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Sample records for ray energy spectra

  1. Elemental composition and energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the major features of the elemental composition and energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays. The requirements for phenomenological models of cosmic ray composition and energy spectra are discussed, and possible improvements to an existing model are suggested.

  2. High-energy X-ray spectra of five sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Gerassimenko, M.; Lewin , W. H. G.

    1973-01-01

    On October 15-16, 1970, we carried out balloon X-ray observations from Australia at energies above 15 keV. We present the high-energy X-ray spectra of three sources discovered by us, GX 301-2, GX 304-1, and GX 1 + 4. The data suggest that these high-energy sources correspond to the sources 2U 1223-62, 2U 1258-61, and 2U 1728-24 respectively. We also present the spectra for two additional sources, GX 5-1 (2U 1757-25) and GX 3 + 1 (2U 1744-26). The average intensity of the highly variable source GX 301-2 was observed to be as great as Tau X-1 in the energy range 15-50 keV.

  3. On Measuring Cosmic Ray Energy Spectra with the Rapidity Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    An important goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays up to 10(exp 16) eV. This goal cannot be achieved with an ionization calorimeter because the required instrument is too massive for space flight. An alternate method will be presented. This method is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11) -10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a conceptual design for a new instrument (KLEM) will be presented. Due to its light weight, this instrument can have a large aperture enabling the direct measurement of cosmic rays to 1016 eV.

  4. The low energy spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Lamb, F. K.

    1982-01-01

    The implications of observed gamma-ray burst spectra for the physical conditions and geometries of the sources are examined. It is noted that an explanation of the continua in terms of optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung requires a relatively large area but a fairly shallow depth. On the other hand, a spectrum similar to that observed could be produced by rapid flickering of sources with less extreme geometries if each flicker emits a Comptonized thermal spectrum. Either field inhomogeneities or plasma motions are required to interpret the low energy features as cyclotron extinction. An alternative explanation is photoelectric absorption by heavy atoms; this requires a field strength high enough to make one-photon electron positron annihilation possible. Observational tests of these possibilities are proposed

  5. Use of thin ionization calorimeters for measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V.; Ormes, J. S.; Schmidt, W. K. H.

    1976-01-01

    The reliability of performing measurements of cosmic ray energy spectra with a thin ionization calorimeter was investigated. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine whether energy response fluctuations would cause measured spectra to be different from the primary spectra. First, Gaussian distributions were assumed for the calorimeter energy resolutions. The second method employed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of cascades from an isotropic flux of protons. The results show that as long as the energy resolution does not change significantly with energy, the spectral indices can be reliably determined even for sigma sub e/e = 50%. However, if the energy resolution is strongly energy dependent, the measured spectra do not reproduce the true spectra. Energy resolutions greatly improving with energy result in measured spectra that are too steep, while resolutions getting much worse with energy cause the measured spectra to be too flat.

  6. On the Energy Spectra of Individual Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailyan, B. G.; Briggs, M. S.; Cramer, E. S.; Connaughton, V.; Dwyer, J. R.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) receives enough photons from some TGFs that spectral fitting of individual TGFs is possible. Previous TGF spectral fits relied upon summing the data from many TGFs. However, this spectral analysis of individual GBM TGFs is difficult because the number of photons is only adequate and because the extreme intensity of TGFs requires the analysis to correct for spectral distortions caused by pulse pileup. For each TGF in the sample, we compare Monte Carlo simulated TGF spectra to the observed detector counts. For each comparison, the best fit intensity is found, including correcting the predicted spectrum for pulse pileup. Using likelihood, we determine which of the simulations are consistent with each TGF, thus constraining the properties (e.g., altitude, beam width, etc.) of the TGF.

  7. BATSE Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Spectra. Part 3; Low-Energy Behavior of Time-Averaged Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Matteson, J. L.; Band, D. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Meegan, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze time-averaged spectra from 86 bright gamma-ray bursts from the first 5 years of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to determine whether the lowest energy data are consistent with a standard spectra form fit to the data at all energies. The BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors have the capability to observe photons as low as 5 keV. Using the gamma-ray burst locations obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors, the Spectroscopy Detectors' low-energy response can be modeled accurately. This, together with a postlaunch calibration of the lowest energy Spectroscopy Detector discriminator channel, which can lie in the range 5-20 keV, allows spectral deconvolution over a broad energy range, approx. 5 keV to 2 MeV. The additional coverage allows us to search for evidence of excess emission, or for a deficit, below 20 keV. While no burst has a significant (greater than or equal to 3 sigma) deficit relative to a standard spectra model, we find that 12 bursts have excess low-energy emission, ranging between 1.2 and 5.8 times the model flux, that exceeds 5 sigma in significance. This is evidence for an additional low-energy spectral component in at least some bursts, or for deviations from the power-law spectral form typically used to model gamma-ray bursts at energies below 100 keV.

  8. PROPAGATION AND SOURCE ENERGY SPECTRA OF COSMIC RAY NUCLEI AT HIGH ENERGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ave, M.; Boyle, P. J.; Hoeppner, C.; Marshall, J.; Mueller, D.

    2009-05-20

    A recent measurement of the TRACER instrument on long-duration balloon has determined the individual energy spectra of the major primary cosmic ray nuclei from oxygen (Z = 8) to iron (Z = 26). The measurements cover a large range of energies and extend to energies beyond 10{sup 14} eV. We investigate if the data set can be described by a simple but plausible model for acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays. The model assumes a power-law energy spectrum at the source with a common spectral index {alpha} for all nuclear species, and an energy-dependent propagation path length ({lambda} {proportional_to} E {sup -0.6}) combined with an energy-independent residual path length {lambda}{sub 0}. We find that the data can be fitted with a fairly soft source spectrum ({alpha} = 2.3-2.4), and with a residual path length {lambda}{sub 0} as high as 0.3 g cm{sup -2}. We discuss this model in the context of other pertinent information, and we determine the relative abundances of the elements at the cosmic ray source.

  9. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  10. Monte Carlo analysis of energy dependent anisotropy of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kakonyi, Robert; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szabo, Gabor

    2009-09-15

    The energy resolved emission angle dependence of x-ray spectra was analyzed by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N particle Monte Carlo) simulator. It was shown that the spectral photon flux had a maximum at a well-defined emission angle due to the anisotropy of the bremsstrahlung process. The higher the relative photon energy, the smaller the emission angle belonging to the maximum was. The trends predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations were experimentally verified. The Monte Carlo results were compared to both the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine spectra table and the SPEKCALCV1.0 code.

  11. X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Shekhtman, L.; Sokolov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The main purpose of this work is to provide reference data on X-ray ionization yields and energy spectra in liquid Ar to the studies in the field of Cryogenic Avalanche Detectors (CRADs) for rare-event and other experiments, based on liquid Ar detectors. We present the results of two related researches. First, the X-ray recombination coefficients in the energy range of 10-1000 keV and ionization yields at different electric fields, between 0.6 and 2.3 kV/cm, are determined in liquid Ar based on the results of a dedicated experiment. Second, the energy spectra of pulsed X-rays in liquid Ar in the energy range of 15-40 keV, obtained in given experiments including that with the two-phase CRAD, are interpreted and compared to those calculated using a computer program, to correctly determine the absorbed X-ray energy. The X-ray recombination coefficients and ionization yields have for the first time been presented for liquid Ar in systematic way.

  12. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  13. Explanation of the local galactic cosmic ray energy spectra measured by Voyager 1. I. Protons

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.; Kempf, A.; Webber, W. R. E-mail: ank@tp4.rub.de

    2014-05-20

    Almost exactly 100 yr after the original discovery of cosmic rays, the V1 spacecraft has observed, for the first time, the local interstellar medium energy spectra of cosmic ray H, He, C/O nuclei at nonrelativistic kinetic energies, after leaving the heliosphere modulation region on 2012 August 25. We explain these observations by modeling the propagation of these particles in the local Galactic environment with an updated steady-state spatial diffusion model including all particle momentum losses with the local interstellar gas (Coulomb/ionization, pion production, adiabatic deceleration, and fragmentation interactions). Excellent agreement with the V1 cosmic ray H observations is obtained if the solar system resides within a spatially homogeneous layer of distributed cosmic ray sources injecting the same momentum power law ∝p {sup –s} with s = 2.24 ± 0.12. The best fit to the V1 H observations also provides an estimate of the characteristic break kinetic energy T{sub C} = 116 ± 27 MeV, representing the transition from ionization/Coulomb energy losses at low energies to pion production and adiabatic deceleration losses in a Galactic wind at high energies. As the determined value is substantially smaller than 217 MeV in the absence of adiabatic deceleration, our results prove the existence of a Galactic wind in the local Galactic environment.

  14. Impact of low-energy photons on the characteristics of prompt fission γ -ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, A.; Billnert, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on a new study of prompt γ -rays from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf . Photons were measured in coincidence with fission fragments by employing four different lanthanide halide scintillation detectors. Together with results from a previous work of ours, we determined characteristic parameters with high precision, such as the average γ -ray multiplicity ν¯γ=(8.29 ±0.13 ), the average energy per photon ɛγ=(0.80 ±0.02 ) MeV, and the total γ -ray energy release per fission Eγ ,tot=(6.65 ±0.10 ) MeV. The excellent agreement between the individual results obtained in all six measurements proves the good repeatability of the applied experimental technique. The impact of low-energy photons, i.e., below 500 keV, on prompt fission γ -ray spectra characteristics has been investigated as well by comparing our results with those taken with the DANCE detector system, which appears to suffer from absorption effects in the low-energy region. Correction factors for this effect were estimated, giving results comparable to ours as well as to historical ones. From this we demonstrate that the different techniques of determining the average γ -ray multiplicity, either from a properly measured and normalized spectrum or a measured multiplicity distribution, give equivalent and consistent results.

  15. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: implications of Auger data for source spectra and chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Aloisio, R.; Blasi, P.

    2014-10-01

    We use a kinetic-equation approach to describe the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic ray protons and nuclei and calculate the expected spectra and mass composition at the Earth for different assumptions on the source injection spectra and chemical abundances. When compared with the spectrum, the elongation rate X{sub max}(E) and dispersion σ(X{sub max}) as observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, several important consequences can be drawn: a) the injection spectra of nuclei must be very hard, ∼ E{sup -γ} with γ∼ 1- 1.6; b) the maximum energy of nuclei of charge Z in the sources must be ∼ 5Z× 10{sup 18} eV, thereby not requiring acceleration to extremely high energies; c) the fit to the Auger spectrum can be obtained only at the price of adding an ad hoc light extragalactic component with a steep injection spectrum ∼ E{sup -2.7}). In this sense, at the ankle E{sub A}≈ 5× 10{sup 18} eV) all the components are of extragalactic origin, thereby suggesting that the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays occurs below the ankle. Interestingly, the additional light extragalactic component postulated above compares well, in terms of spectrum and normalization, with the one recently measured by KASCADE-Grande.

  16. Ultra high energy cosmic rays: implications of Auger data for source spectra and chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, R.; Berezinsky, V.; Blasi, P.

    2014-10-01

    We use a kinetic-equation approach to describe the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic ray protons and nuclei and calculate the expected spectra and mass composition at the Earth for different assumptions on the source injection spectra and chemical abundances. When compared with the spectrum, the elongation rate Xmax(E) and dispersion σ(Xmax) as observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, several important consequences can be drawn: a) the injection spectra of nuclei must be very hard, ~ E-γ with γ~ 1- 1.6; b) the maximum energy of nuclei of charge Z in the sources must be ~ 5Z× 1018 eV, thereby not requiring acceleration to extremely high energies; c) the fit to the Auger spectrum can be obtained only at the price of adding an ad hoc light extragalactic component with a steep injection spectrum ~ E-2.7). In this sense, at the ankle EA≈ 5× 1018 eV) all the components are of extragalactic origin, thereby suggesting that the transition from Galactic to extragalactic cosmic rays occurs below the ankle. Interestingly, the additional light extragalactic component postulated above compares well, in terms of spectrum and normalization, with the one recently measured by KASCADE-Grande.

  17. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectra and Composition during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H..; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2013-01-01

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 <= Z <= 28 in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV / nucleon. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than approx. 7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than approx. 4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2sigma, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  18. A model of galactic cosmic rays for use in calculating linear energy transfer spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Chenette, D.; Clark, R.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Guzik, T. G.; Pyle, K. R.; Sang, Y.; Wefel, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) contain fully stripped nuclei, from Hydrogen to beyond the Iron group, accelerated to high energies and are a major component of the background radiation encountered by satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. This paper presents a GCR model which is based upon our current understanding of the astrophysics of GCR transport through interstellar and interplanetary space. The model can be used to predict the energy spectra for all stable and long-lived radioactive species from H to Ni over an energy range from 50 to 50,000 MeV/nucleon as a function of a single parameter, the solar modulation level phi. The details of this model are summarized, phi is derived for the period 1974 to present, and results from this model during the 1990/1991 Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission are presented.

  19. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2013-06-20

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  20. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  1. Detailed parametrization of neutrino and gamma-ray energy spectra from high energy proton-proton interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma rays and neutrinos are produced as a result of proton-proton interactions that occur in different astrophysical contexts. The detection of these two types of messengers is of great importance for the study of different physical phenomena, related to nonthermal processes, taking place in different astrophysical scenarios. Therefore, the knowledge of the energy spectrum of these two types of particles, as a function of the incident proton energy, is essential for the interpretation of the observational data. In this paper, parametrizations of the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, originated in proton-proton collisions, are presented. The energy range of the incident protons considered extends from 102 to 108 GeV . The parametrizations are based on Monte Carlo simulations of proton-proton interactions performed with the hadronic interaction models QGSJET-II-04 and EPOS-LHC, which have recently been updated with the data taken by the Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Light and Heavy Cosmic-Ray Mass Group Energy Spectra as Measured by the MAKET-ANI Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Gharagyozyan, G.; Hovsepyan, G.; Ghazaryan, S.; Melkumyan, L.; Vardanyan, A.

    2004-03-01

    Standard models of cosmic-ray origin link the space accelerators of our Galaxy to the supernova remnants (SNRs)-expanding shells driven by very fast blast waves, usually with gamma-ray pulsars near the morphological center. Energy spectra of fully stripped ions with charges from Z=1 to Z=26 can provide clues to the validity of the standard model. Unfortunately, smeared data from the extensive air shower experiments do not provide enough information for such ion ``spectroscopy.'' Nonetheless, the measurement of energy spectra of two or three broad mass groups (so-called light, intermediate, and heavy) will allow us to prove or disprove the ``rigidity-dependent'' acceleration. Recently, using multidimensional classification methods, the ``all-particle'' spectra from the MAKET-ANI experiment on Mount Aragats, in Armenia, was categorized into two distinct primary mass groups. We present, for the first time, the light and heavy nuclei spectra from the MAKET-ANI experiment.

  3. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Leitner, D; Benitez, J Y; Lyneis, C M; Todd, D S; Ropponen, T; Ropponen, J; Koivisto, H; Gammino, S

    2008-03-01

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency. PMID:18377002

  4. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA INTHE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd,Damon S.; Ropponen,Tommi; Ropponen,Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Gammino, Santo

    2007-11-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for Nuclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental set-up to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental set-up for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the correction for detector efficiency, the shielding of the detector and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power and heating frequency.

  5. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  6. Reconciling the light component and all-particle cosmic ray energy spectra at the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Jia, Huan-Yu; Zhu, Feng-Rong

    2015-12-01

    The knee phenomenon of the cosmic ray spectrum, which plays an important role in studying the acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays, is still an unsolved mystery. We try to reconcile the knee spectra measured by ARGO-YBJ and Tibet-III. A simple broken power-law model fails to explain the experimental data. Therefore a modified broken power-law model with non-linear acceleration effects is adopted, which can describe the sharp knee structure. This model predicts that heavy elements dominate at the knee. Supported by NSFC (11175147)

  7. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijay, Biplab; Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-09-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  8. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, Lukasz; Petrosian, Vahe; Blandford, Roger D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2011-08-19

    Recent observations of cosmic ray electrons from several instruments have revealed various degrees of deviation in the measured electron energy distribution from a simple power-law, in a form of an excess around 0.1 to 1 TeV energies. An even more prominent deviation and excess has been observed in the fraction of cosmic ray positrons around 10 and 100 GeV energies. These observations have received considerable attention and many theoretical models have been proposed to explain them. The models rely on either dark matter annihilation/decay or specific nearby astrophysical sources, and involve several additional assumptions regarding the dark matter distribution or particle acceleration. In this paper we show that the observed excesses in the electron spectrum may be easily reproduced without invoking any unusual sources other than the general diffuse Galactic components of cosmic rays. The model presented here assumes a power-law injection of electrons (and protons) by supernova remnants, and evaluates their expected energy spectrum based on a simple kinetic equation describing the propagation of charged particles in the interstellar medium. The primary physical effect involved is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. With a very reasonable choice of the model parameters characterizing the local interstellar medium, we can reproduce the most recent observations by Fermi and HESS experiments. Interestingly, in our model the injection spectral index of cosmic ray electrons becomes comparable to, or even equal to that of cosmic ray protons. The Klein-Nishina effect may also affect the propagation of the secondary e{sup {+-}} pairs, and therefore modify the cosmic ray positron-to-electron ratio. We have explored this possibility by considering two mechanisms for production of e{sup {+-}} pairs within the Galaxy. The first is due to the decay of {pi}{sup {+-}}'s produced by interaction of cosmic ray nuclei with ambient protons

  9. High Energy Cosmic Ray Electron Spectra measured from the ATIC Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) is specifically designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. From simulation and a CERN beam test exposure we find that the design consisting of a graphite target and an energy detection device, a totally active calorimeter of BGO scintillator, gives us sufficient information to distinguish electrons from protons up to the TeV energy range. Balloon observations were successfully carried out over Antarctica in both 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 for a total of more than 35 days. This paper presents preliminary results on the spectrum of high energy electrons observed in the first ATIC flight.

  10. An Instrument to Measure Elemental Energy Spectra of Cosmic Ray Nuclei Up to 10(exp 16) eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Chilingarian, A.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov,S.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Podorozhnyi, D.; Procqureur, J.

    2000-01-01

    A longstanding goal of cosmic ray research is to measure the elemental energy spectra of cosmic rays up to and through the "knee" (approx. equal to 3 x 10 (exp 15) eV. It is not currently feasible to achieve this goal with an ionization calorimeter because the mass required to be deployed in Earth orbit is very large (at least 50 tonnes). An alternative method will be presented. This is based on measuring the primary particle energy by determining the angular distribution of secondaries produced in a target layer using silicon microstrip detector technology. The proposed technique can be used over a wide range of energies (10 (exp 11)- 10 (exp 16) eV) and gives an energy resolution of 60% or better. Based on this technique, a design for a new lightweight instrument with a large aperture (KLEM) will be described.

  11. HEAO 1 A-2 low-energy detector X-ray spectra of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leahy, D. A.; Nousek, J.; Hamilton, A. J. S.

    1991-01-01

    The Lupus Loop and SN 1006 were observed by the A-2 low-energy detector proportional counters on the HEAO 1 satellite as part of the all-sky survey. As a result of a major advance in understanding of detector response and background accurate analysis of the data has become possible. Soft X-ray spectra for both supernova remnants were constructed from the PHA data taken during the scanning observations. Single-temperature and two-temperature Raymond-Smith models were fitted to the observed spectra. In addition, power-law and power-law plus one-temperature models were fitted to the spectrum of SN 1006. Only two-component models provide an adequate description for both Lupus Loop and SN 1006 spectra. The temperatures, column densities, and emission measures are significantly more accurate than previous results.

  12. HEAO 1 A-2 low-energy detector X-ray spectra of the Lupus Loop and SN 1006

    SciTech Connect

    Leahy, D.A.; Nousek, J.; Hamilton, A.J.S. Pennsylvania State University, University Park Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics, Boulder, CO )

    1991-06-01

    The Lupus Loop and SN 1006 were observed by the A-2 low-energy detector proportional counters on the HEAO 1 satellite as part of the all-sky survey. As a result of a major advance in understanding of detector response and background accurate analysis of the data has become possible. Soft X-ray spectra for both supernova remnants were constructed from the PHA data taken during the scanning observations. Single-temperature and two-temperature Raymond-Smith models were fitted to the observed spectra. In addition, power-law and power-law plus one-temperature models were fitted to the spectrum of SN 1006. Only two-component models provide an adequate description for both Lupus Loop and SN 1006 spectra. The temperatures, column densities, and emission measures are significantly more accurate than previous results. 29 refs.

  13. ROLE OF LINE-OF-SIGHT COSMIC-RAY INTERACTIONS IN FORMING THE SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS IN TeV GAMMA RAYS AND HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander; Kalashev, Oleg; Beacom, John F.

    2011-04-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. The observed high-energy gamma-ray signals from distant blazars may be dominated by secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. This explains the surprisingly low attenuation observed for distant blazars, because the production of secondary gamma rays occurs, on average, much closer to Earth than the distance to the source. Thus, the observed spectrum in the TeV range does not depend on the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum, while it depends on the output of the source in cosmic rays. We apply this hypothesis to a number of sources and, in every case, we obtain an excellent fit, strengthening the interpretation of the observed spectra as being due to secondary gamma rays. We explore the ramifications of this interpretation for limits on the extragalactic background light and for the production of cosmic rays in AGNs. We also make predictions for the neutrino signals, which can help probe the acceleration of cosmic rays in AGNs.

  14. X-Ray Spectra of Young Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae: Dependence on Spin-Down Energy Loss Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.

    2003-01-01

    An observational model is presented for the spectra of young rotation-powered pulsars and their nebulae based on a study of nine bright Crab-like pulsar systems observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory. A significant correlation is discovered between the X-ray spectra of these pulsars and that of their associated pulsar wind nebulae, both of which are observed to be a function of the spin-down energy loss rate, E. The 2-10 keV spectra of these objects are well characterized by an absorbed power-law model with photon indices, Gamma, in the range of 0.6 < Gamma (sub PSR) < 2.1 and 1.3 < Gamma(sub PWN) < 2.3, for the pulsars and their nebulae, respectively. A linear regression fit relating these two sets of indexes yields Gamma(sub PWN) = 0.91 +/- 0.18 + (0.66 +/- 0.11) Gamma (sub PSR), with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.97. The spectra of these pulsars are found to steepen as Gamma = Gamma(sub max) + alpha E (exp -1/2), with Gamma(sub max) providing an observational limit on the spectral slopes of young rotation-powered pulsars. These results reveal basic properties of young pulsar systems, allow new observational constraints on models of pulsar wind emission, and provide a means of predicting the energetics of pulsars lacking detected pulsations.

  15. Feynman scaling violation on baryon spectra in pp collisions at LHC and cosmic ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Arakelyan, G. H.; Merino, C. Pajares, C.; Shabelski, Yu. M.

    2013-03-15

    A significant asymmetry in baryon/antibaryon yields in the central region of high energy collisions is observed when the initial state has nonzero baryon charge. This asymmetry is connected with the possibility of baryon charge diffusion in rapidity space. Such a diffusion should decrease the baryon charge in the fragmentation region and translate into the corresponding decrease of the multiplicity of leading baryons. As a result, a new mechanism for Feynman scaling violation in the fragmentation region is obtained. Another numerically more significant reason for the Feynman scaling violation comes from the fact that the average number of cut Pomerons increases with initial energy. We present the quantitative predictions of the Quark-Gluon String Model for the Feynman scaling violation at LHC energies and at even higher energies that can be important for cosmic ray physics.

  16. A new background subtraction method for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra using a cubic spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Kai; Chen, Man; Peng, Shiqi; Zhao, Weigang; He, Jialin; Zhao, Guangcui

    2015-03-01

    A new method is presented to subtract the background from the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrum using a cubic spline interpolation. To accurately obtain interpolation nodes, a smooth fitting and a set of discriminant formulations were adopted. From these interpolation nodes, the background is estimated by a calculated cubic spline function. The method has been tested on spectra measured from a coin and an oil painting using a confocal MXRF setup. In addition, the method has been tested on an existing sample spectrum. The result confirms that the method can properly subtract the background.

  17. Processing and quantification of x-ray energy dispersive spectra in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1988-08-01

    Spectral processing in x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy deals with the extraction of characteristic signals from experimental data. In this text, the four basic procedures for this methodology are reviewed and their limitations outlined. Quantification, on the other hand, deals with the interpretation of the information obtained from spectral processing. Here the limitations are for the most part instrumental in nature. The prospects of higher voltage operation does not, in theory, present any new problems and may in fact prove to be more desirable assuming that electron damage effects do not preclude analysis. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  19. ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2013-02-20

    The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

  20. Relativistic X-ray reverberation modelling of the combined time-averaged and lag-energy spectra in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainakun, P.; Young, A. J.; Kara, E.

    2016-08-01

    General relativistic ray tracing simulations of the time-averaged spectrum and energy-dependent time delays in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are presented. We model the lamp-post geometry in which the accreting gas is illuminated by an X-ray source located on the rotation axis of the black hole. The spectroscopic features imprinted in the reflection component are modelled using REFLIONX. The associated time delays after the direct continuum, known as reverberation lags, are computed including the full effects of dilution and ionization gradients on the disc. We perform, for the first time, simultaneous fitting of the time-averaged and lag-energy spectra in three AGN: Mrk 335, IRAS 13224-3809 and Ark 564 observed with XMM-Newton. The best-fitting source height and central mass of each AGN partly agree with those previously reported. We find that including the ionization gradient in the model naturally explains lag-energy observations in which the 3 keV and 7-10 keV bands precede other bands. To obtain the clear 3 keV and 7-10 keV dips in the lag-energy profile, the model requires either a source height >5 rg, or a disc that is highly ionized at small radii and is colder further out. We also show that fitting the lag or the mean spectra alone can lead to different results and interpretations. This is therefore important to combine the spectral and timing data in order to find the plausible but self-consistent fits which are achievable with our model.

  1. RELATIVE COMPOSITION AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF LIGHT NUCLEI IN COSMIC RAYS: RESULTS FROM AMS-01

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Berdugo, J.; Allaby, J.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Azzarello, P.; Battiston, R.; Anderhub, H.; Ao, L.; Arefiev, A.; Arruda, L.; Barao, F.; Barreira, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Becker, R.; Becker, U.; Bene, P.

    2010-11-20

    Measurement of the chemical and isotopic composition of cosmic rays is essential for the precise understanding of their propagation in the galaxy. While the model parameters are mainly determined using the B/C ratio, the study of extended sets of ratios can provide stronger constraints on the propagation models. In this paper, the relative abundances of light-nuclei lithium, beryllium, boron, and carbon are presented. The secondary-to-primary ratios Li/C, Be/C, and B/C have been measured in the kinetic energy range 0.35-45 GeV nucleon{sup -1}. The isotopic ratio {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li is also determined in the magnetic rigidity interval 2.5-6.3 GV. The secondary-to-secondary ratios Li/Be, Li/B, and Be/B are also reported. These measurements are based on the data collected by the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-01 during the STS-91 space shuttle flight in 1998 June. Our experimental results are in substantial agreement with other measurements, where they exist. We describe our light-nuclei data with a diffusive-reacceleration model. A 10%-15% overproduction of Be is found in the model predictions and can be attributed to uncertainties in the production cross-section data.

  2. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-01

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  3. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-raymore » multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.« less

  4. Energy levels and spectral lines in the X-ray spectra of highly charged W XLIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang-Huan; Kang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    The multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method is employed to calculate the fine-structure energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, and oscillator strengths for electric dipole allowed (E1) and forbidden (M1, E2, M2) lines for the 4 s 24 p and 4 s4 p 2 configurations of W XLIV. The valence-valence and core-valence correlation effects are accounted for in a systematic way. Breit interactions and quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects are estimated in subsequent relativistic configuration interaction (CI) calculations. The present results are in good agreement with other available theoretical and experimental values, and we predict new data for several levels where no other theoretical and/or experimental results are available, precise measurements are clearly needed here.

  5. Resonant Compton scattering and gamma-ray burst continuum spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, M. G.

    1995-01-01

    The Thomson limit of resonant inverse Compton scattering in the strong magnetic fields of neutron stars is considered as a mechanism for producing gamma-ray burst continuum spectra. Photon production spectra and electron cooling rates are presented using the full magnetic Thomson cross-section. Model emission spectra are obtained as self-consistent solutions of a set of photon and electron kinetic equations, displaying spectral breaks and other structure at gamma-ray energies.

  6. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  7. A New Method for the Reconstruction of Very-High-Energy Gamma-Ray Spectra and Application to Galactic Cosmic-Ray Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgílio

    2014-06-01

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E > 0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E > 0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESS J1646-458 (2.2° in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd 1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESS J1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of

  8. Pulsar gamma-rays: Spectra luminosities and efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The general characteristics of pulsar gamma ray spectra are presented for a model where the gamma rays are produced by curvature radiation from energetic particles above the polar cap and attenuated by pair production. The shape of the spectrum is found to depend on pulsar period, magnetic field strength, and primary particle energy. By a comparison of numerically calculated spectra with the observed spectra of the Crab and Vela pulsars, it is determined that primary particles must be accelerated to energies of about 3 x 10 to the 7th power mc sq. A genaral formula for pulsar gamma ray luminosity is determined and is found to depend on period and field strength.

  9. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source (abstract only)

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-02-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (versatile ECR for nuclear science), produce large amounts of x rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  10. Primary Cosmic-Ray Spectra in the Knee Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel V.; Biermann, P. L.

    2003-07-01

    Using EAS inverse approach and KASCADE EAS data the primary energy spectra for different primary nuclei at energies 1015 - 1017 eV are obtained in the framework of multi-comp onent model of primary cosmic ray origin and QGSJET and SIBYLL interaction models. The rigidity-dep endent behavior of spectra is the same for two interaction models. The extrap olation of the obtained primary spectra in a 1017 - 1018 eV energy range displays a presence of the extragalactic component of primary cosmic rays.

  11. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  12. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  13. X-ray spectra of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    X-ray spectra were obtained from fields in three supernova remnants with the solid state spectrometer of the HEAO 2 satellite. These spectra, which contain lines from K-shell transitions of several abundant elements with atomic numbers between 10 and 22, were compared with various models, including some of spectra that would be produced by adiabatic phase remnants when the time-dependence of the ionization is considered.

  14. Derivation of a Relation for the Steepening of TeV Selected Blazar Gamma-Ray Spectra with Energy and Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F.

    2010-01-01

    We derive a relation for the steepening of blazar gamma-ray spectra between the multi-GeV Fermi energy range and the TeV energy range observed by atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. The change in spectral index is produced by two effects: (1) an intrinsic steepening, independent of redshift, owing to the properties of emission and absorption in the source, and (2) a redshift-dependent steepening produced by intergalactic pair production interactions of blazar gamma-rays with low energy photons of the "intergalactic background light" (IBL). Given this relation, with good enough data on the mean gamma-ray SED of TeV Selected BL Lacs, the redshift evolution of the IBL can, in principle, be determined independently of stellar evolution models. We apply our relation to the results of new Fermi observations of TeV selected blazars.

  15. X-ray spectra of galactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    The spectroscopic properties of the various classes of Galactic X-ray sources are discussed, with particular emphasis on binary sources containing an accreting compact object, where post-emission scattering in an accretion disk often prevents the initially produced X-radiation from being observed directly. Theoretical interpretations and X-ray observations are considered for the cataclysmic variables, binary systems with a white dwarf as the compact object and which suffer relatively less from Thomson scattering, and the similar phenomenological spectral characteristics of the bulge sources, including soft transients, bursters and steady X-ray sources with thermal spectra, thought to represent an accreting neutron star, are pointed out. The spectral characteristics of X-ray pulsars in accreting binary systems (rather than the Crab pulsar, which is losing rotational kinetic energy with time) are then presented and interpreted in terms of accretion in the polar regions, and mechanisms for the newly discovered X-ray emission from late-type RS CVn stars are considered.

  16. A measurement of the energy spectra of cosmic rays from 20 to 1000 GeV per amu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Thoburn, C.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, John W., Jr.; Fowler, P. H.; Masheder, M. R. W.; Derrickson, James H.

    1991-01-01

    A group collaboration was made in the development of the Bristol University Gas Spectrometer number 4 (BUGS 4). The BUGS 4 detector is designed to measure the charge spectrum for species between oxygen and the iron peak as a function of energy per nucleon, between 20 and 1000 GeV/amu. It is particularly concerned with energies above 50 GeV/amu. The high energy component is considerably less affected by propagation through the interstellar medium than the lower energy component and is expected to approach the original charge spectrum of the source more closely. This information allows one to unravel the effects of cosmic ray production, acceleration, and propagation. The detector is described in total detail. The method of estimating the charge and energy of a cosmic ray depends on the energy of the particle. Calculations and experiments lead to the expectation of a nearly constant charge resolution of about 0.2 charge units over the whole energy range except 4.5 less than gamma less than 20. In this band, the experiment is insensitive to energy. A balloon flight is planned in 1993.

  17. Correlations Between Variations in Solar EUV and Soft X-Ray Irradiance and Photoelectron Energy Spectra Observed on Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. A.; Mitchell, D. L.; Bailey, S. M.; Chamberlin, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV; 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (XUV; 0-10 nm) radiation are major heat sources for the Mars thermosphere as well as the primary source of ionization that creates the ionosphere. In investigations of Mars thermospheric chemistry and dynamics, solar irradiance models are used to account for variations in this radiation. Because of limited proxies, irradiance models do a poor job of tracking the significant variations in irradiance intensity in the EUV and XUV ranges over solar rotation time scales when the Mars-Sun-Earth angle is large. Recent results from Earth observations show that variations in photoelectron energy spectra are useful monitors of EUV and XUV irradiance variability. Here we investigate photoelectron energy spectra observed by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Electron Reflectometer (ER) and the FAST satellite during the interval in 2005 when Earth, Mars, and the Sun were aligned. The Earth photoelectron data in selected bands correlate well with calculations based on 1 nm resolution observations above 27 nm supplemented by broadband observations and a solar model in the 0-27 nm range. At Mars, we find that instrumental and orbital limitations to the identifications of photoelectron energy spectra in MGS/ER data preclude their use as a monitor of solar EUV and XUV variability. However, observations with higher temporal and energy resolution obtained at lower altitudes on Mars might allow the separation of the solar wind and ionospheric components of electron energy spectra so that they could be used as reliable monitors of variations in solar EUV and XUV irradiance than the time shifted, Earth-based, F(10.7) index currently used.

  18. Evaluation of conversion coefficients relating air-kerma to H*(10) using primary and transmitted x-ray spectra in the diagnostic radiology energy range.

    PubMed

    Santos, J C; Mariano, L; Tomal, A; Costa, P R

    2016-03-01

    According to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), the relationship between effective dose and incident air-kerma is complex and depends on the attenuation of x-rays in the body. Therefore, it is not practical to use this quantity for shielding design purposes. This correlation is adopted in practical situations by using conversion coefficients calculated using validated mathematical models by the ICRU. The ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), is a quantity adopted by the IAEA for monitoring external exposure. Dose constraint levels are established in terms of H*(10), while the radiation levels in radiometric surveys are calculated by means of the measurements of air-kerma with ion chambers. The resulting measurements are converted into ambient dose equivalents by conversion factors. In the present work, an experimental study of the relationship between the air-kerma and the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent was conducted using different experimental scenarios. This study was done by measuring the primary x-ray spectra and x-ray spectra transmitted through materials used in dedicated chest radiographic facilities, using a CdTe detector. The air-kerma to ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficients were calculated from these measured spectra. The resulting values of the quantity ambient dose equivalent using these conversion coefficients are more realistic than those available in the literature, because they consider the real energy distribution of primary and transmitted x-ray beams. The maximum difference between the obtained conversion coefficients and the constant value recommended in national and international radiation protection standards is 53.4%. The conclusion based on these results is that a constant coefficient may not be adequate for deriving the ambient dose equivalent. PMID:26835613

  19. Asymmetry effects in the full-energy x-ray spectra in xenon: a Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, T. H. V. T.; Rachinhas, P. J. B. M.; Santos, F. P.; Conde, C. A. N.; Stauffer, Ad

    1998-05-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the absorption of x-rays in xenon predicts an asymmetry in the full-energy peaks, which depends on the energy E of the incident x-rays and on the extent of fluorescence escape(THVT Dias, JMF dos Santos, PJBM Rachinhas, FP Santos, CAN Conde and AD Stauffer, J. of Appl. Phys. 82(1997)2742-53), an effect which required further clarification. The skewness of the distributions is observed to fade with increasing E in the regions between the Xe absorption edges, with a sudden increase at the edges. In the present work, the effect is analysed as a function of E between the xenon L- and K-edges, and above the K-edge up to 40keV. The clarification of the effect, including the influence of fluorescence escape, is made in terms of the evolution with E peaks corresponding to the distinct decay branches initiated by K-, L-, M-, N- or O-photoionization.

  20. A Measurement of the Energy Spectra of Cosmic Rays from 20 to 1000 GeV Per Amu

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Thoburn, C.; Smith, A. E.; Petruzzo, J. J., III; Austin, R. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Masheder, M. R. W.; Fowler, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The design features and operational performance from the test flight of the fourth generation of spherical geometry cosmic ray detectors developed at Bristol University (Bristol University Gas Scintillator 4 - BUGS-4) are presented. The flight from Ft. Sumner (NM) in Sept. 1993 was the premier flight of a large (1m radius) spherical drift chamber which also gave gas scintillation and Cerenkov signals. The combinations of this chamber with one gas and two solid Cerenkov radiators lead to a large aperture factor (4.5 m2sr), but low (approximately 3.5 g/sq cm) instrument mass over the energy sensitive range 1 to several hundred GeV/a. Moreover, one simple timing measurement determined the impact parameter which provided a trajectory (path length) correction for all detector elements. This innovative and efficient design will be of interest to experimental groups engaged in studies of energetic charged particles. Although there were technical problems on the flight, which were compounded by the total destruction of BUGS-4 by fire while landing in Oklahoma, there was a period of stable operation during which the instrument was exposed at float altitude (approximately 125,000 ft.) to high energy cosmic rays. We present the performance of the instrument as determined from the analysis of these data and an appraisal of its novel design features. Suggestions for design improvements in a future instrument are made.

  1. ON ESTIMATING THE HIGH-ENERGY CUTOFF IN THE X-RAY SPECTRA OF BLACK HOLES VIA REFLECTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    García, Javier A.; Steiner, James F.; McClintock, Jeffrey E.; Keck, Mason L.; Dauser, Thomas; Wilms, Jörn E-mail: jem@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: keckm@bu.edu

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental parameters describing the coronal spectrum of an accreting black hole are the slope Γ of the power-law continuum and the energy E{sub cut} at which it rolls over. Remarkably, this latter parameter can be accurately measured for values as high as 1 MeV by modeling the spectrum of X-rays reflected from a black hole accretion disk at energies below 100 keV. This is possible because the details in the reflection spectrum, rich in fluorescent lines and other atomic features, are very sensitive to the spectral shape of the hardest coronal radiation illuminating the disk. We show that by fitting simultaneous NuSTAR (3–79 keV) and low-energy (e.g., Suzaku) data with the most recent version of our reflection model relxill one can obtain reasonable constraints on E{sub cut} at energies from tens of keV up to 1 MeV, for a source as faint as 1 mCrab in a 100 ks observation.

  2. Measuring Flash X-Ray Spectra with a Compton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Hunter, James; King, Nick; Merrill, Frank; Sedillo, Robert; Urbaitis, Algis; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. The determination of the x-ray energy spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult due to the short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). Recently, a Compton spectrometer has been refurbished and investigated as a potential device for conducting these measurements. The spectrometer was originally designed and characterized by Morgan et al.. The spectrometer consists of a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet and measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. In this apparatus, the incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam before encountering a converter foil. Compton electrons are ejected and collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the device. The position of the electrons on the magnet focal plane is a function of their energy, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent energy calibration measurements and the spectrum reconstruction of a Bremsstrahlung source will be presented. LA-UR-14-23602.

  3. Observations of galactic cosmic ray energy spectra between 1 and 9 AU. [Pioneer space probes and Helios 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, F. B.; Lal, N.; Vanhollebeke, M. A. I.; Trainor, J. H.; Webber, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The variation of the 5 to 500 MeV/nuc cosmic ray helium component was studied between 1 and 9 A.U. using essentially identical detector systems on Pioneer 10 and 11 and Helios I. Between 100 and 200 MeV/nuc a radial gradient of 3.3?1.3%/A.U. is found. At 15 MeV/nuc this value increases to 20?4%/A.U. Between 4 and 9 A.U. a well defined intensity maximum is observed at approximately 17 MeV/nuc. The average adiabatic energy loss between 1 and 9 A.U. is approximately 4 MeV/nuc/A.U. The observed radial variation between 1 and 9 A.U. is well described by the Gleeson-Axford force field solution of the modulation equations over an energy range extending from 15 to 500 MeV/nuc and is in good agreement with the results reported by other Pioneer experiments. These values are much smaller than had been theoretically predicted.

  4. Differential energy spectra of low energy (less than 8.5 MeV per nucleon) heavy cosmic rays during solar quiet times. [from Explorer 47 satellite observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Vollmer, O.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Explorer 47 satellite observations of carbon, oxygen, and heavier nuclei differential energy spectra below 8.5 MeV/nucleon are presented for solar quiet time periods. A dE/dx vs E method for particle identification and energy determination was used. The instrumentation telescope included an isobutane proportional counter, a surface barrier Si detector, and a cylindrical plastic scintillator anticoincidence shield. The observations were performed outside the bow-shock and in the ecliptic plane. Results show an anisotropy of about 25% at 22 degrees west of the sun with a C/O ratio of 0.5 supporting a solar origin. The low energy portions of the C and O spectra have steep negative slopes, and the corresponding power law is given. Peculiarities in the O spectrum are discussed.

  5. Quasar x-ray spectra revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastri, P.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J.

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 45 quasars observed by the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on the Einstein satellite is used to re-examine the relationship between the soft (0.2-3.5 keV) X-ray energy index and radio-loudness. We found the following: (1) the tendency for radio-loud quasars to have systematically flatter X-ray slopes than radio-quiet quasars (RQQ's) is confirmed with the soft X-ray excess having negligible effect; (2) there is a tendency for the flatness of the X-ray slope to correlate with radio core-dominance for radio-loud quasars, suggesting that a component of the X-ray emission is relativistically beamed; (3) for the RQQ's the soft X-ray slopes, with a mean of approximately 1.0, are consistent with the slopes found at higher energies (2-10 keV) although steeper than those observed for Seyfert 1 galaxies (also 2-10 keV) where the reflection model gives a good fit to the data; (4) the correlation of FeII emission line strength with X-ray energy index is confirmed for radio-quiet quasars using a subset of 18 quasars. The radio-loud quasars show no evidence for a correlation. This relation suggests a connection between the ionizing continuum and the line emission from the broad emission line region (BELR) of radio-quiet quasars, but in the opposite sense to that predicted by current photoionization models; and (5) the correlations of X-ray slope with radio core dominance and FeII equivalent width within the radio-loud and radio-quiet sub-classes respectively imply that the observed wide range of X-ray spectral slopes is real rather than due to the large measuring uncertainties for individual objects.

  6. X ray spectra of cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Halpern, Jules

    1990-01-01

    X ray spectral parameters of cataclysmic variables observed with the 'Einstein' imaging proportional counter were determined by fitting an optically thin, thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum to the raw data. Most of the sources show temperatures of order a few keV, while a few sources exhibit harder spectra with temperatures in excess of 10 keV. Estimated 0.1 to 3.5 keV luminosities are generally in the range from 10(exp 30) to 10(exp 32) erg/sec. The results are consistent with the x rays originating in a disk/white dwarf boundary layer of non-magnetic systems, or in a hot, post-shock region in the accretion column of DQ Her stars, with a negligible contribution from the corona of the companion. In a few objects column densities were found that are unusually high for interstellar material. It was suggested that the absorption occurs in the system itself.

  7. The associated X-ray spectra of Amersham caesium-137 afterloading sources.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D A; Chong, C S

    1987-02-01

    Low-energy X rays are clearly observed in the energy spectra of Amersham 137Cs afterloading sources. Examination is made of the effects of encapsulation and source train attenuation on the source spectra. Estimates of the resulting X-ray intensities are also made.

  8. Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

    2010-02-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

  9. The soft X-ray excess in Einstein quasar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masnou, J. L.; Wilkes, B. J.; Elvis, M.; Mcdowell, J. C.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    An SNR-limited subsample of 14 quasars from the Wilkes and Elvis (1987) sample is presently investigated for low-energy excess above a high-energy power law in the X-ray spectra obtained by the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter. A significant excess that is 1-6 times as strong as the high-energy component at 0.2 keV is noted in eight of the 14 objects. In the case of 3C273, multiple observations show the excess to be variable.

  10. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin

  11. Relativistic Effects on Reflection X-ray Spectra of AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Khee-Gan; Fuerst, Steven V.; Brandwardi-Raymond, Graziella; Wu, Kinwah; Crowley, Oliver; /University Coll. London

    2007-01-05

    We have calculated the reflection component of the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and shown that they can be significantly modified by the relativistic motion of the accretion flow and various gravitational effects of the central black hole. The absorption edges in the reflection spectra suffer severe energy shifts and smearing. The degree of distortion depends on the system parameters, and the dependence is stronger for some parameters such as the inner radius of the accretion disk and the disk viewing inclination angles. The relativistic effects are significant and are observable. Improper treatment of the reflection component of the X-ray continuum in spectral fittings will give rise to spurious line-like features, which will mimic the fluorescent emission lines and mask the relativistic signatures of the lines.

  12. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239 Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John

    2015-05-25

    Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  13. Photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons - Comparison with gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    The model of gamma-ray-burst spectra proposed by Zdziarski and Lamb (1986, 1987) is reviewed and compared with observed spectra. In the model, the spectrum arises from multiple Compton scatterings in a nonthermal source with a deficit of soft photons. The steady-state electron distribution in such a source is a nonthermal power law that joins at low energies onto a thermal distribution that may be either optically thick or thin. Both cases lead naturally to a two-component spectrum with a photon-energy index in the X-ray spectrum which is much less than one and a photon-energy index in the gamma-ray spectrum which is larger than the X-ray photon-energy index. Fits to the observed gamma-ray-burst spectra (where data exist for both X-ray and gamma-ray energies) show good agreement with the model.

  14. Size Effect on Nuclear Gamma-Ray Energy Spectra Acquired by Different Sized CeBr3, LaBr3:Ce, and NaI:Tl Gamma-Ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Paul; Reed, Michael; Yuan, Ding; Beller, Denis; Cutler, Matthew; Contreras, Chris; Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Wilde, Scott UNLV

    2014-03-01

    Gamma-ray energy spectra were acquired for different sizes of cerium tribromide (CeBr3), cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide (LaBr3:Ce), and thallium-doped sodium iodide (NaI:Tl) detectors. A comparison was conducted of the energy resolution and detection efficiency of these scintillator detectors for different sizes of detectors. The results of this study are consistent with the observation that for each size detector, LaBr3:Ce offers better resolution than either a CeBr3 or NaI:Tl detector of the same size. In addition, CeBr3 and LaBr3:Ce detectors could resolve some closely spaced peaks in the spectra of several radioisotopes that NaI:Tl could not. As the detector size increased, all three detector materials exhibited higher efficiency, albeit with slightly reduced resolution. Significantly, the very low intrinsic activity of CeBr3 is also demonstrated in this study, which, when combined with energy resolution characteristics for a range of detector sizes, could lead to an improved ability to detect special nuclear materials compared to the other detectors.

  15. Model Atmospheres and X-Ray Spectra of Bursting Neutron Stars: Hydrogen-Helium Comptonized Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, J.; Joss, P. C.; Różańska, A.

    2004-02-01

    Compton scattering plays a crucial role in determining the structure of the atmosphere of an X-ray burster and its theoretical spectrum. Our paper presents a description of the plane-parallel model atmosphere of a very hot neutron star and its theoretical flux spectrum of outgoing radiation. Our model equations take into account all bound-free and free-free monochromatic opacities relevant to hydrogen-helium chemical composition and take into account the effects of Compton scattering of radiation in thermal plasma with fully relativistic thermal velocities. We use Compton scattering terms in the equation of transfer, which precisely describe photon-electron energy and momentum exchange for photons with initial energies exceeding the electron rest mass of 511 keV. Model atmosphere equations are solved with the variable Eddington factors technique. The grid of H-He model atmospheres and flux spectra is computed on a dense mesh of 107K<=Teff<=3×107K and a surface gravity of logg. In many cases, the assumed logg approached the critical gravity loggcr, i.e., the Eddington limit. We confirm that H-He spectra of X-ray bursters deviate from blackbody spectra and discuss their shapes. The table of color to effective temperature ratios shows that theoretical values of Tc/Teff do not exceed 1.9 in H-He atmospheres in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium.

  16. DISCREPANT HARDENING OBSERVED IN COSMIC-RAY ELEMENTAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, H. S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, M. H.; Lutz, L.; Malinin, A.; Allison, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Bigongiari, G.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Childers, J. T.; DuVernois, M. A.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Mognet, S. I.; Jeon, J. A.; Minnick, S.

    2010-05-01

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass experiment launched five times from Antarctica has achieved a cumulative flight duration of about 156 days above 99.5% of the atmosphere. The instrument is configured with complementary and redundant particle detectors designed to extend direct measurements of cosmic-ray composition to the highest energies practical with balloon flights. All elements from protons to iron nuclei are separated with excellent charge resolution. Here, we report results from the first two flights of {approx}70 days, which indicate hardening of the elemental spectra above {approx}200 GeV/nucleon and a spectral difference between the two most abundant species, protons and helium nuclei. These results challenge the view that cosmic-ray spectra are simple power laws below the so-called knee at {approx}10{sup 15} eV. This discrepant hardening may result from a relatively nearby source, or it could represent spectral concavity caused by interactions of cosmic rays with the accelerating shock. Other possible explanations should also be investigated.

  17. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David C.; Sedillo, Robert; Shurter, Roger P.; Volegov, Petr; Webb, Timothy J.

    2015-08-01

    A Compton spectrometer has been re-commissioned for measurements of flash radiographic sources. The determination of the energy spectrum of these sources is difficult due to the high count rates and short nature of the pulses (~50 ns). The spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. Incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam incident on a converter foil. The ejected Compton electrons are collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the magnet's focal plane is a function of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent measurements of flash sources are presented.

  18. Analyzing the Spectra of Accreting X-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Michael

    This proposal seeks funding for the analysis of accretion-powered X-ray pulsar spectra from NASA/ HEASARC archived X-ray data. Spectral modeling of accreting X-ray pulsars can tell us a great deal about the physical conditions in and near high mass X-ray binary systems. Such systems have accretion flows where plasma is initially channeled from an accretion disk by the strong neutron star magnetic field, eventually falling onto the magnetic polar cap of the neutron star compact object. Many of these accreting X-ray pulsars have X-ray spectra that consist of broad power-law continua with superposed cyclotron resonant scattering features indicating magnetic field strengths above 10^12 G. The energies of these cyclotron line features have recently been shown to vary with X-ray luminosity in a number of sources such as Her X-1 and V 0332+53, a phenomenon not well understood. Another recent development is the relatively new analytic model for the spectral continuum formation in accretion-powered pulsar systems developed by Becker & Wolff. In their formalism the accretion flows are assumed to go through radiation- dominated radiative shocks and settle onto the neutron star surface. The radiation field consists of strongly Comptonized bremsstrahlung emission from the entire plasma, Comptonized cyclotron emission from the de-excitations of Landau-excited electrons in the neutron star magnetic field, and Comptonized black-body emission from a thermal mound near the neutron star surface. We seek to develop the data analysis tools to apply this model framework to the X-ray data from a wide set of sources to make progress characterizing the basic accretion properties (e.g., magnetic field strength, plasma temperatures, polar cap size, accretion rate per unit area, dominance of bulk vs. thermal Comptonization) as well as understanding the variations of the cyclotron line energies with X-ray luminosity. The three major goals of our proposed work are as follows: In the first year

  19. Measuring X-ray Spectra of Flash Radiographic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Espy, Michelle; Haines, Todd; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David; Sedillo, Robert; Volegov, Petr; Webb, Tim

    2015-10-01

    A Compton spectrometer has been re-commissioned for measurements of flash radiographic sources. The determination of the energy spectrum provides information about the x-ray production mechanisms of these sources (ie. reaction history of plasmas, electron-target interactions) and benefits the analysis of images obtained at radiographic facilities. However, the measurements of the spectra are difficult due to the high count rates and short nature of the pulses (~ 50 ns). The spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet which measures spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV energy range. Incoming x-rays are collimated into a narrow beam incident on a converter foil. The ejected Compton electrons are collimated so that the forward-directed electrons enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The position of the electrons at the focal plane of the magnet is a function of their momentum, allowing the x-ray spectrum to be reconstructed. Recent measurements of both flash and continuous radiographic sources will be presented.

