unlike the SIR model, there is no threshold value above which the diffusion will peter out. Surprisingly, diffusion on scale-free networks is nearly identical to that on Cartesian ones.

  17. Bass-SIR model for diffusion of new products in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibich, Gadi

    2016-09-01

    We consider the diffusion of new products in social networks, where consumers who adopt the product can later "recover" and stop influencing others to adopt the product. We show that the diffusion is not described by the susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model, but rather by a new model, the Bass-SIR model, which combines the Bass model for diffusion of new products with the SIR model for epidemics. The phase transition of consumers from nonadopters to adopters is described by a nonstandard Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model, in which clusters growth is limited by adopters' recovery. Therefore, diffusion in the Bass-SIR model only depends on the local structure of the social network, but not on the average distance between consumers. Consequently, unlike the SIR model, a small-worlds structure has a negligible effect on the diffusion. Moreover, unlike the SIR model, there is no threshold value above which the diffusion will peter out. Surprisingly, diffusion on scale-free networks is nearly identical to that on Cartesian ones.

  18. Time-resolved transmittance: a comparison of the diffusion model approach with Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfischer, Ramona; Grosenick, Dirk; Macdonald, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    We discuss the determination of optical properties of thick scattering media from measurements of time-resolved transmittance by diffusion theory using Monte Carlo simulations as a gold standard to model photon migration. Our theoretical and experimental investigations reveal differences between calculated distributions of times of flight (DTOFs) of photons from both models which result in an overestimation of the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficient by diffusion theory which becomes larger for small scattering coefficients. By introducing a temporal shift in the DTOFs obtained with the diffusion model as additional fit parameter, the deviation in the absorption coefficient can be compensated almost completely. If the scattering medium is additionally covered by transparent layers (e.g. glass plates) the deviation between the DTOFs from both models is even larger which mainly effects the determination of the reduced scattering coefficient by diffusion theory. A temporal shift improves the accuracy of the optical properties derived by diffusion theory in this case as well.

  19. Climate stability for a Sellers-type model. [atmospheric diffusive energy balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghil, M.

    1976-01-01

    We study a diffusive energy-balance climate model governed by a nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation. Three positive steady-state solutions of this equation are found; they correspond to three possible climates of our planet: an interglacial (nearly identical to the present climate), a glacial, and a completely ice-covered earth. We consider also models similar to the main one studied, and determine the number of their steady states. All the models have albedo continuously varying with latitude and temperature, and entirely diffusive horizontal heat transfer. The diffusion is taken to be nonlinear as well as linear. We investigate the stability under small perturbations of the main model's climates. A stability criterion is derived, and its application shows that the 'present climate' and the 'deep freeze' are stable, whereas the model's glacial is unstable. A variational principle is introduced to confirm the results of this stability analysis. For a sufficient decrease in solar radiation (about 2%) the glacial and interglacial solutions disappear, leaving the ice-covered earth as the only possible climate.

  20. The Diffuse Cosmic Gamma-ray Background with SMM between 0.3 MeV and 8 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Leising, M. D.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1996-12-01

    The cosmic diffuse gamma -ray background (CGB) in the MeV region is extremely hard to measure. Some previous scintillation counter experiments have suggested a ``bump'' in the few Mev region, which was theoretically intriguing and hard to reconcile with proposed sources of the CGB in this energy region. The Solar Maximum Mission gamma -ray spectrometer (SMM/GRS) had a large field of view (140(0) FWHM) and was sensitive from 0.3 Mev to 8.5 Mev. The largest contributor to the count rate in the SMM gamma -ray detectors, after internal and Earth albedo backgrounds, was the isotropic extragalactic gamma -ray emission. To extract this spectrum, the observed count rates were fitted with a model that is the sum of: 1) the variation of the CGB count rate, 2) the variation of the Earth albedo count rate, 3) the decay of radioactivity within the instrument and spacecraft and 4) cosmic rays (prompt and delayed). The CGB term of the model is the 4pi integral of the GRS response minus the ~ 4 steradian portion blocked by the Earth. Each energy channel was fitted independently, and in the end combined to form the entire spectrum. We use a non-linear fitting program to find non-linear parameters in the model (e.g. radioactive lifetimes). Brute force chi (2) mapping was performed to locate the true global minimum in the multidimensional parameter space. We use a constrained linear fitting routine to explore the region near the global chi (2) minimum in detail. The result shows no indication of the MeV bump. Our measured spectrum is roughly consistent with a power-law of photon index -2.90+/-0.1 %_{-0.017}+{+0.032} over energies 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV with a flux of 1.32(\\pm 0.37) (photon cm^{-2} s^{-1} ster^{-1} keV^{-1}$) at 0.3 Mev. Near 1--3 MeV, this is much lower than past measurements and somewhat lower than the recent CGRO/COMPTEL measurement. We have only upper limits above 3 MeV.

  1. Time-dependent modelling of the Markarian 501 X-ray and TeV gamma-ray data taken during 1997 March and April

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, H.; Coppi, P. S.; Aharonian, F.

    2002-11-01

    If the high-energy emission from TeV blazars is produced by the Synchrotron Self-Compton (SSC) mechanism, then simultaneous X-ray and gamma-ray observations of these objects are a powerful probe of the electron (and positron) populations responsible for this emission. Understanding the emitting particle distributions and their temporal evolution in turn allows us to probe physical conditions in the inner blazar jet and test, for example, various acceleration scenarios. Furthermore, by constraining the SSC model parameters, such observations enable us to predict the intrinsic (unabsorbed) gamma-ray energy spectra of these sources, a major uncertainty in current attempts to use gamma-ray observations to constrain the intensity of the Diffuse Extragalactic Background Radiation (DEBRA) at optical/infrared wavelengths. As a next step in testing the SSC model and as a demonstration of the potential power of coordinated X-ray and gamma-ray observations, we model in detail the X-ray and gamma-ray light curves of the TeV blazar Mrk 501 during its 1997 April-May outburst with a time-dependent SSC model. Extensive, quasi-simultaneous X-ray and gamma-ray coverage exists for this period. We discuss and explore quantitatively several of the flare scenarios presented in the literature. We show that simple two-component models (with a soft, steady X-ray component plus a variable SSC component) involving substantial pre-acceleration of electrons to Lorentz factors on the order of γmin= 105 describe the data train surprisingly well. All considered models imply an emission region that is strongly out of equipartition and low radiative efficiencies (ratio between kinetic jet luminosity and comoving radiative luminosity) of 1 per-mill and less. Degeneracy in both, model variant and jet parameters, prevents us from using the time-resolved SSC calculations to tighten substantially the constraints on the amount of extragalactic gamma-ray extinction by the DEBRA in the relevant 0.5-50

  2. Modeling the flow in diffuse interface methods of solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhedar, A.; Steinbach, I.; Varnik, F.

    2015-08-01

    Fluid dynamical equations in the presence of a diffuse solid-liquid interface are investigated via a volume averaging approach. The resulting equations exhibit the same structure as the standard Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid with a constant viscosity, the effect of the solid phase fraction appearing in the drag force only. This considerably simplifies the use of the lattice Boltzmann method as a fluid dynamics solver in solidification simulations. Galilean invariance is also satisfied within this approach. Further, we investigate deviations between the diffuse and sharp interface flow profiles via both quasiexact numerical integration and lattice Boltzmann simulations. It emerges from these studies that the freedom in choosing the solid-liquid coupling parameter h provides a flexible way of optimizing the diffuse interface-flow simulations. Once h is adapted for a given spatial resolution, the simulated flow profiles reach an accuracy comparable to quasiexact numerical simulations.

  3. THE ORTHOGONAL GAMMA-RAY BURST MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Contopoulos, Ioannis; Pugliese, Daniela; Nathanail, Antonios

    2014-01-01

    We explore the analogy between a rotating magnetized black hole and an axisymmetric pulsar and derive the black hole's electromagnetic spindown after its formation in the core collapse of a supermassive star. The spindown shows two characteristic phases: an early Blandford-Znajek phase that lasts a few hundred seconds and a late pulsar-like afterglow phase that lasts much longer. During the first phase, the spindown luminosity decreases almost exponentially, whereas during the afterglow phase it decreases as t {sup –a} with 1 ≲ a ≲ 1.5. We associate our findings with long duration gamma-ray bursts and compare them with observations.