  20. Modeling Spectra of the North and South Jovian X-ray Auroras

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchenko, Vasili A; Bhardwaj, Anil; Dalgarno, A.; Schultz, David Robert; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2008-08-01

    Spectra of Jovian X-ray auroras observed from the North and South poles with the Chandra X-ray telescope are analyzed and compared with predicted spectra of the charge-exchange mechanism. To determine the theoretical spectra of Jovian X-ray auroras, we model numerically the collisionally induced evolution of energy and charge distributions of Oq+ and Sq+ ions, precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere. Monte Carlo simulations of the energy and charge relaxation of the precipitating ions are carried out with updated cross-sections of the ion stripping, electron capture, and gas-ionization collisions. X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spectra of cascading radiation induced by individual energetic sulfur and oxygen ions are calculated, and relative intensities of X-ray emission lines are determined. Synthetic spectra of X-ray and EUV photons are computed at different initial kinetic energies and compositions of ion-precipitating fluxes. Theoretical spectra with adjustable initial energies and relative fraction of sulfur and oxygen ions are shown to be in good agreement with the spectra of X rays detected from the South and North polar regions. The abundances and initial energies of the precipitating ions are inferred by comparing synthetic and observed X-ray spectra. Comparisons are performed independently for the North and South pole emissions. Abundances of the precipitating sulfur ions are found to be four to five times smaller than those of oxygen ions, and averaged ion energies are determined to lie between 1 and 2 MeV/amu. Slightly different ion flux compositions are found to describe the observed spectra of X-ray emission from the North and South poles.

  1. Gamma-ray spectra from neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.E.; Becker, J.A.; Stelts, M.L.

    1981-07-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum following neutron capture on /sup 87/Sr was measured at 3 neutron energies: E/sub n/ = thermal, 2 keV, and 24 keV. Gamma rays were detected in a three-crystal Ge(Li)-NaI-NaI pair spectrometer. Gamma-ray intensities deduced from these spectra by spectral unfolding are presented.

  2. Performance of the Tibet hybrid experiment (YAC-II + Tibet-III + MD) to measure the energy spectra of the light primary cosmic rays at energies 50-10,000 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Zhai, L. M.; Chen, D.; Shibata, M.; Katayose, Y.; Zhang, Ying; Liu, J. S.; Chen, Xu; Hu, X. B.; Zhang, X. Y.; Jia, H. Y.; Danzengluobu; Ohnishi, M.; Takita, M.

    2015-06-01

    A new hybrid detector system has been constructed by the Tibet ASγ collaboration at Tibet, China, since 2014 to measure the chemical composition of cosmic rays around the knee in the wide energy range. They consist of an air-shower-core detector-grid (YAC-II) to detect high energy electromagnetic component, the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and a large underground water-Cherenkov muon-detector array (MD). We have carried out a detailed air-shower Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to study the performance of the hybrid detectors by using CORSIKA (version 6.204), which includes QGSJET01c and SIBYLL2.1 hadronic interaction models. Assumed primary cosmic ray models are based on helium poor, helium rich and Gaisser's fit compositions around the knee. All detector responses are calculated using Geant4 (version 9.5) according to the real detector configurations and the MC events are reconstructed by the same procedure as the experimental data analysis. The energy determination is made by lateral density fitting (LDF) method using modified NKG function and the separation of the light components (proton, helium) is made by means of the artificial neural network (ANN) method and the random forest (RF) method. The systematic errors of the spectra of proton and helium caused by each steps of the analysis procedure are investigated including the dependence of the MC data on the hadronic interaction models and the primary composition models, and the algorithms for the primary mass identification. The systematic errors of the flux to be obtained by the new experiment are summarized as less than 30% in total. Our results show that the new hybrid experiment is powerful enough to study the chemical composition of the cosmic rays, in particular, to obtain the light-component spectra of the primary cosmic rays in 50-10,000 TeV energy range overlapping to the direct observation data at low energy side and ground-based indirect observations at high energy side. It is possible in this

  3. Energy spectra of high energy atmospheric neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitsui, K.; Minorikawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on high energy neutrinos ( or = 1 TeV), a new calculation of atmospheric neutrino intensities was carried out taking into account EMC effects observed in P-A collisions by accelerator, recent measurement of primary cosmic ray spectrum and results of cosmic ray muon spectrum and charge ratio. Other features of the present calculation are (1) taking into account kinematics of three body decays of kaons and charm particles in diffusion equations and (2) taking into account energy dependence of kaon production.

  4. Decomposition of Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Rémond, Guy; Myklebust, Robert; Fialin, Michel; Nockolds, Clive; Phillips, Matthew; Roques-Carmes, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Line shapes of atomic lines and soft x-ray emission bands measured with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) with the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) are reviewed. Least square fitting to pseudo-Voigt profiles of the digitally measured spectra are used to account for the presence of non-diagram features (high and low energy satellites) and instrumental induced distortions. The effect of line width and relative intensities on the quality of fits is illustrated. Spectral distortions resulting from the presence of absorption edges within the analyzed wavelength region are illustrated for the case of FeLα,β emission bands for pure Fe and iron oxides. For quantitative analysis, an analytical approach is presented where the measured soft x-ray emission bands are corrected for self absorption before extracting the intensities from the experimental data. PMID:27446750

  5. High Resolution X-Ray Spectra of WR 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, D.; Gayley, K.; Hamann, W.-R.; Ignace, R.; Nichols, J.; Oskinova, L. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Schulz, N.

    As WR 6 is a putatively single WN4 star, and is relatively bright (V = 6.9), it is an ideal case for studying the wind mechanisms in these extremely luminous stars. To obtain higher resolution spectra at higher energy (above 1 keV) than previously obtained with the XMM/Newton RGS, we have observed WR 6 with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer for 450 ks. We have resolved emission lines of S, Si, Mg, Ne, and Fe, which all show a “fin"-shaped prole, characteristic of a self-absorbed uniformly expanding shell. Steep blue edges gives robust maximal expansion velocities of about 2000 km/s, somewhat larger than the 1700km/s derived from UV lines. The He-like lines all indicate that X-ray emitting plasmas are far from the photosphere - even at the higher energies where opacity is lowest { as was also the case for the longer wavelength lines observed with XMM-Newton/RGS. Abundances determined from X-ray spectral modeling indicate enhancements consistent with nucleosynthesis. The star was also variable in X-rays and in simultaneous optical photometry obtained with Chandra aspect camera, but not coherently with the optically known period of 3.765 days.

  6. A Simulation Study on the Flash X-Ray Spectra Spatial Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiufeng; Li, Shiping; Cao, Hongrui; Xiao, Rui; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Linwen; Yin, Zejie

    2013-11-01

    Accurate measurement of flash X-ray energy spectra plays an important role in high-energy flash radiography. In this paper, by virtue of Geant4 toolkit, we simulated the generation and transport of X-ray photons resulting from the interaction of a high-energy electron beam with a solid thin target. We obtained the flash X-ray energy spectral distribution in the plane perpendicular to the electron beam incident direction. Our results indicate that the flash X-ray spectrum is almost uniform in the azimuthal direction but is quite different in the radius direction. Specifically, as the radius increases, the incident X-ray dose decreases significantly. Our work paves a theoretical basis for selecting appropriate structures and layout of the spectrometer and facilitates the measurements of flash X-ray energy spectra.

  7. Preliminary spectra of the primary cosmic ray nuclei from the first year of the NUCLEON experiment exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The NUCLEON cosmic ray observatory is designed to measure high energy cosmic ray composition and energy distribution. Methods of identification of charge and energy measurement for primary cosmic ray nuclei are considered. C, O, Ne, Mg, Si, Fe energy spectra are presented and discussed. The results are obtained from the first year of the planned exposure time.

  8. Gamma-ray burst spectra and time histories from 2 to 400keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenimore, E. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray burst detector on Ginga consisted of a proportional counter to observe the x-rays and a scintillation counter to observe the gamma-rays. It was ideally suited to study the x-rays associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Ginga detected ~120 GRBs and 22 of them had sufficient statistics to determine spectra from 2 to 400keV. Although the Ginga and BATSE trigger criteria were very similar, the distribution of spectral parameters was different. Ginga observed bend energies in the spectra down to 2keV and had a larger fraction of bursts with low energy power law indexes greater than zero. The average ratio of energy in the x-ray band (2 to 10keV) compared to the gamma-ray band (50 to 300keV) was 24%. Some events had more energy in the x-ray band than in the gamma-ray band. One Ginga event had a period of time preceding the gamma rays that was effectively pure x-ray emission. This x-ray ``preactivity'' might be due to the penchant for the GRB time structure to be broader at lower energy rather than a different physical process. The x-rays tend to rise and fall slower than the gamma rays but they both tend to peak at about the same time. This argues against models involving the injection of relativistic electrons that cool by synchrotron radiation.

  9. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  10. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, Amanda Elizabeth; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd Joseph; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David C.; Sedillo, Robert; Shurter, Roger P.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Webb, Timothy J

    2015-11-02

    The x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult to measure. The sources measured were Radiographic Integrated Test Stand-6 (370 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse) and Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) (550 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse). Features of the Compton spectrometer are described, and spectra are shown. Additional slides present data on instrumental calibration.

  11. Spectra of cosmic x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-02-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term spectroscopy as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  12. Spectra of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term "spectroscopy" as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  13. Simulation of mammographic x-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; O'Foghludha, F

    1980-01-01

    Attempts to simulate Mo-anode spectra for film mammography by using Mo filters with W-anode tubes have been reported by several workers, and others have generated W-like continua for xeromammographic purposes by heavy Al filtration of Mo-anode tubes. In the present work the success of these simulations was tested by Si(Li) spectrometric methods that measured the spectral shapes and the exposure levels. Comparisons of Mo-anode/Al-filter with W-anode/Al-filter combinations were made, and also of W-anode/M-filter with Mo-anode/Mo-folter combinations. In certain circumstance the spectral shape is moderately well simulated but in all cases the useful output is less in the simulations than in the original spectra. The general conclusion is that simulation is always less attractive than direct use of the desired anode. PMID:7393143

  14. Simulation of mammographic x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.A.; O'Foghludha, F.

    1980-05-01

    Attempts to simulate Mo-anode spectra for film mammography by using Mo filters with W-anode tubes have been reported by several workers, and others have generated W-like continua for xeromammographic purposes by heavy A1 filtration of Mo-anode tubes. In the present work the success of these simulations was tested by Si(Li) spectrometric methods that measured the spectral shapes and the exposure levels. Comparisons of Mo-anode/A1-filter with W-anode/A1-filter combinations were made, and also of W-anode/M-filter with Mo-anode/Mo-folter combinations. In certain circumstance the spectral shape is moderately well simulated but in all cases the useful output is less in the simulations than in the original spectra. The general conclusion is that simulation is always less attractive than direct use of the desired anode.

  15. Covariance analysis of gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-15

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  16. Covariance Analysis of Gamma Ray Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Trainham, R.; Tinsley, J.

    2013-01-01

    The covariance method exploits fluctuations in signals to recover information encoded in correlations which are usually lost when signal averaging occurs. In nuclear spectroscopy it can be regarded as a generalization of the coincidence technique. The method can be used to extract signal from uncorrelated noise, to separate overlapping spectral peaks, to identify escape peaks, to reconstruct spectra from Compton continua, and to generate secondary spectral fingerprints. We discuss a few statistical considerations of the covariance method and present experimental examples of its use in gamma spectroscopy.

  17. Cometary Spectra Induced by Scattering and Florescence of Hard Solar X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snios, B. T.; Lewkow, N.; Kharchenko, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate calculations of X-ray emissions from cometary atmospheres due to Scattering and Florescence (SF) of solar X-rays are carried out over the photon energy range 0.4-3.0 keV. Computations of the X-ray SF spectra are performed for different distributions of the cometary neutral gas, dust, and ice grains, including nano-size particles. The SF spectra of cometary X-rays above 1 keV are determined for different solar conditions, incorporating X-ray spectra induced by solar flares. Theoretical X-ray SF spectra are compared with the results of recent observations of several comets with the Chandra X-ray Observatory [1]. A correlation between the spectral shapes of the observed cometary and solar X-ray emissions above 1 keV has been found and analyzed. The strong similarity between the cometary SF spectra and the X-ray spectra observed from the Jupiter atmosphere with XMM-Newton [2] is analyzed in detail. Upper limits on the density of cometary nano-particles are determined through comparison of the theoretical and observational data. The X-ray SF spectra with photon energies above 1 keV are predicted for a model history of solar activity and compositions of cometary gas, dust, and ice particles, which could reflect evolutionary transformations of cometary environment. [1] Ewing, I., Christina, D. J., & Bodewits, D. et al. 2013, ApJ, 763, 66 [2] Branduardi-Raymont, G., Bhardwaj, A., & Elsner, R. F. et al. 2007, Planet. Space Sci., 55, 1126

  18. The very high energy gamma ray spectra of IES 1959+650 and Mrk 421 as measured with the Whipple 10 m telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, M.K.; Badran, H.M.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J.H.; Byrum, K.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Celik, O.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Calle Perez, I. de la; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, D.J.; Fegan, S.J.; Finley, J.P.; Fortson, L.F.; Gammell, S.; Gibbs, K.

    2005-02-21

    In observations made with the Whipple 10 m telescope, 1ES 1959+650 (z 0.048) was caught in a high flaring state in May 2002, concurrent with a high X-ray state, and in June 2002, for which there was no corresponding X-ray flare. The spectra for both of those occasions are well fitted by a power law of differential spectral index {approx} -2.8. The relative stability of the spectral index for those flares argues strongly in favour of a two-component model as to the emission zones for the two radiation regimes.Markarian 421 (z = 0.031) was observed to be in a high flaring state, at levels of {>=} 3 Crab, during March and April 2004. The average spectrum over this time period shows evidence for a cut-off in the spectrum at {approx} 5 TeV, similar to a cut-off seen during an equivalently strong episode of flaring activity in 2001. The continued appearance of this feature indicates a long term stability, either in the physical conditions at the source, or in the intervening medium (such as attenuation on the extra-galactic infra-red background radiation)

  19. XAP, a program for deconvolution and analysis of complex X-ray spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quick, James E.; Haleby, Abdul Malik

    1989-01-01

    The X-ray analysis program (XAP) is a spectral-deconvolution program written in BASIC and specifically designed to analyze complex spectra produced by energy-dispersive X-ray analytical systems (EDS). XAP compensates for spectrometer drift, utilizes digital filtering to remove background from spectra, and solves for element abundances by least-squares, multiple-regression analysis. Rather than base analyses on only a few channels, broad spectral regions of a sample are reconstructed from standard reference spectra. The effects of this approach are (1) elimination of tedious spectrometer adjustments, (2) removal of background independent of sample composition, and (3) automatic correction for peak overlaps. Although the program was written specifically to operate a KEVEX 7000 X-ray fluorescence analytical system, it could be adapted (with minor modifications) to analyze spectra produced by scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobes, and probes, and X-ray defractometer patterns obtained from whole-rock powders.

  20. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  1. X-ray M-shell spectra of multiply-charged tungsten ions produced at the energy of the electron beam of 3.9 keV at the LLNL EBIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Travis; Harris, Cliff; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Boyce, Kevin R.

    2005-05-01

    X-ray M-shell spectra of multiply-charged tungsten ions are spectroscopically studied. These spectra were collected at the LLNL EBIT-I at the energy of the electron beam of 3.9 keV and recorded by a broad-band x-ray microcalorimeter spectrometer (XRS). The XRS covered the spectral region from 3.5 to 8 å, which represented several distinct groups of lines due to 3-4, 3-5, and 3-6 transitions. The development of spectroscopic modeling of M-shell tungsten spectra is presented. Modeling indicates that Ni-like lines dominate at this electron energy and include not only the allowed E1 transitions but also the forbidden M1 and E2 transitions. The advantage of using LLNL EBIT data for the development of M-shell diagnostics of plasmas is shown. Work was supported by DOE-NNSA/NV Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-01NV14050. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the DOE by UC-LLNL under contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  2. Summarizing X-ray Stellar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunsook; Kashyap, V.; XAtlas Collaboration

    2008-05-01

    XAtlas is a spectrum database made with the High Resolution Transmission Grating on the Chandra X-ray Observatory, after painstaking detailed emission measure analysis to extract quantified information. Here, we explore the possibility of summarizing this spectral information into relatively convenient measurable quantities via dimension reduction methods. Principal component analysis, simple component analysis, projection pursuit, independent component analysis, and parallel coordinates are employed to enhance any patterned structures embedded in the high dimensional space. We discuss pros and cons of each dimension reduction method as a part of developing clustering algorithms for XAtlas. The biggest challenge from analyzing XAtlas was handling missing values that pertain astrophysical importance. This research was supported by NASA/AISRP grant NNG06GF17G and NASA contract NAS8-39073.

  3. X-ray-binary spectra in the lamp post model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, F. H.; Różańska, A.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Madej, J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The high-energy radiation from black-hole binaries may be due to the reprocessing of a lamp located on the black hole rotation axis and emitting X-rays. The observed spectrum is made of three major components: the direct spectrum traveling from the lamp directly to the observer; the thermal bump at the equilibrium temperature of the accretion disk heated by the lamp; and the reflected spectrum essentially made of the Compton hump and the iron-line complex. Aims: We aim to accurately compute the complete reprocessed spectrum (thermal bump + reflected) of black-hole binaries over the entire X-ray band. We also determine the strength of the direct component. Our choice of parameters is adapted to a source showing an important thermal component. We are particularly interested in investigating the possibility to use the iron-line complex as a probe to constrain the black hole spin. Methods: We computed in full general relativity the illumination of a thin accretion disk by a fixed X-ray lamp along the rotation axis. We used the ATM21 radiative transfer code to compute the local, energy-dependent spectrum emitted along the disk as a function of radius, emission angle and black hole spin. We then ray traced this local spectrum to determine the final reprocessed spectrum as received by a distant observer. We consider two extreme values of the black hole spin (a = 0 and a = 0.98) and discuss the dependence of the local and ray-traced spectra on the emission angle and black hole spin. Results: We show the importance of the angle dependence of the total disk specific intensity spectrum emitted by the illuminated atmosphere when the thermal disk emission is fully taken into account. The disk flux, together with the X-ray flux from the lamp, determines the temperature and ionization structure of the atmosphere. High black hole spin implies high temperature in the inner disk regions, therefore, the emitted thermal disk spectrum fully covers the iron-line complex. As a

  4. Dependence with the oxidation state of X-ray transition energies, intensities and natural line widths of CrKβ spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres Deluigi, M.; Tirao, G.; Stutz, G.; Cusatis, C.; Riveros, J. A.

    2006-06-01

    The Kβ emission spectrum of chromium was experimentally analyzed in different compounds and compared with previous data. Measurements of whole Kβ spectra were performed with a wavelength dispersive commercial XRF equipment. To study possible effects of the chemical state in the width and position of the main Kβ 1,3 line, high resolution measurements were also performed. In the latter measurements, a spectrometer based on a backdiffracting crystal analyzer with spherical focalization and synchrotron radiation monochromatic excitation was used. Kβ 1,3 line shifts in relation to metallic Cr were observed, both to higher energies (≅+1 eV) for Cr III and to lower energies (≅-0.5 eV) for Cr VI. It was also found that the natural width of CrKβ 1,3 line, the ionization energy of the 3p orbital of Cr, and the relative intensities of Kβ″ and Kβ 2,5 lines with respect to the main Kβ 1,3 line increase as the oxidation state increases. The use of these features as an index for chemical state analysis is discussed.

  5. Low-Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; ACE/CRIS Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV/nucleon have been measured with high precision as a result of experiments on the HEAO, Ulysses, and ACE spacecrafts. The observations provide energy spectra, elemental abundances, and isotopic composition for elements up through Z=30. They include both stable and radioactive nuclides that are synthesized in stars or are produced by nuclear fragmentation during diffusion at high energies through interstellar medium. From these data one obtains a rather detailed picture of the origin of low-energy cosmic rays. For refractory species, the cosmic-ray source composition closely resembles that of the Sun, suggesting that cosmic rays are accelerated from a well-mixed sample of interstellar matter. A chemical fractionation process has depleted the abundances of volatile elements relative to refractories. Using various radioactive clock isotopes it has been shown that particle acceleration occurs at least 105 years after supernova nucleosynthesis and that the accelerated particles diffuse in the Galaxy for approximately 15 Myr after acceleration. Energy spectra and secondary-to-primary ratios are reasonably well accounted for by models in which particles gain the bulk of their energy in a single encounter with a strong shock. Among the large number of species that have been measured, 22Ne stands out as the only nuclide with an abundance that is clearly much different than solar. To test models proposed to account for this anomaly, the data are being analyzed for predicted smaller effects on abundances of other nuclides. In addition to providing a detailed understanding of the origin and acceleration of low-energy cosmic rays, these data are providing constraints on the chemical evolution of interstellar matter. This work was supported by NASA at Caltech (under grant NAG5-6912), JPL, NASA/GSFC, and Washington U.

  6. Model for Cumulative Solar Heavy Ion Energy and LET Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xapsos, Mike; Barth, Janet; Stauffer, Craig; Jordan, Tom; Mewaldt, Richard

    2007-01-01

    A probabilistic model of cumulative solar heavy ion energy and lineary energy transfer (LET) spectra is developed for spacecraft design applications. Spectra are given as a function of confidence level, mission time period during solar maximum and shielding thickness. It is shown that long-term solar heavy ion fluxes exceed galactic cosmic ray fluxes during solar maximum for shielding levels of interest. Cumulative solar heavy ion fluences should therefore be accounted for in single event effects rate calculations and in the planning of space missions.

  7. Comptonization in a radiation-dominated shock, and the spectra of X-ray pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubarskij, Y. E.; Syunyaev, R. A.

    1982-10-01

    If a neutron star is accreting material at a high rate, much of the accretion energy will be released in a radiation-dominated shock. The radiation will arrest the plasma flow and withdraw energy. As the flow is braked, its electrons will multiply scatter the photons, forming distinctive radiation spectra and causing the electrons to become heated. The hard-photon tail in X-ray pulsar spectra is presumably formed by such a mechanism. These spectra have a small spectral index (alpha in the range between 0 and 1) and an exponential cutoff for (h) x (nu) approximately equal to or greater than 100 keV.

  8. Preliminary cosmic ray proton and helium spectra from the first year of the NUCLEON experiment exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Igor

    2016-07-01

    The NUCLEON cosmic ray observatory is designed to measure high energy cosmic ray composition and energy distribution. Methods of identification of charge and energy measurement are presented. Preliminary proton and helium spectra and proton to helium ratio are presented. The results are obtained from the first year of the planned exposure time.

  9. Bremsstrahlung X-ray spectra of Jupiter and Saturn - Predictions for future planetary spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1990-07-01

    Calculations of X-ray spectra due to bremsstrahlung from precipitating auroral electrons of Jupiter and Saturn are presented. The model assumes that a field-aligned potential drop accelerates a primary beam of electrons into the atmosphere where a population of secondary electrons having a power law energy dependence is generated. The spectrum at Jupiter is normalized to the soft X-ray observations of Metzger et al. (1983) at the low-energy end and constrained at the high-energy end by UV auroral energy requirements. The spectrum at Saturn is constructed by analogy to the Jovian case allowing for variation of the beam energy, energy flux, and scale size of the Saturnian aurora. The results indicate that a significant flux of X-rays is emanating from both planets which may serve as a basis for conducting planetary X-ray astronomy as a part of future spacecraft missions to the planets.

  10. Spectra and Luminosities of X-Ray Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Windsor Anthony, Jr.

    1995-01-01

    I present results of the analysis of 112 X-ray -selected and fully optically-identified quasars in four sky fields in the southern hemisphere, detected by the Rosat Position Sensitive Proportional Counters. These fields were originally studied (Boyle et al. 1990) for the ultraviolet-excess properties of objects in the fields. This is one of the largest sets of fully-identified Rosat-observed quasars. The quasars were optically identified during observing runs with the AUTOFIB multi-fiber spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope in Australia. I determine the quasars' power-law spectral index alphaE with three different methods: spectral "stacking", hardness ratios, and direct fitting, and discuss the differences between each of these methods. Both spectral stacking and the hardness ratio methods are used because several of the quasars were too dim to reliably calculate spectral indices individually. The spectral stacking method, which involves co-adding quasar spectra energy bins (after first binning the quasars themselves in redshift bins) shows that a definite change in quasar spectral index with redshift, which I have attributed to thermal bremsstrahlung emission (Morgan et al. 1992). The hardness ratio method, taken from a suggestion by Zamorani et al. (1988), uses the hardness ratios, using energy bins of 0.15-0.8 keV and 0.8-2.0 keV, and the known galactic column density N_{H } to determine the quasar power-law spectral index. I find that the hardness-ratio method yields spectral indices which do not change appreciably with redshift. I derive monochromatic X-ray and optical luminosities L_{rm x} and L opt, by using the spectral indices I found and the optical observations of the quasars. I discuss the relationship between L_{x } and Lopt, examine the optical-X-ray spectral slope alpha ox and the related L x/L_{opt } ratio and their relationship to the redshift. I finally present a model which could explain the observations.

  11. Experimental simulation of A-bomb gamma ray spectra: revisited.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E; Payne, Lester C; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Beddoe, Alun H; Charles, Monty W

    2004-01-01

    It has been reported recently that the A-bomb gamma ray spectra received by the colon of the average Japanese survivor of Hiroshima and Nagasaki may be experimentally simulated using a hospital-based Philips SL15 linear accelerator. The simulated A-bomb gamma radiation may be used in radiobiology experiments to determine, amongst other things, the biological effectiveness of the A-bomb gamma radiation. However, in that study, the electron beams from the linear accelerator were poorly defined and photon contamination was ignored. In the study reported here, a Varian Clinac 2100C linear accelerator has been used for the same purpose but with photon contamination included in better defined output electron beams. It is found that the A-bomb gamma radiation can still be matched to an acceptable degree (<10%). The cause of the slightly poorer fit was due mainly to the different ranges of energies available from the linear accelerators used. The absorbed dose received by model breasts was also estimated in this study for the same situations as in the previous study. The ratio of the breast to colon doses was found to be only (3.9 +/- 4.0)% low compared with the expected values of 1.17 and 1.16 for Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively. These results provide further confirmation of the acceptability of the simple cylindrically symmetrical body models employed in these studies to represent the average Japanese survivor.

  12. On the spectra and pulse profiles of gamma-ray pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturner, Steven J.; Dermer, Charles D.

    1994-01-01

    We model spectra and pulse profiles of gamma-ray pulsars assuming that the pulsar's magnetic axis is nearly aligned with its rotation axis. In this model, the nonthermal energy of electrons flowing outward along field lines connected to the light cylinder is efficiently converted to gamma rays via magnetic Compton scattering of optical and soft X-ray photons. The hard photons initiate a pair cascade in the pulsar magnetosphere through magnetic pair production followed by synchrotron emission. The calculated spectra are used to fit gamma-ray pulsar observations. This model produces a hollow cone of emission which can reproduce both the broad single-peaked and narrow double-peaked pulse profiles observed from gamma-ray pulsars.

  13. Energy spectra in elasto-inertial turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, P. C.; da Silva, C. B.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-07-01

    Direct numerical simulations of statistically steady homogeneous isotropic turbulence in viscoelastic fluids described by the FENE-P model are presented. Emphasis is given to large polymer relaxation times compared to the eddy turnover time, which is a regime recently termed elasto-inertial turbulence. In this regime the polymers are ineffective in dissipating kinetic energy but they play a lead role in transferring kinetic energy to the small solvent scales which turns out to be concomitant with the depletion of the usual non-linear energy cascade. However, we show that the non-linear interactions are still highly active, but they lead to no net downscale energy transfer because the forward and reversed energy cascades are nearly balanced. Finally, we show that the tendency for a steeper elasto-inertial power-law spectra is reversed for large polymer relaxation times and the spectra tend towards the usual k-5/3 functional form.

  14. Spectra of X-ray and Gamma-ray Bursts Produced by Stepping Lightning Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestin, Sebastien; Xu, Wei; Pasko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from the Earth's atmosphere in association with thunderstorm activity. TGFs were serendipitously discovered by BATSE detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory originally launched to perform observations of celestial gamma-ray sources [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994]. These events have also been detected by the RHESSI satellite [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the AGILE satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010], and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010]. Moreover, measurements have correlated TGFs with initial development stages of normal polarity intra-cloud lightning that transports negative charge upward (+IC) [e.g, Lu et al., JGR, 116, A03316, 2011]. Photon spectra corresponding to well-established model of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. However, it has been suggested that high-potential +IC lightning leaders could produce a sufficient number of energetic electrons to explain TGFs [Celestin and Pasko, JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] and Xu et al. [GRL, 39, L08801, 2012] have shown that this mechanism could explain the TGF spectrum for lightning potentials higher than 100 MV. In addition to TGFs, X-ray bursts are produced by negative lightning leaders in association with stepping processes and are observed from the ground [Dwyer et al., GRL, 32, L01803, 2005]. However, the energy spectrum of X-ray bursts from lightning is still poorly known, mainly due to the low fluence detected from the ground. In this work, we use Monte Carlo models to study the acceleration of runaway electrons in the electric field produced around lightning leader tip and the associated bremsstrahlung photon spectra observed by low-orbit satellites in the case of high potential +IC discharges and from the ground in the

  15. Detector-Response Correction of Two-Dimensional γ-Ray Spectra from Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Arnold, C. W.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    The neutron-capture reaction produces a large variety of γ-ray cascades with different γ-ray multiplicities. A measured spectral distribution of these cascades for each γ-ray multiplicity is of importance to applications and studies of γ-ray statistical properties. The DANCE array, a 4π ball of 160 BaF2 detectors, is an ideal tool for measurement of neutron-capture γ-rays. The high granularity of DANCE enables measurements of high-multiplicity γ-ray cascades. The measured two-dimensional spectra (γ-ray energy, γ-ray multiplicity) have to be corrected for the DANCE detector response in order to compare them with predictions of the statistical model or use them in applications. The detector-response correction problem becomes more difficult for a 4π detection system than for a single detector. A trial and error approach and an iterative decomposition of γ-ray multiplets, have been successfully applied to the detector-response correction. Applications of the decomposition methods are discussed for two-dimensional γ-ray spectra measured at DANCE from γ-ray sources and from the 10B(n, γ) and 113Cd(n, γ) reactions.

  16. Detector-Response Correction of Two-Dimensional γ -Ray Spectra from Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Arnold, C. W.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron-capture reaction produces a large variety of γ-ray cascades with different γ-ray multiplicities. A measured spectral distribution of these cascades for each γ-ray multiplicity is of importance to applications and studies of γ-ray statistical properties. The DANCE array, a 4π ball of 160 BaF2 detectors, is an ideal tool for measurement of neutron-capture γ-rays. The high granularity of DANCE enables measurements of high-multiplicity γ-ray cascades. The measured two-dimensional spectra (γ-ray energy, γ-ray multiplicity) have to be corrected for the DANCE detector response in order to compare them with predictions of the statistical model or use them in applications. Themore » detector-response correction problem becomes more difficult for a 4π detection system than for a single detector. A trial and error approach and an iterative decomposition of γ-ray multiplets, have been successfully applied to the detector-response correction. Applications of the decomposition methods are discussed for two-dimensional γ-ray spectra measured at DANCE from γ-ray sources and from the 10B(n, γ) and 113Cd(n, γ) reactions.« less

  17. Interatomic scattering in energy dependent photoelectron spectra of Ar clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Patanen, M.; Benkoula, S.; Nicolas, C.; Goel, A.; Antonsson, E.; Neville, J. J.; Miron, C.

    2015-09-28

    Soft X-ray photoelectron spectra of Ar 2p levels of atomic argon and argon clusters are recorded over an extended range of photon energies. The Ar 2p intensity ratios between atomic argon and clusters’ surface and bulk components reveal oscillations similar to photoelectron extended X-ray absorption fine structure signal (PEXAFS). We demonstrate here that this technique allows us to analyze separately the PEXAFS signals from surface and bulk sites of free-standing, neutral clusters, revealing a bond contraction at the surface.

  18. SPECTRA OF COSMIC-RAY PROTONS AND HELIUM PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2013-01-20

    Data obtained in the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC-2), Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM), and Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) experiments suggest that the elemental interstellar spectra of cosmic rays below the knee at a few times 10{sup 6} GeV are not simple power laws, but that they experience hardening at a magnetic rigidity of about 240 GV. Another essential feature is the difference between proton and helium energy spectra, such that the He/p ratio increases by more than 50% in the energy range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4} GV. We consider the concavity of the particle spectrum resulting from the nonlinear nature of diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) as a possible reason for the observed spectrum hardening. The increase of the helium-to-proton ratio with energy can be interpreted as a consequence of cosmic-ray acceleration by forward and reverse shocks in SNRs. The contribution of particles accelerated by reverse shocks makes the concavity of the produced overall cosmic-ray spectrum more pronounced. The spectra of protons and helium nuclei accelerated in SNRs and released into the interstellar medium are calculated. The derived steady-state interstellar spectra are in reasonably good agreement with observations.

  19. Cosmic-ray source and local interstellar spectra deduced from the isotopes of hydrogen and helium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, G. M.; Hsieh, K. C.; Simpson, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A self-consistent model for cosmic-ray hydrogen and helium propagation from the sources in the Galaxy to the orbit of earth is obtained, taking into account experimental information now available on the isotopes H-1, H-2, He-3, and He-4. The only adjustable parameters include the shape of the energy spectra of H-1 and He-4 at the time of source injection, the distribution of particle path lengths in interstellar space, and the solar modulation parameters. It is found that the allowed form of the source differential spectra of the H-1 and He-4 nuclei is dominated by a power law in total energy.

  20. Effects of axion-photon mixing on gamma-ray spectra from magnetized astrophysical sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hochmuth, Kathrin A.; Sigl, Guenter

    2007-12-15

    Astrophysical {gamma}-ray sources come in a variety of sizes and magnetizations. We deduce general conditions under which {gamma}-ray spectra from such sources would be significantly affected by axion-photon mixing. We show that, depending on strength and coherence of the magnetic field, axion couplings down to {approx}(10{sup 13}GeV){sup -1} can give rise to significant axion-photon conversions in the environment of accreting massive black holes. Resonances can occur between the axion mass term and the plasma frequency term as well as between the plasma frequency term and the vacuum Cotton-Mouton shift. Both resonances and nonresonant transitions could induce detectable features or even strong suppressions in finite energy intervals of {gamma}-ray spectra from active galactic nuclei. Such effects can occur at keV to TeV energies for couplings that are currently allowed by all experimental constraints.

  1. Chandra X-ray grating spectra of V959 Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orio, Marina; Zemko, Polina; Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud

    2016-07-01

    V959 Mon (Nova Mon 2012) was discovered in X-rays and gamma rays in the Summer of 2012, before it could be observed optically. It was observed twice with the Chandra gratings, by us in December of 2012 with the Low Energy Transmission Grating (LETG) and previously, in September of 2012, by another team with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings. Although it seems very likely that only a small fraction of the ejecta emitted X-rays in small, dense clumps, the X-ray emission of the ejecta are very important for what the teach us about the kinematics, the chemical composition and nucleosynthesis of the nova. By December, the central source had shrunk almost to pre-outburst size and was visible in X-rays, revealing a massive, hot oxygen-neon white dwarf.

  2. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  3. (HP)Ge Measurement of spectra for diagnostic X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, M S; Mota, H C; Campos, L L

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray spectra applied in diagnostic radiology to the energy range between 50 and 125 kVp, were experimentally determined using a high-purity germanium detector, (HP)Ge, coupled to a multichannel analyser. A simple stripping procedure was implemented, according to that described by Seelentag and Panzer, to correct the pulse height distribution and then to determine the photon spectra. The measurements were performed for those conditions where the X-ray beam is transmitted through Pb filters 0.2-0.7 mm thick. It was necessary to estimate the effective dose in the same way that it is done for radiology diagnosis room shielding projects. The spectra were also determined to the X-ray qualities recommended by the IEC for primary diagnostic X-ray and for X-ray beams attenuated by aluminium filters 2.5-42.5 mm thick. The spectra obtained were compared with data derived from the literature presenting good agreement. PMID:15367779

  4. Local environment of metal ions in phthalocyanines: K-edge X-ray absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Rossi, G; d'Acapito, F; Amidani, L; Boscherini, F; Pedio, M

    2016-09-14

    We report a detailed study of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectra of four transition metal phthalocyanines (MPc, M = Fe, Co, Cu and Zn). We identify the important single and multiple scattering contributions to the spectra in the extended energy range and provide a robust treatment of thermal damping; thus, a generally applicable model for the interpretation of X-ray absorption fine structure spectra is proposed. Consistent variations of bond lengths and Debye Waller factors are found as a function of atomic number of the metal ion, indicating a variation of the metal-ligand bond strength which correlates with the spatial arrangement and occupation of molecular orbitals. We also provide an interpretation of the near edge spectral features in the framework of a full potential real space multiple scattering approach and provide a connection to the local electronic structure. PMID:27510989

  5. Local environment of metal ions in phthalocyanines: K-edge X-ray absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Rossi, G; d'Acapito, F; Amidani, L; Boscherini, F; Pedio, M

    2016-09-14

    We report a detailed study of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectra of four transition metal phthalocyanines (MPc, M = Fe, Co, Cu and Zn). We identify the important single and multiple scattering contributions to the spectra in the extended energy range and provide a robust treatment of thermal damping; thus, a generally applicable model for the interpretation of X-ray absorption fine structure spectra is proposed. Consistent variations of bond lengths and Debye Waller factors are found as a function of atomic number of the metal ion, indicating a variation of the metal-ligand bond strength which correlates with the spatial arrangement and occupation of molecular orbitals. We also provide an interpretation of the near edge spectral features in the framework of a full potential real space multiple scattering approach and provide a connection to the local electronic structure.

  6. Predicted TeV Gamma-ray Spectra and Images of Shell Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, S. P.

    1999-04-01

    One supernova remnant, SN 1006, is now known to produce synchrotron X-rays (Koyama et al., 1995, Nature, 378, 255), requiring 100 TeV electrons. SN 1006 has also been seen in TeV gamma rays (Tanimori et al., 1998, ApJ, 497, L25), almost certainly due to cosmic-microwave-background photons being upscattered by those same electrons. Other young supernova remnants should also produce high-energy electrons, even if their X-ray synchrotron emission is swamped by conventional thermal X-ray emission. Upper limits to the maximum energy of shock-accelerated electrons can be found for those remnants by requiring that their synchrotron spectrum steepen enough to fall below observed thermal X-rays (Reynolds and Keohane 1999, ApJ, submitted). For those upper-limit spectra, I present predicted TeV inverse-Compton spectra and images for assumed values of the mean remnant magnetic field. Ground-based TeV gamma-ray observations of remnants may be able to put even more severe limits on the presence of highly energetic electrons in remnants, raising problems for conventional theories of galactic cosmic-ray production in supernova remnants. Detections will immediately confirm that SN 1006 is not alone, and will give mean remnant magnetic field strengths.

  7. Common origin of the high energy astronomical gamma rays, neutrinos and cosmic ray positrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2016-03-01

    We show that the observed fluxes, spectra and sky distributions of the high energy astronomical neutrinos, gamma rays and cosmic ray positrons satisfy the simple relations expected from their common production in hadronic collisions in/near source of high energy cosmic rays with diffuse matter.

  8. Spectra Transmitted by Mortar Barite in x-ray Qualities Applied in Diagnostic Radiology as Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. T., Jr.; Araújo, F. G. S.; Nogueira, M. S.; Santos, M. A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Concrete which contains water, cement and aggregate, is widely used in building construction such as medical hospitals. The CdZnTe spectrometry system was used to acquire the transmitted spectra in the RQR qualities and the stripping procedure was performed by taking into account both the contributions of efficiency and x-ray escape fraction, experimentally determined. The samples were prepared in rectangular plate format with dimensions of (5 x 5) cm with thicknesses varying from 0.2cm to 2cm and exposed to x-ray beams generated. The HVL and the mean energy in this energy range was determined.

  9. Cyclotron scattering lines in gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.; Preece, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    If cyclotron scattering, rather than absorption, is responsible for the line features observed recently in two gamma-ray burst spectra (Murakami et al., 1988), then the second and higher harmonics are due to resonant scattering events that excite the electron to Landau levels above the ground state. Here, relativistic Compton scattering cross sections are used to estimate the expected ratio of third to second harmonics in the presence of Doppler broadening. At the field strength (1.7 TG) required to give first and second harmonics at 19 keV and 38 keV, there should be no detectable third harmonic in the spectrum.

  10. X-ray spectra from convective photospheres of neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Zavlin, V.E.; Pavlov, G.G. |; Shibanov, Yu.A.; Rogers, F.J.; Iglesias, C.A.

    1996-01-17

    We present first results of modeling convective photospheres of neutron stars. We show that in photospheres composed of the light elements convection arises only at relatively low effective temperatures ({le}3 - 5 x 10{sup 4} K), whereas in the case of iron composition it arises at T{sub eff}{le} 3 x 10{sup 5}K. Convection changes the depth dependence of the photosphere temperature and the shapes of the emergent spectra. Thus, it should be taken into account for the proper interpretation of EUV/soft-X-ray observations of the thermal radiation from neutron stars.

  11. Diagnostic of dense plasmas using X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q. Z.; Zhang, J.; Li, Y. T.; Zhang, Z.; Jin, Z.; Lu, X.; Li, J.; Yu, Y. N.; Jiang, X. H.; Li, W. H.; Liu, S. Y.

    2005-12-01

    The spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray spectra emitted from a dense aluminum plasma produced by 500 J, 1 ns Nd:glass laser pulses are presented. Six primary hydrogen-like and helium-like lines are identified and simulated with the atomic physics code FLY. We find that the plasma is almost completely ionized under the experimental conditions. The highest electron density we measured reaches up to 1023 cm-3. The spatial variations of the electron temperature and density are compared with the simulations of MEDUSA hydrocode for different geometry targets. The results indicate that lateral expansion of the plasma produced with this laser beam plays an important role.

  12. Intensities of high-energy cosmic rays at Mount Kanbala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of atmospheric cosmic rays at Mt. Kanbala (520 g/sq cm.) are measured with emulsion chambers. The power indexes of the spectra are values of about 2.0 for both gamma-rays and hadrons. Those fluxes are consistent with the ones expected from the model of primary cosmic rays with heavy nuclei of high content in the energy around 10 to the 15th power eV.

  13. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra, for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 3 contains the software listings for these applications.

  14. Composition and spectra of primary cosmic-ray electrons and nuclei above 10 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, P.

    1975-01-01

    Recent experiments have extended the knowledge of the flux and energy spectra of individual cosmic-ray components to much higher energies than had previously been accessible. Both electron and nuclear components show a behavior at high energy which is unexpected, and which carries information regarding the sources and the propagation of particles between sources and observer. Electromagnetic interactions which are suffered by the electrons in interstellar space should steepen their spectrum, a steepening that would reveal the average lifetime a cosmic-ray particle spends in the galaxy. Measurements up to 1000 GeV show no such steepening. It was discovered that the composition of the nuclear species which is now measured up to 100 GeV/nucleon changes with energy. This change indicates traversal of less interstellar matter by the high energy particles than by those of lower energy.-

  15. Comparison of hard and soft x-ray photoelectron spectra of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offi, F.; Werner, W. S. M.; Sacchi, M.; Torelli, P.; Cautero, M.; Cautero, G.; Fondacaro, A.; Huotari, S.; Monaco, G.; Paolicelli, G.; Smekal, W.; Stefani, G.; Panaccione, G.

    2007-08-01

    A detailed comparison of the surface sensitivity of x-ray photoemission spectroscopy for hard and soft x rays is presented and discussed. Electron scattering parameters and their energy dependence are given for Si and two Si spectra are analyzed: a MgKα (hν=1253.6eV) excited spectrum of the Si2p and 2s lines and a hard x-ray excited spectrum (hν=5925eV) of the Si1s line. The differential inelastic scattering characteristics for Si are extracted from reflection electron energy loss spectra taken at energies of 1500 and 4000eV . Using these scattering characteristics and electron mean free paths from the literature, simulated spectra are compared with experiment. The experimental spectra are deconvoluted to give the true intrinsic line shape corresponding to the theoretical collision statistics when interference effects between intrinsic and extrinsic scattering are neglected. The magnitude of interference effects cannot be assessed by our analysis. Within the (unknown) uncertainty introduced by neglecting interference effects, it is possible to determine the relative intensity of intrinsic and extrinsic excitations. In this way, it is found that in the case of the soft x-ray excited photoelectron spectrum of the shallower electronic shells ( 2p and 2s ), intrinsic plasmon creation is rather weak, and the apparent asymmetric line shape of the spectrum might be interpreted as the fact that electron-hole pair creation dominates the intrinsic loss spectrum, while an alternative explanation in terms of surface core level shifted components is also proposed. For the deeper core electronic shell, probed with hard x rays, the opposite situation is observed: while intrinsic electron-hole pair creation was not observed, a strong contribution of intrinsic plasmon losses of about 30% was seen.

  16. Galaxy cluster thermal x-ray spectra constrain axionlike particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Joseph P.; Powell, Andrew J.; Marsh, M. C. David

    2016-06-01

    Axionlike particles (ALPs) and photons interconvert in the presence of a magnetic field. At keV energies in the environment of galaxy clusters, the conversion probability can become unsuppressed for light ALPs. Conversion of thermal x-ray photons into ALPs can introduce a steplike feature into the cluster thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum, and we argue that existing x-ray data on galaxy clusters should be sufficient to extend bounds on ALPs in the low-mass region ma≲1 ×10-12 eV down to M ˜7 ×1011 GeV , and that for 1011 GeV ray (and potentially x-ray polarization) observations of galaxy clusters.

  17. Direct analysis of molybdenum target generated x-ray spectra with a portable device.

    PubMed

    Stumbo, S; Bottigli, U; Golosio, B; Oliva, P; Tangaro, S

    2004-10-01

    In routine applications, information about the photon flux of x-ray tubes is obtained from exposure measurements and cataloged spectra. This approach relies mainly on the assumption that the real spectrum is correctly approximated by the cataloged one, once the main characteristics of the tube such as voltage, target material, anode angle, and filters are taken account of. In practice, all this information is not always available. Moreover, x-ray tubes with the same characteristics may have different spectra. We describe an apparatus that should be useful for quality control in hospitals and for characterizing new radiographic systems. The apparatus analyzes the spectrum generated by an x-ray mammographic unit. It is based on a commercial CZT produced by AMPTEK Inc. and a set of tungsten collimator disks. The electronics of the CZT are modified so as to obtain a faster response. The signal is digitized using an analog to digital converter with a sampling frequency of up to 20 MHz. The whole signal produced by the x-ray tube is acquired and analyzed off-line in order to accurately recognize pile-up events and reconstruct the emitted spectrum. The energy resolution has been determined using a calibrated x-ray source. Spectra were validated by comparison of the HVL measured using an ionization chamber.

  18. Interactive Analysis of Gamm-ray Spectra from GE Semiconductor Detectors

    1997-09-25

    GAUSS IX is a tool to interactively analyze gamma-ray spectra from Ge Semicondutor detectors. The user has full control over the view of the spectrum being analyzed and the location of the peaks and peak regions. Analysis is performed at user request to the requested peak regions. The fit of a peak region can be previewed before archival or deletion. An iterative procedure is available for calibrating the energy and width equations.

  19. Determining x-ray spectra of radiographic sources with a Compton spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda E.; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd J.; Hunter, James F.; King, Nick S. P.; Manard, Manuel J.; Merrill, Frank E.; Morgan, George L.; Sedillo, Robert; Trainham, Rusty; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Volegov, Petr

    2014-09-01

    Flash radiography is a diagnostic with many physics applications, and the characterization of the energy spectra of such sources is of interest. A Compton spectrometer has been proposed to conduct these measurements. Our Compton spectrometer is a 300 kg neodymium-iron magnet constructed by Morgan et al1, and it is designed to measure spectra in the <1 MeV to 20 MeV range. In this device, the x-rays from a radiographic source are collimated into a narrow beam directed on a converter foil. The forward-selected Compton electrons that are ejected from the foil enter the magnetic field region of the spectrometer. The electrons are imaged on a focal plane, with their position determined as a function of their energy. The x-ray spectrum is then reconstructed. Challenges in obtaining these measurements include limited dose of x-rays and the short pulse duration (about 50 ns) for time-resolved measurements. Here we present energy calibration measurements of the spectrometer using a negative ion source. The resolution of the spectrometer was measured in previous calibration experiments to be the greater of 1% or 0.1 MeV/c1. The reconstruction of spectra from a bremsstrahlung source and Co-60 source are also presented.

  20. Relativistic cosmic ray spectra in the full non-linear theory of shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.; Ellison, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The non-linear theory of shock acceleration was generalized to include wave dynamics. In the limit of rapid wave damping, it is found that a finite ave velocity tempers the acceleration of high Mach number shocks and limits the maximum compression ratio even when energy loss is important. For a given spectrum, the efficiency of relativistic particle production is essentially independent of v sub Ph. For the three families shown, the percentage of kinetic energy flux going into relativistic particles is (1) 72%, 2) 44%, and (3) 26% (this includes the energy loss at the upper energy cuttoff). Even small v sub ph, typical of the HISM, produce quasi-universal spectra that depend only weakly on the acoustic Mach number. These spectra should be close enough to e(-2) to satisfy cosmic ray source requirements.

  1. Probing symmetry and symmetry breaking in resonant soft-x-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.; Guo, J.

    1997-04-01

    Conventional non-resonant soft X-ray emission brings about information about electronic structure through its symmetry and polarization selectivity, the character of which is governed by simple dipole rules. For centro-symmetric molecules with the emitting atom at the inversion center these rules lead to selective emission through the required parity change. For the more common classes of molecules which have lower symmetry or for systems with degenerate core orbitals (delocalized over identical sites), it is merely the local symmetry selectivity that provides a probe of the local atomic orbital contribution to the molecular orbital. For instance, in X-ray spectra of first row species the intensities essentially map the p-density at each particular atomic site, and, in a molecular orbital picture, the contribution of the local p-type atomic orbitals in the LCAO description of the molecular orbitals. The situation is different for resonant X-ray fluorescence spectra. Here strict parity and symmetry selectivity gives rise to a strong frequency dependence for all molecules with an element of symmetry. In addition to symmetry selectivity the strong frequency dependence of resonant X-ray emission is caused by the interplay between the shape of a narrow X-ray excitation energy function and the lifetime and vibrational broadenings of the resonantly excited core states. This interplay leads to various observable effects, such as linear dispersion, resonance narrowing and emission line (Stokes) doubling. Also from the point of view of polarization selectivity, the resonantly excited X-ray spectra are much more informative than the corresponding non-resonant spectra. Examples are presented for nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide molecules.

  2. Influence of phantom materials on the energy dependence of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters exposed to 20-300 kV narrow x-ray spectra, 137Cs and 60Co photons.

    PubMed

    Massillon-J L, G; Cabrera-Santiago, A; Minniti, R; O'Brien, M; Soares, C G

    2014-08-01

    LiF:Mg,Ti, are widely used to estimate absorbed-dose received by patients during diagnostic or medical treatment. Conveniently, measurements are usually made in plastic phantoms. However, experimental conditions vary from one group to another and consequently, a lack of consensus data exists for the energy dependence of thermoluminescent (TL) response. This work investigated the energy dependence of TLD-100 TL-response and the effect of irradiating the dosimeters in different phantom materials for a broad range of energy photons in an attempt to understand the parameters that affect the discrepancies reported by various research groups. TLD-100s were exposed to 20-300 kV narrow x-ray spectra, (137)Cs and (60)Co photons. Measurements were performed in air, PMMA, wt1, polystyrene and TLDS as surrounding material. Total air-kerma values delivered were between 50 and 150 mGy for x-rays and 50 mGy for (137)Cs and (60)Co beams; each dosimeter was irradiated individually. Relative response, R, defined as the TL-response per air-kerma and relative efficiency, RE, described as the TL-response per absorbed-dose (obtained through Monte Carlo (MC) and analytically) were used to describe the TL-response. Both R and RE are normalized to the responses in a (60)Co beam. The results indicate that the use of different phantom materials affects the TL-response and this response varies with energy and material type. MC simulations reproduced qualitatively the experimental data: a) R increases, reaches a maximum at ~25 keV and decreases; b) RE decreases, down to a minimum at ~60 keV, increases to a maximum at ~150 keV and after decreases. Independent of the phantom materials, RE strongly depends on how the absorbed dose is evaluated and the discrepancies between RE evaluated analytically and by MC simulation are around 4% and 18%, dependent on the photon energy. The comparison between our results and that reported in the literature suggests that the discrepancy observed

  3. X-ray spectra from convective photospheres of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavlin, V. E.; Pavlov, G. G.; Shibanov, Yu. A.; Rogers, F. J.; Iglesias, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    The preliminary results from the simulation of convective photospheres of neutron stars are presented. It is shown that in photospheres composed of light elements, convection arises at relatively low effective temperatures of between 3 x 10(exp 4) and 5 x 10(exp 4) K, whereas, in the case of iron composition, it arises at temperatures of less than or equal to 3 x 10(exp 5) K. Convection changes the depth dependence of the photosphere temperature and the shapes of the emergent spectra. It is concluded that depth should be taken into account for the correct interpretation of extreme ultraviolet/soft X-ray observations of the thermal radiation from neutron stars.

  4. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    SciTech Connect

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M.; Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  5. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  6. Simulation of gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrum simulation program BSIMUL was designed to allow the operator to follow the path of a gamma-ray through a detector, shield and collimator whose dimensions are entered by the operator. It can also be used to simulate spectra that would be generated by a detector. Several improvements have been made to the program within the last few months. The detector, shield and collimator dimensions can now be entered through an interactive menu whose options are discussed below. In addition, spectra containing more than one gamma-ray energy can now be generated with the menu - for isotopes listed in the program. Adding isotopes to the main routine is also quite easy. Subroutines have been added to enable the operator to specify the material and dimensions of a collimator. This report details the progress made in simulating gamma-ray spectra for a variety of user-specified detector designs. In addition, a short discussion of work done in the related areas of pulse shape analysis and the spectral analysis is included. The pulse shape analysis and spectral analysis work is being performed pursuant to the requirements of contract F-94-C-0006, for the Advanced Research Projects Agency and the U.S. Air Force.

  7. Numerical Study of the Generation of Linear Energy Transfer Spectra for Space Radiation Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Wilson, John W.; Hunter, Abigail

    2005-01-01

    In analyzing charged particle spectra in space due to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE), the conversion of particle energy spectra into linear energy transfer (LET) distributions is a convenient guide in assessing biologically significant components of these spectra. The mapping of LET to energy is triple valued and can be defined only on open energy subintervals where the derivative of LET with respect to energy is not zero. Presented here is a well-defined numerical procedure which allows for the generation of LET spectra on the open energy subintervals that are integrable in spite of their singular nature. The efficiency and accuracy of the numerical procedures is demonstrated by providing examples of computed differential and integral LET spectra and their equilibrium components for historically large SPEs and 1977 solar minimum GCR environments. Due to the biological significance of tissue, all simulations are done with tissue as the target material.

  8. On the origin of X-ray spectra in luminous blazars

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Janiak, Mateusz; Moderski, Rafał; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg M. E-mail: mjaniak@camk.edu.pl

    2013-12-10

    Gamma-ray luminosities of some quasar-associated blazars imply jet powers reaching values comparable to the accretion power even if assuming very strong Doppler boosting and very high efficiency of gamma-ray production. With much lower radiative efficiencies of protons than of electrons, and the recent reports of very strong coupling of electrons with shock-heated protons indicated by particle-in-cell simulations, the leptonic models seem to be strongly favored over the hadronic ones. However, the electron-proton coupling combined with the external-radiation-Compton (ERC) models of gamma-ray production in leptonic models predict extremely hard X-ray spectra, with energy indices α {sub x} ∼ 0. This is inconsistent with the observed 2-10 keV slopes of blazars, which cluster around α {sub x} ∼ 0.6. This problem can be resolved by assuming that electrons can be efficiently cooled down radiatively to non-relativistic energies, or that blazar spectra are entirely dominated by the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) component up to at least 10 keV. Here, we show that the required cooling can be sufficiently efficient only at distances r < 0.03 pc. SSC spectra, on the other hand, can be produced roughly co-spatially with the observed synchrotron and ERC components, which are most likely located roughly at a parsec scale. We show that the dominant SSC component can also be produced much further than the dominant synchrotron and ERC components, at distances of ≳ 10 pc. Hence, depending on the spatial distribution of the energy dissipation along the jet, one may expect to see γ-ray/optical events with either correlated or uncorrelated X-rays. In all cases the number of e{sup +}e{sup –} pairs per proton is predicted to be very low. The direct verification of the proposed SSC scenario, and particularly the question of the co-spatiality of the SSC component with other spectral components, requires sensitive observations in the hard X-ray band. This is now possible with the

  9. The hard X-ray emission spectra from accretion columns in intermediate polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray emission from accretion columns in an intermediate polar system, GK Per, using a simple settling solution. The rate of photon emission per logarithmic energy interval can be fitted with a power law, E(exp -gamma), with gamma approximately 2.0, in agreement with observations. This index is only weakly dependent on the mass accretion rate, dot-M, for dot-M in the range of a few times 10(exp 16-18) g/s. The peak energy of the photon spectra (after photoelectric absorption) is expected to be E(sub p) approximately (5 keV) gamma(exp -1/3) (N(sub H)/10(exp 23)/sq cm)(exp 1/3) where N(sub H) is the hydrogen column density along the line of sight. The observed spectra of GK Per and possibly of V1223 Sgr suggest N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This large N(sub H) may be due to partially ionized preshock column material. Alternatively, we also consider absorption by the cool outer parts of an accretion disk. In this case the photoelectric absorption depth in the disk is a sensitive function of inclination. For GK Per the required inclination is approximately 83 deg. For mass accretion rates larger than a critical rate of approximately 10(exp 18) g/s, X-ray emission from the column accretion is significantly affected by radiation drag. Although the mass accretion rate increases dramatically during outbursts, the observed hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray luminosity will not rise proportionately. The slope and peak energy of the outburst spectra are only weakly affected. We conclude that the observed X-ray spectra can be explained by this simple analytic solution and that the production of hard X-rays from the accretion shock at the magnetic poles in the intermediate polars is in general agreement with the observations. However, since the X-ray emission and absorption depend on the mass accretion rate in a complicated manner, observed hard X-ray luminosities (greater than 2 keV) are not a good indicator of the mass

  10. Assessment of different computational models for generation of x-ray spectra in diagnostic radiology and mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Ay, M.R.; Sarkar, S.; Shahriari, M.; Sardari, D.; Zaidi, H.

    2005-06-15

    Different computational methods based on empirical or semi-empirical models and sophisticated Monte Carlo calculations have been proposed for prediction of x-ray spectra both in diagnostic radiology and mammography. In this work, the x-ray spectra predicted by various computational models used in the diagnostic radiology and mammography energy range have been assessed by comparison with measured spectra and their effect on the calculation of absorbed dose and effective dose (ED) imparted to the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom quantified. This includes empirical models (TASMIP and MASMIP), semi-empirical models (X-rayb and m, X-raytbc, XCOMP, IPEM, Tucker et al., and Blough et al.), and Monte Carlo modeling (EGS4, ITS3.0, and MCNP4C). As part of the comparative assessment, the K x-ray yield, transmission curves, and half value layers (HVLs) have been calculated for the spectra generated with all computational models at different tube voltages. The measured x-ray spectra agreed well with the generated spectra when using X-raytbc and IPEM in diagnostic radiology and mammography energy ranges, respectively. Despite the systematic differences between the simulated and reference spectra for some models, the student's t-test statistical analysis showed there is no statistically significant difference between measured and generated spectra for all computational models investigated in this study. The MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo calculations showed there is no discernable discrepancy in the calculation of absorbed dose and ED in the adult ORNL hermaphroditic phantom when using different computational models for generating the x-ray spectra. Nevertheless, given the limited flexibility of the empirical and semi-empirical models, the spectra obtained through Monte Carlo modeling offer several advantages by providing detailed information about the interactions in the target and filters, which is relevant for the design of new target and filter combinations and optimization of

  11. Particle-hole cumulant approach for inelastic losses in x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Curtis, J. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic losses in core level x-ray spectra arise from many-body excitations, leading to broadening and damping as well as satellite peaks in x-ray photoemission (XPS) and x-ray absorption (XAS) spectra. Here we present a practical approach for calculating these losses based on a cumulant representation of the particle-hole Green's function, a quasiboson approximation, and a partition of the cumulant into extrinsic, intrinsic, and interference terms. The intrinsic losses are calculated using real-time time-dependent density functional theory while the extrinsic losses are obtained from the G W approximation of the photoelectron self-energy and the interference terms are approximated. These effects are included in the spectra using a convolution with an energy dependent particle-hole spectral function. The approach elucidates the nature of the spectral functions in XPS and XAS and explains the significant cancellation between extrinsic and intrinsic losses. Edge-singularity effects in metals are also accounted for. Illustrative results are presented for the XPS and XAS of both weakly and more correlated systems.

  12. GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRA AND SPECTRAL CORRELATIONS FROM SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chhotray, Atul; Lazzati, Davide

    2015-04-01

    One of the most important unresolved issues in gamma-ray burst (GRB) physics is the origin of the prompt gamma-ray spectrum. Its general non-thermal character and the softness in the X-ray band remain unexplained. We tackle these issues by performing Monte Carlo simulations of radiation–matter interactions in a scattering dominated photon–lepton plasma. The plasma—initially in equilibrium—is driven to non-equilibrium conditions by a sudden energy injection in the lepton population, mimicking the effect of a shock wave or the dissipation of magnetic energy. Equilibrium restoration occurs due to an energy exchange between the photons and leptons. While the initial and final equilibrium spectra are thermal, the transitional photon spectra are characterized by non-thermal features such as power-law tails, high energy bumps, and multiple components. Such non-thermal features are observed at infinity if the dissipation occurs at small to moderate optical depths, and the spectrum is released before thermalization is complete. We model the synthetic spectra with a Band function and show that the resulting spectral parameters are similar to observations for a frequency range of 2–3 orders of magnitude around the peak. In addition, our model predicts correlations between the low-frequency photon index and the peak frequency as well as between the low- and high-frequency indices. We explore baryon and pair-dominated fireballs and reach the conclusion that baryonic fireballs are a better model for explaining the observed features of GRB spectra.

  13. SOHO/EPHIN energy spectra during GLE 69 and 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, Bernd; Kühl, Patrick; Dresing, Nina; Klassen, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) are solar energetic particle (SEP) events that are recorded by ground-based instrumentation. The energy of the particles is so high that they produce secondary particles in the Earth's atmosphere, i.e. protons and neutrons, which are detected as sudden increases in cosmic ray intensities measured by e.g. neutron monitors. Since the launch of SOHO in December 1995 the neutron monitor network recorded 16 GLEs. The Electron Proton Helium INstrument on board SOHO has been designed to measure protons and helium up to 53 MeV/nucleon as well as electrons up to 8.3 MeV. Above these energies, particles penetrate all detector elements and thus, a separation between different particle species becomes more complicated. Recently we developed a method that allows deriving the energy spectrum for penetrating protons up to more than 1 GeV. In this contribution we present the proton energy spectra for two of the 16 above-mentioned GLEs and compare them to previous measurements. Although there are differences of up to a factor two the overall shape of the energy spectra agree surprisingly well. Thus it has been demonstrated that EPHIN measurements are a valuable tool for understanding GLE. In addition our measurements allow the investigation of SUB GLEs that are events that are below the threshold of GLEs but may affect the ionization in the upper atmosphere.

  14. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  15. Primary cosmic ray spectra observed by RUNJOB --- spectra for heavy and all particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RUNJOB Collaboration

    1999-08-01

    The absolute fluxes of heavy cosmic ray primaries, CNO, Ne Mg Si groups and Fe comp onents are reported from RUssian Nipp on JOint Balloon (RUNJOB) experiment. Total exposure of RUNJOB turns out to b e 342.4 m2 hour at the average altitude of around 30 km in three campaigns in 1995, 1996 and 1997. Using the angular distribution of the fragments nuclei and secondary particles, and the darkness on X-ray films, the energy of the primary particle is estimated. The flux of Fe comp onent extends up to 5*1012 eV/nucleon. And summing up the observed sp ectra, we got the all particle sp ectrum up to 1015 eV/particle. Combining with OG.1.2.14 of this conference, this paer will be the full explanation of RUNJOB experiment.

  16. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  17. The soft X ray excess in Einstein quasar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Masnou, Jean-Louis; Elvis, Martin; Mcdowell, Jonathan; Arnaud, Keith

    1989-01-01

    The soft X-ray excess component is studied for a signal to noise limited subsample of 14 quasars from the WE87 sample observed with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). Detailed analysis of the IPC data, combined with Einstein Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) data where possible, and use of accurate galactic N sub H values allows estimation of the strength of any excess and improvement of constraints on the spectral slope at higher X-ray energies. A significant excess in 9 of the 14 objects is found. It is confined in all but one case to below 0.6 keV and variable in the two cases where there are multiple observations. The relation of the soft excess to other continuum properties of the quasars is investigated.

  18. A new method of reconstructing VHE γ-ray spectra: the Template Background Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgílio; Horns, Dieter; Kosack, Karl; Raue, Martin; Rowell, Gavin

    2014-08-01

    Context. Very-high-energy (VHE, E > 0.1 TeV) γ-ray emission regions with angular extents comparable to the field-of-view of current imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) require additional observations of source-free regions to estimate the background contribution to the energy spectrum. This reduces the effective observation time and deteriorates the sensitivity. Aims: A new method of reconstructing spectra from IACT data without the need of additional observations of source-free regions is developed. Its application is not restricted to any specific IACT or data format. Methods: On the basis of the template background method, which defines the background in air-shower parameter space, a new spectral reconstruction method from IACT data is developed and studied, the Template Background Spectrum (TBS); TBS is tested on published H.E.S.S. data and H.E.S.S. results. Results: Good agreement is found between VHE γ-ray spectra reported by the H.E.S.S. collaboration and those re-analysed with TBS. This includes analyses of point-like sources, sources in crowded regions, and of very extended sources down to sources with fluxes of a few percent of the Crab nebula flux and excess-to-background ratios around 0.1. However, the TBS background normalisation introduces new statistical and systematic errors which are accounted for, but may constitute a limiting case for very faint extended sources. Conclusions: The TBS method enables the spectral reconstruction of data when other methods are hampered or even fail. It does not need dedicated observations of VHE γ-ray-free regions (e.g. as the On/Off background does) and circumvents known geometrical limitations to which other methods (e.g. the reflected-region background) for reconstructing spectral information of VHE γ-ray emission regions are prone to; TBS would be, in specific cases, the only feasible way to reconstruct energy spectra.

  19. Unwrapping the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are complex phenomena. At the heart of an AGN is a relativistic accretion disk around a spinning supermassive black hole (SMBH) with an X-ray emitting corona and, sometimes, a relativistic jet. On larger scales, the outer accretion disk and molecular torus act as the reservoirs of gas for the continuing AGN activity. And on all scales from the black hole outwards, powerful winds are seen that probably affect the evolution of the host galaxy as well as regulate the feeding of the AGN itself. In this review article, we discuss how X-ray spectroscopy can be used to study each of these components. We highlight how recent measurements of the high-energy cutoff in the X-ray continuum by NuSTAR are pushing us to conclude that X-ray coronae are radiatively-compact and have electron temperatures regulated by electron-positron pair production. We show that the predominance of rapidly-rotating objects in current surveys of SMBH spin is entirely unsurprising once one accounts for the observational selection bias resulting from the spin-dependence of the radiative efficiency. We review recent progress in our understanding of fast (v˜ (0.1-0.3)c, highly-ionized (mainly visible in Fe XXV and Fe XXVI lines), high-column density winds that may dominate quasar-mode galactic feedback. Finally, we end with a brief look forward to the promise of Astro-H and future X-ray spectropolarimeters.

  20. Implications of solar flare hard X-ray ``knee'' spectra observed by RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, A. J.; Brown, J. C.; Eves, B. A. C.; Kontar, E.

    2003-08-01

    We analyse the RHESSI photon spectra of four flares that exhibit significant deviations from power laws - i.e. changes in the ``local'' Hard X-ray spectral index. These spectra are characterised by two regions of constant power law index connected by a region of changing spectral index - the ``knee''. We develop theoretical and numerical methods of describing such knees in terms of variable photon spectral indices and we study the results of their inversions for source mean thin target and collisional thick target injection electron spectra. We show that a particularly sharp knee can produce unphysical negative values in the electron spectra, and we derive inequalities that can be used to test for this without the need for an inversion to be performed. Such unphysical features would indicate that source model assumptions were being violated, particularly strongly for the collisional thick target model which assumes a specific form for electron energy loss. For all four flares considered here we find that the knees do not correspond to unphysical electron spectra. In the three flares that have downward knees we conclude that the knee can be explained in terms of transport effects through a region of non-uniform ionisation. In the other flare, which has an upward knee, we conclude that it is most likely a feature of the accelerated spectrum.

  1. Direct Measurement of Mammographic X-Ray Spectra with a Digital CdTe Detection System

    PubMed Central

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano; Principato, Fabio; Sordo, Stefano Del; Raso, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a detection system, based on a CdTe detector and an innovative digital pulse processing (DPP) system, for high-rate X-ray spectroscopy in mammography (1–30 keV). The DPP system performs a height and shape analysis of the detector pulses, sampled and digitized by a 14-bit, 100 MHz ADC. We show the results of the characterization of the detection system both at low and high photon counting rates by using monoenergetic X-ray sources and a nonclinical X-ray tube. The detection system exhibits excellent performance up to 830 kcps with an energy resolution of 4.5% FWHM at 22.1 keV. Direct measurements of clinical molybdenum X-ray spectra were carried out by using a pinhole collimator and a custom alignment device. A comparison with the attenuation curves and the half value layer values, obtained from the measured and simulated spectra, from an ionization chamber and from a solid state dosimeter, also shows the accuracy of the measurements. These results make the proposed detection system a very attractive tool for both laboratory research, calibration of dosimeters and advanced quality controls in mammography. PMID:22969406

  2. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Ackemann, M.

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which, is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 Ge V. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 Ge V range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  3. Measurement of separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the fermi large area telescope.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Atwood, W B; Baldini, L; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Bechtol, K; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Conrad, J; Cutini, S; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; Digel, S W; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Drlica-Wagner, A; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Grove, J E; Guiriec, S; Gustafsson, M; Hadasch, D; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hughes, R E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Llena Garde, M; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Madejski, G M; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Nakamori, T; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Romani, R W; Roth, M; Sadrozinski, H F-W; Sbarra, C; Schalk, T L; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Tibaldo, L; Tinivella, M; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Usher, T L; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wood, M; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S

    2012-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 and 200 GeV. We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range. The three new spectral points between 100 and 200 GeV are consistent with a fraction that is continuing to rise with energy.

  4. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY SPECTRA AND LIGHT CURVES OF V1494 AQUILAE

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrbach, J. G.; Ness, J.-U.; Starrfield, S. E-mail: Jan-Uwe.Ness@asu.edu E-mail: juness@sciops.esa.int

    2009-06-15

    We present six Chandra X-ray spectra and light curves obtained for the nova V1494 Aql (1999 No. 2) in outburst. The first three observations were taken with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) on days 134, 187, and 248 after outburst. The count rates were 1.00, 0.69, and 0.53 counts s{sup -1}, respectively. We found no significant periodicity in the ACIS light curves. The X-ray spectra show continuum emission and lines originating from N and O. We found acceptable spectral fits using isothermal APEC models with significantly increased elemental abundances of O and N for all observations. On day 248 after outburst a bright soft component appeared in addition to the fading emission lines. The Chandra observations on days 300, 304, and 727 were carried out with the High Resolution Camera/Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (LETGS). The spectra consist of continuum emission plus strong emission lines of O and N, implying a high abundance of these elements. On day 300, a flare occurred and periodic oscillations were detected in the light curves taken on days 300 and 304. This flare must have originated deep in the outflowing material since it was variable on short timescales. The spectra extracted immediately before and after the flare are remarkably similar, implying that the flare was an extremely isolated event. Our attempts to fit blackbody, cloudy, or APEC models to the LETGS spectra failed, owing to the difficulty in disentangling continuum and emission-line components. The spectrum extracted during the flare shows a significant increase in the strengths of many of the lines and the appearance of several previously undetected lines. In addition, some of the lines seen before and after the flare are not present during the flare. On day 727 only the count rate from the zeroth order could be derived, and the source was too faint for the extraction of a light curve or spectrum.

  5. Soft X-ray absorption spectra of aqueous salt solutions with highly charged cations in liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Smith, Jared D.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2010-03-11

    X-ray absorption spectra of 1M aqueous solutions of indium (III) chloride, yttrium (III) bromide, lanthanum (III) chloride, tin (IV) chloride and chromium (III) chloride have been measured at the oxygen K-edge. Relatively minor changes are observed in the spectra compared to that of pure water. SnCl{sub 4} and CrCl{sub 3} exhibit a new onset feature which is attributed to formation of hydroxide or other complex molecules in the solution. At higher energy, only relatively minor, but salt-specific changes in the spectra occur. The small magnitude of the observed spectral changes is ascribed to offsetting perturbations by the cations and anions.

  6. Ionization injection effects in x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, K. T.; Zhao, T. Z.; Cole, J. M.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Nees, J.; Wood, J. C.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-05-01

    Single photon counting techniques were used with an x-ray CCD camera to measure features of synchrotron-like x-ray spectra generated by betatron oscillations of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with different injection techniques. Measurements were made using the Hercules laser system at the University of Michigan. With a single stage gas cell, we demonstrate that pure helium gas in our wakefield accelerator will produce spectra with higher critical energies than when helium mixed with nitrogen is used. This result was not evident when a two stage gas cell was used.

  7. Determination of primary energy spectra from Maket Ani data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A. A.; Gharagyozyan, G. V.; Ghazaryan, S. S.; Hovsepyan, G. G.; Melkumyan, L. G.; Sokhoyan, S. H.; Ter-Antonyan, S. V.; Vardanyan, A. A.

    The unfolding of the primary energy spectra from size spectra measured by MAKET ANI installation is performed. The nonparametric regression method was used for estimation of energy of each detected shower. Simple method of the unfolding of size spectra was introduced as robust alternative to event-by-event analysis of EAS data. Both methods agree within experimental and methodical errors. The ways to utilize a priori knowledge for physical inference are discussed.

  8. Detector-Response Correction of Two-Dimensional γ -Ray Spectra from Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Arnold, C. W.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron-capture reaction produces a large variety of γ-ray cascades with different γ-ray multiplicities. A measured spectral distribution of these cascades for each γ-ray multiplicity is of importance to applications and studies of γ-ray statistical properties. The DANCE array, a 4π ball of 160 BaF2 detectors, is an ideal tool for measurement of neutron-capture γ-rays. The high granularity of DANCE enables measurements of high-multiplicity γ-ray cascades. The measured two-dimensional spectra (γ-ray energy, γ-ray multiplicity) have to be corrected for the DANCE detector response in order to compare them with predictions of the statistical model or use them in applications. The detector-response correction problem becomes more difficult for a 4π detection system than for a single detector. A trial and error approach and an iterative decomposition of γ-ray multiplets, have been successfully applied to the detector-response correction. Applications of the decomposition methods are discussed for two-dimensional γ-ray spectra measured at DANCE from γ-ray sources and from the 10B(n, γ) and 113Cd(n, γ) reactions.

  9. On the X-ray spectra of luminous, inhomogeneous accretion flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merloni, A.; Malzac, J.; Fabian, A. C.; Ross, R. R.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the expected X-ray spectral and variability properties of black hole accretion discs at high luminosity, under the hypothesis that radiation-pressure-dominated discs are subject to violent clumping instabilities and, as a result, have a highly inhomogeneous two-phase structure. After deriving the full accretion disc solutions explicitly in terms of the parameters of the model, we study their radiative properties both with a simple two-zone model, treatable analytically, and with radiative transfer simulations which account simultaneously for energy balance and Comptonization in the hot phase, together with reflection, reprocessing, ionization and thermal balance in the cold phase. We show that, if not only the density, but also the heating rate within these flows is inhomogeneous, then complex reflection-dominated spectra can be obtained for a high enough covering fraction of the cold phase. In general, large reflection components in the observed X-ray spectra should be associated with strong soft excesses, resulting from the combined emission of ionized atomic emission lines. The variability properties of such systems are such that, even when contributing to a large fraction of the hard X-ray spectrum, the reflection component is less variable than the power-law-like emission originating from the hot Comptonizing phase, in agreement with what is observed in many Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies and bright Seyfert 1. Our model falls within the family of those trying to explain the complex X-ray spectra of bright AGN with ionized reflection, but presents an alternative, specific, physically motivated, geometrical set-up for the complex multiphase structure of the inner regions of near-Eddington accretion flows.

  10. Spatial power-spectra from Yohkoh soft X-ray images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Petrus C. H.; Gomez, Daniel O.

    1992-01-01

    We analyze three sequences of images from active regions, and a full disk image obtained by Yohkoh's Soft X-ray Telescope. Two sequences are from a region at center disk observed through different filters, and one sequence is from the limb. After Fourier-transforming the X-ray intensity of the images we find nearly isotropic power-spectra with an azimuthally integrated slope of -2.1 for the center disk, and -2.8 for the limb images. The full-disk picture yields a spectrum of -2.4. These results are different from the active region spectra obtained with the Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope which have a slope of the order of -3.0, and we ascribe this to the difference in temperature response between the instruments. However, both the SXT and NIXT results are consistent with coronal heating as the end result of a downward quasistatic cascade (in lengthscales) of free magnetic energy in the corona, driven by footpoint motions in the photosphere.

  11. Simulation of X-ray absorption spectra with orthogonality constrained density functional theory†

    PubMed Central

    Derricotte, Wallace D.; Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2015-01-01

    Orthogonality constrained density functional theory (OCDFT) is a variational time-independent approach for the computation of electronic excited states. In this work we extend OCDFT to compute core-excited states and generalize the original formalism to determine multiple excited states. Benchmark computations on a set of 13 small molecules and 40 excited states show that unshifted OCDFT/B3LYP excitation energies have a mean absolute error of 1.0 eV. Contrary to time-dependent DFT, OCDFT excitation energies for first- and second-row elements are computed with near-uniform accuracy. OCDFT core excitation energies are insensitive to the choice of the functional and the amount of Hartree–Fock exchange. We show that OCDFT is a powerful tool for the assignment of X-ray absorption spectra of large molecules by simulating the gas-phase near-edge spectrum of adenine and thymine. PMID:25690350

  12. Measurement of Separate Cosmic-Ray Electron and Positron Spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Brogland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    We measured separate cosmic-ray electron and positron spectra with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Because the instrument does not have an onboard magnet, we distinguish the two species by exploiting the Earth's shadow, which is offset in opposite directions for opposite charges due to the Earth's magnetic field. We estimate and subtract the cosmic-ray proton background using two different methods that produce consistent results. We report the electron-only spectrum, the positron-only spectrum, and the positron fraction between 20 GeV and 200 GeV, We confirm that the fraction rises with energy in the 20-100 GeV range and determine for the first time that it continues to rise between 100 and 200 GeV,

  13. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects

  14. The x ray variability of NGC6814: Power spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Done, C.; Madejski, G. M.; Mushotsky, R. F.; Turner, T. J.; Koyama, K.; Kunieda, H.

    1992-01-01

    Simulation techniques are used to obtain the X-ray variability power spectrum of unevenly sampled GINGA data from NGC6814. A simple power law is not an adequate description of the power spectrum, with the residuals showing excess power on timescales consistent with the periodicity seen in EXOSAT observations of this object. However the shape of the folded lightcurve is very different, with 3 main peaks, two of which are separated by an extremely sharp dip instead of the single peak and small harmonic structure observed by EXOSAT. Using the dip as a fiducial mark, a second GINGA observation of this source taken one year later is found to be consistent with being completely periodic and phase coherent with this first GINGA observation. Thus the period is consistent with being constant over a period of 6 years, but phase coherence is only maintained on timescales of approximately 1 year. Over 75 percent of the total source variability is due to the periodic component (r.m.s. amplitude of 36 percent). The residual variability can be described as the more usual 'flicker noise' f(exp -1.1) powerlaw. This shows no apparent high frequency break on timescales greater than 300 seconds. Subtle differences in the shape of the folded light curve with energy, and the very large amount of power in the periodic component suggest occultation as its origin, though amplification of variability from an X-ray emitting 'hot spot' at the disk inner radius through gravitational lensing is also possible. The former suffers from the very arbitrary nature of the periodic timescale, while the latter is unattractive as it cannot simply explain the lack of high frequency break in the residual power. That these models probably fail to provide an adequate explanation may be due to the added complexity of anisotropy of the X-ray emission, suggested by the discrepancy between the lack of soft photons implied by the flat spectrum and the copious source of soft photons available from reprocessing in

  15. Study on Properties of Energy Spectra of the Molecular Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    The energy-spectra of nonlinear vibration of molecular crystals such as acetanilide have been calculated by using discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation appropriate to the systems, containing various interactions. The energy levels including higher excited states are basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide. We further give the features of distribution of the energy-spectra for the acetanilide. Using the energy spectra we also explained well experimental results obtained by Careri et al..

  16. Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, H.; Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.

    1979-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra in molecular fluorine, for energy losses from 0 to 17.0 eV, have been taken at incident electron energies of 30, 50, and 90 eV and scattering angles from 5 to 140 deg. Features in the spectra above 11.5 eV energy loss agree well with the assignments recently made from optical spectroscopy. Excitations of many of the eleven repulsive valence excited electronic states are observed and their location correlates reasonably well with recent theoretical results. Several of these excitations have been observed for the first time and four features, for which there are no identifications, appear in the spectra.

  17. Cosmic ray spectral deformation caused by energy determination errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Per; Wannemark, Conny

    2005-08-01

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the maximum detectable rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  18. The X-ray spectra of galaxies. I - Spectral fits of individual galaxies and X-ray colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, D.-W.; Fabbiano, G.; Trinchieri, G.

    1992-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of normal galaxies is investigated systematically by using the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) data in the Einstein data bank. In addition to the standard model fitting technique, X-ray colors are introduced in order to extract spectral information from the fainter X-ray sources. Spectral parameters for 43 galaxies and X-ray colors for 127 galaxies are presented.

  19. X-RAY SPECTRA FROM MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF ACCRETING BLACK HOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Noble, Scott C. E-mail: jhk@pha.jhu.edu

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a new global radiation transport code coupled to a general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an accreting, non-rotating black hole. For the first time, we are able to explain from first principles in a self-consistent way all the components seen in the X-ray spectra of stellar-mass black holes, including a thermal peak and all the features associated with strong hard X-ray emission: a power law extending to high energies, a Compton reflection hump, and a broad iron line. Varying only the mass accretion rate, we are able to reproduce a wide range of X-ray states seen in most galactic black hole sources. The temperature in the corona is T{sub e} {approx} 10 keV in a boundary layer near the disk and rises smoothly to T{sub e} {approx}> 100 keV in low-density regions far above the disk. Even as the disk's reflection edge varies from the horizon out to Almost-Equal-To 6M as the accretion rate decreases, we find that the shape of the Fe K{alpha} line is remarkably constant. This is because photons emitted from the plunging region are strongly beamed into the horizon and never reach the observer. We have also carried out a basic timing analysis of the spectra and find that the fractional variability increases with photon energy and viewer inclination angle, consistent with the coronal hot spot model for X-ray fluctuations.

  20. On the possibility of observing cosmic ray sources in high energy gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    If cosmic rays are accelerated by strong shocks, then cosmic ray sources should be characterized by spectra, dN/dE alpha E exp -(2.0-2.2), reflecting the strength of those shocks. This is expected from the 'standard leaky box' model of cosmic ray propagation in which the source spectra are harder than the observed spectra because higher energy particles have shorter residence times in the galactic magnetic fields. Furthermore, data on cosmic ray nucleons suggest that these sources might be surrounded by material. If the latter is true, such sources should be observable in gamma rays at energies beyond 1 GeV where the angular resolution of gamma-ray telescopes is optimized and the background is significantly reduced. For identified sources, the source location accuracy can be shown to improve with increasing energy in spite of the decreasing statistics, as long as the gamma-ray spectrum is harder than dN/dE alpha E exp -gamma. A Monte Carlo model is used to predict the photon spectra which would be expected from cosmic ray sources under varying assumptions about the strength of the shocks in the acceleration region.

  1. Galactic Soft X-ray Emission Revealed with Spectroscopic Study of Absorption and Emission Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Takei, Y.; Hagihara, T.; Yoshino, T.; Wang, Q. D.; Yao, Y.; McCammon, D.

    2010-03-01

    Spectroscopic study of Oxygen emission/absorption lines is a new tool to investigate the nature of the soft X-ray background. We investigated the emission spectra of 14 fields obtained by Suzaku, and detected OVII and OVIII lines separately. There is an almost isotropic OVII line emission with 2 LU intensity. As the attenuation length in the Galactic plane for that energy is short, that OVII emission should arise within 300 pc of our neighborhood. In comparison with the estimated emission measure for the local bubble, the most plausible origin of this component is the solar wind charge exchange with local interstellar materials. Another component presented from the correlation between the OVII and OVIII line intensity is a thermal emission with an apparent temperature of 0.2 keV with a field-to-field fluctuation of 10% in temperature, while the intensity varies about a factor of 4. By the combination analysis of the emission and the absorption spectra, we can investigate the density and the scale length of intervening plasma separately. We analyzed the Chanrdra grating spectra of LMC X-3 and PKS 2155-304, and emission spectra toward the line of sight by Suzaku. In both cases, the combined analysis showed that the hot plasma is not iso-thermal nor uniform. Assuming an exponential disk distribution, the thickness of the disk is as large as a few kpc. It suggests that there is a thick hot disk or hot halo surrounding our Galaxy, which is similar to X-ray hot haloes around several spiral galaxies.

  2. Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far-IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the intergalactic photon density as a function of both energy and redshift for 0energies from.003 eV to the Lyman limit cutoff at 13.6 eV in a (Omega)CDM universe with (Omega)(Lambda)=0.7 and (Omega)m=0.3. The basic features of our backward-evolution model for galaxies were developed in earlier papers by Malkan & Stecker. With a few improvements, we find that this evolutionary model gives predictions of new deep number counts from Spitzer, as well as a calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the diffuse infrared background, which are in good agreement with the data. We then use our calculated intergalactic photon densities to extend previous work on the absorption of high-energy Gamma-rays in intergalactic space owing to interactions with low-energy photons and the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation. We calculate the optical depth of the universe, Tau , for Gamma-rays having energies from 4 GeV to 100 TeV emitted by sources at redshifts from 0 to 5. We also give an analytic fit with numerical coefficients for approximating (E(Gamma), z). As an example of the application of our results, we calculate the absorbed spectrum of the blazar PKS 2155-304 at z=0.117 and compare it with the spectrum observed by the HESS air Cerenkov Gamma-ray telescope array.

  3. Photoluminescence and radioluminescence spectra of x-ray phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatovych, M.; Kelemen, A.; Peto, A.; Chuiko, O.

    2003-04-01

    In the present paper a comparative spectral study -- steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PhL) and radioluminescence (RL) -- of Eu-doped phosphors in different host lattices: BaFCl;Sr3(PO4)2; Y2O2S;Y2O3 is reported. Steady state and time-resolved (induced by X-Ray tube, N2-laser and high-energy accelerated electrons respectively) PhL and RL measurements were performed. Bright mono-band and fine-structure line emissions in the blue-green and orange-red region were recorded in PhL and RL for all phosphors. The spectroscopic investigation permits the following conclusions: (i) The spectral patterns, decay curves and life-times observed in both PhL and RL are basically the same for all phosphors. On these observations it was assumed that similar luminescent species are involved in the both PhL and RL processes namely: mono-species Eu2+ and Eu3+ and their clusters (ii) Strong host-lattice influence on the status of Eu in the samples under consideration reflected in the spectral pattern, life-time and quantum efficiency was revealed.

  4. SPECTRA OF COSMIC RAY ELECTRONS AND DIFFUSE GAMMA RAYS WITH THE CONSTRAINTS OF AMS-02 AND HESS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ding; Jin, Hong-Bo; Huang, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746–2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  5. Spectra of Cosmic Ray Electrons and Diffuse Gamma Rays with the Constraints of AMS-02 and HESS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ding; Huang, Jing; Jin, Hong-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, AMS-02 reported their results of cosmic ray (CR) observations. In addition to the AMS-02 data, we add HESS data to estimate the spectra of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays above TeV. In the conventional diffusion model, a global analysis is performed on the spectral features of CR electrons and the diffuse gamma rays by the GALRPOP package. The results show that the spectrum structure of the primary component of CR electrons cannot be fully reproduced by a simple power law and that the relevant break is around 100 GeV. At the 99% confidence level (C.L.) the injection indices above the break decrease from 2.54 to 2.35, but the ones below the break are only in the range of 2.746–2.751. The spectrum of CR electrons does not need to add TeV cutoff to also match the features of the HESS data. Based on the difference between the fluxes of CR electrons and their primary components, the predicted excess of CR positrons is consistent with the interpretation that these positrons originate from a pulsar or dark matter. In the analysis of the Galactic diffuse gamma rays with the indirect constraint of AMS-02 and HESS data, it is found that the fluxes of Galactic diffuse gamma rays are consistent with the GeV data of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) in the high-latitude regions. The results indicate that inverse Compton scattering is the dominant component in the range of hundreds of GeV to tens of TeV, respectively from the high-latitude regions to the low ones, and in all of the regions of the Galaxy the flux of diffuse gamma rays is less than that of CR electrons at the energy scale of 20 TeV.

  6. Bethe-Salpeter Equation Approach for Calculations of X-ray Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, John

    X-ray spectroscopy is a powerful and widely used tool for the investigation of the electronic structure of a large variety of solid state materials, including crystals materials, liquids, amorphous solids, molecules, and extended states such as clusters or interfaces. The local nature of x-ray mediated electronic excitations, involving transitions to or from localized, atomic-like, core levels, makes them ideal probes of local electronic properties: bonding character, charge transfer, and local geometry. The interpretation of spectra relies on modeling the excitations accurately to provide a concrete connection between specific properties of a system and the resulting x-ray spectrum. As experimental techniques and facilities have improved, including third generation synchrotron sources and the advent of x-ray free electron lasers, measurements have been taken on wider ranges of systems, exploring the effects of temperature and pressure, and at higher resolutions than before, but theoretical techniques have lagged. Our goal is to develop a first-principles theoretical framework capable of achieving quantitative agreement with x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) experiments. This thesis aims to develop the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE), a particle-hole Green's function method, for describing the excited electronic state produced in core-level x-ray absorption and related spectroscopies. Building upon density functional theory along with self-energy corrections, our approach provides connection to experiment with minimal adjustable parameters, to both aid in interpretation and highlight unaccounted for physical processes. While a fully parameter-free method for calculating x-ray spectroscopy remains elusive, our method presented here allows for quantitative comparison to experiment without system-dependent fits. This method has been implemented in the OCEAN software package, and results are presented for both insulating and metallic materials, including 3d

  7. Signatures of a Two Million Year Old Supernova in the Spectra of Cosmic Ray Protons, Antiprotons, and Positrons.

    PubMed

    Kachelrieß, M; Neronov, A; Semikoz, D V

    2015-10-30

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above ~20  GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active approximately two million years ago and has injected (2-3)×10^{50} erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited ^{60}Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust.

  8. Signatures of a Two Million Year Old Supernova in the Spectra of Cosmic Ray Protons, Antiprotons, and Positrons.

    PubMed

    Kachelrieß, M; Neronov, A; Semikoz, D V

    2015-10-30

    The locally observed cosmic ray spectrum has several puzzling features, such as the excess of positrons and antiprotons above ~20  GeV and the discrepancy in the slopes of the spectra of cosmic ray protons and heavier nuclei in the TeV-PeV energy range. We show that these features are consistently explained by a nearby source which was active approximately two million years ago and has injected (2-3)×10^{50} erg in cosmic rays. The transient nature of the source and its overall energy budget point to the supernova origin of this local cosmic ray source. The age of the supernova suggests that the local cosmic ray injection was produced by the same supernova that has deposited ^{60}Fe isotopes in the deep ocean crust. PMID:26565453

  9. High energy gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    High energy gamma ray astronomy has evolved with the space age. Nonexistent twenty-five years ago, there is now a general sketch of the gamma ray sky which should develop into a detailed picture with the results expected to be forthcoming over the next decade. The galactic plane is the dominant feature of the gamma ray sky, the longitude and latitude distribution being generally correlated with galactic structural features including the spiral arms. Two molecular clouds were already seen. Two of the three strongest gamma ray sources are pulsars. The highly variable X-ray source Cygnus X-3 was seen at one time, but not another in the 100 MeV region, and it was also observed at very high energies. Beyond the Milky Way Galaxy, there is seen a diffuse radiation, whose origin remains uncertain, as well as at least one quasar, 3C 273. Looking to the future, the satellite opportunities for high energy gamma ray astronomy in the near term are the GAMMA-I planned to be launched in late 1987 and the Gamma Ray Observatory, scheduled for launch in 1990. The Gamma Ray Observatory will carry a total of four instruments covering the entire energy range from 30,000 eV to 3 x 10 to the 10th eV with over an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity relative to previous satellite instruments.

  10. Monte Carlo determination of emerging energy spectra for diagnostically realistic radiopharmaceutical distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubal, L. G.; Harrell, C. R.; Esser, P. D.

    1990-12-01

    In order to realistically define the internal organs of a representative human, 150 transverse CT scans of an (average) male patient were acquired from head to mid-thigh on the GE 9800 Quick scanner. The reconstructed transverse slices were read into a microVAX 3500 and members of the medical staff outlined 42 separate internal organs contained in the transverse slice. This digitized human phantom serves as an input to a Monte Carlo program which models photoelectric absorption and scatter processes of gamma-rays in matter. The organs can be "filled" with variable amounts of radiopharmaceuticals and the simulation computes the emerging energy spectra for a given source distribution and detector position. The simulation follows gamma-ray histories out to a maximum of 32 scatter events. Scatter spectra are histogrammed into energy distributions of gamma-rays which have undergone a specific number of scatter events before emerging from the phantom. A sum of all these scatter spectra yields the simulated total spectra. Simulated total spectra of diagnostically relevant human distributions are compared to spectra acquired from nuclear medicine clinical patients.

  11. Comparative analysis of characteristic electron energy loss spectra and inelastic scattering cross-section spectra of Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, A. S.; Igumenov, A. Yu.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Zhigalov, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The inelastic electron scattering cross section spectra of Fe have been calculated based on experimental spectra of characteristic reflection electron energy loss as dependences of the product of the inelastic mean free path by the differential inelastic electron scattering cross section on the electron energy loss. It has been shown that the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra have certain advantages over the electron energy loss spectra in the analysis of the interaction of electrons with substance. The peaks of energy loss in the spectra of characteristic electron energy loss and inelastic electron scattering cross sections have been determined from the integral and differential spectra. It has been shown that the energy of the bulk plasmon is practically independent of the energy of primary electrons in the characteristic electron energy loss spectra and monotonically increases with increasing energy of primary electrons in the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra. The variation in the maximum energy of the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra is caused by the redistribution of intensities over the peaks of losses due to various excitations. The inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra have been analyzed using the decomposition of the spectra into peaks of the energy loss. This method has been used for the quantitative estimation of the contributions from different energy loss processes to the inelastic electron scattering cross-section spectra of Fe and for the determination of the nature of the energy loss peaks.

  12. Gamma ray Emission Spectra from Dark matter annihilation in dwarf galaxy Draco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duorah, Kalpana

    2015-08-01

    The gamma ray emission from Dark Matter annihilation in the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Draco has been studied. Dwarf Spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are through to be the repository of dark matter due to their high mass to light ratio. Draco is believed to emit energy due to certain dark matter candidates. One of the most motivated dark matter appears to be the neutralino as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard model(MSSM). The mass of the neutralino is constrained to be in the range 6GeV to 100TeV by the CMB measurements and accelerator searches. Gamma Ray Spectra and fluxes have been calculated for neutral no annihilation over a mass range (10-100) GeV. The gamma ray flux from the annihilation of 100GeVneutralino in the dSph galaxy Draco is found to be ~1.6x10^(-10) cm^(-2)s^(-1)GeV^(-1) . This is found to be agreeable with the observed flux as measured from a NFW density profile for dark matter distribution in Draco. The gamma ray distribution for neutral no annihilation shows a maximum value near the centre and found to falls off as radially.

  13. The spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, F. K.; Matteson, J. L.; Peterson, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    Observations made by the Hard X-ray and Low Energy Gamma-Ray Experiment on board HEAO-1 of the spectra and light curves of two gamma-ray bursts for which localized arrival directions will become available are presented. The burst of October 20, 1977 is found to exhibit a fluence of 0.000031 + or - 0.000005 erg/sq cm over the energy range 0.135-2.05 MeV and a duration of 38.7 sec, while that of November 10, 1977 is found to have a fluence of 0.000021 + or - 0.000008 erg/sq cm between 0.125 and 3 MeV over 2.8 sec. The light curves of both bursts exhibit time fluctuations down to the limiting time resolution of the detectors. The spectrum of the October burst can be fit by a power law of index -1.93 + or -0.16, which is harder than any other gamma-burst spectrum yet reported. The spectrum of the second burst is softer (index -2.4 + or - 0.7), and is consistent with the upper index in the double power law fit to the burst of April 27, 1972.

  14. X-ray spectra and time variability of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of broad line active galactic nuclei (AGN) of all types (Seyfert I's, NELG's, broadline radio galaxies) are well fit by a power law in the .5 to 100 keV band of man energy slope alpha = .68 + or - .15. There is, as yet, no strong evidence for time variability of this slope in a given object. The constraints that this places on simple models of the central energy source are discussed. BL Lac objects have quite different X-ray spectral properties and show pronounced X-ray spectral variability. On time scales longer than 12 hours most radio quiet AGN do not show strong, delta I/I .5, variability. The probability of variability of these AGN seems to be inversely related to their luminosity. However characteristics timescales for variability have not been measured for many objects. This general lack of variability may imply that most AGN are well below the Eddington limit. Radio bright AGN tend to be more variable than radio quiet AGN on long, tau approx 6 month, timescales.

  15. Cosmic ray LET spectra and doses on board Cosmos-2044 biosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. W., Jr.; Parnell, T. A.; Dudkin, V. E.; Kovalev, E. E.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Beaujean, R.; Heilmann, C.

    1995-01-01

    Results of the experiments on board Cosmos-2044 (Biosatellite 9) are presented. Various nuclear track detectors (NTD) (dielectric, AgCl-based, nuclear emulsions) were used to obtain the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra inside and outside the satellite. The spectra from the different NTDs have proved to be in general agreement. The results of LET spectra calculations using two different models are also presented. The resultant LET distributions are used to calculate the absorbed and equivalent doses and the orbit-averaged quality factors (QF) of the cosmic rays (CR). Absorbed dose rates inside (approximately 20 g cm (exp -2) shielding) and outside (1 g cm(exp -2) the spacecraft, omitting electrons, were found to be 4.8 and 8.6 mrad d (exp -1), respectively, while the corresponding equivalent doses were 8.8 and 19.7 mrem d(exp -1). The effects of the flight parameters on the total fluence of, and on the dose from the CR particles are analyzed. Integral dose distributions of the detected particles are also determined. The LET values which separate absorbed and equivalent doses into 50% intervals are estimated. The CR-39 dielectric NTD is shown to detect 20-30% of the absorbed dose and 60-70% of the equivalent dose in the Cosmos-2044 orbit. The influence of solar activity phase on the magnitude of CR flux is discussed.

  16. Examining molecular clouds in the Galactic Centre region using X-ray reflection spectra simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, M.; Chernyakova, M.; Terrier, R.; Goldwurm, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the centre of our galaxy lies a super-massive black hole, identified with the radio source Sagittarius A⋆. This black hole has an estimated mass of around 4 million solar masses. Although Sagittarius A⋆ is quite dim in terms of total radiated energy, having a luminosity that is a factor of 1010 lower than its Eddington luminosity, there is now compelling evidence that this source was far brighter in the past. Evidence derived from the detection of reflected X-ray emission from the giant molecular clouds in the galactic centre region. However, the interpretation of the reflected emission spectra cannot be done correctly without detailed modelling of the reflection process. Attempts to do so can lead to an incorrect interpretation of the data. In this paper we present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation code we developed in order to fully model the complex processes involved in the emerging reflection spectra. The simulated spectra can be compared to real data in order to derive model parameters and constrain the past activity of the black hole. In particular we apply our code to observations of Sgr B2, in order to constrain the position and density of the cloud and the incident luminosity of the central source. The results of the code have been adapted to be used in Xspec by a large community of astronomers.

  17. Electron spectra of xenon clusters irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft-x-ray laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Takiyama, K.; Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T.

    2011-11-15

    Xenon clusters were irradiated with plasma soft-x-ray laser pulses (having a wavelength of 13.9 nm, time duration of 7 ps, and intensities of up to 10 GW/cm{sup 2}). The laser photon energy was high enough to photoionize 4d core electrons. The cross section is large due to a giant resonance. The interaction was investigated by measuring the electron energy spectra. The photoelectron spectra for small clusters indicate that the spectral width due to the 4d hole significantly broadens with increasing cluster size. For larger clusters, the electron energy spectra evolve into a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, as a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma is generated.

  18. Hard-X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei in the INTEGRAL complete sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, M.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Stephen, J. B.; Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Ubertini, P.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present the hard-X-ray spectral analysis of a complete sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected by INTEGRAL/IBIS. In conjunction with IBIS spectra, we make use of Swift/BAT data, with the aim of cross-calibrating the two instruments, studying source variability and constraining some important spectral parameters. We find that flux variability is present in at least 14 per cent of the sample, while spectral variability is found only in one object. There is general good agreement between BAT and IBIS spectra, despite a systematic mismatch of about 22 per cent in normalization. When fitted with a simple power-law model, type 1 and type 2 sources appear to have very similar average photon indices, suggesting that they are powered by the same mechanism. As expected, we also find that a simple power law does not always describe the data sufficiently well, thus indicating a certain degree of spectral complexity, which can be ascribed to features like a high energy cut-off and/or a reflection component. Fixing the reflection to be 0, 1 or 2, we find that our sample covers quite a large range in photon indices as well as cut-off energies; however, the spread is due only to a small number of objects, while the majority of the AGNs lie within well-defined boundaries of photon index (1 ≤ Γ ≤ 2) and cut-off energy (30 ≤ Ecut ≤ 300 keV).