  4. Diffuse ultraviolet erythemal irradiance on inclined planes: a comparison of experimental and modeled data.

    PubMed

    Utrillas, María P; Marín, María J; Esteve, Anna R; Estellés, Victor; Tena, Fernando; Cañada, Javier; Martínez-Lozano, José A

    2009-01-01

    Values of measured and modeled diffuse UV erythemal irradiance (UVER) for all sky conditions are compared on planes inclined at 40 degrees and oriented north, south, east and west. The models used for simulating diffuse UVER are of the geometric-type, mainly the Isotropic, Klucher, Hay, Muneer, Reindl and Schauberger models. To analyze the precision of the models, some statistical estimators were used such as root mean square deviation, mean absolute deviation and mean bias deviation. It was seen that all the analyzed models reproduce adequately the diffuse UVER on the south-facing plane, with greater discrepancies for the other inclined planes. When the models are applied to cloud-free conditions, the errors obtained are higher because the anisotropy of the sky dome acquires more importance and the models do not provide the estimation of diffuse UVER accurately.

  5. Diffusion entropy and waiting time statistics of hard-x-ray solar flares.

    PubMed

    Grigolini, Paolo; Leddon, Deborah; Scafetta, Nicola

    2002-04-01

    We show at work a technique of scaling detection based on evaluating the Shannon entropy of the diffusion process obtained by converting the time series under study into trajectories. This method, called diffusion entropy, affords information that cannot be derived from the direct evaluation of waiting times. We apply this method to the analysis of the distribution of time distance tau between two nearest-neighbor solar flares. This traditional part of the analysis is based on the direct evaluation of the distribution function psi(tau), or of the probability Psi(tau), that no time distance smaller than a given tau is found. We adopt the paradigm of the inverse power-law behavior, and we focus on the determination of the inverse power index mu, without ruling out different asymptotic properties that might be revealed, at larger scales, with the help of richer statistics. We then use the DE method, with three different walking rules, and we focus on the regime of transition to scaling. This regime of transition and the value of the scaling parameter itself, delta, depends on the walking rule adopted, a property of interest to shed light on the slow process of transition from dynamics to thermodynamics often occurring under anomalous statistical conditions. With the first two rules the transition regime occurs throughout a large time interval, and the information contained in the time series is transmitted, to a great extent, to it, as well as to the scaling regime. By using the third rule, on the contrary, the same information is essentially conveyed to the scaling regime, which, in fact, emerges very quickly after a fast transition process. We show that the DE method not only causes to emerge the long-range correlation with a given mu < 3, and so a basin of attraction different from the ordinary Gaussian one, but it also reveals the presence of memory effects induced by the time dependence of the solar flare rate. When this memory is annihilated by shuffling, the

  6. EDGE: Explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, L.; den Herder, J. W.; Ohashi, T.; Amati, L.; Atteia, J. L.; Barthelmy, S.; Barbera, M.; Barret, D.; Basso, S.; Boer, M.; Borgani, S.; Boyarskiy, O.; Branchini, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Briggs, M.; Brunetti, G.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Burrows, D.; Campana, S.; Caroli, E.; Chincarini, G.; Christensen, F.; Cocchi, M.; Comastri, A.; Corsi, A.; Cotroneo, V.; Conconi, P.; Colasanti, L.; Cusumano, G.; de Rosa, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ettori, S.; Ezoe, Y.; Ferrari, L.; Feroci, M.; Finger, M.; Fishman, G.; Fujimoto, R.; Galeazzi, M.; Galli, A.; Gatti, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gendre, B.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Giommi, P.; Girardi, M.; Guzzo, L.; Haardt, F.; Hepburn, I.; Hermsen, W.; Hoevers, H.; Holland, A.; in't Zand, J.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kawahara, H.; Kawai, N.; Kaastra, J.; Kippen, M.; de Korte, P. A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kusenko, A.; Labanti, C.; Lieu, R.; Macculi, C.; Makishima, K.; Matt, G.; Mazzotta, P.; McCammon, D.; Méndez, M.; Mineo, T.; Mitchell, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Molendi, S.; Moscardini, L.; Mushotzky, R.; Natalucci, L.; Nicastro, F.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.; Paerels, F.; Page, M.; Paltani, S.; Pareschi, G.; Perinati, E.; Perola, C.; Ponman, T.; Rasmussen, A.; Roncarelli, M.; Rosati, P.; Ruchayskiy, O.; Quadrini, E.; Sakurai, I.; Salvaterra, R.; Sasaki, S.; Sato, G.; Schaye, J.; Schmitt, J.; Sciortino, S.; Shaposhnikov, M.; Shinozaki, K.; Spiga, D.; Suto, Y.; Tagliaferri, G.; Takahashi, T.; Takei, Y.; Tawara, Y.; Tozzi, P.; Tsunemi, H.; Tsuru, T.; Ubertini, P.; Ursino, E.; Viel, M.; Vink, J.; White, N.; Willingale, R.; Wijers, R.; Yoshikawa, K.; Yamasaki, N.

    2009-03-01

    How structures of various scales formed and evolved from the early Universe up to present time is a fundamental question of astrophysical cosmology. EDGE (Piro et al., 2007) will trace the cosmic history of the baryons from the early generations of massive stars by Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) explosions, through the period of galaxy cluster formation, down to the very low redshift Universe, when between a third and one half of the baryons are expected to reside in cosmic filaments undergoing gravitational collapse by dark matter (the so-called warm hot intragalactic medium). In addition EDGE, with its unprecedented capabilities, will provide key results in many important fields. These scientific goals are feasible with a medium class mission using existing technology combined with innovative instrumental and observational capabilities by: (a) observing with fast reaction Gamma-Ray Bursts with a high spectral resolution. This enables the study of their star-forming and host galaxy environments and the use of GRBs as back lights of large scale cosmological structures; (b) observing and surveying extended sources (galaxy clusters, WHIM) with high sensitivity using two wide field of view X-ray telescopes (one with a high angular resolution and the other with a high spectral resolution). The mission concept includes four main instruments: a Wide-field Spectrometer (0.1-2.2 eV) with excellent energy resolution (3 eV at 0.6 keV), a Wide-Field Imager (0.3-6 keV) with high angular resolution (HPD = 15”) constant over the full 1.4 degree field of view, and a Wide Field Monitor (8-200 keV) with a FOV of ¼ of the sky, which will trigger the fast repointing to the GRB. Extension of its energy response up to 1 MeV will be achieved with a GRB detector with no imaging capability. This mission is proposed to ESA as part of the Cosmic Vision call. We will outline the science drivers and describe in more detail the payload of this mission.

  7. Asymptotic profiles of steady states for a diffusive SIS epidemic model with mass action infection mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yixiang; Zou, Xingfu

    2016-10-01

    Mass action and standard incidence are two major infection mechanisms in modelling spread of infectious diseases. Spatial heterogeneity plays an important role in spread of infectious diseases, and hence, motivates and advocates diffusive models for disease dynamics. By analyzing a diffusive SIS model with the standard incidence infection mechanism, some recent works [2,12] have investigated the asymptotical profiles of the endemic steady state for large and small diffusion rates, and the results show that controlling the diffusion rate of the susceptible individuals can help eradicate the infection, while controlling the diffusion rate of the infectious individuals cannot. This paper aims to reveal the difference between the two infection mechanisms in a spatially heterogeneous environment. To this end, we consider a diffusive SIS model of the same structure but with the mass action infection adopted, and explore the asymptotic profiles of the endemic steady state for small and large diffusion rates. It turns out that the new model poses some new challenges due to the nonlocal term in the equilibrium problem and the unboundedness of the nonlinear term. Our results on this new model reveal some fundamental differences between the two transmission mechanisms in such spatial models, which may provide some implications on disease modelling and controls.

  8. Diffusion Dynamics and Creative Destruction in a Simple Classical Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The article explores the impact of the diffusion of new methods of production on output and employment growth and income distribution within a Classical one‐sector framework. Disequilibrium paths are studied analytically and in terms of simulations. Diffusion by differential growth affects aggregate dynamics through several channels. The analysis reveals the non‐steady nature of economic change and shows that the adaptation pattern depends both on the innovation's factor‐saving bias and on the extent of the bias, which determines the strength of the selection pressure on non‐innovators. The typology of different cases developed shows various aspects of Schumpeter's concept of creative destruction. PMID:27642192

  9. Coupled radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation model for photon migration in turbid medium with low-scattering and non-scattering regions.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Tanja; Vauhkonen, Marko; Kolehmainen, Ville; Arridge, Simon R; Kaipio, Jari P

    2005-10-21

    In this paper, a coupled radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation model is extended for light propagation in turbid medium with low-scattering and non-scattering regions. The light propagation is modelled with the radiative transfer equation in sub-domains in which the assumptions of the diffusion approximation are not valid. The diffusion approximation is used elsewhere in the domain. The two equations are coupled through their boundary conditions and they are solved simultaneously using the finite element method. The streamline diffusion modification is used to avoid the ray-effect problem in the finite element solution of the radiative transfer equation. The proposed method is tested with simulations. The results of the coupled model are compared with the finite element solutions of the radiative transfer equation and the diffusion approximation and with results of Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the coupled model can be used to describe photon migration in turbid medium with low-scattering and non-scattering regions more accurately than the conventional diffusion model.