  19. X-Ray Spectra from MHD Simulations of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Noble, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a new global radiation transport code coupled to a general relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic simulation of an accreting, nonrotating black hole. For the first time, we are able to explain from first principles in a self-consistent way the X-ray spectra observed from stellar-mass black holes, including a thermal peak, Compton reflection hump, power-law tail, and broad iron line. Varying only the mass accretion rate, we are able to reproduce the low/hard, steep power-law, and thermal-dominant states seen in most galactic black hole sources. The temperature in the corona is T(sub e) 10 keV in a boundary layer near the disk and rises smoothly to T(sub e) greater than or approximately 100 keV in low-density regions far above the disk. Even as the disk's reflection edge varies from the horizon out to approximately equal to 6M as the accretion rate decreases, we find that the shape of the Fe Ka line is remarkably constant. This is because photons emitted from the plunging region are strongly beamed into the horizon and never reach the observer. We have also carried out a basic timing analysis of the spectra and find that the fractional variability increases with photon energy and viewer inclination angle, consistent with the coronal hot spot model for X-ray fluctuations.

  20. Cyclotron resonant scattering in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. C. L.; Lamb, D. Q.; Loredo, T. J.; Wasserman, I. M.; Salpeter, E. E.

    1989-01-01

    Fits of theoretical spectra from Monte Carlo radiation-transfer calculations to dips at approximately 20 and 40 keV in a spectrum of the gamma-ray burst source GB 880 205 give best-fit values and 68 percent-confidence intervals for the magnetic field of (1.71 + or - 0.07) x 10 to the 12th G, the electron density of (1.2 + or - 0.6) x 10 to the 21st electrons/cm-squared, and the cosine of the viewing angle relative to the field of 0.31 + or - 0.05. The dips observed at approximately 20 keV in the spectra are interpreted as cyclotron resonant scattering, in which electrons undergo radiative 0 to 1 to 0 Landau transitions initiated by photons near the first harmonic. Physical self-consistency fixes the temperature, and the equilibrium temperature equals 5.3 + 0.3 or - 0.2 keV. These results suggest that this gamma-ray burst and many others which exhibit a low-energy dip originate from strongly magnetic neutron stars and are galactic in origin.

  1. LiF:Mg,Ti TLD response as a function of photon energy for moderately filtered x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to 60Co.

    PubMed

    Nunn, A A; Davis, S D; Micka, J A; DeWerd, L A

    2008-05-01

    The response of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of photon energy was determined using irradiations with moderately filtered x-ray beams in the energy range of 20-250 kVp relative to the response to irradiations with 60Co photons. To determine if the relative light output from LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs per unit air kerma as a function of photon energy can be predicted using calculations such as Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, measurements from the x-ray beam irradiations were compared with MC calculated results, similar to the methodology used by Davis et al. [Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)]. TLDs were irradiated in photon beams with well-known air kerma rates using the National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable M-series x-ray beams in the range of 20-250 kVp. For each x-ray beam, several sets of TLDs were irradiated for times corresponding to different air kerma levels to take into account any dose nonlinearity. TLD light output was then compared to that from several sets of TLDs irradiated at similar corresponding air kerma levels using a 60Co irradiator. The MC code MCNP5 was used to account for photon scatter and attenuation in the holder and TLDs and was used to calculate the predicted relative TLD light output per unit air kerma for irradiations with each of the experimentally used photon beams. The measured relative TLD response as a function of photon energy differed by up to 13% from the MC calculations. We conclude that MC calculations do not accurately predict the relative response of TLDs as a function of photon energy, consistent with the conclusions of Davis et al. [Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)]. This is likely due to complications in the solid state physics of the thermoluminescence process that are not incorporated into the simulation.

  2. LiF:Mg,Ti TLD response as a function of photon energy for moderately filtered x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, A. A.; Davis, S. D.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2008-05-15

    The response of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of photon energy was determined using irradiations with moderately filtered x-ray beams in the energy range of 20-250 kVp relative to the response to irradiations with {sup 60}Co photons. To determine if the relative light output from LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs per unit air kerma as a function of photon energy can be predicted using calculations such as Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, measurements from the x-ray beam irradiations were compared with MC calculated results, similar to the methodology used by Davis et al. [Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)]. TLDs were irradiated in photon beams with well-known air kerma rates using the National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable M-series x-ray beams in the range of 20-250 kVp. For each x-ray beam, several sets of TLDs were irradiated for times corresponding to different air kerma levels to take into account any dose nonlinearity. TLD light output was then compared to that from several sets of TLDs irradiated at similar corresponding air kerma levels using a {sup 60}Co irradiator. The MC code MCNP5 was used to account for photon scatter and attenuation in the holder and TLDs and was used to calculate the predicted relative TLD light output per unit air kerma for irradiations with each of the experimentally used photon beams. The measured relative TLD response as a function of photon energy differed by up to 13% from the MC calculations. We conclude that MC calculations do not accurately predict the relative response of TLDs as a function of photon energy, consistent with the conclusions of Davis et al. [Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 106, 33-43 (2003)]. This is likely due to complications in the solid state physics of the thermoluminescence process that are not incorporated into the simulation.

  3. Quasar X-Ray Spectra At z=1.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2001-01-01

    The predicted counts for ASCA observation was much higher than actually observed counts in the quasar. However, there are three weak hard x-ray sources in the GIS field. We are adding them to the source counts in modeling of hard x-ray background. The work is in progress. We have published a paper in Ap.J. on the luminosity function and the quasar evolution. Based on the theory described in this paper we are predicting a number of sources and their contribution to the x-ray background at different redshifts. These model predictions will be compared to the observed data in the final paper.

  4. Laboratory Studies of X-ray Spectra Formed by Charge Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Ali, R.; Brown, G. V.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F.

    2013-04-01

    Charge exchange between ions and neutral atoms or molecules has been accepted at an important soft producing process in our solar system. By extension, charge exchange may contribute to the X-ray emission of circumstellar material. It may also produce X-ray emission at the boundaries of supernova ejecta and star burst galaxies, or whenever hot plasma collides with neutral matter. X-ray spectra of K-shell and L-shell ions formed by charge exchange have now been studied in a variety of laboratory settings. These experiments have shown several characteristic features of line formation by charge exchange when compared to the X-ray emission produced by electron-impact excitation, e.g., enhancement emission of forbidden lines and of lines from levels with high principal quantum number. They have also shown a dependence on the interaction gas and on the energy of the ion-neutral collision. Moreover, the transfer of multiple electrons is typically preferred, provided the donor molecules or atoms have multiple valence-shell electrons. The laboratory measurements are in qualitative agreement with theory. However, the details of the observed X-ray spectra, especially those recorded with high spectral resolution, can differ substantially from predictions, especially for spectra produced at collision velocities equal to or lower than those found in thermal plasmas or produced with neutral gases other than atomic hydrogen. Puzzling discrepancies can be noted, such as enhanced emission from an upper level with the 'wrong' principal quantum number. Even more puzzling is a recent experiment in which two, co-mixed bare ion species of similar atomic number produce very different Lyman series emission upon charge exchange with a given neutral gas, defying both theoretical predictions and empirical scaling. Laboratory measurements have also shown that some of the characteristic features of charge exchange can be reproduced by radiative electron capture, i.e., by capture of a continuum

  5. New Observations of Soft X-ray (0.5-5 keV) Solar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Mason, J. P.; Jones, A. R.; Warren, H. P.

    2013-12-01

    The solar corona is the brightest source of X-rays in the solar system, and the X-ray emission is highly variable on many time scales. However, the actual solar soft X-ray (SXR) (0.5-5 keV) spectrum is not well known, particularly during solar quiet periods, as, with few exceptions, this energy range has not been systematically studied in many years. Previous observations include high-resolution but very narrow-band spectra from crystal spectrometers (e.g., Yohkoh/BCS), or integrated broadband irradiances from photometers (e.g., GOES/XRS, TIMED/XPS, etc.) that lack detailed spectral information. In recent years, broadband measurements with moderate energy resolution (~0.5-0.7 keV FWHM) were made by SphinX on CORONAS-Photon and SAX on MESSENGER, although they did not extend to energies below ~1 keV. We present observations of solar SXR emission obtained using new instrumentation flown on recent SDO/EVE calibration rocket underflights. The photon-counting spectrometer, a commercial Amptek X123 with a silicon drift detector and an 8 μm Be window, measures the solar disk-integrated SXR emission from ~0.5 to >10 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution and 1 s cadence. A novel imager, a pinhole X-ray camera using a cooled frame-transfer CCD (15 μm pixel pitch), Ti/Al/C filter, and 5000 line/mm Au transmission grating, images the full Sun in multiple spectral orders from ~0.1 to ~5 nm with ~10 arcsec/pixel and ~0.01 nm/pixel spatial and spectral detector scales, respectively, and 10 s cadence. These instruments are prototypes for future CubeSat missions currently being developed. We present new results of solar observations on 04 October 2013 (NASA sounding rocket 36.290). We compare with previous results from 23 June 2012 (NASA sounding rocket 36.286), during which solar activity was low and no signal was observed above ~4 keV. We compare our spectral and imaging measurements with spectra and broadband irradiances from other instruments, including SDO/EVE, GOES/XRS, TIMED

  6. Microionization chamber air-kerma calibration coefficients as a function of photon energy for x-ray spectra in the range of 20-250 kVp relative to {sup 60}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, J. R.; Micka, J. A.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of a wide range of microionization chambers for reference dosimetry measurements in low- and medium-energy x-ray beams. Methods: Measurements were performed with six cylindrical microchamber models, as well as one scanning chamber and two Farmer-type chambers for comparison purposes. Air-kerma calibration coefficients were determined at the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory for each chamber for a range of low- and medium-energy x-ray beams (20-250 kVp), with effective energies ranging from 11.5 keV to 145 keV, and a {sup 60}Co beam. A low-Z proof-of-concept microchamber was developed and calibrated with and without a high-Z silver epoxy on the collecting electrode. Results: All chambers composed of low-Z materials (Z{<=} 13), including the Farmer-type chambers, the scanning chamber, and the PTW TN31014 and the proof-of-concept microchambers, exhibited air-kerma calibration coefficients with little dependence on the quality of the beam. These chambers typically exhibited variations in calibration coefficients of less than 3% with the beam quality, for medium energy beams. However, variations in air-kerma calibration coefficients of greater than 50% were measured over the range of medium-energy x-ray beams for each of the microchambers containing high-Z collecting electrodes (Z > 13). For these high-Z chambers, which include the Exradin A14SL and A16 chambers, the PTW TN31006 chamber, the IBA CC01 chamber, and the proof-of-concept chamber containing silver, the average variation in air-kerma calibration coefficients between any two calibration beams was nearly 25% over the entire range of beam qualities investigated. Conclusions: Due to the strong energy dependence observed with microchambers containing high-Z components, these chambers may not be suitable dosimeters for kilovoltage x-ray applications, as they do not meet the TG-61 requirements. It is recommended that only microchambers

  7. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  8. X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray emission from luminous clusters of galaxies is dominated by thermal bremsstrahlung from an intergalactic medium. The central density of the gas is strongly correlated with the X-ray surface brightness. The X-ray surface brightness S(sigma) of many clusters is well modeled by a law of the form S(sigma) alpha S(o) 1 + R(2)/A(2) to the minus 3 beta + 1/2 power with beta approximately equal to 0.66. However, this model does not fit the X-ray spectral or optical galaxy counts well. In clusters with cooling flows in their center there is a strong correlation between the cooling rates of X-ray emitting material and optical H alpha emission. It is not clear, at present, what percentage of the virial mass of the cluster is in hot gas but if beta = 0.66, it is possible for the values to be of the order of 1/2. Spatially resoled X-ray spectroscopy is necessary to determine this value with any accuracy.

  9. A study of cosmic-ray positron and electron spectra in interplanetary and interstellar space and the solar modulation of cosmic rays. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    The differential energy spectra of cosmic-ray positrons and negatrons with energies between approximately 11 and 1500 MeV was measured during the period 1968-1971 using a balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer. These measurements fill a gap in the previously existing data and permit the determination of the interstellar spectra of cosmic-ray positrons and electrons. Knowledge of these spectra provides a crucial tool for studies of the distribution and density of matter and magnetic fields in the interstellar medium and the origin and dynamics of energetic particles contained in the fields. The differential energy spectrum of interstellar electrons may be represented as a power-law, j alpha T to the -1.8 power for 100 MeV approximately T approximately 2 GeV, but must flatten considerably at lower energies. From the measured electron charge composition, it is concluded that the majority of cosmic-ray electrons with energies above approximately 10 MeV originate in primary sources.

  10. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: A method for interpolating asymmetric peak shapes in multiplet γ-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Si-Guang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Tang, Pei-Jia; Zhu, Bo; Liang, Yu-Tie

    2009-05-01

    The peak shapes of γ-rays at various energies must be known before unfolding the multiplet spectra obtained by using semiconductor or scintillation detectors. Traditional methods describe isolated peaks with multi-parameter fitting functions, and assume that most of these parameters do not vary with energy because it is rare to find a spectrum with enough isolated peaks to constrain their dependence. We present an algorithm for interpolating the γ-ray profile at any intermediate energy given a pair of isolated γ-ray peaks from the spectrum under consideration. The algorithm is tested on experimental data and leads to a good agreement between the interpolated profile and the fitting function. This method is more accurate than the traditional approach, since all aspects of the peak shape are allowed to vary with energy. New definitions of Left-Half Width at Half Maximum, and Right-Half Width at Half Maximum for peak shape description are introduced in this paper.

  11. Galactic cosmic ray abundances and spectra behind defined shielding.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, W; Benton, E V; Wiegel, B; Zens, R; Rusch, G

    1994-10-01

    LET spectra have been measured for lunar missions and for several near Earth orbits ranging from 28 degrees to 83 degrees inclination. In some of the experiments the flux of GCR was determined separately from contributions caused by interactions in the detector material. Results of these experiments are compared to model calculations. The general agreement justifies the use of the model to calculate GCR fluxes. The magnitude of variations caused by solar modulation, geomagnetic shielding, and shielding by matter determined from calculated LET spectra is generally in agreement with experimental data. However, more detailed investigations show that there are some weak points in modeling solar modulation and shielding by material. These points are discussed in more detail. PMID:11540030

  12. Portable microcomputer unit for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

    1981-10-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed for the IAEA to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, and a 20-character thermal printer for hardcopy output. Only the positions of the 148-keV Pu-241 and 208-keV U-237 peaks are required for spectral analysis. The unit was tested against gamma-ray spectra taken of NBS plutonium standards and IAEA spectra. Results obtained are presented.

  13. Atomic data and theoretical X-ray spectra of Ge-like through V-like W ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementson, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brage, T.; Gu, M. F.

    2014-03-01

    The atomic structure and spectra of ten tungsten ions have been calculated using the Flexible Atomic Code. The calculations yield energy levels, radiative lifetimes, spectral line positions, transition probability rates, and oscillator strengths for the tungsten ions isoelectronic to germanium, W42, through vanadium, W51. Collisional-radiative models for high-temperature, low-density plasmas have been implemented to produce line emissivities for X-ray transitions in the 1-4 keV (3-12 Å) spectral interval. The Ge-like through V-like W ions are important in nuclear fusion research where their spectra may provide diagnostic information on magnetically confined plasmas.

  14. Definition of energy-calibrated spectra for national reachback

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Christopher L.; Hertz, Kristin L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the timeliness and accuracy of analysis results of spectra submitted to National Reachback, particularly for the detection of threat items. Many spectra submitted for analysis include either a calibration spectrum using 137Cs or no calibration spectrum at all. The single line provided by 137Cs is insufficient to adequately calibrate nonlinear spectra. A calibration source that provides several lines that are well-spaced, from the low energy cutoff to the full energy range of the detector, is needed for a satisfactory energy calibration. This paper defines the requirements of an energy calibration for the purposes of National Reachback, outlines a method to validate whether a given spectrum meets that definition, discusses general source considerations, and provides a specific operating procedure for calibrating the GR-135.

  15. Chemical Sensitivity of the Sulfur K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectra of Organic Disulfides.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Ingrid J; Barney, Monica; Cotelesage, Julien J H; Vogt, Linda; Pushie, M Jake; Nissan, Andrew; Prince, Roger C; George, Graham N

    2016-09-22

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy increasingly is used as a tool to provide speciation information about the sulfur chemical form in complex samples, with applications ranging from fossil fuels to soil science to health research. As part of an ongoing program of systematic investigations of the factors that affect the variability of sulfur K near-edge spectra, we have examined the X-ray absorption spectra of a series of organic symmetric disulfide compounds. We have used polarized sulfur K-edge spectra of single crystals of dibenzyl disulfide to confirm the assignments of the major transitions in the spectrum as 1s → (S-S)σ* and 1s → (S-C)σ*. We also have examined the solution spectra of an extended series of disulfides and show that the spectra change in a systematic and predictable manner with the nature of the external group. PMID:27571342

  16. Effect of gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra on the empirical luminosity correlations and the GRB Hubble diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Li, Xin; Chang, Zhe

    2016-07-01

    The spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in a wide energy range can usually be well described by the Band function, which is a two smoothly jointed power laws cutting at a breaking energy. Below the breaking energy, the Band function reduces to a cut-off power law, while above the breaking energy it is a simple power law. However, for some detectors [such as the Swift-Burst Alert Telescope (BAT)] whose working energy is well below or just near the breaking energy, the observed spectra can be fitted to cut-off power law with enough precision. Besides, since the energy band of Swift-BAT is very narrow, the spectra of most GRBs can be fitted well even using a simple power law. In this paper, with the most up-to-date sample of Swift-BAT GRBs, we study the effect of different spectral models on the empirical luminosity correlations, and further investigate the effect on the reconstruction of GRB Hubble diagram. We mainly focus on two luminosity correlations, i.e. the Amati relation and Yonetoku relation. We calculate these two luminosity correlations in both cases that the GRB spectra are modelled by Band function and cut-off power law. It is found that both luminosity correlations only moderately depend on the choice of GRB spectra. Monte Carlo simulations show that Amati relation is insensitive to the high-energy power-law index of the Band function. As a result, the GRB Hubble diagram calibrated using luminosity correlations is almost independent on the GRB spectra.

  17. First-principles calculation of principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra for warm dense KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2015-06-15

    Principal Hugoniot and K-shell X-ray absorption spectra of warm dense KCl are calculated using the first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method. Evolution of electronic structures as well as the influence of the approximate description of ionization on pressure (caused by the underestimation of the energy gap between conduction bands and valence bands) in the first-principles method are illustrated by the calculation. It is shown that approximate description of ionization in FPMD has small influence on Hugoniot pressure due to mutual compensation of electronic kinetic pressure and virial pressure. The calculation of X-ray absorption spectra shows that the band gap of KCl persists after the pressure ionization of the 3p electrons of Cl and K taking place at lower energy, which provides a detailed understanding to the evolution of electronic structures of warm dense matter.

  18. Foqus: a FORTRAN program for the quantitative analysis of x-ray spectra from thin biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, H; Fuchs, W

    1981-01-01

    An online FORTRAN program for the quantitative analysis of energy dispersive X-ray spectra from thin biological specimens is presented. The methods of background suppression by digital filtering and peak deconvolution by linear least-squares fitting with measured peak profiles are used. The continuum quantitation method for spectra from thin biological sections as proposed by Hall is applied. The performance of the computer program, utilizing the facilities of a disk operating system, is demonstrated. The routines were optimized for speed, resulting in a run-time of less than 5 seconds on a 16 bit minicomputer for a full quantitation for 7 elements of an energy dispersive thin section X-ray spectrum, including an optional absorption correction. Since no assembly language subroutines are implemented, the restrictions for the use of the program with different computer systems are minimized.

  19. X-ray Spectra from GRMHD Simulations of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy; Noble, Scott; Krolik, Julian H.; Kinch, Brooks

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a global radiation transport code coupled to general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of accreting black holes. For the first time, we are able to explain from first principles in a self-consistent way all the components seen in the X-ray spectra of stellar-mass black holes, including a thermal peak and all the features associated with strong hard X-ray emission: a power law extending to high energies, a Compton reflection hump, and a broad iron line. Varying only the mass accretion rate, we are able to reproduce a wide range of X-ray states seen in most galactic black hole sources. The temperature in the corona is Te ~ 10 keV in a boundary layer near the disk and rises smoothly to Te >~ 100 keV in low-density regions far above the disk. We self-consistently solve for the ionization state of gas in each vertical column of the disk, in turn giving iron fluorescent emissivity profile.

  20. Absorbed Dose Determination Using Experimental and Analytical Predictions of X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, D. L.; Carruth, Ralph (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the U.S. Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the international space welding experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine for ground-based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during extravehicular activities to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure, then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the ISWE in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  1. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1973-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra in the energy range from about 10 to the minus 8th to about 100,000 MeV at various depths in the atmosphere were calculated by using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (Crand) mechanism is the source of the protons trapped in the inner radiation belt.

  2. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed.

  3. Prompt Fission γ-ray Spectra Characteristics - A First Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberstedt, S.; Billnert, R.; Gatera, A.; Geerts, W.; Halipré, P.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Lebois, M.; Oberstedt, A.; Marini, P.; Vidali, M.; Wilson, J. N.

    In this work we give an overview of our investigations of prompt γ-ray emission in nuclear fission. This work was conducted during the last five years in response to a high priority nuclear data request formulated by the OECD/NEA. The aim was to reveal data deficiencies responsible for a severe under-prediction of the prompt γ heating in nuclear reactor cores. We obtained new prompt fission γ-ray spectral (PFGS) data for 252Cf(SF) as well as for thermal-neutron induced fission on 235U(nth,f) and 241Pu(nth,f). In addition, first PFGS measurements with a fast-neutron beam were accomplished, too. The impact of the new data and future data needs are discussed.

  4. A method for normalization of X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.-C.; Waldo, G.S.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.

    2010-07-20

    Accurate normalization of X-ray absorption data is essential for quantitative analysis of near-edge features. A method, implemented as the program MBACK, to normalize X-ray absorption data to tabulated mass absorption coefficients is described. Comparison of conventional normalization methods with MBACK demonstrates that the new normalization method is not sensitive to the shape of the background function, thus allowing accurate comparison of data collected in transmission mode with data collected using fluorescence ion chambers or solid-state fluorescence detectors. The new method is shown to have better reliability and consistency and smaller errors than conventional normalization methods. The sensitivity of the new normalization method is illustrated by analysis of data collected during an equilibrium titration.

  5. Analysis of Phobos mission gamma ray spectra from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R.; Floyd, S. R.; Squyres, S. W.; Whelan, J. T.; Bamford, G. J.; Coldwell, R. L.; Rester, A. C.; Surkov, Iu. A.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of the elemental composition of the surface of a planetary body can be achieved, in many cases, by remote-sensing gamma ray spectroscopy. A gamma ray spectrometer was carried on the Soviet spacecraft Phobos-2, and obtained data while in an elliptical orbit around Mars. Results of two independent approaches to data analysis, one by the Soviet group and one by an American group are reported. The results for five elements are given for two different orbits of Mars. Major geologic units that contribute to the signal for each orbit have been identified. The results from the two techniques are in general agreement and there appear to be no geologically significant differences between the results for each orbit.

  6. Quantifying the effect of anode surface roughness on diagnostic x-ray spectra using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mehranian, A.; Ay, M. R.; Alam, N. Riyahi; Zaidi, H.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The accurate prediction of x-ray spectra under typical conditions encountered in clinical x-ray examination procedures and the assessment of factors influencing them has been a long-standing goal of the diagnostic radiology and medical physics communities. In this work, the influence of anode surface roughness on diagnostic x-ray spectra is evaluated using MCNP4C-based Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: An image-based modeling method was used to create realistic models from surface-cracked anodes. An in-house computer program was written to model the geometric pattern of cracks and irregularities from digital images of focal track surface in order to define the modeled anodes into MCNP input file. To consider average roughness and mean crack depth into the models, the surface of anodes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. It was found that the average roughness (R{sub a}) in the most aged tube studied is about 50 {mu}m. The correctness of MCNP4C in simulating diagnostic x-ray spectra was thoroughly verified by calling its Gaussian energy broadening card and comparing the simulated spectra with experimentally measured ones. The assessment of anode roughness involved the comparison of simulated spectra in deteriorated anodes with those simulated in perfectly plain anodes considered as reference. From these comparisons, the variations in output intensity, half value layer (HVL), heel effect, and patient dose were studied. Results: An intensity loss of 4.5% and 16.8% was predicted for anodes aged by 5 and 50 {mu}m deep cracks (50 kVp, 6 deg. target angle, and 2.5 mm Al total filtration). The variations in HVL were not significant as the spectra were not hardened by more than 2.5%; however, the trend for this variation was to increase with roughness. By deploying several point detector tallies along the anode-cathode direction and averaging exposure over them, it was found that for a 6 deg. anode, roughened by 50 {mu}m deep

  7. Soft X-ray absorption excess in gamma-ray burst afterglow spectra: Absorption by turbulent ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, M.; Schady, P.; Gatto, A.; Greiner, J.; Krause, M. G. H.; Diehl, R.; Savaglio, S.; Walch, S.

    2016-10-01

    Two-thirds of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) show soft X-ray absorption in excess of the Milky Way. The column densities of metals inferred from UV and optical spectra differ from those derived from soft X-ray spectra, at times by an order of magnitude, with the latter being higher. The origin of the soft X-ray absorption excess observed in GRB X-ray afterglow spectra remains a heavily debated issue, which has resulted in numerous investigations on the effect of hot material both internal and external to the GRB host galaxy on our X-ray afterglow observations. Nevertheless, all models proposed so far have either only been able to account for a subset of our observations (i.e. at z> 2), or they have required fairly extreme conditions to be present within the absorbing material. In this paper, we investigate the absorption of the GRB afterglow by a collisionally ionised and turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). We find that a dense (3 cm-3) collisionally ionised ISM could produce UV/optical and soft X-ray absorbing column densities that differ by a factor of 10. However the UV/optical and soft X-ray absorbing column densities for such sightlines are 2-3 orders of magnitude lower in comparison to the GRB afterglow spectra. For those GRBs with a larger soft X-ray excess by up to an order of magnitude, the contribution in absorption from a turbulent ISM as considered here would ease the required conditions of additional absorbing components, such as the GRB circumburst medium and intergalactic medium.

  8. Double photoexcitation involving 2p and 4f electrons in L3 -edge x-ray absorption spectra of protactinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Christoph; Le Naour, Claire; Auwer, Christophe Den

    2008-06-01

    The L3 -edge x-ray absorption spectrum of Pa(V) fluoride in aqueous solution show clear evidence for the double photoexcitation involving 2p and 4f electrons. A comparison with the [2p4f] double-electron excitations observed in the L3 -edge x-ray absorption spectra of other actinides (thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium) indicates a monotonic increase in the excitation energy. The sharp edgelike structure of the multielectron excitation reveals the origin of a shake-up channel.

  9. Ionised Iron Lines in X-ray Reflection Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.; Ross, R. R.; Fabian, A. C.

    2000-10-01

    We present results from new calculations of the reflected X-ray spectrum from ionised accretion disks in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). These calculations improve on our previous models by including the condition of hydrostatic balance in the vertical direction, following the work of Nayakshin, Kazanas & Kallman (2000). Our results show that, for gas pressure dominated accretion discs, ionised iron features are found in the reflection spectrum over a range of conditions. We also explore extending our results into radiation pressure dominated discs, and discuss the limitations of the current models.

  10. Diagnostics of imploded core plasma dynamics using time-resolved x-ray spectra and x-ray monochromatic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochi, Y.; Fujita, K.; Fukao, M.; Niki, I.; Nishimura, H.; Sunahara, A.; Shiraga, H.; Miyanaga, N.; Azechi, H.; Takabe, H.; Mima, K.; Yamanaka, T.; Butzbach, R.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.; Golovkin, I.; Mancini, R. C.; Lee, R. W.; Klein, L.

    2000-10-01

    Direct-drive implosion of fusion pellets has been investigated using time- and space-resolved x-ray spectroscopic measurements. The experiments were conducted at ILE, Osaka University, and were designed to explore the influence of the low-modal irradiation non-uniformity on the imploded core plasma dynamics. The time-resolved spectra covered the range from Ar^16+Heα (1s^2-1s2p) to Ar^17+Lyβ (1s-3p) were recorded using an x-ray streak spectrograph (XSS). Time- and space-resolved monochromatic x-ray images of Heβ (1s^2-1s3p) and Lyβ were observed with a monochromatic x-ray framing camera (MXFC). The XSS's spectra were absolutely calibrated with the aid of spectra recorded by an x-ray spectrometer coupled to a calibrated CCD camera. Spatial gradients of the electron temperature and electron density in the imploded core are being investigated by means of a self-consistent analysis of the spectra from the XSS data and emissivities obtained by Abel inversion for the MXFC data. The results will be discussed.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of anode surface roughness on x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kakonyi, Robert; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szabo, Gabor

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Spectral and angular distribution of the x-ray beam generated by medical x-ray tubes as a function of anode surface roughness was analyzed. Methods: Different sets of profiles such as ideal flat, regular profiles, and measured profiles adopted from the literature were analyzed by means of MCNPX Monte Carlo simulator. The geometry used was simplified to separate different physical effects. A sphere centered on the origin of the coordinate system was divided into two hemispheres filled with tungsten and a vacuum, respectively. The studied anode surfaces were placed at the center of the plane of the hemisphere. The profiles were realized by means of the general lattice structure of the MCNPX. The energy and angular distributions of the excited photons were recorded with energy and angular resolutions of 0.5 keV and 1 deg., respectively, by means of point detectors. The range of the studied anode surface roughness was 0-550 {mu}m R{sub a}. The emission angle dependencies of the following quantities were analyzed: Half value layer (HVL) value, intensity, and spectral photon flux. Results: The analysis of the HVL of the x-ray beam showed that around an emission angle of 5 deg., the hardness of the beam was practically independent of the surface roughness. The value of this emission angle depends on the filtration. Below this critical angle, the HVL value decreases, while at a higher emission angle, the beam becomes harder with increasing surface roughness. The intensity degradation saturates with increasing roughness. The position of the maximum spectral photon flux shifts to higher emission angles as the anode surface roughness increases. The surface roughness (R{sub a}) was found to be an inadequate quantity to describe the effect of anode surface roughness on x-ray spectra since no definite connection was found between the values of the intensity degradation and surface roughness. At 120 kVp tube voltage and at a 3.84 {mu}m R{sub a} roughness value, the

  12. ON WEAK REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF GAMMA-RAY SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2012-05-20

    Line-of-sight interactions of cosmic rays provide a natural explanation of the hard gamma-ray spectra of distant blazars, which are believed to be capable of producing both gamma rays and cosmic rays. For sources with redshifts z {approx}> 0.1, secondary gamma rays produced in cosmic-ray interactions with background photons close to an observer can dominate over primary gamma rays originating at the source. The transition from one component to another is accompanied by a change in the spectral index depending on the source redshift. We present theoretical predictions and show that they agree with the data from Fermi Large Area Telescope. This agreement, combined with the spectral data from Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes, provides evidence of cosmic-ray acceleration by active galactic nuclei and opens new opportunities for studying photon backgrounds and intergalactic magnetic fields.

  13. Interpretation of X-ray absorption spectra of As(III) in solution using Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Canche-Tello, Jesus; Vargas, M Cristina; Hérnandez-Cobos, Jorge; Ortega-Blake, Iván; Leclercq, Amelie; Solari, Pierre Lorenzo; Den Auwer, Christophe; Mustre de Leon, José

    2014-11-20

    We performed X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements on the arsenic K-edge of As(III) in solution under acidic conditions. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray near edge structure (XANES) spectra were compared with theoretical calculations which use local atomic structure configurations, either derived from density functional theory (DFT) energy minimization (EM) calculations or based on classical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, for a As(OH)3 cluster surrounded by water molecules. The nearest arsenic-oxygen distances obtained from the fit of the XAFS spectra are consistent with the distances present in configurations derived from Monte Carlo simulations but not with those obtained from DFT-EM calculations. Calculations of XANES using either DFT-EM or the average configuration obtained from MC simulations do not reproduce the XANES spectra in the vicinity of the absorption edge. However, specific local atomic structural configurations of the As(OH)3 and water molecules, obtained from MC simulations, which show some ordering of water molecules up to 5 Å from the arsenic, reproduce qualitatively the experimental spectra. These results highlight the capability of XANES to yield information about hydration of ions in solution.

  14. The Cosmic Rays and Gamma-Quanta Local Sources Spectra Distinction and Formation of Uniform Cosmic Ray Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgievna Sinitysna, Vera; Nikolsky, S. I.

    2003-07-01

    The obtained experimental data about local sources of gamma-quanta are characteristic by the following fact. Though the observed metagalactic sources (active galactic nuclei) are 106 - 107 times more powerful, unlike the galactic one, the gamma-quanta energy spectra from both galactic and metagalactic sources can be averaged with spectrum index F (> Eγ ) ˜ Eγ 1.3±0.15 . This result puts - under doubt the assumption about the galactic origin of observable cosmic ray flux. Uniform cosmic ray spectrum is forming in "infinite" number of elastic (or inelastic) collisions with relict photons in intergalactic space, where the cosmic rays are 0.999... part of their time as the common volume of extragalactic space exceeds more then thousand times the total galactic volume in Universe. Accordingly, the observable spectrum distribution has index of (2.72 ± 0.02) = 2.718..., that is Napier's number. The local sources of extra-high energy cosmic radiation search by the EAS flux excess at narrow angular interval at the direction on supposed sources did not give conformable results because of extremely low flux of showers generated by gamma-quanta, which is connected with the process of accumulation of charged particles in Metagalaxy, which includes intergalactic space. This was confirmed at experiments in the ionization calorimeter with Pb absorb ent of total EAS formed by gamma-quanta which have no muons and hadrons flux determination. The analysis of such showers showed that between EAS on observation level of 3760 m high above sea level the "no hadron" showers flux is slight 0.005 ± 0.001 of full EAS flux; "no muons" showers showed the same result at 0.004 ± 0.001 EAS with primary energy > (3 - 4)1014 eV not a single muon was observed (Fig. 1). As a consequence of small flux of EAS containing no hadrons and muons searching of high-energy gamma-quanta stellar sources it was advisable to concentrate on observations of probable high-energy gamma-quanta sources at narrow

  15. Calculated x-ray linear dichroism spectra for Gd-doped GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheiwchanchamnangij, Tawinan; Lambrecht, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Gd doped GaN has been claimed to be a dilute magnetic semiconductor with colossal magnetic moments. However, the origin of huge magnetic moments is still controversial. The x-ray linear dichroism (XLD) spectrum of the Gd L3 edge and the multiple scattering calculations from Ney et al. (J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 322, 1162 (2010)) suggested that about 15% of Gd atoms should be on antisites. In contrast, our first principle calculations indicate that once the Gd is put on the N site, it will move to the interstitial site and cause large structure relaxation. The formation energy of the system is, therefore, in the order of 10 eV per Gd atom which is extremely large. We show that XLD spectra for L-edges can be analyzed in terms of suitable linear combinations of the partial densities of states of the Gd d-electrons. Core-hole effects are also included. The XLD spectra extracted from our calculations of Gd on the Ga site is shown to fit the experimental spectrum and no Gd on the N site is needed.

  16. Inverse problem for extragalactic transport of ultra-high energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, V.S.; Rogovaya, S.I.; Zirakashvili, V.N. E-mail: rogovaya@izmiran.ru

    2015-03-01

    The energy spectra and composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays are changing in a course of propagation in the expanding Universe filled with background radiation. We developed a numerical code for solution of inverse problem for cosmic-ray transport equations that allows the determination of average source spectra of different nuclei from the cosmic ray spectra observed at the Earth. Employing this approach, the injection spectra of protons and Iron nuclei in extragalactic sources are found assuming that only these species are accelerated at the source. The data from the Auger experiment and the combined data from the Telescope Array + HiRes experiments are used to illustrate the method.

  17. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. II. Diagnostic Tools for X-Ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the emission spectra from accreting sources. We use our new reflection code to compute the reflected spectra from an accretion disk illuminated by X-rays. This set of models covers different values of ionization parameter, solar iron abundance and photon index for the illuminating spectrum. These models also include the most complete and recent atomic data for the inner-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We concentrate our analysis to the 2 - 10 keV energy region, and in particular to the iron K-shell emission lines. We show the dependency of the equivalent width (EW) of the Fe Ka with the ionization parameter. The maximum value of the EW is approx. 800 eV for models with log Epsilon approx. 1.5, and decreases monotonically as Epsilon increases. For lower values of Epsilon the Fe K(alpha) EW decreases to a minimum near log Epsilon approx. 0.8. We produce simulated CCD observations based on our reflection models. For low ionized, reflection dominated cases, the 2 -10 keV energy region shows a very broad, curving continuum that cannot be represented by a simple power-law. We show that in addition to the Fe K-shell emission, there are other prominent features such as the Si and S L(alpha) lines, a blend of Ar VIII-XI lines, and the Ca x K(alpha) line. In some cases the S xv blends with the He-like Si RRC producing a broad feature that cannot be reproduced by a simple Gaussian profile. This could be used as a signature of reflection.

  18. Electron-positron pairs, Compton reflection, and the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Ghisellini, Gabriele; George, Ian M.; Fabian, A. C.; Svensson, Roland; Done, Chris

    1990-01-01

    It is shown here that reprocessing of radiation fron nonthermal pair cascades by cold material in the central parts of active galactic nuclei (AGN) gives rise to X-ray and gamma-ray spectra that satisfy current observational constraints. An average 1-30 keV X-ray spectral index alpha(x) of about 0.7 in the compact range 30-300 is obtained for a wide range of Lorentz factors of the injected electrons. The gamma-ray spectra are steep, with alpha(gamma) about two, and satisfy the observational constraints. Radiation from pair cascades exhibits steep power law decreases in soft X-rays similar to those observed in AGN. The overall picture is consistent with AGN having an accretion disk which intercepts and reprocesses a substantial fraction of the nonthermal continuum incident upon it from above and below.

  19. The gamma-ray blazar quest: new optical spectra, state of art and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, F.; Álvarez Crespo, N.; D'Abrusco, R.; Landoni, M.; Masetti, N.; Ricci, F.; Milisavljevic, D.; Paggi, A.; Chavushyan, V.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Patiño-Álvarez, V.; Strader, J.; Chomiuk, L.; La Franca, F.; Smith, Howard A.; Tosti, G.

    2016-10-01

    We recently developed a procedure to recognize γ-ray blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty regions of the unidentified/unassociated γ-ray sources (UGSs). Such procedure was based on the discovery that Fermi blazars show peculiar infrared colors. However, to confirm the real nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic data are necessary. Thus, we performed an extensive archival search for spectra available in the literature in parallel with an optical spectroscopic campaign aimed to reveal and confirm the nature of the selected γ-ray blazar candidates. Here, we first search for optical spectra of a selected sample of γ-ray blazar candidates that can be potential counterparts of UGSs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR12). This search enables us to update the archival search carried out to date. We also describe the state-of-art and the future perspectives of our campaign to discover previously unknown γ-ray blazars.

  20. Plutonium isotopic determination from gamma-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Skourikhine, A.N.; Strittmatter, R.B.; Zardecki, A.

    1998-12-31

    The use of low- and medium-resolution room-temperature detectors for the nondestructive assay of nuclear materials has widespread applications to the safeguarding of nuclear materials. The challenge to using these detectors is the inherent difficulty of the spectral analysis to determine the amount of specific nuclear materials in the measured samples. This is especially true for extracting plutonium isotopic content from low- and medium-resolution spectral lines that are not well resolved. In this paper, neural networks trained by stochastic and singular value decomposition algorithms are applied to retrieve the plutonium isotopic content from a simulated NaI spectra. The simulated sample consists of isotopes {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. It is demonstrated that the neutral network optimized by singular value decomposition (SVD) and stochastic training algorithms is capable of estimating plutonium content consistently resulting in an average error much smaller than the error previously reported.

  1. Sharp knee phenomenon of primary cosmic ray energy spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel

    2014-06-01

    Primary energy spectral models are tested in the energy range of 1-200 PeV using standardized extensive air shower responses from BASJE-MAS, Tibet, GAMMA and KASCADE scintillation shower arrays. Results point toward the two-component origin of observed cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region consisting of a pulsar component superimposed upon rigidity-dependent power law diffuse Galactic flux. The two-component energy spectral model accounts for both the sharp knee shower spectral phenomenon and observed irregularity of all-particle energy spectrum in the region of 50-100 PeV. Alternatively, tested multipopulation primary energy spectra predicted by nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration models describe observed shower spectra in the knee region provided that the cutoff magnetic rigidities of accelerating particles are 6±0.3 and 45±2 PV for the first two populations, respectively. Both tested spectral models confirm the predominant H-He primary nuclei origin of observed shower spectral knee. The parameters of tested energy spectra are evaluated using solutions of the inverse problem on the basis of the corresponding parameterizations of energy spectra for primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei, standardized shower size spectral responses in the 550-1085 g/cm2 atmospheric slant depth range and near vertical muon truncated size spectra detected by the GAMMA array.

  2. Consistency of time dilation in temporal profiles and spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriss, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Bonnell, J. T.; Scargle, J. D.; Davis, S. P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances-a possibility suggested by their isotropic distribution and spatial inhomogeneity-then the temporal profiles and spectra of more distant sources will be time dilated compared to those of relatively nearby sources. Analyses of bright and dim Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray bursts yield a relative time-dilation factor of 2.3 on timescales of pulses and event durations. We redshift the spectra of time intervals near the intensity peaks of the bright sample on a trial grid and compare with spectra of the dim sample. A redshift factor of order two-with wide latitude permitted-brings the spectra of the two brightness groups into alignment. Thus there is coarse agreement with the time-dilation factor found in the temporal domain.

  3. Searching for Narrow Emission Lines in X-ray Spectra: Computation and Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taeyoung; van Dyk, David A.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra is a challenging statistical task. The Poisson nature of the photon counts leads to local random fluctuations in the observed spectrum that often result in excess emission in a narrow band of energy resembling a weak narrow line. From a formal statistical perspective, this leads to a (sometimes highly) multimodal likelihood. Many standard statistical procedures are based on (asymptotic) Gaussian approximations to the likelihood and simply cannot be used in such settings. Bayesian methods offer a more direct paradigm for accounting for such complicated likelihood functions, but even here multimodal likelihoods pose significant computational challenges. The new Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods developed in 2008 by van Dyk and Park, however, are able to fully explore the complex posterior distribution of the location of a narrow line, and thus provide valid statistical inference. Even with these computational tools, standard statistical quantities such as means and standard deviations cannot adequately summarize inference and standard testing procedures cannot be used to test for emission lines. In this paper, we use new efficient MCMC algorithms to fit the location of narrow emission lines, we develop new statistical strategies for summarizing highly multimodal distributions and quantifying valid statistical inference, and we extend the method of posterior predictive p-values proposed by Protassov and coworkers to test for the presence of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra. We illustrate and validate our methods using simulation studies and apply them to the Chandra observations of the high-redshift quasar PG 1634+706.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectra structure and chemical bond nature in NpO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, Yu. A.; Teterin, A. Yu.; Ivanov, K. E.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Maslakov, K. I.; Kalmykov, St. N.; Petrov, V. G.; Enina, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis was done of the x-ray photoelectron spectra structure in the binding energy (BE) range of 0 to ˜35 eV for neptunium dioxide (NpO2) valence electrons. The BEs and structure of the core electronic shells (˜35-1250 eV) as well as the relativistic discrete variation calculation results for the finite fragment of the NpO2 lattice and the data of other authors were taken into account. The experimental data show that the many-body effects and the multiplet splitting contribute to the spectral structure much less than the effects of formation of the outer (0-˜15 eV) and the inner (˜15-˜35 eV) valence molecular orbitals (OVMO and IVMO, respectively). The filled Np 5f electronic states were shown to form in the NpO2 valence band. The Np 6p electrons participate in formation of both the IVMO and the OVMO (bands). The filled Np 6p3/2 and the O 2s electronic shells were found to take the maximum part in the IVMO formation. The MO composition and the sequence order in the BE range 0-˜35 eV in NpO2 were established. The experimental and theoretical data allowed a quantitative MO scheme for NpO2, which is fundamental for both understanding the chemical bond nature in neptunium dioxide and the interpretation of other x-ray spectra of NpO2.

  5. Induced Radioactivity in Recovered Skylab Materials. [gamma ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Four radioactive isotopes found in aluminum and stainless steel samples from Skylab debris were recovered in Australia. The low-level activity was induced by high-energy protons and neutrons in the space environment. Measurements of the specific activities are given.

  6. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  7. ON THE e{sup +}e{sup -} EXCESSES AND THE KNEE OF THE COSMIC RAY SPECTRA-HINTS OF COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION IN YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hongbo; Yuan Qiang; Wang Bo; Fan Chao; Zhang Jianli; Bi Xiaojun

    2009-08-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been regarded as sources of the Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) up to petaelectronvolts, but convincing evidence is still lacking. In this work we explore the common origin of the subtle features of the CR spectra, such as the knee of CR spectra and the excesses of electron/positron fluxes recently observed by ATIC, H.E.S.S., Fermi-LAT, and PAMELA. Numerical calculation shows that those features of CR spectra can be well reproduced in a scenario with e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production by interactions between high-energy CRs and background photons in an environment similar to the young SNR. The success of such a coherent explanation serves in turn as evidence that at least a portion of CRs might be accelerated in young SNRs.

  8. X-Ray Spectra of VY Scl Stars Are Not Blackbodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauche, C. W.; Mukai, K.

    2001-01-01

    Using ASCA data, we find, contrary to other researchers using ROSAT data, that the X, ray spectra of the VY Scl stars TT Ari and KR Aur are poorly fit by an absorbed blackbody model but are well fit by an absorbed thermal plasma model. The different conclusions about the nature of the X-ray spectrum of KR Aur may be due to differences in the accretion rate, since this star was in a high optical state during the ROSAT observation, but in an intermediate optical state during the ASCA observation. TT Ari, on the other hand, was in a high optical state during both observations, so directly contradicts the hypothesis that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their high optical states are blackbodies. Instead, based on theoretical expectations and the ASCA, Chandra, and XMM spectra of other nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, we believe that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their low and high optical states are due to hot thermal plasma in the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf, and appeal to the acquisition of Chandra and XMM grating spectra to test this prediction.

  9. A code to simulate nuclear reactor inventories and associated gamma-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, A J; Allyson, J D; Sanderson, D C

    2001-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate the gamma-ray spectra that would be measured by airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) systems from sources containing short-lived fission products. The code uses simple numerical methods to simulate the production and decay of fission products and generates spectra for sodium iodide (NaI) detectors using Monte Carlo codes. A new Monte Carlo code using a virtual array of detectors to reduce simulation times for airborne geometries is described. Spectra generated for a short irradiation and laboratory geometry have been compared with an experimental data set. The agreement is good. Spectra have also been generated for airborne geometries and longer irradiation periods. The application of this code to generate AGS spectra for accident scenarios and their uses in the development and evaluation of spectral analysis methods for such situations are discussed.

  10. Calculated Neutron and Gamma-ray Spectra across the Prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor Core

    SciTech Connect

    James W. Sterbentz

    2008-05-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray flux spectra are calculated using the MCNP5 computer code and a one-sixth core model of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor based on the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor. Spectra are calculated in the five inner reflector graphite block rings, three annular active core fuel rings, three outer graphite reflector block rings, and the core barrel. The neutron spectra are block and fuel pin averages and are calculated as a function of temperature and burnup. Also provided are the total, fast, and thermal radial profile fluxes and core barrel dpa rates.

  11. The gamma-ray spectra of halocarbons in positron-electron annihilation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. G.; Zhu, Y. H.; Liu, Y.

    2015-10-01

    The gamma-ray spectra of the positron annihilation process in methane CH4 and its fully substituent halocarbons CF4, CCl4, and CBr4 have been studied. The theoretical predictions of the inner valence electrons agree well with the experimental measurements for all these molecules. That the outermost s electrons in carbon or halogen atoms dominate the gamma-ray spectra has been confirmed for the first time. The positrophilic site has also been found in these molecules and understanding of annihilation processes in molecules has been enhanced.

  12. X-ray Signature of Charge Exchange in the Spectra of L-shell Iron Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Schweikhard, L; Liebisch, P; Brown, G V

    2007-01-05

    The X-ray signature of charge exchange between highly charged L-shell iron ions and neutral gas atoms was studied in the laboratory in order to assess its diagnostic utility. Significant differences with spectra formed by electron-impact excitation were observed. In particular, a strong enhancement was found of the emission corresponding to n {le} 4 {yields} n = 2 transitions relative to the n = 3 {yields} n = 2 emission. This enhancement was detectable even with relatively low-resolution X-ray instrumentation (E/{Delta}E {approx} 10) and may enable future identification of charge exchange as a line-formation mechanism in astrophysical spectra.

  13. Numerical simulations of planetary gamma-ray spectra induced by galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C.

    1994-07-01

    The fluxes of cosmic-ray-produced gamma rays escaping from Mars were calculated using the LAHET Code System and basic nuclear data for {gamma}-ray production. Both surface water content and atmospheric thickness strongly affect the fluxes of {gamma}-ray lines escaping from Mars.

  14. Localization, time histories, and energy spectra of a new type of recurrent high-energy transient source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J.-L.; Boer, M.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Kouveliotou, C.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of a recurrent high-energy transient source which is neither a classical X-ray nor a gamma-ray burster, but whose properties are intermediate between the two, is reported. The energy spectra of 12 recurrent events are found to be soft, characterized by kT's of 34-56 keV. The time histories are short with rise and fall times as fast as about 10 ms. The source location is a 0.12 sq deg region about 10 deg from the Galactic center.

  15. Absorbed dose determination using experimental and analytical predictions of x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, David Lee

    1999-10-01

    Electron beam welding in a vacuum is a technology that NASA is investigating as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. This investigation characterizes the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool and provides recommendations for adequate radiation shielding for astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two ground tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests used Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) to measure the radiation dose. The TLD's were exposed to x- ray radiation generated by operation of the ISWE in- vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 keV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was completely verified. Therefore alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by ISWE electron beam impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were normalized to an equivalent ISWE exposure then used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during

  16. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  17. Modeling energy-loss spectra due to phonon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, B. D.; Allen, L. J.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss a fundamental theory of how to calculate the phonon-loss sector of the energy-loss spectrum for electrons scattering from crystalline solids. A correlated model for the atomic motion is used for calculating the vibrational modes. Spectra are calculated for crystalline silicon illuminated by a plane wave and by an atomic-scale focused coherent probe, in which case the spectra depend on probe position. These spectra are also affected by the size of the spectrometer aperture. The correlated model is contrasted with the Einstein model in which atoms in the specimen are assumed to vibrate independently. We also discuss how both the correlated and Einstein models relate to a classical view of the energy-loss process.

  18. Simultaneous X-ray and Far-Ultraviolet Spectra of AGN with ASCA and HUT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriss, Gerard A.

    1997-01-01

    We obtained ASCA spectra of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516 in March 1995. Simultaneous far-UV observations were obtained with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope on the Astro-2 shuttle mission. The ASCA spectrum shows a lightly absorbed power law of energy index 0.78. The low energy absorbing column is significantly less than previously seen. Prominent 0 VII and 0 VIII absorption edges are visible, but, consistent with the much lower total absorbing column, no Fe K absorption edge is detectable. A weak, narrow Fe K(alpha) emission line from cold material is present as well as a broad Fe K(alpha) line. These features are similar to those reported in other Seyfert 1 galaxies. A single warm absorber model provides only an imperfect description of the low energy absorption. In addition to a highly ionized absorber with ionization parameter U = 1.66 and a total column density of 1.4 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm, adding a lower ionization absorber with U = 0.32 and a total column of 6.9 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm significantly improves the fit. The contribution of resonant line scattering to our warm absorber models limits the Doppler parameter to less than 160 km/s at 90% confidence. Turbulence at the sound speed of the photoionized gas provides the best fit. None of the warm absorber models fit to the X-ray spectrum can match the observed equivalent widths of all the UV absorption lines. Accounting for the X-ray and UV absorption simultaneously requires an absorbing region with a broad range of ionization parameters and column densities.