  10. Information diffusion, Facebook clusters, and the simplicial model of social aggregation: a computational simulation of simplicial diffusers for community health interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Kerk F; Sparks, Lisa; Struppa, Daniele C; Mannucci, Mirco A; Damiano, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    By integrating the simplicial model of social aggregation with existing research on opinion leadership and diffusion networks, this article introduces the constructs of simplicial diffusers (mathematically defined as nodes embedded in simplexes; a simplex is a socially bonded cluster) and simplicial diffusing sets (mathematically defined as minimal covers of a simplicial complex; a simplicial complex is a social aggregation in which socially bonded clusters are embedded) to propose a strategic approach for information diffusion of cancer screenings as a health intervention on Facebook for community cancer prevention and control. This approach is novel in its incorporation of interpersonally bonded clusters, culturally distinct subgroups, and different united social entities that coexist within a larger community into a computational simulation to select sets of simplicial diffusers with the highest degree of information diffusion for health intervention dissemination. The unique contributions of the article also include seven propositions and five algorithmic steps for computationally modeling the simplicial model with Facebook data.

  11. Modeling of the magnetic free energy of self-diffusion in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, N.; Chang, Z.; Messina, L.; Olsson, P.; Korzhavyi, P.

    2015-11-01

    A first-principles based approach to calculating self-diffusion rates in bcc Fe is discussed with particular focus on the magnetic free energy associated with diffusion activation. First, the enthalpies and entropies of vacancy formation and migration in ferromagnetic bcc Fe are calculated from standard density functional theory methods in combination with transition state theory. Next, the shift in diffusion activation energy when going from the ferromagnetic to the paramagnetic state is estimated by averaging over random spin states. Classical and quantum mechanical Monte Carlo simulations within the Heisenberg model are used to study the effect of spin disordering on the vacancy formation and migration free energy. Finally, a quasiempirical model of the magnetic contribution to the diffusion activation free energy is applied in order to connect the current first-principles results to experimental data. The importance of the zero-point magnon energy in modeling of diffusion in bcc Fe is stressed.

  12. Constraint on dark matter annihilation with dark star formation using Fermi extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background data

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Qiang; Yue, Bin; Chen, Xuelei; Zhang, Bing E-mail: yuebin@bao.ac.cn E-mail: xuelei@cosmology.bao.ac.cn

    2011-04-01

    It has been proposed that during the formation of the first generation stars there might be a ''dark star'' phase in which the power of the star comes from dark matter annihilation. The adiabatic contraction process to form the dark star would result in a highly concentrated density profile of the host halo at the same time, which may give enhanced indirect detection signals of dark matter. In this work we investigate the extragalactic γ-ray background from dark matter annihilation with such a dark star formation scenario, and employ the isotropic γ-ray data from Fermi-LAT to constrain the model parameters of dark matter. The results suffer from large uncertainties of both the formation rate of the first generation stars and the subsequent evolution effects of the host halos of the dark stars. We find, in the most optimistic case for γ-ray production via dark matter annihilation, the expected extragalactic γ-ray flux will be enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude. In such a case, the annihilation cross section of the supersymmetric dark matter can be constrained to the thermal production level, and the leptonic dark matter model which is proposed to explain the positron/electron excesses can be well excluded. Conversely, if the positron/electron excesses are of a dark matter annihilation origin, then the early Universe environment is such that no dark star can form.

  13. Employing a Modified Diffuser Momentum Model to Simulate Ventilation of the Orion CEV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straus, John; Lewis, John F.

    2011-01-01

    The Ansys CFX CFD modeling tool was used to support the design efforts of the ventilation system for the Orion CEV. CFD modeling was used to establish the flow field within the cabin for several supply configurations. A mesh and turbulence model sensitivity study was performed before the design studies. Results were post-processed for comparison with performance requirements. Most configurations employed straight vaned diffusers to direct and throw the flow. To manage the size of the models, the diffuser vanes were not resolved. Instead, a momentum model was employed to account for the effect of the diffusers. The momentum model was tested against a separate, vane-resolved side study. Results are presented for a single diffuser configuration for a low supply flow case.