  19. Ground level enhancement of cosmic rays on November 6, 1997: Spectra and anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, M. V.; Sdobnov, V. E.

    2016-01-01

    Variations of the rigidity spectrum and anisotropy of cosmic rays in the period of the ground-level enhancement (GLE) of cosmic rays on November 6, 1997, according to the data from the worldwide network of ground-based stations and satellites have been studied by the unique spectrographic global survey method developed at the Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Rigidity spectra of cosmic rays in various periods of the event under study have been determined. It has been shown that the acceleration of protons in the period of this GLE event was observed to a rigidity of ~10-12 GV, and neither a power-law nor an exponential function of the rigidity of particles describes the differential rigidity spectra of cosmic rays in the event under consideration. The analysis has indicated that the Earth at the time of the GLE event was in a looplike structure of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  20. Temperature Spectra of Interstellar Dust Grains Heated by Cosmic Rays. I. Translucent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, Juris

    2016-06-01

    Heating of whole interstellar dust grains by cosmic-ray (CR) particles affects the gas-grain chemistry in molecular clouds by promoting molecule desorption, diffusion, and chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The frequency of such heating, f T , s-1, determines how often a certain temperature T CR, K, is reached for grains hit by CR particles. This study aims to provide astrochemists with a comprehensive and updated data set on CR-induced whole-grain heating. We present calculations of f T and T CR spectra for bare olivine grains with radius a of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 μm and such grains covered with ice mantles of thickness 0.1a and 0.3a. Grain shape and structure effects are considered, as well as 30 CR elemental constituents with an updated energy spectrum corresponding to a translucent cloud with A V = 2 mag. Energy deposition by CRs in grain material was calculated with the srim program. We report full T CR spectra for all nine grain types and consider initial grain temperatures of 10 K and 20 K. We also provide frequencies for a range of minimum T CR values. The calculated data set can be simply and flexibly implemented in astrochemical models. The results show that, in the case of translucent clouds, the currently adopted rate for heating of whole grains to temperatures in excess of 70 K is underestimated by approximately two orders of magnitude in astrochemical numerical simulations. Additionally, grains are heated by CRs to modest temperatures (20-30 K) with intervals of a few years, which reduces the possibility of ice chemical explosions.

  1. Direct measurement of mammographic x-ray spectra using a CdZnTe detector.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Yamamoto, A; Honda, I; Taniguchi, A; Kanamori, H

    2000-07-01

    Our purpose is to directly measure mammographic x-ray spectra with collimators and a low-efficiency CdZnTe detector developed recently and to find out the best fit response function of CdZnTe detector to correct the measured spectra. Photon spectra (target Mo or Rh) produced by a mammographic x-ray unit at 25-32 kV and 240 mAs (= 3 times of 80 mAs) and transmitted through 0.03 mm Mo or 0.025 mm Rh filter and object (0.1 mm Al to 0.8 mm Al phantoms) have been analyzed. Since detected spectra were distorted by the response of CdZnTe detector and did not present the true photon spectra, the correction was applied by the stripping procedure. The response function of detector used in this procedure has been determined by the evaluation of interactions (K-escape, coherent scattering, and Compton scattering processes) and incomplete charge collection calculated using the Monte Carlo method. We have used Kalpha1, Kalpha2, Kbeta1, Kbeta2 radiations of Cd, Zn, and Te, respectively and have used the weight function for the incomplete charge collection and have considered Compton scattering. The Monte Carlo simulations were continued by changing the important factors (mean path length of hole lambda(h), dead layer of the CZT crystal and weight factor Wq) of incomplete charge collection until the best fit response function was found out. Corrected photon spectra were compared with the mammographic x-ray spectral data of Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) measured using a Ge detector. Attenuation curves of aluminum for 25-32 kV were calculated from the corrected photon spectra and compared with the attenuation curves measured using an ionization chamber. These results obtained using the CdZnTe detector agreed with the mammographic x-ray spectral data of BRH and attenuation curves obtained by the ionization chamber.

  2. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072

  3. Quantitative analysis of deconvolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra: a tool to push the limits of the X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Migliorati, Valentina; Persson, Ingmar; Mancini, Giordano; Della Longa, Stefano

    2014-09-15

    A deconvolution procedure has been applied to K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of lanthanoid-containing solid systems, namely, hexakis(dmpu)praseodymium(III) and -gadolinium(III) iodide. The K-edges of lanthanoids cover the energy range 38 (La)-65 (Lu) keV, and the large widths of the core-hole states lead to broadening of spectral features, reducing the content of structural information that can be extracted from the raw X-ray absorption spectra. Here, we demonstrate that deconvolution procedures allow one to remove most of the instrumental and core-hole lifetime broadening in the K-edge XANES spectra of lanthanoid compounds, highlighting structural features that are lost in the raw data. We show that quantitative analysis of the deconvolved K-edge XANES spectra can be profitably used to gain a complete local structural characterization of lanthanoid-containing systems not only for the nearest neighbor atoms but also for higher-distance coordination shells. PMID:25171598

  4. Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays from a laser plasma accelerator with quadrant-sectored range filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jong Ho; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Kim, Hyung Taek; Rhee, Yong Joo; Pathak, Vishwa Bandhu; Cho, Myung Hoon; Shin, Jung Hun; Yoo, Byung Ju; Jo, Sung Ha; Shin, Kang Woo; Hojbota, Calin; Bae, Lee Jin; Jung, Jaehyung; Cho, Min Sang; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Byoung Ick; Choi, Il Woo; Nam, Chang Hee

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of angularly dependent spectra of betatron gamma-rays radiated by GeV electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are presented. The angle-resolved spectrum of betatron radiation was deconvolved from the position dependent data measured for a single laser shot with a broadband gamma-ray spectrometer comprising four-quadrant sectored range filters and an unfolding algorithm, based on the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The unfolded gamma-ray spectra in the photon energy range of 0.1-10 MeV revealed an approximately isotropic angular dependence of the peak photon energy and photon energy-integrated fluence. As expected by the analysis of betatron radiation from LWFAs, the results indicate that unpolarized gamma-rays are emitted by electrons undergoing betatron motion in isotropically distributed orbit planes.

  5. X-ray spectra from the Cornell Electron-Beam Ion Source (CEBIS I)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Kostroun, V.O.; Ghanbari, E.; Janson, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation emitted from the Cornell electron beam ion source (CEBIS I) has been surveyed with a Si(Li) x-ray detector. These spectra can be used to estimate backgrounds from electron bremsstrahlung and to evaluate the feasibility of atomic physics experiments using the CEBIS I source in this configuration. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  6. Ray invariants, plane wave spectra, and adiabatic modes for tapered dielectric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. M.; Felsen, L. B.

    1984-10-01

    In nonseparable problems resulting from the analysis of wave propagation in longitudinally varying waveguides, such as a wedge-shaped taper, singularities appear in both ray and coupled mode treatments at the local normal mode cutoff transition. A uniformization of the local normal (adiabatic) mode is proposed, using plane wave spectra, which effectively resolves this difficulty.

  7. Source energy spectra from demodulation of solar particle data by interplanetary and coronal transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez-Madrigal, M.; Rivero, F.; Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1985-01-01

    The data on source energy spectra of solar cosmic rays (SCR), i.e. the data on the spectrum form and on the absolute SCR are of interest for three reasons: (1) the SCR contain the energy comparable to the total energy of electromagnetic flare radiation (less than or equal to 10 to the 32nd power ergs); (2) the source spectrum form indicates a possible acceleration mechanism (or mechanism); and (3) the accelerated particles are efficiently involved in nuclear electromagnetic and plasma processes in the solar atmosphere. Therefore, the data on SCR source spectra are necessary for a theoretical description of the processes mentioned and for the formulation of the consistent flare model. Below it is attempted to sound solar particle sources by means of SCR energy spectrum obtained near the Sun, at the level of the roots of the interplanetary field lines in the upper solar corona. Data from approx. 60 solar proton events (SPE) between 1956-1981. These data were obtained mainly by the interplanetary demodulation of observed fluxes near the Earth. Further, a model of coronal azimuthal transport is used to demodulate those spectra, and to obtain the source energy spectra.

  8. Galactic Cosmic Ray Proton Spectra during Solar Cycle 23 and 24 - Measurement Capabilities of the Electron Proton Helium Telescope on Board SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühl, Patrick; Klassen, Andreas; Gieseler, Jan; Dresing, Nina; Heber, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    The solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can be studied in detail by long term variations of the GCR energy spectrum (e.g. on the scales of a solar cycle). With almost 20 years of data, the Electron Proton Helium INstrument (EPHIN) aboard SOHO is well suited for these kind of investigations. Although the design of the instrument is optimized to measure proton and helium isotope spectra up to 50 MeV/nucleon the capability exist that allow to determine energy spectra between 250 MeV and 1.6 GeV. Therefore we developed a sophisticated inversion method to calculate such proton spectra. The method relies on a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation of the instrument and a simplified spacecraft model that calculates the energy response function of EPHIN for electrons, protons and heavier ions. In order to determine the energy spectra the resulting inversion problem is solved numerically. As a result we present galactic cosmic ray spectra from 1995 to 2015. For validation, the derived spectra are compared to AMS, BESS and PAMELA data. Furthermore we discuss the spectra with respect to the solar modulation.

  9. Impact of rare earth element added filters on the X-ray beam spectra: a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Eskandarlou, Amir; Jafari, Amir Abbas; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Faghihi, Reza; Shokri, Abbas; Pourolajal, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of added filters including conventional and rare earth materials for dental radiography tasks was investigated using a simulation approach. Current study focuses on the combination of a range of various filters to investigate the reduction of radiation absorbed dose and improving the quality of a radiography image. To simulate the X-ray beam spectrum, a MCNP5 code was applied. Relative intensity, beam quality, and mean energy were investigated for a typical dental radiography machine. The impact of different rare-earth materials with different thicknesses and tube voltages on the X-ray spectrum was investigated. For Aluminum as a conventional filter, the modeled X-ray spectra and HVL values were in a good agreement with those reported by IPEM. The results showed that for a 70 kVp voltage, with an increase of the thickness and atomic number of a given added filters, an increase of HVL values were observed. However, with the increase of the attenuator thickness, X-ray beam intensity decreases. For mean energy, different results were observed. It was also found that rare earth made filters reduce high energy X-ray radiation due to k-edge absorption. This leads to an ideal beam for intra-oral radiography tasks. However, as a disadvantage of rare earth added filters, the reduction of the tube output levels should also be considered.

  10. The spectra program library: A PC based system for gamma-ray spectra analysis and INAA data reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Grossman, J.N.

    1995-01-01

    A PC based system has been developed for the analysis of gamma-ray spectra and for the complete reduction of data from INAA experiments, including software to average the results from mulitple lines and multiple countings and to produce a final report of analysis. Graphics algorithms may be called for the analysis of complex spectral features, to compare the data from alternate photopeaks and to evaluate detector performance during a given counting cycle. A database of results for control samples can be used to prepare quality control charts to evaluate long term precision and to search for systemic variations in data on reference samples as a function of time. The entire software library can be accessed through a user-friendly menu interface with internal help.

  11. Inclusive gamma-ray spectra from psi/3095/ and psi-prime/3684/ decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddick, C. J.; Burnett, T. H.; Masek, G. E.; Miller, E. S.; Smith, J. G.; Stronski, J. P.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vernon, W.; Badtke, D. H.; Barnett, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Inclusive gamma-ray experiments were carried out in a e(+)e(-) colliding-beam apparatus with NaI(Tl) arrays as detectors. The inclusive gamma-ray spectra, after cosmic-ray background subtraction, are shown as histograms for the decays of the psi(3095) and psi-prime(3684). The psi spectrum has no significant narrow structure, while the psi-prime spectrum shows at least four peaks. Three major radiative decays of the psi-prime(3684) are found, and their respective branching fractions are computed.

  12. First Principles Calculations for X-ray Resonant Spectra and Elastic Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yongbin

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, we discuss applications of first principles methods to x-ray resonant spectra and elastic properties calculation. We start with brief reviews about theoretical background of first principles methods, such as density functional theory, local density approximation (LDA), LDA+U, and the linear augmented plane wave (LAPW) method to solve Kohn-Sham equations. After that we discuss x-ray resonant scattering (XRMS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and the branching problem in the heavy rare earths Ledges. In the last chapter we discuss the elastic properties of the second hardest material AlMgB14.

  13. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Pollock, B. B.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Chen, Y. -H.; Alessi, D.; Pak, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  14. Investigating the atmospheric energy spectra using ECMWF analysis: Regional dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.; Zhang, M.

    2010-12-01

    The atmospheric turbulence energy spectrum has been a subject of active research for a long time. Beginning with Kolmogorov’s theory of three-dimensional turbulence, to Kraichnan’s two-dimensional turbulence and its extension to the quasi-geostrophic case by Charney, various theoretical models and hypothesis have tried to explain the energy spectrum slope. However, the success or failure of a theory can only be gauged by comparing its output with actual observational data. Nastrom and Gage were able to do just that by analyzing thousands of flight observation data and plotting the wave number spectra of wind and temperature in 1980’s. But, the flight data was confined only to the upper atmosphere and mostly mid-latitudes of northern hemisphere. We use the high-resolution ECMWF analysis data, as a part of Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) to study the atmospheric energy spectra over a wide range of conditions. We compared and interpreted the differences of the atmospheric energy spectra in the tropics and mid-latitudes, in the winter (DJF) and summer (JJA), at the surface and in the upper troposphere. Our results conform to the previously observed -3 power law for mid-latitude data in the upper troposphere, but the slope of the energy spectrum from the surface wind data and for the tropics exhibited quite different shapes. The causes of these differences are discussed.

  15. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  16. Energy response of LiF (TLD-100) and CaSO4:Dy TL dosimeters to different diagnostic spectra.

    PubMed

    Servomaa, A J

    1985-08-01

    Energy response of LiF (TLD-100) and CaSO4:Dy TL dosimeters to different diagnostic X-ray spectra has been studied. Through energy response the X-ray spectrum influences the dose to be measured with a thermoluminescence dosimeter. The energy responses of both dosimeters were calculated with typical diagnostic high voltages 60-140 kVp and with 1-50 mmAl total filtrations for 2-pulse and constant potential generators. Theoretical X-ray spectra were used. Pulse form and small differences in high voltage and in total filtration do not cause any significant error in measured dose due to energy response. The ratio of the energy responses of CaSO4: Dy and LiF does not produce a sufficiently strongly sloping curve as a function of high voltage for the determination of the half-value layer with typical diagnostic exposure values.

  17. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, K. V.; Baldis, H. A.; Dunn, J.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Scott, H. A.; Purvis, M. A.

    2012-10-15

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated by a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in two-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  18. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma.

    PubMed

    Cone, K V; Baldis, H A; Dunn, J; May, M J; Purvis, M A; Schneider, M B; Scott, H A

    2012-10-01

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated by a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in two-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  19. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, K V; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A; May, M J; Purvis, M A; Scott, H A; Schneider, M B

    2012-05-02

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated from a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terrawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in 2-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of X-ray Spectra from Scanning Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Patton, Bruce W.; Weber, Charles F.; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2014-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to evaluate x-ray spectra generated within a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine elemental composition of small samples. This will be accomplished by performing Monte Carlo simulations of the electron and photon interactions in the sample and in the x-ray detector. The elemental inventories will be determined by an inverse process that progressively reduces the difference between the measured and simulated x-ray spectra by iteratively adjusting composition and geometric variables in the computational model. The intended benefit of this work will be to develop a method to perform quantitative analysis on substandard samples (heterogeneous phases, rough surfaces, small sizes, etc.) without involving standard elemental samples or empirical matrix corrections (i.e., true standardless quantitative analysis).

  1. Spectroscopic analysis of solar and cosmic X-ray spectra. 1: The nature of cosmic X-ray spectra and proposed analytical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, A. B. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the study of the solar corona are reviewed as an introduction to a discussion of modifications required for the study of cosmic sources. Spectroscopic analysis of individual sources and the interstellar medium is considered. The latter was studied via analysis of its effect on the spectra of selected individual sources. The effects of various characteristics of the ISM, including the presence of grains, molecules, and ionization, are first discussed, and the development of ISM models is described. The expected spectral structure of individual cosmic sources is then reviewed with emphasis on supernovae remnants and binary X-ray sources. The observational and analytical requirements imposed by the characteristics of these sources are identified, and prospects for the analysis of abundances and the study of physical parameters within them are assessed. Prospects for the spectroscopic study of other classes of X-ray sources are also discussed.

  2. X-ray characterization by energy-resolved powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, G.; Hooker, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    A method for single-shot, nondestructive characterization of broadband x-ray beams, based on energy-resolved powder diffraction, is described. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to simulate data for x-ray beams in the keV range with parameters similar to those generated by betatron oscillations in a laser-driven plasma accelerator. The retrieved x-ray spectra are found to be in excellent agreement with those of the input beams for realistic numbers of incident photons. It is demonstrated that the angular divergence of the x rays can be deduced from the deviation of the detected photons from the Debye-Scherrer rings which would be produced by a parallel beam. It is shown that the angular divergence can be measured as a function of the photon energy, yielding the angularly resolved spectrum of the input x-ray beam.

  3. Atomic site sensitivity of the energy loss magnetic chiral dichroic spectra of complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Calmels, L.; Rusz, J.

    2011-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of magnetic oxide core level spectra can become complicated when the magnetic atoms are located at several nonequivalent atomic sites in the crystal. This is, for instance, the case for Fe atoms in magnetite, which are located in tetrahedral and octahedral atomic sites; in this case, the x-ray magnetic circular dichroic (XMCD) spectra recorded at the L{sub 2,3} edge of Fe contain contributions from the different nonequivalent atomic sites, which unfortunately cannot be separated. Energy loss magnetic chiral dichroic (EMCD) spectra are the transmission electron microscope analogies of the XMCD spectra. One of the important differences between these two techniques of magnetic analysis is that EMCD uses a fast electron beam instead of polarized light. The fast electrons behave like Bloch states in the sample, and the fine structure of the EMCD spectra is strongly influenced by channeling and dynamical diffraction effects. These effects can be adjusted by changing the experimental configuration. We use theoretical calculations, which include dynamical diffraction effects and in which electronic transitions are treated in the atomic multiplet formalism, to show that the relative weight of the Fe atoms in different nonequivalent atomic sites can be changed by a proper choice of the position of the detector and of the magnetite sample orientation and thickness. We conclude that EMCD spectra could be used to isolate the magnetic contribution of atoms in each of the nonequivalent atomic sites, which would not be possible with XMCD techniques.

  4. Measurement of cosmic ray positron and negatron spectra between 50 and 800 MeV. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daugherty, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon-borne magnetic spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of cosmic ray positrons and negatrons at energies between 50 and 800 MeV. Comparisons of the separate positron and negatron spectra observed near the earth with their expected intensities in interstellar space can be used to investigate the complex (and variable) interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the expanding solar wind. The present measurements, which have established finite values or upper limits for the positron and negatron spectral between 50 and 800 MeV, have confirmed earlier evidence for the existence of a dominant component of negatrons from primary sources in the galaxy. The present results are shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that the positron component is in fact mainly attributable to collisions between cosmic ray nuclei and the interstellar gas. The estimate of the absolute intensities confirm the indications from neutron monitors that in 1972 the interplanetary cosmic ray intensities were already recovering toward their high levels observed in 1965.

  5. X-ray Photoemission Spectra and Electronic Structure of Coumarin and its Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wickrama Arachchilage, Anoja P; Wang, Feng; Feyer, Vitaliy; Plekan, Oksana; Acres, Robert G; Prince, Kevin C

    2016-09-15

    The electronic structures of coumarin and three of its derivatives (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, 7-amino-4-(trifluoro)methylcoumarin, and 4-hydroxycoumarin) have been studied by theoretical calculations, and compared with experimental valence and core photoelectron spectra to benchmark the predicted spectra. The outer valence band spectra of the first three compounds showed good agreement with theoretical calculations for a single isomer, whereas the spectrum of 4-hydroxycoumarin indicated the presence of more than one tautomer, consistent with published results. Calculations of core level spectra of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine of the first three compounds are also in satisfactory agreement with our measurements. The carbon and oxygen 1s spectra of 4-hydroxycoumarin allow us to identify and quantify the populations of the principle tautomers present. The 4-hydroxy enol form is the most stable isomer at 348 K, followed by the diketo form, with 1.3 kJ·mol(-1) lower energy. PMID:27545582

  6. Ultrahigh energy photons, electrons, and neutrinos, the microwave background, and the universal cosmic-ray hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    The production of ultrahigh energy photons, electrons and neutrinos as the decay products of pions produced in photomeson interactions between cosmic ray nucleons and the blackbody microwave background is discussed in terms of the resultant energy spectra of these particles. Simple asymptotic formulas are given for calculating the ultrahigh energy photon spectrum predicted for the universal cosmic ray hypothesis and the resulting spectra are compared with those obtained previously by numerical means using a different propagation equation for the photons. Approximate analytic solutions for the photon spectra are given in terms of simple power-law energy functions and slowly varying logarithmic functions.

  7. Two Types of Soft X-ray Spectra in Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Mukai, K.; Kinkhabwala, A.; Peterson, J. R.; Kahn, S. M.; Paerels, F.

    2002-01-01

    We present results of analyses of Chandra HETG soft X-ray spectra (Lambda = 1.5-25 A) of seven cataclysmic variables. We find that these spectra divide unambiguously into two distinct types. Spectra of the first type, consisting of EX Hya, V603 Aql, U Gem, and SS Cyg, are remarkably well fit by a simple cooling flow model, which assumes only steady-state isobaric radiative cooling. This model has only two free parameters, the maximum temperature, kT(sub max), which provides a rough measurement of the depth of the potential well, and the overall normalization, which provides a highly precise measurement of the total accretion rate. Spectra of the second type, consisting of V1223 Sgr, A Psc, and GK Per, are grossly inconsistent with a simple cooling flow model. They instead exhibit a hard continuum, and, in addition, show strong H-like and He-like ion emission but little Fe L-shell emission, which is consistent with expectations for line emission from a photoionized plasma. Using a simple photoionization model, we argue that the observed line emission for these sources can be driven entirely by the hard continuum. The physical significance of these two distinct types of X-ray spectra is also explored.

  8. Obscuration effects in super-soft-source X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, J.-U.; Osborne, J. P.; Henze, M.; Dobrotka, A.; Drake, J. J.; Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Starrfield, S.; Kuulkers, E.; Behar, E.; Hernanz, M.; Schwarz, G.; Page, K. L.; Beardmore, A. P.; Bode, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    Context. Super-soft-source (SSS) X-ray spectra are blackbody-like spectra with effective temperatures ~3-7 × 105 K and luminosities of 1035-38 erg s-1. Grating spectra of SSS and novae in outburst that show SSS type spectra display atmospheric absorption lines. Radiation transport atmosphere models can be used to derive physical parameters. Blue-shifted absorption lines suggest that hydrostatic equilibrium is an insufficient assumption, and more sophisticated models are required. Aims: In this paper, we bypass the complications of spectral models and concentrate on the data in a comparative, qualitative study. We inspect all available X-ray grating SSS spectra to determine systematic, model-independent trends. Methods: We collected all grating spectra of conventional SSS like Cal 83 and Cal 87 plus observations of novae during their SSS phase. We used comparative plots of spectra of different systems to find common and different features. The results were interpreted in the context of system parameters obtained from the literature. Results: We find two distinct types of SSS spectra that we name SSa and SSe. Their main observational characteristics are either clearly visible absorption lines or emission lines, respectively, while both types contain atmospheric continuum emission. SSa spectra are highly structured with no spectral model currently able to reproduce all details. The emission lines clearly seen in SSe may also be present in SSa, hidden within the forest of complex atmospheric absorption and emission features. This suggests that SSe are in fact obscured SSa systems. Similarities between SSe and SSa with obscured and unobscured AGN, respectively, support this interpretation. We find all known or suspected high-inclination systems to emit permanently in an SSe state. Some sources are found to transition between SSa and SSe states, becoming SSe when fainter. Conclusions: SSS spectra are subject to various occultation processes. In persistent SSS spectra

  9. Effect of Viewing Angle on Super-Soft-Source X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, Jan-Uwe

    2012-09-01

    The advent of the X-ray grating spectrometers has given new momentum to the studies of Super-Soft-Source (SSS) X-ray spectra in high resolution. Earlier CCD-type spectra only allow determinations of effective temperatures while in the grating spectra, lines and continuum can be resolved. I have studied the X-ray grating spectra of eight classical novae during their SSS phase, two of them candidates for recurrent novae, two established recurrent novae, and four permanent SSSs including the prototypes Cal 83 and Cal 87. I discovered two categories of SSSs: those dominated by emission lines (SSSe) and by absorption line (SSSa). All spectra contain photospheric continuum emission, indicated by the shape of a blackbody. For the majority of SSSe, the inclination angle is known, which are all greater than 75 degrees. I argue that the SSSe are high-inclination systems in which photospheric X-ray emission from the central source is partially blocked and scattered via Thompson scattering, which preserves the spectral shape of the continuum. Since the electrons in the scattering medium move at high velocities, photospheric absorption lines are smeared out and are therefore not seen. Additional emission lines are produced by resonant line scattering. The fact that only high inclination systems show these effects of scattering, the scattering material must be concentrated to the ecliptic plane. While in permanent SSSs, the accretion disk can explain this behavior, this result implies that in novae, the reformation of the accretion disk has already progressed to an advanced stage during their SSS phase. I argue that also the novae in low-inclination angle systems possess a reformed accretion disk. The viewing angle dependence requires non-symmetrical modeling approaches. Early disk reformation can also explain high-amplitude variations that have frequently been observed during the early SSS phase.

  10. Evaluation of X-ray spectra transmitted by different concrete compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, P. R.; Vieira, D. V.; Naccache, V. K.; Ferreira, K. R.; Priszkulnik, S.

    2015-11-01

    Additional shielding material must frequently be incorporated to medical facilities in order to comply with radiation protection requirements when using radiation sources. Typical materials for shielding walls, floor and ceiling are the lead, concrete and barite. In the present work, a group of four concrete compositions was evaluated by using broad beam transmission curves and transmitted spectra in the range of X-ray energies used for diagnostic imaging. The studied concretes were classified as ordinary concrete (Type C), concrete with addition of hematite (Types H1 and H2) and concrete with addition of steel grit (Type S). Concrete with steel grit shows be more efficient as shielding material of the three heavy types concrete studied. The two mixes of concrete and hematite are practically equivalent from the radioprotection point of view. However, the granulation difference between them might be important to other fields, as shielding is not the only function of concrete in the building structure. Although they are not as efficient as concrete with steel grit, they may be a shielding option in a facility with low shielding requirement.

  11. Distribution of iron&titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Elphic, R. C.; Gasnault, O. M.; Maurice, S.; Moore, K. R.; Binder, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. {approx}140 g/cm{sup 2} for inelastic scattering and {approx}50 g/cm{sup 2} for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods [e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)], which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum in order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  12. Distribution of iron and titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. approximately 140g/cm2 for inelastic scattering and approximately 50 g/cm2 for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods (e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)), which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum on order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  13. Correcting x ray spectra obtained from the AXAF VETA-I mirror calibration for pileup, continuum, background and deadtime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartas, G.; Flanagan, Kathy; Hughes, John P.; Kellogg, Edwin M.; Nguyen, D.; Zombeck, M.; Joy, M.; Kolodziejezak, J.

    1992-01-01

    The VETA-I mirror was calibrated with the use of a collimated soft X-ray source produced by electron bombardment of various anode materials. The FWHM, effective area and encircled energy were measured with the use of proportional counters that were scanned with a set of circular apertures. The pulsers from the proportional counters were sent through a multichannel analyzer that produced a pulse height spectrum. In order to characterize the properties of the mirror at different discrete photon energies one desires to extract from the pulse height distribution only those photons that originated from the characteristic line emission of the X-ray target source. We have developed a code that fits a modeled spectrum to the observed X-ray data, extracts the counts that originated from the line emission, and estimates the error in these counts. The function that is fitted to the X-ray spectra includes a Prescott function for the resolution of the detector a second Prescott function for a pileup peak and a X-ray continuum function. The continuum component is determined by calculating the absorption of the target Bremsstrahlung through various filters correcting for the reflectivity of the mirror and convolving with the detector response.

  14. Correcting X-ray spectra obtained from the AXAF VETA-I mirror calibration for pileup, continuum, background and deadtime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartas, G.; Flanagan, K.; Hughes, J. P.; Kellogg, E. M.; Nguyen, D.; Zombek, M.; Joy, M.; Kolodziejezak, J.

    1993-01-01

    The VETA-I mirror was calibrated with the use of a collimated soft X-ray source produced by electron bombardment of various anode materials. The FWHM, effective area and encircled energy were measured with the use of proportional counters that were scanned with a set of circular apertures. The pulsers from the proportional counters were sent through a multichannel analyzer that produced a pulse height spectrum. In order to characterize the properties of the mirror at different discrete photon energies one desires to extract from the pulse height distribution only those photons that originated from the characteristic line emission of the X-ray target source. We have developed a code that fits a modeled spectrum to the observed X-ray data, extracts the counts that originated from the line emission, and estimates the error in these counts. The function that is fitted to the X-ray spectra includes a Prescott function for the resolution of the detector a second Prescott function for a pileup peak and a X-ray continuum function. The continuum component is determined by calculating the absorption of the target Bremsstrahlung through various filters, correcting for the reflectivity of the mirror and convolving with the detector response.

  15. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Abare, A.C.; Keane, C.J.; Crane, J.K.; DaSilva, L.B.; Lee, R.W.; Perry, M.D.; Falcone, R.W.

    1993-04-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with a gas jet target. In these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n=4-2 and n=3-2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium.

  16. Long-term variations of interplanetary magnetic field spectra with implications for cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Chen, Jiasheng; Matthaeus, William H.; Smith, Charles W.; Pomerantz, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    The paper calculates yearly averaged power spectra of interplanetary magnetic field turbulence at 1 AU over the period 1965-1988 for fluctuations in the frequency range 5.8 x 10 exp -6 to 4.6 x 10 exp -5 Hz, corresponding to periods of 6-48 hr. The amplitudes of the spectra vary with the sunspot cycle and are inversely correlated with the intensity of about 10-GeV cosmic rays. The observed spectra are used to calculate a lower limit to the cosmic ray scattering mean free path employing resonant magnetostatic quasi-linear theory for both 'slab' and isotropic geometries of the turbulence. The mean free paths thus obtained are typically about 0.1 AU in the slab model and about 0.3 AU in the isotropic model, but they are not significantly correlated with the modulated galactic cosmic ray intensity recorded by neutron monitors. It is inferred that the scattering processes described by resonant magnetostatic theory play, at best, a very minor role in the solar modulation of about 10-GeV cosmic rays.

  17. Analysis of neon soft x-ray spectra from short-pulse laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abare, Amber C.; Keane, Christopher J.; Crane, John K.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Lee, Richard W.; Perry, Michael D.; Falcone, Roger W.

    1993-07-01

    We report preliminary results from the analysis of streaked soft x-ray neon spectra obtained from the interaction of a picosecond Nd:glass laser with a gas jet target. In these experiments streaked spectra show prompt harmonic emission followed by longer time duration soft x-ray line emission. The majority of the line emission observed was found to originate from Li- and Be-like Ne and the major transitions in the observed spectra have been identified. Li-like emission lines were observed to decay faster in time than Be-like transitions, suggesting that recombination is taking place. Line ratios of n equals 4 - 2 and n equals 3 - 2 transitions supported the view that these lines were optically thin and thick, respectively. The time history of Li-like Ne 2p-4d and 2p-3d lines is in good agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model coupled to a time dependent collisional-radiative code. Further x-ray spectroscopic analysis is underway which is aimed at diagnosing plasma conditions and assessing the potential of this recombining neon plasma as a quasi-steady-state recombination x-ray laser medium.

  18. The peculiar optical-UV X-ray spectra of the X-ray weak quasar PG 0043+039

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollatschny, W.; Schartel, N.; Zetzl, M.; Santos-Lleó, M.; Rodríguez-Pascual, P. M.; Ballo, L.; Talavera, A.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The object PG 0043+039 has been identified as a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar based on its UV spectra. However, this optical luminous quasar has not been detected before in deep X-ray observations, making it the most extreme X-ray weak quasar known today. Aims: This study aims to detect PG 0043+039 in a deep X-ray exposure. The question is what causes the extreme X-ray weakness of PG 0043+039? Does PG 0043+039 show other spectral or continuum peculiarities? Methods: We took simultaneous deep X-ray spectra with XMM-Newton, far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectra with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and optical spectra of PG 0043+039 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) and Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) in July, 2013. Results: We have detected PG 0043+039 in our X-ray exposure taken in 2013. We presented our first results in a separate paper (Kollatschny et al. 2015). PG 0043+039 shows an extreme αox gradient (αox = -2.37). Furthermore, we were able to verify an X-ray flux of this source in a reanalysis of the X-ray data taken in 2005. At that time, it was fainter by a factor of 3.8 ±0.9 with αox = -2.55. The X-ray spectrum is compatible with a normal quasar power-law spectrum (Γ = 1.70-0.45+0.57) with moderate intrinsic absorption (NH = 5.5-3.9+6.9 × 1021 cm-2) and reflection. The UV/optical flux of PG 0043+039 has increased by a factor of 1.8 compared to spectra taken in the years 1990-1991. The FUV spectrum is highly peculiar and dominated by broad bumps besides Lyα. There is no detectable Lyman edge associated with the BAL absorbing gas seen in the CIV line. PG 0043+039 shows a maximum in the overall continuum flux at around λ ≈ 2500 Å in contrast to most other AGN where the maximum is found at shorter wavelengths. All the above is compatible with an intrinsically X-ray weak quasar, rather than an absorbed X-ray emission. Besides strong FeII multiplets and broad Balmer and HeI lines in the optical band we only detect a narrow [O ii

  19. Fission Product Gamma-Ray Line Pairs Sensitive to Fissile Material and Neutron Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R E; Norman, E B; Burke, J T; Macri, R A; Shugart, H A; Browne, E; Smith, A R

    2007-11-15

    The beta-delayed gamma-ray spectra from the fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 239}Pu by thermal and near-14-MeV neutrons have been measured for delay times ranging from 1 minute to 14 hours. Spectra at all delay times contain sets of prominent gamma-ray lines with intensity ratios that identify the fissile material and distinguish between fission induced by low-energy or high-energy neutrons.

  20. High energy gamma ray balloon instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Baker, R. G.; Bertsch, D. L.; Chesney, J. R.; Derdeyn, S. M.; Ehrmann, C. H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hunter, S. D.; Jacques, J. S.; Laubenthal, N. A.

    1985-01-01

    The High Energy Gamma Ray Balloon Instrument was built in part to verify certain subsystems' performance for the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument, the high energy telescope to be carried on the Gamma Ray Observatory. This paper describes the instrument, the performance of some subsystems, and some relevant results.

  1. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: Unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Andrew M.; Boone, John M.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. Methods: X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Results: Using pairedt-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R{sup 2}) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, “Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector,” Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505–517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9

  2. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: Unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Andrew M.; Boone, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. Methods: X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Results: Using paired t-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R2) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, “Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector,” Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505–517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9 ke

  3. Fragmentation of water by ion impact: Kinetic energy release spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput, Jyoti; Safvan, C. P.

    2011-11-15

    The fragmentation of isolated water molecules on collision with 450-keV Ar{sup 9+} has been studied using time-of-flight mass spectrometry employing multihit detection. The kinetic energy release spectrum for the dissociation of [H{sub 2}O]{sup 2+ White-Star} into (H{sup White-Star },H{sup +},O{sup +}) fragments has been measured where H{sup White-Star} is a neutral Rydberg hydrogen atom. Ab initio calculations are carried out for the lowest states of [H{sub 2}O]{sup q+} with q=2 and 3 to help interpret the kinetic energy release spectra.

  4. IONS (ANURADHA): Ionization states of low energy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, S.; Chakraborti, R.; Cowsik, R.; Durgaprasad, N.; Kajarekar, P. J.; Singh, R. K.; Vahia, M. N.; Yadav, J. S.; Dutt, N.; Goswami, J. N.

    1987-01-01

    IONS (ANURADHA), the experimental payload designed specifically to determine the ionization states, flux, composition, energy spectra and arrival directions of low energy (10 to 100 MeV/amu) anomalous cosmic ray ions of helium to iron in near-Earth space, had a highly successful flight and operation Spacelab-3 mission. The experiment combines the accuracy of a highly sensitive CR-39 nuclear track detector with active components included in the payload to achieve the experimental objectives. Post-flight analysis of detector calibration pieces placed within the payload indicated no measurable changes in detector response due to its exposure in spacelab environment. Nuclear tracks produced by alpha-particles, oxygen group and Fe ions in low energy anomalous cosmic rays were identified. It is calculated that the main detector has recorded high quality events of about 10,000 alpha-particles and similar number of oxygen group and heavier ions of low energy cosmic rays.

  5. Precision measurements of nuclear CR energy spectra and composition with the AMS-02 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiandrini, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 02 (AMS-02) is a large acceptance high-energy physics experiment operating since May 2011 on board the International Space Station. More than 60 billion events have been collected by the instrument in the first four years of operation. AMS-02 offers a unique opportunity to study the Cosmic Rays (CRs) since it measures the spectra of all the species simultaneously. We report on the precision measurements of primary and secondary nuclear spectra, in the GeV-TeV energy interval. These measurements allow for the first time a detailed study of the spectral index variation with rigidity providing a new insight on the origin and propagation of CR.

  6. Energy dispersive X-ray reflectivity characterization of semiconductor heterostructures and interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Mayer, T.M.; Krstelj, Z.M.

    1995-07-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray reflectivity is a versatile tool for analyzing thin film structures. Layer thickness, interface roughness and composition can be determined with a single non-destructive measurement. Use of energy dispersive detection enables spectra to be acquired in less than 500 s with a rotating anode X-ray generator, making the study of kinetics possible.

  7. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1-100 MeV region is reported. Most of the events studied are dominated by He and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. Spectra of H, He-3, O, and Fe have spectral indices that are consistent with a value of about 3.5 above about 2 MeV/amu. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. Alternative interpretations are that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the resulting ion spectrum or that low-energy particles encounter significant additional scattering during transport from the flare.

  8. Calibration and analysis of spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectra from a nonuniform plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2012-07-15

    We report here the calibration and analysis techniques used to obtain spatially resolved density and temperature measurements of a pair of imploding aluminum wires from x-ray absorption spectra. A step wedge is used to measure backlighter fluence at the film, allowing transmission through the sample to be measured with an accuracy of {+-}14% or better. A genetic algorithm is used to search the allowed plasma parameter space and fit synthetic spectra with 20 {mu}m spatial resolution to the measured spectra, taking into account that the object plasma nonuniformity must be physically reasonable. The inferred plasma conditions must be allowed to vary along the absorption path in order to obtain a fit to the spectral data. The temperature is estimated to be accurate to within {+-}25% and the density to within a factor of two. This information is used to construct two-dimensional maps of the density and temperature of the object plasma.

  9. Distortion of pulse-height spectra of neutron capture gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, A.; Harada, H.; Nakamura, S.; Hori, J.; Igashira, M.; Ohsaki, T.; Ohgama, K.

    2006-03-13

    A distortion of pulse-height spectra of neutron capture {gamma}-rays caused by {gamma}-flash at neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurement using a pulse neutron source has been investigated. Pulses from C6D6 detectors accumulated by flash-ADC were processed with both traditional analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and flash-ADC operational modes. A correction factor of {gamma}-ray yields, due to baseline shift, was quantitatively obtained by comparing the pulse-height spectra of the two data-collecting modes. The magnitude of the correction factor depends on the time, which passed after {gamma}-flash, and has complicated time dependence with a changing sign.

  10. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  11. Measuring key X-ray parameters from simulated spectra of Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonson, K.; Gallo, L. C.

    2016-05-01

    Supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion is an important topic of astrophysical research for a variety of fields. However, literature shows that precisely modelling the X-ray reflection component of an accretion disk around a SMBH is challenging. We test how reliably we can measure key active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray reflection parameters by simulating the spectra of average Seyfert 1 galaxies and then fitting those spectra using common modelling techniques. The AGN spectra were created from 0.01-300.0 keV using XMM-Newton pn responses and with (3.75±0.10)×106 counts in the 2-10 keV band. The model RELXILL was used to create all spectra with a reflection fraction (ratio of reflected flux over primary flux from 0.1-100 keV) of R = 1. The values of six key parameters were generated randomly within given ranges to simulate the spectra: photon index (Γ), inner emissivity index (q1), black hole spin (a), disk inclination angle (θ), ionization (ξ), and iron abundance in solar units (A_Fe). Once the simulated spectra were created, they were autonomously fit with RELXILL from 2.5-10.0 keV. All six key parameters were allowed to vary throughout the modelling process, with a gradual thawing of model parameters to mimic manual fitting procedure. We find that we can successfully measure key AGN spectral components in this scenario, but some conditions apply: Γ, θ, and A_Fe are well constrained, however they are also consistently overestimated. Only black hole spin (a) measurements that are in extrema, a > 0.9, can be considered reliable. Lastly, ξ and q1 cannot be measured and these parameters - along with intermediate spin values - should be verified using other techniques.

  12. Energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Wenzel, K.-P.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the energy spectra of ions from impulsive solar flares in the 0.1 to 100 MeV region is reported with data from the combined observations of experiments on the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft. Most of the events studied are dominated by He, and these He spectra show a persistent steepening or break above about 10 MeV resulting in an increase in the power-law spectral indices from about 2 to about 3.5 or more. One event, dominated by protons, shows a clear maximum in the spectrum near 1 MeV. If the rollover in the spectrum below 1 MeV is interpreted as a consequence of matter traversal in the solar atmosphere, then the source of the acceleration would lie only about 800 km above the photosphere, well below the corona. An alternative interpretation is that trapping in the acceleration region directly causes a peak in the spectrum.

  13. Preliminary optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel detection of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra in the 280-550 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, B.S.; McKinney, W.R.; Hussain, Z.; Padmore, H.

    1996-07-01

    The optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel recording of NEXAFS spectra in a single {open_quotes}snapshot{close_quotes} is proposed. The spectrograph is to be used with a bending magnet source on beamline 7.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Approximately 20 volts of spectra are simultaneously imaged across a small square of material sample at each respective K absorption edge of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Photoelectrons emitted from the material sample will be collected by an electron imaging microscope, the view field of which determines the sampling size. The sample also forms the exit slit of the optical system. This dispersive method of NEXAFS data acquisition is three to four orders of magnitude faster than the conventional method of taking data point-to-point using scanning of the grating. The proposed design is presented along with the design method and supporting SHADOW raytrace analysis.

  14. Cosmic rays: the highest-energy messengers.

    PubMed

    Olinto, Angela V

    2007-01-01

    The origin of the most energetic particles ever observed, cosmic rays, will begin to be revealed in the next few years. Newly constructed ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray observatories together with high-energy gamma-ray and neutrino observatories are well positioned to unveil this mystery before the centenary of their discovery in 2012. Cosmic ray sources are likely to involve the most energetic phenomena ever witnessed in the universe.

  15. Analysis of X-ray Spectra of High-Z Elements obtained on Nike with high spectral and spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglitskiy, Yefim; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.; Ralchenko, Yu.

    2014-10-01

    The spectra of multi-charged ions of Hf, Ta, W, Pt, Au and Bi have been studied on Nike krypton-fluoride laser facility with the help of two kinds of X-ray spectrometers. First, survey instrument covering a spectral range from 0.5 to 19.5 angstroms which allows simultaneous observation of both M- and N- spectra of above mentioned elements with high spectral resolution. Second, an imaging spectrometer with interchangeable spherically bent Quartz crystals that added higher efficiency, higher spectral resolution and high spatial resolution to the qualities of the former one. Multiple spectral lines with X-ray energies as high as 4 keV that belong to the isoelectronic sequences of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn were identified with the help of NOMAD package developed by Dr. Yu. Ralchenko and colleagues. In our continuous effort to support DOE-NNSA's inertial fusion program, this campaign covered a wide range of plasma conditions that result in production of relatively energetic X-rays. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA.

  16. Comparative Analysis and Variability of the Jovian X-Ray Spectra Detected by the Chandra and XMM-Newton Observatories

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Yawei; Schultz, David Robert; Kharchenko, Vasili A; Bhardwaj, Anil; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E. E.; Lisse, Carey M.; Dalgarno, A.

    2010-01-01

    Expanding upon recent work, a more comprehensive spectral model based on charge exchange induced X-ray emission by ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere is used to provide new understanding of the polar auroras. In conjunction with the Xspec spectral fitting software, the model is applied to analyze observations from both Chandra and XMM-Newton by systematically varying the initial precipitating ion parameters to obtain the best fit model for the observed spectra. In addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions considered previously, carbon is included to discriminate between solar wind and Jovian magnetospheric ion origins, enabled by the use of extensive databases of both atomic collision cross sections and radiative transitions. On the basis of fits to all the Chandra observations, we find that carbon contributes negligibly to the observed polar X-ray emission suggesting that the highly accelerated precipitating ions are of magnetospheric origin. Most of the XMM-Newton fits also favor this conclusion with one exception that implies a possible carbon contribution. Comparison among all the spectra from these two observatories in light of the inferred initial energies and relative abundances of precipitating ions from the modeling show that they are significantly variable in time (observation date) and space (north and south polar X-ray auroras).

  17. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances from planetary spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Robert; Frankle, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of elemental abundances is a top scientific priority of most planetary missions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an excellent method to determine elemental abundances using gamma rays made by nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray particles and by the decay of radioactive nuclides [Re73,Re78]. Many important planetary gamma rays are made by neutron-capture reactions. However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature [e.g. Lo81] are poor [RF99,RF00]. With gamma-ray spectrometers having recently returned data from Lunar Prospector and NEAR and soon to be launch to Mars, there is a need for good data for neutron-capture gamma rays.

  18. (e,2e) Angular Distributions and Energy Spectra in Cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N. L. S.; Bauman, R. P.; Ross, K. J.; Wilson, M.

    1996-05-01

    Early angular distribution measurements on the Cd 4d^95s^25p ^3P1 autoionizing level( N.L.S. Martin and K.J. Ross, J. Phys. B 17), 4033 (1984). did not correspond with those expected from a single level of mixed ^3P+^1P character. An analysis indicated that the results were consistent with the combined angular distributions of the ^3P1 level and a previously unknown ^1D2 even parity autoionizing level at a slightly displaced ejected-electron energy. Recent (e,2e) energy spectra measurements( N.L.S. Martin, D.B. Thompson, R.P. Bauman, M. Wilson, Phys.Rev.A 50), 3878 (1994). that spanned the 4d^95s^25p energy region were interpreted with the help of ab initio structure and plane wave Born amplitude calculations. It was found that the experimental data could be modeled satisfactorily without including a ^1D2 level close to the ^3P1 level. We will present new calculations which reconcile these apparent contradictions between the angular distributions and energy spectra.

  19. Measurements of the secondary particle energy spectra in the Space Shuttle.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Patel, J U; Cucinotta, F A; Wilson, J W

    1995-01-01

    Measurements of the energy spectra of secondary particles produced by galactic cosmic rays and trapped protons due to the nuclear interactions of these particles with the Shuttle shielding provide a powerful tool for validating radiation transport codes. A code validated in this way can be used to better estimate the dose and dose equivalent to body organs, measurements that cannot be made directly. The principal cause of single event upsets in electronic devices in the region of the South Atlantic Anomaly is secondary particles, and even in the region of galactic cosmic radiation a significant fraction is produced by secondary particles. In this paper, we describe the first direct measurements of the energy spectra of secondary protons, deuterons, tritons, 3He and 4He produced by galactic cosmic rays inside the Space Shuttle using a charged particle spectrometer. A comparison of these spectra with radiation transport code HZETRN showed reasonably good agreement for secondary protons. However, the code seriously underestimated the flux of all other light ions. The code has been modified to include pick-up and knock-on processes. The modified code leads to good agreement for deuterons and 3He but not for other light ions. This revised code leads to about 10% higher dose equivalent than the original code under moderate shielding, if we assume that higher charge ion fluxes are correctly predicted by the model.

  20. The X-ray spectra of the BL Lacertae objects PKS 0548 - 322 and 3C 66A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Maccagni, D.; Tarenghi, M.

    1983-01-01

    Einstein Observatory simultaneous imaging proportional counter and monitor proportional counter data are combined in order to derive the energy spectra of the BL Lac objects PKS 0548-322 and 3C 66A between 0.2 and 10 keV. While the latter is found to be variable in both intensity and spectral shape, the former, although constant in the present data, is found to have experienced a spectrum variation in view of results from other experiments. Attention is given to the implications of flux and spectral variability in BL Lac objects for models of X-ray emission mechanisms. It is suggested that the wide spread of the spectral index distribution is due to the detection of the highly variable synchrotron-produced X-rays that are generally undetected in QSOs.

  1. Calculation of x-ray spectra emerging from an x-ray tube. Part II. X-ray production and filtration in x-ray targets

    SciTech Connect

    Poludniowski, Gavin G.

    2007-06-15

    A new approach to the calculation of the x-ray spectrum emerging from an x-ray tube is proposed. Theoretical results for the bremsstrahlung cross section appearing in the literature are summarized. Four different treatments of electron penetration, based on the work presented in Part I, are then used to generate bremsstrahlung spectra. These spectra are compared to experimental data at 50, 80 and 100 kVp tube potentials. The most sophisticated treatment of electron penetration was required to obtain good agreement. With this treatment both the National Institute of Standards and Technology bremsstrahlung cross sections, based on accurate partial wave calculations, and the Bethe-Heitler cross section [H. A. Bethe and W. Heitler, Proc R. Soc. London, Ser. A. 146, 83-112 (1934)] corrected by a modified Elwert factor [G. Elwert, Ann. Phys. (Leipzig) 426, 178-208 (1939)], provided good agreement to measured data. An approximate treatment of the characteristic spectrum is suggested. The dependencies of the bremsstrahlung and characteristic outputs of an x-ray tube on tube potential are compared to experimentally derived data for 70-140 kVp potentials. Agreement is to within a few percent of the total output over the entire range. The spectral predictions of the semiempirical models of Birch and Marshall [R. Birch and M. Marshall, Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505-513 (1979)] (IPEM Report 78) and of Tucker et al. [D. M. Tucker, G. T. Barnes, and D. P. Chakraborty, Med. Phys. 18, 211-218 (1991).] are also assessed. The predictions of Tucker et al. are very close to the model developed here. The predictions of IPEM Report 78 are similar, but consistently harder for the range of tube potentials examined (50-100 kV). Unlike the semiempirical models, the model proposed here requires the introduction of no empirical and unphysical parameters in the differential bremsstrahlung cross section, bar an overall normalization factor which is close to unity.

  2. On the use of Lineal Energy Measurements to Estimate Linear Energy Transfer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, David A.; Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Adam, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the error resulting from using a lineal energy spectrum to represent a linear energy transfer spectrum for applications in the space radiation environment. Lineal energy and linear energy transfer spectra are compared in three diverse but typical space radiation environments. Different detector geometries are also studied to determine how they affect the error. LET spectra are typically used to compute dose equivalent for radiation hazard estimation and single event effect rates to estimate radiation effects on electronics. The errors in the estimations of dose equivalent and single event rates that result from substituting lineal energy spectra for linear energy spectra are examined. It is found that this substitution has little effect on dose equivalent estimates in interplanetary quiet-time environment regardless of detector shape. The substitution has more of an effect when the environment is dominated by solar energetic particles or trapped radiation, but even then the errors are minor especially if a spherical detector is used. For single event estimation, the effect of the substitution can be large if the threshold for the single event effect is near where the linear energy spectrum drops suddenly. It is judged that single event rate estimates made from lineal energy spectra are unreliable and the use of lineal energy spectra for single event rate estimation should be avoided.

  3. Determination of X-ray excitation spectra in micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, R. D.; Sosa, C.; Sbarato, V.; Leani, J.; Sánchez, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    The quantitative X-ray fluorescence microanalysis by fundamental parameters requires the knowledge of the energy distribution of the excitation beam. When this beam is produced by capillary optics, its high intensity and anisotropy complicate a direct determination. An alternative is an indirect determination based on measurement of induced X-ray fluorescence in a set of targets. In this work the X-ray excitation spectrum is determined by an iterative deconvolution process of the fundamental parameter expression for the X-ray fluorescence intensities. The method has the advantage that it does not require any assumption about the energy distribution of the X-ray source or the energy dependence of the lens transmission. Numerous XRF targets of pure elements with emission lines covering the full energy range of the X-ray source are employed. The only requirement on the targets is a high homogeneity in its composition. In fact, it does not impose any condition on the sample thickness. The accuracy observed in the validation process implemented with reference materials is similar to that reported with alternative approaches: 5% for main components, 10% for minor elements and 15% for trace elements.

  4. Intensities of high-energy cosmic rays at Mount Kanbala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, J. R.; Kuang, H. H.; Huo, A. X.; Lu, S. L.; Su, S.; Wang, Y. X.; Xue, Y. G.; Wang, C. R.; He, M.; Zhang, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    General features of family events with Summary E sub gamma 200 TeV, observed by the emulsion chambers at Mt. Kanbala, are presented in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation. The lateral and cluster structure, and the energy spectra of constituent gamma-rays and hadrons are shown to be consistent with the Monte Carlo results calculated under the assumption of heavy-enriched primary, scaling, QCD jets and increasing cross-section.

  5. Bremsstrahlung spectra from atoms and ions at low relativistic energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdonina, N. B.; Pratt, R. H.

    1999-09-01

    Analytic expressions for bremsstrahlung spectra from neutral atoms and ions, including the polarizational bremsstrahlung contribution in a stripped atom approximation, are developed for electron scattering at energies of 10-2000 keV. A modified Elwert factor and a simple higher Born correction are used for the Coulomb spectrum, with ordinary bremsstrahlung screening effects in ions and atoms adequately characterized in the non-relativistic Born approximation. In parallel with the development of this analytic description, new numerical results are obtained for ordinary bremsstrahlung from ions and from bare nuclei, appreciably extending the available data set which can be used to study dependences on element, ionicity, energy and the fraction of incident energy radiated. The accuracy of predictions with the analytic expressions is then determined by comparison with the full numerical relativistic partial-wave results for ordinary bremsstrahlung and with non-relativistic numerical results in the Born approximation or in partial waves for the polarizational amplitude.

  6. Erratum: Intergalactic Photon Spectra from the Far IR to the UV Lyman Limit for 0 < z < 6 and the Optical Depth of the Universe to High Energy Gamma-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Malkan, M. A.; Scully, S. T.

    2007-01-01

    Table 1 in our paper had erroneous numbers for the coefficients fitting the parametric form for the optical depth of the universe to gamma-rays; tau. The correct values for these parameters as described in the original text are given in the table for various redshifts for the baseline model (upper row) and fast evolution (lower row) for each individual redshift.

  7. PARTICLE ENERGY SPECTRA AT TRAVELING INTERPLANETARY SHOCK WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Reames, Donald V.

    2012-09-20

    We have searched for evidence of significant shock acceleration of He ions of {approx}1-10 MeV amu{sup -1} in situ at 258 interplanetary traveling shock waves observed by the Wind spacecraft. We find that the probability of observing significant acceleration, and the particle intensity observed, depends strongly upon the shock speed and less strongly upon the shock compression ratio. For most of the 39 fast shocks with significant acceleration, the observed spectral index agrees with either that calculated from the shock compression ratio or with the spectral index of the upstream background, when the latter spectrum is harder, as expected from diffusive shock theory. In many events the spectra are observed to roll downward at higher energies, as expected from Ellison-Ramaty and from Lee shock-acceleration theories. The dearth of acceleration at {approx}85% of the shocks is explained by (1) a low shock speed, (2) a low shock compression ratio, and (3) a low value of the shock-normal angle with the magnetic field, which may cause the energy spectra that roll downward at energies below our observational threshold. Quasi-parallel shock waves are rarely able to produce measurable acceleration at 1 AU. The dependence of intensity on shock speed, seen here at local shocks, mirrors the dependence found previously for the peak intensities in large solar energetic-particle events upon speeds of the associated coronal mass ejections which drive the shocks.

  8. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  9. The VHE gamma-ray spectra of several hard-spectrum blazars from long-term observations with the VERITAS telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Arun

    2013-08-01

    Analysis is presented on VERITAS observations of the very high energy gamma-ray spectra of five high frequency peaked BL Lac objects over a range of redshifts. Each object has an unusually hard intrinsic GeV spectrum, and is expected to produce TeV gamma-ray emission into the optically- thick regime of the universe's diffuse extragalactic background light (EBL). Hard spectrum HBLs have recently emerged as an effective tool for measurement of the EBL spectrum, due to extinction of gamma-ray signals from blazars via the pair production interaction gamma-TeVgamma EBL → e+e -. The VERITAS collaboration has approved long term observations on several of these sources, with the specific intent of studying their spectra to probe for absorption features resulting from these interactions. An introduction to the field of particle astrophysics is presented, followed by an overview of the EBL and its relation to the evolution of the universe. The VERITAS gamma-ray telescope is described in detail, followed by a full overview of the analysis techniques used to derive gamma-ray spectra from VERITAS data. The analyses of the blazars themselves are presented, followed by a discussion of their application to further constraints of the EBL. Each blazar is de-absorbed with an assumed EBL spectrum. In each case the intrinsic TeV spectrum is consistent with lower-energy gamma-ray emission in the optically-thin regime of the EBL.

  10. Electron Emission Sites on Carbon Nanotubes and the Energy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Chuhei; Matsuda, Kohei; Kona, Takayuki; Mogami, Yuhta; Komaki, Masashi; Murata, Yoshitaka; Yamashita, Tetsutane; Saito, Yahachi; Hata, Koichi; Takakura, Akihiro

    2001-11-01

    Two kinds of electron emission sites on carbon nanotubes have been clarified; one is a nanoprotrusion exhibiting deformed honeycomb structures composed of carbon hexagons,pentagons and possibly heptagons. The other is either an edged species or adsorbates. The emission spectra show two characteristic features; a broad main peak as compared with theoretical curves based on Fowler-Nordheim theory, and an additional shoulder at about 0.5 eV from EF, of which the features are observed independent of the emission direction. The broad main peak may indicate that energy band bending occurs near the emission sites.

  11. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  12. Determination of Endpoint Energy and Bremsstrahlung Spectra for High-Energy Radiation-Therapy Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Danny Joe

    Few attempts have been made to experimentally determine thick-target bremsstrahlung spectra of megavoltage therapy beams. For spectral studies using the Compton scattering technique, sodium iodine (NaI) detectors with relatively poor energy resolution have been used. Other experimental techniques for determining spectra are generally not suited for a clinical environment with the inherent time and space constraints. To gather more spectral information than previously obtained in the region near the endpoint energy, the use of a high-resolution intrinsic-germanium (Ge) detector was proposed. A response function matrix was determined from experimentally obtained pulse height distributions on the multichannel analyzer. The distributions were for nine various monoenergetic sources between 280 adn 1525 keV. The response function was used to convert the measured pulse height distributions to photon flux spectra using an iterative approximation technique with a computer. Photon flux spectra from the Sagittaire Linear Accelerator were obtained at average-electron endpoint energies of 15, 20, and 25 MeV. Two spectra were measured at the 25 MeV setting; one spectrum was measured along the central axis and one spectrum at 4(DEGREES) off axis. Photon spectra were also obtained for a Van de Graaff generator at the nominal endpoint energies of 2.2, 2.35, and 2.5 MeV. The results for both the linac and the Van de Graaff generator were compared with theoretical spectra and previously measured spectra where available. Also, photon spectra from a Theratron-80 (('60)Co) unit were determined for three field sizes and for a 10 x 10 cm. field with a lucite tray or a 45(DEGREES) wedge in the beam. The resulting spectra were compared to previously measured ('60)Co spectra.

  13. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were

  14. X-Ray Spectra from MHD Simulations of Accreting Black Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Noble, Scott C.; Krolik, Julian H.

    2011-01-01

    We present new global calculations of X-ray spectra from fully relativistic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHO) simulations of black hole (BH) accretion disks. With a self consistent radiative transfer code including Compton scattering and returning radiation, we can reproduce the predominant spectral features seen in decades of X-ray observations of stellar-mass BHs: a broad thermal peak around 1 keV, power-law continuum up to >100 keV, and a relativistically broadened iron fluorescent line. By varying the mass accretion rate, different spectral states naturally emerge: thermal-dominant, steep power-law, and low/hard. In addition to the spectral features, we briefly discuss applications to X-ray timing and polarization.

  15. Expected gamma ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th, and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines are calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions are those of Reedy and Arnold (1972) and Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The areal resolution of the experiment is calculated to be around 70-140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method is described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  16. Expected gamma-ray emission spectra from the lunar surface as a function of chemical composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    The gamma rays emitted from the moon or any similar body carry information on the chemical composition of the surface layer. The elements most easily measured are K, U, Th and major elements such as O, Si, Mg, and Fe. The expected fluxes of gamma ray lines were calculated for four lunar compositions and one chondritic chemistry from a consideration of the important emission mechanisms: natural radioactivity, inelastic scatter, neutron capture, and induced radioactivity. The models used for cosmic ray interactions were those of Reedy and Arnold and Lingenfelter. The areal resolution of the experiment was calculated to be around 70 to 140 km under the conditions of the Apollo 15 and 16 experiments. Finally, a method was described for recovering the chemical information from the observed scintillation spectra obtained in these experiments.

  17. Data management and visualization of x-ray diffraction spectra from thin film ternary composition spreads

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, I.; Long, C.J.; Famodu, O.O.; Murakami, M.; Hattrick-Simpers, J.; Rubloff, G.W.; Stukowski, M.; Rajan, K.

    2005-06-15

    We discuss techniques for managing and visualizing x-ray diffraction spectrum data for thin film composition spreads which map large fractions of ternary compositional phase diagrams. An in-house x-ray microdiffractometer is used to obtain spectra from over 500 different compositions on an individual spread. The MATLAB software is used to quickly organize the data and create various plots from which one can quickly grasp different information regarding structural and phase changes across the composition spreads. Such exercises are valuable in rapidly assessing the 'overall' picture of the structural evolution across phase diagrams before focusing in on specific composition regions for detailed structural analysis. We have also shown that simple linear correlation analysis of the x-ray diffraction peak information (position, intensity and full width at half maximum) and physical properties such as magnetization can be used to obtain insight about the physical properties.

  18. K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra in MnF{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, M.; Parlebas, J. C.; Uozumi, T.; Kotani, A.; Kao, C.-C.

    2000-01-15

    We report experimental and theoretical results on Mn K{beta} resonant x-ray emission spectra (K{beta} RXES) at the pre-edge region of K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy in a powdered MnF{sub 2} sample. The experimental results are studied theoretically in terms of coherent second-order optical process, using a MnF{sub 6}{sup -4} cluster model with the effects of intra-atomic multiplet coupling and interatomic hybridization in the space of three configurations and taking into account both the Mn 1s-3d quadrupole excitation and the Mn 1s-4p dipole excitation. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. Moreover, we show that if the sample is a single crystal the resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy caused by the quadrupole excitation has a strong sensitivity to the angle of the incident photon. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  19. Hints of the Existence of Axion-Like-Particles From the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Cosmological Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; Prada, F.; Dominguez, A.; /IAA, Granada /Seville U.

    2009-06-23

    Axion Like Particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as AGNs. Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the EBL intensity at 3.6 {micro}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like

  20. Estimation of identification limit for a small-type OSL dosimeter on the medical images by measurement of X-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2016-07-01

    Our aim in this study is to derive an identification limit on a dosimeter for not disturbing a medical image when patients wear a small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter on their bodies during X-ray diagnostic imaging. For evaluation of the detection limit based on an analysis of X-ray spectra, we propose a new quantitative identification method. We performed experiments for which we used diagnostic X-ray equipment, a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom (1-20 cm), and a CdTe X-ray spectrometer assuming one pixel of the X-ray imaging detector. Then, with the following two experimental settings, corresponding X-ray spectra were measured with 40-120 kVp and 0.5-1000 mAs at a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm: (1) X-rays penetrating a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom with the OSL dosimeter attached directly on the phantom, and (2) X-rays penetrating only the soft-tissue-equivalent phantom. Next, the energy fluence and errors in the fluence were calculated from the spectra. When the energy fluence with errors concerning these two experimental conditions was estimated to be indistinctive, we defined the condition as the OSL dosimeter not being identified on the X-ray image. Based on our analysis, we determined the identification limit of the dosimeter. We then compared our results with those for the general irradiation conditions used in clinics. We found that the OSL dosimeter could not be identified under the irradiation conditions of abdominal and chest radiography, namely, one can apply the OSL dosimeter to measurement of the exposure dose in the irradiation field of X-rays without disturbing medical images. PMID:27260346

  1. Estimation of identification limit for a small-type OSL dosimeter on the medical images by measurement of X-ray spectra.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2016-07-01

    Our aim in this study is to derive an identification limit on a dosimeter for not disturbing a medical image when patients wear a small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter on their bodies during X-ray diagnostic imaging. For evaluation of the detection limit based on an analysis of X-ray spectra, we propose a new quantitative identification method. We performed experiments for which we used diagnostic X-ray equipment, a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom (1-20 cm), and a CdTe X-ray spectrometer assuming one pixel of the X-ray imaging detector. Then, with the following two experimental settings, corresponding X-ray spectra were measured with 40-120 kVp and 0.5-1000 mAs at a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm: (1) X-rays penetrating a soft-tissue-equivalent phantom with the OSL dosimeter attached directly on the phantom, and (2) X-rays penetrating only the soft-tissue-equivalent phantom. Next, the energy fluence and errors in the fluence were calculated from the spectra. When the energy fluence with errors concerning these two experimental conditions was estimated to be indistinctive, we defined the condition as the OSL dosimeter not being identified on the X-ray image. Based on our analysis, we determined the identification limit of the dosimeter. We then compared our results with those for the general irradiation conditions used in clinics. We found that the OSL dosimeter could not be identified under the irradiation conditions of abdominal and chest radiography, namely, one can apply the OSL dosimeter to measurement of the exposure dose in the irradiation field of X-rays without disturbing medical images.

  2. X-Ray Emitting GHz-Peaked Spectrum Galaxies: Testing a Dynamical-Radiative Model with Broad-Band Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Ostorero, L.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Diaferio, A.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C.C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M.C.; Wagner, S.J.; /Heidelberg Observ.

    2010-06-07

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the GPS spectral energy distribution (SED) with the source expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broad-band SEDs of a sample of eleven X-ray emitting GPS galaxies with Compact-Symmetric-Object (CSO) morphology, and show that: (i) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism; (ii) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N{sub H}) and radio (N{sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  3. X-RAY-EMITTING GHz-PEAKED-SPECTRUM GALAXIES: TESTING A DYNAMICAL-RADIATIVE MODEL WITH BROADBAND SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ostorero, L.; Diaferio, A.; Moderski, R.; Stawarz, L.; Kowalska, I.; Cheung, C. C.; Kataoka, J.; Begelman, M. C.; Wagner, S. J.

    2010-06-01

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of GPS sources with their expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broadband SEDs of a sample of 11 X-ray-emitting GPS galaxies with compact-symmetric-object morphology, and show that (1) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism and (2) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk-dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N {sub H}) and radio (N {sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  4. High energy gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Michael Richard

    This thesis presents a design study into gamma ray collimation techniques for use in high energy radiation imaging devices for the nuclear industry. Such technology is required to provide information on the nature and location of isotopes within nuclear facilities that have reached the end of their useful life. The work has concentrated on the use of two different techniques, namely mechanical collimation using the Anger camera and electronic collimation using a Compton camera. The work has used computational models to evaluate the performance of such systems and thereby suggest optimal design parameters for use in prototype devices. Ray tracing models have been constructed to simulate both parallel hole and tapered bore diverging collimators. Investigations have been carried out to measure the effects on the spatial resolution of changing various design parameters of the collimators. The effects of varying the hole size, septal thickness and collimator length over a range of source to collimator distances likely to be encountered in an industrial scenario have been examined. Some new insight into the nature of the point spread function of mechanical collimators has been gained and the limitations of the conventional analytical approach to collimator evaluation have been highlighted. Modifications to the standard equations used in collimator design have subsequently been suggested. An analytical description of tapered bore collimators has been derived. Monte Carlo models have been developed to model a single scatter Compton camera. Germanium, silicon and sodium iodide have been investigated as candidates for the scattering detector in such a device. A model of a complete ring array Compton camera system has been used to evaluate performance. The data from the Monte Carlo model has been reconstructed to form images. The quality of the images generated have then been compared with images obtained from parallel hole and focusing mechanical collimators.

  5. Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra, Composition and Anisotropy at Low Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gold, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lin, R. P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Pick, M.; Roelof, E. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Simnett, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra, Composition, and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HI-SCALE) is designed to make measurements of interplanetary ions and electrons throughout the entire Ulysses mission. The ions (E(i) greater than about 50 keV) and electrons (E(e) greater than about 30 keV) are identified uniquely and detected by five separate solid-state detector telescopes that are oriented to give nearly complete pitch-angle coverage from the spinning spacecraft. Ion elemental abundances are determined by Delta E vs E telescope using a thin (5 microns) front solid state detector element in a three-element telescope. Experimental operation is controlled by a microprocessor-based data system. Inflight calibration is provided by radioactive sources mounted on telescope covers which can be closed for calibration purposes and for radiation protection during the course of the mission. Ion and electron spectral information is determined using both broad-energy-range rate channels and a 32 channel pulse-height analyzer for more detailed spectra. Some initial in-ecliptic measurements are presented which demonstrate the features of the instrument.

  6. Cadmium (e,2e) Energy Spectra in the Autoionizing Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N. L. S.; Bauman, R. P.; Wilson, M.

    1997-04-01

    We will present an analysis of our comprehensive set of (e,2e) measurements in the Cd 4d^95s^25p autoionizing region, carried out for an incident electron-beam energy of 150 eV and scattering angles between 2^circ and 18^circ, corresponding to momentum transfer K=0.2 → 1 au. The results are presented as the sum and difference of k_ej=±hat k pairs of (e,2e) ejected-electron energy spectra(N.L.S. Martin, D.B. Thompson, R.P. Bauman and M. Wilson, Phys.Rev.Lett 72), 2163 (1994); Phys. Rev. A 50, 3878 (1994). for three special directions hat k, and compared with plane wave Born calculations that include ejected-electron partial waves l=0→7. It is found that the relative Born phases are incorrect for l=0,1,2 by amounts that are independent of scattering angle. The relative Born magnitudes are extremely good for hat k=hat K, but are extremely bad for the other two hat k directions. With increasing scattering angle we observe a reduction in the ^3P_1/^1P1 intensity ratio in the sum spectra, probably due to an increase in exchange scattering, and we also see a previously unobserved Cd 4d^95s^25p J=3 autoionizing level.

  7. Modeling solar flare hard X-ray images and spectra observed with RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2004-12-01

    Observations obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) of a flare on February 20, 2002 indicate a hard X-ray (HXR) coronal source at or near the top of a flare loop (called a HXR looptop source). The existence of the HXR looptop source suggests that magnetic reconnection, which is believed to power flares, occurs above the loop. In order to explain this HXR looptop source, I created a steady-state particle transport model, in which high-energy electrons are continuously injected at the top of a semicircular flare loop. Based on the simulation results, I find that the model predictions are consistent with the RHESSI observations in many respects, but the spectrum of the looptop source obtained from the model is steeper than that from the RHESSI data. This suggests that, instead of being accelerated above the loop as generally believed, the particles might be accelerated in the looptop itself. RHESSI observations of three other homologous flares that occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002, provide strong evidence for the presence of a large- scale current sheet above a flare loop, which is the basis of standard flare models. The most convincing finding is the presence of the temperature distribution of a separate coronal source above the flare loops: the hotter part of the coronal source was located lower in altitude than the cooler part. Together with the fact that the hotter flare loops are higher than the cooler loops, the observations support the existence of a large-scale current sheet between the top of the flare loops and the coronal source above. Blob-like sources along a line above the loop in the decay phase of the April 15, 2002, flare, which are suggestive of magnetic islands initiated by the tearing-mode instability, and the observation of a cusp structure in microwaves, further support the presence of the current sheet. The observations of the three homologous flares reveal two other features which are beyond the

  8. The Energy Spectra of Proton and Helium Measured from the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, H. S.; Seo, E. S.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon experiment is designed to investigate the composition and energy spectra of cosmic rays at the highest energies currently accessible from direct measurements, the region up to 100 TeV. The instrument consists of a silicon matrix for charge measurement, a graphite target (0.75 nuclear interaction length) to induce hadronic fragmentation, 3 scintillator strip hodoscopes for triggering and helping reconstruct trajectory, and a BGO calorimeter (18 radiation lengths) to measure the energy of incident particles. ATIC had two successful Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo, Antarctica: from 12/28/00 to 01/13/01 and from 12/29/02 to 01/18/03. We present the energy spectra of proton and helium extracted from the ATIC flights, over the energy range from 100 GeV to 100 TeV, and compare them with the results from other experiments at both the lower and higher energy ends.

  9. Effects of domain size on x-ray absorption spectra of boron nitride doped graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Hua, Weijie; Wang, Bo-Yao; Pong, Way-Faung; Glans, Per-Anders; Guo, Jinghua; Luo, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Doping is an efficient way to open the zero band gap of graphene. The control of the dopant domain size allows us to tailor the electronic structure and the properties of the graphene. We have studied the electronic structure of boron nitride doped graphenes with different domain sizes by simulating their near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra at the N K-edge. Six different doping configurations (five quantum dot type and one phase-separated zigzag-edged type) were chosen, and N K-edge NEXAFS spectra were calculated with large truncated cluster models by using the density functional theory with hybrid functional and the equivalent core hole approximation. The opening of the band gap as a function of the domain size is revealed. We found that nitrogens in the dopant boundary contribute a weaker, red-shifted π* peak in the spectra as compared to those in the dopant domain center. The shift is related to the fact that these interfacial nitrogens dominate the lowest conduction band of the system. Upon increasing the domain size, the ratio of interfacial atom decreases, which leads to a blue shift of the π* peak in the total NEXAFS spectra. The spectral evolution agrees well with experiments measured at different BN-dopant concentrations and approaches to that of a pristine h-BN sheet.

  10. Understanding Chemical versus Electrostatic Shifts in X-ray Photoelectron Spectra of Organic Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the present article is on understanding the insight that X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements can provide when studying self-assembled monolayers. Comparing density functional theory calculations to experimental data on deliberately chosen model systems, we show that both the chemical environment and electrostatic effects arising from a superposition of molecular dipoles influence the measured core-level binding energies to a significant degree. The crucial role of the often overlooked electrostatic effects in polar self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is unambiguously demonstrated by changing the dipole density through varying the SAM coverage. As a consequence of this effect, care has to be taken when extracting chemical information from the XP spectra of ordered organic adsorbate layers. Our results, furthermore, imply that XPS is a powerful tool for probing local variations in the electrostatic energy in nanoscopic systems, especially in SAMs. PMID:26937264

  11. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  12. New Approach on Quantification of Porosity of Thin Films via Electron-Excited X-ray Spectra.

    PubMed

    Ortel, Erik; Hertwig, Andreas; Berger, Dirk; Esposito, Pasquale; Rossi, Andrea M; Kraehnert, Ralph; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2016-07-19

    One of the crucial characteristics of functionalized thin films is their porosity (i.e., the ratio between the pore volume and the volume of the whole film). Due to the very low amount of material per coated area corresponding to thin films, it is a challenge for analytics to measure the film porosity. In this work, we present an approach to determine the porosity of thin films by means of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) either by wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (WDX) or by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The procedure is based on the calculation of the film mass deposition from electron-excited X-ray spectra. The mass deposition is converted into film density by division of measured film thickness. Finally, the film porosity is calculated from the measured film density and the density of bulk, nonporous film material. The general applicability of the procedure to determine the porosity is demonstrated on thin templated mesoporous TiO2 films, dip-coated on silicon wafer, with controlled porosity in the range of 15 to 50%. The high accuracy of the mass deposition as determined from X-ray spectra was validated with independent methods (ICP-OES and weighing). Furthermore, for the validation of the porosity results, ellipsometry, interference fringes method (IFM), and focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning were employed as independent techniques. Hence, the approach proposed in the present study is proven to be suited as a new analytical tool for accurate and relatively fast determination of the porosity of thin films. PMID:27334649

  13. The spectra of ten galactic X-ray sources in the southern sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruddace, R.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.; Mack, J. E., Jr.; Margon, B.

    1971-01-01

    Data on ten galactic X-ray sources were obtained during a rocket flight from Brazil in June 1969. Detailed spectra of these sources have been compared with bremsstrahlung, black body, and power law models, each including interstellar absorption. Six of the sources were fitted well by one or more of these models. In only one case were the data sufficient to distinguish the best model. Three of the sources were not fitted by any of the models, which suggests that more complex emission mechanisms are applicable. A comparison of our results with those of previous investigations provides evidence that five of the sources vary in intensity by a factor of 2 or more, and that three have variable spectra. New or substantially improved positions have been derived for four of the sources observed.

  14. The spectra of ten galactic X-ray sources in the southern sky.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruddace, R.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.; Mack, J.; Margon, B.

    1972-01-01

    Data on 10 galactic X-ray sources located between 320 and 20 deg galactic longitude were obtained during a rocket flight from Brazil in June 1969. Detailed spectra of these sources have been compared with bremsstrahlung, blackbody, and power-law models, each including interstellar absorption. Six of the sources were fitted well by one or more of these models. In only one case were the data sufficient to distinguish the best model. Three of the sources were not fitted by any of the models, which suggests that more complex emission mechanisms are applicable. A comparison of our results with those of previous investigations provides evidence that five of the sources vary in intensity by a factor of two or more, and that three have variable spectra.

  15. Unidentified line in x-ray spectra of the Andromeda galaxy and Perseus galaxy cluster.

    PubMed

    Boyarsky, A; Ruchayskiy, O; Iakubovskyi, D; Franse, J

    2014-12-19

    We report a weak line at 3.52±0.02  keV in x-ray spectra of the Andromeda galaxy and the Perseus galaxy cluster observed by the metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) and p-n (PN) CCD cameras of the XMM-Newton telescope. This line is not known as an atomic line in the spectra of galaxies or clusters. It becomes stronger towards the centers of the objects; is stronger for Perseus than for M31; is absent in the spectrum of a deep "blank sky" data set. Although for each object it is hard to exclude that the feature is due to an instrumental effect or an atomic line, it is consistent with the behavior of a dark matter decay line. Future (non-)detections of this line in multiple objects may help to reveal its nature.

  16. Unidentified line in x-ray spectra of the Andromeda galaxy and Perseus galaxy cluster.

    PubMed

    Boyarsky, A; Ruchayskiy, O; Iakubovskyi, D; Franse, J

    2014-12-19

    We report a weak line at 3.52±0.02  keV in x-ray spectra of the Andromeda galaxy and the Perseus galaxy cluster observed by the metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) and p-n (PN) CCD cameras of the XMM-Newton telescope. This line is not known as an atomic line in the spectra of galaxies or clusters. It becomes stronger towards the centers of the objects; is stronger for Perseus than for M31; is absent in the spectrum of a deep "blank sky" data set. Although for each object it is hard to exclude that the feature is due to an instrumental effect or an atomic line, it is consistent with the behavior of a dark matter decay line. Future (non-)detections of this line in multiple objects may help to reveal its nature. PMID:25554871

  17. High-energy emission in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matz, S. M.; Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Rieger, E.

    1985-01-01

    Between February 1980 and August 1983 the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission Satellite (SMM) detected 72 events identified as being of cosmic origin. These events are an essentially unbiased subset of all gamma-ray bursts. The measured spectra of these events show that high energy (greater than 1 MeV) emission is a common and energetically important feature. There is no evidence for a general high-energy cut-off or a distribution of cut-offs below about 6 MeV. These observations imply a limit on the preferential beaming of high energy emission. This constraint, combined with the assumption of isotropic low energy emission, implies that the typical magnetic field strength at burst radiation sites is less than 1 x 10 to the 12th gauss.

  18. Ultra-high energy cosmic rays from blazar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2013-02-01

    In spite of major observational advances in high-energy astronomy, the problem of UHECR origin has defied solution. Nevertheless, candidate sources can be ruled out on the basis of physical arguments and available data. For example, only a few source classes remain viable after requiring that the sources of UHECRs are extragalactic, that some of the sources are found within the GZK radius, and that they have adequate emissivity to explain the UHECR intensity and adequate power to accelerate the highest energy UHECRs. Features in the γ-ray spectra of blazars observed with Fermi at GeV energies, and with ground-based γ-ray telescopes at very-high energies (VHE; >~ 100 GeV), favor acceleration of UHECRs in blazar black-hole jets.

  19. Searching for narrow absorption and emission lines in XMM-Newton spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Braito, V.; D'Avanzo, P.; Ghirlanda, G.; Melandri, A.; Pescalli, A.; Salafia, O. S.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic search for narrow emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Using XMM-Newton data, both EPIC and RGS spectra, of six bright (fluence > 10-7 erg cm-2) and relatively nearby (z = 0.54-1.41) GRBs, we performed a blind search for emission or absorption lines that could be related to a high cloud density or metal-rich gas in the environ close to the GRBs. We detected five emission features in four of the six GRBs with an overall statistical significance, assessed through Monte Carlo simulations, of ≲ 3.0σ. Most of the lines are detected around the observed energy of the oxygen edge at ~ 0.5 keV, suggesting that they are not related to the GRB environment but are most likely of Galactic origin. No significant absorption features were detected. A spectral fitting with a free Galactic column density (NH) testing different models for the Galactic absorption confirms this origin because we found an indication of an excess of Galactic NH in these four GRBs with respect to the tabulated values.

  20. Measurement of the Multi-T{bold e}V Gamma-Ray Flare Spectra of Markarian 421 and Markarian 501

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, F.; Biller, S.D.; Bond, I.H.; Boyle, P.J.; Bradbury, S.M.; Breslin, A.C.; Buckley, J.H.; Burdett, A.M.; Gordo, J.B.; Carter-Lewis, D.A.; Catanese, M.; Cawley, M.F.; Fegan, D.J.; Finley, J.P.; Gaidos, J.A.; Hall, T.; Hillas, A.M.; Lamb, R.C.; Lessard, R.W.; Masterson, C.; McEnery, J.E.; Mohanty, G.; Moriarty, P. and others.

    1999-01-01

    The energy spectrum of Markarian 421 in flaring states has been measured from 0.3 to 10 TeV using both small and large zenith angle observations with the Whipple Observatory 10 m imaging telescope. The large zenith angle technique is useful for extending spectra to high energies, and the extraction of spectra with this technique is discussed. The resulting spectrum of Markarian 421 is fitted reasonably well by a simple power law: J(E)=E{sup {minus}2.54{plus_minus}0.03{plus_minus}0.10} photons m{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} TeV{sup {minus}1}, where the first set of errors is statistical and the second set is systematic. This is in contrast to our recently reported spectrum of Markarian 501, which over a similar energy range has substantial curvature. The differences in TeV energy spectra of gamma-ray blazars reflect both the physics of the gamma-ray production mechanism and possibly differential absorption effects at the source or in the intergalactic medium. Since Markarian 421 and Markarian 501 have almost the same redshift (0.031 and 0.033, respectively), the difference in their energy spectra must be intrinsic to the sources and not due to intergalactic absorption, assuming the intergalactic infrared background is uniform. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1999.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  1. MAGNETIC HELICITY AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongqi; Brandenburg, Axel; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2014-04-01

    We compute for the first time the magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 2011 February 11-15 at 20° southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of the magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The magnetic helicity normalized to its theoretical maximum value, here referred to as relative helicity, is around 4% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ≈ 0.4 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to a scale of 2π/k ≈ 16 Mm. The same sign and a similar value are also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The modulus of the magnetic helicity spectrum shows a k {sup –11/3} power law at large wavenumbers, which implies a k {sup –5/3} spectrum for the modulus of the current helicity. A k {sup –5/3} spectrum is also obtained for the magnetic energy. The energy spectra evaluated separately from the horizontal and vertical fields agree for wavenumbers below 3 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to scales above 2 Mm. This gives some justification to our assumption of isotropy and places limits resulting from possible instrumental artifacts at small scales.

  2. Studies of the Energy Spectra of Incident Cosmic Radiation by the Networks of Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, Ashot A.; Hovsyapayan, Gagik G.

    2007-08-01

    There are numerous indications that particle acceleration took place in supernovae remnants, by pulsars, super-massive black holes, in the galaxy clusters and by stars. As a universal mechanism operated on different scales the stochastic and shock acceleration is pointed. It is very important to use our nearest star - the sun, as laboratory in studying particle acceleration phenomena. The surface particle detectors, along with space-born spectrometers are capable of detecting solar particles in the energy range from KeVs till several Tens of GeV. The large surface arrays are detecting particle in energy range from ~100 TeV till EeV. This richness of information on particle fluxes on different scales can be used in studying physical processes responsible for particle acceleration in Universe. Surface detectors measuring Extensive Air Showers (EAS) initiated by Primary Cosmic Rays (PCR) incident on terrestrial atmosphere have been in operation since the last 50 years with main goal to explore the major enigma of Cosmic Ray (CR) origin and acceleration. Recent achievements of the Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes and X-ray space laboratories, establishing the supernova remnants (SNRs) as source of hadronic cosmic rays pose stringent conditions on the quality of the EAS evidence. After establishing the existence of the “knee” in all particle spectrum the most pronounced result from EAS studies is the rigidity dependent shift of the knee position to the highest energies. This feature first observed by the exploiting the separation of the primary beam in different groups of mass in MAKET-ANI, EAS-TOP and KASCADE experiments also pointed to the SNR blast shocks as CR source. The MAKET ANI detector is placed on mountain Aragats (Armenia) on 3200m at sea level (40.50N, 44.20E). More than 1.3 x 10^6 showers with size greater than 10^5 were registered in 1997-2004. The detector has effectively collected the cores of EAS, initiated by primaries with energies of 5 × 10

  3. EUV/soft x-ray spectra for low B neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Rajagopal, Mohan; Rogers, Forrest J.; Iglesias, Carlos A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent ROSAT and EUVE detections of spin-powered neutron stars suggest that many emit 'thermal' radiation, peaking in the EUV/soft X-ray band. These data constrain the neutron stars' thermal history, but interpretation requires comparison with model atmosphere computations, since emergent spectra depend strongly on the surface composition and magnetic field. As recent opacity computations show substantial change to absorption cross sections at neutron star photospheric conditions, we report here on new model atmosphere computations employing such data. The results are compared with magnetic atmosphere models and applied to PSR J0437-4715, a low field neutron star.

  4. A disc-reflected component in the spectra of X-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, C. S. R.; Done, C.

    1991-01-01

    An argument is presented to the effect that a disk-reflected component should be present in the spectra of X-ray bursts and is best seen just after the burst peak when the reflected photons, delayed by their passage to the site of reflection, appear in stronger contrast to the fast-declining primary emission from the cooling neutron star. It is shown that disk reflection has an observable effect on the spectrum of the burst tail. The possible use of the concomitant absorption edge as a diagnostic of the accretion disk is discussed.

  5. An introduction to the pair-reflection model of X-ray spectra in AGN's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Roland

    1992-03-01

    The pair reflection model of Zdziarski, Ghisellini, George, Svensson, Fabian, and Done (1990), in which most features of the extreme ultraviolet gamma ray spectra of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are accounted for is considered. Details of the conception of the model are given and the model itself is explained. In the pair reflection model a pair cloud located above a cold slab generates a self consistently computed nonthermal spectrum that irradiates and is reflected by the slab. Some of these features are discussed using simplest possible arguments. The robustness of the pair reflection model as well as possible variability patterns are also discussed.

  6. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra were calculated using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron-leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic-ray-albedo-neutron-decay mechanism is the source of the protons and electrons trapped in the Van Allen belts.

  7. The Energy Spectra of Heavy Nuclei Measured by the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panov, A. D.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazley, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays in the region of total energy from 100 GeV to near 100 TeV for Z from 1 to 26. ATIC consists of a pixelated silicon matrix detector to measure charge plus a fully active BGO calorimeter, to measure energy, located below a carbon target interleaved with three layers of scintillator hodoscope. The ATIC instrument had a second (scientific) flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 12/29/02 to 1/18/03, yielding 20 days of good data. The GEANT 3.21 Monte Carlo code with the QGSM event generator and the FLUKA code with the DPMJET-II event generator were used to convert energy deposition measurements to primary energy. We present the preliminary energy spectra for the abundant elements C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe and compare them with the results of the first (test) flight of ATIC in 2000-01 and with results from the HEAO-3 and CRN experiments.

  8. The energy spectra of heavy nuclei measured by the ATIC experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, A.; Atic Team

    ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter) is a balloon-borne experiment to measure the spectra and composition of primary cosmic rays in the region of total energy from 100 GeV to near 100 TeV for Z from 1 to 26. ATIC consists of a pixelated silicon matrix detector to measure charge plus a fully active BGO calorimeter, to measure energy, located below a carbon target interleaved with three layers of scintillator hodoscope. The ATIC instrument had a second (scientific) flight from McMurdo, Antarctica from 12/29/02 to 1/18/03, yielding 18 days of good data. The GEANT 3.21 Monte Carlo code with the QGSM event generator and the FLUKA code with the DPMJET-II event generator were used to convert energy deposition measurements to primary energy. We present the preliminary energy spectra for the abundant elements C, O, Ne, Mg, Si and Fe and compare them with the results of the first (test) flight of ATIC in 2000-01 and with results from the HEAO-3 and CRN experiments.

  9. Model atmospheres and X-ray spectra of bursting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madej, Jerzy

    1991-01-01

    Model atmosphere equations are derived which correspond to plane-parallel nongray atmospheres of very hot neutron stars in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium. The nonlinear transfer equation used implements an exact photon redistribution function which precisely traces even those scattering events having large photon-electron energy exchange. The numerical results thus obtained encompass tables of the surface fluxes for 20 model atmospheres whose T(eff) ranges from 6 to 30 million K. The spectra of high gravity models are virtually identical with the blackbody spectrum shifted toward higher energies, while models approaching the Eddington limit develop a large low-energy hump.

  10. The Imprint of the Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Schady, P.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Gehrels, N.; Guirec, S.; Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E.; Perkins, J. S.; Scargle, J. D.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL isimportant to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are limited by galactic and other foreground emissions. Here, we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z approx. 1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to ultraviolet frequencies and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  11. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernard, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  12. Analysis of spectra from portable handheld gamma-ray spectrometry for terrain comparative assessment.

    PubMed

    Dias, Flávio; Lima, Marco; Sanjurjo-Sánchez, Jorge; Alves, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Geological characteristics can have impacts on societal development by, e.g., geotechnical issues and radiological hazard levels. Due to urban sprawl, there is an increasing need for detailed geological assessment. In this work are analysed data from portable handheld gamma-ray spectra (K, eU and eTh) obtained in granitic and Silurian metaclastic outcrops as well as in an profile, roughly N-S, on soil covered terrains transecting a mapped contact between these rock types (the profile's northern extremity is at locations mapped as granite). Estimations from gamma-ray spectra were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. K, eU and eTh values were higher on granite in relation to Silurian metaclastic rocks. The northern extremity of the profile showed clearly higher contents of eTh and this contrast was supported by univariate statistical tools (normality plot and Wilk-Shapiro test; boxplots). A ternary plot with the contribution of the elements to gamma-ray absorbed dose showed the separation of granite from Silurian metaclastic rocks with the former being nearer the eTh vertex. The points in the northern extremity of the profile are nearer the eTh vertex than the other points on the profile. These visual suggestions were supported by hierarchical cluster analysis, which was able to differentiate between granite and metaclastic outcrops and separate portions of the profile located on different terrains. Portable gamma-ray spectrometry showed, hence, the potential to distinguish granite and metaclastic terrains at a scale useful for engineering works. These results can also be useful for a first comparative zoning of radiological hazards (which are higher for granite). PMID:26867098

  13. Analysis of spectra from portable handheld gamma-ray spectrometry for terrain comparative assessment.

    PubMed

    Dias, Flávio; Lima, Marco; Sanjurjo-Sánchez, Jorge; Alves, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Geological characteristics can have impacts on societal development by, e.g., geotechnical issues and radiological hazard levels. Due to urban sprawl, there is an increasing need for detailed geological assessment. In this work are analysed data from portable handheld gamma-ray spectra (K, eU and eTh) obtained in granitic and Silurian metaclastic outcrops as well as in an profile, roughly N-S, on soil covered terrains transecting a mapped contact between these rock types (the profile's northern extremity is at locations mapped as granite). Estimations from gamma-ray spectra were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. K, eU and eTh values were higher on granite in relation to Silurian metaclastic rocks. The northern extremity of the profile showed clearly higher contents of eTh and this contrast was supported by univariate statistical tools (normality plot and Wilk-Shapiro test; boxplots). A ternary plot with the contribution of the elements to gamma-ray absorbed dose showed the separation of granite from Silurian metaclastic rocks with the former being nearer the eTh vertex. The points in the northern extremity of the profile are nearer the eTh vertex than the other points on the profile. These visual suggestions were supported by hierarchical cluster analysis, which was able to differentiate between granite and metaclastic outcrops and separate portions of the profile located on different terrains. Portable gamma-ray spectrometry showed, hence, the potential to distinguish granite and metaclastic terrains at a scale useful for engineering works. These results can also be useful for a first comparative zoning of radiological hazards (which are higher for granite).

  14. CALCULATION OF GAMMA SPECTRA IN A PLASTIC SCINTILLATOR FOR ENERGY CALIBRATIONAND DOSE COMPUTATION.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chankyu; Yoo, Hyunjun; Kim, Yewon; Moon, Myungkook; Kim, Jong Yul; Kang, Dong Uk; Lee, Daehee; Kim, Myung Soo; Cho, Minsik; Lee, Eunjoong; Cho, Gyuseong

    2016-09-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors have practical advantages in the field of dosimetry. Energy calibration of measured gamma spectra is important for dose computation, but it is not simple in the plastic scintillators because of their different characteristics and a finite resolution. In this study, the gamma spectra in a polystyrene scintillator were calculated for the energy calibration and dose computation. Based on the relationship between the energy resolution and estimated energy broadening effect in the calculated spectra, the gamma spectra were simply calculated without many iterations. The calculated spectra were in agreement with the calculation by an existing method and measurements. PMID:27127208

  15. Study of extensive air showers and primary energy spectra by MAKET-ANI detector on mountain Aragats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Gharagyozyan, G.; Ghazaryan, S.; Hovsepyan, G.; Mamidjanyan, E.; Melkumyan, L.; Romakhin, V.; Vardanyan, A.; Sokhoyan, S.

    2007-09-01

    Small and middle size surface detectors measuring extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by primary cosmic rays (PCR) incident on terrestrial atmosphere have been in operation for the last 50 years. Their main goal is to explore the "knee" in all particle spectrum to solve the problem of cosmic ray (CR) origin and acceleration. The recent achievements of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and X-ray space laboratories, establishing the supernova remnants (SNRs) as a source of hadronic cosmic rays, pose stringent conditions on the quality of EAS evidence. After establishing the existence of the "knee" itself, the most pronounced result from EAS studies is the rigidity dependent shift of the knee position to the highest energies. This feature was first observed by separation of the primary flux in different mass groups in MAKET-ANI, EAS-TOP and KASCADE experiments. The MAKET-ANI detector is placed on Mt. Aragats (Armenia) at 3200 m above the sea level (40°25'N, 44°15'E). More than 1.3 × 10 6 showers with size greater than 10 5 particles were registered in 1997-2004. The detector effectively collected the cores of EAS, initiated by primaries with energies of 10 14-10 17 eV. After proving that the quality of the EAS size and shape reconstruction was reasonably high, we present the lateral distribution function (LDF) for distances from 10 to 120 m from EAS core and EAS size spectra in 5 zenith angle intervals. We use CORSIKA simulations to present the energy spectra. The results from the MAKET-ANI experiment on the energy spectra of the "light"(p + He) and "heavy" (O + Si + Fe) nuclear groups are compared to the spectra obtained by balloon experiments and to other available spectra.

  16. The Gamma Ray Spectra Measurement in Reactor Pressure Vessel Simulator in WWER-1000 Engineering Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ošmera, B.; Kyncl, J.; Mařík, M.; Cvachovec, F.; Smutný, V.; Králík, M.

    2003-06-01

    The space - energy distribution of the mixed neutron - photon radiation field has been measured over the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) simulator thickness in the WWER-1000 engineering benchmark assembly in the LR-0 experimental reactor (in Nuclear Research Institute Řež plc) with a scintillation spectrometer. The spectra have been measured before the RPV in one quarter, one half, and three quarters of its thickness and behind the RPV in the energy range 0.5 - 10 MeV. The evaluated integral fluxes above 1 MeV and their ratio are compared with the MCNP and DORT calculation, the measured spectra are presented graphically. The measurements are being performed in the frame of the project REDOS [1], 5th Framwork Programme of the European Community 1998 - 2002.

  17. On the origin of power-law X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosman, I.; Shaham, J.; Shaviv, G.

    1984-01-01

    In the present analytical model for a power law X-ray continuum production in active galactic nuclei, the dissipation of turbulent energy flux above the accretion disk forms an optically thin transition layer with an inverted temperature gradient. The emitted thermal radiation has a power law spectrum in the 0.1-100 keV range, with a photon energy spectral index gamma of about 0.4-1.0. Thermal X-ray contribution from the layer is 5-10 percent of the total disk luminosity. The gamma value of 0.75 is suggested as a 'natural' power law index for Seyfert galaxies and QSOs.

  18. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  19. EMISSION LINES BETWEEN 1 AND 2 keV IN COMETARY X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Ian; Christian, Damian J.; Bodewits, Dennis; Dennerl, Konrad; Lisse, Carey M.; Wolk, Scott J. E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu

    2013-01-20

    We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0-2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected five comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model. Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV which we identify as being created by SWCX lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700-2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution that these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.

  20. Gamma-ray spectra of hexane (C6H14) in positron-electron annihilation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Wang, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical gamma-ray spectra of molecule hexane have been calculated and compared with the experimental results in both gas (Iwata et al., 1997a) and liquid (Kerr et al., 1965) phases. The present study reveals that in gas phase not all valence electrons of hexane contribute the same degree in the electron-positron annihilation of hexane. The electrons which dominate the positron-electron annihilation of molecules are called positrophilic electrons. The positrophilic electrons are predominately found to involve the electrons on the lowest occupied valence orbital (LOVO) of a free molecule in gas phase. When hexane is confined in liquid phase, however, the intermolecular interactions ultimately eliminate the free molecular orientation and selectivity for the positrophilic electrons in the gas phase. As a result, the gamma-ray spectra of hexane become an "averaged" contribution from all valence electrons, which is again in agreement with liquid phase measurement. The roles of valence electrons in annihilation process for gas and liquid phases of hexane have been recognized for the first time in the present study.

  1. A wavelet analysis for the X-ray absorption spectra of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Penfold, T. J.; Tavernelli, I.; Rothlisberger, U.; Milne, C. J.; Abela, R.; Reinhard, M.; Nahhas, A. El; Chergui, M.

    2013-01-07

    We present a Wavelet transform analysis for the X-ray absorption spectra of molecules. In contrast to the traditionally used Fourier transform approach, this analysis yields a 2D correlation plot in both R- and k-space. As a consequence, it is possible to distinguish between different scattering pathways at the same distance from the absorbing atom and between the contributions of single and multiple scattering events, making an unambiguous assignment of the fine structure oscillations for complex systems possible. We apply this to two previously studied transition metal complexes, namely iron hexacyanide in both its ferric and ferrous form, and a rhenium diimine complex, [ReX(CO){sub 3}(bpy)], where X = Br, Cl, or ethyl pyridine (Etpy). Our results demonstrate the potential advantages of using this approach and they highlight the importance of multiple scattering, and specifically the focusing phenomenon to the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of these complexes. We also shed light on the low sensitivity of the EXAFS spectrum to the Re-X scattering pathway.

  2. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  3. Particle Acceleration Inside Thunderstorms and the Variation in Source Spectra of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Eric; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Briggs, Michael S.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-03-01

    One of the unresolved questions in the atmospheric sciences is the origin of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). These flashes are short but intense gamma ray bursts emanating from Earth's atmosphere. This phenomenon has been observed by gamma ray detectors on orbiting satellites, e.g. NASA Fermi, intended to study astrophysical phenomena such as Gamma-ray Bursts. TGFs are thought to originate inside thunderstorms where electrons can be accelerated and emit radiation in the multi MeV range due to bremsstrahlung interactions with air molecules. These so called ``runaway electrons'' are seeded from cosmic ray air showers hitting the Earth's atmosphere from (extra) galactic sources. In this work, we present a Monte Carlo model that simulates particle physics inside a thunderstorm region. The subsequent transport of high energy gamma rays through the Earth's atmosphere and up to satellite orbit is also included. We show that by varying both the potential difference and the ambient electric field inside the thundercloud, different electron and photon energy distributions are produced. This effect may be detectable by orbiting spacecraft, and therefore serves as a method to remote sense the electric fields that exist inside thunderstorms.

  4. How realistic UV spectra and X-rays suppress the abundance of direct collapse black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. A.; Bovino, S.; Grassi, T.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Spaans, M.

    2015-01-01

    Observations of high-redshift quasars at z > 6 indicate that they harbour supermassive black holes (SMBHs) of a billion solar masses. The direct collapse scenario has emerged as the most plausible way to assemble SMBHs. The nurseries for the direct collapse black holes are massive primordial haloes illuminated with an intense UV flux emitted by Population II (Pop II) stars. In this study, we compute the critical value of such a flux (J_{21}^crit) for realistic spectra of Pop II stars through three-dimensional cosmological simulations. We derive the dependence of J_{21}^crit on the radiation spectra, on variations from halo to halo, and on the impact of X-ray ionization. Our findings show that the value of J_{21}^crit is a few times 104 and only weakly depends on the adopted radiation spectra in the range between Trad = 2 × 104and105 K. For three simulated haloes of a few times 107 M⊙, J_{21}^crit varies from 2 × 104 to 5 × 104. The impact of X-ray ionization is almost negligible and within the expected scatter of J_{21}^crit for background fluxes of JX, 21 ≤ 0.1. The computed estimates of J_{21}^crit have profound implications for the quasar abundance at z = 10 as it lowers the number density of black holes forming through an isothermal direct collapse by a few orders of magnitude below the observed black hole density. However, the sites with moderate amounts of H2 cooling may still form massive objects sufficient to be compatible with observations.

  5. Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana; Li Luhua; Chen Ying; Cowie, Bruce C. C.

    2013-05-15

    The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

  6. Soft-X-ray spectra of highly charged Os, Bi, Th, and U ions in an electron beam ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Beiersdorfer, P; Fournier, K B; Chen, M H

    2004-12-03

    Systematic variation of the electron-beam energy in an electron-beam ion trap has been employed to produce soft-X-ray spectra of Os, Bi, Th, and U with highest charge states ranging up to Ni-like ions. Guided by relativistic atomic structure calculations, the strongest lines have been identified with {Delta}n = 0 (n = 4 to n' = 4) transitions in Rb- to Cu-like ions. The rather weak 4p-4d transitions are much less affected by QED contributions than the dominant 4s-4p transitions. Our wavelength measurements consequently provide benchmarks with and (almost) without QED. Because the radiative corrections are not very sensitive to the number of electrons in the valence shell, our data, moreover, provide benchmarks for the evaluation of electron-electron interactions.