  14. A fractal derivative model for the characterization of anomalous diffusion in magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yingjie; Ye, Allen Q.; Chen, Wen; Gatto, Rodolfo G.; Colon-Perez, Luis; Mareci, Thomas H.; Magin, Richard L.

    2016-10-01

    Non-Gaussian (anomalous) diffusion is wide spread in biological tissues where its effects modulate chemical reactions and membrane transport. When viewed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), anomalous diffusion is characterized by a persistent or 'long tail' behavior in the decay of the diffusion signal. Recent MRI studies have used the fractional derivative to describe diffusion dynamics in normal and post-mortem tissue by connecting the order of the derivative with changes in tissue composition, structure and complexity. In this study we consider an alternative approach by introducing fractal time and space derivatives into Fick's second law of diffusion. This provides a more natural way to link sub-voxel tissue composition with the observed MRI diffusion signal decay following the application of a diffusion-sensitive pulse sequence. Unlike previous studies using fractional order derivatives, here the fractal derivative order is directly connected to the Hausdorff fractal dimension of the diffusion trajectory. The result is a simpler, computationally faster, and more direct way to incorporate tissue complexity and microstructure into the diffusional dynamics. Furthermore, the results are readily expressed in terms of spectral entropy, which provides a quantitative measure of the overall complexity of the heterogeneous and multi-scale structure of biological tissues. As an example, we apply this new model for the characterization of diffusion in fixed samples of the mouse brain. These results are compared with those obtained using the mono-exponential, the stretched exponential, the fractional derivative, and the diffusion kurtosis models. Overall, we find that the order of the fractal time derivative, the diffusion coefficient, and the spectral entropy are potential biomarkers to differentiate between the microstructure of white and gray matter. In addition, we note that the fractal derivative model has practical advantages over the existing models from the

  15. Solving the advection-diffusion equations in biological contexts using the cellular Potts model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Debasis; Mueller, Chris; Chen, Kun; Glazier, James A.

    2005-10-01

    The cellular Potts model (CPM) is a robust, cell-level methodology for simulation of biological tissues and morphogenesis. Both tissue physiology and morphogenesis depend on diffusion of chemical morphogens in the extra-cellular fluid or matrix (ECM). Standard diffusion solvers applied to the cellular potts model use finite difference methods on the underlying CPM lattice. However, these methods produce a diffusing field tied to the underlying lattice, which is inaccurate in many biological situations in which cell or ECM movement causes advection rapid compared to diffusion. Finite difference schemes suffer numerical instabilities solving the resulting advection-diffusion equations. To circumvent these problems we simulate advection diffusion within the framework of the CPM using off-lattice finite-difference methods. We define a set of generalized fluid particles which detach advection and diffusion from the lattice. Diffusion occurs between neighboring fluid particles by local averaging rules which approximate the Laplacian. Directed spin flips in the CPM handle the advective movement of the fluid particles. A constraint on relative velocities in the fluid explicitly accounts for fluid viscosity. We use the CPM to solve various diffusion examples including multiple instantaneous sources, continuous sources, moving sources, and different boundary geometries and conditions to validate our approximation against analytical and established numerical solutions. We also verify the CPM results for Poiseuille flow and Taylor-Aris dispersion.

  16. Diffusion within the Cytoplasm: A Mesoscale Model of Interacting Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Fabio; Tozzini, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Recent experiments carried out in the dense cytoplasm of living cells have highlighted the importance of proteome composition and nonspecific intermolecular interactions in regulating macromolecule diffusion and organization. Despite this, the dependence of diffusion-interaction on physicochemical properties such as the degree of poly-dispersity and the balance between steric repulsion and nonspecific attraction among macromolecules was not systematically addressed. In this work, we study the problem of diffusion-interaction in the bacterial cytoplasm, combining theory and experimental data to build a minimal coarse-grained representation of the cytoplasm, which also includes, for the first time to our knowledge, the nucleoid. With stochastic molecular-dynamics simulations of a virtual cytoplasm we are able to track the single biomolecule motion, sizing from 3 to 80 nm, on submillisecond-long trajecto