  7. Gamma-ray spectra and doses from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C.E.; Lucas, M.C.; Tisinger, E.W.; Hamm, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    Most radiation safety guidelines in the nuclear industry are based on the data concerning the survivors of the nuclear explosions at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Crucial to determining these guidelines is the radiation from the explosions. We have measured gamma-ray pulse-height distributions from an accurate replica of the Little Boy device used at Hiroshima, operated at low power levels near critical. The device was placed outdoors on a stand 4 m from the ground to minimize environmental effects. The power levels were based on a monitor detector calibrated very carefully in independent experiments. High-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with a germanium detector to identify the lines and to obtain line intensities. The 7631 to 7645 keV doublet from neutron capture in the heavy steel case was dominant. Low-resolution pulse-height distributions were acquired with bismuth-germanate detectors. We calculated flux spectra from these distributions using accurately measured detector response functions and efficiency curves. We then calculated dose-rate spectra from the flux spectra using a flux-to-dose-rate conversion procedure. The integral of each dose-rate spectrum gave an integral dose rate. The integral doses at 2 m ranged from 0.46 to 1.03 mrem per 10/sup 13/ fissions. The output of the Little Boy replica can be calculated with Monte Carlo codes. Comparison of our experimental spectra, line intensities, and integral doses can be used to verify these calculations at low power levels and give increased confidence to the calculated values from the explosion at Hiroshima. These calculations then can be used to establish better radiation safety guidelines. 7 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  8. A model of the spectra and high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Jason

    2016-07-01

    High-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) in black hole X-ray binaries have frequencies comparable to the orbital frequency at the innermost stable circular orbit, and therefore may encode information about strong field general relativity. However, the origin of the oscillations and the associated X-ray spectra remain uncertain. I will discuss a new model for these spectra, which also acts to filter coherent QPOs from local accretion disk oscillations. This model explains many puzzling aspects of HFQPOs, makes predictions which are testable with archival and future X-ray data, and can in principle be used as a new method to measure black hole spin.

  9. 5f{sup N} configurations and x-ray spectra of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, N.A.

    1995-04-01

    The electronic structure of 5f{sup N} configurations and the characteristic X-ray radiation energies for an entire actinium series are calculated using the Hartree-Fock-Pauli approximation, and the variations obtained are analyzed. The electrostatic and magnetic parameters of these ions, as well as energies of their K and L lines, exhibit essentially nonlinear dependence on the nuclear charge and number of electrons. This fact evidences that simplified models of atomic structure are inapplicable to heavy ions.

  10. The Broadband XMM-Newton and NuSTAR X-Ray Spectra of Two Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources in the Galaxy IC 342

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vikram; Harrison, Fiona A.; Bachetti, Matteo; Walton, Dominic J.; Furst, Felix; Barret, Didier; Miller, Jon M.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn C.; Craig, William W.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Ptak, Andrew F.; Stern, Daniel; Webb, Natalie A.; Zhang, William W.

    2015-02-01

    We present results for two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), IC 342 X-1 and IC 342 X-2, using two epochs of XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations separated by ~7 days. We observe little spectral or flux variability above 1 keV between epochs, with unabsorbed 0.3-30 keV luminosities being 1.04+0.08-0.06 × 1040 erg s-1 for IC 342 X-1 and 7.40 ± 0.20 × 1039 erg s-1 for IC 342 X-2, so that both were observed in a similar, luminous state. Both sources have a high absorbing column in excess of the Galactic value. Neither source has a spectrum consistent with a black hole binary in low/hard state, and both ULXs exhibit strong curvature in their broadband X-ray spectra. This curvature rules out models that invoke a simple reflection-dominated spectrum with a broadened iron line and no cutoff in the illuminating power-law continuum. X-ray spectrum of IC 342 X-1 can be characterized by a soft disk-like blackbody component at low energies and a cool, optically thick Comptonization continuum at high energies, but unique physical interpretation of the spectral components remains challenging. The broadband spectrum of IC 342 X-2 can be fit by either a hot (3.8 keV) accretion disk or a Comptonized continuum with no indication of a seed photon population. Although the seed photon component may be masked by soft excess emission unlikely to be associated with the binary system, combined with the high absorption column, it is more plausible that the broadband X-ray emission arises from a simple thin blackbody disk component. Secure identification of the origin of the spectral components in these sources will likely require broadband spectral variability studies.

  11. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  12. Local electron spectrum above 100 MeV derived from gamma-ray emissivity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two new determinations of the local gamma-ray emmissivity spectrum are in good accord and were used to derive constraints on the local electron spectrum. The requirement for an electron intensity above 1 GeV larger than previously believed is confirmed and no low energy upturn is then needed.

  13. Breaking of modulated wave trains: energy and spectra evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vita, Francesco; Verzicco, Roberto; Iafrati, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    process is completed. At least for the conditions considered in the present study, the whole breaking process lasts 10-12 wave periods. Results are presented in terms of energy amount dissipated by the whole breaking process and changes operated to the pre-breaking spectra. Some analyses concerning the maximum wave steepness and the energy content of the single wave components are also presented with the aim of deriving a criteria which might explain the conditions leading the breaking to stop.

  14. Artifacts in energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the scanning electron microscope (II).

    PubMed

    Fiori, C E; Newbury, D E

    1980-01-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra obtained with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer on an electron beam instrument can be severely compromised by the presence of electromagnetic interference. Sources of electromagnetic interference include ground currents and signals generated by time-varying currents in instrument components such as scan coils. Spectrometer resolution can be degraded by the accumulation of ice and vaccum oil on critical components of the device. Operation at high electron energy can cause artifacts in spectra due to direct entry of electrons and spurious x-rays into the detector. Processing high energy photons (above 40 keV) can lead to detector saturation effects which degrade resolution and affect dead time correction. Transmission of high energy x-rays through the detector accompanied by Compton scattering can lead to a distortion of the low energy portion of the spectrum.

  15. Artifacts in energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the scanning electron microscope (II).

    PubMed

    Fiori, C E; Newbury, D E

    1980-01-01

    The quality of x-ray spectra obtained with an energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer on an electron beam instrument can be severely compromised by the presence of electromagnetic interference. Sources of electromagnetic interference include ground currents and signals generated by time-varying currents in instrument components such as scan coils. Spectrometer resolution can be degraded by the accumulation of ice and vaccum oil on critical components of the device. Operation at high electron energy can cause artifacts in spectra due to direct entry of electrons and spurious x-rays into the detector. Processing high energy photons (above 40 keV) can lead to detector saturation effects which degrade resolution and affect dead time correction. Transmission of high energy x-rays through the detector accompanied by Compton scattering can lead to a distortion of the low energy portion of the spectrum. PMID:7423119

  16. Energy Spectra of Ions Accelerated in Impulsive and Gradual Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, D. V.; Barbier, L. M.; Von Rosenvinge; T. T.; Mason, G. M.; Mazur, J. E.; Dwyer; J. R.

    1997-07-01

    We report new high-sensitivity measurements of the energy spectra of ions from five impulsive solar flares and one gradual event observed during solar minimum by the Energetic Particles, Acceleration, Composition, and Transport (EPACT) experiment aboard the WIND spacecraft. All of the impulsive-flare events had intensities too low to be visible on previous spacecraft such as ISEE 3, which observed hundreds of impulsive-flare events. Often these events cluster in or behind a coronal mass ejection (CME) where magnetic field lines provide an excellent connection to a solar active region where flares are occurring. In most cases we can see velocity dispersion as the ions of 20 keV amu-1 to 10 MeV amu-1 streamed out from the impulsive flare at the Sun, arriving in inverse order of their velocity. Ions from a large, magnetically well-connected gradual event, associated with a CME-driven shock, also show velocity dispersion early in the event but show identical time profiles that last for several days late in the event. These time-invariant spectra of H, 4He, C, O, and Fe in this gradual event are well represented as power laws in energy from 20 keV amu-1 to ~100 MeV amu-1. In the impulsive-flare events, H, 3He, 4He, C, O, and Fe have more rounded spectra that flatten somewhat at low energies; yet the intensities continue to increase down to 20 keV amu-1. Most of the ion energy content appears to lie below 1 MeV in the impulsive events, where it would be invisible to γ-ray line observations.

  17. Gamma-ray burst spectra from photon-deficient Compton scattering by nonthermal electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Lamb, Don Q.

    1986-01-01

    Consideration is given to a model of gamma-ray burst sources based on repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic nonthermal electrons. Relativistic electrons which are continuously produced in the source radiate the total power L supplied to them. Higher order Compton scatterings, which occur when L(soft) is much less than L make the model distinct. The spectrum having an X-ray energy index of about one results from the superposition of the spectral components from several orders of Compton scattering; the change of the slope at several hundred keV arises from the Klein-Nishina decline of the scattering cross section.

  18. Anomalous Transport of High Energy Cosmic Rays in Galactic Superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Nasser F.

    2014-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays may exhibit anomalous transport as they traverse and are accelerated by a collection of supernovae explosions in a galactic superbubble. Signatures of this anomalous transport can show up in the particles' evolution and their spectra. In a continuous-time-random- walk (CTRW) model assuming standard diffusive shock acceleration theory (DSA) for each shock encounter, and where the superbubble (an OB stars association) is idealized as a heterogeneous region of particle sources and sinks, acceleration and transport in the superbubble can be shown to be sub-diffusive. While the sub-diffusive transport can be attributed to the stochastic nature of the acceleration time according to DSA theory, the spectral break appears to be an artifact of transport in a finite medium. These CTRW simulations point to a new and intriguing phenomenon associated with the statistical nature of collective acceleration of high energy cosmic rays in galactic superbubbles.

  19. Gamma ray bursts and extreme energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Scarsi, Livio

    1998-06-15

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray particles (EECR) with E>10{sup 20} eV arriving on Earth with very low flux ({approx}1 particle/Km{sup 2}-1000yr) require for their investigation very large detecting areas, exceeding values of 1000 km{sup 2} sr. Projects with these dimensions are now being proposed: Ground Arrays ('Auger' with 2x3500 km{sup 2} sr) or exploiting the Earth Atmosphere as seen from space ('AIR WATCH' and OWL,'' with effective area reaching 1 million km{sup 2} sr). In this last case, by using as a target the 10{sup 13} tons of air viewed, also the high energy neutrino flux can be investigated conveniently. Gamma Rays Bursts are suggested as a possible source for EECR and the associated High Energy neutrino flux.

  20. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  1. Properties of Energy Spectra of Molecular Crystals Investigated by Nonlinear Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Huai-Wu

    We calculate the quantum energy spectra of molecular crystals, such as acetanilide, by using discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing various interactions, appropriate to the systems. The energy spectra consist of many energy bands, in each energy band there are a lot of energy levels including some higher excited states. The result of energy spectrum is basically consistent with experimental values obtained by infrared absorption and Raman scattering in acetanilide and can also explain some experimental results obtained by Careri et al. Finally, we further discuss the influences of variously characteristic parameters on the energy spectra of the systems.

  2. X-ray Absorption Spectra of Dissolved Polysulfides in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries from First-Principles.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Wujcik, Kevin H; Velasco-Velez, Juan; Wu, Chenghao; Teran, Alexander A; Kapilashrami, Mukes; Cabana, Jordi; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Balsara, Nitash; Prendergast, David

    2014-05-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of lithium polysulfides (Li2Sx) of various chain lengths (x) dissolved in a model solvent are obtained from first-principles calculations. The spectra exhibit two main absorption features near the sulfur K-edge, which are unambiguously interpreted as a pre-edge near 2471 eV due to the terminal sulfur atoms at either end of the linear polysulfide dianions and a main-edge near 2473 eV due to the (x - 2) internal atoms in the chain, except in the case of Li2S2, which only has a low-energy feature. We find an almost linear dependence between the ratio of the peaks and chain length, although the linear dependence is modified by the delocalized, molecular nature of the core-excited states that can span up to six neighboring sulfur atoms. Thus, our results indicate that the ratio of the peak area, and not the peak intensities, should be used when attempting to differentiate the polysulfides from XAS.

  3. Measurement and simulations of hollow atom X-ray spectra of solid-density relativistic plasma created by high-contrast PW optical laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Colgan, J.; Dance, R. J.; Abdallah, J.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. L.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2013-09-01

    K-shell spectra of solid Al excited by petawatt picosecond laser pulses have been investigated at the Vulcan PW facility. Laser pulses of ultrahigh contrast with an energy of 160 J on the target allow studies of interactions between the laser field and solid state matter at 1020 W/cm2. Intense X-ray emission of KK hollow atoms (atoms without n = 1 electrons) from thin aluminum foils is observed from optical laser plasma for the first time. Specifically for 1.5 μm thin foil targets the hollow atom yield dominates the resonance line emission. It is suggested that the hollow atoms are predominantly excited by the impact of X-ray photons generated by radiation friction to fast electron currents in solid-density plasma due to Thomson scattering and bremsstrahlung in the transverse plasma fields. Numerical simulations of Al hollow atom spectra using the ATOMIC code confirm that the impact of keV photons dominates the atom ionization. Our estimates demonstrate that solid-density plasma generated by relativistic optical laser pulses provide the source of a polychromatic keV range X-ray field of 1018 W/cm2 intensity, and allows the study of excited matter in the radiation-dominated regime. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of hollow atom radiation is found to be a powerful tool to study the properties of high-energy density plasma created by intense X-ray radiation.

  4. X-ray Diffraction Spectra in Cu-Implanted SiO{sub 2} Films on Si(100) Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokoff, J.; Lewis, J. Courtenay

    2010-10-29

    Cu-implanted SiO{sub 2} films on Si(100) have been studied using x-ray methods and x-ray diffraction pattern processing. The x-ray results indicate the presence of a preferred orientation for Cu {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes parallel to the substrate surface without directional orientation for Cu-implanted SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) and nano-crystalline-Cu/SiO{sub 2}/Si(100)(ie. after implanted and annealed Cu). The x-ray diffraction spectra of the Cu-implanted and nano-crystalline-Cu phases were analyzed (ie. in terms of peak search, profile fit, crystallite size) and compared to data from complimentary techniques (RBS, TEM). Results are discussed with respect to x-ray spectral lines shapes derived from XRD spectra processing and the nanostructure problem.

  5. Solar flare composition and thermodynamics from RESIK X-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Kępa, A.; Mrozek, T.; Phillips, K. J. H. E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl E-mail: kennethjhphillips@yahoo.com

    2014-06-01

    Previous estimates of the solar flare abundances of Si, S, Cl, Ar, and K from the RESIK X-ray crystal spectrometer on board the CORONAS-F spacecraft were made on the assumption of isothermal X-ray emission. We investigate the effect on these estimates by relaxing this assumption and instead determining the differential emission measure (DEM) or thermal structure of the emitting plasma by re-analyzing RESIK data for a GOES class M1.0 flare on 2002 November 14 (SOL2002-11-14T22:26) for which there was good data coverage. The analysis method uses a maximum-likelihood (Withbroe-Sylwester) routine for evaluating the DEM. In a first step, called here AbuOpt, an optimized set of abundances of Si, S, Ar, and K is found that is consistent with the observed spectra. With these abundances, the DEM evolution during the flare is found. The abundance optimization leads to revised abundances of silicon and sulfur in the flare plasma: A(S) = 6.94 ± 0.06 and A(Si) = 7.56 ± 0.08 (on a logarithmic scale with A(H) = 12). Previously determined abundances of Ar, K, and Cl from an isothermal assumption are still the preferred values. During the flare's maximum phase, the X-ray-emitting plasma has a basically two-temperature structure, with the cooler plasma with approximately constant temperature (3-6 MK) and a hotter plasma with temperature 16-21 MK. Using imaging data from the RHESSI hard X-ray spacecraft, the emission volume of the hot plasma is deduced from which lower limits of the electron density N{sub e} and the thermal content of the plasma are given.

  6. X-Ray CT of Highly-Attenuating Objects: 9- or 15- MV Spectra?

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G; Trebes, J; Perry, R; Schneberk, D; Logan, C

    2005-08-29

    We imaged-highly attenuating test objects in three dimensions with 9-MV (at LLNL) and 15-MV (at Hill Air Force Base) x-ray spectra. While we used the same detector and motion control, there were differences that we could not control in the two radiography bays and in the sources. The results show better spatial resolution for the 9-MV spectrum and better contrast for the 15-MV spectrum. The 15-MV data contains a noise pattern that obfuscates the data. It is our judgment that if sufficient attention were given to design of the bay, beam dump, collimation, filtration and linac spot size; a 15-MV imaging system using a flat panel could be developed with spatial resolution of 5 lp/mm and contrastive performance better than we have demonstrated using a 9-MV spectrum.

  7. Infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectra of ruthenium oxide films and ruthenium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Belova, I.D.; Shifrina, R.R.; Roginskaya, Yu.E.; Popov, A.V.; Varlamova, T.V.

    1988-03-01

    The IR and x-ray photoelectron spectra of ruthenium hydroxide and of ruthenium oxide films produced by ruthenium chloride hydroxide decomposition at 300, 400, 500, and 600 degrees C were examined in order to obtain information concerning the effect of hydration on the structure and electronic properties of the surface of ruthenium oxide electrodes. It was shown that Ru hydroxide and Ru oxide films contain both water molecules and hydroxyl groups; the latter are retained up to higher temperatures (600 degrees C) in the Ru oxide films than in Ru hydroxide. It was found that water makes the materials studied amorphous, and it also was found that hydration influences their electronic structure (valence band and the electronic core levels of Ru and O).

  8. Gamma-ray burst prompt emission light curves and power density spectra in the ICMART model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Bing E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-02-20

    In this paper, we simulate the prompt emission light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) within the framework of the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. This model applies to GRBs with a moderately high magnetization parameter σ in the emission region. We show that this model can produce highly variable light curves with both fast and slow components. The rapid variability is caused by many locally Doppler-boosted mini-emitters due to turbulent magnetic reconnection in a moderately high σ flow. The runaway growth and subsequent depletion of these mini-emitters as a function of time define a broad slow component for each ICMART event. A GRB light curve is usually composed of multiple ICMART events that are fundamentally driven by the erratic GRB central engine activity. Allowing variations of the model parameters, one is able to reproduce a variety of light curves and the power density spectra as observed.

  9. Plasma Diagnostics in High Resolution X-Ray Spectra of Magnetic Cataclysmic Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W

    2001-10-02

    Using the Chandra HETG spectrum of EX Hya as an example, we discuss some of the plasma diagnostics available in high-resolution X-ray spectra of magnetic cataclysmic variables. Specifically, for conditions appropriate to collisional ionization equilibrium plasmas, we discuss the temperature dependence of the H- to He-like line intensity ratios and the density and photoexcitation dependence of the He-like R line ratios and the Fe XVII I(17.10 {angstrom})/I(17.05 {angstrom}) line ratio. We show that the plasma temperature in EX Hya spans the range from {approx}0.5 to {approx}10 keV and that the plasma density n {ge} 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}, orders of magnitude greater than that observed in the Sun or other late-type stars.

  10. Local time-correlation approach for calculations of x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. J.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2012-09-01

    We present a local time-correlation function method for real-time calculations of core level x-ray spectra (RTXS). The approach is implemented in a local orbital basis using a Crank-Nicolson time-evolution algorithm applied to an extension of the siesta code, together with projector augmented wave (PAW) atomic transition matrix elements. Our RTXS is formally equivalent to ΔSCF (Δ self consistent field) Fermi's golden rule calculations with a screened core-hole and an effective independent particle approximation. Illustrative calculations are presented for several molecular and condensed matter systems and found to be in good agreement with experiment. The method can also be advantageous compared to conventional frequency-space methods.

  11. Real time cumulant approach for charge-transfer satellites in x-ray photoemission spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kas, Joshua J.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, John J.; Chambers, Scott A.

    2015-03-01

    X-ray photoemission spectra generally exhibit satellite features in addition to quasi-particle peaks due to many-body excitations which have been of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. However, the satellites attributed to charge-transfer (CT) excitations in correlated materials have proved difficult to calculate from first principles. Here we report a real-time, real-space approach for such calculations based on a cumulant representation of the core-hole Green’s function and time-dependent density functional theory. This approach also yields an interpretation of CT satellites in terms of a complex oscillatory, transient response to a suddenly created core hole. Illustrative results for TiO2 and NiO are in good agreement with experiment.

  12. X-RAY FLARES OF EV Lac: STATISTICS, SPECTRA, AND DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Testa, Paola; Drake, Jeremy J.; Osten, Rachel A.; Reale, Fabio

    2010-11-10

    We study the spectral and temporal behavior of X-ray flares from the active M dwarf EV Lac in 200 ks of exposure with the Chandra/HETGS. We derive flare parameters by fitting an empirical function which characterizes the amplitude, shape, and scale. The flares range from very short (<1 ks) to long ({approx}10{sup 4} s) duration events with a range of shapes and amplitudes for all durations. We extract spectra for composite flares to study their mean evolution and to compare flares of different lengths. Evolution of spectral features in the density-temperature plane shows probable sustained heating. The short flares are significantly hotter than the longer flares. We determined an upper limit to the Fe K fluorescent flux, the best-fit value being close to what is expected for compact loops.

  13. Calibration of an imaging crystal spectrometer for low x-ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.; Bitter, M.

    2008-01-15

    An x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer was designed for the Hanbit magnetic mirror device to observe spectra of heliumlike neon at 13.4474 A. The spectrometer consists of a spherically bent mica crystal and an x-ray sensitive vacuum charge coupled device camera. This spectrometer can provide spatially resolved spectra, making it possible to obtain profiles of the ion charge state distribution from line ratios and profiles of the plasma rotation velocity from Doppler shift measurements. The paper describes measurements of spectral resolution of this instrument for low x-ray energies.

  14. ANALYSIS OF X-RAY SPECTRA EMITTED FROM THE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, J.; Leitner, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Versatile Electron Cyclotron resonance ion source for Nuclear Science (VENUS), located at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab’s 88-inch cyclotron, extracts ion beams from a plasma created by ionizing a gas with energetic electrons. Liquid-helium cooled superconducting coils produce magnetic fi elds that confi ne the plasma and high microwave frequencies heat the electrons enough to allow for successive ionizations of the neutral gas atoms. The combination of strong plasma confi nement and high microwave frequencies results in VENUS’ production of record breaking ion beam currents and high charge state distributions. While in operation, VENUS produces signifi cant quantities of bremsstrahlung, in the form of x-rays, primarily through two processes: 1) electron-ion collisions within the plasma, and 2) electrons are lost from the plasma, collide with the plasma chamber wall, and radiate bremsstrahlung due to their sudden deceleration. The bremsstrahlung deposited into the plasma chamber wall is absorbed by the cold mass used to maintain superconductivity in the magnets and poses an additional heat load on the cryostat. In order for VENUS to reach its maximum operating potential of 10 kW of 28 GHz microwave heating frequency, the heat load posed by the emitted bremsstrahlung must be understood. In addition, studying the bremsstrahlung under various conditions will help further our understanding of the dynamics within the plasma. A code has been written, using the Python programming language, to analyze the recorded bremsstrahlung spectra emitted from the extraction end of VENUS. The code outputs a spectral temperature, which is relatively indicative of the temperature of the hot electrons, and total integrated count number corresponding to each spectra. Bremsstrahlung spectra are analyzed and compared by varying two parameters: 1) the heating frequency, 18 GHz and 28 GHz, and 2) the ratio between the minimum magnetic fi eld and the resonant magnetic fi eld, .44 and

  15. Line intensity enhancements in stellar coronal X-ray spectra due to opacity effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.; Matranga, M.; Mathioudakis, M.; Keenan, F. P.; Wark, J. S.

    2008-06-01

    Context: The I(15.01 Å)/I(16.78 Å) emission line intensity ratio in Fe xvii has been reported to deviate from its theoretical value in solar and stellar X-ray spectra. This is attributed to opacity in the 15.01 Å line, leading to a reduction in its intensity, and was interpreted in terms of a geometry in which the emitters and absorbers are spatially distinct. Aims: We study the I(15.01 Å)/I(16.78 Å) intensity ratio for the active cool dwarf EV Lac, in both flare and quiescent spectra. Methods: The observations were obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on the XMM-Newton satellite. The emission measure distribution versus temperature reconstruction technique is used for our analysis. Results: We find that the 15.01 Å line exhibits a significant enhancement in intensity over the optically thin value. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an enhancement has been detected on such a sound statistical basis. We interpret this enhancement in terms of a geometry in which the emitters and absorbers are not spatially distinct, and where the geometry is such that resonant pumping of the upper level has a greater effect on the observed line intensity than resonant absorption in the line-of-sight.

  16. Monte Carlo derivation of filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra for dose computation in digital mammography*

    PubMed Central

    Paixão, Lucas; Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Viloria, Carolina; de Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Teixeira, Maria Helena Araújo; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro

    2015-01-01

    Objective Derive filtered tungsten X-ray spectra used in digital mammography systems by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Materials and Methods Filtered spectra for rhodium filter were obtained for tube potentials between 26 and 32 kV. The half-value layer (HVL) of simulated filtered spectra were compared with those obtained experimentally with a solid state detector Unfors model 8202031-H Xi R/F & MAM Detector Platinum and 8201023-C Xi Base unit Platinum Plus w mAs in a Hologic Selenia Dimensions system using a direct radiography mode. Results Calculated HVL values showed good agreement as compared with those obtained experimentally. The greatest relative difference between the Monte Carlo calculated HVL values and experimental HVL values was 4%. Conclusion The results show that the filtered tungsten anode X-ray spectra and the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code can be used for mean glandular dose determination in mammography. PMID:26811553

  17. 1SXPS: A Deep Swift X-Ray Telescope Point Source Catalog with Light Curves and Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, P. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Beardmore, A. P.; Page, K. L.; Willingale, R.; Mountford, C. J.; Pagani, C.; Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. A.; Perri, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Gehrels, N.

    2013-01-01

    We present the 1SXPS (Swift-XRT point source) catalog of 151,524 X-ray point sources detected by the Swift-XRT in 8 yr of operation. The catalog covers 1905 sq deg distributed approximately uniformly on the sky. We analyze the data in two ways. First we consider all observations individually, for which we have a typical sensitivity of approximately 3 × 10(exp -13) erg cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) (0.3-10 keV). Then we co-add all data covering the same location on the sky: these images have a typical sensitivity of approximately 9 × 10(exp -14) erg cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) (0.3-10 keV). Our sky coverage is nearly 2.5 times that of 3XMM-DR4, although the catalog is a factor of approximately 1.5 less sensitive. The median position error is 5.5 (90% confidence), including systematics. Our source detection method improves on that used in previous X-ray Telescope (XRT) catalogs and we report greater than 68,000 new X-ray sources. The goals and observing strategy of the Swift satellite allow us to probe source variability on multiple timescales, and we find approximately 30,000 variable objects in our catalog. For every source we give positions, fluxes, time series (in four energy bands and two hardness ratios), estimates of the spectral properties, spectra and spectral fits for the brightest sources, and variability probabilities in multiple energy bands and timescales.

  18. SUZAKU X-RAY SPECTRA AND PULSE PROFILE VARIATIONS DURING THE SUPERORBITAL CYCLE OF LMC X-4

    SciTech Connect

    Hung Liwei; Hickox, Ryan C.; Boroson, Bram S.; Vrtilek, Saeqa D. E-mail: rhickox@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: svrtilek@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-09-10

    We present results from spectral and temporal analyses of Suzaku and RXTE observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LMC X-4. Using the full 13 years of available RXTE/all-sky monitor data, we apply the ANOVA and Lomb Normalized Periodogram methods to obtain an improved superorbital period measurement of 30.32 {+-} 0.04 days. The phase-averaged X-ray spectra from Suzaku observations during the high state of the superorbital period can be modeled in the 0.6-50 keV band as the combination of a power law with {Gamma} {approx} 0.6 and a high-energy cutoff at {approx}25 keV, a blackbody with kT {sub BB} {approx} 0.18 keV, and emission lines from Fe K{sub {alpha}}, O VIII, and Ne IX (X Ly{alpha}). Assuming a distance of 50 kpc, the source has luminosity L {sub X} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1} in the 2-50 keV band, and the luminosity of the soft (blackbody) component is L {sub BB} {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}. The energy-resolved pulse profiles show single-peaked soft (0.5-1 keV) and hard (6-10 keV) pulses but a more complex pattern of medium (2-10 keV) pulses; cross-correlation of the hard with the soft pulses shows a phase shift that varies between observations. We interpret these results in terms of a picture in which a precessing disk reprocesses the hard X-rays and produces the observed soft spectral component, as has been suggested for the similar sources Her X-1 and SMC X-1.

  19. Influence of chemical bonding on X-ray spectra of different aluminium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, Rita; Trincavelli, Jorge; Vasconcellos, Marcos

    2005-11-01

    Five minerals containing aluminium in different crystal configurations are studied. The different kinds of chemical bonding between aluminium and oxygen originate molecular orbitals with energy levels and transition probabilities varying from one compound to another. This effect appears as shifts and changes in relative intensities of Kα emission lines and as modifications of the Kβ characteristic spectrum. In the present work, the aluminium K characteristic spectra obtained by means of an electron microprobe with a wavelength dispersive system are compared for topaz, albite, spodumene, biotite and corundum.

  20. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  1. A large detector for cosmic ray abundance and energy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, C.

    A large aperture, balloon borne cosmic ray detector was designed to measure the energy spectra of individual cosmic ray species with Z greater than 8 in the energy range 0.3GeV/N to 400GeV/N. The energy dependence of the abundance spectrum extending up to such high energies will provide valuable data for determining the nature of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. The properties of cosmic ray nuclei and the interpretation of the energy dependence of the abundance spectrum are discussed. The design and response of the BUGS IV cosmic ray detector are described. The measurement techniques used are gas scintillation, gas proportional scintillation and Cerenkov radiation from both gases and solids. The light collection properties of the detector and several experimental investigations of the light collection efficiency of the drift chamber region are described. The expected signals from the gas scintillation and gas Cerenkov emissions are predicted and the choice of a suitable scintillating gas mixture for minimizing the uncertainty in the charge and energy measurements is considered. The theoretical aspects of electron drift and diffusion in gases and several experimental investigations on the electron drift in the BUGS IV drift chamber are given. Also some preliminary results from a uniform field drift chamber are included which demonstrate the sensitivity of the electron drift velocity in inert gas mixtures to water vapor contamination. The expected overall performance of BUGS IV and the results of an experimental simulation of the parachute landing of the detector are given.

  2. On the Origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T; Colgate, S; Li, H

    2009-07-01

    Turbulence-driven plasma accelerators produced by magnetized accretion disks around black holes are proposed as the mechanism mainly responsible for observed cosmic ray protons with ultra high energies 10{sup 19}-10{sup 21} eV. The magnetized disk produces a voltage comparable to these cosmic ray energies. Here we present a Poynting model in which this voltage provides all of the energy to create the jet-like structures observed to be ejected from accretion disks, and this voltage also accelerates ions to high energies at the top of the expanding structure. Since the inductive electric field E = -v x B driving expansion has no component parallel to the magnetic field B, ion acceleration requires plasma wave generation - either a coherent wave accelerator as recently proposed, or instability-driven turbulence. We find that turbulence can tap the full inductive voltage as a quasi-steady accelerator, and even higher energies are produced by transient events on this structure. We find that both MHD modes due to the current and ion diffusion due to kinetic instability caused by the non-Maxwellian ion distribution contribute to acceleration. We apply our results to extragalactic giant radiolobes, whose synchrotron emissions serve to calibrate the model, and we discuss extrapolating to other astrophysical structures. Approximate calculations of the cosmic ray intensity and energy spectrum are in rough agreement with data and serve to motivate more extensive MHD and kinetic simulations of turbulence that could provide more accurate cosmic ray and synchrotron spectra to be compared with observations. A distinctive difference from previous models is that the cosmic ray and synchrotron emissions arise from different parts of the magnetic structure, thus providing a signature for the model.

  3. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  4. The energy spectra of solar energetic protons in the large energy range: their functional form and parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymmik, Rikho; Pervaia, Taisia

    2016-07-01

    Experimental data on the fluxes of protons of solar energetic particles (SEP) are analyzed. It is known that above energies of 2-45 MeV (averaging 27-30 MeV), the proton spectra are a power-law function of the energy (at relativistic energies - from the momentum) of the particles. At lower energies, the spectra become harder, with the high-energy part of the spectra forming the "knee". This report is devoted to the determination of the parameters of the SEP spectra, having the form of a "double power-law shape", to ascertain the reliability of the parameters of the approximations of the experimental data.

  5. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, John Leonard; Kawano, Toshihiko; Bredeweg, Todd Allen; Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh; Couture, Aaron Joseph; Haight, Robert Cameron; Jandel, Marian; Mosby, Shea Morgan; O'Donnell, John M.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.; Wilhelmy, Jerry B.; Becker, John A.; Wu, Ching-Yen; Krticka, Milan

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  6. Pulsars, supernovae, and ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, K.; Fang, K.; Olinto, A. V.; Phinney, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    The acceleration of ultrahigh energy nuclei in fast spinning newborn pulsars can explain the observed spectrum of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and the trend towards heavier nuclei for energies above 10^{19} eV as indicated by air shower studies reported by the Auger Observatory. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300 ms, we show that the contribution of extragalactic pulsar births to the ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectrum naturally gives rise to a contribution to very high energy cosmic rays (VHECRs, between 10^{16} and 10^{18} eV) by Galactic pulsar births. The required injected composition to fit the observed spectrum depends on the absolute energy scale, differing considerably between the energy scale used by Auger and that used by the Telescope Array. Depending on the composition of the cosmic rays that escape the supernova remnant and the diffusion behavior of VHECRs in the Galaxy, the contribution of Galactic pulsar births can also bridge the gap between predictions for cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants and the observed spectrum below the ankle. Fast spinning newborn pulsars that could produce UHECRs would be born in supernovae that could present interesting specific radiative features, due to the interaction of the pulsar wind with the surrounding ejecta. The resulting supernova lightcurves could present a high luminosity plateau over a few years, and a bright X-ray and gamma-ray peak around one or two years after the onset of the explosion. If such signatures were observed, they could have important implications both for UHECR astrophysics and for the understanding of core-collapse supernovae.

  7. Gamma-ray bursts from magnetospheric plasma oscillations. II - Model spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melia, Fulvio

    1990-01-01

    Several mechanisms for the primary release of energy in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may result in the excitation of relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations above the polar cap of a neutron star. This paper presents a survey of detailed calculations of the inverse Compton scattering interaction between the sinusoidally accelerated particles in relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations and the self-consistently determined thermal radiation from the stellar surface. The upscattered photons are boosted to gamma-ray energies and a Monte Carlo simulation is used to obtain the spectrum for different viewing angles relative to the magnetic field in the oscillating region. It is shown that several GRB spectral characteristics may be understood in the context of a model wherein the overall spectrum changes with aspect angle as a result of the superposition of four components with different angular distributions.

  8. Determination of the texture of arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes from the angular dependence of the X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Okotrub, A. V. Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Gusel'nikov, A. V.; Kudashov, A. G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2008-09-15

    The properties of materials containing carbon nanotubes depend on the degree of alignment and the internal structure of nanotubes. It is shown that the degree of misorientation of carbon nanotubes in samples can be evaluated from the measurements of the angular dependences of the carbon X-ray emission and carbon X-ray absorption spectra. The CK{sub {alpha}} emission and CK X-ray absorption spectra of the array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes synthesized by catalytic thermolysis of a mixture of fullerene and ferrocene are measured. A comparison of the calculated model dependences of the relative intensities of the {pi} and {sigma} bands in the spectra with the experimental results makes it possible to evaluate the degree of misorientation of nanotubes in the sample and their internal texture.

  9. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  10. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. 2: Intrinsic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 was observed in the energy range 2-24 keV with sufficient temporal resolution to allow detailed study of spectral correlations with the 1.24 sec pulse phase. A region of spectral hardening which extends over approximately the 1/10 pulse phase may be associated with the underlying beam. The pulse shape stability and its asymmetry relative to this intrinsic beam are discussed.

  11. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  12. X-ray spectra and atmospheric structures of bursting neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu

    1987-01-01

    Atmospheric structures and emitted X-ray spectra of bursting neutron stars are investigated. Theoretical curves are fitted to observational ones on the color temperature vs. luminosity diagram and two relations among mass, radius, and distance of the bursters are obtained. The fit of the theoretical curve to observations is statistically acceptable. Two possible sets of mass, radius, and distance to the X-ray bursts source MXB 1636-536 are derived, taking into account absorption lines at 4.1 keV, theoretical mass-radius relations of neutron star models, and the distance to the Galactic center. If the absorption line is due to Cr XX III, then M = 1.7-2.0 solar masses, R = 11-12 km, and d = 6.3-6.7 kpc, and if it is due to Fe XXV, then M = 1.8-2.1 solar masses, R = 8-10 km, and d = 5.8-6,4 kpc. The distance to the Galactic center is almost the same as that to MXB 1636-536.

  13. Correlations between X-ray Spectra and kHz QPOS in Sco X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Charles F.; Titarchuk, Lev; Kuznetsov, Sergey

    2008-05-01

    Recent analysis of the RXTE X-ray spectra of Sco X-1 discovered that Sco X-1 can be adequately modeled by a simple two-component model of Compton up-scattering with a soft photon electron temperature of about 0.4 keV, plus an Iron K-line. The results show a strong correlation between spectral power law index and kHz QPOs. Sco X-1 is the prototypical Z-source low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) system radiating near the Eddington limit. This radiation produces a high radiation pressure in its Compton cloud. We infer that the radiation pressure produces a geometrical configuration of the cloud that is quasi-spherical. We conclude that the high Thomson optical depth of the Compton cloud, in the range of 5-6 from the best-fit model parameters, is consistent with the neutron star's surface being obscured by material, which would likely suppress a spin frequency of Sco X-1 due to photon scattering off cloud electrons. We also demonstrate the evolution of its power spectrum when Sco X-1 transitions from the horizontal branch to the normal branch.

  14. Real-time cumulant approach for inelastic losses in x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Curtis, J. B.

    Intrinsic inelastic losses in core level x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), and x-ray photo-emission spectra (XPS), arise from excitations of the system due to the sudden creation or annihilation of a deep core hole. Additional extrinsic losses arise during the propagation of the photoelectron, and interference processes are also important. These excitations are reflected in the satellite peaks observed in XPS. Formally the distribution of these excitations are described in terms of the core-hole spectral function, which can be calculated in terms of the core-hole Green's function represented in exponential form. Here we discuss an approach for calculating the exponent, or cumulant in terms of local density fluctuations via real-space, real-time time-dependent density functional theory. The role of extrinsic and interference terms is also discussed. Our method is illustrated in calculations of XAS and XPS for number of systems, including weakly correlated as well as d- and f-electron materials. Supported by DOE BES Grant DE-FG03-97ER45623.

  15. Modeling of Gamma-ray Spectra to Direct Efficient Chemical Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, Matthew; Friese, Judah I.; Warren, Glen A.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Farmer, Orville T.; Choiniere, Andrea D.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Aalseth, Craig E.

    2008-06-15

    In an age of heightened national security regarding nuclear terrorist threats, reliable and rapid analytical methods for the quantification of radionuclides in fission product samples are needed to provide forensic information and sample characterization. Measurement of characteristic gamma-ray emissions by high-purity germanium spectrometers offers one means of analysis. Due to the high-activity and complex nature of samples, chemical separations are necessary to reduce background continuum levels and instances of spectral interference. A project has been initiated at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to model singles and coincident gamma-ray spectra that would result from various chemical separation strategies. The goal is to use these complementary counting techniques to tailor a series of efficient chemical separations that allow the rapid quantification of signature isotopes in samples. Modeling enables probable instances of spectral interference to be identified and aids in defining the temporal window of detection for radionuclides of interest following a given chemical separation. These data will help future analysts prioritize analytes of interest and separation strategies in the processing of real samples. A description of results to date is described here, demonstrating the utility of this approach for improved processing and analysis of fission product samples.

  16. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. V. X-ray absorption spectra with ionization potential corrected exchange and correlation potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2016-07-01

    Core excitation energies are computed with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the ionization energy corrected exchange and correlation potential QTP(0,0). QTP(0,0) provides C, N, and O K-edge spectra to about an electron volt. A mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.77 and a maximum error of 2.6 eV is observed for QTP(0,0) for many small molecules. TD-DFT based on QTP (0,0) is then used to describe the core-excitation spectra of the 22 amino acids. TD-DFT with conventional functionals greatly underestimates core excitation energies, largely due to the significant error in the Kohn-Sham occupied eigenvalues. To the contrary, the ionization energy corrected potential, QTP(0,0), provides excellent approximations (MAE of 0.53 eV) for core ionization energies as eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equations. As a consequence, core excitation energies are accurately described with QTP(0,0), as are the core ionization energies important in X-ray photoionization spectra or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  17. Starburst Galaxies: Hard X-ray spectra and contribution to the diffuse background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Duane E.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this grant two main tasks were performed: a determination of a selection criterion for starburst galaxies most likely to emit X-rays, and performance of a pilot study of the X-ray emission from nine such systems. Starburst galaxies may be expected to emit flat-spectrum X-ray at energies above 10 keV resulting from the various remnants of the short-lived massive stars which characterize the starburst. The investigation to determine the optimum sample resulted in a change from an X-ray selected (HEAO-2) sample to infrared selection based on the IRAS catalogue. A much broader sample thereby available for study, and selection could be limited to only the nearest objects and still obtain a reasonably large sample. A sample of 99 of the brightest infrared starburst galaxies was settled on for the X-ray survey. For a set of practical size, this was then reduced to a subset of 53, based on luminosity and nearness. X-ray emission from these objects was individually measured from the UCSD HEAO-1 all-sky survey in four energy bands between 13 keV to 160 keV. This data base consists of about 20 optical disk volumes. Net significance for the result was roughly two sigma, and a very hard spectral shape is indicated for the net spectrum of the surveyed galaxies. With the possibility of detection of the class, it was then felt worthwhile to examine fluxes from these sources in other archival data. This was performed with the HEAO-1 A2 data and the HEAO-2 (EINSTEIN) main archive and slew survey. Positive results were also obtained for the sample, but again at weak significance. With three independent measures of weak X-ray fluxes from nearby starburst galaxies, we wrote a letter to the Astrophysical Journal (enclosed) discussing these results and their likely significance, in particular, for the contribution to the cosmic diffuse x-ray background, perhaps as much as 25 percent.

  18. BRIGHT RAY-LIKE FEATURES IN THE AFTERMATH OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS: WHITE LIGHT VERSUS ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaravella, A.; Webb, D. F.; Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.

    2013-03-20

    Current sheets (CSs) are important signatures of magnetic reconnection in the eruption of confined solar magnetic structures. Models of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) involve formation of a CS connecting the ejected flux rope with the post-eruption magnetic loops. CSs have been identified in white light (WL) images of CMEs as narrow rays trailing the outward moving CME core, and in ultraviolet spectra as narrow bright features emitting the [Fe XVIII] line. In this work, samples of rays detected in WL images or in ultraviolet spectra have been analyzed. Temperatures, widths, and line intensities of the rays have been measured, and their correlation to the CME properties has been studied. The samples show a wide range of temperatures with hot, coronal, and cool rays. In some cases, the UV spectra support the identification of rays as CSs, but they show that some WL rays are cool material from the CME core. In many cases, both hot and cool material are present, but offset from each other along the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer slit. We find that about 18% of the WL rays show very hot gas consistent with the CS interpretation, while about 23% show cold gas that we attribute to cool prominence material draining back from the CME core. The remaining events have ordinary coronal temperatures, perhaps because they have relaxed back to a quiescent state.

  19. Use of MCNP + GADRAS in Generating More Realistic Gamma-Ray Spectra for Plutonium and HEU Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Mattingly, John; Mitchell, Dean

    2012-08-07

    The ability to accurately simulate high-resolution gamma spectra from materials that emit both neutrons and gammas is very important to the analysis of special nuclear materials (SNM), e.g., uranium and plutonium. One approach under consideration has been to combine MCNP and GADRAS. This approach is expected to generate more accurate gamma ray spectra for complex three-dimensional geometries than can be obtained from one-dimensional deterministic transport simulations (e.g., ONEDANT). This presentation describes application of combining MCNP and GADRAS in simulating plutonium and uranium spectra.

  20. Extracting ion emission lines from femtosecond-laser plasma x-ray spectra heavily contaminated by spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasilov, S. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Villoresi, P.; Poletto, L.; Stagira, S.; Calegari, F.; Vozzi, C.; Nisoli, M.

    2007-09-01

    Nowadays charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors are widely used for the registration of multicharged ions x-ray spectra. These spectra are generated in a plasma during interaction of ultrashort, ultraintense laser pulses with solid targets. Strong parasitic radiation from the plasma affects CCD detectors and contaminates resulting spectra, so that spectral features can be completely covered by noise even during measurements with a very short accumulation time. In this work we propose a "mean to median" (M2M) algorithm for noise suppression in femtosecond laser plasma x-ray spectra. Series of spectra is necessary for the identification of corrupted data points by the developed method. The algorithm was tested with model spectra which reflect main features of experimental data. In practice we used it for extracting information about spectral lines of Ne-like Fe ions and He-like Al ions which allowed us to calculate plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that M2M method is able to clean spectra with more than 10% of corrupted pixels. Fluctuations in intensity of spectral lines induced by laser instability do not affect validity of the proposed method.

  1. Extracting ion emission lines from femtosecond-laser plasma x-ray spectra heavily contaminated by spikes

    SciTech Connect

    Gasilov, S. V.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T. A.; Villoresi, P.; Poletto, L.; Stagira, S.; Calegari, F.; Vozzi, C.; Nisoli, M.

    2007-09-15

    Nowadays charged-coupled device (CCD) detectors are widely used for the registration of multicharged ions x-ray spectra. These spectra are generated in a plasma during interaction of ultrashort, ultraintense laser pulses with solid targets. Strong parasitic radiation from the plasma affects CCD detectors and contaminates resulting spectra, so that spectral features can be completely covered by noise even during measurements with a very short accumulation time. In this work we propose a ''mean to median'' (M2M) algorithm for noise suppression in femtosecond laser plasma x-ray spectra. Series of spectra is necessary for the identification of corrupted data points by the developed method. The algorithm was tested with model spectra which reflect main features of experimental data. In practice we used it for extracting information about spectral lines of Ne-like Fe ions and He-like Al ions which allowed us to calculate plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that M2M method is able to clean spectra with more than 10% of corrupted pixels. Fluctuations in intensity of spectral lines induced by laser instability do not affect validity of the proposed method.

  2. Solar Modulation of Low-Energy Antiproton and Proton Spectra Measured by BESS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John W.; Abe, Ko; Fuke, Hideyuki; Haino, Sadakazu; Hams, Thomas; Horikoshi, Atsushi; Kim, Ki-Chun; Lee, MooHyun; Makida, Yashuhiro; Matsuda, Shinya; Moiseev, Alexander; Nishimura, Jun; Nozaki, Mitsuaki

    2007-01-01

    The spectra of low-energy cosmic-ray protons and antiprotons have been measured by BESS in nine high-latitude balloon flights between 1993 and 2004. These measurements span a range of solar activity from the previous solar minimum through solar ma>:im%am and the onset of the present solar minimum, as well as a solar magnetic field reversal from positive to negative in 2000. Because protons and antiprotons differ only in charge sign, these simultaneous measurements provide a sensitive probe of charge dependent solar modulation. The antiproton to proton ratio measured by BESS is consistent with simple spherically symmetric models of solar modulation during the Sun's positive polarity phase, but favor charge-sign-dependent drift models during the negative phase. The BESS measurements will be presented and compared to various models of solar modulation.

  3. The variation of solar proton energy spectra size distribution with heliolongitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhollebeke, M. A. I.; Masung, L. S.; Mcdonald, F. B.

    1974-01-01

    A statistical study of the initial phases of 185 solar particle events was carried out using the data from cosmic ray experiments on IMP 4 and IMP 5. Special emphasis was placed on the identification of the associated solar flare, as the parent flare can be determined for 68% of the events. It appears probable that most of the unidentified increases occur on the non-visible disc of the sun. The existence of a 'preferred-connection' longitude between 20 W and 80 W was established by examining the heliolongitude of all the flare associated events. It is demonstrated that the energy spectra determined at the time of maximum particle in the 20 to 80 MeV or 4 to 20 Mev interval range give results identical to that obtained by the 'distance-travelled' method.

  4. Monopole annihilation and highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, P. Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 ); Sigl, G. NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 )

    1995-04-15

    Cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10[sup 20] eV have been detected. The origin of these highest energy cosmic rays remains unknown. Established astrophysical acceleration mechanisms encounter severe difficulties in accelerating particles to these energies. Alternative scenarios where these particles are created by the decay of cosmic topological defects have been suggested in the literature. In this paper we study the possibility of producing the highest energy cosmic rays through a process that involves the formation of metastable magnetic monopole-antimonopole bound states and their subsequent collapse. The annihilation of the heavy monopole-antimonopole pairs constituting the monopolonia can produce energetic nucleons, [gamma] rays, and neutrinos whose expected flux we estimate and discuss in relation to experimental data so far available. The monopoles we consider are the ones that could be produced in the early Universe during a phase transition at the grand unification energy scale. We find that observable cosmic ray fluxes can be produced with monopole abundances compatible with present bounds.

  5. Thick-target external-bremsstrahlung spectra of 147Pm and 35S β rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaliwal, A. S.; Powar, M. S.; Singh, M.

    1993-08-01

    External-bremsstrahlung spectra excited by soft β particles of 147Pm (Emaxβ=225 keV) and 35S (Emaxβ=167 keV) in targets of Al, Cu, Sn, and Pb have been studied. The experimental and theoretical results are compared in terms of the number of photons of energy k per m0c2 per unit photon yield to exclude the uncertainty in the source strength measurement and overcome the inherent inadequacy of the normalization procedure used by earlier workers. The results of present measurements for medium- and high-Z elements show better agreement with the theory of Tseng and Pratt [Phys. Rev. A 3, 1714 (1976)] than with Elwert's corrections [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 34, 78 (1939)] to the Bethe-Heitler theory [Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 14, 83 (1934)], particularly at the higher-energy ends. However, for low-Z elements, both theories are found to be adequate.

  6. Gamma Rays at Very High Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, Felix

    This chapter presents the elaborated lecture notes on Gamma Rays at Very High Energies given by Felix Aharonian at the 40th Saas-Fee Advanced Course on "Astrophysics at Very High Energies". Any coherent description and interpretation of phenomena related to gammarays requires deep knowledge of many disciplines of physics like nuclear and particle physics, quantum and classical electrodynamics, special and general relativity, plasma physics, magnetohydrodynamics, etc. After giving an introduction to gamma-ray astronomy the author discusses the astrophysical potential of ground-based detectors, radiation mechanisms, supernova remnants and origin of the galactic cosmic rays, TeV emission of young supernova remnants, gamma-emission from the Galactic center, pulsars, pulsar winds, pulsar wind nebulae, and gamma-ray loud binaries.

  7. Case for a 700+GeV WIMP: Cosmic ray spectra from PAMELA, Fermi, and ATIC

    SciTech Connect

    Cholis, Ilias; Goodenough, Lisa; Weiner, Neal; Dobler, Gregory; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2009-12-15

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate an anomalous injection of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} in the galactic halo. The recent e{sup +} fraction spectrum from the payload for antimatter matter exploration and light-nuclei astrophysics (PAMELA) shows a sharp rise up to 100 GeV. The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has found a significant hardening of the e{sup +}e{sup -} cosmic-ray spectrum above 100 GeV, with a break, confirmed by HESS at around 1 TeV. The advanced thin ionization calorimeter (ATIC) has also detected a similar excess, falling back to the expected spectrum at 1 TeV and above. Excess microwaves towards the galactic center in the WMAP data are consistent with hard synchrotron radiation from a population of 10-100 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} (the WMAP 'Haze'). We argue that dark matter annihilations can provide a consistent explanation of all of these data, focusing on dominantly leptonic modes, either directly or through a new light boson. Normalizing the signal to the highest energy evidence (Fermi and HESS), we find that similar cross sections provide good fits to PAMELA and the Haze, and that both the required cross section and annihilation modes are achievable in models with Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. These models naturally predict significant production of gamma rays in the galactic center via a variety of mechanisms. Most notably, there is a robust inverse-Compton scattered (ICS) gamma-ray signal arising from the energetic electrons and positrons, detectable at Fermi/GLAST energies, which should provide smoking gun evidence for this production.

  8. Simulations of iron K pre-edge X-ray absorption spectra using the restricted active space method.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-01-28

    The intensities and relative energies of metal K pre-edge features are sensitive to both geometric and electronic structures. With the possibility to collect high-resolution spectral data it is important to find theoretical methods that include all important spectral effects: ligand-field splitting, multiplet structures, 3d-4p orbital hybridization, and charge-transfer excitations. Here the restricted active space (RAS) method is used for the first time to calculate metal K pre-edge spectra of open-shell systems, and its performance is tested against on six iron complexes: [FeCl6](n-), [FeCl4](n-), and [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. The method gives good descriptions of the spectral shapes for all six systems. The mean absolute deviation for the relative energies of different peaks is only 0.1 eV. For the two systems that lack centrosymmetry [FeCl4](2-/1-), the ratios between dipole and quadrupole intensity contributions are reproduced with an error of 10%, which leads to good descriptions of the integrated pre-edge intensities. To gain further chemical insight, the origins of the pre-edge features have been analyzed with a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture that serves as a bridge between the spectra and the electronic structures. The pre-edges contain information about both ligand-field strengths and orbital covalencies, which can be understood by analyzing the RAS wavefunction. The RAS method can thus be used to predict and rationalize the effects of changes in both the oxidation state and ligand environment in a number of hard X-ray studies of small and medium-sized molecular systems.

  9. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-01

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  10. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  11. Variable X-ray spectra of BL Lac objects: HEAO-1 observations of PKS 0548-322 and 2A 1219+305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrall, D. M.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Serlemitsos, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray spectra for the BL Lac objects PKS 0548-322 and 2A 1219+305 measured with the HEAO-1 A2 detectors during pointing maneuvers on September 30, 1978 and May 31, 1978 respectively are presented. Both fit single power law components with low energy absorption. For 2A 1219+305, a thermal bremsstrahlung form gives an unacceptable fit. From a comparison with other statistically poorer observations taken at 6 month intervals while the satellite was in its normal scanning mode, it is found that the sources exhibit spectral variability. A summary of measurements of the 5 BL Lac objects detected with the A2 experiment is presented and it is concluded that X-ray spectral changes in this class of source are common. Their general X-ray spectral characteristics distinguish BL Lac objects from other classes of X-ray emitting active galactic nuclei. Analysis of their total spectra indicates that most of the energy is emitted in the 5 to 100 eV band.

  12. Evidence for Temporally-Extended, High-Energy Emission from Gamma Ray Burst 990104

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wren, D. N.; Bertsch, D. L.; Ritz, S.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that high-energy emission (MeV - GeV) has been observed in several gamma ray bursts and temporally-extended emission from lower-energy gamma rays through radio wavelengths is well established. Observations of extended, high-energy emission are, however, scarce. Here we present evidence for a gamma ray burst emission that is both high-energy and extended, coincident with lower energy emissions. For the very bright and long burst, GRB 990104, we show light curves and spectra that confirm emission above 50 MeV, approximately 152 seconds after the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) trigger and initial burst emission. Between the initial output and the main peak, seen at both low and high energy, there was a period of approx. 100 s during which the burst was relatively quiet. This burst was found as part of an ongoing search for high-energy emission in gamma ray bursts.

  13. Track Structure Model for Radial Distributions of Electron Spectra and Event Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    An analytic method is described for evaluating the average radial electron spectrum and the radial and total frequency-event spectrum for high-energy ions. For high-energy ions, indirect events make important contributions to frequency-event spectra. The method used for evaluating indirect events is to fold the radial electron spectrum with measured frequency-event spectrum for photons or electrons. The contribution from direct events is treated using a spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET). We find that high-energy heavy ions have a significantly reduced frequency-averaged final energy (yF) compared to LET, while relativistic protons have a significantly increased yF and dose-averaged lineal energy (yD) for typical site sizes used in tissue equivalent proportional counters. Such differences represent important factors in evaluating event spectra with laboratory beams, in space- flight, or in atmospheric radiation studies and in validation of radiation transport codes. The inadequacy of LET as descriptor because of deviations in values of physical quantities, such as track width, secondary electron spectrum, and yD for ions of identical LET is also discussed.

  14. X-ray luminescence spectra of graded-gap Al xGa 1- xAs structures irradiated by alpha particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šilėnas, A.; Požela, J.; Požela, K.; Jucienė, V.; Dapkus, L.

    2011-12-01

    The influence of 241Am alpha particle irradiation on X-ray luminescence spectra of the graded-gap AlxGa1-xAs structures of different thicknesses is investigated. It is observed that the integral X-ray luminescence intensity of nonirradiated thin (15 μm) structure is 1.4 times less than that in the thick (32 μm) structure, and this difference increases to 3 times after 3×1010 cm-2 dose of irradiation by alpha particle. The X-ray luminescence intensity of the energy hν<1.5 eV of thin nonirradiated structure is about 7 times less than that in thick one. The internal graded-gap electric field Fgg is responsible of that large difference, because it shifts the X-ray generated carriers to the narrow-gap surface with great nonradiative surface recombination rate. The alpha particle irradiation increases nonradiative recombination rate and causes a decrease of the X-ray luminescence intensity of all spectra lines in the thin (15 μm) detector. The most significant drop in X-ray luminescence efficiency is observed from the region at narrow-gap surface after the initial stage (109 cm-2 dose) of alpha particle irradiation. In the 32 μm thick detector, the luminescence intensity of the energy hν=1.8 eV does not change up to 2×1010 cm-2 of alpha particle irradiation dose. That means the high irradiation hardness of the thick graded-gap X-ray detector with optical response.

  15. WITS-HEX: A renovated code for analysis of PIXE X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipworth, A. D.; Annegarn, H. J.; Bauman, S.; Molokomme, T.; Walker, A. J.

    1990-04-01

    The code REX [H.C. Kaufmann and K.R. Akselsson, Adv. X-ray Anal. 18 (1975) 353] and its successor, HEX were developed at Florida State University and University of Lund in the early seventies for quantitative reduction of PIXE spectra. HEX modelled many of the physical processes, including target self-absorption. Lack of adequate documentation and several inherent software related problems hampered widespread adoption and further development. HEX was designed using a hierarchical functional design approach, coded in FORTRAN IV. Its element library and request list are tightly constrained. ANSI standard FORTRAN provides few structured constructs, nor does it support dynamic data structures. HEX has a batch mode of interaction which affords minimal (interim) user interactions. To overcome these limitations we have modernised the program to run on IBM PC compatible computers by using object-oriented design techniques, documented in Program Description Language (pseudo-code) and implemented in a modern programming language, Pascal. Turbo Pascal 5.5 provides an integrated program development environment, a high resolution graphics library, an operating system interface and many software development tools to improve programmer productivity. A menu-based highly interactive screen management library is used for the user interface. A demonstration version is available for user evaluation. Further rigorous testing and the development of user acquired spectra interfacing code will be developed before the first release. The renovated code, WITS-HEX, has extracted the intellectual value embodied in HEX. It will be inherently more stable, reliable, versatile, maintainable and easy to use to facilitate future process modifications.

  16. The ROSAT Deep Survey. 2; Optical Identification, Photometry and Spectra of X-Ray Sources in the Lockman Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M.; Hasinger, G.; Gunn, J.; Schneider, D.; Burg, R.; Giacconi, R.; Lehmann, I.; MacKenty, J.; Truemper, J.; Zamorani, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ROSAT Deep Survey includes a complete sample of 50 X-ray sources with fluxes in the 0.5 - 2 keV band larger than 5.5 x 10(exp -15)erg/sq cm/s in the Lockman field (Hasinger et al., Paper 1). We have obtained deep broad-band CCD images of the field and spectra of many optical objects near the positions of the X-ray sources. We define systematically the process leading to the optical identifications of the X-ray sources. For this purpose, we introduce five identification (ID) classes that characterize the process in each case. Among the 50 X-ray sources, we identify 39 AGNs, 3 groups of galaxies, 1 galaxy and 3 galactic stars. Four X-ray sources remain unidentified so far; two of these objects may have an unusually large ratio of X-ray to optical flux.

  17. Broadband X-ray spectra of the ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 observed with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Fuerst, F.; Madsen, K. K.; Rana, V.; Stern, D.; Miller, J. M.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Webb, N.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Fabian, A. C.; Parker, M. L.; Hailey, C. J.; Ptak, A.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-09-20

    We present results from the coordinated broadband X-ray observations of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source Holmberg IX X-1 performed by NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Suzaku in late 2012. These observations provide the first high-quality spectra of Holmberg IX X-1 above 10 keV to date, extending the X-ray coverage of this remarkable source up to ∼30 keV. Broadband observations were undertaken at two epochs, between which Holmberg IX X-1 exhibited both flux and strong spectral variability, increasing in luminosity from L {sub X} = (1.90 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} to L {sub X} = (3.35 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}. Neither epoch exhibits a spectrum consistent with emission from the standard low/hard accretion state seen in Galactic black hole binaries, which would have been expected if Holmberg IX X-1 harbors a truly massive black hole accreting at substantially sub-Eddington accretion rates. The NuSTAR data confirm that the curvature observed previously in the 3-10 keV bandpass does represent a true spectral cutoff. During each epoch, the spectrum appears to be dominated by two optically thick thermal components, likely associated with an accretion disk. The spectrum also shows some evidence for a nonthermal tail at the highest energies, which may further support this scenario. The available data allow for either of the two thermal components to dominate the spectral evolution, although both scenarios require highly nonstandard behavior for thermal accretion disk emission.

  18. X-ray spectra of Hercules X-1. 1: Iron line fluorescence from a subrelativistic shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pravdo, S. H.; Becker, R. H.; Boldt, E. A.; Holt, S. S.; Serlemitsos, P. J.; Swank, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of Hercules X-1 was observed in the energy range 2-24 keV from August 29 to September 3, 1975. A broad iron line feature is observed in the normal high state spectrum. The line equivalent width is given along with its full-width-half-maximum energy. Iron line fluorescence from an opaque, cool shell of material at the Alfven surface provides the necessary luminosity in this feature. The line energy width can be due to Doppler broadening if the shell is forced to corotate with the pulsar at a radius 800 million cm. Implications of this model regarding physical conditions near Her X-1 are discussed.

  19. X-ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. I. Constant Density Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Javier; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    We present new models for illuminated accretion disks, their structure and reprocessed emission. We consider the effects of incident X-rays on the surface of an accretion disk by solving simultaneously the equations of radiative transfer, energy balance and ionization equilibrium over a large range of column densities. We assume plane-parallel geometry and azimuthal symmetry, such that each calculation corresponds to a ring at a given distance from the central object. Our models include recent and complete atomic data for K-shell of the iron and oxygen isonuclear sequences. We examine the effect on the spectrum of fluorescent Ka line emission and absorption in the emitted spectrum. We also explore the dependence of the spectrum on the strength of the incident X-rays and other input parameters, and discuss the importance of Comptonization on the emitted spectrum.

  20. Active galactic nuclei at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles Dennison; Giebels, Berrie

    2016-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei can be copious extragalactic emitters of MeV-GeV-TeV γ rays, a phenomenon linked to the presence of relativistic jets powered by a super-massive black hole in the center of the host galaxy. Most of γ-ray emitting active galactic nuclei, with more than 1500 known at GeV energies, and more than 60 at TeV energies, are called "blazars". The standard blazar paradigm features a jet of relativistic magnetized plasma ejected from the neighborhood of a spinning and accreting super-massive black hole, close to the observer direction. Two classes of blazars are distinguished from observations: the flat-spectrum radio-quasar class (FSRQ) is characterized by strong external radiation fields, emission of broad optical lines, and dust tori. The BL Lac class (from the name of one of its members, BL Lacertae) corresponds to weaker advection-dominated flows with γ-ray spectra dominated by the inverse Compton effect on synchrotron photons. This paradigm has been very successful for modeling the broadband spectral energy distributions of blazars. However, many fundamental issues remain, including the role of hadronic processes and the rapid variability of a few FSRQs and several BL Lac objects whose synchrotron spectrum peaks at UV or X-ray frequencies. A class of γ-ray-emitting radio galaxies, which are thought to be the misaligned counterparts of blazars, has emerged from the results of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. Soft γ-ray emission has been detected from a few nearby Seyfert galaxies, though it is not clear whether those γ rays originate from the nucleus. Blazars and their misaligned counterparts make up most of the ≳100 MeV extragalactic γ-ray background (EGB), and are suspected of being the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The future "Cherenkov Telescope Array", in synergy with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and a wide range of telescopes in space and on the ground, will write the next chapter

  1. High-resolution KMM radiative Auger x-ray emission spectra of calcium induced by synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Berset, M.; Fennane, K.; Hoszowska, J.; Maillard, Y.-P.; Szlachetko, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Budnar, M.; Zitnik, M.; Szlachetko, J.

    2011-04-15

    The KMM radiative Auger (RA) x-ray spectra of solid Ca were induced by monochromatic synchrotron radiation and measured with a high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer. Two excitation energies were employed, one in the near K threshold region and the second well above the K absorption edge. The KMM RA spectral structure and relative intensity with respect to the diagram K{beta}{sub 1,3} (K-M{sub 3,2}) line are found to be independent of the excitation energy. The overall RA structure resembles the density of unoccupied s, p, and d states. Due to solid-state effects, however, spectral features resulting from the major discrete shake-up transitions could not be resolved. For the total KMM RA to K{beta}{sub 1,3} yield ratio, a value of 0.053(3) is obtained. The latter is compared to theoretical predictions and available experimental data obtained by various types of target excitation.

  2. Phonon density of states of Sn in textured SnO under high pressure: Comparison of nuclear inelastic x-ray scattering spectra to a shell model

    SciTech Connect

    Giefers, H.; Koval, S.; Wortmann, G.; Sturhahn, W.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.

    2006-09-01

    The local phonon density of states (DOS) at the Sn site in tin monoxide (SnO) is studied at pressures up to 8 GPa with {sup 119}Sn nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) of synchrotron radiation at 23.88 keV. The preferred orientation (texture) of the SnO crystallites in the investigated samples is used to measure NRIXS spectra preferentially parallel and almost perpendicular to the c axis of tetragonal SnO. A subtraction method is applied to these NRIXS spectra to produce projected local Sn DOS spectra as seen parallel and perpendicular to the c axis of SnO. These experimentally obtained local Sn DOS spectra, both in the polycrystalline case as well as projected parallel and perpendicular to the c axis, are compared with corresponding theoretical phonon DOS spectra, derived from dispersion relations calculated with a recently developed shell model. Comparison between the experimental projected Sn DOS spectra and the corresponding theoretical DOS spectra enables us to follow the pressure-induced shifts of several acoustic and optic phonon modes. While the principal spectral features of the experimental and theoretical phonon DOS agree well at energies above 10 meV, the pressure behavior of the low-energy part of the DOS is not well reproduced by the theoretical calculations. In fact, they exhibit, in contrast to the experimental data, a dramatic softening of two low-energy modes, their energies approaching zero around 2.5 GPa, clearly indicating the limitations of the applied shell model. These difficulties are obviously connected with the complex Sn-O and Sn-Sn bindings within and between the Sn-O-Sn layers in the litharge structure of SnO. We derived from the experimental and theoretical DOS spectra a variety of elastic and thermodynamic parameters of the Sn sublattice, such as the Lamb-Moessbauer factor, the mean force constant, and Debye temperatures, as well as the vibrational contributions to the Helmholtz free energy, specific heat, entropy, and

  3. Implications of gamma-ray observations on proton models of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supanitsky, A. D.

    2016-09-01

    The origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) is still unknown. However, great progress has been achieved in past years due to the good quality and large statistics in experimental data collected by the current observatories. The data of the Pierre Auger Observatory show that the composition of UHECRs becomes progressively lighter starting from 1 017 eV up to ˜1 018.3 eV and then, beyond that energy, it becomes increasingly heavier. These analyses are subject to important systematic uncertainties due to the use of hadronic interaction models that extrapolate lower energy accelerator data to the highest energies. Although proton models of UHECRs are disfavored by these results, they cannot be completely ruled out. It is well known that the energy spectra of gamma rays and neutrinos, produced during propagation of these very energetic particles through the intergalactic medium, are a useful tool to constrain the spectrum models. In particular, it has recently been shown that the neutrino upper limits obtained by IceCube challenge the proton models at 95% C.L. In this work we study the constraints imposed by the extragalactic gamma-ray background, measured by Fermi-LAT, on proton models of UHECRs. In particular, we make use of the extragalactic gamma-ray background flux, integrated from 50 GeV to 2 TeV, that originates in point sources, which has recently been obtained by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration, in combination with the neutrino upper limits, to constrain the emission of UHECRs at high redshifts (z >1 ), in the context of the proton models.

  4. X-ray and DFT studies of the structure, vibrational and NMR spectra of 2-amino-pyridine betaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szafran, M.; Kowalczyk, I.; Koput, J.; Katrusiak, A.

    2005-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen bonding, inter- and intramolecular electrostatic interactions on the conformation of 2-amino-pyridine betaine hydrochloride (1-carboxymethyl-2-amino-pyridinium chloride), 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(c), in the crystal and its isolated molecules has been studied by X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, Raman, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies, and by DFT calculations. In the crystal, the Cl - anion is connected with protonated betaine via hydrogen bond, O-H⋯Cl -= 2.975(2) Å, two N(12)-H⋯Cl - hydrogen bonds and two N(1) H⋯Cl - intermolecular electrostatic interactions. Two minima are located in the potential energy surface at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level, 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(t) and 2-NH 2PB⋯HCl(c), with the latter being 20,7 kcal/mol higher in energy. The optimized bond lengths and angles of 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(t) at B3LYP level of theory are in good agreement with X-ray data, except for the conformation of the COOH group, which is cis ( syn) in the crystal and trans ( anti) in the single molecule. The probable assignments for the anharmonic experimental solid state vibrational spectra of 2-NH 2PBH⋯Cl(c) and 2-ND 2PBD⋯Cl(c) based on the calculated B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) harmonic frequencies have been made. 1H and 13C NMR screening constants for both single molecules have been calculated in the GIAO/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) approach. Linear correlation between the calculated and experimental 1H chemical shifts holds only for cis conformer. The lack of such a correlation for trans conformer indicates that it is absent in D 2O solution.

  5. A detailed analysis of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of NGC 3516: variability of the ionized absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. M.; Krongold, Y.; Jimenez-Bailon, E.; Nicastro, F.; Mathur, S.; Longinotti, A. L.

    2014-09-20

    The 1.5 Seyfert galaxy NGC 3516 presents a strong time variability in X-rays. We re-analyzed the nine observations performed in 2006 October by XMM-Newton and Chandra in the 0.3 to 10 keV energy band. An acceptable model was found for the XMM-Newton data fitting the EPIC-PN and RGS spectra simultaneously; later, this model was successfully applied to the contemporary Chandra high-resolution data. The model consists of a continuum emission component (power law + blackbody) absorbed by four ionized components (warm absorbers), and 10 narrow emission lines. Three absorbing components are warm, producing features only in the soft X-ray band. The fourth ionization component produces Fe XXV and Fe XXVI in the hard-energy band. We study the time response of the absorbing components to the well-detected changes in the X-ray luminosity of this source and find that the two components with the lower ionization state show clear opacity changes consistent with gas close to photoionization equilibrium. These changes are supported by the models and by differences in the spectral features among the nine observations. On the other hand, the two components with higher ionization state do not seem to respond to continuum variations. The response time of the ionized absorbers allows us to constrain their electron density and location. We find that one component (with intermediate ionization) must be located within the obscuring torus at a distance 2.7 × 10{sup 17} cm from the central engine. This outflowing component likely originated in the accretion disk. The three remaining components are at distances larger than 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm. Two of the absorbing components in the soft X-rays have similar outflow velocities and locations. These components may be in pressure equilibrium, forming a multi-phase medium, if the gas has metallicity larger than the solar one (≳ 5 Z {sub ☉}). We also search for variations in the covering factor of the ionized absorbers (although partial

  6. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  7. Preparation, crystal structure, spectra and energy levels of the trivalent ytterbium ion doped into rare earth stannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Kaijie; Zhang, Qingli; Sun, Dunlu; Yin, Shaotang; Jiang, Haihe

    2011-11-01

    Yb3+-doped Rare Earth Stannates Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) with space group Fd3m were synthesized by co-precipitation technique. Their structures were determined by Rietveld refinement to their X-ray diffraction, and their atom coordinates, lattice parameters and temperature factors were given. From emission, absorption and excitation spectra, the energy levels of Yb3+ in Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) were assigned and the crystal field parameters were fitted to energy splitting of Yb3+-doped Ln2Sn2O7 (Ln=Y, Gd).

  8. Preparation, crystal structure, spectra and energy levels of the trivalent ytterbium ion doped into rare earth stannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Kaijie; Zhang, Qingli; Sun, Dunlu; Yin, Shaotang; Jiang, Haihe

    2012-01-01

    Yb3+-doped Rare Earth Stannates Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) with space group Fd3m were synthesized by co-precipitation technique. Their structures were determined by Rietveld refinement to their X-ray diffraction, and their atom coordinates, lattice parameters and temperature factors were given. From emission, absorption and excitation spectra, the energy levels of Yb3+ in Ln2Sn2O7(Ln=Y, Gd) were assigned and the crystal field parameters were fitted to energy splitting of Yb3+-doped Ln2Sn2O7 (Ln=Y, Gd).

  9. Room-temperature mercuric iodide spectrometry for low-energy X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusmiss, J. H.; Barton, J. B.; Huth, G. C.; Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the limits of energy resolution in different energy ranges is given. The energy resolution of a spectrometer is analyzed in terms of the parameters characterizing the crystal, the detector, and the amplification electronics. A high-resolution room-temperature HgI2 spectrometry system was used to measure low-energy X-ray fluorescence spectra. For the MgK-alpha X-ray line the measured resolution was 245 eV (fwhm); the electronic noise linewidth of the system was 225 eV. Alpha-particles were used to excite X-ray fluorescence from low-Z elements separately or in combination. The shape of the photopeaks in the spectra is discussed.

  10. Self-consistent modelling of X-ray photoelectron spectra from air-exposed polycrystalline TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Hultman, L.

    2016-11-01

    We present first self-consistent modelling of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) Ti 2p, N 1s, O 1s, and C 1s core level spectra with a cross-peak quantitative agreement for a series of TiN thin films grown by dc magnetron sputtering and oxidized to different extent by varying the venting temperature Tv of the vacuum chamber before removing the deposited samples. So-obtained film series constitute a model case for XPS application studies, where certain degree of atmosphere exposure during sample transfer to the XPS instrument is unavoidable. The challenge is to extract information about surface chemistry without invoking destructive pre-cleaning with noble gas ions. All TiN surfaces are thus analyzed in the as-received state by XPS using monochromatic Al Kα radiation (hν = 1486.6 eV). Details of line shapes and relative peak areas obtained from deconvolution of the reference Ti 2p and N 1 s spectra representative of a native TiN surface serve as an input to model complex core level signals from air-exposed surfaces, where contributions from oxides and oxynitrides make the task very challenging considering the influence of the whole deposition process at hand. The essential part of the presented approach is that the deconvolution process is not only guided by the comparison to the reference binding energy values that often show large spread, but in order to increase reliability of the extracted chemical information the requirement for both qualitative and quantitative self-consistency between component peaks belonging to the same chemical species is imposed across all core-level spectra (including often neglected O 1s and C 1s signals). The relative ratios between contributions from different chemical species vary as a function of Tv presenting a self-consistency check for our model. We propose that the cross-peak self-consistency should be a prerequisite for reliable XPS peak modelling as it enhances credibility of obtained chemical information, while relying

  11. THE BROADBAND XMM-NEWTON AND NuSTAR X-RAY SPECTRA OF TWO ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES IN THE GALAXY IC 342

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Vikram; Harrison, Fiona A.; Walton, Dominic J.; Furst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Webb, Natalie A.; Miller, Jon M.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn C.; Hailey, Charles J.; Ptak, Andrew F.; Zhang, William W.; Stern, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    We present results for two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), IC 342 X-1 and IC 342 X-2, using two epochs of XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations separated by ∼7 days. We observe little spectral or flux variability above 1 keV between epochs, with unabsorbed 0.3-30 keV luminosities being 1.04{sub −0.06}{sup +0.08}×10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} for IC 342 X-1 and 7.40 ± 0.20 × 10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} for IC 342 X-2, so that both were observed in a similar, luminous state. Both sources have a high absorbing column in excess of the Galactic value. Neither source has a spectrum consistent with a black hole binary in low/hard state, and both ULXs exhibit strong curvature in their broadband X-ray spectra. This curvature rules out models that invoke a simple reflection-dominated spectrum with a broadened iron line and no cutoff in the illuminating power-law continuum. X-ray spectrum of IC 342 X-1 can be characterized by a soft disk-like blackbody component at low energies and a cool, optically thick Comptonization continuum at high energies, but unique physical interpretation of the spectral components remains challenging. The broadband spectrum of IC 342 X-2 can be fit by either a hot (3.8 keV) accretion disk or a Comptonized continuum with no indication of a seed photon population. Although the seed photon component may be masked by soft excess emission unlikely to be associated with the binary system, combined with the high absorption column, it is more plausible that the broadband X-ray emission arises from a simple thin blackbody disk component. Secure identification of the origin of the spectral components in these sources will likely require broadband spectral variability studies.

  12. Drift problems in the automatic analysis of gamma-ray spectra using associative memory algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Olmos, P.; Diaz, J.C.; Perez, J.M.; Aguayo, P. ); Gomez, P.; Rodellar, V. )

    1994-06-01

    Perturbations affecting nuclear radiation spectrometers during their operation frequently spoil the accuracy of automatic analysis methods. One of the problems usually found in practice refers to fluctuations in the spectrum gain and zero, produced by drifts in the detector and nuclear electronics. The pattern acquired in these conditions may be significantly different from that expected with stable instrumentation, thus complicating the identification and quantification of the radionuclides present in it. In this work, the performance of Associative Memory algorithms when dealing with spectra affected by drifts is explored considering a linear energy-calibration function. The formulation of the extended algorithm, constructed to quantify the possible presence of drifts in the spectrometer, is deduced and the results obtained from its application to several practical cases are commented.

  13. Ultra high energy cosmic ray spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cady, R.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, P. R.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Salamon, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays have been observed by means of atmospheric fluorescence with the Fly's Eye since 1981. The differential energy spectrum above 0.1 EeV is well fitted by a power law with slope 2.94 + or - 0.02. Some evidence of flattening of the spectrum is observed or energies greater than 10 EeV, however only one event is observed with energy greater than 50 EeV and a spectral cutoff is indicated above 70 EeV.

  14. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrati, R.; Attallah, R.

    2014-04-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥ 10 GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data.

  15. Gravitationally redshifted absorption lines in the X-ray burst spectra of a neutron star.

    PubMed

    Cottam, J; Paerels, F; Mendez, M

    2002-11-01

    The fundamental properties of neutron stars provide a direct test of the equation of state of cold nuclear matter, a relationship between pressure and density that is determined by the physics of the strong interactions between the particles that constitute the star. The most straightforward method of determining these properties is by measuring the gravitational redshift of spectral lines produced in the neutron star photosphere. The equation of state implies a mass-radius relation, while a measurement of the gravitational redshift at the surface of a neutron star provides a direct constraint on the mass-to-radius ratio. Here we report the discovery of significant absorption lines in the spectra of 28 bursts of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO0748-676. We identify the most significant features with the Fe XXVI and XXV n = 2-3 and O VIII n = 1-2 transitions, all with a redshift of z = 0.35, identical within small uncertainties for the respective transitions. For an astrophysically plausible range of masses (M approximately 1.3-2.0 solar masses; refs 2-5), this value is completely consistent with models of neutron stars composed of normal nuclear matter, while it excludes some models in which the neutron stars are made of more exotic matter. PMID:12422210

  16. THE SOLAR FLARE CHLORINE ABUNDANCE FROM RESIK X-RAY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl E-mail: kvd@izmiran.ru

    2011-09-01

    The abundance of chlorine is determined from X-ray spectra obtained with the RESIK instrument on CORONAS-F during solar flares between 2002 and 2003. Using weak lines of He-like Cl, Cl XVI, between 4.44 and 4.50 A, and with temperatures and emission measures from GOES on an isothermal assumption, we obtained A(Cl) = 5.75 {+-} 0.26 on a scale A(H) = 12. The uncertainty reflects an approximately a factor of two scatter in measured line fluxes. Nevertheless, our value represents what is probably the best solar determination yet obtained. It is higher by factors of 1.8 and 2.7 than Cl abundance estimates from an infrared sunspot spectrum and nearby H II regions. The constancy of the RESIK abundance values over a large range of flares (GOES class from below C1 to X1) argues for any fractionation that may be present in the low solar atmosphere to be independent of the degree of solar activity.

  17. On Different Absorption Components in the X-ray Spectra of the Intermediate Polar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balman, S.; Okcu, B.

    2014-07-01

    We present orbital phase-resolved spectroscopy of the Intermediate polars (IP) AO Psc, HT Cam, V1223 Sgr and XSS J0056+4548 using the XMM-Newton EPIC pn data. We detect increase of absorption by neutral hydrogen column density N_{H} during the phases corresponding to the orbital minima in a range ˜ (1.0-2.0)× 10^{22} cm^{-2}. AO Psc indicates spectral hardening in the soft plasma emission component. HT Cam, reveals an increase of N_{H} at the orbital minimum from 0.05× 10^{22} cm^{-2} to 0.13× 10^{22} cm^{-2}. These high N_{H} values are most likely a result of absorption by the bulge material at the accretion impact zone. We discuss implications of this interms of warmabsorbers in IPs and bulge temperatures. The four IPs reveal a second high absorption component that is constant over the orbital phase in a range (5.0-11.0)× 10^{22} cm^{-2}. We attribute this component to the accretion column/curtain. These results are in accordance with the orbital phase-resolved analysis presented in Pekon & Balman (2011) for EX Hya and (2012) for FO Aqr. We strongly suggest that absorption by the bulge at the accretion impact zone is a distinct component in the IP X-ray spectra.

  18. Cumulant approach for electronic excitations in x-ray and electron spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehr, J. J.

    A quantitative treatment of electronic excitations and other many-body effects in x-ray and electron spectra has long been challenging. Physically, electronic correlations and atomic vibrations lead to inelastic losses and damping effects that are ignored in ground state methods or approximations such as TDDFT. Quasi-particle (QP) approaches such as the GW approximation yield significant improvements, as demonstrated in real-space Green's function and GW/Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations, but still ignore multi-electron excitations. Recently such excitations have been treated with considerable success using cumulant expansion techniques and the quasi-boson approximation. In this beyond QP approach, excitations such as plasmons and electron-hole excitations appear as satellites in the spectral function. The method naturally accounts for multiple-satellites and can be extended to include extrinsic losses and interference effects. Extensions for effects of vibrations and strong correlations including charge-transfer satellites may also be possible. These advances are illustrated with a number of applications. Supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45623.

  19. Workshop on Cosmic Ray and High Energy Gamma Ray Experiments for the Space Station Era, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, October 17-20, 1984, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. V. (Editor); Wefel, J. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The potential of the Space Station as a platform for cosmic-ray and high-energy gamma-ray astronomy is discussed in reviews, reports, and specific proposals. Topics examined include antiparticles and electrons, science facilities and new technology, high-energy nuclear interactions, nuclear composition and energy spectra, Space Shuttle experiments, Space Station facilities and detectors, high-energy gamma rays, and gamma-ray facilities and techniques. Consideration is given to universal-baryon-symmetry testing on the scale of galactic clusters, particle studies in a high-inclination orbit, balloon-borne emulsion-chamber results on ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus interactions, ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays, a large gamma-ray telescope for point-source studies above 1 GeV, and the possible existence of stable quark matter.

  20. Measurements and parameterization of neutron energy spectra from targets bombarded with 120 GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajimoto, T.; Shigyo, N.; Sanami, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Hagiwara, M.; Lee, H. S.; Soha, A.; Ramberg, E.; Coleman, R.; Jensen, D.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N. V.; Boehnlein, D.; Vaziri, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Ishibashi, K.; Nakashima, H.

    2014-10-01

    The energy spectra of neutrons were measured by a time-of-flight method for 120 GeV protons on thick graphite, aluminum, copper, and tungsten targets with an NE213 scintillator at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility. Neutron energy spectra were obtained between 25 and 3000 MeV at emission angles of 30°, 45°, 120°, and 150°. The spectra were parameterized as neutron emissions from three moving sources and then compared with theoretical spectra calculated by PHITS and FLUKA codes. The yields of the theoretical spectra were substantially underestimated compared with the yields of measured spectra. The integrated neutron yields from 25 to 3000 MeV calculated with PHITS code were 16-36% of the experimental yields and those calculated with FLUKA code were 26-57% of the experimental yields for all targets and emission angles.

  1. The energy spectra of solar flare hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and iron - Evidence for stochastic acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Mason, G. M.; Klecker, B.; Mcguire, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    The time-integrated differential energy spectra of H, He, O, and Fe measured in 10 large flare events observed at 1 AU over the energy range of 0.3-80 MeV/nucleon showed consistent patterns in their spectral shapes: particles with larger mean mass-to-charge ratios were generally less abundant at higher energies. A steady state model of stochastic particle acceleration with rigidity-dependent diffusion coefficients fit the spectra best; spectra representative of diffusive shock acceleration also described the spectra of some events with the same number of free parameters, but often fell off faster in energy above 30 MeV per nucleon than the observations. The two model predictions differed most at energies near 0.1 MeV per nucleon, below the lowest energies observed in this study. The stochastic model quantitatively described the observed spectral ordering with less efficient acceleration of species with larger mean mass-to-charge ratios.

  2. Measurement of Neutron Energy Spectra behind Shielding of a 120 GeV/c Hadron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, N.; Rokni, S.H.; Vincke, H.; Khater, Hesham; Prinz, A.A.; Taniguchi, S.; Roesler, S.; Brugger, M.; Hagiwara, Masayuki; /Tohoku U.

    2005-12-14

    Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the lateral shield of the CERF (CERN-EU High Energy Reference Field) facility at CERN with a 120 GeV/c positive hadron beam (mainly a mixture of protons and pions) on a cylindrical copper target (7-cm diameter by 50-cm long). NE213 organic liquid scintillator (12.7-cm diameter by 12.7-cm long) was located at various longitudinal positions behind shields of 80- and 160-cm thick concrete and 40-cm thick iron. Neutron energy spectra in the energy range between 12 MeV and 380 MeV were obtained by unfolding the measured pulse height spectra with the detector response functions which have been experimentally verified in the neutron energy range up to 380 MeV in separate experiments. The corresponding MARS15 Monte Carlo simulations generally gave good agreements with the experimental energy spectra.

  3. X-ray Spectra and Pulse Frequency Changes in SAX J2103.5+4545

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baykal, A.; Stark, M. J.; Swank, J. H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The November 1999 outburst of the transient pulsar SAX J2103.5+4545 was monitored with the large area detectors of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer until the pulsar faded after a year. The 358 s pulsar was spun up for 150 days, at which point the flux dropped quickly by a factor of approximately 7, the frequency saturated and, as the flux continued to decline, a weak spin-down began. The pulses remained strong during the decay and the spin-up/flux correlation can be fit to the Ghosh and Lamb derivations for the spin-up caused by accretion from a thin, pressure-dominated disk, for a distance approximately 3.2 kpc and a surface magnetic field approximately 1.2 x 10(exp 13) Gauss. During the bright spin-up part of the outburst, the flux was subject to strong orbital modulation, peaking approximately 3 days after periastron of the eccentric 12.68 day orbit, while during the faint part, there was little orbital modulation. The X-ray spectra were typical of accreting pulsars, describable by a cut-off power-law, with an emission line near the 6.4 keV of Kappa(sub alpha) fluorescence from cool iron. The equivalent width of this emission did not share the orbital modulation, but nearly doubled during the faint phase, despite little change in the column density. The outburst could have been caused by an episode of increased wind from a Be star, such that a small accretion disk is formed during each periastron passage. A change in the wind and disk structure apparently occurred after 5 months such that the accretion rate was no longer modulated or the diffusion time was longer. The distance estimate implies the X-ray luminosity observed was between 1 X 10(exp 36) ergs s(exp -1) and 6 x 10(exp 34) ergs s(exp -1), with a small but definite correlation of the intrinsic power-law spectral index.

  4. X-ray color analysis of the spectra of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Netzer, Hagai; Turner, T. J.; George, Ian M.

    1994-01-01

    The identification and detection of X-ray absorption and emission features depends on the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observation, the understanding of the instrument response, and the Galactic line-of-sight absorption. Since many of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) data sets are limited in their S/N and full modeling of the physical conditions is rather complicated, we suggest a new analysis method based on 'X-ray colors.' The two sets of X-ray colors, defined for low (ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC)) and medium (Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT)) and ASCA Solid-State Imaging Spectrometers (SIS) resolution experiments, are used to separate regions of different physical conditions in a two-dimensional color-color plane. They are similar but superior to previous methods using the X-ray 'hardness ratio' in being able to reveal more of the physical properties of the source. We illustrate the use of such diagrams by studying a number of AGNs suspected of showing absorption features. A sample of 14 AGNs observed by the ROSAT PSPC is presented which includes several objects with suspected 'warm absorbers' along the line-of-sight to the nucleus, several others exhibiting intrinsic continuum variations, and a number of control objects thought to be featureless. Our new observations show, for the first time, the color variation as a function of time for three of the Seyfert 1 sources: NGC 4051, Mrk 335, and Mrk 766. The variations suggest that in two sources we are witnessing real changes in continuum shape, while one (NGC 4051) is consistent with having a warm absorber. Four of the objects observed by BBXRT are reanalyzed using our X-ray colors. Out of these, we discuss in detail the case of NGC 4151 and show that the color-color analysis agrees very well with previous, detailed spectral fitting methods. In particular, we confirm that the observed BBXRT observation of this source is not consistent with the warm absorber

  5. A study of the generation of linear energy transfer spectra for space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.

    1992-01-01

    The conversion of particle-energy spectra into a linear energy transfer (LET) distribution is a guide in assessing biologically significant components. The mapping of LET to energy is triple valued and can be defined only on open subintervals. A well-defined numerical procedure is found to allow generation of LET spectra on the open subintervals that are integrable in spite of their singular nature.

  6. A measurement of the cosmic-ray H-2 and He-3 spectra and H-2/He-4 and He-3/He-4 ratios in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Golden, R. L.; Stochaj, S. J.; Ormes, J. F.; Strittmatter, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The energy spectra of H-2 and H-3 nuclei up to energies of 450 and 800 MeV nucleon, respectively, were measured during a balloon flight of the NASA/NMSU Balloon Borne Magnet Facility on September 5, 1989. These isotopes were cleanly resolved from the more abundant H-1 and He-4 using a measurement of rigidity versus velocity as measured in a high-resolution scintillation counter. After correction for atmospheric secondaries the measured H-2/He-4 and He-3/He-4 ratios are both consistent with the production expected if H-1 and He-4 have the same path length in the galaxy as heavier cosmic-ray nuclei such as C and Fe, to within about 20 percent. Solar modulation effects play an important role in this uncertainty. This result favors a generally similar propagation history, along with similar types of sources for H-1 and He-4 and the heavier cosmic-ray nuclei.

  7. The Galactic plane at faint X-ray fluxes - II. Stacked X-ray spectra of a sample of serendipitous XMM-Newton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warwick, R. S.; Byckling, K.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.

    2014-03-01

    We have investigated the X-ray spectral properties of a sample of 138 X-ray sources detected serendipitously in XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic plane, at an intermediate to faint flux level. We divide our sample into five subgroups according to the spectral hardness of the sources, and stack (i.e. co-add) the individual source spectra within each subgroup. As expected these stacked spectra show a softening trend from the hardest to the softest subgroups, which is reflected in the inferred line-of-sight column density. The spectra of the three hardest subgroups are characterized by a hard continuum plus superimposed Fe-line emission in the 6-7 keV bandpass. The average equivalent width (EW) of the 6.7-keV He-like Fe Kα line is 170^{+35}_{-32} eV, whereas the 6.4-keV Fe K fluorescence line from neutral iron and the 6.9-keV H-like Fe Lyα line have EWs of 89^{+26}_{-25} and 81^{+30}_{-29} eV, respectively, i.e. roughly half that of the 6.7-keV line. The remaining subgroups exhibit soft thermal spectra. Virtually all of the spectrally soft X-ray sources can be associated with relatively nearby coronally active late-type stars, which are evident as bright near-infrared (NIR) objects within the X-ray error circles. On a similar basis only a minority of the spectrally hard X-ray sources have likely NIR identifications. The average continuum and Fe-line properties of the spectrally hard sources are consistent with those of magnetic cataclysmic variables but the direct identification of large numbers of such systems in Galactic X-ray surveys, probing intermediate to faint flux levels, remains challenging.

  8. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.

  9. Conformational and isomerizational studies of 3- N, N-dimethylhydrazino-2-methylsulfonyl propenenitrile using NMR and vibrational spectra, X-ray analysis and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gróf, M.; Gatial, A.; Milata, V.; Prónayová, N.; Kožíšek, J.; Breza, M.; Matějka, P.

    2008-11-01

    The IR, Raman and NMR spectra of 3- N, N-dimethylhydrazino-2-methylsulfonyl propenenitrile (DMHSP) [(H 3C) 2N sbnd NH sbnd CH dbnd C(CN) (SO 2CH 3)] as a solid and in different solvents were measured. The spectra and X-ray analysis revealed that DMHSP was prepared as a pure E-isomer and E- syn conformer with the syn orientation of N, N-dimethylhydrazino group towards the C dbnd C double bond in the solid state. Due to the low barrier practically free isomerization process occurred in solutions at room temperature. DMHSP exists in more polar solvents as pure E-isomer in conformational equilibrium between E- syn and E- anti but in a less polar solvent the presence of Z-isomer was observed as well. From the IR and NMR temperature dependence spectra in polar solvents the energy difference between E- anti and E- syn of Δ H = 2.3 ± 0.9 kJ/mol and Δ H = 3.2 ± 0.4 kJ/mol, respectively, was estimated with the syn one being more stable. The geometries and relative energies of possible conformers of DMHSP were evaluated using ab initio MP2 and B3LYP density functional methods in 6-31G ∗∗ basis set and compared with the X-ray data. The interpretation of NMR spectra was supported by ab initio MP2 calculations. The influence of solvent polarity on the conformational equilibrium is discussed with respect to the SCRF solvent effect calculations using PCM model. In addition, the observed IR and Raman bands were compared also with harmonic vibrational frequencies, calculated on the same levels of theory, and assigned on the base of potential energy distribution.

  10. Formation of SCR Energy Spectra during Stochastic Acceleration with Allowance for Coulomb Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostryakov, V. M.; Kartavykh, Yu. Yu.; Koval'Tsov, G. A.

    2000-02-01

    The stochastic acceleration of heavy ions by Alfven turbulence is considered with allowance for Coulomb losses. The pattern of energy dependence of these losses gives rise to characteristic features in the energy spectra of the accelerated particles at energies of the order of several MeV per nucleon. The manifestation of these features in the spectra is sensitive to the temperature and density of the medium, which can serve as a basis for plasma diagnostics in the flare region. Some impulsive solar energetic particle events during which features in the spectra of He-3 and He-4 were observed are considered as an example.

  11. The high energy X-ray detector on the Ariel-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, A. R.; Coe, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Imperial College hard X-ray detector which is used to make spectral measurements in the 26 keV to 1.2 MeV energy range on celestial X-ray sources from the Ariel-5 satellite is described. Details are given of the design, calibration and in-orbit performance of the detector. A modulation process is used to detect weak signals against a background and we give details of the spectrum unfolding techniques used to convert the measured spectra into corrected incident spectra.

  12. Chemical and Physical Parameters from X-Ray High-resolution Spectra of the Galactic Nova V959 Mon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peretz, U.; Orio, M.; Behar, E.; Bianchini, A.; Gallagher, J.; Rauch, T.; Tofflemire, B.; Zemko, P.

    2016-09-01

    Two observations of V959 Mon done using the Chandra X-ray gratings during the late outburst phases (2012 September and December) offer extraordinary insight into the physics and chemistry of this Galactic ONe nova. The X-ray flux was 1.7 × 10-11 erg cm-2 s-1 and 8.6 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1, respectively, at the two epochs. The first result, coupled with electron density diagnostics and compared with published optical and ultraviolet observations, indicates that most likely in 2012 September, the X-rays originated from a very small fraction of the ejecta, concentrated in very dense clumps. We obtained a fairly good fit to the September spectrum with a model of plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium with two components; one at a temperature of 0.78 keV, associated with flat-topped and asymmetrical emission lines, blueshifted by ≃710-930 km s-1 the other one at a temperature of 4.5 keV, mostly contributing to the high-energy continuum. However, we cannot rule out a range of plasma temperatures between these two extremes; we also modeled the spectrum as a static cooling flow, but the available models and the data quality are not adequate yet to differentiate between the two-component fit and a smoothly varying temperature structure. In December, the central white dwarf (WD) became visible in X-rays. We estimate an effective temperature of ≃680,000 K, consistent with a WD mass ≥slant 1.1 M ⊙. The WD flux is modulated with the orbital period, indicating high inclination, and two quasi-periodic modulations with hour timescales were also observed. No hot plasma component with a temperature above 0.5 keV was observed in December, and the blueshifted component cooled to kT ≃ 0.45 keV. Additionally, new emission lines due to a much cooler plasma appeared, which were not observed two months earlier. We estimate abundances and yields of elements in the nova wind that cannot be measured in the optical spectra and confirm the high Ne abundance previously derived

  13. Analysis of inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of low-temperature water

    PubMed

    Liao; Chen; Sette

    2000-02-01

    We analyze a set of high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectra from H2O measured at T=259, 273, and 294 K using two different phenomenological models. Model I, called the "dynamic cage model," combines the short time in-cage dynamics described by a generalized Enskog kinetic theory with a long-time cage relaxation dynamics described by an alpha relaxation. This model is appropriate for supercooled water where the cage effect is dominant and the existence of an alpha relaxation is evident from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation data of extended simple point charge (SPC/E) model water. Model II is essentially a generalized hydrodynamic theory called the "three effective eigenmode theory" by de Schepper et al. 11. This model is appropriate for normal liquid water where the cage effect is less prominent and there is no evidence of the alpha relaxation from the MD data. We use the model I to analyze IXS data at T=259 K (supercooled water). We successfully extract the Debye-Waller factor, the cage relaxation time from the long-time dynamics, and the dispersion relation of high-frequency sound from the short time dynamics. We then use the model II to analyze IXS data at all three temperatures, from which we are able to extract the relaxation rate of the central mode and the damping of the sound mode as well as the dispersion relation for the high-frequency sound. It turns out that the dispersion relations extracted from the two models at their respective temperatures agree with each other giving the high-frequency sound speed of 2900+/-300 m/s. This is to be compared with a slightly higher value reported previously, 3200+/-320 m/s, by analyzing similar IXS data with a phenomenological-damped harmonic oscillator model 22. This latter model has traditionally been used exclusively for the analysis of inelastic scattering spectra of water. The k-dependent sound damping and central mode relaxation rate extracted from our model analyses are compared with the known

  14. Restricted active space calculations of L-edge X-ray absorption spectra: from molecular orbitals to multiplet states.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Delcey, Mickaël G; Guo, Meiyuan; Odelius, Michael; Lundberg, Marcus

    2014-09-28

    The metal L-edge (2p → 3d) X-ray absorption spectra are affected by a number of different interactions: electron-electron repulsion, spin-orbit coupling, and charge transfer between metal and ligands, which makes the simulation of spectra challenging. The core restricted active space (RAS) method is an accurate and flexible approach that can be used to calculate X-ray spectra of a wide range of medium-sized systems without any symmetry constraints. Here, the applicability of the method is tested in detail by simulating three ferric (3d(5)) model systems with well-known electronic structure, viz., atomic Fe(3+), high-spin [FeCl6](3-) with ligand donor bonding, and low-spin [Fe(CN)6](3-) that also has metal backbonding. For these systems, the performance of the core RAS method, which does not require any system-dependent parameters, is comparable to that of the commonly used semi-empirical charge-transfer multiplet model. It handles orbitally degenerate ground states, accurately describes metal-ligand interactions, and includes both single and multiple excitations. The results are sensitive to the choice of orbitals in the active space and this sensitivity can be used to assign spectral features. A method has also been developed to analyze the calculated X-ray spectra using a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture.

  15. Radiative Energy Loss by Galactic Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahern, Sean C.; Norbury, John W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between galactic cosmic rays and matter are a primary focus of the NASA radiation problem. The electromagnetic forces involved are for the most part well documented. Building on previous research, this study investigated the relative importance of the weak forces that occur when a cosmic ray impinges on different types of materials. For the familiar electromagnetic case, it is known that energy lost in the form of radiation is more significant than that lost via contact collisions the rate at which the energy is lost is also well understood. Similar results were derived for the weak force case. It was found that radiation is also the dominant mode of energy loss in weak force interactions and that weak force effects are indeed relatively weak compared to electromagnetic effects.

  16. Measurement and validation of benchmark-quality thick-target tungsten X-ray spectra below 150 kVp.

    PubMed

    Mercier, J R; Kopp, D T; McDavid, W D; Dove, S B; Lancaster, J L; Tucker, D M

    2000-11-01

    Pulse-height distributions of two constant potential X-ray tubes with fixed anode tungsten targets were measured and unfolded. The measurements employed quantitative alignment of the beam, the use of two different semiconductor detectors (high-purity germanium and cadmium-zinc-telluride), two different ion chamber systems with beam-specific calibration factors, and various filter and tube potential combinations. Monte Carlo response matrices were generated for each detector for unfolding the pulse-height distributions into spectra incident on the detectors. These response matrices were validated for the low error bars assigned to the data. A significant aspect of the validation of spectra, and a detailed characterization of the X-ray tubes, involved measuring filtered and unfiltered beams at multiple tube potentials (30-150 kVp). Full corrections to ion chamber readings were employed to convert normalized fluence spectra into absolute fluence spectra. The characterization of fixed anode pitting and its dominance over exit window plating and/or detector dead layer was determined. An Appendix of tabulated benchmark spectra with assigned error ranges was developed for future reference. PMID:11025653

  17. The multiplicity and the spectra of secondaries correlated with the leading particle energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruglov, N. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Sarycheva, L. I.; Smirnova, L. N.

    1985-01-01

    The spectra of leading particles of different nature in pp-collisions at E sub 0 = 33 GeV are obtained. The multiplicities and the spectra of secondaries, mesons, gamma-quanta, lambda and lambda-hyperons and protons for different leading particle energy ranges are determined.

  18. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume I. Data analysis methodology and hardware description

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and had dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  19. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  20. Inspecting absorption in the spectra of extra-galactic gamma-ray sources for insight into Lorentz invariance violation

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Uri; Piran, Tsvi

    2008-12-15

    We examine what the absorbed spectra of extra-galactic TeV gamma-ray sources, such as blazars, would look like in the presence of Lorentz invariance violation. Pair production with the extra-galactic background light modifies the observed spectra of such sources, and we show that a violation of Lorentz invariance would generically have a dramatic effect on this absorption feature. Inspecting this effect, an experimental task likely practical in the near future, can provide unique insight on the possibility of Lorentz invariance violation.